Scientific American Content: Global
Visualizing the Medical Isotope CrisisInformation graphics help to clarify a little-known but critical challenge to the health care industry


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Futurity.org
Evolution’s winning groups have these 3 traits Scientists now have answer to an obvious yet elusive question: Why have some groups on the evolutionary tree of animals branched into a dizzying thicket of species while others split into a mere handful and called it a day? For millennia, humans have marveled at the seemingly boundless variety and diversity of animals inhabiting the Earth. So far, biologists have described and catalogued about 1.


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New Scientist - News
2016 confirmed as the hottest year on recordThe global average temperature in 2016 was 1.1°C higher than pre-industrial levels and about 0.07°C higher than the previous record set in 2015


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
2016 warmest year on record globally, NASA and NOAA data show

Earth's 2016 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and NOAA. This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New avenue for anti-depressant therapy discoveredResearchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. In so doing, they identified a new molecule that alleviates anxiety and depressive behavior in rodents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding ways to fix the climate before it is too lateScientists and policymakers rely on complex computer simulations called Integrated Assessment Models to figure out how to address climate change. But these models need tinkering to make them more accurate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Milestone in graphene productionFor the first time, it is now possible to produce functional OLED electrodes from graphene. The OLEDs can, for example, be integrated into touch displays, and the miracle material graphene promises many other applications for the future.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
DNA-testing smartphone aims to tackle drugs resistanceA smartphone attachment that analyses DNA could help improve cancer and tuberculosis treatments.
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cognitive science
New Finding: Different Types of Exercise Affect Different Parts of Your Brain submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wheat virus crosses over, harms native grassesOnce upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Giant Stationary Wave Spied in Atmosphere of VenusThe phenomenon, called a gravity wave, is likely produced by winds flowing over a mountain on the planet's surface

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WIRED
Jungle Patrol: Shooting Real Hunger Games Here's a field guide to all the gadgets MTV used to make its new reality show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In Rett syndrome model, team shows how adult learning is impaired in femalesIn mouse models of Rett syndrome -- which in humans is seen overwhelmingly in females -- researchers have demonstrated how failure of Mecp2, the mouse equivalent of the human gene of the same name, has biological consequences that prevent adult females from learning how to gather newborn pups in the days immediately following the pups' birth. They reversed the defect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Talking to children about STEM fields boosts test scores and career interestParents who talk with their high schoolers about the relevance of science and math can increase competency and career interest in the fields, a report suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanofibers developed for healing bone fracturesIn future, it may be possible to use nanofibres to improve the attachment of bone implants, or the fibers may be used directly to scaffold bone regeneration. This would aid the healing of fractures and may enable the care of osteoporosis. This is detailed in a new dissertation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A big nano boost for solar cellsSolar cells convert light into electricity. While the sun is one source of light, the burning of natural resources like oil and natural gas can also be harnessed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin B-12, and a knockoff version, create complex market for marine vitaminsVitamin B-12 exists in two different, incompatible forms in the oceans. An organism thought to supply essential vitamin B-12 in the marine environment is actually churning out a knockoff version.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Luminescent proteins provide color to ecological and cheap bio-displaysMobile phone, computer and TV displays all use very expensive color filters and other components, which cannot be easily recycled. Scientists have designed a new screen, which is cheaper and ecological as it uses a hybrid material. This material's luminescent proteins can be used in backlighting systems and color filters made using a 3-D printing technique.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein involved in blood clotting stimulates liver repairA new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair has been uncovered by researchers. Using an experimental model of high-dosage acetaminophen, the team found that liver injury activated blood clotting, which then stimulated liver repair.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adoptees advantaged by birth language memoryLanguage learning very early on in life can be subconsciously retained even when no conscious knowledge of the early experience remains. The subconscious knowledge can then be tapped to speed up learning of the pronunciation of sounds of the lost tongue, report scientists.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The $2.4-billion plan to steal a rock from Mars NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the red planet. Nature 541 274 doi: 10.1038/541274a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primatesA protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1, researchers have discovered.
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Scientific American Content: Global
India's First GM Food Crop Held Up by LawsuitScientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard
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Ingeniøren
Dansk geotermi mangler erfaringGeotermi bliver spået en stor fremtid som CO2-neutral varmeforsyning i Danmark. Men spørger man branchens egne folk, så skal der mere fart på udviklingen og professionalisering til.
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TEDTalks (video)
How online abuse of women has spiraled out of control | Ashley JuddEnough with online hate speech, sexual harassment and threats of violence against women and marginalized groups. It's time to take the global crisis of online abuse seriously. In this searching, powerful talk, Ashley Judd recounts her ongoing experience of being terrorized on social media for her unwavering activism and calls on citizens of the internet, the tech community, law enforcement and leg
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Scientific American Content: Global
Space-Weather Forecast to Improve with European SatelliteProbe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Moth with 'golden flake hairstyle' named after Donald TrumpThe moth, which has a wingspan of just over a centimetre, was discovered in California.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products helps investors make better choicesThe first online, interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products has been developed. Like the ubiquitous information nutrition panels on food and packaged goods, it is simple, easy to read and uncluttered. What's more, the financial label is interactive, allowing people to easily get a sense of the long-term implications of choices they make today.
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Futurity.org
Young predators can have bigger impact in the pond Smaller, younger predators can have an outsized effect on their ecosystem, report ecologists. “We live in a world where humans are impacting species at different stages of their lives, and this work shows the importance of considering the entire life cycle of a species rather than just looking at a snapshot in time,
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Data shows 2016 likely to be warmest year yetTemperature data for 2016 shows it is likely to have edged ahead of 2015 as the world's warmest year. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily Is it freezing inside that tornado?With winter upon us in full force, outdoor temperatures are plummeting. But inside an intense tornado, it's always chilly -- no matter the time of year. A new study demonstrates why that's the case.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A better way to make renewable hydrogenScientists have developed a method which boosts the longevity of high-efficiency photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices.
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Science : NPR
2016 Was The Hottest Year Yet, Scientists Declare Global temperatures soared above the 20th century average last year, as the climate continues to change. It's the hottest it has been since scientists started tracking global temperatures in 1880. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Marijuana's benefits, Antarctic ice cracks and a $500-million donation The week in science: 13–19 January 2017. Nature 541 264 doi: 10.1038/541264a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Trump nominees talk science: live updates President-elect's picks to lead environment and health agencies testify before Congress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights in genetic defect allow prevention of fatal illnesses in childrenA team of scientists was able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. This mutation causes patients to be extremely vulnerable to normally mild childhood illnesses such as rotavirus and enterovirus. The comprehensive analysis of the genetic defect allows clinicians to provide children with the proper therapies before illnesses prove fatal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food security threatened by sea-level riseCoastal countries are highly prone to sea-level rise, which leads to salt-water intrusion and increased salinity levels in agricultural land. Also typical for these regions are floods and waterlogging caused by cyclones and typhoons, as well as prolonged drought periods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify early impact of Ebola virus on immune systemA new mouse model of early Ebola virus (EBOV) infection has shown scientists how early responses of the immune system can affect development of Ebola disease. The model could help identify protective immune responses as targets for developing human EBOV therapeutics.
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Ingeniøren
Dansk kommissær: Slut med bare at lukke for strømmen fra nabolandetMargrethe Vestager vil forhindre, at lande som Sverige kan lukke af for dansk vindmøllestrøm, når vi har negative elpriser. Svenskerne skal først spørge om lov.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Climate Change Will Lower the Number of Perfect Weather DaysMild weather days worldwide could decline by up to 13 percent by the end of the century due to global warming
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WIRED
Victims’ Families Sue Japan for Failing to Warn of Eruption Families of some of the victims of the 2014 eruption of Mt. Ontake are suing the local government, claiming that they downplayed the volcano's threat.
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WIRED
Introducing Mozilla’s New Logo, Moz://a. Get It? When a big tech company unveils its new identity, it usually does so with a surprise announcement. Not this time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters brain electrical activityLong-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, according to a new study. These alterations were observed in physically and mentally healthy but heavy-drinking adolescents, who nevertheless did not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for a substance abuse disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Bring it back,' but within bounds: Retrieval strains the forelimbs of dogsHunting dogs such as the popular breed retriever are ideally suited for retrieving birds or small game. However, the weight the dogs carry strains their locomotor system. A motion study has shown that the dogs tilt forwards like a seesaw when they carry the prey in their mouths. This can make already existing joint and tendon damage worse. Therefore, adjusted weights should be used for the trainin
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Popular Science
Climate change might mean nicer weather in some places—but don't get too excited From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Most parts of the country will want to spend less time outside While numerous climate studies in recent years have examined the influence of global warming on extreme weather events , there has been little attention directed at the…
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Viden
Donald Trumps frisure inspirerer navngivning af mølEn nyopdaget art af møl med hvid-gullige skæl på hovedet har fået navn efter USA's kommende præsident. SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New reconstruction of an ancient ice sheetA new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is the 5-Second Rule True?Should you really abide by the famous 5-second rule?
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
I dag blev Mærsk Tårnet indviet i KøbenhavnKøbenhavns Universitet voksede med 42.700 kvadratmeter, da det 75 meter høje Mærsk...
2h
cognitive science
Coffee breaks are sooo 2016... submitted by /u/julioot
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Dagens Medicin
FAS: Udvalget løser ikke manglen på speciallæger Forslagene i Lægedækningsudvalgets rapport vil ikke afhjælpe manglen på speciallæger, mener FAS.
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WIRED
A New Series About the Visionary Designers Who Shape Our World We're moving to a future of intentionality. That's a key tenet of design thinking, the main force shaping and pushing tech and innovation of all kinds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viral escape hatch could be treatment target for hepatitis EThe technique that the hepatitis E virus -- an emerging liver virus historically found in developing countries but now on the rise in Europe -- uses to spread could present a weak spot scientists can exploit to treat the disease, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why scientists should research emojis and emoticons :-PMore than 90 percent of online populations now incorporate emojis and emoticons into their texts and emails, and researchers are wondering what the use of (~_^), (>_<), or =D can reveal about human behavior. Emojis and emoticons can be used as tools for evaluating how we relate to each other in the digital age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pitching in: Biologists study development of division of labor among beesBiologists tested a variation of the reproductive ground plan hypothesis in solitary, ground-nesting bees of south central Washington State. Their findings could shed light on development of division of labor in social bees.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preclinical research sheds light on tumor-progression in lung cancerPreclinical research shows that the tumor-promoting properties of neuropilin-2 reside predominantly on isoform NRP2b, while NRP2a has the opposite effects in non-small cell lung cancer. In mouse models, NRP2a inhibited tumor cell proliferation, while NRP2b promoted metastasis and progression. This new understanding may lead to improved therapies that specifically target NRP2b, while sparing the tu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
See how immune cells break through blood vessel wallsIn any given second, thousands of immune cells are poking holes in your blood vessels as they travel out of the blood stream to survey your organs for problems or join the fight against a pathogen. Despite the constant assault, the damage is negligible.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is China's Ivory Ban a Sign of Hope for Elephants?China’s legal ivory market will close this year, but elephants are still being slaughtered SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL
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Dagens Medicin
Yngre Læger meget tilfreds med Lægedækningsudvalget Lægedækningsudvalget har lyttet til Yngre Lægers input til en forbedret rekruttering og fastholdelse af læger i yderområderne, mener organisationen. Manglende analyser af den reelle lægemangel er imidlertid en akilleshæl for flere af rapportens forslag, lyder det.
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Dagens Medicin
Almen praksis i centrum i udvalgs-anbefalinger Lægedækningsudvalget har i sine anbefalinger haft særligt fokus på almen praksis. En række initiativer skal være med til at skaffe flere læger til specialet men også læger til hele landet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly gifted children benefit from explanation as much as their peersWe often assume that highly gifted children always perform at maximum capacity. However, new research shows that this group also benefits from training and explanation. Strangely enough, the benefits are the same for both groups.
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Ingeniøren
Adidas bygger fabrikker til 3D-printede skoAllerede i år vil Adidas åbne en fabrik i både Tyskland og USA, hvor sportssko skal fremstilles af robotter, computerstyret vævning og 3D-print. Tiden fra design til salg i butikken skal skæres ned fra 18 måneder til en uge.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's 5 Most "Anti-Science" MovesThe president-elect has taken what is widely seen as a hostile stance toward the scientific community. Here’s why
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Controversial website that lists ‘predatory’ publishers shuts down Librarian Jeffrey Beall won’t say why he has unpublished his widely read blog.
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Videnskabens Verden
Jo flere forsøgsdyr - jo bedre. Og 30.000 forsøgsdyr må siges at være en del - også selvom det er mennesker, der har spillet små mobilspil på telefonen. Holdet af forskere bag app'en BRAINS, der handler om hvordan mennesker tager beslutninger, har altså masser af data at basere deres forskning på.
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New Scientist - News
Flawed hunt for flight MH370 shows need for new tracking systemThe troubled search for the Malaysian airliner that vanished in 2014 highlights the need for better technology and coordination, says Paul Marks
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New Scientist - News
Resisting Trump: How scientists can fight a climate witch-huntClimate scientists could find themselves facing an internal witch-hunt. But there are several things they can do to fight back, as individuals and as groups
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why I'm Joining the March on WashingtonI'll be there to protest Mr. Turmp's clear and dangerous disrespect for human beings and for scientific evidence
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WIRED
Designers Reinvent the (Steering) Wheel for the Age of Autonomy 10 and 2 may not matter anymore, but the wheel is still the interlocutor between human and machine just yet.


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Dagens Medicin
Minister vil lempe regler for regionsklinikker Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) er parat til at ændre lovgivningen, så regionsklinikker kan eksistere udover de fire år, der i dag er muligt.

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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's CDC May Face Serious HurdlesThe nation’s public health agency is battling on several fronts, including an Obamacare repeal

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Ingeniøren
Fra pyntegran til polymer: Britiske forskere fremstiller plast af nåletræerOlier fra nåletræer kan erstatte råolie i plastindustrien og findes lige nu som et restprodukt fra papirindustrien. Det giver plast af både bionedbrydelige og fornybare materialer.

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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Levende grønlandsk kulturlandskab nomineret til verdensarvEt gigantisk, levende kulturlandskab i Vestgrønland bliver nu nomineret til verdensarv. I dag...

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WIRED
Microsoft Thinks Machines Can Learn to Converse by Making Chat a Game Microsoft just bought a startup that's embracing an AI technique typically used to master games---so it can teach machines to carry on a conversation.

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WIRED
Review: Asus ZenWatch 3 A sensible Android Wear watch comes along just as the platform is about to see an update.

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WIRED
Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It’s Not the Russians A site that chronicles animals versus the power grid makes a good point about cyberwar hype, but an attack would still be serious business.

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WIRED
Alexa Is Conquering the World. Now Amazon’s Real Challenge Begins Amazon's Alexa is about to be everywhere, but ubiquity comes with its own set of challenges.

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WIRED
Eerie Photos Take You Down China’s Neon-Lit Alleyways Marilyn Mugot captures a world bathed in blues, purples, and pinks.

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WIRED
Inside IMAX’s Big Bet to Rule the Future of VR The company that turns cinema to spectacle is betting big on the future of face-computers.

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WIRED
North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA From sea level rise to polluted stormwater drainage, the state faces a host of environmental conflicts that rely on the EPA. And Pruitt's agency would be a toothless one.

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New Scientist - News
First baby born using 3-parent technique to treat infertilityThese are the first photos of a girl born in Kiev who was made using a mitochondrial replacement technique to get around her mother’s infertility problems

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Scientific American Content: Global
When It Comes to Safety, Autonomous Cars Are Still "Teen Drivers"Automakers ask drivers to trust and share the nation’s roadways with autonomous vehicles, but there is no easy answer as to when they will be considered ”safe”

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Dagens Medicin
OVERBLIK: 18 forslag til bedre lægedækningRegeringens Lægedækningsudvalg har i dag præsenteret sin rapport med 18 anbefalinger til at sikre læger over hele landet.

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Viden
Klimaændringer truer Norges nationalsport: Nu vil nordmændene opfinde ’grøn’ kunstsneForskere håber, at produktionen af fremtidens kunstige sne også kan opvarme en svømmehal.

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BBC News - Science & Environment
Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failuresThe onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.

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Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningen peger på huller i Lægedæknings­udvalgets arbejdeDer mangler analyser af det samlede behov for speciallæger i rapporten fra regeringens Lægedækningsudvalg, mener Lægeforeningen. Analyserne er nødvendige for fremadrettet at sikre de rigtige læger overalt i sundhedsvæsenet, lyder det.

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BBC News - Science & Environment
IVF: First three-parent baby born to infertile coupleA technique designed to help parents affected by genetic disorders is used to tackle infertility.SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

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Ingeniøren
Tillidsmand påtalte dårligt arbejdsmiljø - kort efter truede ledelsen ham med fyringTrods kollegernes fulde opbakning truer Hvidovre Kommune ingeniørernes tillidsmand med en fyring. Hør hans historie her.

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Ingeniøren
Sundhedsministeren: OK at hyre Hizb ut-Tahrir-folk til offentlig it-udvikling https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsministeren-ok-at-hyre-hizb-ut-tahrir-folk-offentlige-it-udvikling-1072060 Ifølge sundhedsministeren var der ikke tale om 'en overtrædelse eller et brud på sikkerheden', da højtstående Hizb ut-Tahrir-medlemmer bidrog til udviklingen af et stort it-system på hospitaler i Region Hovedstaden. Version2

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Ingeniøren
Håndholdt apparat hjælper med at servere planter det rette fosfor-måltidDanske forskere har i samarbejde med engelsk firma skabt en håndholdt måler, der kan bestemme indholdet af fosfor i planter på 25 minutter.

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BBC News - Science & Environment
Obama administration gives $500m to UN climate change fundThe payment to the UN Green Climate Fund was announced three days before Donald Trump takes office.


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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Space-weather forecast to improve with European satellite Probe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth.

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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse undersøger mere simpel reportering af utilsigtede hændelserStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed vil undersøge, om rapporteringspligten af utilsigtede hændelser er for tung i forhold til, hvad man får ud af alle anstrengelserne. Arbejdet kan føre til en lovændring.

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Ingeniøren
Gobike: Vores Tesla-tilgang til bycyklerne har været en enorm fordelHovedstadens elektriske bycykler er blevet kritiseret for at være unødigt højteknologiske. Men teknologien har nu vist sit værd, mener direktøren for Gobike.

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Ingeniøren
Vindturbinen skulle være en revolution: Nu står den stilleDen skulle revolutionere vindmølleindustrien, kunne stå i beboede områder og lave brint til Korsørs busser. Men kommunen har ingen dokumentation, konsulenten ved ikke noget, og 3,2 millioner kroner er nu lagt i møllen, der ikke vil køre.

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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
India’s first GM food crop held up by lawsuit Scientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard.

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Viden
Håndholdt fosfor-måler kan gøre landbruget mere miljøvenligtDansk opfindelse gør det muligt at dosere fosfor præcist og reducere udvaskningen af næringsstoffet til grundvandet, lover forskerne.

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Ingeniøren
Cloud-ekspert om serverless: »It-drift som vi kender det vil forsvinde« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/softwarearkitekt-serverless-drift-vi-kender-vil-forsvinde-1071930 Serverless-arkitekturen vil på sigt betyde en revolution inden for it-drift, mener dansk softwarearkitekt. Version2

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moving up the food chain can beat being on topWhen it comes to predators, the biggest mouths may not take the biggest bite. According to a new study from bioscientists, some predators have their greatest ecological impacts before they reach adulthood.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Movin' on up? Views on social mobility shape Americans' faith in the status quoHow Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society -- such as social and economic policies, laws, and institutions -- psychologists have found.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change forecast: More intense deluges and downpours Down UnderExpect strong increases in rainfall during extreme precipitation events in Australia as a result of global warming making Dorothy Mackellar's now classic view of Australia as a country of droughts and flooding rains truer than ever.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make plastic from pine treesMost current plastics are made from oil, which is unsustainable. However, scientists have now developed a renewable plastic from a chemical called pinene found in pine needles.SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery could lead to jet engines that run hotter -- and cleanerResearchers have made a discovery in materials science that sounds like something from the old Saturday morning cartoon Super Friends: they've found a way to deactivate 'nano twins' to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys that are used in jet engines.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest Populus SNP dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, metabolitesResearchers have released the largest-ever single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset of genetic variations in poplar trees, information useful to plant scientists as well as researchers in the fields of biofuels, materials science, and secondary plant metabolism.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson'sIn research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trade-offs between economic growth and deforestationIn many developing countries, economic growth and deforestation seem to go hand in hand -- but the links are not well understood. In a new study, researchers use an innovative methodology to quantify the relationship.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study applies game theory to genomic privacyA new study presents an unorthodox approach to protect the privacy of genomic data, showing how optimal trade-offs between privacy risk and scientific utility can be struck as genomic data are released for research. The framework can be used to suppress just enough genomic data to persuade would-be snoops that their best privacy attacks will be unprofitable.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover drug that increases 'good' fat mass and functionAn FDA-approved drug has been identified that can create the elusive and beneficial brown fat. Mice treated with the drug had more brown fat, faster metabolisms, and lower body weight gain, even after being fed a high-calorie diet. The researchers say the technique, which uses cellular reprogramming, could be a new way to combat obesity and type II diabetes.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Calorie restriction lets monkeys live long and prosperSettling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mounting challenge to brain sex differencesA meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes reveals no significant difference between the sexes. The study strengthens the case for gender similarity in the human brain and psychological abilities.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Successful antibody trial in HIV individualsA research team has tested a new HIV neutralizing antibody, called 10-1074, in humans. The results of the trial have just been published.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Must-see-TV: Educational shows that entertain have greater impact on faithful viewersA study of viewing audiences shows that the television programs most effective at imparting an educational message about social behaviors are the ones that keep people watching engaged and coming back for more.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Racial bias in a heartbeat: How signals from the heart shape snap judgments about threatOur heartbeat can increase pre-existing racial biases when we face a potential threat, according to new research.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Signs of hope for endangered sea turtlesBones from dead turtles washed up on Mexican beaches indicate that Baja California is critical to the survival of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles, which travel some 7,500 miles from their nesting sites in Japan to their feeding grounds off the coast of Mexico.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A tale of two pulsars' tails: Plumes offer geometry lessons to astronomersLike cosmic lighthouses sweeping the universe with bursts of energy, pulsars have fascinated and baffled astronomers since they were first discovered 50 years ago. In two studies, international teams of astronomers suggest that recent images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of two pulsars -- Geminga and B0355+54 -- may help shine a light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as w


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
San Francisco Bay Area methane emissions may be double what we thoughtEmissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas, in the San Francisco Bay Area may be roughly twice as high as official estimates, with most of it coming from biological sources, such as landfills, but natural gas leakage also being an important source, according to a new study,


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antimicrobial sutures can prevent surgical site infections and save moneyNew analyses of the published clinical studies indicate that antimicrobial sutures are effective for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs), and they can result in significant cost savings.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conditions right for complex life may have come and gone in Earth's distant pastConditions suitable to support complex life may have developed in Earth's oceans -- and then faded -- more than a billion years before life truly took hold, a new study has found.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool can help policymakers prioritize information needs for synthetic biology techNew technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the marketplace before policymakers can determine how or whether they should be governed. Now researchers have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products, well before they are ready for the market, to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structures dating to King Solomon discoveredNew discoveries at Tel Aviv University's Timna Valley excavation have revealed intact defensive structures and livestock pens that provide insight into the complexity of Iron Age copper production.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dietary supplement may carry both benefits and risks associated with statinsRed yeast rice (RYR) is contained in dietary supplements that are often used by patients with high cholesterol, and it is often proposed as an alternative therapy in those who experience side effects from statins. A new study found that it is not a good choice for statin-intolerant patients: RYR was linked with muscle and liver injury, which can also occur with statin use.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hip fractures may have both short and long-term effects on survival in elderly individualsA new analysis of numerous studies indicates that men and women aged 60 years and older who have experienced a hip fracture are at increased risk of dying not only in the short term after the fracture, but also a number of years later.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Age-related GABA decline is associated with poor cognitionDiminishing levels of GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, may play a role in cognitive decline as we age, according to a new study. The study shows an association between higher GABA concentrations in the frontal lobe, a brain region important for complex cognitive functioning, and superior performance on a cognitive test in healthy older adults.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioids produce analgesia via immune cellsOpioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Whether our speech is fast or slow, we say about the sameFast talkers tend to convey less information with each word and syntactic structure than slower-paced speakers, meaning that no matter our pace, we all say just about as much in a given time, a new study finds.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metabolic pathway regulating key stage of embryo development revealedResearchers showed that the mevalonate pathway is essential for embryonic development by promoting primitive streak formation, a key landmark for establishing embryo symmetry and gastrulation. The pathway induces farnesylation of lamin-B, which is implicated in inducing expression of primitive streak genes. The findings expand understanding of how embryos transition from a featureless ball of cell


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why 'platonic' flies don't copulate and what that could mean for humansBy studying the sexual behavior of a mutant strain of fruit fly called 'platonic,' researchers have found parallels between humans and flies in the neural control of copulation.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Malaria drug successfully treats 26-year-old brain cancer patientThe anti-authophagy drug chloroquine may be a unique way to resensitize some cancer patients to treatment.

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Inception of the last ice ageA new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imposing 'meaningful work' can lead to staff burnoutStrategies to boost staff performance and morale by manipulating our desire for meaningful work often achieve the opposite -- damaging organizations and alienating employees -- a new study suggests.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sweat bees on hot chillies: Native bees thrive in traditional farming, securing good yieldFarming doesn't always have to be harmful to bees: Even though farmers on the Mexican peninsula of Yucatan traditionally slash-and-burn forest to create small fields, this practice can be beneficial to sweat bees by creating attractive habitats. The farmers profit also since they depend on bees to pollinate their habanero chillies.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny fruit flies use cold hard logic to select matesFruit flies -- the tiny insects that swarm our kitchens over the summer months -- exhibit rational decision making when selecting mates, according to new research. Scientists observed different combinations of fruit flies mate about 2,700 times, and were surprised to discover that male flies almost always pick the female mate that would produce the most offspring. The study provides the first evid


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armorIn a new study, researchers are investigating why hair is incredibly strong and resistant to breaking. The findings could lead to the development of new materials for body armor and help cosmetic manufacturers create better hair care products.


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ArXiv Query
Organization and hierarchy of the human functional brain network lead to a chain-like coreThe brain is a paradigmatic example of a complex system as its functionality emerges as a global property of local mesoscopic and microscopic interactions. Complex network theory allows to elicit the functional architecture of the brain in terms of links (correlations) between nodes (grey matter regions) and to extract information out of the noise. Here we present the analysis of functional magnet


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ArXiv Query
VOCSMAT: a connectionist-inspired treatment proposal for relational traumasPsychological traumas are the main cause of post-traumatic stress disorder, which can be either simple or complex. Psychological traumas of various kinds are also present in a wide range of psychological conditions, including disorganised attachment, personality disorders, eating disorders, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. For such conditions, traumatic experiences are often regarded as an exac


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ArXiv Query
Human perception in computer visionComputer vision has made remarkable progress in recent years. Deep neural network (DNN) models optimized to identify objects in images exhibit unprecedented task-trained accuracy and, remarkably, some generalization ability: new visual problems can now be solved more easily based on previous learning. Biological vision (learned in life and through evolution) is also accurate and general-purpose. I


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ArXiv Query
Modeling Retinal Ganglion Cell Population Activity with Restricted Boltzmann MachinesThe retina is a complex nervous system which encodes visual stimuli before higher order processing occurs in the visual cortex. In this study we evaluated whether information about the stimuli received by the retina can be retrieved from the firing rate distribution of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs), exploiting High-Density 64x64 MEA technology. To this end, we modeled the RGC population activity u


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers zero-in on cholesterol's role in cellsFor the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.


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