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Futurity.org

Why computers need to learn to ‘disambiguate’ people Millions of people share names. Computers have to distinguish—or, technically speaking, disambiguate—between them, which can be challenging for common names. This conundrum occurs in a wide range of environments, from the bibliographic—which Anna Hernandez authored a specific study?—to law enforcement—which Robert Jones is attempting to board an airplane flight? “Our method grows and changes when
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Science : NPR

Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine sorted through 10,000 studies to determine the good and bad health effects of marijuana. Tight drug restrictions impede research, they say.
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Popular Science

Fiat Chrysler may have mimicked Volkswagen's emissions scam Environment So we’re still doing this secret software thing? The EPA notified Fiat Chrysler that is has reason to believe the company used software to alter emissions systems in 104,000 cars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Classic video game system used to improve understanding of the brainThe complexity of neural networks makes them difficult to analyze, but humanmade computing systems should be simpler to understand. Researchers have now applied widely used neuroscience approaches to analyze the classic games console Atari 2600 -- which runs the video game 'Donkey Kong' -- and found that such approaches do not meaningfully describe how the console's microprocessor really works.
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WIRED

Just in Time for Trump, the NSA Loosens Its Privacy Rules Privacy critics have called on Obama to rein in US surveillance powers before Trump can abuse them. With a new NSA rule change, he's done the opposite. .

Science : NPR

Flipping A Switch In The Brain Turns Lab Rodents Into Killer Mice When scientists activate hunting circuits in the brains of genetically modified mice, the animals attack insects and even bottle caps as prey. It gives clues to the evolution of hunting in humans. (Image credit: Courtesy of Ivan de Araujo/Cell Press)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists discover how viruses hijack cell's machineryBiologists have documented for the first time how very large viruses reprogram the cellular machinery of bacteria during infection to more closely resemble an animal or human cell -- a process that allows these alien invaders to trick cells into producing hundreds of new viruses, which eventually explode from and kill the cells they infect.
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Futurity.org

New device could lead to tiny ‘DNA photocopiers’ A new way to control a powerful but finicky process called the polymerase chain reaction raises the possibility of a “DNA photocopier” small enough to hold in your hand. Such a device could identify the bacteria or virus causing an infection even before the symptoms appear. Kary Mullis developed PCR in 1983 and received the Nobel Prize for his invention. A key advance in the field of molecular bi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Affordable water in the US: A burgeoning crisisIf water rates continue rising at projected amounts, the number of US households unable to afford water could triple in five years, to nearly 36 percent, finds new research.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Lasers Activate Killer Instinct in MiceStimulating certain areas of the animals’ brains can trigger predatory behaviors including biting and grabbing -- SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL - MICE HUNTING / KILLER INSTINCT / PREDATORY BEHAVIOUR
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving longevity of functionally integrated stem cells in regenerative vision therapyOne of the challenges in developing stem cell therapies is ensuring that transplanted cells can survive long enough to work. Researchers report one of the first demonstrations of long-term vision restoration in blind mice by transplanting photoreceptors derived from human stem cells and blocking the immune response that causes transplanted cells to be rejected. The findings support a path to impro SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL VISION STEM CELLS
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How well do we understand the relation between incorrect chromosome number, cancer?Researchers report surprising results of experiments intended to explore the consequences of having too many or too few chromosomes, a phenomenon that biologists call aneuploidy. They were surprised to find that having one extra chromosome actually supresses cancer, contrary to long-held belief.
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Popular Science

Where did 'Planet Nine' come from? Space New evidence suggests it could be a rogue planet captured by our sun If it's out there, Planet Nine is expected to be 1,000 times farther from the sun than Earth. How did it get so far away?
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WIRED

Take a Close Look at Faraday Future’s (Supposed) Tesla-Killer You have many reasons to be skeptical that this company will change transportation. But the fact remains, its car is hot. The post Take a Close Look at Faraday Future’s (Supposed) Tesla-Killer appeared first on WIRED .
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NeuWrite San Diego

Dosing Dopamine to Regulate RestSleep is great. We all do it (sort of), and the fortunate among us can look forward to getting some sweet slumber every night. But sometimes, something better comes along. A new video game, Netflix series, or Tinder date might be so captivating that even late into the night, our body’s need for sleep changes - it seems […]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Mysterious' non-protein-coding RNAs play important roles in gene expressionEnhancers boost the rate of gene expression from nearby protein-coding genes so a cell can pump out more of a needed protein molecule. A mysterious subset of non-coding RNAs -- enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are transcribed from enhancer sequences. Shedding new light on these elusive eRNAs, researchers showed that CBP, an enzyme that activates transcription from enhancers, binds directly to eRNAs to contro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria recruit other species with long-range electrical signalsThe same biologists who recently found that bacteria resolve social conflicts within their communities and communicate with one another like neurons in the brain have discovered another human-like trait in these apparently not-so-simple, single-celled creatures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Perfect powder: Laboratory perfects metal powders for manufacturingA high-pressure gas atomization process has garnered an American laboratory at least 16 patents over the last two decades and created a spin-off company.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decreasing cocaine use leads to regression of coronary artery diseasePeople who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study now reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping movements of alien bird speciesA global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers create mosquito resistant to dengue virusResearchers have genetically modified mosquitoes to resist infection from dengue virus, a virus that sickens an estimated 96 million people globally each year and kills more than 20,000, mostly children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cholera bacteria infect more effectively with a simple twist of shapeThe bacteria behind the life-threatening disease cholera initiates infection by coordinating a wave of mass shapeshifting that allows them to more effectively penetrate their victims' intestines, researchers have found. The researchers also identified the protein that allows Vibrio cholerae to morph, and found that it's activated through quorum sensing. The findings could lead to new treatments fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exercise ... It does a body good: 20 minutes can act as anti-inflammatoryIt's well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers have found how just one session of moderate exercise can also act as an anti-inflammatory. The findings have encouraging implications for chronic diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia and for more p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR gene editing takes on rare immunodeficiency disorderResearchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells of patients with a rare immunodeficiency disorder; the engineered cells successfully engrafted in mice for up to five months.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Will Trump's Climate Team Accept Any "Social Cost of Carbon"?The nation’s top science panel has just sketched a clearer way to set a fair price today for cutting tomorrow’s climate risks—and some of Trump’s advi
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Sat-nav neurons tell bats where to go Long-hypothesized brain cells give bats their distance and angle to a location.
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Popular Science

To understand the evolution of menopause, just look at family drama—in killer whales Animals Mother-daughter conflict could help explain why women live beyond child-bearing years Why does menopause exist? For most animals, it doesn't. But by looking to some of the only other animals who live past their reproductive prime, we can find out…
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Science : NPR

As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground After years of drought, California is getting drenched with rains. Some scientists and farmers are testing a way to capture that water by filling the state's depleted groundwater aquifers. (Image credit: Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis)
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Quanta Magazine

How Many Half-Lives Do You Have? Do protons live forever or do they decay with a half-life of around 16 billion trillion trillion years? That’s an eternity considering the universe is thought to be less than 14 billion years old. Yet, as Natalie Wolchover recently described , the fate of physicists’ beloved grand unification theories — the idea that the forces of nature were unified at the beginning of time — rests on finding th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study outlines framework for identifying disease risk in genome sequenceImagine a day when you visit the doctor's office for your annual physical. Your physician orders routine tests -- cholesterol, glucose and blood count -- but they also order a sequence of your genome, all 3 billion letters of it. Routine genomic testing is not far away, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists tie the tightest knot ever achievedScientists have produced the most tightly knotted physical structure ever known -- a scientific achievement which has the potential to create a new generation of advanced materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable biosensors can flag illness, Lyme disease, risk for diabetes; low airplane oxygenCan your smart watch detect when you are becoming sick? A new study indicates that this is possible. By following 60 people through their everyday lives, researchers found that smart watches and other personal biosensor devices can help flag when people have colds and even signal the onset of complex conditions like Lyme disease and diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Shrew'-d study: Arctic shrews, parasites indicate climate change effect on ecosystemsThe shrew and its parasites -- even 40-year-old preserved ones -- are the new indicators of environmental change, according a researcher. A new study indicates a changes in shrews' ranges whenever the climate warms. Using archived field collections of shrews, the researchers can collect DNA, the animals' diets and parasites that can be used to predict future changes and how changes with shrews can
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Advanced metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors: New drug in development shows improved progression-free survival for patientsA new therapy in development for the treatment of midgut neuroendocrine tumors, a rare type of cancer that occurs in the small intestine and colon, shows improved progression-free survival and response rates for patients with advanced disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Target freshers to halt spread of meningitis, say researchersA campaign targeted at students arriving at university for the first time could hold the key to reducing the spread of meningitis and septicemia, say researchers in England.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

This bay in Scandinavia has world record in carbon storingForests are potent carbon sinks, but also the oceans' seagrasses can store enormous amounts of carbon. A little bay (ålegræs) in Denmark stores a record amount of carbon. Here is the secret.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conservation practices may leave African indigenous populations behindConservation and logging groups in Central and West Africa are failing to fully incorporate local concerns into management, marginalizing the livelihoods of the local population, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online dating booming but how much does education matter?Online daters are most likely to contact people with the same level of education as them, but are less fussy about an intellectual match as they get older, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why Lyme disease is common in the North, rare in the SouthWhen it's hot and not too muggy, Lyme disease-bearing black-legged ticks avoid desiccation by hiding out where people don't tread. Scientists say that's why the illness is rare in the South, and may eventually fade out along the Mason-Dixon line.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Meet the Endangered Plant Named after Rock Legend Jimi HendrixThe entire Hendrix’s liveforever species could be wiped out by a single tractor -
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish lightly to keep snapper on the reefScientists have looked at 253 coral reef sites across the Indian Ocean. They found that top-level predator fish -- such as snapper and grouper -- were easily overfished and require a different approach if they are to be conserved.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New system for forming memoriesUntil now, the hippocampus was considered the most important brain region for forming and recalling memory, with other regions only contributing as subordinates. But a new study finds that a brain region called entorhinal cortex plays a new and independent role in memory. Researchers showed that, in rats, the entorhinal cortex replays memories of movement independent of input from the hippocampus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Training computers to differentiate between people with the same nameHow do you tell which Anna Hernandez authored a specific study or which Robert Jones is attempting to board an airplane flight? New researchers have developed a novel-machine learning method to provide better solutions to the perplexing problem of name disambiguation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yoga may have health benefits for people with chronic non-specific lower back painYoga may lead to a reduction in pain and functional ability in people with chronic non-specific lower back pain over the short term, compared with no exercise, a new systematic review suggests. However, researchers advise that more studies are needed to provide information on long-term effects.
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Popular Science

These freaky baboon shrieks could push back the evolution of speechThese silly sounds in baboons are vowels, and that's a big deal Baboon barks are more than just silly noises…
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Prion-like protein spotted in bacteria for the first timePrion in bacteria. Until now, prions were only seen in the cells of eukaryotic organisms such as plants and animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowelsBaboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This has been demonstrated using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of the tongue muscles and the modeling of the acoustic potential of the vocal tract in monkeys. The data confirm that baboons are capable of producing at least five vocalizations with the properties of vowels, in spite of their high larynx, and th
SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL - BABOON VOWEL
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Master regulator of cellular aging discoveredScientists have discovered a protein that fine-tunes the cellular clock involved in aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crybaby: The vitamins in your tears
Use tears in stead of blood for analysis. Would you rather shed a couple tears or have your blood drawn? Testing for nutritional deficiencies in blood can be invasive and expensive. Researchers explored what it takes to switch to tears instead and their study focuses on the nutritional connection between infants and parents.
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Architecture of the yeast small subunit processomeThe small subunit (SSU) processome, a large ribonucleoprotein particle, organizes the assembly of the eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit by coordinating the folding, cleavage, and modification of nascent pre–ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the yeast SSU processome at 5.1-angstrom resolution. The structure reveals how large ribosome biogenesis comple
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Science: Current Issue

[Errata] Erratum for the Letter “Response to ‘Forest value: More than commercial’” by C. B. Barrett, M. Zhou, P. B. Reich, T. W. Crowther, J. Liang
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Science: Current Issue

[Review] Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials designElectrocatalysis plays a central role in clean energy conversion, enabling a number of sustainable processes for future technologies. This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts and associated materials for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performa
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Strong peak in Tc of Sr2RuO4 under uniaxial pressureSr2RuO4 is an unconventional superconductor that has attracted widespread study because of its high purity and the possibility that its superconducting order parameter has odd parity. We study the dependence of its superconductivity on anisotropic strain. Applying uniaxial pressures of up to ~1 gigapascals along a 〈100〉 direction (a axis) of the crystal lattice results in the transition temperatur
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Science: Current Issue

[Editorial] Global clean energy in 2017During the November 2016 Climate Change Conference in Marrakesh, much talk centered on implementation of the political commitments made in Paris in 2015. Governments are now focused on putting their words into action as they prepare for the first official stocktake in 2018. Innovation will have an essential role to play. Author: David King
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Science: Current Issue

[In Brief] News at a glanceIn science news around the world, U.S. officials release a plan to help agencies decide whether to fund controversial studies that make viruses more dangerous, a new survey of U.K. academics finds that 90% still think universities will be harmed by the country's departure from the European Union, members of the U.S. Congress call for a ban on federal funding of research with fetal tissue donated a
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Expedition probes ocean trench's deepest secretsThe Mariana Trench, a scythe-shaped cleft in the western Pacific sea floor, plunges nearly 11 kilometers—deeper than any other place in the oceans. The trench marks a subduction zone, where one slab of crust slides beneath another. But whereas many other subducting plates slope gradually downward, in the Mariana the Pacific Plate dives nearly vertically. Scientists have long wondered what accounts
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Jilted again, Venus scientists pine for their neglected planetA probe from NASA has not targeted Venus, Earth's closest neighbor in solar system, since the early 1990s, although missions to Mars continue to pile up. Scientists had thought it likely that NASA would select a Venus mission for its next low-cost planetary probe, but on 4 January the agency selected two projects targeting asteroids instead. There are a host of scientific questions to be answered
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] NASA missions aim at asteroid oddballsOn 4 January, the agency picked two $450 million missions for Discovery, its low-cost planetary program, and, like several recent probes, both target small bodies. Set for a 2021 launch, Lucy will fly past Jupiter's Trojan asteroids, which share the gas giant's orbit but precede and follow it. Two years later, Psyche will set out for a rare iron and nickel asteroid of the same name. Little is know
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Pioneering study images activity in fetal brainsBabies born prematurely are prone to problems later in life—they're more likely to develop autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and more likely to struggle in school. A new study that's among the first to investigate brain activity in human fetuses suggests that the underlying neurological issues may begin in the womb. The research, led by Moriah Thomason, a developmental neuroscien
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Life-saving diphtheria drug is running outTwo children have died in Europe in the past 2 years because they suffered from diphtheria and did not get an antiserum that neutralizes the deadly toxin produced by Corynebacterium diphtheriae in time. The antitoxin, produced in horses, is in short supply worldwide; the market is too small to make production profitable. The European Center for Disease Control and Prevention is planning to highlig
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Observations hint at a new recipe for giant black holesAstronomers have glimpsed a new solution to a long-standing puzzle: how black holes could have grown fast enough to explain the monsters a billion times the mass of the sun seen soon after the big bang. Most black holes are thought to start out as collapsed stars, but they grow too slowly to fit the bill. Instead, theorists have suggested, the behemoth black holes in the early universe could have
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Birds don't need exercise to stay fit for epic flightsAnyone who rose morning after morning this week for an exhausting and ache-generating exercise class to fulfill a New Year's resolution will envy the bar-headed goose. The bird has the strength and endurance to fly 4000 kilometers over the Himalayas without having to do a lick of exercise to prepare. Reported last week at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, t
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Science: Current Issue

[Feature] Fateful imprintsImprinting means that in some places along the human genome—about 100 genes in all—the way DNA behaves depends on which parent passes it to the offspring. Some of the genes in sperm and egg cells have chemicals called methyl molecules that attach to them, a process called methylation; these molecules can either activate or silence a gene. In some cases, the mother's copy of the gene is activated,
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Science: Current Issue

[Policy Forum] The irreversible momentum of clean energyThe release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) due to human activity is increasing global average surface air temperatures, disrupting weather patterns, and acidifying the ocean (1). Left unchecked, the continued growth of GHG emissions could cause global average temperatures to increase by another 4°C or more by 2100 and by 1.5 to 2 times as much in many midcontinent and fa
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] A matter of tree longevityThere is much scientific and political interest in using the transfer of carbon from the atmosphere to the biosphere, or carbon sequestration, to help mitigate the greenhouse effect (1). Because plants fix carbon dioxide (CO2) by photosynthesis and store carbon in their body (close to half of plant dry matter is carbon), faster carbon uptake by plants through faster growth is widely held to increa
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Multiple mechanisms for memory replay?Cast your mind back to your childhood. A stream of mental images of events and places appears, like photographs in an album. How do our brains capture and preserve these episodes, and then vividly recall them at will many years later? On page 184 of this issue, O'Neill et al. (1) show that a region of the brain called the medial entorhinal cortex can replay waking experiences. Their work thus chal SE OGSÅ TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MEMORY ENTORHINAL
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Putting the squeeze on superconductivitySuperconductivity is a fascinating quantum state of matter that has captured the imagination of physicists for over a century. The pioneering theoretical work of Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer described the superconducting state as a phase-coherent condensate of electrons bound into Cooper pairs, whose distinguishing hallmark, the order parameter, reflects the symmetry of the pair wave function.
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Belowground drivers of plant diversityLong before Ernst Haeckel coined the term “ecology” in 1866, nature explorers, such as Alexander von Humboldt, observed that vegetation composition changes with climate. However, it still remains unclear what determines the local composition and species richness of vegetation. Understanding the roles of belowground invertebrates and microbes is particularly challenging. On pages 173 and 181 of thi
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Electron diffraction and the hydrogen atomThe humble hydrogen atom, with just a single proton and a single electron, is the key to many chemical and biological processes, but precisely because of its low number of electrons, it is difficult to detect even in a single-crystal x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment. If the material is polycrystalline (crystal volume <100 µm3) and only powder-diffraction techniques can be applied, detection beco
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Science: Current Issue

[Book Review] Life in the age of the algorithmAndreas Weigend, former chief scientist of Amazon, has written a book— Data for the People: How to Make Our Post-Privacy Economy Work for You—that offers techno-insiders a guide for making the world a more efficient self-branding mechanism. Reviewer Cathy O'Neil dissects Weigend's vision of the future of big data, with an eye toward questions of class, discrimination, and access. Author: Cathy O'N
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Science: Current Issue

[Book Review] Travels through timeTime is what everybody agrees the time is," a researcher says a few pages into Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation. It sounds like something the Mad Hatter might have said in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. But it's the truth. Time is such a fundamental part of modern life that sometimes we forget how it insinuates itself into everything that we do. In this, his second book, New Yo
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Science: Current Issue

[Letter] Europe's biodiversity avoids fatal setbackAuthors: Arie Trouwborst, Guillaume Chapron, Floor Fleurke, Yaffa Epstein, José Vicente López-Bao
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Science: Current Issue

[Letter] Pipelines imperil Canada's ecosystemAuthors: Juan José Alava, Nastenka Calle
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Science: Current Issue

[Technical Comment] Comment on “Ribose and related sugars from ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogs”Meinert et al. (Reports, 8 April 2016, p. 208) reported the formation of prebiotic molecules, including ribose, in an interstellar ice analog experiment. We show that if their experimental procedure is accurately described, much or most of their products may have been formed during their analysis process, not in the parent ice. Author: Jun Kawai
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Science: Current Issue

[Technical Response] Response to Comment on “Ribose and related sugars from ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogs”We detected ribose and related sugars in the organic residues of simulated interstellar ices using multidimensional gas chromatography. Kawai questions the formation of sugar compounds in the ices and suggests that they arise from a classical formose reaction during sample workup for analysis. We disagree with this hypothesis and present additional data to argue that Kawai’s criticism does not app
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Science: Current Issue

[Letter] A big, bug science partyAuthor: Cara M. Gibson
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Are you aware how well you remember?Author: Peter Stern
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Designing proteins with cavitiesAuthor: Valda Vinson
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Initiating an antitumor attackAuthor: Yevgeniya Nusinovich
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Poised for the second step of splicingAuthor: Valda Vinson
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Inducing strong couplingAuthor: Ian S. Osborne
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Phages build themselves a wallAuthor: Stella M. Hurtley
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Prions enter another domain of lifeAuthor: Stella M. Hurtley SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL PRION
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Channeling pain through GPCRsAuthor: Nancy R. Gough
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Better living through water-splittingAuthor: Jake Yeston
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] A machine for building ribosomesAuthor: Guy Riddihough
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Squeezing out the oddnessAuthor: Jelena Stajic
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] A cyclic catalyst to pair up sugarsAuthor: Jake Yeston
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Pin the tail on the hydrogensAuthor: Marc S. Lavine
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Redox metabolite role in biofilmsAuthor: Caroline Ash
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Soil biota and plant diversityAuthor: Andrew M. Sugden
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] How to get to place BAuthor: Peter Stern
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Parallel computation in memory-makingAuthor: Peter Stern
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Faster tree growth is no panaceaAuthor: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] More light on dopamine receptorsAuthor: Philip Yeagle
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] TAMpering with tumorsAuthor: Angela Colmone
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Three strands ironed closely togetherAuthor: Jake Yeston
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Effects of drought on tree performanceAuthor: Andrew M. Sugden
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Observing peculiar vorticesAuthor: Jelena Stajic
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Fast point-of-care detection of biomarkersAuthor: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Cancer and nerves: A tuf(t) partnershipAuthor: Paula A. Kiberstis
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Did Phaethon father the Geminids?Author: Keith T. Smith
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Gut communities form a history of connectionAuthor: Caroline Ash
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Speedy spermAuthor: Sacha Vignieri
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Structure of a yeast step II catalytically activated spliceosomeEach cycle of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing comprises two sequential reactions, first freeing the 5′ exon and generating an intron lariat–3′ exon and then ligating the two exons and releasing the intron lariat. The second reaction is executed by the step II catalytically activated spliceosome (known as the C* complex). Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy structure of a C* c
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photonSilicon is vital to the computing industry because of the high quality of its native oxide and well-established doping technologies. Isotopic purification has enabled quantum coherence times on the order of seconds, thereby placing silicon at the forefront of efforts to create a solid-state quantum processor. We demonstrate strong coupling of a single electron in a silicon double quantum dot to th
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Braiding a molecular knot with eight crossingsKnots may ultimately prove just as versatile and useful at the nanoscale as at the macroscale. However, the lack of synthetic routes to all but the simplest molecular knots currently prevents systematic investigation of the influence of knotting at the molecular level. We found that it is possible to assemble four building blocks into three braided ligand strands. Octahedral iron(II) ions control
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Macrocyclic bis-thioureas catalyze stereospecific glycosylation reactionsCarbohydrates are involved in nearly all aspects of biochemistry, but their complex chemical structures present long-standing practical challenges to their synthesis. In particular, stereochemical outcomes in glycosylation reactions are highly dependent on the steric and electronic properties of coupling partners; thus, carbohydrate synthesis is not easily predictable. Here we report the discovery
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Hydrogen positions in single nanocrystals revealed by electron diffractionThe localization of hydrogen atoms is an essential part of crystal structure analysis, but it is difficult because of their small scattering power. We report the direct localization of hydrogen atoms in nanocrystalline materials, achieved using the recently developed approach of dynamical refinement of precession electron diffraction tomography data. We used this method to locate hydrogen atoms in
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Pyocyanin degradation by a tautomerizing demethylase inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilmsThe opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces colorful redox-active metabolites called phenazines, which underpin biofilm development, virulence, and clinical outcomes. Although phenazines exist in many forms, the best studied is pyocyanin. Here, we describe pyocyanin demethylase (PodA), a hitherto uncharacterized protein that oxidizes the pyocyanin methyl group to formaldehyde and re
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublandsSoil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other pl
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Vectorial representation of spatial goals in the hippocampus of batsTo navigate, animals need to represent not only their own position and orientation, but also the location of their goal. Neural representations of an animal’s own position and orientation have been extensively studied. However, it is unknown how navigational goals are encoded in the brain. We recorded from hippocampal CA1 neurons of bats flying in complex trajectories toward a spatial goal. We dis
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] Plant-soil feedbacks and mycorrhizal type influence temperate forest population dynamicsFeedback with soil biota is an important determinant of terrestrial plant diversity. However, the factors regulating plant-soil feedback, which varies from positive to negative among plant species, remain uncertain. In a large-scale study involving 55 species and 550 populations of North American trees, the type of mycorrhizal association explained much of the variation in plant-soil feedbacks. In
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] Superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex replay independently of the hippocampusThe hippocampus is thought to initiate systems-wide mnemonic processes through the reactivation of previously acquired spatial and episodic memory traces, which can recruit the entorhinal cortex as a first stage of memory redistribution to other brain areas. Hippocampal reactivation occurs during sharp wave–ripples, in which synchronous network firing encodes sequences of places. We investigated t SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MEMORT ENTORHINAL
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] Causal neural network of metamemory for retrospection in primatesWe know how confidently we know: Metacognitive self-monitoring of memory states, so-called “metamemory,” enables strategic and efficient information collection based on past experiences. However, it is unknown how metamemory is implemented in the brain. We explored causal neural mechanism of metamemory in macaque monkeys performing metacognitive confidence judgments on memory. By whole-brain searc
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] Assembly of a nucleus-like structure during viral replication in bacteriaWe observed the assembly of a nucleus-like structure in bacteria during viral infection. Using fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, we showed that Pseudomonas chlororaphis phage 201φ2-1 assembled a compartment that separated viral DNA from the cytoplasm. The phage compartment was centered by a bipolar tubulin-based spindle, and it segregated phage and bacterial proteins according
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] A bacterial global regulator forms a prionPrions are self-propagating protein aggregates that act as protein-based elements of inheritance in fungi. Although prevalent in eukaryotes, prions have not been identified in bacteria. Here we found that a bacterial protein, transcription terminator Rho of Clostridium botulinum (Cb-Rho), could form a prion. We identified a candidate prion-forming domain (cPrD) in Cb-Rho and showed that it conferr SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL PRION BAKTERIA
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Report] Principles for designing proteins with cavities formed by curved β sheetsActive sites and ligand-binding cavities in native proteins are often formed by curved β sheets, and the ability to control β-sheet curvature would allow design of binding proteins with cavities customized to specific ligands. Toward this end, we investigated the mechanisms controlling β-sheet curvature by studying the geometry of β sheets in naturally occurring protein structures and folding simu
5h
Science: Current Issue

[New Products] New ProductsA weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Science: Current Issue

[Business Office Feature] Webinar | Deciphering cancer: Modulating immunoregulatory pathways to treat tumorsIn addition to being the first line of defense against pathogenic attack, the immune system seeks out aberrant cells within the body that may become cancerous. In response, precancerous and cancerous cells may exploit immune checkpoint pathways to evade immune detection and destruction. In order to block these tumorigenic cells, novel therapeutics that modulate immune checkpoint signaling have bee
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Business Office Feature] Editing the editor: Genome editing gets a makeover with CRISPR 2.0Applications of the genome editing system CRISPR are appearing at a furious pace, and gathering momentum toward therapeutic use in human cells. Indeed, Chinese scientists recently began a human clinical trial using CRISPR-edited cells to fight lung cancer, and U.S. clinical trials are slated to begin in 2017. But leading up to this exciting milestone, researchers performed some editing on the CRIS
5h
Science: Current Issue

[Working Life] Choosing the hard roadAuthor: Katharina Henke
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbes rule in 'knee-high tropical rainforests'Rainforests on infertile wet soils support more than half of all plant species. Shrublands on infertile dry soils in southwestern Australia, jokingly called 'knee-high tropical rainforests', support another 20 percent of all plants. In both, plants team up with soil bacteria or fungi to gather nutrients more efficiently. The plants' choice of microbial teammates influences a suite of other plant-s
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Fitness Bracelets May Warn of Serious IllnessBaseline data on body rhythms can make the wrist monitors work like “check engine” lights, a new study suggests --
5h
WIRED

Wearables Could Soon Know You’re Sick Before You Do Researchers need to carefully study how biometrics change in individuals over time, and determine which wearables provide data good enough for diagnosis. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL WEARABLES
5h
New Scientist - News

No sign of seasonal dark matter after four years of searchingThe XENON100 experiment just checked up on a controversial claim that dark matter comes and goes with the seasons - and found nothing
5h
New Scientist - News

Smartwatches know you’re getting a cold days before you feel illAfter sensors alerted a researcher to Lyme disease symptoms he was unaware he had, his team have shown that smartwatches can tell if a wearer is getting ill
5h
New Scientist - News

Molecules tied into beautiful ‘octofoil’ knot for first timeThe most complex molecular knot ever tied is just 20 nanometres long, and might be used to make innovative new materials
5h
Science : NPR

Scientists Have Twisted Molecules Into The Tightest Knot Ever This new knot has eight crossings, far more than previous molecular knots. The "rope" is very short — just 192 atoms long, or 500 times smaller than a red blood cell. (Image credit: Stuart Jantzen/Biocinematics.com/Science)
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

The First Cartoon: Make Your Own Thaumatrope!An eye-popping project --
5h
Dana Foundation

New Paper: Incorporating Sex Influences into Today’s Brain Research Historically, most medical research has used male subjects (human and animal) and tissues, but recently there has been a notable increase in the acceptance of the need to incorporate sex influences into brain research. in 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandated that all future biomedical research funded by the agency include sex differences. But two years after the NIH passed its m
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printing could transform future membrane technologyResearchers suggest developments in 3-D printing techniques could open the door to the advancement of membrane capabilities.
5h
WIRED

Republicans’ Three-Step Plan to Kill Obamacare: Step 1 Complete Republicans have started to pave a winding path toward a full repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Here's how they'll do it, step by step. The post Republicans’ Three-Step Plan to Kill Obamacare: Step 1 Complete appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ice Age 'skeleton crew' offers insights for today’s endangered speciesThe ghosts of Ice Age mammals can teach valuable, real-world lessons about what happens to an ecosystem when its most distinct species go extinct, according to a new study.
6h
Futurity.org

Will IVG make egg and sperm optional for reproduction? A new lab technology—already far along in mice—could allow for the creation of fertilized embryos using sperm and eggs derived from non-reproductive body tissues. Even game-changing reproductive advances like in vitro fertilization or mitochondrial replacement therapy require that the gametes—the sperm and the egg—come from the father’s testes and the mother’s ovaries, respectively. But the new l
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Searching for planets in the Alpha Centauri systemAstronomers are conducting a search for planets in the nearby star system Alpha Centauri. Such planets could be the targets for an eventual launch of miniature space probes by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why do killer whales go through menopause? Mother-daughter conflict is keyKiller whales are one of only three species that are known to go through menopause, surviving long after they've stopped reproducing. Those older females play an essential role in helping their younger family members to find food and survive even in lean times. But, researchers report in a new study, the reason older females stop reproducing has more to do with conflict between mothers and their d SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MENOPAUSE
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists switch on predatory kill instinct in miceResearchers have isolated the brain circuitry that coordinates predatory hunting, according to a new study. One set of neurons in the amygdala, the brain's center of emotion and motivation, cues the animal to pursue prey. Another set signals the animal to use its jaw and neck muscles to bite and kill. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MICE KILLING PREDATORY HUNTING
6h
Science : NPR

New Gene-Editing Techniques Hold the Promise Of Altering The Fundamentals Of Life New Yorker writer Michael Specter discusses emerging biotechnologies that will make it possible to remove disease and change the characteristics of life by rewriting the genetic code in cells.
6h
Ingeniøren

Siver energien langsomt ud af universet?Tre fysikere lancerer en teori, der forklarer størrelsen af mørk energi med, at loven om energibevarelsen i virkeligheden ikke holder. Matematikerne prøver at få styr på problemet om de ensomme løbere.
6h
Viden

Kvinder med højt blodtryk føder flere drengeNyt studie finder en sammenhæng mellem kvinders blodtryk før graviditeten og barnets køn
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

5 Big Mysteries about CRISPR's OriginsWhere did crispr come from? How do organisms use it without self-destructing? And what else can it do? -
6h
WIRED

Ever Heard of Motocross Martial Arts? Let Vin Diesel Explain It to You Sometimes you just have to invent new ways to kick ass. The post Ever Heard of Motocross Martial Arts? Let Vin Diesel Explain It to You appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Too Bad Audi’s Swanky New Headlights Aren’t Allowed in the US Stodgy regulations mean US drivers don't get headlights that can spell out messages and spotlight pedestrians.
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Lasers activate killer instinct in mice Stimulating certain areas of the animals’ brains can trigger predatory behaviours including biting and grabbing. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MICE KILLER HUNTING PREDATORY

Scientific American Content: Global

Adult Daughter Orcas May Trigger Moms' MenopauseCompetition between older female orcas and their adult daughters when they can breed simultaneously may cause the matriarch to enter menopause.
7h
New Scientist - News

Mice turn into killers when brain circuit is triggered by laserTwo sets of neurons control whether a mouse will pounce to kill. Using a technique called optogenetics, researchers can turn this behaviour on and off
SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL MICE KILLER HUNTING PREDATORY

7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Whale menopause mystery solvedBy studying the long lives of killer whale families, researchers say they have solved the evolutionary mystery of the menopause.
7h
Science : NPR

Menopause Mystery: Why Do Female Killer Whales Experience The Change Of Life? Killer whales are one of only three species known to have menopause. Researchers are looking at the conflict and cooperation between older and younger female whales to understand why. (Image credit: Mark Malleson/Center for Whale Research/AP)
7h
Ingeniøren

Nye kvælstoftal udfordrer Venstre-regeringens landbrugspakkeI 2015 steg kvælstofudledningen til vandmiljøet med godt 2.000 ton. Men hvis der var hold i regeringens beregninger forud for landbrugspakken, burde udledningen have været uændret i forhold til året før, mener Danmarks Naturfredningsforening.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twelve new tombs discovered in Gebel el Silsila, EgyptThe Swedish mission at Gebel el Silsila has discovered 12 new tombs dating from the 18th Dynasty (Thutmosid period), including crypts cut into the rock, rock-cut tombs with one or two chambers, niches possibly used for offering, a tomb containing multiple animal burials, and several juvenal burials, some intact.
7h
WIRED

The 8 Burning Questions We Still Have About the Nintendo Switch How much will Nintendo's new console cost? What kinds of games will it play? And what else can it do, besides switch between tablet and TV? The post The 8 Burning Questions We Still Have About the Nintendo Switch appeared first on WIRED .
8h
WIRED

Dirty Diesels Could Cost VW Execs Decades in Prison Six indicted employees face serious charges, and they won't be the last ones.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Viruses in genome important for our brainOver millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. A research group has now discovered a mechanism through which these retroviruses may have an impact on gene expression. This means that they may have played a significant role in the development of the human brain as well as in various neurological disease
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The moon is older than scientists thoughtThe moon is much older than some scientists believe, a research team now reports. Their precise analysis of zircons bought to Earth by Apollo 14 astronauts reveals the moon is at least 4.51 billion years old and probably formed only about 60 million years after the birth of the solar system -- 40 to 140 million years earlier than recently thought.
8h
Viden

GRAFIK Sådan kan solstormen rammeVed det værste scenarie kan en voldsom solstorm volde store problemer.
8h
Popular Science

Want people to notice your climate research? Learn how to write. From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Research with a narrative is shared more widely A new study found that climate change papers written in a more narrative style — those that tell a story — were the most highly cited by other scientists, an important…
8h
Popular Science

The flooding in California won't end its three-year drought Environment We’ll have to wait and see California usually drenched with sunlight but this week, they’re just drenched. The state has gotten a pummeling from a series of storms that have dropped vast amounts…
8h
TEDTalks (video)

To solve old problems, study new species | Alejandro Sánchez AlvaradoNature is wonderfully abundant, diverse and mysterious -- but biological research today tends to focus on only seven species, including rats, chickens, fruit flies and us. We're studying an astonishingly narrow sliver of life, says biologist Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado, and hoping it'll be enough to solve the oldest, most challenging problems in science, like cancer. In this visually captivating ta
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Wind and Solar Growth Outpace GasMore than half of electricity generation capacity added to the U.S. grid in 2016 came from renewable resources --
9h
Futurity.org

Hungry salmonella hunt and then eat brain tumors A detoxified version of salmonella is proving to be an unlikely weapon for treating glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. Glioblastoma is difficult to treat with drugs and nearly impossible to completely remove through surgery, as even tiny remnants inevitably spawn new tumors. Even with the best care currently available, median survival time is a dire 15 months, and only 10 percent o
9h
Futurity.org

Drinking to forget could make PTSD worse Drinking to forget may make the fearful memories associated with post-traumatic stress disorder worse, not better, experiments with mice suggest. A new study demonstrates that alcohol can strengthen such emotional memories, preventing the rodents from pushing aside their fears, say the scientists who conducted it. “Binge drinking or other attempts to use alcohol to self-medicate could be sabotagi SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL ALKOHOL PTSD
9h
WIRED

Why It’s Impossible to Predict When That Giant Antarctic Ice Sheet Will Split Melting ice is a master's class in fluid dynamics.
9h
Futurity.org

Some belugas linger when Arctic sea ice forms late Changes in Arctic sea ice are altering the annual migration of some beluga whales in Alaska, but not others. A new study finds that as Arctic sea ice takes longer to freeze up each fall due to climate change, one population of belugas mirrors that timing and delays its migration south by up to one month. In contrast, a different beluga population, also in Alaska, that migrates and feeds in the sa
9h
Dana Foundation

Tickets on Sale for Brainwave 2017: Perception Photo credit: Adam Ferguson Tickets are now on sale to the public for the Rubin Museum of Art’s 2017 Brainwave series on perception. Based in New York City, this series, which runs from January 25 – April 29, pairs scientists and artists, celebrities, and other personalities for talks on topics related to the program theme. As described on the Rubin Museum’s website: “The tenth season of Brainwav
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Trump's Pick for Secretary of State Backs Paris Climate AccordBut Rex Tillerson, Trump’s nominee, tells senators that efforts to predict climate change are ‘very limited’ -

Ingeniøren

Amerikansk forsvar udvikler bionedbrydelige frø-patronerI fremtiden vil det amerikanske miltær måske skyde med blomster og træer. USA's forsvarsministerium efterlyser nemlig virksomheder, der kan udvikle bionedbrydelige patroner med indbyggede plantefrø til militæret.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sharing of data to combat infectious disease outbreaksTo protect people against potentially deadly infectious disease outbreaks, it is critical that scientists and governments rapidly share information about the pathogens that cause them. A new shows how it is possible to encourage the greater international sharing of such data, despite numerous challenges that exist.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Meets with 2 Contenders to Lead NIHThe agency's current director has said he would be willing to stay -
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tidal lagoon: £1.3bn Swansea Bay project backed by reviewPlans for a £1.3bn tidal lagoon off Swansea are backed in a government-commissioned review.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Baboon vocalizations contain five vowel-like sounds comparable to those of human speechAn acoustical analysis of the grunts, barks, wahoos, copulation calls, and yaks from baboons shows that, like people who use several vowels during speech, these nonhuman primates make five distinct vowel-like sounds. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL BABOON VOWEL
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

US energy agency strengthens protections for scientists Revised scientific-integrity policy gives researchers more leeway to speak to the press and publish their findings.
10h
Viden

15 millioner sikrer fortsat udvikling af sensationen med omvendt fotosynteseKøbenhavns Universitet har fået penge til de næste tre år at arbejde videre med den revolutionerende biotek-opdagelse, der kan give billig og grøn energi.
10h
WIRED

What Happens When Algorithms Design a Concert Hall? The Stunning Elbphilharmonie Herzog and De Meuron's new philharmonic in Hamburg, Germany is an impressive feat of technology.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Patienter savner viden om ventetid i akutmodtagelsen Patienter føler sig lyttet til men efterspørger bedre kommunikation omkring ventetid. Det er nogle af konklusionerne i den nye LUP-undersøgelse af patientoplevet kvalitet i landets akutmodtagelser.
10h
Dagens Medicin

LVS: Mistro til tilknytning til industrien er gift for samarbejde Formand for Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber Henrik Ullum forstår ikke kritikken af nye, mere lempelige habilitetsregler.
10h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Fremtidens lægemidler afhænger af ingeniører Medicin Nanoteknologi
10h
New Scientist - News

Army of 350,000 Star Wars bots found lurking on TwitterStar Wars Twitter botnet may span more than 350,000 accounts – and no one knows why it exists
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Energy Agency Toughens Protections for ScientistsRevised scientific-integrity policy gives researchers more leeway to speak to the press and publish their findings --

Dagens Medicin

Biologisk viden giver markant bedre behandling af blodsygdommeDer sker konstant store spring i diagnosticeringen og behandlingen af hæmatologiske sygdomme, fortæller professor Henrik Birgens, medicinsk hæmatologisk afdeling på Herlev Hospital
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

When Your Self-Driving Car Wants to Be Your Friend, TooWho knew Knight Rider would be so prescient?

Ingeniøren

Færgebatterier tjener forurening hjem på halvanden månedProduktionen af lithium-ion-batterier til elfærger udleder kun, hvad der svarer til halvanden måneds drift af færgen, viser nye beregninger.
11h
Ingeniøren

Seks gode råd til whistlebloweren https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/seks-gode-raad-whistlebloweren-4410 Du bør gennemtænke en række forhold, før du vælger at indrapportere snyd og ulovligheder på din arbejdsplads. Sådan lyder det fra Ingeniørforeningen, der har udarbejdet en liste med gode råd til whistlebloweren Jobfinder
11h
WIRED

Mike Pompeo’s CIA Director Hearing: 3 Questions Congress Must Ask Tensions between the incoming administration and the intelligence community mean it's more important than ever that the Senate asks tough questions.
12h
WIRED

Inside Bangladesh’s Polluted, Billion-Dollar Leather Industry Hazaribagh, Bangladesh is one of the most toxic places on earth. T
12h
WIRED

To Understand PTSD, Send Scientists to War A combat veteran says mental trauma is more complicated than we think. To reduce psychological casualties, we need research on the battlefield.
12h
WIRED

James Mattis Defense Secretary Hearings: 4 Questions Senators Must Ask The Mattis hearings shouldn't end until he answers these crucial questions.
12h
WIRED

Think Exercise Is Hard? Try Training Like a Nike Super-Athlete Our writer is using the same training regime, apparel, and expertise as three elite Nike athletes.
12h
WIRED

3 Key Questions Senators Should Ask Ben Carson, Trump’s HUD Pick Ben Carson has said little about what he may do at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. His confirmation hearing today could provide insight.
12h
WIRED

Ease Back Into WIRED Book Club With the Hugo-Winning Novella Binti Welcome (back) to WIRED Book Club! We know you've resolved to read more in the new year, so let us help.
12h
WIRED

The Next Big Crime Podcast Is Coming From Inside the Jail Antwan Williams, Earlonne Woods and Nigel Poor produce Radiotopia's latest podcast. Two of them are in prison.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Mind of an OctopusEight smart limbs plus a big brain add up to a weird and wondrous kind of intelligence --
12h
New Scientist - News

Largest ever shark was doomed by its taste for dwarf whalesThe 16-metre-long megalodon may have fed on small marine mammals, and when they went extinct, so did the sharks
12h
New Scientist - News

UK urged to push ahead with world-first tidal lagoon power plantAn independent review commissioned by the UK government is expected to back the mega-scheme to harness energy from tides
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Mathematics of Evolution: Q&A with Biologist Marcus FeldmanFeldman creates mathematical models that reveal how cultural traditions can affect the evolution of a species --

New Scientist - News

Fat shaming is everywhere but gets society precisely nowhereYet more evidence that poverty is a key driver of obesity makes the growing use of fat shaming to try to change behaviour look repulsive, says Anthony Warner
12h
Ingeniøren

Kontroversiel efterretningsrapport: Rusland har knækket krypto-tjenesten Telegram Telegram er ikke noget problem for Rusland, siger kilde ifølge ikke verificerede efterretningsdokument. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kontroversiel-efterretningsrapport-rusland-har-knaekket-crypto-tjenesten-telegram-1071901 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren

Undersøgelse: Danskere klar til e-valg med NemID Syv ud af ti danskere er helt trygge ved digitalt folketingsvalg, hvis det foregår via NemID-login. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/undersoegelse-danskere-klar-e-valg-med-nemid-1071877 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren

NOx: Dieselbiler er værre end lastbiler og kan undslippe testlaboratorierneNu skal der vandtætte skotter mellem de laboratorier, der tester biler for NOx-udslip og de bilproducenter, som betaler for testen. Almindelige dieselbiler forurener nemlig op til ti gange så meget som busser og lastbiler.
13h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Five big mysteries about CRISPR’s origins Where did it come from? How do organisms use it without self-destructing? And what else can it do? SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL
13h
Science : NPR

The Curious Case Of The Hyolith, An Ancient 'Ice Cream Cone' That's Found A Home The creature, which roamed ocean floors over 500 million years ago, went years without a definitive scientific classification. Now, researchers think the oddball finally has a group to call its own. (Image credit: Danielle Dufault/(C) Royal Ontario Museum)
13h
Dagens Medicin

Elektronisk overvågning af hjertepatienter skal redde liv og spare pengeI et forsøg på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital bliver de svageste hjertepatienter udstyret med en sensor, så de kan fremover slippe for besværlige hospitalsbesøg


13h
Ingeniøren

BAGGRUND: Er solstorme virkelig en trussel for samfundet?Selv om Beredskabsstyrelsen nu medtager solstorme på listen over hændelser, som samfundet skal tage alvorligt, betyder det dog ikke, at risikoen for samfundsforstyrrelser af denne årsag er øget.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Sygehus holder charme­dage for uddannelses­læger To årlige uddannelsesdage for HU-læger på Sygehus Lillebælt er dedikeret til netværk og uddannelse, og skal give lægerne et billede af, hvilken karriere de kan få på sygehuset.
14h
Science : NPR

Obesity-Linked Diagnoses On The Rise Among Kids And Teens A new analysis of U.S. health insurance claims is worrisome, pediatricians say: More and more young people are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep apnea.
14h
Science : NPR

Gas Taxes May Go Up Around The Country As States Seek To Plug Budget Holes This year could see a wave of state tax hikes on gasoline and diesel. Oklahoma is one of about a dozen states seriously considering increases. (Image credit: Sue Ogrocki/AP)
14h
Ingeniøren

Tesla baner vejen for markrobotterTeknologien til markrobotter er sådan set udviklet. Samfundet er bare ikke klar til at sluge ideen, siger udviklerne. Men Tesla vænner os til tanken om det selvkørende.
14h
Dagens Medicin

SDU får psykologiprofessor med speciale i diabetesFrans Pouwer bliver fra januar tilknyttet Syddansk Universitet som professor i medicinsk psykologi med speciale i diabetes. Han skal fortsætte sit arbejde med forskning i de psykologiske aspekter ved diabetes.
15h
Science : NPR

California Nail Salons Start To Invest In Worker Safety A statewide collaborative of nail salons now has 120 members; all have made ventilation upgrades and switched from toxic products to safer ones. Will clients be willing to pay extra to help workers? (Image credit: Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News)
15h
Viden

Solstorme truer forsyning, trafik og kommunikationSåkaldte solstorme står højt på listen over trusler, som Beredskabsstyrelsen fremlægger i dag.
15h
Ingeniøren

Tusindvis af DAB-radioer bliver ubrugelige til oktoberEt ukendt antal tusinde DAB-radioer bliver ubrugelige, når danske radiokanaler skifter teknologi til oktober. Til gengæld får de resterende radioer flere kanaler at vælge imellem.
15h
WIRED

HTC U Ultra Is a Phone for Teens, or Something Like That Meet the phone that's just for you. Just for u. Just for #u. The post HTC U Ultra Is a Phone for Teens, or Something Like That appeared first on WIRED .
16h
Science : NPR

We Asked People What They Know About Obamacare. See If You Know The Answers A new NPR/Ipsos poll shows many Americans don't know details about the Affordable Care Act. And only 1 in 7 favors repealing the law altogether without a replacement. (Image credit: Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR)
16h
Ingeniøren

Bombe under 10 års dansk telelogning: Den er klart ulovlig og skal skrottes https://www.version2.dk/artikel/bombe-under-ti-aars-dansk-telelogning-klart-ulovlig-skal-skrottes-1071891 Justitsministeren bør øjeblikkeligt stoppe teleselskabernes logning af danskerne, mener førende jurister. Den fører til et overvågningssamfund, som ifølge EU-domstolen strider mod reglerne. Version2
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Cycles Could Have Carved Canyons on MarsResearchers think Mars may have experienced a series of climate cycles, which etched the planet’s surface with river valleys and lake basins. Julia Rosen reports.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diet helps shed pounds, release toxins and reduce oxidative stressResearch by exercise scientists has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Incentive pay schemes can affect employee well-beingIncentive-related pay schemes can stress rather than motivate employees, according to new research.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacterial protein structure could aid development of new antibioticsBacterial cells have an added layer of protection, called the cell wall, that animal cells don't. Assembling this tough armor entails multiple steps, some of which are targeted by antibiotics like penicillin and vancomycin. Now researchers have provided the first close-up glimpse of a protein, called MurJ, which is crucial for building the bacterial cell wall and protecting it from outside attack.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pressures from grazers hastens ecosystem collapse from droughtEcosystem collapse from extreme drought can be significantly hastened by pressures placed on drought-weakened vegetation by grazers and fungal pathogens, a new study finds. The study's experimental evidence shows that the natural enemies of plants play a major role in lowering resilience to drought and preventing recovery afterward. The finding may be applicable to a wide range of ecosystems now t
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deciphering the beetle exoskeleton with nanomechanicsEngineers have employed a creative way to identify the geometry and material properties of the fibers that comprise a beetle's exoskeleton. This work could ultimately uncover information that could guide the design and manufacturing of new and improved artificial materials through bio-mimicry.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New target for taming EbolaA team of scientists has identified a mechanism that appears to represent one way that host cells have evolved to outsmart infection by Ebola and other viruses.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How stress may increase risk of heart disease and strokeHeightened activity in the amygdala -- a region of the brain involved in stress -- is associated with a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study that provides new insights into the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease in humans.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Release of water shakes Pacific plate at depthA team of seismologists analyzing the data from 671 earthquakes that occurred between 30 and 280 miles beneath the Earth's surface in the Pacific Plate as it descended into the Tonga Trench were surprised to find a zone of intense earthquake activity in the downgoing slab. The pattern of the activity along the slab provided strong evidence that the earthquakes are sparked by the release of water a
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strep spreads by harnessing immune defenses of those infectedThe bacteria that cause most cases of pneumonia worldwide secrete a toxin that helps them jump from one body to the next -- with help from the hosts' immune defenses.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trust issues: Users more gullible when they customize their technologyCheery robots may give people the creeps and serious robots may actually ease anxiety depending on how users perceive the robot's role in their lives, according to an international team of researchers.
22h
ArXiv Query

Reply to Slotnick (2017), "Resting-state fMRI data reflects default network activity rather than null data: A defense of commonly employed methods to correct for multiple comparisons"A recent Editorial by Slotnick (2015) reconsiders the findings of our paper on the accuracy of false positive rate control with cluster inference in fMRI (Eklund et al, 2016). In this commentary we respond to a number of misrepresentations of our work and discuss a potential problems with Slotnick's own method.
22h
ArXiv Query

Modeling Retinal Ganglion Cell Population Activity with Restricted Boltzmann MachinesThe retina is a complex nervous system which encodes visual stimuli before higher order processing occurs in the visual cortex. In this study we evaluated whether information about the stimuli received by the retina can be retrieved from the firing rate distribution of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs), exploiting High-Density 64x64 MEA technology. To this end, we modeled the RGC population activity u
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sketching out magnetism with electricityIn a proof-of-concept study, researchers drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then “read” this magnetic doodle with X-rays.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cost, technology issues are barriers to real-time cancer patient symptom reportingIn a perspective article, a researcher addresses the need for – and the barriers preventing – electronic reporting of patients’ symptoms between visits.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why better choices depend on 'libertarian paternalism'Nudging people toward better behavior through policy can be effective, but can face resistance if people feel their autonomy is threatened.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers develop novel treatment to prevent graft-versus-host-diseaseGraft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of non-relapse associated death in patients who receive stem cell transplants. In a new study, researchers show that a novel treatment can effectively inhibit the development of GVHD in mice and maintain the infection- and tumor-fighting capabilities of the immune system.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Should biomedical graduate schools ignore the GRE?The Graduate Record Exam (GRE), which is required for admission to graduate and doctorate programs across the country, is not the best indicator for predicting a student's success while pursuing a doctorate in the experimental life sciences. And from that research, investigators recommend devaluing - if not eliminating altogether - the GRE from the applications process for biomedical PhD candidate
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cells used to regenerate the external layer of a human heartA process using human stem cells can generate the cells that cover the external surface of a human heart -- epicardium cells -- according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Report recommends new framework for estimating the social cost of carbonTo estimate the social cost of carbon dioxide for use in regulatory impact analyses, the federal government should use a new framework that would strengthen the scientific basis, provide greater transparency, and improve characterization of the uncertainties of the estimates, suggests a new report.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most valuable colleagues: What the NBA can teach us about worker productivitySome employees could have a halo effect on their peers, according to new research. An individual's decisions regarding whether to smoke, how much to eat and whether to attend college can all be influenced by peer choices. In the same way, workplace productivity can spill over from one employee to another.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a Western diet leads to overeating and obesityMore than two in three adults in the United States are considered overweight or obese, with substantial biomedical and clinical evidence suggesting that chronic overconsumption of a 'western diet' -- foods consisting high levels of sugars and fats -- is a major cause of this epidemic. New research now shows that chronic consumption of a western diet leads to overeating and obesity due to elevation
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do dogs of all ages respond equally to dog-directed speech?People tend to talk to dogs as though they are human babies. A new study shows that people speak more slowly and with a higher tone to dogs of all ages -- both adults and puppies -- and that puppies respond most readily to this dog-directed speech.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

National salt reduction strategy is cost-effective 'best buy' for 183 countries worldwideA new global study projects that a government-supported intervention to reduce national salt consumption by 10 percent over 10 years would be a highly cost-effective 'best buy' for preventing cardiovascular disease across 183 countries worldwide. Government-supported policy projected to be a highly cost-effective way to reduce salt consumption and gain healthy years lost to cardiovascular disease
WIRED

If Trump Wants a ‘Hacking Defense’ Strategy, He Should Just Use Obama’s President-elect Trump could learn a lot about the cyber from his predecessor
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WIRED

Trump’s Plan to Avoid Conflicts of Interest Won’t Avoid a Thing Lawyers and ethicists say from transparency to debts, the plan Trump revealed today solves nothing. Oh, and blind trusts actually have to be blind.
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Futurity.org

The first sights babies see sculpt the brain’s visual circuitry When a newborn baby opens her eyes, she does not see well at all. It can take months for her world to come into focus. Now scientists have found more clues about what happens in the brains of baby mammals as they try to make visual sense of the world. The study in mice, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience , is part of an ongoing project in the lab of Spencer Smith, assistant professor of
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Futurity.org

What a pal! Pluto’s moon blocks solar wind Pluto’s relationship with its moon Charon is one of the more unusual interactions in the solar system due to Charon’s size and proximity. It’s more than half of Pluto’s diameter and orbits only 12,000 or so miles away. To put that into perspective, picture our moon three times closer to Earth, and as large as Mars. A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology provides additional insight i
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Futurity.org

Immature form of Zika could clarify how virus infects Researchers have determined the high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus, a step toward better understanding how the virus infects host cells and spreads. Zika belongs to a family of viruses called flaviviruses, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitic viruses. Although only the mature forms of flaviviruses are considered infectiou
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WIRED

Tillerson’s Hearing Seals It: the US Won’t Lead on Climate Change Tillerson and Trump are poised to cede America's leadership role on climate change to other nations.

WIRED

The Next Transportation Secretary Seems Pretty Down With Self-Driving Cars Elaine Chao's confirmation hearing offered subtle assurances that autonomous advocates would have an ally at the top.

Science : NPR

New 'Skywalker' Ape Species Will Need Jedi Powers To Survive Scientists named a new species of gibbon ape after Star Wars rebel character Luke Skywalker. Like similar species that live in China and Myanmar, the so-called skywalker hoolock gibbon is endangered.

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Science : NPR

Powerful Storms Make Dent In California's Historic Drought A week of powerful storms on the West Coast is helping to put a dent in California's historic drought, yet state officials are warning they are by no means a drought buster.
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Viden

VIDEO Japansk abe forsøger overraskende at parre sig med en hjortFranske forskere har dokumenteret et meget sjældent fænomen i naturen: Seksuel kontakt mellem to vidt forskellige arter.
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WIRED

Donald Trump Is Still Campaigning—Against the Press In a wide-ranging press conference—his first since July—president-elect Trump's contempt for the media was the consistent thread.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Trump nominee backs Paris climate agreement and questions Iran nuclear deal But Rex Tillerson, Trump’s pick for secretary of state, tells senators that efforts to predict climate change are ‘very limited’.


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