Scientific American Content: Global

Monkey Say, Monkey Do: Baboons Can Make Humanlike Speech SoundsNew research suggests our last common ancestor with these monkeys possessed the vocal machinery needed to speak -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic opposites attract when chimpanzees choose a mateResearchers find that chimpanzees are more likely to reproduce with mates whose genetic makeup most differs from their own. Many animals avoid breeding with parents, siblings and other close relatives, researchers say. But chimps are unusual in that even among virtual strangers they can tell genetically similar mates from more distant ones. Chimps are able to distinguish degrees of genetic similar
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Catching CRISPR in action: First all-atom simulation of genome editing in actionScientists have performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage in action. The simulations shed light on the process of Cas9 genome editing and helped resolve controversies about specific aspects of the cutting.
7min
WIRED

George Lucas’ Museum Finally (Maybe!) Lands in Los AngelesAfter bouncing from city to city, it appears George Lucas' museum will end up in LA. The post George Lucas' Museum Finally (Maybe!) Lands in Los Angeles appeared first on WIRED .
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First look inside nanoscale catalysts shows 'defects' are usefulPeering for the first time into the workings of tiny chemical catalysts, scientists observed that the 'defective' structure on their edges enhances their reactivity and effectiveness. This finding that could lead to the design of improved catalysts that make industrial chemical processes greener, by decreasing the amount of energy needed for chemical reactions, and preventing the formation of unwa
36min
Popular Science

Please, please prescribe me gluten-free foodScience The U.K.’s prescription system might be confusing, but I want it anyway Doctor’s convenience be damned, I’d love to not pay twice as much for my pasta.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measuring how perovskite solar films efficiently convert light to powerResearchers have directly shown that electrons generated when light strikes a well-oriented perovskite film are unrestricted by grain boundaries and travel long distances without deteriorating. Identification of this property, which is key to efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, could lead to more efficient solar panels.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Superhero culture magnifies aggressive, not defending behaviorsChildren who frequently engage with superhero culture are more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive one year later and not more likely to be defenders of kids being picked on by bullies, new research concludes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New type of monitoring provides information about the life of bacteria in microdropletsIn the future, it will be possible to carry out tests of new drugs on bacteria much more efficiently using microfluidic devices, since each of the hundreds and thousands of droplets moving through the microchannels can act as separate incubators. So far, however, there has been no quick or accurate method of assessing the oxygen conditions in individual microdroplets.
1h
Popular Science

Why are scientists so obsessed with studying zombies?Science Just because zombies aren’t real doesn’t mean we can’t learn from them Zombies can help us understand how infectious diseases spread, teach us about math or neuroscience, and improve our efforts to prepare for real crises.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can the 'greening' be greener?The EU introduced the new 'greening' instrument into the Common Agricultural Policy in 2015, with the intention to slow the rapid loss of biodiversity in agricultural areas. A group of scientists examined how effective the flagship greening measure called 'Ecological Focus Areas' actually is. Their conclusions are sobering: Ecological Focus Areas are implemented in a way that provides little benef
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA duplicator small enough to hold in your handEngineers have developed a new method for duplicating DNA that makes devices small enough to hold in your hand that are capable of identifying infectious agents before symptoms appear.
1h
New Scientist - News

Baboons recorded making key sounds found in human speechA claim that baboons are capable of five vowel-like sounds could mean key features of spoken language emerged with the common ancestor of monkey and humans
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genes identified that regulate the spread of cancersResearchers have discovered a new biological target for drugs to reduce the spread of tumours in cancer patients. The study with genetically modified mice found 23 genes that are involved in regulating the spread of cancers. The researchers showed that targeting one of these genes -- Spns2 -- led to a three-quarters reduction in tumor spread.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New laser based on unusual physics phenomenon could improve telecommunications, computingResearchers have demonstrated the world's first laser based on an unconventional wave physics phenomenon called bound states in the continuum. The technology could revolutionize the development of surface lasers, making them more compact and energy-efficient for communications and computing applications. The new BIC lasers could also be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense app
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Connectivity is key for preserving isolated sage-grouse populationsGreater sage-grouse depend on large, intact tracts of the sagebrush habitat. Current sage-grouse conservation plans focus on protecting selected 'priority areas,' but these areas vary in size and proximity to each other -- will they be able to sustain thriving, interconnected populations over time? A new study evaluates this approach.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changing climate changes soilsResearchers have used digital techniques to predict how one vital soil characteristic, soil organic carbon, may be altered by climate change.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists 'squeeze' light to cool microscopic drum below quantum limitPhysicists have cooled a mechanical object to a temperature lower than previously thought possible, below the so-called 'quantum limit.'
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gun violence in PG-13 movies continues to climb past R-rated filmsThe amount of gun violence in top-grossing PG-13 movies has continued to exceed the gun violence in the biggest box-office R-rated films, an analysis shows. What increasingly differentiates the gun violence in PG-13 movies from those rated R is not just frequency but these films' 'erasure of the consequences' such as blood and suffering and the involvement of comic book-inspired heroes and antiher
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-sugar diet programs a short lifespan in fliesFlies with a history of eating a high sugar diet live shorter lives, even after their diet improves. This is because the unhealthy diet drives long-term reprogramming of gene expression, according to a team of researchers.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Behind New Zealand's Wild Plan to Purge All PestsThe country is gearing up to get rid of rats, possums, stoats and other invasive predators by 2050. Is it a pipe dream? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover world's largest tropical peatland in remote Congo swampsA vast peatland in the Congo Basin has been mapped for the first time, revealing it to be the largest in the tropics. The new study found that the Cuvette Centrale peatlands in the central Congo Basin, which were unknown to exist five years ago, cover 145,500 square kilometres -- an area larger than England. They lock in 30 billion tonnes of carbon making the region one of the most carbon-rich eco
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Marvel microbes' illuminate how cells became complexA newly discovered group of microbes provide new insights as to how complex cellular life emerged. The study provides new details of how, billions of years ago, complex cell types that comprise plants, fungi, but also animals and humans, gradually evolved from simpler microbial ancestors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

new light shed on functioning of human gut bacteriaResearchers shed new light on the functioning of human gut bacteria, revealing how nutrients are transported into the bacterial cell.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New therapeutic target against persistent viral infectionsLife is a question of balance, and the body is no exception. Expression levels of certain proteins can affect the immune system's ability to neutralize a virus. Type I interferons (IFN-I) are cytokines that were previously thought of as key contributors to the antiviral response, but emerging lines of evidence suggest that they may also participate in the establishment and maintenance of persisten
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Walking the tightrope: The balance between helping patients now without risking the futureAntibiotic use represents a special challenge, in which too much of a good thing can be dangerous to public health as a whole. The fight against a common, costly, hospital-acquired infection known as Clostridium difficile, or C. diff offers an illuminating case study in the area of so-called antibiotic stewardship.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First ever perched landing performed using machine learning algorithmsThe very first unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to perform a perched landing using machine learning algorithms has been developed by researchers. The revolutionary development of a fixed wing aircraft that can land in a small or confined space has the potential to significantly impact intelligence-gathering and the delivery of aid in a humanitarian disaster.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A glimpse into the workings of the baby brainNeuroscientists have adapted their MRI scanner to make it easier to scan infants' brains as the babies watch movies featuring different types of visual input.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Testing breast milk for cannabinoidsWith the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana spreading across the country, the drug's use is reportedly increasing among pregnant women. It stands to reason that many of these women will continue to use marijuana after they give birth. Now researchers have developed a new method to help determine what this means for infants' potential exposure to the active compounds in marijuana in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find a potential target for anti-Alzheimer treatmentsScientists have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The USP9 gene has an indirect influence on the so-called tau protein,which is believed to play a significant role in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. This discovery may open a new door to developing active ingredients to treat Alzheimer’s disease.
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Futurity.org

Anxiety can lead men to over-treat prostate cancerThe anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers report. “Emotional distress may motivate men with low-risk prostate cancer to choose more aggressive treatment, such as choosing surgery over active surveillance,” says the study’s lead author, Heather Orom, associate professor of community heal
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Star Wars gibbon' is new primate speciesA gibbon living in the tropical forests of China is a new species of primate, scientists say.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paleontologists classify mysterious ancient cone-shaped sea creaturesOne branch on the tree of life is heavier as a team of scientists has determined what a bizarre group of extinct cone-shaped animals actually are. Known as hyoliths, these marine creatures evolved over 530 million years ago and are among the first known to have external skeletons. Long believed to be molluscs, a new study shows a stronger relationship to brachiopods -- a group with a rich fossil r
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Customers who receive genetic health data not alarmed by results, find information usefulAs consumers have been able to learn more about their genetic makeup in recent years through personal genomic testing, one big criticism has been that without someone to interpret it, the health information could be harmful to the receivers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Looking for life in all the right places, with the right toolResearchers have invented a range of instruments from giant telescopes to rovers to search for life in outer space, but so far, these efforts have yielded no definitive evidence that it exists beyond Earth. Now scientists have developed a new tool that can look for signs of life with 10,000 times more sensitivity than instruments carried on previous spaceflight missions.
2h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Titia de Lange (Rockefeller U.) 2: How telomeres solve the end-protection problemhttps://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/telomeres-solve-end-protection-problem.html In this seminar, Dr. Titia de Lange gives an overview of telomeres, the protective repeats at the ends of chromosomes. Because telomeres resemble double stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks, they could be recognized by the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway leading to cell cycle arrest and genome instability. De Lange discuss
2h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Titia de Lange (Rockefeller U.) 1: Telomeres and human diseasehttps://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/telomeres-and-human-disease.html In this seminar, Dr. Titia de Lange gives an overview of telomeres, the protective repeats at the ends of chromosomes. Because telomeres resemble double stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks, they could be recognized by the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway leading to cell cycle arrest and genome instability. De Lange discusses the prot
2h
Viden

Planet-måltid kan måske forklare mystisk megastruktur-stjerneLyset fra den uforklarlige stjerne "Tabby's star" dæmpes måske, fordi stjernen for nyligt har spist en stor planet, mener forskere.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

In Final Address, Obama Urges U.S. to Deal with Climate ChangePresident Obama made a last plea for democratic engagement and fact-based debate, including on global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
WIRED

Quantum Computing Is Real, and D-Wave Just Open-Sourced ItThe company behind Google's quantum computer is releasing open source tools so coders can create software without needing an advanced physics degree. The post Quantum Computing Is Real, and D-Wave Just Open-Sourced It appeared first on WIRED .
2h
New Scientist - News

Squeezed light cools tiny drum to coldest temperature everA special trick with lasers helped lower a nano-sized membrane to below the "quantum limit" – colder than was thought possible
2h
New Scientist - News

Preventing Big Cannabis: How to nip marijuana lobby in the budA powerful lobby could be an unintended consequence of legalising the drug. Could Canada's regulatory approach ensure public health comes before profit?
2h
New Scientist - News

China plans telescope to hunt for primordial gravitational wavesLocated at 5250 metres above sea level in Tibet, Ngari-1 will hunt for gravitational waves that should have been thrown out by the big bang
2h
New Scientist - News

Carbon seen bonding with six other atoms for the first timeA pyramid-shaped carbon molecule breaks one of the most basic lessons of chemistry textbooks – bonding with six other atoms instead of the typical four
2h
New Scientist - News

Wild vampire bats are now sucking blood from humans at nightBats in Brazil exclusively feed on bird blood, but new arrivals in their territory are now on the menu – they have been caught feasting on human blood
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mysterious fossils find place on the tree of lifeScientists say they have solved the mystery surrounding a sea creature that lived more than 500 million years ago.
2h
Popular Science

Is urine actually sterile?Health Just in case you were wondering Urine: Is it sterile, and why?
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High dietary red meat intake linked to common bowel condition diverticulitisReplacing one daily portion with poultry or fish may lower risk, findings suggest.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Distorted Vaccine ScienceHis anti-vaccine credentials date back to 2005 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Dana Foundation

Brain Awareness Week 2017: Why Become a Partner?Brain Awareness Week 2017 (March 13-19) is only a couple of months away, and it is the perfect time to become a Brain Awareness Week partner ! Partners participate in the campaign by organizing creative and innovative activities within their communities to educate the public about the brain and the promise of brain research. Many different types of organizations can become partners including K-12
3h
Futurity.org

Seniors with arthritis: here’s your minimum amount of exerciseEven a third of the recommended physical activity can be beneficial for older adults with arthritis, researchers find. Federal guidelines suggest getting 150 minutes of moderate activity per week to prevent premature death and serious illness, however only one in 10 older American adults with arthritis in their knees meet these guidelines. The researchers wanted to determine a less overwhelming a
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tucatinib (ONT-380) progressing in pivotal trial against HER2+ breast cancerTwenty-seven percent of 50 heavily pretreated patients with stage IV HER2+ breast cancer saw clinical benefit from the drug Tucatinib (ONT-380) , with at least 'stable disease' at 24 or more weeks after the start of treatment.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Air pollution and lack of physical activity pose competing threats to children in ChinaHealth workers and policymakers need to find ways to address poor air quality and lack of exercise among children in China so that children can be more physically active without suffering the health risks caused by exposure to air pollution.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our galaxy's black hole is spewing out planet-size 'spitballs'Every few thousand years, an unlucky star wanders too close to the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The black hole's powerful gravity rips the star apart, sending a long streamer of gas whipping outward. That would seem to be the end of the story, but it's not. New research shows that not only can the gas gather itself into planet-size objects, but those objects then are flung throughout
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bronchial carcinoma: Added benefit of crizotinib not provenThe dossier contains no data or no suitable data on ROS1-positive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Results on ALK-positive tumors are not applicable.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychology: Playful people are at an advantageAdults can positively utilise their inclination towards playfulnessin many situations. They are good at observing, can easily see things from new perspectives, and can turn monotonous tasks into something interesting. At the same time, playfulness should not be equated with humor. Instead we need a new vocabulary to describe it, write psychologists.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Remembering where to get highAddiction-related memories are exceptionally strong and stable, suggesting that addictive drugs remodel the brain’s circuitry in a prominent and lasting way. In the past decade, researchers have used mouse models to unravel how cellular changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain structure involved in action selection associated with arousal and reward, may contribute to addiction-related beha
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Gene-silencing' technique is a game-changer for crop protectionGround-breaking research based on nanotechnology promises to help conquer the greatest threat to global food crops – pests and diseases in plants, report scientists who have developed a non-toxic, degradable spray which is capable of disabling specific genes in plant. ‘BioClay’ spray protects plants from disease-causing pathogens without altering their DNA, they report.
3h
Futurity.org

How parents should act to get kids to fess upA study finds that children who anticipate a parent will feel happy about their child confessing a misdeed are more likely to come forward—even if they think they might be punished. The goal of the research was to investigate the emotions that children associate with lying and confessing. The study also tested whether these emotions were connected to children’s tendencies to confess or cover up m
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conifer cones bear their ages well, and still move itFossil conifer cones can still move their individual seed scales after millions of years, biologists have found. The cones analyzed in a new study represent the oldest known plant structures that are still capable of movement and can also serve as a model for bioinspired technical applications with low maintenance requirements.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Weak measurement' with strong resultsA new method has been developed allowing for quick and precise measurement of quantum states.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our senses can't learn under stressStress is part of our everyday lives. While some thrive on it, it makes others sick. But what does stress do to our senses?
3h
Futurity.org

Years as a postdoc can cost PhDs money laterPostdoctoral jobs don’t yield a positive return in the labor market, say researchers, who also find that the positions likely cost graduates about three years’ worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers. Federal research agencies, such as the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, tout postdoctoral positions as valuable training for those pursuing scientific
3h
Popular Science

This bumblebee is the first to become endangered—but it won't be the lastAnimals The rusty patched bumblebee joins the red list Just a few decades ago, the rusty patched bumblebee pollinated crops and wildflowers in 28 states. Now, as of Tuesday, it lives on the endangered species list.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Legal or not, marijuana can increase the risk of developing alcohol use disordersAlcohol use disorders (AUDs) develop with time and in stages. Following the initiation of drinking, some people progress to problem drinking, and then develop a “cluster” of specific problems to comprise an AUD. However, not all stages of AUD development have been studied equally. This report examines high-risk families to understand underlying influences across multiple stages of AUD development.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Contrary to decades of hype, curcumin alone is unlikely to boost healthCurcumin, a compound in turmeric, continues to be hailed as a natural treatment for a wide range of health conditions, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. But a new review of the scientific literature on curcumin has found it's probably not all it's ground up to be. The report instead cites evidence that, contrary to numerous reports, the compound has limited -- if any -- therapeutic benefit
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Farthest stars in Milky Way might be ripped from another galaxyThe 11 farthest known stars in our galaxy are located about 300,000 light-years from Earth, well outside the Milky Way's spiral disk. New research shows that half of those stars might have been ripped from another galaxy: the Sagittarius dwarf. Moreover, they are members of a lengthy stream of stars extending one million light-years across space, or 10 times the width of our galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatmentThe anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers report.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nature's weaving formula used to engineer advanced functional materialsFor the first time, biomedical engineers have woven a 'smart' fabric that mimics the sophisticated and complex properties of one nature's ingenious materials, the bone tissue periosteum. Having achieved proof of concept, the researchers are now ready to produce fabric prototypes for a range of advanced functional materials that could transform the medical, safety and transport sectors.
4h
Futurity.org

Why queasy rides in ‘space chair’ are totally disorientingImagine you’re a jet fighter pilot being chased by a heat-seeking missile. You undertake evasive maneuvers, climbing and nose-diving, performing barrel rolls and loops, and sharply banking left and right. Your speed is around 1,500 miles per hour. Without the proper training—even with it—you’re liable to get pretty nauseous. You’d grow disoriented and become unable to tell which direction you wer
4h
Ingeniøren

De første norske FM-sendere er nu slukketKlokken 11.11 i dag slukkede den første norske FM-sender, og det norske FM-net har taget første skridt mod pensionen.
4h
New Scientist - News

Cyprus reunification may harm unique wildlife thriving on borderThe buffer zone between Greek and Turkish sides of the Mediterranean island has become a wildlife haven — but it could vanish if the two get reunited
4h
WIRED

Universities Must Help Educate Woefully Uninformed LawmakersOpinion: In the age of fake news, Congress is employing fewer and fewer technical experts. Higher education should try to fill the gap. The post Universities Must Help Educate Woefully Uninformed Lawmakers appeared first on WIRED .
4h
New Scientist - News

Space travel's mental health toll could endanger long missionsA review of NASA research highlights the risk that prolonged social isolation poses to long-distance space missions, as well as other dangers like radiation
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Colombian plant discovered honors Colombian presidentA new plant species from Northeastern Colombia has been named Espeletia praesidentis, in honor of efforts made by Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos to build peace in his country after over five decades of conflict.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to inflate a huge hardened concrete shellAn alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes has been developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure.
4h
WIRED

How to Watch President-Elect Trump’s Big Wednesday Press ConferenceWIRED is at Trump Tower for Donald Trump's first press conference since being elected. The post How to Watch President-Elect Trump's Big Wednesday Press Conference appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED

The Dumb ‘Smart’ Gear That Someone’s Gonna Hack in 2017Putting a chip in it isn't always the best move. The post The Dumb ‘Smart’ Gear That Someone’s Gonna Hack in 2017 appeared first on WIRED .
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to remove nickel from contaminated seawaterThe same deposit that builds up in many tea kettles or water pipes in areas where calcium-rich water is the norm might be just the (cheap) ticket to rid contaminated seawater of toxic metals.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changes to hospital electronic health records could improve care of patients on warfarinUsing electronic health records can improve the care patients on warfarin receive after they leave the hospital and eliminate potential confusion among care providers and pharmacists, research concludes.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor-seeking salmonella treats brain tumorsGenetic tweaks to salmonella turn the bacteria into cancer-seeking missiles that produce self-destruct orders deep within tumors. Tests in rat models with extreme cases of the disease showed a remarkable 20 percent survival rate over 100 days -- roughly equivalent to 10 human years -- with the tumors going into complete remission.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A novel cancer immunotherapy shows early promise in preclinical studiesScientists report that GARP, a TGF-beta cell surface receptor, could be a novel diagnostic marker for breast, colon, and lung cancer. An antibody-based therapy targeting GARP prevented metastasis to the lung in a mouse model of breast cancer. Targeting GARP with an antibody could represent a novel addition to established immunotherapies that 'wake up' the immune system so that it can fight cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancersAn epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use was identified. This discovery was unexpected since it seemed highly improbable that this kind of alterations of the epigenome found in children could also target an epithelial tumor like throat cancer that occurs only in adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Updated classification system captures many more people at risk for heart attackExperts have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grasslands hold potential for increased food productionManaging grazing on grasslands in a more efficient way could significantly increase global milk and meat production or free up land for other uses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New material in the fight against hospital-acquired infectionsResearchers have developed a newlight-activated antimicrobial material for use in the fight against the most common hospital infections.
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Ingeniøren

Vindfattigt 2016 brød otte års vindkraftrekorder i rap2016 blev året, hvor vindkraftens andel af elforbruget faldt efter otte års uafbrudt vækst. Sidste år dækkede vindkraften således 37,6 procent af elforbruget mod 42 procent i 2015.
4h
New Scientist - News

Thousands of birds to be culled in France to stop bird fluThe H5N8 strain is killing many wild birds, including ducks, swans, plus endangered species like white-tailed eagles, prompting large culls at poultry farms
4h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The HBP Medical Informatics PlatformThe Medical Informatics Platform (MIP), built by Subproject 8 of the Human Brain Project, provides sophisticated tools for researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists, to name but a few, for exploration and analysis of Big Data relevant to brain diseases. The MIP is a web-based platform allowing users not only to share data and know-how, but also to collaborate in a true translational way. By dev
4h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Tilikum dies, US antibiotic ban and a Nazi-science probeThe week in science: 6–12 January 2017 Nature 541 138 doi: 10.1038/541138a
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TEDTalks (video)

Meet the inventor of the electronic spreadsheet | Dan BricklinDan Bricklin changed the world forever when he codeveloped VisiCalc, the first electronic spreadsheet and grandfather of programs you probably use every day like Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets. Join the software engineer and computing legend as he explores the tangled web of first jobs, daydreams and homework problems that led to his transformational invention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Manager, are you aware of beliefs guiding your actions?A new study explores managers' perceptions on firm performance. According to the study, managers approach firm performance differently. One managing director emphasizes partnership with customers, where as other emphasize fine tuning in production. Various things influence managers' perceptions. For instance, different management tools like Balanced scorecard and demands from customer firms influe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood test may help predict confusion after surgeryMany people experience an extended period of confusion when they awake after surgery. This acute confusional state, called delirium, particularly affects older adults and poses an important clinical challenge as it can lead to greater postoperative complications and may extend hospitalization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infectionsYou can pretty much put a mark in your calendar for when the annual flu epidemic begins. Using 20,000 virus samples and weather statistics, researchers have now discovered more details about how outdoor temperature and flu outbreaks are linked.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Hidden Trade in Our Medical Data: Why We Should WorryFor-profit companies use our anonymized medical data in a huge secondary market. Advances in computing make it increasingly possible for outsiders to identify people from among the hundreds of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intensive weight loss does not cause major health problems for female fitness competitorsWorries about the potential negative consequences of fat loss regimens for aesthetic purposes in normal weight females have been surfacing in the media. This has taken place regardless of the lack of longitudinal studies on this kind of diets. Now researchers have published a study that shows for the first time what effects an intensive weight reduction had in rather a large group of normal weight
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Duckweed: Tiny plants with huge potentialWolffia globosa, a tiny, rootless duckweed, or water lens, apparently has what it takes to achieve great things, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Positive effect of winter dormancy on cold-blooded cognitionResearchers discovered thatbrumation – the period of winter dormancy that is observed in cold-blooded animals, similar to the process of hibernation in mammals – does not seem to adversely affect the memory of salamanders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How far do invasive species travel?As a result of the globalization of trade and transport, in the past decades, tens of thousands of species have spread into regions where they were not originally at home. Potentially serious consequences of this include the displacement or extinction of native species and the spread of health risks. Even though trade flows are known to represent an important path for the introduction of invasive
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderlyAntidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even 4 years later.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Normal ranges for testosterone levels definedA large study of more than 9,000 men has established harmonized reference ranges for total testosterone in men that when applied to assays that have been appropriately calibrated will effectively enable clinicians to make a correct diagnosis of hypogonadism, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First study to show chair yoga as effective alternative treatment for osteoarthritisThe first randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of chair yoga on pain and physical function in older adults with osteoarthritis is proving to be an effective way to reduce pain and improve quality of life while avoiding pharmacologic treatment or adverse events for the millions who suffer from the disease in their lower extremities (hip, knee, ankle or foot).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Essential quality control system in cells identifies and destroys faulty genetic materialNew research describes a mechanism by which an essential quality control system in cells identifies and destroys faulty genetic material.
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Ingeniøren

Hollandske tog kører nu på 100% vindenergiHollands nationale jernbaneselskab har indfriet sit mål for vedvarende energi et år tidligere end planlagt.
5h
Viden

70% af Japans største koralrev er dødtStigning i vandtemperaturen har betydetblegning af koralrev ud for øen Okinawa.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Struggle to escape distant galaxies creates giant halos of scattered photonsAstronomers have discovered giant halos around early Milky Way type galaxies, made of photons (elementary particles of light) that have struggled to escape them.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More older Americans using cannabis, underscoring need for researchCannabis use among older adults in the US is on the rise, yet there is currently a lack of biomedical, clinical, and public health research to inform policy related to this trend, according to a new article.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Lists a Bumble Bee Species as Endangered for First TimePopulation plunges almost 90 percent since 1990s; the species is seen as a key pollinator of blueberries, tomatoes and wildflowers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using E. coli to detect hormone disruptors in the environmentEndocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. EDCs are potentially harmful, even at low concentrations, equal in some cases to mere milligrams dissolved in in a swimming pool full of water. Now researchers report that they can quickly detect
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rural dementia: We need to talkEnglish research into the experience of dementia in farming and farming families, and its impact on their businesses and home lives, has identified four areas of concern which need to be addressed if dementia in the countryside is to be managed. It is the first time that research has addressed this issue in farming.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Important bio-chemical, serine, produced on a large scale by E.coliE. coli cells have now been engineered into producing large quantities of serine, which is used in detergents, tube feeding formula, and as building blocks for many important chemicals. Using the evolutionary technique ALE, scientists managed to develop this robust and commercially interesting cell line.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pumping iron is good for the heart, researchers showJust one session of interval weight-training can improve the risk of Type 2 diabetes complications, according to a new study. This is encouraging news for those starting the New Year with good intentions.
5h
New Scientist - News

This is why you can’t help babbling to your dog like it’s a babyCompeting theories for the use of baby talk on dogs are being untangled and it looks like it's got less to do with cute faces than you think, says Clive Wynne
5h
cognitive science

The Transition to Minimal Consciousness through the Evolution of Associative Learningsubmitted by /u/Bubblbu [link] [comments]
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nutritional quality of kids' menus at chain restaurants not improvingUS chain restaurants participating in an initiative to improve the nutritional quality of their children's menus have made no significant changes compared with restaurants not participating in the program.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists pave the way for enhanced detection and treatment of vascular graft infectionsA study reports the detrimental aftereffects of infected grafts, including the formation of biofilms that can shelter bacteria and function as a source of recurrent infection. This new research should enable researchers to develop better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tree-bark thickness indicates fire-resistance in a hotter futureA new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Deceptive Spice Extract Offers Cautionary Tale for ChemistsCurcumin dupes assays and leads some drug hunters astray -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
New Scientist - News

Home robot to nudge older people to stay social and activeA home robot called ElliQ is designed to connect older people to online services and proactively pipe up with activity suggestions
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

New U.S. Effort Aims to Speed Drugs to Cancer ResearchersScientists hope to pursue new combination therapies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Quickly Calculate PercentagesHow to calculate percentages is easier than you think. Quick, what’s 36% of 25? Or how about 250% of 20? Learn a quick and dirty tip to help you calculate all of those pesky percentages in your... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Ingeniøren

Varmemåler i alle brændeovne: Dyrt i byen - billigt på landetSkatteministeriet ser på en afgiftmodel, der bygger på en måler i skorstenen. Realistisk, bekræfter målerfirma.
6h
WIRED

Instagram Races to Make Money Ahead of Snap’s IPOInstagram now has 150 million daily users—just as many as Snap. So what do you do when you have that many eyeballs trained on your app? Monetize. The post Instagram Races to Make Money Ahead of Snap’s IPO appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Ingeniøren

Kinesisk ansigtsgenkendelse: Skal foreslå dagens ret ud fra dit humørhttps://www.version2.dk/artikel/fastfoodkaede-kina-indfoerer-ansigtsgenkendelse-skal-foreslaa-mad-ud-dit-humoer-1071875 Kunstig intelligens skal hjælpe kunder med at vælge friturestegt kylling. Version2
6h
Ingeniøren

Microsoft giver brugeren mere kontrol over privatliv i Windows 10https://www.version2.dk/artikel/microsoft-giver-brugeren-mere-kontrol-privatliv-windows-10-1071874 De oplysninger, der indsamles via Microsoft-kontoen og i Windows 10, kan nu begrænses og slettes. Version2
6h
Videnskabens Verden

I 1970'erne praktiserede en række læger at behandle folk for depression ved simpelthen at holde dem vågne. Den metode har klinisk forskningslektor fra Region Hovedstaden Klaus Martiny taget op igen; han har nemlig støvet den gamle metode af og tilsat den en portion lysterapi. Tilrettelæggelse: Kristoffer Frøkjær-Jensen og Marie Hougaard. www.dr.dk/p1/videnskabensverden
7h
Dagens Medicin

Region indleder stikprøve-kontrol af lægers honorarændringRegion Midtjylland har i sagen om konvertering af honorarer for samtaleterapi, krævet dokumentation fra en række læger. Det er PLO Midtjylland utilfreds med, og regionen og PLO er nu gået i dialog om sagen
7h
Dagens Medicin

Ny PLO-formand i Midt: Det er vigtigt, at honoreringen afspejler den tid, vi faktisk brugerFør jul valgte de praktiserende læger i Midtjylland Lise Høyer som ny formand. Hun har mange ønsker i rollen som formand bl.a. at sikre en honorering, der følger opgaverne.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Ny procedure omkring urinvejsinfektion hjælper børn og familierIndlæggelse i flere dage og intravenøs antibiotikabehandling kan undgås ved at bruge ambulant behandling, viser internationale forsøg. Det forklarer pædiater Søren Hagstrøm fra Aalborg Universitetshospital.
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Deceptive curcumin offers cautionary tale for chemistsSpice extract dupes assays and leads some drug hunters astray. Nature 541 144 doi: 10.1038/541144a
7h
Viden

Greenpeace: Netflix belaster klimaet med fossiltung strømDerimod er en høj procent af energiforbruget hos Google, Facebook og Apple dækket af vedvarende energi, fastslår miljøorganisationen i en ny rapport.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nightmare on the pillMillions of women have no problem with the pill but some find it shatters their mental health. Here The Debrief's Vicky Spratt describes years of depression, anxiety and panic.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Crochet a Coral Reef--and WhyWhen words aren't enough to get people engaged in an environmental issue, it can be useful to try another medium -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren

Klikker du 'grønt' eller 'sort'? Rapport udpeger klimabelastende streamingHvis du går op i miljøet, skal du måske begynde at overveje, hvor du får din underholdning fra. Ny rapport fra Greenpeace viser, at mange streamingtjenester og sociale medier kører på et energimiks af fossile brændsler.
7h
WIRED

WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: SherlockGet ready for a big ol' Cumberbatch of mystery! (See what we did there?) The post WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Sherlock appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Want to Take a Cool Photo? Stick an Explosion in ItKen Hermann is obsessed with stuff that goes boom. And now, he photographs it. The post Want to Take a Cool Photo? Stick an Explosion in It appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Meet a Couple of Web-Surfing, Voice-Activated … FridgesA fridge should do more than just keep your food cold. The post Meet a Couple of Web-Surfing, Voice-Activated ... Fridges appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Don’t Turn Earth Into Venus, Warns NASA Ex-Chief Scientist Ellen StofanNASA's former chief scientist talks rocket explosions, Carl Sagan, cats, and climate change. The post Don't Turn Earth Into Venus, Warns NASA Ex-Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Gaze Upon the Coolest Cars at This Year’s Detroit Auto ShowMotown is still the center of the American auto industry, and it's got plenty to show you. The post Gaze Upon the Coolest Cars at This Year's Detroit Auto Show appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

3 Key Questions Senators Must Ask Rex Tillerson, Trump’s Secretary of State PickFrom trade to climate change to his ties to Vladimir Putin, Tillerson faces a tough day of questioning from both sides of the aisle. The post 3 Key Questions Senators Must Ask Rex Tillerson, Trump's Secretary of State Pick appeared first on WIRED .
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Legendary Arecibo Observatory Faces a Bleak FutureAlthough still producing world-class science, a lack of funding could soon mothball the storied radio telescope -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Dagens Medicin

K og LA vil beholde produktivitetskravRegioner, læger og sygeplejersker vil af med det årlige produktivitetskrav på to pct, men der er langt til flertal for en afskaffelse i blå blok.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Salsa Primeval: 52-Million-Year-Old Tomatillo FoundThe fossilized fruit, a cousin of tomatoes, potatoes, chilies and tobacco, dates the famous plant family 30 million years older than previously thought -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com





8h
Ingeniøren

Vestas skal bygge minimølle til afrikanske minigridsDanida har søsat et minigridprojekt i samarbejde med DTU, Vedvarende Energi og Vestas, der skal give flere afrikanere adgang til grøn strøm med en ny type vindmølle.
8h
Ingeniøren

Rambøll, Alectia og CF Møller fyret efter budgetskred på supersygehusOpdateret: Byggeriet af det nye supersygehus i Køge vil blive 300-350 mio. kr. dyrere end budgetteret. Blandt andet fordi decentral varmeforsyning og robotbetjente lagertårne alligevel ikke kan bruges. Region Sjælland har nu opsagt totalrådgiverkontrakten.
8h
WIRED

Step Into the Comfiness of NYC’s 2nd Ave. Subway (Yes, Comfiness)Improvements for all five senses along the United States' most long-anticipated transit line The post Step Into the Comfiness of NYC's 2nd Ave. Subway (Yes, Comfiness) appeared first on WIRED .
8h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Behind New Zealand’s wild plan to purge all pestsThe country is gearing up to get rid of rats, possums, stoats and other invasive predators by 2050. Is it a pipe dream? Nature 541 148 doi: 10.1038/541148a
8h
Dagens Medicin

Vaccineskeptiker bliver formand for Trumps vaccinekommisionDonald Trump, der er mangeårig kritiker af det amerikanske vaccineprogram, har peget på Robert F. Kennedy Jr. som formand for en ny kommision om vaccinesikkerhed og videnskabelig integritet.
9h
Popular Science

New research might explain why you get so hungry when you're drunkAnimals Scientists gave some mice the drunchies Why do I binge eat when I binge drink? New research might explain the connection between alcohol and hunger, thanks to mouse brains…
9h
Popular Science

China's new ballistic missile submarine could change its prospects in nuclear warEastern Arsenal It's stealthier, with a range long enough to attack the United States from Chinese waters. The Type 094A SSBN, in addition to being stealthier, can launch longer ranged nuclear missiles, safe within Chinese coastal waters.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Psykiatrisk Hospital får strakspåbud af Arbejds­tilsynetEn bæltefikseret patient vristede sig i oktober sidste år fri og forsøgte at kvæle en ansat på Psykiatrisk Hospital Risskov. Nu udløser manglende opfølgning af episoden et påbud fra Arbejdstilsynet
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Inside the secret lives of polar bearsA camera attached to the neck of a female polar bear shows two bears breaking through ice sheets to hunt for prey.
10h
Viden

Forskere: Frygt for medicinsk stråling er ubegrundetHvis frygten derimod får læger og patienter til at fravælge radiologiske undersøgelser, vil det i sig selv være skadeligt, mener amerikanske læger.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Blind mice have sight restoredBlind mice regain partial vision after stem cell reprogramming
10h
Dagens Medicin

Studie bekræfter interaktion mellem svampemiddel og warfarinCasehistorier om utilsigtede hændelser efter samtidig behandling med svampemidlet miconazol og warfarin bekræftet i netop offentliggjort artikel.
10h
Ingeniøren

Big data fra satellit: Landmanden holder øje med den enkelte planteMODERNE LANDBRUG: Dansk teknologi bruger big data, machine learning og satellitfotos til at analysere fotosyntesen i afgrøder. Det reducerer kvælstofudledningen og øger indtjeningen.
10h
Ingeniøren

VW-svindel har stået på siden 2006Den tyske bilgigants svindelnummer med NOx-udledning har ifølge amerikanske myndigheder stået på i ti år. Volkswagen har nu accepteret endnu et milliardforlig i USA, der bringer regningen for dieselgate op på 134 milliarder kroner.
10h
Science : NPR

Fitness Trackers Aim To Improve The Health And Happiness Of Zoo ElephantsOK, so they're not using Fitbits. But zoos across America are using software to minutely track the activity, behavior and physiology of captive elephants, and using that data to improve zoo life. (Image credit: Courtesy of the Fresno Chaffee Zoo)
10h
Ingeniøren

Fejl i Sundhedsplatformen forsinkede operationerhttps://www.version2.dk/artikel/fejl-sundhedsplatformen-laaste-laeger-ude-patienternes-journaler-1071872 Hele tirsdag formiddag forsøgte lægerne i Herlev, Gentofte og på Rigshospitalet forgæves at logge på den nye, omdiskuterede it-platform Sundhedsportalen. Det resulterede i stor irritation og udskydelser af operationer. Version2
11h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Brexit offers rare chance to make Britain greenerEnvironmental scientists plan to push for policy changes but are nervous about losing current protections. Nature 541 145 doi: 10.1038/541145a
11h
Dagens Medicin

Nye habilitetsregler mødt med kritik: Ikke lempelige nokEn skærpet tolkning af habilitetsreglerne for lægers samarbejde med industrien fik i 2016 flere til at melde afbud i sidste øjeblik. Men et udkast til nye – og mindre restriktive – regler er stadig for stramme, lyder kritikken.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Antallet af nye kræfttilfælde stigerSundhedsstyrelsen nye årsrapport fra Cancerregisteret 2015 viser igen en stigning for visse former for cancer.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Den digitale nytårstaleJeg tror, det er tid til at nyfortolke hele funktionen af det offentlige sygehusvæsen og finde måder at fungere på, der går i spænd med digitalisering, kravet om transparens og åbenhed som dogme.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Star Wars gibbon' is new primate speciesScientists have found a new species of gibbon living in the tropical forests of south west China.
14h
WIRED

How Spy Agency Vets Read That Bombshell Trump Report: With CautionAn explosive new report about Trumps relationship with Russia shouldn't be taken at face value. The post How Spy Agency Vets Read That Bombshell Trump Report: With Caution appeared first on WIRED .
14h
WIRED

Obama Urges Americans Not to Take Democracy for GrantedObama's final speech was as much a warning as it was a farewell—a warning that the United States is still in the middle of crafting its history. The post Obama Urges Americans Not to Take Democracy for Granted appeared first on WIRED .
14h
Ingeniøren

Region Midt sanerer ud i 1.400 apps: »Det giver noget murren i krogene«https://www.version2.dk/artikel/region-midt-kaempe-it-opgradering-sanering-apps-giver-noget-murren-krogene-1071449 Over 1400 applikationer er i Region Midtjylland ved at blive ompakket til Windows 7. Men mange bliver også kasseret. Projektet gennemføres parallelt med en store infrastrukturopgradering. Version2
16h
Ingeniøren

Søren Pind lover kulegravning af loft over ingeniørdarlingsUddannelsesministeren lover at fjerne forhindringerne for de ingeniøruddannelser, som virksomhederne efterspørger.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Killing time: Study sheds light on phages and precision cell destructionPhage therapy, which exploits the ability of certain viruses to infect and replicate within bacteria, shows promise for treating antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. But designing such therapies depends on understanding how phages work. Phages can kill the cell immediately, or become dormant and kill it later, with a high level of precision in kill time.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technology will cut plug-in hybrid fuel consumption by one thirdEngineers have taken inspiration from biological evolution and the energy savings garnered by birds flying in formation to improve the efficiency of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) by more than 30 percent.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers identify monarch butterfly birthplaces to help conserve speciesResearchers have pinpointed the North American birthplaces of migratory monarch butterflies that overwinter in Mexico, vital information that will help conserve the dwindling species. The researchers analyzed 'chemical fingerprints' in the wings of butterflies collected as far back as the mid-1970s to learn where monarchs migrate within North America each autumn.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Next-generation optics offer the widest real-time views of vast regions of the sunA groundbreaking new optical device to correct images of the Sun distorted by multiple layers of atmospheric turbulence, is providing scientists with the most precisely detailed, real-time pictures to date of solar activity occurring across vast stretches of the star's surface.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dual-purpose biofuel crops could extend production, increase profitsDual-purpose biofuel crops could extend production by two months, decreasing the cost of each gallon of fuel and increasing profits by as much as 30 percent.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hospitals are less likely to admit publicly insured children, but outcomes aren't affectedHospitals are less likely to admit children covered by public insurance such as Medicaid than privately insured children with similar symptoms, especially when hospitals beds are scarce. But the disparity doesn't appear to affect health outcomes, according to researchers.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For viral predators of bacteria, sensitivity can be contagiousScientists have shown for the first time how bacteria with resistance to a viral predator can become susceptible to it after spending time in the company of other susceptible or 'sensitive' bacteria. This 'contagious' sensitivity, enabling bacteriophage invasion into previously resistant cells, could have a major impact on the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Play an instrument? You probably react faster, tooResearchers find that musicians have faster reaction times than non-musicians -- and that could have implications for the elderly.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene mutations behind lack of a nose identifiedResearchers have identified gene mutations associated with a rare congenital condition involving the absence of a nose and often accompanied by defects involving the eye and reproductive systems. Mutations in the same gene have previously been associated with a form of muscular dystrophy.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover new subtype of cervical cancerScientists have identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that may explain why a fraction of cervical cancer patients do not respond to standard treatment.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Certain species of vaginal bacteria can increase a woman's susceptibility to HIVSpecific bacteria living in the human vagina may play a previously unrecognized role in the sexual transmission of HIV. Researchers, working with young, healthy, South African women, found that individuals with vaginas dominated by pro-inflammatory bacterial species were at a 4-fold higher risk of acquiring HIV than those with 'healthy' vaginal bacteria. Meanwhile, viruses in the female genital tr
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Play, cognitive skills in kindergarten predict extracurricular activities in middle schoolCognitive skills and experiences like classroom-based play in kindergarten lead to participation in extracurricular activities in 8th grade among children growing up in poverty, finds a new study.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New active filaments mimic biology to transport nano-cargoInspired by micro-scale motions of nature, a group of researchers has developed a new design for transporting colloidal particles, tiny cargo suspended in substances such as fluids or gels, more rapidly than is currently possible by diffusion.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zeroing in on the true nature of fluids within nanocapillariesShrinking the investigation of objects to the nanometer scale often reveals new properties of matter that have no equivalent for their bulk analysis. This phenomenon is motivating studies of nanomaterials which can reveal fascinating new phenomena. It inspired researchers to explore the extent of knowledge about fundamental properties of fluids, which demands reconsideration with the increasing us
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Compound from chicory reveals possible treatment strategy for neurodegenerative disordersIn a new research report scientists used mice to show that chicoric acid, a component of chicory, may help reduce memory impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nothing fishy about better nutrition for moms and babiesResearchers have found a way to provide mothers and young children in Cambodia with better nutrition through an unlikely source -- fish sauce.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Routine procalcitonin screening reduces hospital stays and costs for patients with sepsisA dangerous and often deadly condition, sepsis affects more than a million Americans every year and the cases continue to increase. A new study examines whether procalcitonin (PCT) testing helps to more effectively manage sepsis care. Investigators found that the use of PCT screening on the first day of ICU admission was linked to significantly shorter hospital stays, as well as an overall decreas
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Circulating fatty acids ratio may help predict bariatric weight loss surgery outcomeNew findings may one day help clinicians predict the outcome of roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Dementia gene' may guard against decline associated with parasitic diseaseNew research suggests that carriers of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele, which is the single strongest genetic predictor of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease, may have a reduced risk of cognitive decline associated with parasitic diseases.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein build-up may trigger inflammation associated with Alzheimer's and other conditionsA recent review article points to the 'trigger' for the inflammatory response, caused by the immune system, that precedes Alzheimer's disease and other neurological conditions.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble's front row seat when galaxies collideIRAS 14348-1447 is actually a combination of two gas-rich spiral galaxies doomed by gravity to affect and tug at each other and slowly, destructively, merge into one.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Puppy talk' - why do we use it and do dogs respond?Scientists decode "dog-directed speech" - and they find puppies respond but older dogs ignore it.
18h
WIRED

A Robert F. Kennedy Jr.-led Vaccine Commission Would Be Bad NewsHe's an outspoken anti-vaccine activist ... and the new president might put him in charge of a panel to investigate vaccines. The post A Robert F. Kennedy Jr.-led Vaccine Commission Would Be Bad News appeared first on WIRED .
18h
ArXiv Query

Issues in data expansion in understanding criticality in biological systemsAt the point of a second order phase transition also termed as a critical point, systems display long range order and their macroscopic behaviors are independent of the microscopic details making up the system. Due to these properties, it has long been speculated that biological systems that show similar behavior despite having very different microscopics, may be operating near a critical point. R
18h
Blog » Languages » English

Hummingbird vs Fiddler CrabBattle of the musical animals! If you had an all-animal band, would you want to be lead hummer, or jamming away on a mean fiddle? Now’s your chance to tell the world! Hummingbird Unlike humans, hummingbirds don’t use their throats to hum. The sound that gives the hummingbird its name comes from the rapid flapping of its wings – typically around 50 flaps per minute! A species of hummingbird called
19h
ArXiv Query

A simple unified view of branching process statistics: random walks in balanced logarithmic potentialsWe revisit the problem of deriving the mean-field values of avalanche critical exponents in systems with absorbing states. These are well-known to coincide with those of an un-biased branching process. Here, we show that for at least 4 different universality classes (directed percolation, dynamical percolation, the voter model or compact directed percolation class, and the Manna class of stochasti
19h
Ingeniøren

Rumdyst skal vække unges interesse for rumforskninghttps://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/rumdyst-skal-vaekke-unges-interesse-rumforskning-5906 Børn og unge med interesse for rumforskning og rumteknologi kan vinde en tur til EU’s rumbase i Fransk Guyana i europæisk konkurrence med DTU Space som nordisk partner Jobfinder
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug shown to aid injured adult brains may exacerbate cognitive problems in childrenThe pediatric brain responds negatively to traumatic brain injury treatment that targets inflammation, new research suggests.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer models could help design physical therapy regimensResearchers have developed a computational walking model that could help guide patients to their best possible recovery after a stroke.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eastern Russian plant collection could improve cold hardiness in miscanthusWinters in eastern Russia are intensely cold, with air temperatures regularly reaching -30 degrees Fahrenheit in some locations. It is a seemingly inhospitable climate, but native plants have found ways to thrive there. A plant geneticist suspected one of these plants may hold the key to breeding cold-tolerant food and biomass crops. To find out, the modern-day botanical explorer set off across ea
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Portable device for early diabetes detection being developedResearchers are developing a portable device for detecting type 1 or type 2 diabetes at an early stage. The ultimate aim of the project is to develop a prototype of the device.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugarMany pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists have now analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that cou
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Repeat cesarean deliveries less cost-effective in low-risk women, investigators findFor women with a prior low transverse incision cesarean delivery, the decision to undergo a vaginal delivery or elect to have a repeat cesarean delivery has important clinical and economic ramifications.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Innovative imaging, surgery treats lymph condition in adultsResearchers who developed a safe and effective procedure to remove thick clogs in children's airways are now reporting similar success in adult patients. In this rare condition, called plastic bronchitis, patients develop thick, caulk-like casts that form in the branching paths of their airways.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New molecular discovery may help identify drug therapies to prevent dementiaScientists have discovered a molecular pathway in the brain that may help provide answers to long-term memory problems in the elderly and aid researchers in identifying drug-based therapies to prevent dementia.
19h
WIRED

3 Key Questions Senators Must Ask Elaine Chao, Trump’s Transport PickThe way Americans move is changing fast—and Chao will have a lot to say about it. The post 3 Key Questions Senators Must Ask Elaine Chao, Trump's Transport Pick appeared first on WIRED .
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers reveal connection between female estrogen cycle, addictive potential of cocaineA new study shows how high estrogen release during the estrus cycle increases the pleasure felt via the brain’s reward pathway.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microscopic spaces between heart cells may play role in sudden cardiac deathSudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure is a major concern in the United States. A research team will investigate how the microscopic spaces surrounding heart cells affect connections called gap junctions.
19h
Futurity.org

It costs about 20 cents to build this blood centrifugeBioengineers have created hand-powered centrifuge that separates blood into its individual components in only 1.5 minutes. Built from 20 cents of paper, twine, and plastic, a “paperfuge” can spin at speeds of 125,000 rpm and exert centrifugal forces of 30,000 Gs. “From a technical spec point of view, we can match centrifuges that cost from $1,000 to $5,000.” “To the best of my knowledge, it’s the
20h
New Scientist - News

Extinct giant goose used its wings to fight rather than flyGarganornis ballmanni, which lived on a Mediterranean island, was around 1.5 metres tall and had wing adaptations seen in birds that fight over territory
20h
Popular Science

The Pentagon's new drone swarm heralds a future of autonomous war machinesMilitary Buzzkill. The Pentagon tested an autonomous drone swarm in October.
21h
Science : NPR

52 Million-Year-Old Tomatillo Fossils Rewrite Veggie HistoryPotatoes, tomatoes and bell peppers belong to the nightshade family. Newly discovered fossils in Patagonia suggest that family started much earlier than believed, perhaps when dinosaurs roamed. (Image credit: Peter Wilf, Penn State University)
21h
WIRED

Russia Hacked ‘Older’ Republican Emails, FBI Director SaysFBI Director James Comey tells Congress the same hackers who breached the DNC also penetrated the RNC's older email domains and state-level GOP targets. The post Russia Hacked 'Older' Republican Emails, FBI Director Says appeared first on WIRED .
22h
ArXiv Query

Morphognosis: the shape of knowledge in space and timeArtificial intelligence research to a great degree focuses on the brain and behaviors that the brain generates. But the brain, an extremely complex structure resulting from millions of years of evolution, can be viewed as a solution to problems posed by an environment existing in space and time. The environment generates signals that produce sensory events within an organism. Building an internal
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Vast Shadow Sweeps Across Young Exoplanetary System18 years of Hubble Telescope data on a star system reveals a surprising phenomenon spanning tens of billions of miles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pretty in pink: Some algae like it coldScientific efforts are aimed at learning more about the effects of pink snow algae on glaciers and snowfields covering Pacific Northwest stratovolcanoes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plus-sized fly: A model to understand the mechanisms underlying human obesityA new fly model sheds light on how the brain acts to signal 'fullness' and the possibility of conferring resilience against the impact of high-fat diets.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique gene signature predicts potentially lethal prostate cancersStandard therapy for prostate cancer, the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men, is based on blocking androgens, the male sex hormones. However, for some men, prostate cancer recurs despite androgen-deprivation therapy. A team of scientists has identified an 11-gene signature unique to advanced recurrent prostate cancer that they believe will help to identify these aggressiv
23h
WIRED

ICYMI: Watch President Obama’s Farewell AddressA president looking to leave a tech-forward legacy has made it easy to watch his parting remarks online. The post ICYMI: Watch President Obama's Farewell Address appeared first on WIRED .
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wastewater treatment upgrades result in major reduction of intersex fishUpgrades to a wastewater treatment plant along Ontario's Grand River, led to a 70 per cent drop of fish that have both male and female characteristics within one year and a full recovery of the fish population within three years, according to researchers.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Postdoc jobs in biomedicine don't yield positive returns in the labor marketPostdoc jobs don't yield a positive return in the labor market, research has concluded. Additionally, the investigators found that these positions likely cost graduates roughly three years' worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers.
23h
Futurity.org

Shedding mutations may let cancer evade immunotherapyCancer cells may develop resistance to drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors by simply getting rid of mutations that would otherwise trigger the body’s disease-fighting immune system, research suggests. Researchers conducted the study, aimed at determining why so-called immunotherapy can become ineffective over time, on cells from five lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients. A summary appea
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Futurity.org

Snails that carry disease can travel surprisingly farParasite-carrying snails can travel long distances, spreading a deadly disease along the way, according to new research. The study is the first to find genetic evidence for long-distance movements—as far as 30 miles—among snails that pose an important public health threat. Where and how snails move is of concern in many developing countries because freshwater snails transmit schistosomiasis, a pa
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Viden

Kunstig uintelligens: Amazons Alexa køber dukkehuse af sig selvEn familie fik pludselig et dukkehus tilsendt, som enheden havde bestilt.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Japanese monkey tries to mate with deerA male Japanese monkey has been filmed trying to mount and mate with a Sika deer.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Donald Trump win 'won't sway world on climate'Targets on CO2 will continue despite a climate change sceptic becoming president, a UK minister says.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Brazil: Clash of cultures over Amazon damsIndigenous groups and river dwellers are battling the government and big corporations over the huge dams being built to meet Brazil's energy needs.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Chimp drinking culture caught on videoCritically endangered chimpanzees craft absorbent drinking sticks, remote cameras reveal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA-evidence needs statistical back-upHow do forensic scientists deal with complex DNA-evidence found at crime scenes? A researcher has now developed new statistical models to analyze them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suppressing a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumorsInhibiting a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What kind of selfie taker are you?Taking and posting pictures of yourself doesn't necessarily mean you're a narcissist, new research suggests. People also take selfies to engage in conversations and chronicle their lives.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The String and Paper CentrifugeThis toy-inspired centrifuge could enable medical testing in remote locations, and costs just 20 cents to make. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on January 10,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find protein that weakens severe sepsis immune reactionNo effective therapy exists today for sepsis, an inflammatory storm that afflicts about 3 million Americans a year, killing up to half. But now, investigators have identified a key molecule that, in mice, helps protect the body’s central nervous system against the runaway inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surf and Earth: How prawn shopping bags could save the planetBioengineers are trialing how to use shrimp shells to make biodegradable shopping bags, as a ‘green’ alternative to oil-based plastic, and as a new food packaging material to extend product shelf life.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Vaccine Critic Kennedy Set to Chair Trump Panel on Vaccination SafetyLike the president-elect, Robert Kennedy, Jr., has pushed arguments of a link to autism -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily folic acid supplementation remains important for prevention of birth defectsDespite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to a new editorial.
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Popular Science

This super-cheap paper centrifuge can spin 125,000 times per minuteHealth The hand-powered device could help detect malaria A paper centrifuge powered only by human hands could perform super-cheap blood tests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?Researchers examined the characteristics of HIV-1 strains that were successful in traversing the genital mucosa that forms a boundary to entry by viruses and bacteria. Studying viral isolates from the blood and genital secretions of eight chronically HIV-1 infected donors and their matched recipients, the researchers identified a sub-population of HIV-1 strains with biological properties that pred
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Summer heat for the winterCan thermal solar energy be stored until wintertime? Within a European research consortium, scientists have spent four years studying this question by pitting three different techniques against each other.
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Popular Science

Could you walk to the moon in a lifetime?Space An amazing video shows you how, and David Bowie is there (for some amazing reason) Amazing 360-video from NPR's Skunk Bear walks us to the moon with David Bowie…
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Viden

Obama: Selv Trump kan ikke stoppe skiftet til grøn energiI en artikel i Science argumenterer den afgående præsident for, at vedvarende energikilder er kommet for at blive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather's not to blame for your aches and painsThe weather plays no part in the symptoms associated with either back pain or osteoarthritis, new research reveals. It's long been thought episodes of both back pain and arthritis can be triggered by changes in the weather, including temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ancient Retroviruses Emerged Half a Billion Years AgoThis viral group appeared hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Housekeepers' of the brain renew themselves more quickly than first thoughtCells in the brain responsible for detecting and fixing minor damage renew themselves more quickly than previously thought, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older adults with obesity less responsive to memory training than those with lower BMIsIn first study to compare results of cognitive training by BMI category, scientists found that memory training provided only one-third the benefit to older adults with obesity than benefit it provided to older adults without obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Couch potatoes face same chance of dementia as those with genetic risk factors: ResearchSedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Current controls on alcohol marketing are not protecting youth, warn public health expertsYouth around the world are exposed to extensive alcohol marketing, experts warn, adding that current controls on that marketing appear ineffective in blocking the association between youth exposure and subsequent drinking.
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Viden

Forskere får ødelagte tænder til at gendanne sig selvMetoden kan revolutionere den måde, tandlæger lapper huller i tænderne på.
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Popular Science

#DoesItFart is the burning science question you never knew you hadAnimals And Twitter is here to answer it A gassier, more informative version of “does it blend?”…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers develop new compound to fight cytomegalovirusA Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Testing how species respond to climate changePredicting how species will respond to climate change is a critical part of efforts to prevent widespread climate-driven extinction, or to predict its consequences for ecosystems, say scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA study finds a connection between wildfires, droughtFor centuries drought has come and gone across northern sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, water shortages have been most severe in the Sahel -- a band of semi-arid land situated just south of the Sahara Desert and stretching coast-to-coast across the continent, from Senegal and Mauritania in the west to Sudan and Eritrea in the east.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of skin cancer doesn't deter most college students who tan indoors, study showsWhite female college students in Indiana who tan indoors know they are placing themselves at risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging, but most continue to tan indoors anyway, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach to managing warfarin patients improves care, cuts costsNew performance measures have been developed for patients on warfarin that may save lives and money, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cell therapy reverses blindness in animals with end-stage retinal degenerationA stem cell-based transplantation approach that restores vision in blind mice moves closer to being tested in patients with end-stage retinal degeneration, according to a study. The researchers showed that retinal tissue derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established connections with neighboring cells and responded to light stimulation after transplantation into the host ret
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glia, not neurons, are most affected by brain agingThe difference between an old brain and a young brain isn't so much the number of neurons but the presence and function of supporting cells called glia. In a new article, researchers who examined postmortem brain samples from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 found that the state of someone's glia is so consistent through the years that it can be used to predict someone's age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark studyA landmark study has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warmer West Coast ocean conditions linked to increased risk of toxic shellfishHazardous levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin that accumulates in shellfish, have been linked to warmer ocean conditions in waters off Oregon and Washington for the first time, report scientists.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump and Space: Panel Forecasts Changes to ComeAs Trump’s “landing team” touches down at NASA, science community members mull ways to interact with politics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rate of elevated systolic blood pressure increases globally, along with associated deathsAn analysis that included 8.7 million participants finds that the rate of elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased substantially globally between 1990 and 2015, and that in 2015 an estimated 3.5 billion adults had systolic blood pressure of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg, and 874 million adults had SBP of 140 mm Hg or higher, according to a study.
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WIRED

California Floods Its Fields to Keep Its Cities From FloodingOpening the Sacramento Weir means flooding the plains to protect the state's capital from the same fate. The post California Floods Its Fields to Keep Its Cities From Flooding appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cultural differences may leave their mark on DNASignatures of ethnicity in the genome appear to reflect an ethnic group's shared culture and environment, rather than their common genetic ancestry, report scientists. Epigenetic signatures distinguishing Mexican and Puerto Rican children in this study cannot be explained by genetic ancestry alone, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Byzantine skeleton yields 800-year-old genomes from a fatal infectionNew insight has been gained into the everyday hazards of life in the late Byzantine Empire, sometime around the early 13th century, as well as the evolution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a common bacterial pathogen.
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Viden

Sorte huller sender "spytklatter" afsted med 30 millioner km/tStjernerester som slynges væk fra det sorte hul i Mælkevejens galakse, samler sig i planetstore klatter, viser ny forskning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rise of personal technology in criminal proceedings poses risks to individuals' rightsPersonal technology such as fitness trackers and smartphones have become common companions in our daily lives. But those same devices increasingly will be used in criminal proceedings to gather evidence of criminal activity by their owners, raising questions about individuals' rights that the legal system is not yet fully prepared to address, according to a new study.
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Popular Science

Certain kinds of vaginal bacteria can actually boost HIV riskHealth The balance of microbes can change your susceptibility Certain bacteria that dwell in the vagina can make a woman more vulnerable to HIV.
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‘Alien megastructure’ signal may be due to star eating a planetTabby’s star’s odd blinking and fading has been put down to alien signals and swarms of comets, but devouring a planet could explain everything
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mother-baby bonding insight revealedScientists say mothers hold babies on the left to help in bonding - and this is not unique to humans.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Am I Addicted to Climbing Rocks?The science on that question is mixed, but for me it feels more like a form of meditation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Omstridte Uber offentliggør trafikdata på nyt websitehttps://www.version2.dk/1071528 Uber Movement skal ifølge Uber selv hjælpe lokale myndigheder med at forbedre de trafikale forhold i byerne. Version2
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemicals in ubiquitous Mediterranean plants may hold key to delaying neurodegenerative diseases, study suggestsChemicals extracted from the prickly pear and brown seaweed, two ubiquitous Mediterranean plants, eased symptoms in organisms suffering from neurodegenerative disease, according to new research. Small molecules from the plants interfere with the build-up of sticky protein clumps rendering them less toxic to neurons. The results of the study hold promise for ground-breaking treatment of age-related
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New categorization of food scares will help efficient development of strategies to prevent food chain being compromisedA new categorization of food scares has been developed by experts. Existing categorizations were found to be too simplistic, not recognizing contributing factors, they say. The researchers propose that the term ‘food scare’ is redefined to take into account consumers’ distrust in the food supply chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefitsThe rollout of Sweden’s first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use – namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.
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Futurity.org

These tips could make it easier to plan a funeralA new report aims to ease stressful end-of-life decisions, such as services and burials, for those who have lost a loved one. The report is intended to help social workers who are responsible for discharge planning in health-care settings, where 80 percent of deaths occur. The report’s lead author, Mercedes Bern-Klug of the University of Iowa’s School of Social Work, also casts it as a helpful gu
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Futurity.org

Brain scans of kids overturn idea that tissue stops growingNew research seems to contradict a central thought in neuroscience: the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives—from too much to just enough. For the first time, scientists found microscopic tissue growth in the brain continues in regions that also show changes in function. The group made this finding by looking at the brains of an often-overlooked participant pool: chil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experiments in mice may help boost newly FDA-approved therapy for spinal muscular atrophyAcademic and drug industry investigators say they have identified a new biological target for treating spinal muscular atrophy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The fly reveals a new signal involved in limb growthMany of the secrets of life, such as how we become a certain size and shape, have been uncovered in studies performed over more than 100 years and involving animal models such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Now, researchers disclose a new signal that participates in the specification and growth of fly wings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fixing overuse, underuse of medical care can improve health and save moneyInternational experts have pinpointed how reforming the overuse and underuse of health and medical services around the world can improve health outcomes and stem spiraling costs of health care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychology essential to achieving goals of patient-centered medical homesPsychologists can offer critical experience and expertise in strengthening the increasingly common model of coordinated health care, the patient-centered medical home, helping to achieve the 'triple aim' of improved outcomes, decreased cost and enhanced patient experience, according to new research.
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WIRED

Fiddler Crabs Use Their Giant Claw For the Two F’s: Fightin’ And Flirtin’One of fiddler crab's claws comes way, way bigger than the other—totally naturally. So it can fight and flirt, of course. The post Fiddler Crabs Use Their Giant Claw For the Two F's: Fightin' And Flirtin' appeared first on WIRED .
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Ingeniøren

Pacemakere skal drives af solceller placeret under hudenSchweiziske læger og fysikere har testet solceller, der kan lægges under huden og generere en effekt, der langt overgår behovet for at drive eksempelvis en pacemaker. Det kan gøre batterier overflødige.
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Ingeniøren

Kun én softwareingeniør-uddannelse går fri af uddannelsesloftKun Aalborg Universitet, der har den ældste af de tre danske uddannelser til softwareingeniør, kan fremover modtage studerende med en anden uddannelse i forvejen. Det forstår uddannelsesinstitutionerne ikke.
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Viden

Størstedelen af verdens koralrev risikerer at dø inden år 210099 procent af klodens koralrev vil inden udgangen af dette århundrede være døende på grund af koralblegning, viser ny forskning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast fine art: 19th century painting tricks revealedTo paint quickly while creating exceptional texture and volume effects, J. M. W. Turner and other English artists of his generation relied on the development of innovative gels. All the rage in the 19th century -- and still in use today--these compounds alter the properties of the oil paints they are combined with. Now, researchers have finally learned the chemical secrets behind these mixtures. L
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High cholesterol intake and eggs do not increase risk of memory disordersA relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, no association was found in persons carrying the APOE4 gene variant that affects cholesterol metabolism and increases the risk of memory disorders, report researchers at conclusion of a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Rise and Fall of a Shrimp BiologistWhen you mix science and politics and disrupt the social order, you had better be ready for some lowbrow playground antics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

The trunk trick that lets elephants pick up almost anythingKelly the elephant has shown how trunks can grip and lift anything from fine granules to 350-kilogram logs – it’s all in the kink
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New unknown risk factor for arteriosclerosis identifiedFollowing a blood infection, the first class of antibodies produced by the immune system are IgM antibodies. They form the "vanguard" of the immune response, before other cells are activated to fight the infection. Some people are deficient or completely lack these antibodies, so that they develop congenital immune deficiency. Researchers have now discovered how this deficiency can also lead to an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How phishing scams thrive on overconfidenceA new study examines overconfidence in detecting phishing e-mails. According to the research, most people believe they're smarter than the criminals behind these schemes, which is why so many fall easily into a trap.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Species diversity reduces chances of crop failure in algal biofuel systemsWhen growing algae in outdoor ponds as a next-generation biofuel, a naturally diverse mix of species will help reduce the chance of crop failure, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicians can better predict outcomes for kidney transplant patients with key data, study findsKidney transplant patients have a better chance of survival if physicians use all the data that's available to them -- including data that's tracked over time -- to predict the likelihood of organ failure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural tooth repair method, using Alzheimer's drug, could revolutionize dental treatmentsA new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer's drug has been discovered by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New potential treatment for cancer metastasis identifiedBreast cancer metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads, may be prevented through the new use of a class of drugs already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, say investigators.
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Futurity.org

‘Breathalyzer’ ignitions may cut fatal car crashesRequiring ignition interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers appears to cut fatal alcohol-related car crashes more than less strict interlock laws do, report researchers. The study—published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine —finds that mandatory interlock laws were associated with a 7 percent decrease in the rate of fatal crashes involving at least one driver with blood alcohol ove
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Scientific American Content: Global

What to Say to a Climate Change SkepticWhat should you say to a climate change skeptic? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Moms of juvenile offenders lack legal know-howTeenagers who commit crimes for the first time are more likely to re-offend if their mothers don’t participate in their legal process, new research finds. Unfortunately, their mothers are widely unfamiliar with the juvenile justice system—and those who know the least about the system also participate the least. A new study suggests a dire need for more legal education for parents of juvenile offe
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