16h
Dagens Medicin
811 kvinder indkaldt for sent til kræftundersøgelseSygehusene i Region Syddanmark har i 811 tilfælde ikke overholdt den lovpligtige ventetidsgaranti på 14 dage for undersøgelse for brystkræft, efter at der er opstået mistanke om brystkræft i forbindelse med mammografiscreening. 138 af dem har senere fået konstateret brystkræft.¤
17h
Ingeniøren
Politikere vil sætte Banedanmark under skærpet tilsynTransportordførere fra både borgerlige partier og Socialdemokraterne frygter, at tidsplanen og budgettet i Signalprogrammet skrider yderligere.¤
17h
Ingeniøren
Teleindustrien venter på svar fra Borgen: »Vi har ingen interesse i at fortsætte logning« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/teleindustrien-venter-paa-svar-borgen-vi-har-ingen-interesse-at-fortsaette-logning-1072024 Teleindustrien dømmer dansk telelogning ude, men vil ikke trække stikket før justitsministeriet kommenterer på dommen. Version2¤
19h
Ingeniøren
Philips satsede på serverless: Udviklingstid gik fra tyve mandeår til tyve måneder https://www.version2.dk/artikel/philips-satsede-paa-serverless-udviklingstid-gik-tyve-mandeaar-tyve-maaneder-1071918 Et dansk softwarehus udviklede en serverless platform for Phillips før de fleste havde hørt om den nye type software-arkitektur. Version2¤
19h
Dagens Medicin
Hjerteplan skal styrke behandling af hjertesygeKommende Hjerteplan fra Hjerteforeningen skal give et samlet svar på, hvordan Danmark kan optimere hjerte-indsatsen.¤
19h
Viden
Ensomme haj-hunner lærer at parre sig uden hannerZebrahajer kan skifte seksualitet og reproducere uden at parre sig med hanner, viser ny forskning.¤
19h
Science : NPR
Coronations, Coups, And Keeping Up With The Kardashians It's in our nature to idolize the rich and famous. But this week on Hidden Brain, we explore the other side of our nature: the part of us that wants to see the rich and powerful fall from grace. (Image credit: D Dipasupil/WireImage)¤
20h
Ingeniøren
Snyd gør københavnske bycykler dyrereBrugen af de heftigt omdiskuterede bycykler i hovedstadsområdet stiger og stiger. Men det har været for let at snyde systemet. Og indtjeningen har ikke kunnet dække vedligeholdelsen af bycykelsystemet. Så nu stiger priserne.¤
21h
ArXiv Query
Subsampling scaling: a theory about inference from partly observed systemsIn real-world applications, observations are often constrained to a small fraction of a system. Such spatial subsampling can be caused by the inaccessibility or the sheer size of the system, and cannot be overcome by longer sampling. Spatial subsampling can strongly bias inferences about a system's aggregated properties. To overcome the bias, we derive analytically a subsampling scaling framework¤
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Concerns over first snow and common leopards found in same areaVideo footage showing snow leopards and common leopards sharing the same habitat causes alarm.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Maternal micronutrients, nurturing environment boost child developmentA new study offers a recipe for parents who want smarter kids: maternal micronutrient supplements during pregnancy, early life nurturing, happy moms, and educated parents.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smoking related imagery absent from only one James Bond movie to dateSmoking related imagery is conspicuous by its absence from only one Bond movie since 007 first graced cinema screens in 1962, finds a new analysis.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Access to health care strengthens communitiesNew research has focused on an aspect of the ACA/health care debate that hasn’t really been discussed—the social impact on communities. The author of a new report was able to control for income level and other factors and still finds issues with trust, support and other issues in communities where members are uninsured.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acupuncture may alleviate babies' excessive crying (infantile colic), study suggestsAcupuncture may be an effective treatment option for babies with infantile colic -- those who cry for more than three hours a day on three or more days of the week, new research suggests.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Student, professor use sports analytics to discover NCAA ranking patternsDoes conference size impact conference rankings in NCAA men's basketball? According to research and analysis, it does.¤
1d
Ingeniøren
Du kan grine dig til succes - og det er ikke en joke https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/du-kan-grine-dig-succes-ikke-joke-6025 Ny undersøgelse fra Harvard Business School viser, at vellykkede vitser får dig til at virke mere kompetent. Faktisk kan selv dårlige jokes fremme din chefs og kollegers syn på dig ¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain anti-influenza compounds also inhibit Zika virus infection, Researchers findThree anti-influenza compounds effectively inhibit Zika virus infection in human cells, scientists have discovered. These results provide the foundation for development of the broad-spectrum cell-directed antivirals or their combinations for treatment of Zika and other emerging viral diseases.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome sequence of polar alga explains evolutionary adaptation to extreme variable climateAn international team of researchers has identified the genetic mutations which allowed microalgae (phytoplankton) from the Southern Ocean to adapt to extreme and highly variable climates -- a step towards understanding how polar organisms are impacted by climate change.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study tracks 'memory' of soil moistureSMAP's first year of observational data has now been analyzed and is providing some significant surprises that will help in the modeling of climate, forecasting of weather, and monitoring of agriculture around the world.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoscale view of energy storageThrough long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers have recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. Their success is another step toward building a better battery.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light source discovery 'challenges basic assumption' of physicsA widely-held understanding of electromagnetic radiation has been challenged in newly published research. The study found that the normal direct correspondence between the bandwidths of the current source and emitted radiation can be broken. This was achieved by extracting narrowband radiation with high efficiency, without making the oscillation of the current narrowband.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computational modeling reveals anatomical distribution of drag on downhill skiersMinimizing air resistance and friction with snow is key to elite performance in downhill skiing. Experiments in wind tunnels have revealed the total drag experienced by skiers, but have not provided precise data on which parts of the body cause the most air resistance when adopting the full-tuck position.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diversification key to resilient fishing communitiesFishing communities can survive, and even thrive, as fish abundance and market prices shift if they can catch a variety of species and nimbly move from one fishery to the next, a new study finds.¤
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment
Common leopards 'moving to higher altitudes'Common leopards could be moving to higher altitudes on the Tibetan plateau.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For first time ever, x-ray imaging captures material defect processA new approach has been uncovered to detail the formation of material defects at the atomic scale and in near-real time, an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study finds high survival rate for elderly patients with implantable defibrillatorOf patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years—a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Persistent infection keeps immune memory sharp, leading to long-term protectionFor many infectious diseases, a single bout of the illness protects a person against contracting it again. Sometimes, the infecting microbe persists in the body long after symptoms resolve. Now, researchers studying the tropical parasite Leishmania have found a clue to explain the link between long-term immunity and long-term infection: The parasite is constantly multiplying and being killed by im¤
1d
Futurity.org
Sand absorbs high-speed projectiles better than steel If someone is firing projectiles in your direction, you might be safer hiding behind a sand block rather than a steel wall, new research shows. While sand has long been used in military fortification, limited literature exists on the mechanism behind its energy absorption capabilities. A team of engineers at the National University of Singapore decided to find out more about the material’s unique¤
1d
Futurity.org
Will Airbnb’s policy to fight discrimination backfire? More information about guests, not less, might help reduce racial discrimination against people who use services like Airbnb, a new study finds. “We know discrimination exists in the sharing economy,” says Dennis Zhang, assistant professor at Washington University in St. Louis’s Olin Business School. “We wanted to find out how do we prevent it, and how do we mitigate it?” “When hosts don’t have c¤
1d
Futurity.org
How to rebuild heart’s layers with stem cells A process using human stem cells can generate the epicardium cells that cover the outer surface of a human heart. “In 2012, we discovered that if we treated human stem cells with chemicals that sequentially activate and inhibit Wnt signaling pathway, they become myocardium muscle cells,” says Xiaojun Lance Lian, assistant professor of biomedical engineering and biology, who is leading the study a¤

1d
Science : NPR
How Chickens Shifted From Sacred To Diet Staple For the last three years, researchers in the United Kingdom have been studying the lowly chicken, and they say there's much more to the ubiquitous bird than many people realize.¤


1d
New Scientist - News
Complex life may have had a false start 2.3 billion years agoHigh levels of oceanic oxygen could have allowed advanced, animal-like life to develop for the first time – only to be wiped out again as oxygen vanished¤
1d
Futurity.org
21st birthday offers glimpse of the year’s drinking How much people drink on their 21st birthdays may indicate how much they will drink in the future. Investigators analyzed data from a group of 600 undergraduate student drinkers who were followed from one month before their 21st birthday to one year after. Those who drank the most on their 21st birthday also reported consuming the highest amounts of alcohol throughout the following year, the rese¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metabolic sensor causes granulomas to formGranulomas are tissue nodules of immune cells that occur in diseases such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis and can damage many organs. For the first time, a team of researchers has identified what causes them to form. It is the chronic activation of the metabolic sensor mTOR (mammalian Target Of Rapamycin) that is responsible for the formation of granulomas. The scientists also discovered that, in¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Best treatment option written in cancer's genetic scriptAn international collaboration has shown proof-of-concept that truly personalized therapy will be possible in the future for people with cancer. Details of how a knowledge bank could be used to find the best treatment option for people with acute myeloid leukemia are published in a new report.¤
1d
Viden
Forskere konkurrerer på Twitter om de bedste døde dyrMakabre billeder af ådsler og stivfrosne dyr og fisk er blevet et hit på Twitter. Billederne viser naturen, som den er, mener forskeren, der startede hashtagget #BestCarcass¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein research: the computer as microscopeUsing a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. With high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UV light for producing customized surfacesScientists have developed a new process to structure surfaces and to apply or detach functional molecules. They use UV light for the formation or breaking of so-called disulfide bridges, i.e. bonds of sulfur atoms. Both photodynamic reactions allow for a temporally and spatially controlled and reversible modification of the surface and, hence, can be used to produce functional interfaces.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical-biological strategy for microRNA target identificationA research team reports photo-clickable miRNAs as probes for intracellular target identification of miRNAs.¤
1d
Popular Science
Wyoming is basically trying to outlaw clean energy Environment Solar and wind would be penalized under proposed law Last week, Wyoming legislators filed a measure that would prevent utilities from selling residents electricity generated by wind or solar farms.¤
1d¤
BBC News - Science & Environment
Venus wave may be Solar System's biggestA giant wave in the atmosphere of Venus may be the biggest of its kind in the Solar System.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find new genetic influences on fat distributionScientists have found new areas of genetic influence for body fat distribution, in multiethnic study, outlines a new report.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atrial fibrillation more prevalent in dialysis patients than expectedAtrial fibrillation, which is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is an important risk factor for strokes. A multi-centre study shows that the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients in Vienna is significantly higher than previously thought. Moreover, only half of the patients affected are treated with an anticoagulant.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benzodiazepines, related drugs increase stroke risk among persons with Alzheimer's diseaseThe use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs was associated with a 20 per cent increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer’s disease, shows a recent study. Benzodiazepines were associated with a similar risk of stroke as benzodiazepine-like drugs.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in five young people lose sleep over social mediaOne in five young people regularly wake up in the night to send or check messages on social media, according to new research. This night-time activity is making teenagers three times more likely to feel constantly tired at school than their peers who do not log on at night, and could be affecting their happiness and wellbeing.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research study creates new opportunities for treating brain diseasesImmunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Retail therapy for jealous partnersWhen people in relationships feel jealous about the attention their partners are receiving, they are more likely to purchase eye-grabbing products. This is an attempt to recapture the attention of their partners, new research suggests.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parents struggle with when to keep kids home sick from schoolOpinions among parents differ when it comes to how sick is too sick to stay home, or the importance of sick day consequences such as parents missing work or kids missing tests.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simultaneous water, nitrogen use can enhance sustainabilityResearchers have studied diverse techniques to enhance the water- and nitrogen-use efficiency in cropping systems.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Presumed young star turns out to be a galactic senior citizen49 Lib, a relatively bright star in the southern sky, is twelve billion years old rather than just 2.3 billion. For many decades, researchers were stumped by conflicting data pertaining to this celestial body, because they had estimated it as much younger than it really is. Determining its age anew, astronomers have now successfully resolved all inconsistencies.¤
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment
Battery with inbuilt 'fire extinguisher' developedFlames from an exploding battery were put out in less than half a second during tests.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Now drivers can hear ambulances no matter how loud their music is playingIf you’ve ever been startled by the sudden appearance of an ambulance while blasting music in your car, then you appreciate the value of a loud siren. Fortunately, your car is probably equipped already to receive warning signals on its audio system, thanks to a new solution developed by students in Sweden.¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Every meal triggers inflammationWhen we eat, we do not just take in nutrients – we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. This triggers an inflammatory response that activates the immune systems of healthy individuals and has a protective effect, as doctors have proven for the first time. In overweight
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common crop chemical leaves bees susceptible to deadly virusesA chemical that is thought to be safe and is, therefore, widely used on crops -- such as almonds, wine grapes and tree fruits -- to boost the performance of pesticides, makes honey bee larvae significantly more susceptible to a deadly virus, according to researchers.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticle exposure can awaken dormant viruses in the lungsNanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in in lung tissue cells, researchers have found.
¤
New Scientist - News
Antibody can protect brains from the ageing effects of old bloodOld blood can prompt ageing and inflammation. But an antibody that blocks a protein associated with ageing called VCAM1 - seems to protect mice from damage¤
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment
Trump team moving away from supporters on climate scienceThe incoming Trump administration accepts far more of the research on climate change than many of their political supporters, say British scientists.¤
1d
Popular Science
ISIS is dropping bombs with drones in IraqThe quadcopter menace ISIS is using drones to drop grenades in Iraq…¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The lasting effects of ministrokes may contribute to dementiaInvestigators report preclinical research showing that microinfarcts induce prolonged dysfunction in brain areas estimated to be 12-times larger than the visible injury site. Data from c-Fos assays and in vivo hemodynamic imaging reveal how individually miniscule microinfarcts might collectively contribute to broader brain dysfunction in patients with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking Antarctic adaptations in diatomsIn the Antarctic Ocean, large populations of the diatom Fragillariopsis cylindrus dominate the phytoplankton communities. To learn more about how F. cylindrus adapted to its extremely cold environment, a team of researchers conducted a comparative genomic analysis involving three diatoms. The results provided insights into the genome structure and evolution of F. cylindrus, as well as this diatom'¤
1d
Viden
Ny bog: Kronhjorten har overlevet årtusinders klimaforandringerEngang havde vi mammutter og urokser. Nu er kronhjorten det eneste store stykke vildt, der er tilbage fra dengang. Ny bog fortæller om Danmarks pattedyr fra istid til nutid.¤
1d
New Scientist - News
Global sea ice is at lowest level ever recordedThe area of ocean covered by floating ice is at its lowest since the satellite era began, and probably the lowest it has been for thousands of years¤
1d
Futurity.org
26 markers in your blood tell how well you’re aging Researchers have identified a set of biomarker signatures that suggest how well a person is aging and the risk for aging-related diseases. “These signatures depict differences in how people age, and they show promise in predicting healthy aging, changes in cognitive and physical function, survival, and age-related diseases like heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and cancer,” the researchers¤
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ice crack to put UK Antarctic base in shut-downThe British Antarctic Survey is pulling all staff out of the space-age Halley base in March because of a big crack in nearby ice.¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Baby talk' in marmoset monkeysNeuroscientists have investigated the development of vocalization in young monkeys, and have summarized their findings in a new report. SE TIDLIGERE¤
1d
WIRED
Gravity Waves Might Be Lighting Up Venus’ Atmosphere Nothing else about the planet's atmosphere makes sense, so sure, why not? ¤
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing the quantum futureScientists have demonstrated the ability to 'see' the future of quantum systems and used that knowledge to preempt their demise, in a major achievement that could help bring the strange and powerful world of quantum technology closer to reality.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Considering cattle could help eliminate malaria in IndiaThe goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study refutes how fruit flies developed their tolerance for alcoholScientists have conducted experiments investigating whether a molecular change in an enzyme gave the Drosophila melanogaster fruit fly species its superior ability to metabolize alcohol.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First humans arrived in North America a lot earlier than believedThe timing of the first entry of humans into North America across the Bering Strait has now been set back 10,000 years, scientists report.
¤
Ingeniøren
Ny robot klarer krævende poleringsopgaverFlere har prøvet at tilpasse robotter til at udføre poleringsopgaver – men det var først, da Teknologisk Institut tog fat, at et velfungerende system blev færdigudviklet.
¤
Ingeniøren
Kvægdatabase rykker kreaturmarkedet ind i stuenDET DIGITALE LANDBRUG: En online platform med adgang til central kvægdatabase gør det muligt for de danske landmænd at handle med kvæg fra stuen.
¤
Futurity.org
Genetically modified mosquito doesn’t catch dengue Researchers have genetically modified mosquitoes in the lab to resist infection from dengue, a virus that each year sickens an estimated 96 million people globally and kills more than 20,000, mostly children. The project, summarized in the online journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , shows it is possible, at least in the lab, to boost the Aedes aegypti mosquito’s natural ability to fight den
¤
Futurity.org
Why we prefer to be buddies with serious robots Cheery robots may give people the creeps and serious robots may actually ease anxiety—but it depends on how we perceive the robot’s role in our lives. In a study of robot use in a retirement home, senior citizens were more likely to consider an assistant robot as socially attractive and intelligent when they thought its demeanor was cheery, according to S. Shyam Sundar, professor of communication
¤
Viden
Kina suspenderer opførelsen af 85 kulkraftværkerVærkerne, der allerede er under konstruktion, ville have kapacitet til at dække 100 millioner danske husstandes elforbrug.¤
1d
Ingeniøren
18 procent af danske virksomheder har ikke basale it-sikkerhedstiltag på plads Især mindre firmaer og virksomheder inden for byggeri, handel og transport har ikke grundlæggende it-sikkerhed som antivirus, backup og brugerrettigheder på plads. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/rapport-18-procent-danske-virksomheder-har-ikke-basale-it-sikkerhedstiltag-paa-plads-1072016 Version2
¤
Ingeniøren
ITU-adjunkt: It-skandaler skyldes, at chefer ignorerer it-specialisternes advarsler https://www.version2.dk/artikel/john-goetze-it-arkitekter-kom-nu-vaek-erp-sumpen-1072004 Lyt mere til it-arkitekterne, lyder opfordringen fra adjunkt John Gøtze, IT-Universitetet. De er de bedste til at forudse konsekvenserne af digitalisering og ny it, f.eks. i forhold til Sundhedsplatformen og Polsag. Version2
¤
Ingeniøren
Fysiker: Universet er slet ikke så fintunet, som mange trorDen elektromagnetiske kraft og tyngdekraften kunne sagtens have meget andre værdier, uden det ville umuliggøre dannelse af stjerner og planeter, hvor liv kunne opstå.
¤
Futurity.org
Why more and more Americans can’t afford the water bill If water rates continue rising at projected amounts, the number of US households unable to afford water could triple in five years, to nearly 36 percent. A variety of factors, ranging from aging infrastructure to climate change to population decline in urban areas, are making residents’ ability to afford water and wastewater services a burgeoning crisis, says Elizabeth Mack, an assistant geograph
¤
Futurity.org
Touchy moms may boost ‘social brain’ in kids Tough is a significant factor in the social development of young children between four and six years old, research suggests. Findings from the first study to focus on the relationship between touch and social development in children older than infants appear in the journals Cerebral Cortex and Cognitive Development . The study involved 39 mother-child pairs in play for 10 minutes, during which re¤
Scientific American Content: Global
Coral Bleaching is Killing Reefs. Is the Answer a Great Migration?A spectacular submersible plunge reveals potential havens for organisms from hotter water -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
¤
Ingeniøren
Kviksølv i danske fisk er op til 13 gange højere end miljøgrænsenSkrubber, rødspætter og ålekvabber i danske farvande er så fyldt med kviksølv, at de i alle prøver overskrider miljøkvalitetskrav. Problem for miljøet, mener forsker.
¤
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Italiensk gestik er ikke for begyndereEn ny afhandling viser, at det kan lade sig gøre at lære ”at gestikulere på...
¤
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Gymnasieeleverne får for lidt konstruktiv feedback på deres stileNår dansklærerne i gymnasiet giver feedback på skriftlige opgaver, fokuserer de på...
¤
Viden
Mængden af elektronikskrot eksploderer i AsienPå fem år er mængden af elektronikaffald i Asien steget med 63 procent, og affaldet håndteres langt fra forsvarligt.
¤
Futurity.org
Funds help vulnerable women pay for abortions Women who get aid from an abortion fund to help pay for the procedure are younger and more likely to be African American compared to abortion patients overall in the US, according to a new study. These patients receive more than $1,000 in aid on average to pay for procedures that would otherwise be unaffordable, given their limited resources. “The patients in this study are trying to fund procedu
¤
Dagens Medicin
Stig Gerdes får frataget sin autorisation Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed fratog i fredags praktiserende læge Stig Gerdes’ autorisation. Det betyder, at han ikke må behandle patienter de næste to år.
¤
cognitive science
When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
¤
WIRED
Tour a Brewery That Pumps Out 5,000 Cans an Hour Cheers to chemistry majors! ¤
Dagens Medicin
Projekt skal skabe sikker sammenhæng for ældre på tværs af sektorer Et nyt innovationsprojekt skal undersøge, hvordan sektorers arbejdsgange kan mødes, så den ældre borger oplever sikker sammenhæng på tværs af sektorer.
¤
Scientific American Content: Global
The Road to Pseudoscientific ThinkingHow to prevent the most salient feature from being the least informative (Pseudoscience)
¤
1d
WIRED
Trump’s Data Firm Snags RNC Tech Guru Darren Bolding Darren Bolding, the chief technology officer of the Republican National Committee is moving to the data science firm that helped win Trump the election. ¤
1d
WIRED
This Is No Painting. It’s Melted Metal Fabian Oefner draws out bismuth's magical colors.
¤
1d
WIRED
The Critter That’s Mushy as a Jellyfish and Long as a Whale It's got a name almost as long and threatening as its string of clones.
¤
1d
WIRED
Blogologues: The Hilarious Live Show That Puts Internet Trolls in Their Place The live show turns Internet ugliness into comedy gold.
¤
New Scientist - News
Female shark learns to reproduce without males after years aloneSome fish and reptiles can reproduce asexually, but a shark in an Australian aquarium is a rare case of this in an animal that once had a mate¤
1d
New Scientist - News
Cold case: The unsolved mystery of what lit Kepler’s supernovaIn 1604, the last Milky Way supernova recorded by naked-eye observers brightened the night sky. Despite 400 years of study, we still don't know what lit the fuse¤
1d
Ingeniøren
Piloter gruer for lukning af tværbane i KøbenhavnKøbenhavns Lufthavn vil nedlægge den såkaldte tværbane som led i en omfattende udvidelse. Dybt bekymrende, fordi lufthavnens beregninger bygger på forkerte forudsætninger, advarer piloterne i Flyvebranchens Personale Union.¤
1d
Scientific American Content: Global
Police Programs to Help Treat Addicts Face Uncertain FutureThe Trump administration may not be as supportive as Obama was of successful “ANGEL” programs --
¤
1d
Scientific American Content: Global
Should You Wear Makeup at Work?Research shows intriguing differences in how male and female co-workers react to women who wear makeup in the office
¤
1d
Scientific American Content: Global
Autism Risk May Arise From Sex-Specific TraitsGenetic sequences that code for physical features that differ between boys and girls also seem to contribute to risk for the disorder
¤
1d
WIRED
Move Over, Coders—Physicists Will Soon Rule Silicon Valley As the technological challenges of tech companies get bigger and badder, a crowd of physicists is moving in on the engineer headcount
¤
1d
Dagens Medicin
Dansk tilsynskoks: Nordiske lande blev ikke advaret om 62 sager Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har siden august 2015 ikke informeret andre nordiske lande om i alt 62 tilsynssager – heriblandt 17 autorisationsfratagelser.¤
1d
New Scientist - News
Woman dies from infection resistant to all available antibioticsIncurable bacterial infections are on the rise worldwide, but 90 per cent of multi-resistant infections in the US can still be beaten by at least one drug
¤
Science : NPR
Researchers Unravel Strange And Contradictory Feelings About Power It's inauguration season in Washington, D.C. Many of us revel in the pomp and circumstance — yet we have another side to our psychology that enjoys seeing the powerful fall from grace.
¤
Ingeniøren
Etik-professor: Hvis vi giver en robot skylden - hvordan skal vi så straffe den?Lovgivningsapparatet i EU er i gang med regler for fremtidens robotter. Men hvem har ansvaret, hvis en robot skader mennesker? Dansk etik-professor mener ikke, vi kan give robotter personlige rettigheder.
¤
Ingeniøren
Lunt kloakvand skal varme bystyre og badegæsterVarmevekslere i byens kloakledning skal varme rådhus og svømmehal i Stavanger. Teknikken er gennemprøvet. Men herhjemme står afgifter og ansvarsdiskussioner i vejen.
¤
Ingeniøren
Virtuelle assistenter baner vejen for it-kæmpernes dominans https://www.version2.dk/artikel/virtuelle-assistenter-vil-give-it-kaemper-endnu-stoerre-markedsdominans-1071086 Chatbots og AI-assistenter kan betyde et signifikant løft af brugervenlighed - men på bekostning af sikkerhed og privacy, mener konsulent. Version2
¤
Ingeniøren
Faste ritualer løfter din præstation https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/faste-ritualer-loefter-din-praestation-5987 Ritualer, inden man skal levere en stor præstation, kan ses som ren overtro, men faktisk viser en ny undersøgelse fra Harvard Business School, at fænomenet har en fordel – det fremmer din indsats Jobfinder
¤
Ingeniøren
Havet bliver stadigt mere forurenet med næringsstofferDe seneste to år er tilførslen af fosfor til havet steget, og landbrugene hælder stadigt mere fosfor på jorden, end planterne kan optage, viser ny rapport.
¤
Ingeniøren
Byg-selv i stor skala: Vindmøller med 16 ton tunge samleledNyt forskningsprojekt arbejder videre med en Siemens-idé om billige offshore-fundamenter til vindindustrien som samlesæt.
¤
New Scientist - News
We should embrace our ability to harness plant genesA spray that kills crop pests by switching off genes without changing them offers the chance to reach a consensus on genetic modification. It must not be squandered
¤
Science : NPR
When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them If your mom had to run through the name of everyone in the family, including the dog, before hitting yours, it's probably because you're all in a mental folder labeled "loved ones." (Image credit: Alex Reynolds/NPR)
¤
Science : NPR
An Ice Shelf Is Cracking In Antarctica, But Not For The Reason You Think Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf is about to lose an iceberg the size of Delaware. Scientists gathering in the U.K. are scratching their heads about why it's cracking off. (Image credit: John Sonntag/NASA)
¤
New Scientist - News
Taxi races show black cabs beat Uber on speed but not costRacing Ubers and black cabs between London destinations is helping researchers develop a journey comparison app that acts like a "Skyscanner for taxis"
¤
Dagens Medicin
Lars Søndergård ansat som overlæge i psykiatri igen – i Sverige Den kontroversielle danske læge Lars Søndergård har siden marts sidste år arbejdet som overlæge i psykiatri på en misbrugsenhed i Sverige. Han fik ansættelsen blot en måned efter, at den danske Styrelse for Patientsikkerhed havde forbudt ham at arbejde som psykiater herhjemme.
¤
Ingeniøren
Antivirus gik amok - 10.000 falske positiver forsinkede digitale eksamensopgaver i to døgn https://www.version2.dk/artikel/antivirus-gik-amok-10000-falske-positiver-forsinkede-digitale-eksamensopgaver-to-doegn Gymnasielærere måtte vente i to dage, mens titusindvis af skoleopgaver blev gennemgået, fordi Netprøver.dk mistænkte de mange skoleopgaver for at indeholde virus. Gymnasielærer er bekymret for den mere intensive eksamensperiode til sommer. Version2
¤
Ingeniøren
Nye forsinkelser på F-35 kan bremse Danmarks missioner i udlandetProblemerne i kampflyprogrammet er nu kun et år fra at kollidere med leveringen af de første danske F-35. Yderligere forsinkelser kan udelukke danske kampfly fra internationale missioner i flere år, siger militærforsker.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant Middle East dust storm caused by a changing climate, not human conflictResearchers have concluded that the most likely cause of a giant dust storm that struck the Middle East in 2015 was climate and unusual weather rather than conflict.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large scale study highlights challenges faced by children with ASD in early school yearsNew research outlined in a report stems from one of the largest studies on young children with ASD as they transition into school.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to be winner in the game of evolutionA new study helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep mantle chemistry surprise: Carbon content not uniformEven though carbon is one of the most-abundant elements on Earth, it is actually very difficult to determine how much of it exists below the surface in Earth's interior. Analysis of crystals containing completely enclosed mantle magma with its original carbon content preserved has doubled the world's known finds of mantle carbon.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of microbes reveals new insight about Earth's geology, carbon cyclesTiny microbes play a big role in cycling carbon and other key elements through our air, water, soil and sediment. Researchers who study these processes have discovered that these microbial communities are significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available. Their findings reveal that the type of carbon source affects not only the composition and activity of natural microbial com
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multiregional brain on a chipA multiregional brain-on-a-chip that models the connectivity between three distinct regions of the brain has been revealed by researchers. The in vitro model was used to extensively characterize the differences between neurons from different regions of the brain and to mimic the system's connectivity.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D scans for the automotive industryThe variety of car models has increased significantly over the past decades. Take Volkswagen: In 1950, the automaker produced just two model ranges – the Beetle and the transporter. Long gone are the times when one factory fabricated the same car for years on end. There is a trend towards more frequent model changes and smaller volumes. A car factory with just one production line suitable to manuf
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New pest threatens crops in West AfricaThe moth Spodoptera frugiperda, commonly known as fall armyworm moth, was first registered in Africa in 2016. It is not certain how it arrived, but DNA-analyses show that it is likely to have been more than an introduction. The species is a native of Latin America where it is a well-known pest. It can attack more than 80 different plant species, including important crops such as maize, rice, sugar
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemist develops new theory for explaining the function of proteinsA chemist and a collaborator have developed a new theory for explaining how proteins and other biomolecules function based on movement and change of shape and structure rather than content.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnesium is ready for take offResearchers are hoping to transform the fortunes of magnesium this year, by showcasing it as a viable alternative for luxury car makers and the aerospace industry.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clean-fuel cookstoves may improve cardiovascular health in pregnant womenReplacing biomass and kerosene cookstoves used throughout the developing world with clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, according to new research.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crystallography: Electron diffraction locates hydrogen atomsDiffraction-based analytical methods are widely used in laboratories, but they struggle to study samples that are smaller than a micrometer in size. Researchers have nevertheless been successful in using electron diffraction to reveal the structure of nanocrystals.
¤
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diagnostic breakthrough: 'Shaking piglets' attributed to previously unidentified virusSymptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in “shaking piglets”, making it possib¤
Scientific American Content: Global
Off-the-Top Is an Off-Broadway Mix of Rap and NeuroscienceFreestylin’ rapper Baba Brinkman and neuroscientist Heather Berlin drop a brainy beat at the Huron Club every Wednesday for the next seven weeks
¤

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.