BBC News - Science & Environment
Aeolus wind mission heads for test and launchUK engineers finish the assembly of a wind-observing satellite that meteorologists expect to have a major impact on weather forecasts.¤
¤
BBC News - Science & Environment
Babies remember their birth language - scientistsBabies learn language in the early months of life, and retain this knowledge, say scientists.¤
¤

WIRED
Ford’s 2018 Mustang Gets Shapelier and High-TechierBetter aero, smarter computer.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species of moth named in honor of Donald Trump ahead of his swearing-in as presidentDays before Donald J. Trump steps forward on the Presidential Inauguration platform in Washington on Jan. 20, an evolutionary biologist has named a new species in his honor. The researcher hopes that the fame around the new moth will successfully point to the critical need for further conservation efforts for fragile areas such as the habitat of the new species.¤
¤
cognitive science
A paper in Psych Science explores what happens when people use very specific anchors in negotiation.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]¤
¤
WIRED
Obama Will Free Chelsea Manning, a Final Ceasefire in His War on LeakersObama prosecuted more leakers to the press under the Espionage Act than all other presidents combined; a dangerous precedent for Trump.¤
¤
Popular Science
A mysterious stranding left nearly 100 dead dolphins off the coast of FloridaEnvironment Scientists aren't sure why they stranded themselves in the mangroves Seventy-two false killer whales died of natural causes after being stranded in Everglades National Park. Another 10 were euthanized and 13 remain unaccounted for.¤
¤
Scientific American Content: Global
We're Taking You To BellevuePulitzer Prize-winning NYU historian David Oshinsky, director of the Division of Medical Humanities at the NYU Langone Medical Center, talks about his latest book, Bellevue: Three Centuries of...¤
¤
BBC News - Science & Environment
Drone footage shows huge Antarctic ice crackAerial video shows a huge ice crack which is forcing British Antarctic Survey staff to leave their base.¤
¤
WIRED
So What Exactly Is the Design Industry Anyway?Google and AIGA surveyed 9,000 designers about their work. Here's what they heard back.¤
¤
Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. High School Soccer Concussions on the RiseMore than one third of all injuries on the pitch occurred during practice ¤¤
¤
Futurity.org
Program cut risky opioid prescriptions for U.S. veteransAfter a national initiative took aim at high opioid doses and potentially dangerous drug combinations, the number of veterans receiving such prescriptions dropped, a new study finds. Over a two-year period, high-dose opioid prescribing declined by 16 percent, and very-high-dose opioid prescribing dropped by 24 percent. The number of patients receiving both opioids and sedatives, which can be leth¤
¤
Scientific American Content: Global
6 Questions for Trump's Nominee to Lead HHSRep. Tom Price can expect some tough questions from his Senate interrogators¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prolonged exposure to work-related stress thought to be related to certain cancersFor men, prolonged exposure to work-related stress has been linked to an increased likelihood of lung, colon, rectal, and stomach cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This is the first study to assess the link between cancer and work-related stress perceived by men throughout their working life.¤
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better diagnosis of fungal infections key to reducing antibiotic resistancePoor diagnosis worldwide of fungal disease causes doctors to overprescribe antibiotics, increasing harmful resistance to antimicrobial drugs, according to a new paper.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Galaxy murder mysteryIt’s the big astrophysical whodunnit. Across the Universe, galaxies are being killed and the question scientists want answered is, what’s killing them?¤
¤
Popular Science
¤Hey look, Venus is smilingSpace A curved line marked the planet's surface for four days A smile-shaped feature running through the atmosphere of Venus persisted for four days, despite 220-mph winds.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flexible ferroelectrics bring two material worlds togetherThanks to a new discovery, scientists have pioneered a new class of materials with advanced functionalities that moves the idea of flexible ferroelectrics from the realm of oxymoron into reality.¤
¤
WIRED
Did LeBron James Flop? Here’s What Physics SaysIn a recent game, it appears that Draymond hit LeBron. But did LeBron flop? Here is a physics analysis.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bait knocks out cockroaches, and asthma symptom daysIn homes of children sensitized and exposed to cockroaches, a single intervention -- the strategic placement of insecticidal bait -- results in eradication of cockroaches and improved asthma outcomes for children.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Religious involvement lessens likelihood of owning a handgunAmericans who are more involved in religious congregations are less likely to own handguns, according to a new study.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of tree species disappearing in central Africa 'a major concern,' say researchersHuman disturbance may often be criticized for harming the environment, but new research suggests a persistent lack of human attention in the central African forest could actually cause some tree species to disappear.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic discovery provides new insight into cognitive disordersAn international team of scientists has unlocked some of the genes responsible for cognitive ability.The findings bring scientists a step closer to developing new -- and potentially better -- treatments for cognitive disorders of the brain, such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HIV treatment might boost susceptibility to syphilis, say researchersThe antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV infection might inadvertently be boosting gay/bisexual men's susceptibility to the bacteria responsible for syphilis, Treponema pallidum, conclude researchers.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study reveals why cancer cells spread within the bodyNew findings uncover an ancient mechanism that makes cancer cells invasive, explains melanoma’s resistance to therapy and opens the door to development of novel cancer therapies¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tools will drive greater understanding of wheat genesScientists have developed a much-needed genetic resource that will greatly accelerate the study of gene functions in wheat. The resource, a collection of wheat seeds with more than 10 million sequenced and carefully catalogued genetic mutations, is freely available to wheat breeders and researchers, and is already aiding in the development of wheat plants with improved traits.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How China is poised for marine fisheries reformChina has introduced an unprecedented policy platform for stewarding its fisheries and other marine resources. In order to achieve a true paradigm shift a team of international scientists from within and outside of China recommend major institutional reform.¤
¤
Viden
Airbus-chef: Vi tester prototype på en flyvende bil i årEn udviklingsafdeling under flyfabrikanten arbejder på en helikopter-lignende bil til flere personer, sagde Airbus-direktøren ved DLD-konferencen.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More with mental illness, substance use disorders have health insuranceSignificantly more people with mental illness and substance use disorders had insurance coverage in 2014 due to the expansion of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but many barriers to treatment remain, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researcher uncovers influence of microorganisms on soil carbon storageCritical information about tiny organisms under our feet has now been uncovered. Although small, these organisms can have a huge impact on the environment.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers discover a protein that protects against fatty liver, the most common hepatic disease in Western countriesA team of scientists has revealed the capacity of the CPEB4 protein to prevent fatty liver disease.¤
¤
Viden
Glem askeskyen: Sådan udryddede mørke og kulde dinosaurerneDet var svovlpartikler og ikke støv, der sænkede den gennemsnitlige temperatur på Jorden til under frysepunktet i tre år, mener tyske forskere.¤
¤
Futurity.org
Fast talkers aren’t conveying any extra informationFast and slow talkers end up conveying information at about the same rate, research shows, because faster speech packs less information into each utterance. The study suggests we tend to converse within a narrow channel of communication data so that we do not provide too much or too little information at a given time, says Uriel Cohen Priva, author of the study in the journal Cognition and assist¤
¤
New Scientist - News
Curiosity finds Mars rock that may be a meteorite made from ironLast week, NASA’s Curiosity rover took a picture that appears to show a new iron-nickel meteorite on Mars, one of only eight that have been discovered by rovers there so far¤
¤
WIRED
Santa Clarita Diet Trailer: Drew Barrymore Is a Funny ZombieEat your heart out, other zombie comedies..¤
¤
WIRED
Evernote’s New App Is More Than an Update—It’s a RebootA note-taking company is trying to become something much bigger and more powerful.¤
¤
Futurity.org
Acidic ocean could soon cost us lots of crabsDungeness crab fisheries on the West Coast—valued at about $220 million annually—may face a strong downturn over the next 50 years. The acidification of the ocean expected as seawater absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will reverberate through the West Coast’s marine food web in unexpected ways, say researchers. Dungeness crabs, for example, will likely suffer as the¤
¤h
Futurity.org
Gene network is a new target for epilepsy treatmentsResearchers have pinpointed a gene network in the brain that causes epilepsy when it is disrupted. Based on the results, they are predicting which drugs will work to restore the network’s function. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that causes recurring unprovoked seizures. The search for treatment is still ongoing and current research to identify new anti-epileptic drugs has been largely unsuc¤
¤
Scientific American Content: Global
Is It Time to Give Up on Dark Matter?There is still good reason to think undiscovered fundamental particles act as gravitational glue for galaxiesb. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL
¤
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are you ready to explore baby's genome?A national consortium of clinical geneticists is studying the ins and outs of potentially using genome sequencing for newborn health screenings and beyond.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How solvents affect the skinResearchers have developed a method that makes it possible to see how individual molecules from solvents in skin creams, medicated ointments and cleaning products affect and interact with the skin’s own molecules.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astrophysicists discover dimming of binary starA team astrophysicists has observed the unexplained fading of an interacting binary star, one of the first discoveries using the Sarah L. Krizmanich Telescope.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steroid discovered in dogfish sharks attacks Parkinson's-related toxin in animal modelA synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. The clustering of this protein, alpha-synuclein, is the hallmark of Parkinson's and dementia with Lewy bodies, suggesting a new potential compound for t¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study reveals the structure of DNA helicase at the replication forkScientists have successfully described a crucial structure involved in DNA replication, placing another piece in the puzzle of how life propagates.¤
¤
New Scientist - News
In an era of nationalism the net needs its freethinking championWith a rise in isolationist politics and totalitarianism, we must back the body that has quietly defended internet freedom for 10 years, says Carl Miller¤
¤
New Scientist - News
Calorie restriction diet extends life of monkeys by yearsMacaques on permanent diets live significantly longer – the equivalent of nine years in people. But is the detailed meal planning and loss of libido worth it?¤
¤
New Scientist - News
Electronic gene control could let us plug bacteria into devicesHooking up custom-made microbes to electronics could have a host of applications in medicine and industry, such as smarter drugs and better health apps¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Frankly, we do give a damn: Study finds links between swearing and honestyIt's long been associated with anger and coarseness but profanity can have another, more positive connotation. Psychologists have learned that people who frequently curse are being more honest. Now a team of researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA and Hong Kong report thatpeople who use profanity are less likely to be associated with lying and deception.¤
¤
TEDTalks (video)
What happens when you have a disease doctors can't diagnose | Jennifer BreaFive years ago, TED Fellow Jennifer Brea became progressively ill with myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness that severely impairs normal activities and on bad days makes even the rustling of bed sheets unbearable. In this poignant talk, Brea describes the obstacles she's encountered in seeking treatment for her condition, whose root causes a¤
¤
Popular Science
3 weird ways we can remotely control animals and bacteriaScience A zap of electricity can make E. coli swim. A gentle pulse of electricity can make bacteria dance (or rather, swim) to scientists’ tune.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-assembling particles brighten future of LED lightingResearchers have illuminated another path forward for LED technologies by refining the manufacturing of light sources made with crystalline substances known as perovskites, a more efficient and potentially lower-cost alternative to materials used in LEDs found on store shelves.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humble bee among Australia's most lethalAn Australian-first national analysis of 13 years' data on bites and stings from venomous creatures reveals Australia's towns and cities are a hot-spot for encounters.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How safe is that driver next to you? A trucker's poor health could increase crash riskAs commuters shimmy past large, lumbering trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, “How safe is that driver next to me?” If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. Commercial truck drivers with three or more medical conditions double to quadruple their chance for being in a crash than healthier drivers, reports a new study.¤
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UV light can aid hospitals' fight to wipe out drug-resistant superbugsA new tool -- a type of ultraviolet light called UVC -- could aid hospitals in the ongoing battle to keep drug-resistant bacteria from lingering in patient rooms and causing new infections
¤
10h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor er overvågningsbilleder så grynede?En læser undrer sig over, at billeder af gerningsmænd fra lufthavne og andre offentlige steder er så grynede i kvaliteten. Det svarer Metroselskabet og Atea på.¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Talking therapy changes the brain's wiring, study reveals for first timeFor the first time, research shows that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later.¤
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Give the public the tools to trust scientistsAnita Makri argues that the form of science communicated in popular media leaves the public vulnerable to false certainty. Nature 541 261 doi: 10.1038/541261a¤
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
House Science Panel Adds Climate-Denying MembersThe committee has jurisdiction over $40 billion in federal budgets, and influence on climate research and environmental regulations¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The sun in detail: Contorted center of sunspot nearly twice the size of EarthNew images have revealed otherwise invisible details of our Sun, including a new view of the dark, contorted center of a sunspot that is nearly twice the diameter of the Earth. The images are the first ever made of the Sun with a facility where ESO is a partner. The results are an important expansion of the range of observations that can be used to probe the physics of our nearest star.¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common heart drug repurposed to treat rare cancer in EuropeA drug that's commonly used to treat high blood pressure is being repurposed for a rare tissue cancer in Europe. The medication, named propranolol,was recently granted Orphan Drug Designation by the European Commission (EC).¤
10h
Futurity.org
Australia’s most dangerous venom isn’t what you’d thinkThe first national study of the bites and stings inflicted by Australia’s venomous creatures shatters stereotypes about which most threaten human health. The 13 years of data reveal that bees and other insects—not snakes, spiders, or jellyfish—pose the biggest public health threat. Snakes, however, are the country’s deadliest venomous creatures. “Australia has an international reputation for bein¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to ace an exam? Tell a friend what you learnedStudents who are given information and tell someone about it immediately recall the details better and longer —a strategy which could be a plus come test time, says a researcher.¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tigers could roam again in Central Asia, scientists sayCaspian tigers, some of the largest cats that ever lived, roamed through much of Central Asia before they were designated as extinct in the middle of the 20th century. But there is a chance that tigers — using a subspecies that is nearly identical, genetically, to the Caspian — could be restored to Central Asia, say experts.¤
10h
Ingeniøren
Ny forskning: Methangas er 25 procent værre for klimaetEn revidering af nuværende klimamodeller peger på, at methangas bidrager væsentligt mere til den globale opvarmning end hidtil antaget.¤
10h
Futurity.org
How health insurance binds neighbors togetherAccess to health insurance can help hold a community together socially, and lack of it can help fray neighborhood cohesion, report researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior , is an effort by researchers Tara McKay and Stefan Timmermans to “broaden the conversation” about the effects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). “Given the strain that uninsurance places on¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What makes erionite carcinogenic?The mineral erionite is considered to be highly carcinogenic. Up to now it has been thought that iron as a constituent element of the mineral erionite is the reason for the carcinogenic effect. However, mineralogists have discovered that this metal does not even appear in the crystal structure of erionite.¤
10h
New Scientist - News
Resisting Trump: How to survive the coming surveillance stateTrump has signalled his desire to follow the UK in eroding online privacy. From Tor's hidden dangers to the right secure chat apps, here’s how to stay under the radar¤
10h
Futurity.org
Should thoughts of murder influence time in prison?Criminal offenders who exhibit homicidal ideation—thoughts of committing deadly violence, regardless of action—were more likely to commit a variety of serious crimes, research found. Matt DeLisi, professor of sociology and criminal justice at Iowa State University, says identifying criminal offenders with homicidal ideation could change how we sentence and treat some of the most serious offenders¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Candidates for bionic hand reconstructionResearchers offer a treatment algorithm, or protocol, for identifying patients with global (flail arm) brachial plexus injuries who are likely to benefit from trading in their insensate and nonfunctional hand for a myoelectric prosthetic device.¤
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Personalized treatment for those in blood pressure 'gray zone'Using data from a national study, researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure.¤
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
The "Bad Is Black" EffectResearch finds darker skin is associated with perceptions of evil¤
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fact or Fiction 2: 50 (More) Popular Myths ExplainedWe're back to debunk a second collection of urban lore and cultural mythology in Fact or Fiction 2: 50 (More) Cultural Myths Explained. In this sequel to our best-selling first edition, we cast our...¤
11h
Dagens Medicin
Liselott Blixt: Fyr den ansvarlige for tilsyns­koksFormanden for Folketingets sundhedsudvalg synes, det er dybt kritisabelt, at Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har siddet på hænderne i stedet for at kommunikere sine afgørelser i tilsynsager væk.¤
11h
Ingeniøren
Eksotiske former af silicium kan give hurtige computerchips og effektive solcellerSilicium kan ikke kun antage sin velkendte diamantstruktur, men også som kulstof danne ringe, bure og kanaler, der giver materialet nye og forbedrede egenskaber.¤
Scientific American Content: Global
Apollo Astronaut Eugene Cernan Dies at 82As commander of the final Apollo mission in 1972, Cernan was the last human to walk on the moon
¤
11h
WIRED
One Indian State’s Grand Plan to Get 23 Million People OnlineThe state of Telangana is doing something unprecedented in India: Bringing broadband internet to every home in the region.
¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular podiatry: Understanding how cells form feetA protein known as Arf1 plays a role in podosome formation by regulating the assembly of myosin-II within the cytoskeleton, a new study has revealed.¤
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
How the Panda's "Thumb" Evolved TwiceTwo species of distantly related panda may have adapted to a bamboo-centric diet in similar genetic ways ¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin filmsBased on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
European soccer increasingly popular in the USAEuropean professional soccer has a growing fan base also in the USA. Among the most popular clubs in the USA are the two English clubs Manchester United and Chelsea FC as well as the two Spanish clubs FC Barcelona and Real Madrid.¤
11h
Dagens Medicin
Praktiserende læger være primus motor i kræftpatienters forløb¤Et fælles udspil fra Praktiserende Lægers Organisation (PLO) og Kræftens Bekæmpelse udstikker klare mål for, hvordan den praktiserende læge skal spille en mere aktiv og opsøgende rolle over for kræftpatienter – både før, under og efter behandling på sygehuset.¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: Take the mRNA trainMessenger RNAs bearing the genetic information for the synthesis of proteins are delivered to defined sites in the cell cytoplasm by molecular motors. Researchers have elucidated how the motors recognize their mRNA freight.¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate policies alone will not save Earth's most diverse tropical forestsA focus on policies to conserve tropical forests for their carbon storage value may imperil some of the world’s most biologically rich tropical forests, says new research.¤
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Exercise ParadoxStudies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight—and how our species acquired some of its most distinctive traits ¤¤
11h
Popular Science
James Bond has been teaching kids to smoke for over half a centuryHealth But with better intelligence, he's smoking less Over the course of six decades, James Bond eluded thousands of enemy bullets, averted global wars and deactivated some potent bombs. But he may have also encouraged kids…¤
Viden
Svenske ambulancer skal advare bilister via radioNyt system advarer bilister via radio, når en ambulance nærmer sig. Det testes i Stockholm til foråret.¤
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fossils found reveal unseen 'footprint' makerFossils found in Morocco from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites, including rarely seen soft-body parts, may be previously unseen animals that left distinctive fossil 'footprints' around the ancient supercontinent Gondwana.¤
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
From Workouts and Weight Loss to the Perils of Traveling Far out in Space¤
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery adds rock collecting to Neanderthal's repertoireResearchers have discovered a brownish piece of split limestone in a site in Croatia that suggests Neanderthals 130,000 years ago collected the rock that stands out among all other items in the cave.¤
12h
Dagens Medicin
Andreas Rudkjøbing vred over nyt tilsynskoks: Hvor svært kan det være?Formanden for Lægeforeningen synes, det er meget mærkeligt, at Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed ikke har formået at få kommunikationen med de øvrige nordiske lande om tilsynssager op at køre. For det var jo bl.a. det, styrelsen blev sat i verden for tilbage i 2015¤
12h
Ingeniøren
Aalborg-forsker: Banedanmark burde have forudset kompleksiteten i SignalprogrammetEndnu en IC4-skandale, kalder en forsker Banedanmarks signalprogram til 20 milliarder kroner. Projektet er løbet løbsk, og nu vil politikerne sætte projektet under skærpet tilsyn.¤
12h
cognitive science
How can we measure implicit bias? Researchers weigh in after recent controversy.submitted by /u/byrd_nick [link] [comments]¤
12h
WIRED
The Man in the Zebra Suit Knows the Secret of the StripesTim Caro has spent 20 years trying to figure out why zebras have stripes. And he finally has an answer.
¤
12h
Videnskabens Verden
Forskerne har længe vidst at vægt og tarmflora spiller sammen på en eller anden måde. Nu har et forskerhold på Fødevareinstituttet ved DTU fundet ud af, hvordan de to ting hænger sammen. Og det ser ud til, at bakterierne er afgørende for hvor tilbøjelige vi er til at tage på. Tilrettelæggelse: Kristoffer Frøkjær-Jensen og Marie Hougaard. www.dr.dk/p1/videnskabensverden¤
12h
WIRED
Tech’s Favorite School Faces Its Biggest Test: the Real WorldPersonalized learning has taken off in high-powered charter schools. Now proponents are faced with figuring out how to make it work for everyone.¤
13h
WIRED
Norway’s Reindeer Police Are Here to Save the DayMeet the people who follow around reindeer all day. Yes really. The post Norway’s Reindeer Police Are Here to Save the Day appeared first on WIRED .¤
13h
WIRED
Darpa’s Off-Roaders Ditch Windows for a Digital World ViewThe inside of the tank of the future will feel a lot more like a video game.
¤
13h
WIRED
How a Mere Prick of the Finger Can Diagnose a ConcussionRecognizing mild concussions is crucial for preventing deaths, and now there's a way to do that more accurately than ever before, with your blood.
¤
13h
New Scientist - News
Antelope revived in Sahara years after going extinct in the wildScimitar-horned oryx were hunted to extinction in the 1990s, but are now returning to the wild, thanks to breeding in captivity and reintroduction efforts in Chad¤
13h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Croatia’s science minister rejects calls to resign amid plagiarism scandalPavo Barišić says he won't step down after a parliamentary ethics committee found he copied another scholar's work.¤
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
What to Do with Your Amputated LegYou own your body parts when they’re inside you—but take them out, and it gets complicated
¤
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Robots, Apps and Brain Scans: New Tools to Help the Autistic ChildTechnology can improve communication and curb social isolation of kids with autism
¤
14h
Dagens Medicin
Ny bekendtgørelse skal gøre dyre blodprøver gratisHospitalslæger skal ikke kunne indkassere f.eks. 40.000 kr. årligt på at tage blodprøver for politiet. Opgaven skal være en del af hospitalslægernes faste arbejde, mener sundhedsministeren.¤
14h
Ingeniøren
Google-selskab dropper soldrevne internetdronerSoldrevne droner fra Google-moderselskabet Alphabet kommer alligevel ikke til at levere internet i øde egne. Signalerne skal komme fra balloner, mener Alphabet, som lukker projektet.¤
14h
Ingeniøren
Hærdet Windows 10 afviser zero-day-exploit i dørenEfter stor opdatering kvaser Windows 10 zero-day-exploits før de er patchede. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/haerdet-windows-10-afviser-zero-day-exploit-doeren-1072026 Version2¤

15h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Læg batteri i toget frem for at ændre Aarhus HBroer Jernbane Tog¤
15h
Ingeniøren
Sværme af militære dronebåde patruljerer på egen håndDen amerikanske flådes forskningsenhed er så langt med at udvikle autonome dronebåde, at de i flok og uden direkte overvågning kan patruljere og bevogte et farvand.¤
15h
Futurity.org
People balk at influence if it threatens ‘free will’Nudging people toward better behavior through policy can be effective, but can spark resistance if people feel their autonomy is under threat, new research suggests. Despite advances in neuroscience and genetics that raise questions about the limitations of free will, people hold strongly to their sense of autonomy, according to a study by Joe Alba, professor of marketing at the University of Flo¤
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Last man to walk on the Moon, Gene Cernan, has diedDocumentary maker reflects on the life of astronaut Gene Cernan, following his death.¤
16h
Ingeniøren
Er du en god nok holdspiller? Tjek det herhttps://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/du-god-nok-holdspiller-tjek-her-5961 Teamwork er ikke altid nemt, men det bliver betydeligt værre, hvis du ikke kender spillereglerne. Her er en liste over ti måder, hvor du kan jokke i spinaten, når du skal samarbejde Jobfinder¤
16h
New Scientist - News
Don’t judge drug funding on political groundsA cash-starved health service like the NHS has to make tough decisions on drug funding – but the “worthiness” of patients shouldn’t be a factor¤



Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.