Meitu, a Viral Anime Makeover App, Has Major Privacy Red Flags
1KWIRED / by Lily Hay Newman / 1
Turning yourself into a pretty fairy will cost you some personal data.


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Recycled eggshells can be used for next-gen data storage
300+New Scientist /
A nano-powder made from eggshells has been turned into a device using ReRAM, a type of memory that could offer fast, efficient computer data storage


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Team uncovers cellular responses to bird flu vaccine
5Latest Science News / 2min
New research eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu, exposing cellular responses associated with a vaccine constituent called AS03, short for adjuvant system 03. Using massive computation, the investigators pursue a systems biology approach, providing a new wealth of detail about vaccine responses and data for the generation of new


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Study discusses model for understanding nutrition and brain development
4Latest Science News / 4min
For nearly a decade, researchers have studied the piglet as a translational model to understand which aspects of early brain development are affected by nutrition interventions. In a recent review article, investigators provide background for the work they do with nutrition and neurodevelopment using the piglet as a model.


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This soft-shelled exosuit might put Iron Man's duds to shame
Popular Science / by Kendra Pierre-Louis / 3min
Technology Exoskeletons of the future look like high-tech workout clothes Researchers design exos…


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Sustaining a High-Tech Economy Using Inspiration from Nature
Scientific American Content / by Oswald Schmitz / 4min
Fundamentally, nature’s economy is sustained because species create a grand circular economy in which materials are produced, consumed, decomposed, and then reused.

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Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines
23WIRED / by Rhett Allain / 9min
In this competition, humans are throwing washing machines. What is the force and power required to accomplish such a feat? The post Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines appeared first on WIRED .


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Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes
9Latest Science News / 9min
People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria, a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study.


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Robot skin senses warm bodies like a snake locating nearby prey
3New Scientist / 18min
A heat-sensing membrane could be applied to robots like a Westworld-style “skin dip” and give them the ability to detect human bodies from a distance


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Breast cancer prognosis of African-American patients may improve with administration of chemotherapy before surgery, study finds
7Latest Science News / 24min
Administering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study.


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Gene-Edited Animals Face U.S. Regulatory Crackdown
5Scientific American Content / by Amy Maxmen / 36min
Last-minute proposal would address CRISPR and other cutting-edge technologies

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Ancient Warm Period Hints at Future Sea Level Rise
1Scientific American Content / by Alister Doyle /
Ocean temperatures in a natural warm period 125,000 years ago were indistinguishable from today—but sea level was six to nine meters higher

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Inauguration Liveblog: Donald Trump Is Sworn In as President
40WIRED / by Wired Staff /
Join WIRED for analysis, insight, and updates from the Capitol as Donald Trump—real estate mogul, reality TV star, and tweeter-in-chief—becomes president.


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China’s Plan to Rule the World: Make All the Gadgets
42WIRED / by David Pierce /
Instead of just making and selling smartphones, Xiaomi wants to make and sell just about everything.


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That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New’
37WIRED / by Klint Finley /
ZeniMax claims its tech is being used in Facebook-owned Oculus products without permission. But what does it really mean to steal code? The post That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New' appeared first on WIRED .


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The Whirling Ballet of the Presidential Motorcade
29WIRED / by Aarian Marshall /
The most complex of safety dances.


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M. Night Shyamalan’s Latest Twist? Making Good Movies Again
23WIRED / by Brian Raftery /
The writer-director's new film, 'Split,' is his second good high-drama shocker in a row.


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Secret Facebook Groups Are the Trump Era’s Worst, Best Echo Chamber
21WIRED / by Emily Dreyfuss /

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People seeking solidarity and safety in like-minded groups are increasingly looking to secret Facebook groups. They're solipsistic—but that's OK.
The Totally Legit Complete Guide to Trump’s Inauguration
28WIRED / by Brian Raftery /
Get the full line-up here.



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Galactic Murder Mystery Solved by Gas Stripping
8Scientific American Content / by Calla Cofield /
Astronomers unveil a new mechanism to explain the premature demise of young galaxies

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Trump Day 1: Global Warming's Fate
35Scientific American Content / by Annie Sneed /
If the new president delays climate action as promised, the world is far more likely to miss its Paris agreement goals

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Starling Murmurations Are Beautiful. Just Ignore the Poop
35WIRED / by Laura Mallonee /
Hundreds of birds soared through the sky above Pontevedra, Spain. It's stunning and just a little bit icky.


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Smart buildings predict when critical systems are about to fail
82New Scientist /
Start-ups use sensors and machine learning to do “predictive maintenance”, spotting faults in building systems like heating and air con before they crash


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At the DeploraBall, Trump’s Online Army Wonders: What Now?
62WIRED / by Issie Lapowsky /
They're the new heart of conservatism, but finding consensus about what they stand for is as difficult as finding consensus about anything online.


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Larsen ice crack continues to open up
400+BBC News - Science & Environment / 1
The crack in Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf that looks set to spawn a giant iceberg has spread a further 10km.


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Why Is It Important To Be Touched?
28Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 1
Neuroscientist David Linden thinks that of the five senses, touch is the most overlooked, and perhaps the most important for promoting psychological health. (Image credit: Courtesy of Dr. David J. Linden)


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How Do Pheromones Really Work?
21Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 1
Pheromones are mysterious compounds that can make a mammal smell more sexy--but that's not true for humans. Zoologist Tristram Wyatt says human pheremones are hard to find. (Image credit: Maria Pavlova/Getty Images)


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Are There More Than Five Basic Tastes?
13Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 1
Scientists have long believed we have just five tastes - salty, sweet, bitter, sour and umami (or savory). Geneticist Nicole Garneau argues we might be able to taste a sixth — fat. (Image credit: Courtesy of Dr. Nicole Garneau)


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Exit Interview: Presidential Science Advisor John Holdren
11Scientific American Content / by Fred Guterl / 1
Scientific American executive editor Fred Guterl talks with President Obama’s science advisor John Holdren about climate science, space travel, the issue of reproducibility in science, the...

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NIH director Francis Collins staying on — for now
NatureNews / by Sara Reardon / 1
President-elect Donald Trump's team has asked Collins to remain in his job for an unknown period. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.19081


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Dividing Droplets Could Explain Life’s Origin
200+Quanta Magazine / by Natalie Wolchover / 1
A collaboration of physicists and biologists in Germany has found a simple mechanism that might have enabled liquid droplets to evolve into living cells in early Earth’s primordial soup. Origin-of-life researchers have praised the minimalism of the idea. Ramin Golestanian , a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Oxford who was not involved in the research, called it a big achieve


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Astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet
75Latest Science News / 1
Astronomers have located the habitable zone, the region where water could exist on the surface of a planet, on the Wolf 1061, a planetary system that's 14 light years away.


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Perry Promises to Protect "All of the Science" at the US Energy Department
100+Scientific American Content / by Jeff Tollefson / 1
Trump's nominee for energy secretary says that he will base decisions on ‘sound science’

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UFOs, Psychics, and Spies: The CIA Just Put 12M Pages of Files Online. Start Here
3KWIRED / by Lily Hay Newman / 1
All the spy secrets that are fit to declassify.


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Time to put TB on a diet
17Latest Science News / 1
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages. The scientists have discovered that the bacterium has the ability to 'reprogram' the cell it infects so that it can feed on its lipids. This results will pave the way for t


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Treated carbon pulls radioactive elements from water
46Latest Science News / 1
Scientists have developed inexpensive, oxidized carbon particles that extract radioactive metals from water. They said their materials may help purify contaminated waters stored after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.


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Statins could halt vein blood clots, research suggests
81Latest Science News / 1
Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill.


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Chip-sized, high-speed terahertz modulator raises possibility of faster data transmission
12Latest Science News / 1
Engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz (THz) frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. The discovery could help fill the “THz gap” that is limiting development of new and more powerful wireless devices that could transmit data at significantly higher speeds than currently possible.


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Trapped by the game: Why professional soccer players don't talk about their mental health
8Latest Science News / 1
Professional soccer players do not feel it is safe to show vulnerability or admit to experiencing emotional struggles, suggests a new report.


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This may be the most promising herpes vaccine ever
1KPopular Science / by Rachel Feltman / 1
Health Which is good because pretty much everyone has herpes You probably have herpes, and that's okay. But ideally, none of us would have herpes. A new vaccine may provide the most promising solution yet.


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U.S. Cities Move to Curb Lead Poisoning
Scientific American Content / 1
Public officials are advancing measures, such as more blood-lead screening and property inspections, to protect children from the toxic threat

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Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
18Latest Science News / 1
Scientists have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a 'glass-like state' and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft conne


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Public reporting of lung cancer surgery outcomes provides valuable information about quality of patient care
6Latest Science News / 1
The first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy has now been released by experts.


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How much drought can a forest take?
27Latest Science News / 1
Why do some trees die in a drought and others don't? And how can we predict where trees are most likely to die in future droughts? Scientists have examined those questions in a new study.


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Digital assay of circulating tumor cells may improve diagnosis, monitoring of liver cancer
59Latest Science News / 1
Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction method to analyze circulating tumor cells may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment.


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Extinction threatens 60% of world’s primates
14Futurity.org / by Carol Clark-Emory / 1
Urgent action is needed to protect the world’s dwindling primate populations, experts warn. Sixty percent of the more than 500 primate species worldwide are threatened with extinction, while more than 75 percent have declining populations. “The majority of primate species are endangered now. We are at a turning point where we must take action or lose many species during the next 50 years,” says T


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Brain readjusts your eyeballs with each blink
11Futurity.org / by Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley / 1
Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. Why don’t we perceive intermittent darkness and light? Because the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes. In a study in the journal Current Biology , researchers show that when we blink, our brain repositions our eyeballs so we can stay focused on what we’re viewi


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[Review] Human tissues in a dish: The research and ethical implications of organoid technology
100+Science: Current Issue / by Annelien L. Bredenoord / 1
The ability to generate human tissues in vitro from stem cells has raised enormous expectations among the biomedical research community, patients, and the general public. These organoids enable studies of normal development and disease and allow the testing of compounds directly on human tissue. Organoids hold the promise to influence the entire innovation cycle in biomedical research. They affect


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[Errata] Erratum for the Report “Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska” by D. Fee, M. M. Haney, R. S. Matoza, A. R. Van Eaton, P. Cervelli, D. J. Schneider, A. M. Iezzi
2Science: Current Issue / 1


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[Research Article] Distortion of histone octamer core promotes nucleosome mobilization by a chromatin remodeler
2Science: Current Issue / by Kalyan K. Sinha / 1
Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)–dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes play essential biological roles by mobilizing nucleosomal DNA. Yet, how DNA is mobilized despite the steric constraints placed by the histone octamer remains unknown. Using methyl transverse relaxation–optimized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 450-kilodalton complex, we show that the chromatin remodeler, SNF2h, dis


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[Research Article] Tumor aneuploidy correlates with markers of immune evasion and with reduced response to immunotherapy
8Science: Current Issue / by Teresa Davoli / 1
Immunotherapies based on immune checkpoint blockade are highly effective in a subset of patients. An ongoing challenge is the identification of biomarkers that predict which patients will benefit from these therapies. Aneuploidy, also known as somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), is widespread in cancer and is posited to drive tumorigenesis. Analyzing 12 human cancer types, we find that, for m


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[Research Article] The role of dimer asymmetry and protomer dynamics in enzyme catalysis
3Science: Current Issue / by Tae Hun Kim / 1
Freeze-trapping x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and computational techniques reveal the distribution of states and their interconversion rates along the reaction pathway of a bacterial homodimeric enzyme, fluoroacetate dehalogenase (FAcD). The crystal structure of apo-FAcD exhibits asymmetry around the dimer interface and cap domain, priming one protomer for substrate binding. T


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[Editorial] Everyone should try
7Science: Current Issue / by Jeremy Berg / 1
The new year brings opportunities to think creatively about finding solutions to difficult problems. It's a chance to affirm that although views may differ dramatically, we should try to work effectively with one another. My namesake believed in this. Jeremy Stone, the long-time president of the Federation of American Scientists, passed away on 1 January at the age of 81. As a graduate student, St


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[In Brief] News at a glance
1Science: Current Issue / 1
In science news around the world, the United States confers protections to the Walrus Islands and a handful of other sites of archaeological significance by making them historic landmarks, a U.S. report finds that marijuana can treat chronic pain and notes that researchers who want to study the drug face significant obstacles, a new international particle accelerator located in Jordan takes a big


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[In Depth] Science suffers in cold war over polar base
4Science: Current Issue / by Martin Enserink / 1
It's summer in Antarctica, the season for science. But at the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica research station, Belgium's futuristic research outpost in East Antarctica, not a single Belgian researcher is at work. A protracted dispute between the Belgian government and the International Polar Foundation, which built and operates the station, has resulted in the cancellation of this year's Belgian ex


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[In Depth] Your self-driving car could kill radio astronomy
17Science: Current Issue / by Daniel Clery / 1
Add energy-saving streetlights, self-driving cars, and balloon-borne internet services to the threats facing astronomers needing dark skies free of electromagnetic smog. The rise of all three technologies is posing new challenges to ground-based researchers who use the optical and radio spectrum to observe the universe, speakers warned earlier this month at the annual meeting of the American Astro


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[In Depth] Mixed results from cancer replications unsettle field
20Science: Current Issue / by Jocelyn Kaiser / 1
The first results of a high-profile effort to replicate dozens of influential papers in cancer biology are roiling the biomedical community. Of the five studies the project has tackled so far, some involving experimental treatments already in clinical trials, only two could be repeated; one could not, and technical problems stymied the remaining two replication efforts. Some scientists say these e


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[In Depth] Unique free electron laser laboratory opens in China
3Science: Current Issue / by Dennis Normile / 1
China has become the latest country making a free electron laser available to its scientists. Researchers around the world want access to these lasers because they are an advance on the synchrotron light sources that have been the workhorses of protein crystallography, cell biology, and materials science. The completion of the $30 million Dalian Coherent Light Source, announced this week in Beijin


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[In Depth] How do gut microbes help herbivores? Counting the ways
100+Science: Current Issue / by Elizabeth Pennisi / 1
No matter what a vegan may tell you, a solely plant-based diet is a tough way to get all the calories and nutrients you need. Unless you have the right microbial partners. At the recent annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, researchers made it clear that microbes lend a wide array of other talents to herbivores. One gut microbe helps a tropical ant recycle nitrogen


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[In Depth] A half-billion-dollar bid to head off emerging diseases
16Science: Current Issue / by Jon Cohen / 1
In the wake of the Ebola crisis that erupted in West Africa in 2014, many public health leaders recognized that a more aggressive effort to develop vaccines could have moved a vaccine forward more quickly and prevented that outbreak from becoming an epidemic. A new organization was formed last year, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), to speed development of vaccines agains


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[Feature] Taming rabies
17Science: Current Issue / by Erik Stokstad / 1
An estimated 59,000 people die from rabies around the world every year. Their horrible suffering—including convulsions, terror, and aggression—and the fact that many victims are children led the World Health Organization and others to announce a goal to eliminate rabies deaths worldwide by 2030. The plan calls for cheaper and faster treatment for people. But its long-term bet is on vaccinating dom


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[Perspective] Technology beats corruption
14Science: Current Issue / by Rema Hanna / 1
More than 1.9 billion individuals in the developing world benefit from social safety net programs: noncontributory transfer programs that distribute cash or basic in-kind products to the poor. But despite their importance, high levels of corruption often stifle the effectiveness of these programs. If cash transfer programs are particularly prone to graft, then in-kind programs should be preferred


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[Perspective] Unlocking the nucleosome
1Science: Current Issue / by Andrew Flaus / 1
Almost all eukaryotic genomes are packaged as nucleosomal building blocks that are assembled from an octameric core of histone proteins around which nearly two turns of DNA are wrapped. The apparent homogeneity and stability of nucleosomes has led to their depiction as beads, balls, and other simplifications that imply a largely static histone structural surface on which DNA wraps and unwraps. On


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[Perspective] Enzymes at work are enzymes in motion
2Science: Current Issue / by Tamjeed Saleh / 1
Enzymes provide the necessary impetus for chemical reactions to occur at a rate that can support biological life. They do so by forming a unique enzyme-substrate complex and thus lowering the energy required for a substrate to convert to a product. Numerous approaches have been used for more than 50 years to unravel the mechanisms of enzyme-mediated catalysis (1). Initial kinetic experiments helpe


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[Perspective] Big-data approaches to protein structure prediction
5Science: Current Issue / by Johannes Söding / 1
A protein's structure determines its function. Experimental protein structure determination is cumbersome and costly, which has driven the search for methods that can predict protein structure from sequence information (1). About half of the known proteins are amenable to comparative modeling; that is, an evolutionarily related protein of known structure can be used as a template for modeling the


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[Perspective] Chromosomal chaos silences immune surveillance
5Science: Current Issue / by Maurizio Zanetti / 1
Not all cancers, and not all individuals with the same cancer type, respond equally to immunotherapy—the use of antibodies to block so-called immune checkpoints in T cells—thereby unleashing immune responses against tumor cells. This can be partially explained by nonsynonymous mutations, which can create neoantigen epitopes that induce T cell responses against cancer cells (1). However, such mutat


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[Policy Forum] Closing global achievement gaps in MOOCs
200+Science: Current Issue / by René F. Kizilcec / 1
Advocates for free massive open online courses (MOOCs) have heralded them as vehicles for democratizing education and bridging divides within and across countries (1). More than 25 million people enrolled in MOOCs between 2012 and 2015, including 39% from less-developed countries (LDCs) (2). But the educated and affluent in all countries enroll in and complete MOOCs at relatively higher rates (3,


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[Book Review] Beyond Schrödinger's cat
12Science: Current Issue / by Mirko Kovac / 1
According to traditional flight physics, bees should not be able to fly. But fly they do, with mastery of non– steady state aerodynamics and little concern about our limited understanding of their capabilities. Building on recent insights in biophysics research, Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life uses a refreshing combination of scientific precision and colloquial wit to show how animals use


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[Book Review] Born this way?
4Science: Current Issue / by Sheri Berenbaum / 1
How and why do the sexes differ? And why do we care? Few questions generate as much controversy and debatein both scientific and public arenas. In her book Testosterone Rex: Myths of Sex, Science, and Society, Cordelia Fine tackles the question from the perspective that has generated the most discussion: biological contributions to sex differences. Author: Sheri Berenbaum


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[Letter] Building community for deaf scientists
6Science: Current Issue / by Gerry Buckley / 1
Authors: Gerry Buckley, Scott Smith, James DeCaro, Steve Barnett, Steve Dewhurst


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[Letter] Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forests
6Science: Current Issue / by Thomas N. E. Gray / 1
Authors: Thomas N. E. Gray, Antony J. Lynam, Teak Seng, William F. Laurance, Barney Long, Lorraine Scotson, William J. Ripple


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[Letter Letters letters Outside the Tower] Young science officers lead by example
1Science: Current Issue / by Dhruv Iyer / 1
Author: Dhruv Iyer


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[This Week in Science] Robots have a change of heart
1Science: Current Issue / by Caitlin Czajka / 1
Author: Caitlin Czajka


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[This Week in Science] Alcohols remove lithium to make nanowires
1Science: Current Issue / by Marc S. Lavine / 1
Author: Marc S. Lavine


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[This Week in Science] An x-ray view of C–F and S–F bond breaks
1Science: Current Issue / by Jake Yeston / 1
Author: Jake Yeston


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[This Week in Science] Keeping roots water-tight
1Science: Current Issue / by Pamela J. Hines / 1
Author: Pamela J. Hines


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[This Week in Science] Filling in the protein fold picture
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 1
Author: Valda Vinson


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[This Week in Science] Sea surface temperatures of the past
1Science: Current Issue / by H. Jesse Smith / 1
Author: H. Jesse Smith


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[This Week in Science] Deciding a protein's fate
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 1
Author: Valda Vinson


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[This Week in Science] Locking TNFR2 to kill ovarian cancer
1Science: Current Issue / by Leslie K. Ferrarelli / 1
Author: Leslie K. Ferrarelli


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[This Week in Science] Working as a pair
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 1
Author: Valda Vinson


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[This Week in Science] Ethics of organoid research
1Science: Current Issue / by Beverly A. Purnell / 1
Author: Beverly A. Purnell


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[This Week in Science] Chromosomal chaos and tumor immunity
1Science: Current Issue / by Paula A. Kiberstis / 1

Author: Paula A. Kiberstis


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[This Week in Science] Deformation powers the nucleosome slide
1Science: Current Issue / by Guy Riddihough / 1
Author: Guy Riddihough


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[This Week in Science] Moving transistors downscale
1Science: Current Issue / by Phil Szuromi / 1
Author: Phil Szuromi


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[This Week in Science] Impending primate extinction
1Science: Current Issue / by Michael Hochberg / 1
Author: Michael Hochberg


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[This Week in Science] Small peptides allow rapid responses
1Science: Current Issue / by Pamela J. Hines / 1
Author: Pamela J. Hines


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[This Week in Science] Using technology to beat corruption
1Science: Current Issue / by Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink / 1
Author: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink


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[Editors' Choice] Brain cancer therapy
1Science: Current Issue / by Lisa D. Chong / 1
Author: Lisa D. Chong


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[Editors' Choice] DNA methylation in hematopoietic cascade
1Science: Current Issue / by Beverly A. Purnell / 1
Author: Beverly A. Purnell


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[Editors' Choice] An intelligent little sniffer
1Science: Current Issue / by Marc S. Lavine / 1
Author: Marc S. Lavine


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[Editors' Choice] A different kind of chemical plant
1Science: Current Issue / by Jake Yeston / 1
Author: Jake Yeston


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[Editors' Choice] Blind climber
1Science: Current Issue / by Sacha Vignieri / 1
Author: Sacha Vignieri


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[Editors' Choice] Know who you are asking for money
1Science: Current Issue / by Gilbert Chin / 1
Author: Gilbert Chin


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[Editors' Choice] Making garnets the hard way
1Science: Current Issue / by Brent Grocholski / 1
Author: Brent Grocholski


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[Report] Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source
1Science: Current Issue / by Yoann Pertot / 1
Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS) has so far practically been limited to large-scale facilities, to subpicosecond temporal resolution, and to the condensed phase. We report the realization of TR-XAS with a temporal resolution in the low femtosecond range by developing a tabletop high-harmonic source reaching up to 350 electron volts, thus partially covering the spectral region o


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[Report] Transformation of bulk alloys to oxide nanowires
2Science: Current Issue / by Danni Lei / 1
One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer prospects for enhancing the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a broad range of functional materials and composites, but their synthesis methods are typically elaborate and expensive. We demonstrate a direct transformation of bulk materials into nanowires under ambient conditions without the use of catalysts or any external stimuli. The nano


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[Report] Scaling carbon nanotube complementary transistors to 5-nm gate lengths
Science: Current Issue / by Chenguang Qiu / 1
High-performance top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) with a gate length of 5 nanometers can be fabricated that perform better than silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs at the same scale. A scaling trend study revealed that the scaled CNT-based devices, which use graphene contacts, can operate much faster and at much lower supply voltage (0.4 versus


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[Report] Regional and global sea-surface temperatures during the last interglaciation
32Science: Current Issue / by Jeremy S. Hoffman / 1
The last interglaciation (LIG, 129 to 116 thousand years ago) was the most recent time in Earth’s history when global mean sea level was substantially higher than it is at present. However, reconstructions of LIG global temperature remain uncertain, with estimates ranging from no significant difference to nearly 2°C warmer than present-day temperatures. Here we use a network of sea-surface tempera


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[Report] Root diffusion barrier control by a vasculature-derived peptide binding to the SGN3 receptor
3Science: Current Issue / by Verónica G. Doblas / 1
The root endodermis forms its extracellular diffusion barrier by developing ringlike impregnations called Casparian strips. A factor responsible for their establishment is the SCHENGEN3/GASSHO1 (SGN3/GSO1) receptor-like kinase. Its loss of function causes discontinuous Casparian strips. SGN3 also mediates endodermal overlignification of other Casparian strip mutants. Yet, without ligand, SGN3 func


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[Report] A peptide hormone required for Casparian strip diffusion barrier formation in Arabidopsis roots
25Science: Current Issue / by Takuya Nakayama / 1
Plants achieve mineral ion homeostasis by means of a hydrophobic barrier on endodermal cells called the Casparian strip, which restricts lateral diffusion of ions between the root vascular bundles and the soil. We identified a family of sulfated peptides required for contiguous Casparian strip formation in Arabidopsis roots. These peptide hormones, which we named Casparian strip integrity factor 1


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[Report] The receptor kinase FER is a RALF-regulated scaffold controlling plant immune signaling
88Science: Current Issue / by Martin Stegmann / 1
In plants, perception of invading pathogens involves cell-surface immune receptor kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis SITE-1 PROTEASE (S1P) cleaves endogenous RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR (RALF) propeptides to inhibit plant immunity. This inhibition is mediated by the malectin-like receptor kinase FERONIA (FER), which otherwise facilitates the ligand-induced complex formation of the immun


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[Report] Evolutionary drivers of thermoadaptation in enzyme catalysis
6Science: Current Issue / by Vy Nguyen / 1
With early life likely to have existed in a hot environment, enzymes had to cope with an inherent drop in catalytic speed caused by lowered temperature. Here we characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying thermoadaptation of enzyme catalysis in adenylate kinase using ancestral sequence reconstruction spanning 3 billion years of evolution. We show that evolution solved the enzyme’s key kinetic


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[Report] Protein structure determination using metagenome sequence data
300+Science: Current Issue / by Sergey Ovchinnikov / 1
Despite decades of work by structural biologists, there are still ~5200 protein families with unknown structure outside the range of comparative modeling. We show that Rosetta structure prediction guided by residue-residue contacts inferred from evolutionary information can accurately model proteins that belong to large families and that metagenome sequence data more than triple the number of prot


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[Report] Mechanistic basis for a molecular triage reaction
Science: Current Issue / by Sichen Shao / 1
Newly synthesized proteins are triaged between biosynthesis and degradation to maintain cellular homeostasis, but the decision-making mechanisms are unclear. We reconstituted the core reactions for membrane targeting and ubiquitination of nascent tail-anchored membrane proteins to understand how their fate is determined. The central six-component triage system is divided into an uncommitted client


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[Association Affairs] AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting Program
Science: Current Issue / 1
This issue of Science includes the program of the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting. The theme of the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, 16 to 20 February 2017, is Serving Society Through Science Policy.A PDF of the program as it appears in this issue is available here; for more information on the meeting (including registration forms and information on accommodations), please visit www.aaas.org/meetings/.


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[New Products] New Products
Science: Current Issue / 1
A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.


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[Working Life] The transcontinental scientist
8Science: Current Issue / by Wim Delva / 1
Author: Wim Delva


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Moth gut bacteria could help create new antibiotics
300+Popular Science / by Claire Maldarelli / 1
Health This benevolent bacteria fends off deadly microbial invaders A recent study suggests that a bacteria in a moth's gut secretes a toxic substance that kills off other invading, and often deadly, bacteria.


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In Alzheimer's, excess tau protein damages brain's GPS
36Latest Science News / 1
Researchers have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.


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Your 'anonmyized' web browsing history may not be anonymous
29Latest Science News / 1
Researchers have written computer programs that found patterns among anonymized data about web traffic and used those patterns to identify individual users. The researchers note web users with active social media are vulnerable to the attack.


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Moth gut bacterium defends its host by making antibiotic
20Latest Science News / 1
Nearly half of all insects are herbivores, but their diets do not consist of only plant material. It is not uncommon for potentially harmful microorganisms to slip in during a feast. Researchers now report that these insects use an ironic strategy to resist microbial infections. A bacterial species commonly found in the gut of the cotton leafworm and other moths secretes a powerful antimicrobial p


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Lasers and Drones Help Preserve Ancient Temples
6Scientific American Content / by Benjamin Meyers / 1
3-D digital preservation not only helps save the memories of historical sites, it also guides restoration projects after natural disasters, such as the earthquakes that damaged the temples of...


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Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory
26Latest Science News / 1
For the first time, scientists have found that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it's in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functionin


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Researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer
13Latest Science News / 1
Researchers have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper, researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.


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Roots of related genetic diseases found in cell powerhouses
32Latest Science News / 1
Scientists have discovered the mechanisms behind a genetic change known to cause a set of related diseases.


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The type, not just the amount, of sugar consumption matters in risk of health problems
66Latest Science News / 1
The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function.


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Telecommuting extends the work week, at little extra pay
13Latest Science News / 1
Telecommuting may not be as advantageous as employees think. A new study shows working from home adds extra hours to the work week, at little additional pay. The findings may change workers' perceptions of the value of telecommuting and could spur employers to better define the work-at-home workday.


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Come watch the Army's hoverbike prototype fly
300+Popular Science / by Kelsey D. Atherton / 1
Military From sci-fi scout to robot pack mule The army tested a prototype hover bike.


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Curb your immune enthusiasm
23Latest Science News / 1
Scientists have discovered how to prevent undesirable immune attacks on therapeutic viruses.


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Ants find their way even when going backwards
200+Latest Science News / 1
Ants can get their bearings whatever the orientation of their body, new research shows. Their brains may be smaller than the head of a pin, but ants are excellent navigators that use celestial and terrestrial cues to memorize their paths. To do so, they use several regions of the brain simultaneously, proving once again that the brain of insects is more complex than thought.


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New method could turbocharge drug discovery, protein research
13Latest Science News / 1
A team led by scientists has developed a versatile new method that should enhance the discovery of new drugs and the study of proteins.


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Affordable Care Act made cancer screening more accessible for millions, study finds
26Latest Science News / 1
The Affordable Care Act helped make recommended cancer screening more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans, according to new research.


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Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens
500+Latest Science News / 1
The intrinsic ability of graphene to superconduct (or carry an electrical current with no resistance) has been activated for the first time. This further widens the potential of graphene as a material that could be used in fields such as energy storage, high-speed computing, and molecular electronics.


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Perry promises to protect ‘all of the science’ at the US energy department
100+NatureNews / by Jeff Tollefson / 1
Trump's nominee for energy secretary says that he will base decisions on 'sound science'. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21334


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Theorists propose new class of topological metals with exotic electronic properties
13Latest Science News / 1
Researchers have proposed a theory-based approach to characterize a class of metals that possess exotic electronic properties that could help scientists find other, similarly-endowed materials.


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Teenagers who access mental health services see significant improvements, study shows
25Latest Science News / 1
Young people with mental health problems who have contact with mental health services are significantly less likely to suffer from clinical depression later in their adolescence than those with equivalent difficulties who do not receive treatment, according to new research.


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Harvests in US to suffer from climate change
41Latest Science News / 1
Some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. To better assess how climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions will likely impact wheat, maize and soybean, an international team of scientists now ran an unprecedentedly comprehensive set of computer simulations of US crop yields. Importantly, the scientists find that increased irrigation can help to


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5th 'Mars Mission' Simulation Ready For Launch In Hawaii
500+Science : NPR / by Rebecca Hersher / 1
Starting Thursday, six people will spend eight months in a dome on Mauna Loa volcano to study what living on Mars might be like. The mission is co-sponsored by the University of Hawaii and NASA. (Image credit: University of Hawaii News)


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Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening's Popularity on the Rise
15Latest Science News / 1
Genetic counselors are playing a greater role in areas of medicine in the wake of advancement in genomic technology. In the last decade, genetic testing has improved dramatically, enabling medical professionals the ability to screen for common genetic conditions like Down syndrome more accurately beginning at 10 weeks gestation.


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Global sea level could rise 8 feet by 2100
4Futurity.org / by Todd Bates-Rutgers / 1
Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions could rise significantly faster than the global average. Moreover, in a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100, according to a new report which lays out six scenarios intended to assist with national and regional planning. “Currently, about 6 million Americans live within about 6 feet of the sea level, and t


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Heat from Earth’s core may drive plate tectonics
3Futurity.org / by Greg Borzo-U. Chicago / 1
For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows that the additional force of heat drawn from Earth’s core also drives plate dynamics. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries between moving


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'Marine repairmen': Limpets are construction workers of the seashore
16Latest Science News / 1
New research shows that limpets can repair their damaged shells with biological material so that they are as strong as the originals. However, they are still vulnerable to multiple impacts and 'spalling' -- a well-known cause of failure in engineering materials such as concrete.


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Quality control inside the cell: How rescue proteins dispose of harmful messages
12Latest Science News / 1
The ability to dispose of proteins that are either aberrant or (in the worst case) toxic is fundamental to a cell's survival. Researchers have been able to demonstrate the manner in which two specific proteins recognize defective messenger RNAs (molecules that carry the 'assembly instructions' for protein synthesis) and trigger their destruction.


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WIRED Book Club: We Have Wrapped Our Tentacles Around Binti
64WIRED / by Wired Staff / 1
In Nnedi Okorafor's Hugo-winning novella, a young student confronts many-tentacled monsters—and it's not even her first day of school yet.


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Research team develops new diagnostic tool to identify tinnitus in animals
16Latest Science News / 1
A behavioral tool has been developed that may significantly aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tinnitus, ultimately leading to new drugs and treatment methods, report scientists.


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New guidelines seek to promote family-centered care in the ICU
7Latest Science News / 1
Critical illness is a stressful and traumatic experience that may have lasting effects on the health of patients and families, even months after discharge from the intensive care unit. A new set of guidelines aims to promote family-centered care in neonatal, pediatric, and adult ICUs.


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What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes
13Latest Science News / 1
It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs.


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Insects also migrate, study shows
100+Latest Science News / 1
Insects engage in the largest continental migration on Earth, new research indicates. Some 3.5 trillion insects in Southern Britain alone migrate each year – a biomass eight times that of bird migration. The researchers fear that global warming may significantly increase the number of insects, potentially affecting various ecosystems in different parts of the world


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Technological progress alone won't stem resource use
19Latest Science News / 1
While some scientists believe that the world can achieve significant dematerialization through improvements in technology, a new study finds that technological advances alone will not bring about dematerialization and, ultimately, a sustainable world. The researchers found that no matter how much more efficient and compact a product is made, consumers will only demand more of that product and in t


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Advances in imaging detect blunt cerebrovascular injury more frequently in trauma patients
17Latest Science News / 1
Advances in diagnostic imaging technology have meant that more trauma patients are being diagnosed with blunt cerebrovascular injuries, and as a result, stroke and related death rates in these patients have declined significantly over the past 30 years. These changes are due to the evolution of imaging technology, namely CT-scanning, and its wide availability in hospitals large and small, accordin


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One percent of Cambodian children live in orphanages yet have a living parent
28Latest Science News / 1
Nearly 80 percent of adolescents living in Cambodia's orphanages have one or more living parents, according to a study. This is the first research of its kind to assess the literacy and health of children living outside of family care in Cambodia.


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Employee wages not just linked to skills, but quality of co-workers
12Latest Science News / 1
The presence of high-performing co-workers can improve an individual’s earnings, research has shown.


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Leica Debuts Its New M10 Camera and, Yep, It’s Gorgeous
300+WIRED / by Tim Moynihan / 1
The successor to the M only shoots stills, and you'll pay a lot for that red dot.


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Images of 2 pulsars could clear up geometry debate
8Futurity.org / by Matt Swayne-Penn State / 1
Pulsars are a type of neutron star born in supernova explosions when massive stars collapse. Astronomers first discovered them 50 years ago. Recent images of two pulsars—Geminga and B0355+54—could shed light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as well as their often perplexing geometry. Astronomers detect pulsars by their lighthouse-like beams of radio emission and beams of high-en


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Neil Gaiman’s Very Necessary Apocalypse Comedy Good Omens Is Coming to Amazon
500+WIRED / by Charley Locke / 1
Welcome to the End Times.


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Great differences in the view of withdrawing futile intensive care
12Latest Science News / 1
The views among physicians and the general public when it comes to deciding whether to withhold or withdraw treatment of terminally ill patients differ greatly. However, in a hypothetical case study of a clearly hopeless medical case, great unanimity among physicians’ and the public’s assessments could be seen with regards to cancelling treatment or offering relief at the final stages of life.


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New study will help find the best locations for thermal power stations in Iceland
15Latest Science News / 1
A new research article gives indications of the best places in Iceland to build thermal power stations.


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Green Sahara's ancient rainfall regime revealed
79Latest Science News / 1
Rainfall patterns in the Sahara during the 6,000-year 'Green Sahara' period have been pinpointed by analyzing marine sediments. From 5,000 to 11,000 years ago, what is now the Sahara Desert had ten times the rainfall it does today and was home to hunter-gatherers who lived in the region's savannahs and wooded grasslands. The new research is the first to compile a continuous record of the region's


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Regional sea-level scenarios: Helping US Northeast plan for faster-than-global rise
100+Latest Science News / 2
Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions will rise significantly faster than the global average, according to a new report. In a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100, according to the report, which lays out six scenarios intended to inform national and regional planning.


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Mars and Venus on the therapist's couch
18Latest Science News / 2
Generally speaking, men want a quick fix from psychological therapy and women want to talk about their feelings, concludes a new study.


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Caves in central China show history of natural flood patterns
15Latest Science News / 2
Researchers have found that major flooding and large amounts of precipitation occur on 500-year cycles in central China. These findings shed light on the forecasting of future floods and improve understanding of climate change over time and the potential mechanism of strong precipitation in monsoon regions.


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Creating atomic scale nanoribbons
16Latest Science News / 2
A recent study has demonstrated the first important step toward integrating atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (APGNRs) onto nonmetallic substrates.


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Insecticides mimic melatonin, creating higher risk for diabetes
400+Latest Science News / 2
Synthetic chemicals commonly found in insecticides and garden products bind to the receptors that govern our biological clocks researchers have found.


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Ants can find their way home walking backwards, but they have to peek first
300+Popular Science / by Sara Chodosh / 2
Animals Ants may have a complex understanding of their place in space You'd have to, too.


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This machine lets your smartphone analyze DNA
12Popular Science / by Sophie Bushwick / 2
Health There's an app for that? This $500 device enables a smartphone to identify DNA sequences.


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Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health
2KScience : NPR / by Alex Smith / 2
Once an elite swimmer and a Yale grad, Siphiwe Baleka now coaches 3,000 fellow truckers on the best ways to work out, eat right and stay connected on the road. Drivers say his wellness plan works. (Image credit: Alex Smith)


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Ants use Sun and memories to navigate
400+BBC News - Science & Environment / 2
Scientists say ants can plot a route home even when travelling backwards.


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Lap band surgery benefits very obese adolescents
15Latest Science News / 2
Lap band surgery has significant benefits for severely obese teenagers and, despite its controversial nature, should still be considered as a first option to manage obesity during adolescence, a new study has found.


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Gene-edited animals face US regulatory crackdown
NatureNews / by Amy Maxmen / 2
Last-minute proposal from Obama administration addresses CRISPR and other cutting-edge technologies. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21331


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Do You Speak Virus? Phages Caught Sending Chemical Messages
1KScientific American Content / by Ewen Callaway / 2
A virus that infects bacteria listens to messages from its relatives when deciding how to attack its hosts

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How Kids Catch Our Social Biases
500+Scientific American Content / by Allison L. Skinner / 2
The nonverbal messages we send, sometimes unconsciously, can play a surprisingly large role

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Precision medicine advances pediatric brain tumor diagnosis and treatment
26Latest Science News / 2
In the largest clinical study to date of genetic abnormalities in pediatric brain tumors, researchers performed clinical testing on more than 200 tumor samples and found that a majority had genetic irregularities that could influence how the disease was diagnosed and/or treated with approved drugs or agents being evaluated in clinical trials.


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It's not in your head: The weather is weirder, and climate change is the reason why
3KPopular Science / by Mark D. Kaufman / 2
Environment But don’t point any fingers at one particular flood. Or drought. Or hurricane. Or heatwave. If it seems like you’re regularly reading about devastating floods, droughts and storms, it’s because these extreme events are actually happening more frequently, so…


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Magnetic moment of a single antiproton determined with greatest precision ever
19Latest Science News / 2
Physicists have published the most accurate measurement of a fundamental property of the antiproton to date. This research represents a contribution to the matter-antimatter debate.


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Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
100+Latest Science News / 2
One of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate, research suggests.


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Making AI systems that see the world as humans do
100+Latest Science News / 2
An artificial intelligence system has been developed that performs at human levels on a standard intelligence test.


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One in five adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts
21Latest Science News / 2
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission.


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The $2.4-Billion Plan to Steal a Rock from Mars
200+Scientific American Content / by Alexandra Witze / 2
NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the Red Planet


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13 Must-See Flicks Coming to Sundance This Year
100+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter / 2
These are the films coming to Park City, Utah that we're most psyched about.


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Abortion rate halves if women have to go extra 100 miles
500+New Scientist / 2
A law that closed many abortion clinics in Texas has led to a drop in the rate of abortions. On average, the nearest clinic is now 80 kilometres further away


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Disability risk rises after older adults visit E.R.
7Futurity.org / by Ziba Kashef-Yale / 2
Older adults who go to the emergency department for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, research shows. Most adults aged 65 and older who visit the emergency department each year are treated and sent home. Earlier research has shown that these patients are more likely to experience disability and declines in function


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Art made of the air we breathe | Emily Parsons-Lord
200+TEDTalks (video) / by contact@ted.com (TED Conferences LLC) / 2
Emily Parsons-Lord re-creates air from distinct moments in Earth's history -- from the clean, fresh-tasting air of the Carboniferous period to the soda-water air of the Great Dying to the heavy, toxic air of the future we're creating. By turning air into art, she invites us to know the invisible world around us. Breathe in the Earth's past and future in this imaginative, trippy talk.


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Scientists saw nanocubes self-heal
5Futurity.org / by Taylor Kubota-Stanford / 2
Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers have recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. The work could someday help our phone batteries last longer and our electric vehicles go farther on a single charge. In a lab 18 feet underground, researchers in the Dionne lab at Stanford University conducted the arduous experiments—sometimes requiring 30 con


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Mandarin makes you more musical?
16Latest Science News / 2
Mandarin makes you more musical -- and at a much earlier age than previously thought. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don't' rush just yet to sign your kids up for Chinese lessons instead of piano.


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Blood-repellent materials: A new approach to medical implants
200+Latest Science News / 2
Medical implants like stents, catheters and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection -- a perpetual problem for many patients. Engineers now offer a potential solution: A specially grown, 'superhemophobic' titanium surface that's extremely repellent to blood. The material could form the basis for surgical implants with lower risk of rejection by the body.


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How estrogen modulates fear learning
41Latest Science News / 2
Low estrogen levels may make women more susceptible to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while high estrogen levels may be protective. New research provides insight into how estrogen changes gene activity in the brain to achieve its protective effects.


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Why baboon males resort to domestic violence
18Latest Science News / 2
Some baboon males vying for a chance to father their own offspring expedite matters in a gruesome way -- they kill infants sired by other males and attack pregnant females, causing them to miscarry, researchers report. Infanticide has been documented in other animals including baboons, lions and dolphins, but rarely feticide. The perpetrators are more prone to commit domestic violence when forced


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Changes in blood-brain barrier, intestinal permeability found in individuals with autism
39Latest Science News / 2
A new study finds reduced expression of genes involved in integrity of the blood-brain barrier, intestinal barrier in those with autism spectrum disorder.


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The tasmanian tiger had a brain structure suited to a predatory life style
12Latest Science News / 2
Brain scans suggest the action-planning part of the cortex was large in these extinct predators.


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Seafloor valleys discovered below West Antarctic glaciers
12Latest Science News / 2
Glaciologists have uncovered large valleys in the ocean floor beneath some of the massive glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica. Carved by earlier advances of ice during colder periods, the troughs enable warm, salty water to reach the undersides of glaciers, fueling their increasingly rapid retreat.


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Meeting the challenges of nanotechnology: Nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology
19Latest Science News / 2
Scientists show nanoscale modifications to the edge region of nanocontacts to nanowires can be used to engineer the electrical function of the interfaces.


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Four ways Trump could unravel Obama's science legacy
NatureNews / by Lauren Morello / 2
From stem-cell law to national monuments, the president-elect has myriad opportunities to transform the research landscape. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21327


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Watch a giant robot use 8-foot-long knives to chop veggies
6Popular Science / by Sophie Bushwick / 2
DIY MegaBots built a giant version of Simone Giertz's terrifying machine To build a mega version of Simone Giertz's vegetable-chopping machine, MegaBots attached eight-foot-long knife arms to their giant robot.


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Billion-Dollar Project Aims to Prep Vaccines before Epidemics Hit
400+Scientific American Content / by Declan Butler / 2
Early targets include Nipah virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome

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How Trump’s erratic nuclear policy could spark a new arms race
14New Scientist / 2
The red “button” might not be safe under Trump's finger – but the new presidency brings some strange and surprising silver linings


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More than half of atrial fibrillation patients become asymptomatic after catheter ablation
13Latest Science News / 2
More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure.


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The New Logan Trailer Plays (Violently) Against Type
2KWIRED / by Graeme McMillan / 2
The latest Wolverine movie is going to be unlike any superhero movie out there.


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New theory may explain mystery of Fairy Circles of Namibia
100+Latest Science News / 2
One of nature's greatest mysteries -- the 'Fairy Circles' of Namibia -- may have been unraveled by researchers. The study suggests that the interaction between termite engineering and the self-organization of vegetation could be jointly responsible for the phenomenon.


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Eco-HAB: New quality in research on neuronal basis of social behavior
15Latest Science News / 2
How the brain controls social behaviors and what exactly the neuronal impairments causing its pathologies are, is yet to be determined. To better understand mechanisms in play, scientists perform thousands of tests of social interactions, usually conducted in mice. However, such assays are highly irreproducible, which significantly impedes making new discoveries. To address this issue scientists h


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Major Viking Age manor discovered at Birka, Sweden
55Latest Science News / 2
For centuries it has been speculated where the manor of the royal bailiff of Birka, Herigar, might have been located. New geophysical results provide evidence of its location at Korshamn, outside the town rampart of the Viking Age proto-town Birka in Sweden.


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Mapping brain in preemies may predict later disability
23Latest Science News / 2
Scanning a premature infant’s brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain’s white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study.


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Foxes may confuse predators by rubbing themselves in puma scent
300+New Scientist / 2
Gray foxes in the mountains of California rub in the scent of pumas, possibly to absorb their smell and confuse predators to give themselves a chance to run


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Cutting Greenhouse Gases Would Help Trump Achieve His Economic Goals
300+Scientific American Content / by Michael E. Mann / 2
The new administration could cut greenhouse gases and achieve its economic goals all at once


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Raw materials for meatballs, falafel from mealworms and crickets
52Latest Science News / 2
A research team has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavor, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity also in Europe, they say.


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Molecule flash mob
14Latest Science News / 2
Neurotransmitter transporters are some of the most popular transport proteins in research as they play a major role in the processing of signals in the brain. A new study has now successfully demonstrated for the first time the structural impact of membrane lipids on medically relevant serotonin transporters.


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3 strategies for surviving intimate partner violence
6Futurity.org / by Bert Gambini-Buffalo / 2
Interviews show that African-American women in abusive relationships use a variety of strategies pulled from three general categories to survive intimate partner violence. “There’s this stereotype that African-American women who experience abuse are probably reacting to it a certain way, but there is a range of responses,” says Noelle M. St. Vil, an assistant professor in the University at Buffal


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Protein complex prevents genome instability
17Latest Science News / 2
An international research collaboration is investigating the repair process of a serious form of DNA damage that can lead to instability of genetic material and tumor formation. The researchers are studying the roles of groups of proteins that control the repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA that occur from internal or external sources, such as UV irradiation.


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School curricula are a reflection of society's expectations
15Latest Science News / 2
In a pioneering project, researchers studied the development of school curricula in Switzerland’s three main language regions. This project clearly showed that ever since the Swiss school system was created in 1830 the importance and content of every subject in the curriculum, whether language, history, handicraft or physical education, has been in flux.


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Structure of atypical cancer protein paves way for drug development
16Latest Science News / 2
The elusive structure of a cancer cell receptor protein has been uncovered by researchers. This protein can be leveraged to fight disease progression, say investigators.


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Connected Devices Give Spies a Powerful New Way to Surveil
300+WIRED / by Shay Hershkovitz and Roey Tzezana / 2
Opinion: A pair of Israeli security researchers argue that the advent of connected home devices presents a new opportunity for spy agencies.


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Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump
39KWIRED / by Zoë Schlanger / 2
The incoming Trump administration's EPA transition team intends to remove some climate data from the agency's website. These researchers are swooping in to help.


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The Ultimate Cure for the Fake-News Epidemic Will Be More Skeptical Readers
3KScientific American Content / by David Pogue / 2
New algorithms will help—but users' skepticism is the ultimate weapon


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Proposed Presidential Autism–Vaccine Panel Could Help Spread Disease
8KScientific American Content / by John McQuaid / 2
Committee mentioned in a Trump meeting last week could scare people away from protective immunizations, scientists say

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How to Overcome Unconscious Bias
500+Scientific American Content / by Jordan Axt /
We all have prejudices we're not even aware of—but they don't have to govern our behavior

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Slovakia’s Hyperloop Moves a Step Closer to Not Being a Joke
1KWIRED / by Alex Davies /
Hyperloop Transportation Technologies strikes a deal to explore extending its plans to the Czech Republic.


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Fighting Cancer’s Crisis of Confidence, One Study at a Time
200+WIRED / by Megan Molteni /
The Reproducibility Project announces its initial cancer study results today.


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Will mega-cities swallow up vital farmland?
8Futurity.org / by Keith Randall-Texas A&M /
The increase of mega-cities in some parts of the world is almost certain to eliminate huge areas of farmland critical for food production by 2030, say researchers. This shift could have severe implications worldwide. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that some urban areas located near key farmland producing regions will triple in size, resulting in huge impl


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Think Trump Will Be More Inclusive after Winning?
500+Scientific American Content / by Samir Nurmohamed /
Behavioral research suggests the answer is probably no

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Robotic sleeve 'hugs' failing hearts
1KBBC News - Science & Environment /
US scientists develop a robotic sleeve that can help hearts pump when they fail to work properly.


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The Magnificent Refuges That Hide Humanity’s Information
500+WIRED / by Charley Locke /
What do data centers and monasteries have in common? Data storage apparently.


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Now You Can Save the Democratic Party for the Low, Low Price of $4.68 a Month
500+WIRED / by Emily Dreyfuss /
On the eve of Trump's inauguration, Democrats are falling apart. For the price of a latte, one political techie thinks he can bring them back together.


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The Touchy Task of Making Robots Seem Human—But Not Too Human
72WIRED / by Margaret Rhodes /
On the anthropomorphic spectrum, is there a sweet spot for robotic assistants? The post The Touchy Task of Making Robots Seem Human—But Not Too Human appeared first on WIRED .


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A Wall Alone Can’t Secure the Border, No Matter Who Pays for It
500+WIRED / by Lily Hay Newman /
Border patrol technology is the future whether Trump acknowledges that or not.


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Review: Yuneec Breeze 4K
71WIRED / by Scott Gilbertson /
With the new Breeze 4K, Yuneec has launched a drone made just for newcomers.


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3 Questions for Rick Perry, Trump’s Pick to Lead the Um… Um… Oh Yeah, the Department of Energy
79WIRED / by Nick Stockton /
Rick Perry once couldn't remember the name of the agency he's been nominated to lead.


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Inside the Weird, Industry-Shaking World of Donald Glover
3KWIRED / by Allison Samuels /
Childish Gambino. Atlanta. Lando Calrissian. Glover has just about every performance space covered, and all his projects intersect in strange ways.


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Stephen Hawking says he has a way to escape from a black hole
40KNew Scientist /
Researchers have long struggled to resolve what happens to information when it falls inside a black hole, but the famous physicist says he has a solution


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Brain's "Helper" Cells Turn Toxic in Injury and Disease
1KScientific American Content / by Moheb Costandi /
The Jekyll-and-Hyde behavior of astrocytes may point the way to treatments for degenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s and MS

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Brainwaves could act as your password – but not if you’re drunk
500+New Scientist /
EEG authentication is touted as a potential biometric alternative to passwords, but a test involving shots of whisky suggests it won’t work if you’re tipsy


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Why are we running out of courgettes?
500+BBC News - Science & Environment /
Bad weather in Italy and Spain is significantly increasing the price of vegetables across northern Europe


¤

How to Watch Trump’s Presidential Inauguration
100+WIRED / by Emma Grey Ellis /
Here's how you can tune in for the first moments of Trump's presidency.


¤

BBC Breakfast presenters meet 'Orangu-cam'
500+BBC News - Science & Environment /
The Breakfast team have been monkeying around with one of the stars of new series 'Spy in the Wild'.


¤

Fujifilm’s Excellent Digital Cameras Just Got Even Excellenter
100+WIRED / by Tim Moynihan /
Our favorite compact camera gets a little bump for 2017.


¤

Knot Not Easy to Knot
13Scientific American Content / by Christopher Intagliata /
Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Mapping the mind of worms
39Latest Science News /
Biologists have identified signals that drive distinct behavior in microscopic nematode worms, and which may hold lessons for human brains.


¤

Intense industrial fishing
31Latest Science News /
A new study examines how China maintains large catches and what it means for fishery management elsewhere


¤

Pruitt Says He Backs Biofuels Program, but Is Open to Tweaks
Scientific American Content / by Valerie Volcovici /
Trump's choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency tells Senate he would honor the intent of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard

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Study provides new evidence on role of person-to person transmission in drug-resistant TB
18Latest Science News /
A study of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB)in KwaZulu province, South Africa, builds on a growing body of evidence showing person-to-person transmission, not just inadequate treatment, is driving the spread of XDR TB.


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Could better eye training help reduce concussion in women's soccer?
25Latest Science News /
With the ever-growing popularity of women's soccer, attention to sports-related concussions is also a growing concern. High school female soccer players incur a higher concussion rate than males, and researchers noticed in photographs of female soccer players, the players often had their eyes closed. They wanted to quantify whether female athletes closed their eyes more frequently than male counte


¤

Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
18Latest Science News /
Production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2, an international team of researchers has discovered.


¤

Trump EPA Pick Expresses Doubts about Climate Change, Defends Oil Industry Funding
2Scientific American Content / by Valerie Volcovici /
Pruitt tells Senate he would seek to ensure environmental protections are effective without hurting development

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Scientists Needn't Get A Patient's Consent To Study Blood Or DNA
400+Science : NPR / by Rob Stein /
In its update of ethics rules aimed at protecting patients, the Obama administration decided against a provision that scientists said would hinder research. Consumer advocates aren't happy. (Image credit: Dana Neely/Getty Images)


¤

Seals hunt down hidden fish by sensing their breath in the sand
400+New Scientist /
The only way for flatfish hidden under the sand on the sea floor to avoid harbour seal predators might be to hold their breath


¤

Trump's EPA nominee Scott Pruitt grilled on oil company ties
52BBC News - Science & Environment /
Donald Trump's choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has faced some tough questioning at his confirmation hearing.


¤

Billion-dollar project aims to prep vaccines before epidemics hit
NatureNews / by Declan Butler /
Massive effort plans to stockpile vaccines against future outbreaks. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21329


¤

Many more people could still die from mad cow disease in the UK
500+New Scientist /
A man who has died of vCJD has shown that the disease can affect a second genetic subtype of people. It’s likely these people take longer to develop symptoms


¤

Patients with chronic conditions face big deductibles
10Futurity.org / by Kara Gavin-U. Michigan /
For tens of millions of Americans, the start of a new year means the counter has gone back to zero on their health insurance deductibles. If they need health care, they’ll pay for some of it out of their own pockets before their insurance takes over. But what do those plans mean for people with common chronic health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, joint problems, and heart disease? The short


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Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging
500+Latest Science News /
Elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older than their chronological age by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary, research shows.


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Small intestine GIST associated with better prognosis in younger patients
50Latest Science News /
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are tumors that arise is the wall of the digestive tract, and most often occur in the stomach or small intestine. Though more common in later in life, GISTs can occur in adolescents and young adults (AYA) under 40 years old as well. Researchers report findings from the first population-based analysis of AYA patients with GIST.


¤

Swamphens signal dominance through fleshy faces
9Latest Science News /
What's in a face? In addition to their plumage, Pukeko -- large purple swamphens found in New Zealand -- convey information about their status through their faces. A new study shows that the strongest predictor of male dominance in Pukeko is the size of their frontal shield, a fleshy ornament on their bill that can change quickly.


¤

2016 Was the Hottest Year on Record
200+Scientific American Content / by Andrea Thompson /
Both NASA and NOAA declare that our planet is experiencing record-breaking warming for the third year in a row

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U.S. Report Confirms 2016 Was The Hottest Year On Record
24Science : NPR / by Geoff Brumfiel /
2016 was the warmest year on record, according to a new report by the U.S. government. This is the third year in a row that global temperatures have soared above the 20th century average. The report comes ahead of the inauguration of Donald Trump, who has at times, referred to global warming as a "hoax."


¤

States Could Take Lead On Environmental Regulation Under Trump
100+Science : NPR /
NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Dallas Burtraw, senior fellow with the nonpartisan think tank Resources for the Future, about what role states have traditionally played in environmental regulation, and what a decentralized approach under the Trump administration would look like.


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EPA Nominee Scott Pruitt Acknowledges Existence Of Climate Change
30Science : NPR / by Nathan Rott /
Trump's pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency has acknowledged that human activity plays "some" role in the changing climate. In his confirmation hearing on Wednesday, Scott Pruitt said he wants to work with states to protect the environment while also encouraging economic growth.


¤

3 Critical Questions Tom Price Didn’t Answer at the Health and Human Services Hearing
100+WIRED / by Megan Molteni /
These are the important points to consider when Price faces his formal confirmation hearing on January 24.


¤

Delirium could accelerate dementia-related mental decline
20Latest Science News /
When hospitalized, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.


¤

The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells
200+Quanta Magazine / by Alla Katsnelson /
Structure equals function: If there’s one thing we all learned about proteins in high school biology, that would be it. According to the textbook story of the cell, a protein’s three-dimensional shape determines what it does — drive chemical reactions, pass signals up and down the cell’s information superhighway, or maybe hang molecular tags onto DNA. For more than a century, biologists have thou


¤

From the archives: In 1999, Eugene Cernan knew we'd make it to Mars
300+Popular Science / by Popular Science, July 1999, by Frank Vizard /
Space In memory of "the last moonwalker" In memory of Eugene Cernan, who passed away on January 16, 2017, we're republishing our 1999 Q&A with him—"The Last Moonwalker."…


¤

Global threat to primates concerns us all
40Latest Science News /
In cooperation with an international team of experts, scientists demand immediate measures to protect primates.


¤

Soft robot helps the heart beat
100+Latest Science News /
A customizable soft robot that fits around a heart and helps it beat has now been developed by researchers, potentially opening new treatment options for people suffering from heart failure.


¤

Northern Quebec lichen yields two unique molecules and several antibacterial compounds
15Latest Science News /
Two unique molecules have been discovered by researchers in a species of lichen growing in northern Quebec. A number of compounds with interesting antibacterial properties have also been isolated from the lichen, according to an article.


¤

It’s Time to Stand Up for the Climate—and for Civilization
10KWIRED / by Bill McKibben /
Bill McKibben argues that protecting science's legacy of climate research is a matter of protecting civilization itself.


¤

Finally, Miles Morales Will Get to Be a Big Screen Spider-Man
400+WIRED / by Graeme McMillan /
Step aside, Peter Parker.


¤

Out of Places to Stick Diamonds, Rolls-Royce Starts Infusing Cars With Gold
200+WIRED / by Alex Davies /
Built to ferry guests around Macau, these Phantoms are stuffed with Au.


¤

Mississippi River: Reviving floodplain to reduce Gulf of Mexico's dead zone
31Latest Science News /
Researchers are reviving one of the Mississippi River's main filters: the floodplain. The result is a unique environment that removes nitrogen, a contributor to the Gulf of Mexico's dead zone.


¤

Study identifies molecular signal for maintaining adult neuron
32Latest Science News /
Research in mice points to better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders, report researchers.


¤

'Collateral' lethality may offer new therapeutic approach for cancers of the pancreas, stomach and colon
14Latest Science News /
Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as 'collateral lethality,' which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers.


¤

Nintendo Switch Ain’t for Mom and Pop—It’s for Die-Hard Fans
500+WIRED / by Chris Kohler /
Nintendo is courting a new sort of player with its new hybrid console: the people who already like Nintendo.


¤

2016 was the hottest year on record
8Popular Science / by Kendra Pierre-Louis /
Environment The temps trump all historical records Climate data reveals that 2016 was the hottest year since we began keeping temperature records.


¤

Researchers develop ways to improve machining, milling processes
17Latest Science News /
Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers – and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created.


¤

Novel mechanism identified that protects pancreas from digestive enzymes
11Latest Science News /
Researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas.


¤

Cancer treatment for transplant patients discovered
19Latest Science News /
Nephrologists have published a letter that profiles a novel drug combination with the potential to help prevent rejection of a donor kidney in transplant patients undergoing cancer treatment.


¤

The Future of Global Risk: A View from Davos
20Scientific American Content / by Erwann Michel-Kerjan /
The latest edition of a report from the World Economic Forum updates its annual lists of global threats


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3D simulation could replace some zebrafish in labs
4Futurity.org / by James Devitt-NYU /
Scientists have developed the first data-driven modeling framework capable of simulating zebrafish swimming in three dimensions. It is rooted in real-life data and robust enough to potentially replace animals in some types of research, particularly neurobehavioral studies that are critical to understanding the brain. Every year, approximately 20 million animals are used in scientific research. In


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Meet China's Sharp Sword, a stealth drone that can likely carry 2 tons of bombs
3KPopular Science / by Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer /
From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal It just won a technology prize, so China's pretty proud of it. The Sharp Sword won a big national technology award, showcasing China's secretive research into stealth drones.


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2016 Was the Hottest Year on Record, and Humans Are to Blame
2KWIRED / by Damian Carrington /
2016 was the hottest year on record, setting a new high for the third year in a row, with scientists firmly putting the blame on human activities.


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Soft Robot Exosuits Will Give You Springier Steps
100+WIRED / by Nick Stockton /
Rigid exoskeletons to help the movement-impaired heavy, and they have a hard time aligning with human joints. A soft robotic wearable could be the fix.


¤

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?
1KScience : NPR / by Richard Harris /
Results from some key cancer studies were different when the experiments were redone in different labs. Scientists don't yet know why but say the answer could have health implications for patients. (Image credit: Tom Werner/Getty Images)


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Here's a plan to turn bullfighting arenas into drone hubs
95Popular Science / by Kelsey D. Atherton /
Aviation No bull. Can we turn a bullfighting arena into a drone hub? Read on.


¤

Primates facing 'extinction crisis'
1KBBC News - Science & Environment /
Primates are facing an extinction crisis, according to researchers who have found that 60% of species are under threat.


¤

Super-resolution imaging offers fast way to discern fate of stem cells
17Latest Science News /
A new way to identify the state and fate of individual stem cells earlier than previously possible has now been developed by a team of scientists.


¤

Which facebook 'friends' help most when looking for a job? Depends where you live in the world
16Latest Science News /
Research used anonymous Facebook data from almost 17 million social connections in 55 countries to determine that the role of weak and strong ties in job searches is important around the world, but the value of a single strong tie is even more important for job seekers in countries with pronounced income inequality.


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Massive sea lion, fur seal hunting in the Patagonian coasts is altering Southern Atlantic Ocean ecosystems
45Latest Science News /
Sea lion hunting by the Europeans at the Atlantic coasts of South America – it started in the 19th Century and continued up to the second half of the 20th century in Argentina and Uruguay – changed its nutrition guidelines of these pinnipeds as well as the structure of the coastal trophic network, according to new research.


¤

Gestational diabetes increases risk for postpartum depression
100+Latest Science News /
Gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression in first-time mothers, researcher have concluded.


¤

Study finds new target for controlling cell division
10Latest Science News /
Modern genome sequencing methods used to measure the efficiency of synthesis of individual protein during cell division has found that the enzymes that make lipids and membranes were synthesized at much greater efficiency when a cell is ready to split.


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Majority of primate species may vanish in next 25 to 50 years
2KNew Scientist /
The latest review of primate survival prospects shows that habitat loss from farming and human expansion is putting our closest evolutionary relatives at risk


¤

Stretchy robotic suit reduces energy used to walk by 23 per cent
500+New Scientist /
A lightweight textile exoskeleton that assists the leg muscles could be a boon for people who find it difficult to get around


¤

Traffic jam in empty space
85Latest Science News /
An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made by researchers in Germany. The team of scientists has now shown how to manipulate the electric vacuum field and thus generate deviations from the ground state of empty space which can only be understood in the context of the quantum theory of light.


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Severe side effects of approved multiple sclerosis medication
59Latest Science News /
The multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy alemtuzumab can trigger severe, unpredictable side effects. Scientists report on two patients for whom the infusion of alemtuzumab significantly worsened symptoms. The team also describes a treatment that successfully curbed the harmful side effects.


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This soft robot hugs your heart to help keep it pumping
3KPopular Science / by Sarah Fecht /
Health It could help you survive heart failure About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, meaning their hearts don't pump blood as well as they should. A squishy, air-powered robot might be able to help.


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Scientists Must Become More Involved in the Political Process
3KScientific American Content / by Shaughnessy Naughton /
The dearth of lawmakers who bring a scientific perspective to national issues of energy, climate change, national security and technology deeply concern me as a scientist and as an American


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Prehistoric mega-lake sediment offers key insight into how inland regions responded to ‘super-greenhouse’ event
26Latest Science News /
Sediment found at the site of one of the largest lakes in Earth's history could provide a fascinating new insight into how inland regions responded to global climate change millions of years ago.


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Toxic brain cells may drive many neurodegenerative disorders, study finds
75Latest Science News /
While most of us haven't heard of astrocytes, these cells are four times as plentiful in the human brain as nerve cells. Now, a team led by researchers has found that astrocytes, which perform many indispensable functions in the brain, can take on a villainous character, destroying nerve cells and likely driving many neurodegenerative diseases.


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New data show heightened risk of birth defects with antidepressants prescribed during pregnancy
43Latest Science News /
Antidepressants prescribed to pregnant women could increase the chance of having a baby with birth defects, new research indicates.


¤

Harnessing the energy of fireworks for fuel
18Latest Science News /
The world relies heavily on gasoline and other hydrocarbons to power its cars and trucks. In search of an alternative fuel type, some researchers are turning to the stuff of fireworks and explosives: metal powders. And now one team is reporting a method to produce a metal nanopowder fuel with high energy content that is stable in air and doesn't go boom until ignited.


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Driving factors behind changes between local and global carbon cycles
16Latest Science News /
Pioneering new research has provided a fascinating new insight in the quest to determine whether temperature or water availability is the most influential factor in determining the success of global, land-based carbon sinks. The research, carried out by an international team of climate scientists has revealed new clues on how land carbon sinks are regulated on both local and global scales.


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Slack’s New Threaded Messages Tame Your Meandering Chats
300+WIRED / by Davey Alba /
Finally. Slack has just released threaded messaging, a way to connect related messages within a chatroom.


¤

What You Need to Know From Ryan Zinke’s Interior Secretary Hearing
100+WIRED / by Megan Molteni /
With a history of voting to expand fossil fuel exploration on public lands and weakening regulations, Zinke curries no favor with environmentalists.


¤

Stranded With a Million Dollars: How MTV Spied on Contestants for Real-Life Hunger Games
500+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter /
If you think this sounds like the Hunger Games, you're not alone there.


¤

International effort announced to try to save the world's most endangered marine mammal
48Latest Science News /
An ambitious, emergency plan to help save the vaquita porpoise from extinction in the northern Gulf of California has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA). The plan involves relocating some of the remaining vaquitas to a temporary sanctuary, while crucial efforts aimed at eliminating illegal fishing and removing gillnets from their environment con


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Heat from earth’s core could be underlying force in plate tectonics
55Latest Science News /
For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth's tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth's core. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries b


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Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records
47Latest Science News /
Researchers have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat.


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Researcher examines effect of exercise on breast cancer survivors
34Latest Science News /
A new study has focused on the effects of exercise and physical activity on postmenopausal breast cancer survivors taking AIs -- hormone-therapy drugs that stop the production of estrogen. The work concludes that a combination of resistance and aerobic exercise helps mitigate the side effects of AIs and improves health outcomes in breast cancer survivors, particularly their body composition.


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Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed
31Latest Science News /
Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless 'smart' patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The device has been tested on mice.


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Childbirth: Delayed clamping prevents anemia, study suggests
16Latest Science News /
When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study.


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Controversial patient-consent proposal left out of research-ethics reforms
NatureNews / by Sara Reardon /
US agency releases finalized ‘Common Rule’, which governs human-subjects research. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21330


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Magnetic recording with light and no heat
23Latest Science News /
A strong short light pulse can record data on a magnetic layer of yttrium iron garnet doped with Co-ions. The novel mechanism outperforms existing alternatives allowing ever fastest write-read magnetic recording accompanied by unprecedentedly low heat load, researchers report.


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A toolkit for transformable materials
17Latest Science News /
Researchers have developed a general framework to design reconfigurable metamaterials. The design strategy is scale independent, meaning it can be applied to everything from meter-scale architectures to reconfigurable nano-scale systems such as photonic crystals, waveguides and metamaterials to guide heat.


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What's behind the durian fruit's notorious stench?
21Latest Science News /
Most people who have tried durian either love it or hate it. The fruit's yellowish flesh is sweet and custard-like, but it comes with an overpowering stench of garbage. Scientists studying the unique fruit have now analyzed a set of 20 stinky and fruity chemical ingredients and found that a mere two compounds can re-create the overall smell.


¤

A new study explains the origin of mysterious 'fairy circles' in the desert
300+Popular Science / by Sara Chodosh /
Environment These mystical rings may be created by termites Yet another debunking, this time with complex computer modeling!


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A female shark had a bunch of babies without male contact
500+Popular Science / by Rachel Feltman /
Animals It's not the first time a female animal has taken matters into her own fins A female shark had babies without any sperm, which isn't as weird as it sounds…


¤

First evidence of dwarf galaxy merger boosts two cosmic theories
500+New Scientist /
Astronomers have found dwarf galaxies that seem about to merge, backing ideas about how large galaxies form and the scattered nature of dark matter


¤

Mysterious fairy circles in Namibian desert explained at last
500+New Scientist /
Patterns in desert vegetation have been puzzling ecologists for years, but now it seems to have been finally cracked: both water and termites are at play


¤

Under Pressure, Scientists Seek Solutions to Human-Caused Earthquakes
300+Scientific American Content / by Anna Kuchment /
Wastewater injection has created seismic problems in states like Oklahoma and Texas—but there are ways to mitigate the rumbling


¤

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Cancer reproducibility project releases first results
NatureNews / by Monya Baker /
An open-science effort to replicate dozens of cancer-biology studies is off to a confusing start. Nature 541 269 doi: 10.1038/541269a


¤

Do you speak virus? Phages caught sending chemical messages
4KNatureNews / by Ewen Callaway /
A virus that infects bacteria listens to messages from its relatives when deciding how to attack its hosts. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21313


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Why busy college counseling centers aren’t a bad sign
8Futurity.org / by Heather Robbins-Penn State /
Increased demand at college counseling cenrs doesn’t necessarily mean students are less well than in the past. Instead, the increase may be due to national prevention and awareness efforts over the past decade. “The results we are seeing are the outcomes we would expect to see from suicide prevention efforts over the last decade,” says Ben Locke, executive director of the Center for Collegiate


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Deep-space mission to metal asteroid
51Latest Science News /
Scientists are planning to send a deep-space probe to a metal asteroid, enabling them to see what is believed to be a planetary core. Psyche, an asteroid orbiting the sun between Mars and Jupiter, is made almost entirely of nickel-iron metal.


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US army wants to fire swarm of weaponised drones from a missile
500+New Scientist /
A swarm of drones equipped with munitions could locate and attack targets after being released from a missile mid-flight, according to an army proposal


¤

New System Could Connect Cell Phones to Real Cells and Treat Disease
69Scientific American Content / by William Bentley /
Cells, as medicine, now can be switched on and off with electricity

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Male fruit flies rationally choose how to rank mates
5Futurity.org / by James Urton-Washington /
A complex series of experiments shows that male fruit flies, when presented with a pair of females as potential mating partners, display a key component of rational choice: transitivity. “Transitivity is a hallmark of rational decision-making,” says senior author Daniel Promislow, a professor of pathology and biology at the University of Washington. “Essentially, it is the process of establishing


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High school isn’t too late to get teens into STEM
13Futurity.org / by Mark Peters-U. Chicago /
Parents can increase their high schooler’s competency and career interest in STEM fields by talking to them about the relevance of math and science, new research shows. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , show a 12 percentage point increase on the math and science ACT for students whose parents received information on how to effectively convey the impo
Visualizing the Medical Isotope Crisis
300+Scientific American Content / by Amanda Montañez /
Information graphics help to clarify a little-known but critical challenge to the health care industry

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Evolution’s winning groups have these 3 traits
11Futurity.org / by Daniel Stolte-Arizona /
Scientists now have answer to an obvious yet elusive question: Why have some groups on the evolutionary tree of animals branched into a dizzying thicket of species while others split into a mere handful and called it a day? For millennia, humans have marveled at the seemingly boundless variety and diversity of animals inhabiting the Earth. So far, biologists have described and catalogued about 1.


¤

2016 confirmed as the hottest year on record
1KNew Scientist /
The global average temperature in 2016 was 1.1°C higher than pre-industrial levels and about 0.07°C higher than the previous record set in 2015


¤

2016 warmest year on record globally, NASA and NOAA data show
500+Latest Science News /
Earth's 2016 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and NOAA. This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.


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New avenue for anti-depressant therapy discovered
1KLatest Science News /
Researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. In so doing, they identified a new molecule that alleviates anxiety and depressive behavior in rodents.


¤

Finding ways to fix the climate before it is too late
27Latest Science News /
Scientists and policymakers rely on complex computer simulations called Integrated Assessment Models to figure out how to address climate change. But these models need tinkering to make them more accurate.


¤

Milestone in graphene production
14Latest Science News /
For the first time, it is now possible to produce functional OLED electrodes from graphene. The OLEDs can, for example, be integrated into touch displays, and the miracle material graphene promises many other applications for the future.


¤

DNA-testing smartphone aims to tackle drugs resistance
500+BBC News - Science & Environment /
A smartphone attachment that analyses DNA could help improve cancer and tuberculosis treatments.


¤

Patients face 'surprise' medical bills from out-of-network specialists
15Latest Science News /
The average anesthesiologist, emergency physician, pathologist and radiologist charge more than four times what Medicare pays for similar services, often leaving privately insured consumers stuck with surprise medical bills that are much higher than they anticipated, new research suggests.


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Wheat virus crosses over, harms native grasses
12Latest Science News /
Once upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses.


¤

Giant Stationary Wave Spied in Atmosphere of Venus
84Scientific American Content / by Elizabeth Howell /
The phenomenon, called a gravity wave, is likely produced by winds flowing over a mountain on the planet's surface

¤


Jungle Patrol: Shooting Real Hunger Games
100+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter /
Here's a field guide to all the gadgets MTV used to make its new reality show.


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Five-minute chats in the waiting room may prompt families to eat more fruits, vegetables
33Latest Science News /
Low-income families were more likely to use their federal food assistance on nutritious food after learning that their dollars can be doubled for more fruits and vegetables, a new study finds.


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In Rett syndrome model, team shows how adult learning is impaired in females
14Latest Science News /
In mouse models of Rett syndrome -- which in humans is seen overwhelmingly in females -- researchers have demonstrated how failure of Mecp2, the mouse equivalent of the human gene of the same name, has biological consequences that prevent adult females from learning how to gather newborn pups in the days immediately following the pups' birth. They reversed the defect.


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Talking to children about STEM fields boosts test scores and career interest
75Latest Science News /
Parents who talk with their high schoolers about the relevance of science and math can increase competency and career interest in the fields, a report suggests.


¤

Nanofibers developed for healing bone fractures
19Latest Science News /
In future, it may be possible to use nanofibres to improve the attachment of bone implants, or the fibers may be used directly to scaffold bone regeneration. This would aid the healing of fractures and may enable the care of osteoporosis. This is detailed in a new dissertation.


¤

A big nano boost for solar cells
40Latest Science News /
Solar cells convert light into electricity. While the sun is one source of light, the burning of natural resources like oil and natural gas can also be harnessed.


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Vitamin B-12, and a knockoff version, create complex market for marine vitamins
19Latest Science News /
Vitamin B-12 exists in two different, incompatible forms in the oceans. An organism thought to supply essential vitamin B-12 in the marine environment is actually churning out a knockoff version.


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Luminescent proteins provide color to ecological and cheap bio-displays
20Latest Science News /
Mobile phone, computer and TV displays all use very expensive color filters and other components, which cannot be easily recycled. Scientists have designed a new screen, which is cheaper and ecological as it uses a hybrid material. This material's luminescent proteins can be used in backlighting systems and color filters made using a 3-D printing technique.


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Protein involved in blood clotting stimulates liver repair
40Latest Science News /
A new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair has been uncovered by researchers. Using an experimental model of high-dosage acetaminophen, the team found that liver injury activated blood clotting, which then stimulated liver repair.


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Adoptees advantaged by birth language memory
100+Latest Science News /
Language learning very early on in life can be subconsciously retained even when no conscious knowledge of the early experience remains. The subconscious knowledge can then be tapped to speed up learning of the pronunciation of sounds of the lost tongue, report scientists.


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The $2.4-billion plan to steal a rock from Mars
NatureNews / by Alexandra Witze /
NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the red planet. Nature 541 274 doi: 10.1038/541274a


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New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates
23Latest Science News /
A protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1, researchers have discovered.


¤

Delhi's health system: Inadequate progress for a global city
9Latest Science News /
Access to effective care remains insufficient to overcome the crushing poverty and inequalities within Delhi, suggest a new report.


¤

India's First GM Food Crop Held Up by Lawsuit
100+Scientific American Content / by Sanjay Kumar /
Scientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard


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How online abuse of women has spiraled out of control | Ashley Judd
19KTEDTalks (video) / by contact@ted.com (TED Conferences LLC) /
Enough with online hate speech, sexual harassment and threats of violence against women and marginalized groups. It's time to take the global crisis of online abuse seriously. In this searching, powerful talk, Ashley Judd recounts her ongoing experience of being terrorized on social media for her unwavering activism and calls on citizens of the internet, the tech community, law enforcement and leg


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Space Weather Forecast to Improve with European Satellite
72Scientific American Content / by Elizabeth Gibney /
Probe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth

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Moth with 'golden flake hairstyle' named after Donald Trump
12KBBC News - Science & Environment /

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The moth, which has a wingspan of just over a centimetre, was discovered in California.
Interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products helps investors make better choices
7Latest Science News /

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The first online, interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products has been developed. Like the ubiquitous information nutrition panels on food and packaged goods, it is simple, easy to read and uncluttered. What's more, the financial label is interactive, allowing people to easily get a sense of the long-term implications of choices they make today.
Young predators can have bigger impact in the pond
3Futurity.org / by Jade Boyd-Rice /

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Smaller, younger predators can have an outsized effect on their ecosystem, report ecologists. “We live in a world where humans are impacting species at different stages of their lives, and this work shows the importance of considering the entire life cycle of a species rather than just looking at a snapshot in time,” says ecologist Volker Rudolf, associate professor in Rice University’s departmen
Climate change: Data shows 2016 likely to be warmest year yet
10KBBC News - Science & Environment /

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Temperature data for 2016 shows it is likely to have edged ahead of 2015 as the world's warmest year.
Is it freezing inside that tornado?
100+Latest Science News /

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With winter upon us in full force, outdoor temperatures are plummeting. But inside an intense tornado, it's always chilly -- no matter the time of year. A new study demonstrates why that's the case.
A better way to make renewable hydrogen
18Latest Science News /

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Scientists have developed a method which boosts the longevity of high-efficiency photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices.
2016 Was The Hottest Year Yet, Scientists Declare
21KScience : NPR / by Nell Greenfieldboyce /

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Global temperatures soared above the 20th century average last year, as the climate continues to change. It's the hottest it has been since scientists started tracking global temperatures in 1880. (Image credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR)
Marijuana's benefits, Antarctic ice cracks and a $500-million donation
NatureNews /

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The week in science: 13–19 January 2017. Nature 541 264 doi: 10.1038/541264a
Trump nominees talk science: As it happened
NatureNews / by Jeff Tollefson /

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President-elect's picks to lead environment and health agencies testify before Congress. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21319
New insights in genetic defect allow prevention of fatal illnesses in children
14Latest Science News /

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A team of scientists was able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. This mutation causes patients to be extremely vulnerable to normally mild childhood illnesses such as rotavirus and enterovirus. The comprehensive analysis of the genetic defect allows clinicians to provide children with the proper therapies before illnesses prove fatal.
Food security threatened by sea-level rise
31Latest Science News /

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Coastal countries are highly prone to sea-level rise, which leads to salt-water intrusion and increased salinity levels in agricultural land. Also typical for these regions are floods and waterlogging caused by cyclones and typhoons, as well as prolonged drought periods.
Scientists identify early impact of Ebola virus on immune system
7Latest Science News /

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A new mouse model of early Ebola virus (EBOV) infection has shown scientists how early responses of the immune system can affect development of EBOV disease. The model could help identify protective immune responses as targets for developing human EBOV therapeutics.
Climate Change Will Lower the Number of Perfect Weather Days
41Scientific American Content / by Scott Waldman /

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Mild weather days worldwide could decline by up to 13 percent by the end of the century due to global warming

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Victims’ Families Sue Japan for Failing to Warn of Eruption
100+WIRED / by Erik Klemetti /

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Families of some of the victims of the 2014 eruption of Mt. Ontake are suing the local government, claiming that they downplayed the volcano's threat.
#########The post Victims’ Families Sue Japan for Failing to Warn of Eruption appeared first on WIRED .
Introducing Mozilla’s New Logo, Moz://a. Get It?
500+WIRED / by Margaret Rhodes /

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When a big tech company unveils its new identity, it usually does so with a surprise announcement. Not this time.
#########The post Introducing Mozilla’s New Logo, Moz:a. Get It? appeared first on WIRED .
Heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters brain electrical activity
500+Latest Science News /

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Long-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, according to a new study. These alterations were observed in physically and mentally healthy but heavy-drinking adolescents, who nevertheless did not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for a substance abuse disorder.
'Bring it back,' but within bounds: Retrieval strains the forelimbs of dogs
22Latest Science News /

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Hunting dogs such as the popular breed retriever are ideally suited for retrieving birds or small game. However, the weight the dogs carry strains their locomotor system. A motion study has shown that the dogs tilt forwards like a seesaw when they carry the prey in their mouths. This can make already existing joint and tendon damage worse. Therefore, adjusted weights should be used for the trainin
Climate change might mean nicer weather in some places—but don't get too excited
300+Popular Science / by Marlene Cimons /

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From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Most parts of the country will want to spend less time outside While numerous climate studies in recent years have examined the influence of global warming on extreme weather events , there has been little attention directed at the…
New reconstruction of an ancient ice sheet
25Latest Science News /

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A new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.
Women’s access to birth control and abortion fading under Trump
14New Scientist /

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There are ways for women to take back their reproductive rights - but they might have to go to Mexico
Is the 5-Second Rule True?
100+Scientific American Content / by Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt /

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Should you really abide by the famous 5-second rule?

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A New Series About the Visionary Designers Who Shape Our World
4KWIRED / by Scott Dadich /

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We're moving to a future of intentionality. That's a key tenet of design thinking, the main force shaping and pushing tech and innovation of all kinds.
#########The post A New Series About the Visionary Designers Who Shape Our World appeared first on WIRED .
How the FDA Will Help Lead the Next Medical Revolution
100+WIRED / by Robert M. Califf /

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Smart regulation and early engagement with developers can foster innovation, says FDA commissioner Robert Califf.
#########The post How the FDA Will Help Lead the Next Medical Revolution appeared first on WIRED .
Viral escape hatch could be treatment target for hepatitis E
13Latest Science News /

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The technique that the hepatitis E virus -- an emerging liver virus historically found in developing countries but now on the rise in Europe -- uses to spread could present a weak spot scientists can exploit to treat the disease, according to a new study.
Why scientists should research emojis and emoticons :-P
23Latest Science News /

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More than 90 percent of online populations now incorporate emojis and emoticons into their texts and emails, and researchers are wondering what the use of (~_^), (>_<), or =D can reveal about human behavior. Emojis and emoticons can be used as tools for evaluating how we relate to each other in the digital age.
Pitching in: Biologists study development of division of labor among bees
15Latest Science News /

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Biologists tested a variation of the reproductive ground plan hypothesis in solitary, ground-nesting bees of south central Washington State. Their findings could shed light on development of division of labor in social bees.
Preclinical research sheds light on tumor-progression in lung cancer
15Latest Science News /

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Preclinical research shows that the tumor-promoting properties of neuropilin-2 reside predominantly on isoform NRP2b, while NRP2a has the opposite effects in non-small cell lung cancer. In mouse models, NRP2a inhibited tumor cell proliferation, while NRP2b promoted metastasis and progression. This new understanding may lead to improved therapies that specifically target NRP2b, while sparing the tu
See how immune cells break through blood vessel walls
13Latest Science News /

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In any given second, thousands of immune cells are poking holes in your blood vessels as they travel out of the blood stream to survey your organs for problems or join the fight against a pathogen. Despite the constant assault, the damage is negligible.
Is China's Ivory Ban a Sign of Hope for Elephants?
300+Scientific American Content / by John R. Platt /

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China’s legal ivory market will close this year, but elephants are still being slaughtered

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Highly gifted children benefit from explanation as much as their peers
30Latest Science News /

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We often assume that highly gifted children always perform at maximum capacity. However, new research shows that this group also benefits from training and explanation. Strangely enough, the benefits are the same for both groups.
Trump's 5 Most "Anti-Science" Moves
2KScientific American Content / by Andrea Marks /

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The president-elect has taken what is widely seen as a hostile stance toward the scientific community. Here’s why

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Controversial website that lists ‘predatory’ publishers shuts down
NatureNews / by Andrew Silver /

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Librarian Jeffrey Beall won’t say why he has unpublished his widely read blog. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21328
Flawed hunt for flight MH370 shows need for new tracking system
100+New Scientist /

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The troubled search for the Malaysian airliner that vanished in 2014 highlights the need for better technology and coordination, says Paul Marks
Climate scientists brace themselves for a Trump-led witch-hunt
14New Scientist /

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Trump can now target scientists he doesn't like using archaic laws. Here's how they can fight back
Why I'm Joining the March on Washington
5KScientific American Content / by Joan E. Strassmann /

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I'll be there to protest Mr. Turmp's clear and dangerous disrespect for human beings and for scientific evidence

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Designers Reinvent the (Steering) Wheel for the Age of Autonomy
100+WIRED / by Jack Stewart /

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10 and 2 may not matter anymore, but the wheel is still the interlocutor between human and machine just yet.
#########The post Designers Reinvent the (Steering) Wheel for the Age of Autonomy appeared first on WIRED .
Trump's CDC May Face Serious Hurdles
500+Scientific American Content / by Dina Fine Maron /

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The nation’s public health agency is battling on several fronts, including an Obamacare repeal

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Microsoft Thinks Machines Can Learn to Converse by Making Chat a Game
100+WIRED / by Cade Metz /

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Microsoft just bought a startup that's embracing an AI technique typically used to master games---so it can teach machines to carry on a conversation.
#########The post Microsoft Thinks Machines Can Learn to Converse by Making Chat a Game appeared first on WIRED .
Review: Asus ZenWatch 3
100+WIRED / by Christopher Null /

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A sensible Android Wear watch comes along just as the platform is about to see an update.
#########The post Review: Asus ZenWatch 3 appeared first on WIRED .
Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It’s Not the Russians
300+WIRED / by Brian Barrett /

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A site that chronicles animals versus the power grid makes a good point about cyberwar hype, but an attack would still be serious business.
#########The post Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It's Not the Russians appeared first on WIRED .
Alexa Is Conquering the World. Now Amazon’s Real Challenge Begins
500+WIRED / by Liz Stinson /

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Amazon's Alexa is about to be everywhere, but ubiquity comes with its own set of challenges.
#########The post Alexa Is Conquering the World. Now Amazon’s Real Challenge Begins appeared first on WIRED .
Eerie Photos Take You Down China’s Neon-Lit Alleyways
1KWIRED / by Laura Mallonee /

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Marilyn Mugot captures a world bathed in blues, purples, and pinks.
#########The post Eerie Photos Take You Down China's Neon-Lit Alleyways appeared first on WIRED .
Inside IMAX’s Big Bet to Rule the Future of VR
2KWIRED / by David Pierce /

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The company that turns cinema to spectacle is betting big on the future of face-computers.
#########The post Inside IMAX's Big Bet to Rule the Future of VR appeared first on WIRED .
North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA
400+WIRED / by Eric Niiler /

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From sea level rise to polluted stormwater drainage, the state faces a host of environmental conflicts that rely on the EPA. And Pruitt's agency would be a toothless one.
#########The post North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA appeared first on WIRED .
First baby born using 3-parent technique to treat infertility
3KNew Scientist /

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These are the first photos of a girl born in Kiev who was made using a mitochondrial replacement technique to get around her mother’s infertility problems
When It Comes to Safety, Autonomous Cars Are Still "Teen Drivers"
68Scientific American Content / by Jeremy Hsu /

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Automakers ask drivers to trust and share the nation’s roadways with autonomous vehicles, but there is no easy answer as to when they will be considered ”safe”

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Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failures
300+BBC News - Science & Environment /

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The onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.
IVF: First three-parent baby born to infertile couple
500+BBC News - Science & Environment /

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A technique designed to help parents affected by genetic disorders is used to tackle infertility.
Obama administration gives $500m to UN climate change fund
1KBBC News - Science & Environment /

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The payment to the UN Green Climate Fund was announced three days before Donald Trump takes office.
Space-weather forecast to improve with European satellite
70NatureNews / by Elizabeth Gibney /

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Probe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth. Nature 541 271 doi: 10.1038/541271a
India’s first GM food crop held up by lawsuit
100+NatureNews / by Sanjay Kumar /

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Scientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard. Nature 541 267 doi: 10.1038/541267a
Moving up the food chain can beat being on top
11Latest Science News /

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When it comes to predators, the biggest mouths may not take the biggest bite. According to a new study from bioscientists, some predators have their greatest ecological impacts before they reach adulthood.
Movin' on up? Views on social mobility shape Americans' faith in the status quo
25Latest Science News /

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How Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society -- such as social and economic policies, laws, and institutions -- psychologists have found.
Climate change forecast: More intense deluges and downpours Down Under
51Latest Science News /

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Expect strong increases in rainfall during extreme precipitation events in Australia as a result of global warming making Dorothy Mackellar's now classic view of Australia as a country of droughts and flooding rains truer than ever.
Scientists make plastic from pine trees
200+Latest Science News /

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Most current plastics are made from oil, which is unsustainable. However, scientists have now developed a renewable plastic from a chemical called pinene found in pine needles.
Discovery could lead to jet engines that run hotter -- and cleaner
16Latest Science News /

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Researchers have made a discovery in materials science that sounds like something from the old Saturday morning cartoon Super Friends: they've found a way to deactivate 'nano twins' to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys that are used in jet engines.
Largest Populus SNP dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, metabolites
12Latest Science News /

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Researchers have released the largest-ever single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset of genetic variations in poplar trees, information useful to plant scientists as well as researchers in the fields of biofuels, materials science, and secondary plant metabolism.
'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's
28Latest Science News /

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In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.
Trade-offs between economic growth and deforestation
17Latest Science News /

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In many developing countries, economic growth and deforestation seem to go hand in hand -- but the links are not well understood. In a new study, researchers use an innovative methodology to quantify the relationship.
Study applies game theory to genomic privacy
19Latest Science News /

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A new study presents an unorthodox approach to protect the privacy of genomic data, showing how optimal trade-offs between privacy risk and scientific utility can be struck as genomic data are released for research. The framework can be used to suppress just enough genomic data to persuade would-be snoops that their best privacy attacks will be unprofitable.
Scientists discover drug that increases 'good' fat mass and function
51Latest Science News /

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An FDA-approved drug has been identified that can create the elusive and beneficial brown fat. Mice treated with the drug had more brown fat, faster metabolisms, and lower body weight gain, even after being fed a high-calorie diet. The researchers say the technique, which uses cellular reprogramming, could be a new way to combat obesity and type II diabetes.
Calorie restriction lets monkeys live long and prosper
500+Latest Science News /

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Settling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives.
Mounting challenge to brain sex differences
500+Latest Science News /

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A meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes reveals no significant difference between the sexes. The study strengthens the case for gender similarity in the human brain and psychological abilities.
Successful antibody trial in HIV individuals
19Latest Science News /

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A research team has tested a new HIV neutralizing antibody, called 10-1074, in humans. The results of the trial have just been published.
Must-see-TV: Educational shows that entertain have greater impact on faithful viewers
9Latest Science News /

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A study of viewing audiences shows that the television programs most effective at imparting an educational message about social behaviors are the ones that keep people watching engaged and coming back for more.
Racial bias in a heartbeat: How signals from the heart shape snap judgments about threat
23Latest Science News /

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Our heartbeat can increase pre-existing racial biases when we face a potential threat, according to new research.
Signs of hope for endangered sea turtles
84Latest Science News /

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Bones from dead turtles washed up on Mexican beaches indicate that Baja California is critical to the survival of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles, which travel some 7,500 miles from their nesting sites in Japan to their feeding grounds off the coast of Mexico.
A tale of two pulsars' tails: Plumes offer geometry lessons to astronomers
300+Latest Science News /

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Like cosmic lighthouses sweeping the universe with bursts of energy, pulsars have fascinated and baffled astronomers since they were first discovered 50 years ago. In two studies, international teams of astronomers suggest that recent images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of two pulsars -- Geminga and B0355+54 -- may help shine a light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as w
San Francisco Bay Area methane emissions may be double what we thought
26Latest Science News /

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Emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas, in the San Francisco Bay Area may be roughly twice as high as official estimates, with most of it coming from biological sources, such as landfills, but natural gas leakage also being an important source, according to a new study,
Antimicrobial sutures can prevent surgical site infections and save money
6Latest Science News /

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New analyses of the published clinical studies indicate that antimicrobial sutures are effective for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs), and they can result in significant cost savings.
Conditions right for complex life may have come and gone in Earth's distant past
200+Latest Science News /

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Conditions suitable to support complex life may have developed in Earth's oceans -- and then faded -- more than a billion years before life truly took hold, a new study has found.
New tool can help policymakers prioritize information needs for synthetic biology tech
9Latest Science News /

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New technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the marketplace before policymakers can determine how or whether they should be governed. Now researchers have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products, well before they are ready for the market, to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.
Structures dating to King Solomon discovered
89Latest Science News /

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New discoveries at Tel Aviv University's Timna Valley excavation have revealed intact defensive structures and livestock pens that provide insight into the complexity of Iron Age copper production.
Dietary supplement may carry both benefits and risks associated with statins
58Latest Science News /

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Red yeast rice (RYR) is contained in dietary supplements that are often used by patients with high cholesterol, and it is often proposed as an alternative therapy in those who experience side effects from statins. A new study found that it is not a good choice for statin-intolerant patients: RYR was linked with muscle and liver injury, which can also occur with statin use.
Hip fractures may have both short and long-term effects on survival in elderly individuals
8Latest Science News /

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A new analysis of numerous studies indicates that men and women aged 60 years and older who have experienced a hip fracture are at increased risk of dying not only in the short term after the fracture, but also a number of years later.
Age-related GABA decline is associated with poor cognition
15Latest Science News /

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Diminishing levels of GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, may play a role in cognitive decline as we age, according to a new study. The study shows an association between higher GABA concentrations in the frontal lobe, a brain region important for complex cognitive functioning, and superior performance on a cognitive test in healthy older adults.
Opioids produce analgesia via immune cells
39Latest Science News /

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Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells.
Whether our speech is fast or slow, we say about the same
300+Latest Science News /

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Fast talkers tend to convey less information with each word and syntactic structure than slower-paced speakers, meaning that no matter our pace, we all say just about as much in a given time, a new study finds.
Metabolic pathway regulating key stage of embryo development revealed
10Latest Science News /

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Researchers showed that the mevalonate pathway is essential for embryonic development by promoting primitive streak formation, a key landmark for establishing embryo symmetry and gastrulation. The pathway induces farnesylation of lamin-B, which is implicated in inducing expression of primitive streak genes. The findings expand understanding of how embryos transition from a featureless ball of cell
Why 'platonic' flies don't copulate and what that could mean for humans
22Latest Science News /

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By studying the sexual behavior of a mutant strain of fruit fly called 'platonic,' researchers have found parallels between humans and flies in the neural control of copulation.
Malaria drug successfully treats 26-year-old brain cancer patient
3KLatest Science News /

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The anti-authophagy drug chloroquine may be a unique way to resensitize some cancer patients to treatment.
Inception of the last ice age
37Latest Science News /

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A new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.
Imposing 'meaningful work' can lead to staff burnout
26Latest Science News /

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Strategies to boost staff performance and morale by manipulating our desire for meaningful work often achieve the opposite -- damaging organizations and alienating employees -- a new study suggests.
Sweat bees on hot chillies: Native bees thrive in traditional farming, securing good yield
25Latest Science News /

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Farming doesn't always have to be harmful to bees: Even though farmers on the Mexican peninsula of Yucatan traditionally slash-and-burn forest to create small fields, this practice can be beneficial to sweat bees by creating attractive habitats. The farmers profit also since they depend on bees to pollinate their habanero chillies.
Tiny fruit flies use cold hard logic to select mates
200+Latest Science News /

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Fruit flies -- the tiny insects that swarm our kitchens over the summer months -- exhibit rational decision making when selecting mates, according to new research. Scientists observed different combinations of fruit flies mate about 2,700 times, and were surprised to discover that male flies almost always pick the female mate that would produce the most offspring. The study provides the first evid
Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armor
67Latest Science News /

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In a new study, researchers are investigating why hair is incredibly strong and resistant to breaking. The findings could lead to the development of new materials for body armor and help cosmetic manufacturers create better hair care products.
Researchers zero-in on cholesterol's role in cells
56Latest Science News /

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For the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.
Aeolus wind mission heads for test and launch
200+BBC News - Science & Environment /

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UK engineers finish the assembly of a wind-observing satellite that meteorologists expect to have a major impact on weather forecasts.
Babies remember their birth language - scientists
6KBBC News - Science & Environment /

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Babies learn language in the early months of life, and retain this knowledge, say scientists.
Ford’s 2018 Mustang Gets Shapelier and High-Techier
500+WIRED / by Alex Davies /

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Better aero, smarter computer.
#########The post Ford’s 2018 Mustang Gets Shapelier and High-Techier appeared first on WIRED .
New species of moth named in honor of Donald Trump ahead of his swearing-in as president
400+Latest Science News /

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Days before Donald J. Trump steps forward on the Presidential Inauguration platform in Washington on Jan. 20, an evolutionary biologist has named a new species in his honor. The researcher hopes that the fame around the new moth will successfully point to the critical need for further conservation efforts for fragile areas such as the habitat of the new species.


Myndigheder frikender Teslas autopilot for dødsulykke
Ingeniøren / by Christian Østergaard / 54minTeslas autopilot har nedbragt ulykkestal i bilerne med 40 pct. og er uden skyld i en bilists død sidste år, konkluderer amerikansk myndighed. Bilisten havde ifølge rapporten over syv sekunder til at undvige en sættevogn.
WIRED
Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines In this competition, humans are throwing washing machines. What is the force and power required to accomplish such a feat? The post Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines appeared first on WIRED .
3min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changesPeople with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria, a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study.
4min
New Scientist - News
Robot skin senses warm bodies like a snake locating nearby preyA heat-sensing membrane could be applied to robots like a Westworld-style “skin dip” and give them the ability to detect human bodies from a distance
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast cancer prognosis of African-American patients may improve with administration of chemotherapy before surgery, study findsAdministering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study.
19min
Scientific American Content: Global
Gene-Edited Animals Face U.S. Regulatory CrackdownLast-minute proposal would address CRISPR and other cutting-edge technologies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
30min
Ingeniøren
Myndigheder frikender Teslas autopilot for dødsulykkeTeslas autopilot har nedbragt ulykkestal i bilerne med 40 pct. og er uden skyld i en bilists død sidste år, konkluderer amerikansk myndighed. Bilisten havde ifølge rapporten over syv sekunder til at undvige en sættevogn.
51min
Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient Warm Period Hints at Future Sea Level RiseOcean temperatures in a natural warm period 125,000 years ago were indistinguishable from today—but sea level was six to nine meters higher -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
57min
WIRED
Inauguration Liveblog: Donald Trump Is Sworn In as President Join WIRED for analysis, insight, and updates from the Capitol as Donald Trump—real estate mogul, reality TV star, and tweeter-in-chief—becomes president. The post Inauguration Liveblog: Donald Trump Is Sworn In as President appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
China’s Plan to Rule the World: Make All the Gadgets Instead of just making and selling smartphones, Xiaomi wants to make and sell just about everything. The post China's Plan to Rule the World: Make All the Gadgets appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New’ ZeniMax claims its tech is being used in Facebook-owned Oculus products without permission. But what does it really mean to steal code? The post That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New' appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
The Whirling Ballet of the Presidential Motorcade The most complex of safety dances. The post The Whirling Ballet of the Presidential Motorcade appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
M. Night Shyamalan’s Latest Twist? Making Good Movies Again The writer-director's new film, 'Split,' is his second good high-drama shocker in a row. The post M. Night Shyamalan's Latest Twist? Making Good Movies Again appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
Secret Facebook Groups Are the Trump Era’s Worst, Best Echo Chamber People seeking solidarity and safety in like-minded groups are increasingly looking to secret Facebook groups. They're solipsistic—but that's OK. The post Secret Facebook Groups Are the Trump Era's Worst, Best Echo Chamber appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED
The Totally Legit Complete Guide to Trump’s Inauguration Get the full line-up here. The post The Totally Legit Complete Guide to Trump's Inauguration appeared first on WIRED .
1h

**Meitu, a Viral Anime Makeover App, Has Major Privacy Red Flags**
1KWIRED / by Lily Hay Newman / 12h
Turning yourself into a pretty fairy will cost you some personal data. The post Meitu, a Viral Anime Makeover App, Has Major Privacy Red Flags appeared first on WIRED .
**Recycled eggshells can be used for next-gen data storage**
300+New Scientist / 2h
A nano-powder made from eggshells has been turned into a device using ReRAM, a type of memory that could offer fast, efficient computer data storage
**Team uncovers cellular responses to bird flu vaccine**
5Latest Science News / 2min
New research eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu, exposing cellular responses associated with a vaccine constituent called AS03, short for adjuvant system 03. Using massive computation, the investigators pursue a systems biology approach, providing a new wealth of detail about vaccine responses and data for the generation of new
TODAY
**Study discusses model for understanding nutrition and brain development**
4Latest Science News / 4min
For nearly a decade, researchers have studied the piglet as a translational model to understand which aspects of early brain development are affected by nutrition interventions. In a recent review article, investigators provide background for the work they do with nutrition and neurodevelopment using the piglet as a model.

**This soft-shelled exosuit might put Iron Man's duds to shame**
Popular Science / by Kendra Pierre-Louis / 3min
Technology Exoskeletons of the future look like high-tech workout clothes Researchers design exos…

**Sustaining a High-Tech Economy Using Inspiration from Nature**
Scientific American Content / by Oswald Schmitz / 4min
Fundamentally, nature’s economy is sustained because species create a grand circular economy in which materials are produced, consumed, decomposed, and then reused. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines**
23WIRED / by Rhett Allain / 9min
In this competition, humans are throwing washing machines. What is the force and power required to accomplish such a feat? The post Physics Explains How (But Not Why) Humans Can Throw Washing Machines appeared first on WIRED .

**Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes**
9Latest Science News / 9min
People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria, a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study.

**Robot skin senses warm bodies like a snake locating nearby prey**
3New Scientist / 18min
A heat-sensing membrane could be applied to robots like a Westworld-style “skin dip” and give them the ability to detect human bodies from a distance

**Breast cancer prognosis of African-American patients may improve with administration of chemotherapy before surgery, study finds**
7Latest Science News / 24min
Administering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study.

**Gene-Edited Animals Face U.S. Regulatory Crackdown**
5Scientific American Content / by Amy Maxmen / 36min
Last-minute proposal would address CRISPR and other cutting-edge technologies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Ancient Warm Period Hints at Future Sea Level Rise**
1Scientific American Content / by Alister Doyle / 1h
Ocean temperatures in a natural warm period 125,000 years ago were indistinguishable from today—but sea level was six to nine meters higher -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Inauguration Liveblog: Donald Trump Is Sworn In as President**
40WIRED / by Wired Staff / 1h
Join WIRED for analysis, insight, and updates from the Capitol as Donald Trump—real estate mogul, reality TV star, and tweeter-in-chief—becomes president. The post Inauguration Liveblog: Donald Trump Is Sworn In as President appeared first on WIRED .

**China’s Plan to Rule the World: Make All the Gadgets**
42WIRED / by David Pierce / 1h
Instead of just making and selling smartphones, Xiaomi wants to make and sell just about everything. The post China's Plan to Rule the World: Make All the Gadgets appeared first on WIRED .

**That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New’**
37WIRED / by Klint Finley / 1h
ZeniMax claims its tech is being used in Facebook-owned Oculus products without permission. But what does it really mean to steal code? The post That Whole Oculus Lawsuit Hinges on What Makes Code ‘New' appeared first on WIRED .

**The Whirling Ballet of the Presidential Motorcade**
29WIRED / by Aarian Marshall / 1h
The most complex of safety dances. The post The Whirling Ballet of the Presidential Motorcade appeared first on WIRED .

**M. Night Shyamalan’s Latest Twist? Making Good Movies Again**
23WIRED / by Brian Raftery / 1h
The writer-director's new film, 'Split,' is his second good high-drama shocker in a row. The post M. Night Shyamalan's Latest Twist? Making Good Movies Again appeared first on WIRED .

**Secret Facebook Groups Are the Trump Era’s Worst, Best Echo Chamber**
21WIRED / by Emily Dreyfuss / 1h
People seeking solidarity and safety in like-minded groups are increasingly looking to secret Facebook groups. They're solipsistic—but that's OK. The post Secret Facebook Groups Are the Trump Era's Worst, Best Echo Chamber appeared first on WIRED .

**The Totally Legit Complete Guide to Trump’s Inauguration**
28WIRED / by Brian Raftery / 1h
Get the full line-up here. The post The Totally Legit Complete Guide to Trump's Inauguration appeared first on WIRED .

**Galactic Murder Mystery Solved by Gas Stripping**
8Scientific American Content / by Calla Cofield / 1h
Astronomers unveil a new mechanism to explain the premature demise of young galaxies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Trump Day 1: Global Warming's Fate**
35Scientific American Content / by Annie Sneed / 1h
If the new president delays climate action as promised, the world is far more likely to miss its Paris agreement goals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Starling Murmurations Are Beautiful. Just Ignore the Poop**
35WIRED / by Laura Mallonee / 2h
Hundreds of birds soared through the sky above Pontevedra, Spain. It's stunning and just a little bit icky. The post Starling Murmurations Are Beautiful. Just Ignore the Poop appeared first on WIRED .

**Smart buildings predict when critical systems are about to fail**
82New Scientist / 2h
Start-ups use sensors and machine learning to do “predictive maintenance”, spotting faults in building systems like heating and air con before they crash

**At the DeploraBall, Trump’s Online Army Wonders: What Now?**
62WIRED / by Issie Lapowsky / 4h
They're the new heart of conservatism, but finding consensus about what they stand for is as difficult as finding consensus about anything online. The post At the DeploraBall, Trump's Online Army Wonders: What Now? appeared first on WIRED .

**Larsen ice crack continues to open up**
400+BBC News - Science & Environment / 11h
The crack in Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf that looks set to spawn a giant iceberg has spread a further 10km.

**Why Is It Important To Be Touched?**
28Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 14h
Neuroscientist David Linden thinks that of the five senses, touch is the most overlooked, and perhaps the most important for promoting psychological health. (Image credit: Courtesy of Dr. David J. Linden)

**How Do Pheromones Really Work?**
21Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 14h
Pheromones are mysterious compounds that can make a mammal smell more sexy--but that's not true for humans. Zoologist Tristram Wyatt says human pheremones are hard to find. (Image credit: Maria Pavlova/Getty Images)

**Are There More Than Five Basic Tastes?**
13Science : NPR / by NPR/TED Staff / 14h
Scientists have long believed we have just five tastes - salty, sweet, bitter, sour and umami (or savory). Geneticist Nicole Garneau argues we might be able to taste a sixth — fat. (Image credit: Courtesy of Dr. Nicole Garneau)

**Exit Interview: Presidential Science Advisor John Holdren**
11Scientific American Content / by Fred Guterl / 14h
Scientific American executive editor Fred Guterl talks with President Obama’s science advisor John Holdren about climate science, space travel, the issue of reproducibility in science, the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

YESTERDAY
**NIH director Francis Collins staying on — for now**
NatureNews / by Sara Reardon / 15h
President-elect Donald Trump's team has asked Collins to remain in his job for an unknown period. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.19081

**Dividing Droplets Could Explain Life’s Origin**
200+Quanta Magazine / by Natalie Wolchover / 15h
A collaboration of physicists and biologists in Germany has found a simple mechanism that might have enabled liquid droplets to evolve into living cells in early Earth’s primordial soup. Origin-of-life researchers have praised the minimalism of the idea. Ramin Golestanian , a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Oxford who was not involved in the research, called it a big achieve

**Astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet**
75Latest Science News / 15h
Astronomers have located the habitable zone, the region where water could exist on the surface of a planet, on the Wolf 1061, a planetary system that's 14 light years away.

**Perry Promises to Protect "All of the Science" at the US Energy Department**
100+Scientific American Content / by Jeff Tollefson / 15h
Trump's nominee for energy secretary says that he will base decisions on ‘sound science’ -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**UFOs, Psychics, and Spies: The CIA Just Put 12M Pages of Files Online. Start Here**
3KWIRED / by Lily Hay Newman / 16h
All the spy secrets that are fit to declassify. The post UFOs, Psychics, and Spies: The CIA Just Put 12M Pages of Files Online. Start Here appeared first on WIRED .

**Time to put TB on a diet**
17Latest Science News / 16h
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages. The scientists have discovered that the bacterium has the ability to 'reprogram' the cell it infects so that it can feed on its lipids. This results will pave the way for t

**Treated carbon pulls radioactive elements from water**
46Latest Science News / 17h
Scientists have developed inexpensive, oxidized carbon particles that extract radioactive metals from water. They said their materials may help purify contaminated waters stored after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

**Statins could halt vein blood clots, research suggests**
81Latest Science News / 17h
Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill.

**Chip-sized, high-speed terahertz modulator raises possibility of faster data transmission**
12Latest Science News / 17h
Engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz (THz) frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. The discovery could help fill the “THz gap” that is limiting development of new and more powerful wireless devices that could transmit data at significantly higher speeds than currently possible.

**Trapped by the game: Why professional soccer players don't talk about their mental health**
8Latest Science News / 17h
Professional soccer players do not feel it is safe to show vulnerability or admit to experiencing emotional struggles, suggests a new report.

**This may be the most promising herpes vaccine ever**
1KPopular Science / by Rachel Feltman / 17h
Health Which is good because pretty much everyone has herpes You probably have herpes, and that's okay. But ideally, none of us would have herpes. A new vaccine may provide the most promising solution yet.

**U.S. Cities Move to Curb Lead Poisoning**
Scientific American Content / 17h
Public officials are advancing measures, such as more blood-lead screening and property inspections, to protect children from the toxic threat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains**
18Latest Science News / 17h
Scientists have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a 'glass-like state' and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft conne

**Public reporting of lung cancer surgery outcomes provides valuable information about quality of patient care**
6Latest Science News / 17h
The first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy has now been released by experts.

**How much drought can a forest take?**
27Latest Science News / 17h
Why do some trees die in a drought and others don't? And how can we predict where trees are most likely to die in future droughts? Scientists have examined those questions in a new study.

**Digital assay of circulating tumor cells may improve diagnosis, monitoring of liver cancer**
59Latest Science News / 17h
Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction method to analyze circulating tumor cells may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment.

**Extinction threatens 60% of world’s primates**
14Futurity.org / by Carol Clark-Emory / 17h
Urgent action is needed to protect the world’s dwindling primate populations, experts warn. Sixty percent of the more than 500 primate species worldwide are threatened with extinction, while more than 75 percent have declining populations. “The majority of primate species are endangered now. We are at a turning point where we must take action or lose many species during the next 50 years,” says T

**Brain readjusts your eyeballs with each blink**
11Futurity.org / by Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley / 17h
Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. Why don’t we perceive intermittent darkness and light? Because the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes. In a study in the journal Current Biology , researchers show that when we blink, our brain repositions our eyeballs so we can stay focused on what we’re viewi

**[Review] Human tissues in a dish: The research and ethical implications of organoid technology**
100+Science: Current Issue / by Annelien L. Bredenoord / 17h
The ability to generate human tissues in vitro from stem cells has raised enormous expectations among the biomedical research community, patients, and the general public. These organoids enable studies of normal development and disease and allow the testing of compounds directly on human tissue. Organoids hold the promise to influence the entire innovation cycle in biomedical research. They affect

**[Errata] Erratum for the Report “Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska” by D. Fee, M. M. Haney, R. S. Matoza, A. R. Van Eaton, P. Cervelli, D. J. Schneider, A. M. Iezzi**
2Science: Current Issue / 17h
**[Research Article] Distortion of histone octamer core promotes nucleosome mobilization by a chromatin remodeler**
2Science: Current Issue / by Kalyan K. Sinha / 17h
Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)–dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes play essential biological roles by mobilizing nucleosomal DNA. Yet, how DNA is mobilized despite the steric constraints placed by the histone octamer remains unknown. Using methyl transverse relaxation–optimized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 450-kilodalton complex, we show that the chromatin remodeler, SNF2h, dis

**[Research Article] Tumor aneuploidy correlates with markers of immune evasion and with reduced response to immunotherapy**
8Science: Current Issue / by Teresa Davoli / 17h
Immunotherapies based on immune checkpoint blockade are highly effective in a subset of patients. An ongoing challenge is the identification of biomarkers that predict which patients will benefit from these therapies. Aneuploidy, also known as somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), is widespread in cancer and is posited to drive tumorigenesis. Analyzing 12 human cancer types, we find that, for m

**[Research Article] The role of dimer asymmetry and protomer dynamics in enzyme catalysis**
3Science: Current Issue / by Tae Hun Kim / 17h
Freeze-trapping x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and computational techniques reveal the distribution of states and their interconversion rates along the reaction pathway of a bacterial homodimeric enzyme, fluoroacetate dehalogenase (FAcD). The crystal structure of apo-FAcD exhibits asymmetry around the dimer interface and cap domain, priming one protomer for substrate binding. T

**[Editorial] Everyone should try**
7Science: Current Issue / by Jeremy Berg / 17h
The new year brings opportunities to think creatively about finding solutions to difficult problems. It's a chance to affirm that although views may differ dramatically, we should try to work effectively with one another. My namesake believed in this. Jeremy Stone, the long-time president of the Federation of American Scientists, passed away on 1 January at the age of 81. As a graduate student, St

**[In Brief] News at a glance**
1Science: Current Issue / 17h
In science news around the world, the United States confers protections to the Walrus Islands and a handful of other sites of archaeological significance by making them historic landmarks, a U.S. report finds that marijuana can treat chronic pain and notes that researchers who want to study the drug face significant obstacles, a new international particle accelerator located in Jordan takes a big

**[In Depth] Science suffers in cold war over polar base**
4Science: Current Issue / by Martin Enserink / 17h
It's summer in Antarctica, the season for science. But at the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica research station, Belgium's futuristic research outpost in East Antarctica, not a single Belgian researcher is at work. A protracted dispute between the Belgian government and the International Polar Foundation, which built and operates the station, has resulted in the cancellation of this year's Belgian ex

**[In Depth] Your self-driving car could kill radio astronomy**
17Science: Current Issue / by Daniel Clery / 17h
Add energy-saving streetlights, self-driving cars, and balloon-borne internet services to the threats facing astronomers needing dark skies free of electromagnetic smog. The rise of all three technologies is posing new challenges to ground-based researchers who use the optical and radio spectrum to observe the universe, speakers warned earlier this month at the annual meeting of the American Astro

**[In Depth] Mixed results from cancer replications unsettle field**
20Science: Current Issue / by Jocelyn Kaiser / 17h
The first results of a high-profile effort to replicate dozens of influential papers in cancer biology are roiling the biomedical community. Of the five studies the project has tackled so far, some involving experimental treatments already in clinical trials, only two could be repeated; one could not, and technical problems stymied the remaining two replication efforts. Some scientists say these e

**[In Depth] Unique free electron laser laboratory opens in China**
3Science: Current Issue / by Dennis Normile / 17h
China has become the latest country making a free electron laser available to its scientists. Researchers around the world want access to these lasers because they are an advance on the synchrotron light sources that have been the workhorses of protein crystallography, cell biology, and materials science. The completion of the $30 million Dalian Coherent Light Source, announced this week in Beijin

**[In Depth] How do gut microbes help herbivores? Counting the ways**
100+Science: Current Issue / by Elizabeth Pennisi / 17h
No matter what a vegan may tell you, a solely plant-based diet is a tough way to get all the calories and nutrients you need. Unless you have the right microbial partners. At the recent annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, researchers made it clear that microbes lend a wide array of other talents to herbivores. One gut microbe helps a tropical ant recycle nitrogen

**[In Depth] A half-billion-dollar bid to head off emerging diseases**
16Science: Current Issue / by Jon Cohen / 17h
In the wake of the Ebola crisis that erupted in West Africa in 2014, many public health leaders recognized that a more aggressive effort to develop vaccines could have moved a vaccine forward more quickly and prevented that outbreak from becoming an epidemic. A new organization was formed last year, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), to speed development of vaccines agains

**[Feature] Taming rabies**
17Science: Current Issue / by Erik Stokstad / 17h
An estimated 59,000 people die from rabies around the world every year. Their horrible suffering—including convulsions, terror, and aggression—and the fact that many victims are children led the World Health Organization and others to announce a goal to eliminate rabies deaths worldwide by 2030. The plan calls for cheaper and faster treatment for people. But its long-term bet is on vaccinating dom

**[Perspective] Technology beats corruption**
14Science: Current Issue / by Rema Hanna / 17h
More than 1.9 billion individuals in the developing world benefit from social safety net programs: noncontributory transfer programs that distribute cash or basic in-kind products to the poor. But despite their importance, high levels of corruption often stifle the effectiveness of these programs. If cash transfer programs are particularly prone to graft, then in-kind programs should be preferred

**[Perspective] Unlocking the nucleosome**
1Science: Current Issue / by Andrew Flaus / 17h
Almost all eukaryotic genomes are packaged as nucleosomal building blocks that are assembled from an octameric core of histone proteins around which nearly two turns of DNA are wrapped. The apparent homogeneity and stability of nucleosomes has led to their depiction as beads, balls, and other simplifications that imply a largely static histone structural surface on which DNA wraps and unwraps. On

**[Perspective] Enzymes at work are enzymes in motion**
2Science: Current Issue / by Tamjeed Saleh / 17h
Enzymes provide the necessary impetus for chemical reactions to occur at a rate that can support biological life. They do so by forming a unique enzyme-substrate complex and thus lowering the energy required for a substrate to convert to a product. Numerous approaches have been used for more than 50 years to unravel the mechanisms of enzyme-mediated catalysis (1). Initial kinetic experiments helpe

**[Perspective] Big-data approaches to protein structure prediction**
5Science: Current Issue / by Johannes Söding / 17h
A protein's structure determines its function. Experimental protein structure determination is cumbersome and costly, which has driven the search for methods that can predict protein structure from sequence information (1). About half of the known proteins are amenable to comparative modeling; that is, an evolutionarily related protein of known structure can be used as a template for modeling the

**[Perspective] Chromosomal chaos silences immune surveillance**
5Science: Current Issue / by Maurizio Zanetti / 17h
Not all cancers, and not all individuals with the same cancer type, respond equally to immunotherapy—the use of antibodies to block so-called immune checkpoints in T cells—thereby unleashing immune responses against tumor cells. This can be partially explained by nonsynonymous mutations, which can create neoantigen epitopes that induce T cell responses against cancer cells (1). However, such mutat

**[Policy Forum] Closing global achievement gaps in MOOCs**
200+Science: Current Issue / by René F. Kizilcec / 17h
Advocates for free massive open online courses (MOOCs) have heralded them as vehicles for democratizing education and bridging divides within and across countries (1). More than 25 million people enrolled in MOOCs between 2012 and 2015, including 39% from less-developed countries (LDCs) (2). But the educated and affluent in all countries enroll in and complete MOOCs at relatively higher rates (3,

**[Book Review] Beyond Schrödinger's cat**
12Science: Current Issue / by Mirko Kovac / 17h
According to traditional flight physics, bees should not be able to fly. But fly they do, with mastery of non– steady state aerodynamics and little concern about our limited understanding of their capabilities. Building on recent insights in biophysics research, Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life uses a refreshing combination of scientific precision and colloquial wit to show how animals use

**[Book Review] Born this way?**
4Science: Current Issue / by Sheri Berenbaum / 17h
How and why do the sexes differ? And why do we care? Few questions generate as much controversy and debatein both scientific and public arenas. In her book Testosterone Rex: Myths of Sex, Science, and Society, Cordelia Fine tackles the question from the perspective that has generated the most discussion: biological contributions to sex differences. Author: Sheri Berenbaum

**[Letter] Building community for deaf scientists**
6Science: Current Issue / by Gerry Buckley / 17h
Authors: Gerry Buckley, Scott Smith, James DeCaro, Steve Barnett, Steve Dewhurst

**[Letter] Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forests**
6Science: Current Issue / by Thomas N. E. Gray / 17h
Authors: Thomas N. E. Gray, Antony J. Lynam, Teak Seng, William F. Laurance, Barney Long, Lorraine Scotson, William J. Ripple

**[Letter Letters letters Outside the Tower] Young science officers lead by example**
1Science: Current Issue / by Dhruv Iyer / 17h
Author: Dhruv Iyer

**[This Week in Science] Robots have a change of heart**
1Science: Current Issue / by Caitlin Czajka / 17h
Author: Caitlin Czajka

**[This Week in Science] Alcohols remove lithium to make nanowires**
1Science: Current Issue / by Marc S. Lavine / 17h
Author: Marc S. Lavine

**[This Week in Science] An x-ray view of C–F and S–F bond breaks**
1Science: Current Issue / by Jake Yeston / 17h
Author: Jake Yeston

**[This Week in Science] Keeping roots water-tight**
1Science: Current Issue / by Pamela J. Hines / 17h
Author: Pamela J. Hines

**[This Week in Science] Filling in the protein fold picture**
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 17h
Author: Valda Vinson

**[This Week in Science] Sea surface temperatures of the past**
1Science: Current Issue / by H. Jesse Smith / 17h
Author: H. Jesse Smith

**[This Week in Science] Deciding a protein's fate**
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 17h
Author: Valda Vinson

**[This Week in Science] Locking TNFR2 to kill ovarian cancer**
1Science: Current Issue / by Leslie K. Ferrarelli / 17h
Author: Leslie K. Ferrarelli

**[This Week in Science] Working as a pair**
1Science: Current Issue / by Valda Vinson / 17h
Author: Valda Vinson

**[This Week in Science] Ethics of organoid research**
1Science: Current Issue / by Beverly A. Purnell / 17h
Author: Beverly A. Purnell

**[This Week in Science] Chromosomal chaos and tumor immunity**
1Science: Current Issue / by Paula A. Kiberstis / 17h
Author: Paula A. Kiberstis

**[This Week in Science] Deformation powers the nucleosome slide**
1Science: Current Issue / by Guy Riddihough / 17h
Author: Guy Riddihough

**[This Week in Science] Moving transistors downscale**
1Science: Current Issue / by Phil Szuromi / 17h
Author: Phil Szuromi

**[This Week in Science] Impending primate extinction**
1Science: Current Issue / by Michael Hochberg / 17h
Author: Michael Hochberg

**[This Week in Science] Small peptides allow rapid responses**
1Science: Current Issue / by Pamela J. Hines / 17h
Author: Pamela J. Hines

**[This Week in Science] Using technology to beat corruption**
1Science: Current Issue / by Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink / 17h
Author: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink

**[Editors' Choice] Brain cancer therapy**
1Science: Current Issue / by Lisa D. Chong / 17h
Author: Lisa D. Chong

**[Editors' Choice] DNA methylation in hematopoietic cascade**
1Science: Current Issue / by Beverly A. Purnell / 17h
Author: Beverly A. Purnell

**[Editors' Choice] An intelligent little sniffer**
1Science: Current Issue / by Marc S. Lavine / 17h
Author: Marc S. Lavine

**[Editors' Choice] A different kind of chemical plant**
1Science: Current Issue / by Jake Yeston / 17h
Author: Jake Yeston

**[Editors' Choice] Blind climber**
1Science: Current Issue / by Sacha Vignieri / 17h
Author: Sacha Vignieri

**[Editors' Choice] Know who you are asking for money**
1Science: Current Issue / by Gilbert Chin / 17h
Author: Gilbert Chin

**[Editors' Choice] Making garnets the hard way**
1Science: Current Issue / by Brent Grocholski / 17h
Author: Brent Grocholski

**[Report] Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source**
1Science: Current Issue / by Yoann Pertot / 17h
Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS) has so far practically been limited to large-scale facilities, to subpicosecond temporal resolution, and to the condensed phase. We report the realization of TR-XAS with a temporal resolution in the low femtosecond range by developing a tabletop high-harmonic source reaching up to 350 electron volts, thus partially covering the spectral region o

**[Report] Transformation of bulk alloys to oxide nanowires**
2Science: Current Issue / by Danni Lei / 17h
One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer prospects for enhancing the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a broad range of functional materials and composites, but their synthesis methods are typically elaborate and expensive. We demonstrate a direct transformation of bulk materials into nanowires under ambient conditions without the use of catalysts or any external stimuli. The nano

**[Report] Scaling carbon nanotube complementary transistors to 5-nm gate lengths**
Science: Current Issue / by Chenguang Qiu / 17h
High-performance top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) with a gate length of 5 nanometers can be fabricated that perform better than silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs at the same scale. A scaling trend study revealed that the scaled CNT-based devices, which use graphene contacts, can operate much faster and at much lower supply voltage (0.4 versus

**[Report] Regional and global sea-surface temperatures during the last interglaciation**
32Science: Current Issue / by Jeremy S. Hoffman / 17h
The last interglaciation (LIG, 129 to 116 thousand years ago) was the most recent time in Earth’s history when global mean sea level was substantially higher than it is at present. However, reconstructions of LIG global temperature remain uncertain, with estimates ranging from no significant difference to nearly 2°C warmer than present-day temperatures. Here we use a network of sea-surface tempera

**[Report] Root diffusion barrier control by a vasculature-derived peptide binding to the SGN3 receptor**
3Science: Current Issue / by Verónica G. Doblas / 17h
The root endodermis forms its extracellular diffusion barrier by developing ringlike impregnations called Casparian strips. A factor responsible for their establishment is the SCHENGEN3/GASSHO1 (SGN3/GSO1) receptor-like kinase. Its loss of function causes discontinuous Casparian strips. SGN3 also mediates endodermal overlignification of other Casparian strip mutants. Yet, without ligand, SGN3 func

**[Report] A peptide hormone required for Casparian strip diffusion barrier formation in Arabidopsis roots**
25Science: Current Issue / by Takuya Nakayama / 17h
Plants achieve mineral ion homeostasis by means of a hydrophobic barrier on endodermal cells called the Casparian strip, which restricts lateral diffusion of ions between the root vascular bundles and the soil. We identified a family of sulfated peptides required for contiguous Casparian strip formation in Arabidopsis roots. These peptide hormones, which we named Casparian strip integrity factor 1

**[Report] The receptor kinase FER is a RALF-regulated scaffold controlling plant immune signaling**
88Science: Current Issue / by Martin Stegmann / 17h
In plants, perception of invading pathogens involves cell-surface immune receptor kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis SITE-1 PROTEASE (S1P) cleaves endogenous RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR (RALF) propeptides to inhibit plant immunity. This inhibition is mediated by the malectin-like receptor kinase FERONIA (FER), which otherwise facilitates the ligand-induced complex formation of the immun

**[Report] Evolutionary drivers of thermoadaptation in enzyme catalysis**
6Science: Current Issue / by Vy Nguyen / 17h
With early life likely to have existed in a hot environment, enzymes had to cope with an inherent drop in catalytic speed caused by lowered temperature. Here we characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying thermoadaptation of enzyme catalysis in adenylate kinase using ancestral sequence reconstruction spanning 3 billion years of evolution. We show that evolution solved the enzyme’s key kinetic

**[Report] Protein structure determination using metagenome sequence data**
300+Science: Current Issue / by Sergey Ovchinnikov / 17h
Despite decades of work by structural biologists, there are still ~5200 protein families with unknown structure outside the range of comparative modeling. We show that Rosetta structure prediction guided by residue-residue contacts inferred from evolutionary information can accurately model proteins that belong to large families and that metagenome sequence data more than triple the number of prot

**[Report] Mechanistic basis for a molecular triage reaction**
Science: Current Issue / by Sichen Shao / 17h
Newly synthesized proteins are triaged between biosynthesis and degradation to maintain cellular homeostasis, but the decision-making mechanisms are unclear. We reconstituted the core reactions for membrane targeting and ubiquitination of nascent tail-anchored membrane proteins to understand how their fate is determined. The central six-component triage system is divided into an uncommitted client

**[Association Affairs] AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting Program**
Science: Current Issue / 17h
This issue of Science includes the program of the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting. The theme of the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, 16 to 20 February 2017, is Serving Society Through Science Policy.A PDF of the program as it appears in this issue is available here; for more information on the meeting (including registration forms and information on accommodations), please visit www.aaas.org/meetings/.

**[New Products] New Products**
Science: Current Issue / 17h
A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.

**[Working Life] The transcontinental scientist**
8Science: Current Issue / by Wim Delva / 17h
Author: Wim Delva

**Moth gut bacteria could help create new antibiotics**
300+Popular Science / by Claire Maldarelli / 17h
Health This benevolent bacteria fends off deadly microbial invaders A recent study suggests that a bacteria in a moth's gut secretes a toxic substance that kills off other invading, and often deadly, bacteria.

**In Alzheimer's, excess tau protein damages brain's GPS**
36Latest Science News / 17h
Researchers have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.

**Your 'anonmyized' web browsing history may not be anonymous**
29Latest Science News / 17h
Researchers have written computer programs that found patterns among anonymized data about web traffic and used those patterns to identify individual users. The researchers note web users with active social media are vulnerable to the attack.

**Moth gut bacterium defends its host by making antibiotic**
20Latest Science News / 18h
Nearly half of all insects are herbivores, but their diets do not consist of only plant material. It is not uncommon for potentially harmful microorganisms to slip in during a feast. Researchers now report that these insects use an ironic strategy to resist microbial infections. A bacterial species commonly found in the gut of the cotton leafworm and other moths secretes a powerful antimicrobial p

**Lasers and Drones Help Preserve Ancient Temples**
6Scientific American Content / by Benjamin Meyers / 18h
3-D digital preservation not only helps save the memories of historical sites, it also guides restoration projects after natural disasters, such as the earthquakes that damaged the temples of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory**
26Latest Science News / 18h
For the first time, scientists have found that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it's in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functionin

**Researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer**
13Latest Science News / 18h
Researchers have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper, researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.

**Roots of related genetic diseases found in cell powerhouses**
32Latest Science News / 18h
Scientists have discovered the mechanisms behind a genetic change known to cause a set of related diseases.

**The type, not just the amount, of sugar consumption matters in risk of health problems**
66Latest Science News / 18h
The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function.

**Telecommuting extends the work week, at little extra pay**
13Latest Science News / 18h
Telecommuting may not be as advantageous as employees think. A new study shows working from home adds extra hours to the work week, at little additional pay. The findings may change workers' perceptions of the value of telecommuting and could spur employers to better define the work-at-home workday.

**Come watch the Army's hoverbike prototype fly**
300+Popular Science / by Kelsey D. Atherton / 18h
Military From sci-fi scout to robot pack mule The army tested a prototype hover bike.

**Curb your immune enthusiasm**
23Latest Science News / 18h
Scientists have discovered how to prevent undesirable immune attacks on therapeutic viruses.

**Ants find their way even when going backwards**
200+Latest Science News / 18h
Ants can get their bearings whatever the orientation of their body, new research shows. Their brains may be smaller than the head of a pin, but ants are excellent navigators that use celestial and terrestrial cues to memorize their paths. To do so, they use several regions of the brain simultaneously, proving once again that the brain of insects is more complex than thought.

**New method could turbocharge drug discovery, protein research**
13Latest Science News / 18h
A team led by scientists has developed a versatile new method that should enhance the discovery of new drugs and the study of proteins.

**Affordable Care Act made cancer screening more accessible for millions, study finds**
26Latest Science News / 18h
The Affordable Care Act helped make recommended cancer screening more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans, according to new research.

**Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens**
500+Latest Science News / 18h
The intrinsic ability of graphene to superconduct (or carry an electrical current with no resistance) has been activated for the first time. This further widens the potential of graphene as a material that could be used in fields such as energy storage, high-speed computing, and molecular electronics.

**Perry promises to protect ‘all of the science’ at the US energy department**
100+NatureNews / by Jeff Tollefson / 18h
Trump's nominee for energy secretary says that he will base decisions on 'sound science'. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21334

**Theorists propose new class of topological metals with exotic electronic properties**
13Latest Science News / 18h
Researchers have proposed a theory-based approach to characterize a class of metals that possess exotic electronic properties that could help scientists find other, similarly-endowed materials.

**Teenagers who access mental health services see significant improvements, study shows**
25Latest Science News / 18h
Young people with mental health problems who have contact with mental health services are significantly less likely to suffer from clinical depression later in their adolescence than those with equivalent difficulties who do not receive treatment, according to new research.

**Harvests in US to suffer from climate change**
41Latest Science News / 18h
Some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. To better assess how climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions will likely impact wheat, maize and soybean, an international team of scientists now ran an unprecedentedly comprehensive set of computer simulations of US crop yields. Importantly, the scientists find that increased irrigation can help to

**5th 'Mars Mission' Simulation Ready For Launch In Hawaii**
500+Science : NPR / by Rebecca Hersher / 18h
Starting Thursday, six people will spend eight months in a dome on Mauna Loa volcano to study what living on Mars might be like. The mission is co-sponsored by the University of Hawaii and NASA. (Image credit: University of Hawaii News)

**Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening's Popularity on the Rise**
15Latest Science News / 19h
Genetic counselors are playing a greater role in areas of medicine in the wake of advancement in genomic technology. In the last decade, genetic testing has improved dramatically, enabling medical professionals the ability to screen for common genetic conditions like Down syndrome more accurately beginning at 10 weeks gestation.

**Global sea level could rise 8 feet by 2100**
4Futurity.org / by Todd Bates-Rutgers / 19h
Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions could rise significantly faster than the global average. Moreover, in a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100, according to a new report which lays out six scenarios intended to assist with national and regional planning. “Currently, about 6 million Americans live within about 6 feet of the sea level, and t

**Heat from Earth’s core may drive plate tectonics**
3Futurity.org / by Greg Borzo-U. Chicago / 19h
For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows that the additional force of heat drawn from Earth’s core also drives plate dynamics. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries between moving

**'Marine repairmen': Limpets are construction workers of the seashore**
16Latest Science News / 19h
New research shows that limpets can repair their damaged shells with biological material so that they are as strong as the originals. However, they are still vulnerable to multiple impacts and 'spalling' -- a well-known cause of failure in engineering materials such as concrete.

**Quality control inside the cell: How rescue proteins dispose of harmful messages**
12Latest Science News / 19h
The ability to dispose of proteins that are either aberrant or (in the worst case) toxic is fundamental to a cell's survival. Researchers have been able to demonstrate the manner in which two specific proteins recognize defective messenger RNAs (molecules that carry the 'assembly instructions' for protein synthesis) and trigger their destruction.

**WIRED Book Club: We Have Wrapped Our Tentacles Around Binti**
64WIRED / by Wired Staff / 19h
In Nnedi Okorafor's Hugo-winning novella, a young student confronts many-tentacled monsters—and it's not even her first day of school yet. The post WIRED Book Club: We Have Wrapped Our Tentacles Around Binti appeared first on WIRED .

**Research team develops new diagnostic tool to identify tinnitus in animals**
16Latest Science News / 19h
A behavioral tool has been developed that may significantly aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tinnitus, ultimately leading to new drugs and treatment methods, report scientists.

**New guidelines seek to promote family-centered care in the ICU**
7Latest Science News / 19h
Critical illness is a stressful and traumatic experience that may have lasting effects on the health of patients and families, even months after discharge from the intensive care unit. A new set of guidelines aims to promote family-centered care in neonatal, pediatric, and adult ICUs.

**What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes**
13Latest Science News / 19h
It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs.

**Insects also migrate, study shows**
100+Latest Science News / 19h
Insects engage in the largest continental migration on Earth, new research indicates. Some 3.5 trillion insects in Southern Britain alone migrate each year – a biomass eight times that of bird migration. The researchers fear that global warming may significantly increase the number of insects, potentially affecting various ecosystems in different parts of the world

**Technological progress alone won't stem resource use**
19Latest Science News / 19h
While some scientists believe that the world can achieve significant dematerialization through improvements in technology, a new study finds that technological advances alone will not bring about dematerialization and, ultimately, a sustainable world. The researchers found that no matter how much more efficient and compact a product is made, consumers will only demand more of that product and in t

**Advances in imaging detect blunt cerebrovascular injury more frequently in trauma patients**
17Latest Science News / 19h
Advances in diagnostic imaging technology have meant that more trauma patients are being diagnosed with blunt cerebrovascular injuries, and as a result, stroke and related death rates in these patients have declined significantly over the past 30 years. These changes are due to the evolution of imaging technology, namely CT-scanning, and its wide availability in hospitals large and small, accordin

**One percent of Cambodian children live in orphanages yet have a living parent**
28Latest Science News / 19h
Nearly 80 percent of adolescents living in Cambodia's orphanages have one or more living parents, according to a study. This is the first research of its kind to assess the literacy and health of children living outside of family care in Cambodia.

**Employee wages not just linked to skills, but quality of co-workers**
12Latest Science News / 19h
The presence of high-performing co-workers can improve an individual’s earnings, research has shown.

**Leica Debuts Its New M10 Camera and, Yep, It’s Gorgeous**
300+WIRED / by Tim Moynihan / 19h
The successor to the M only shoots stills, and you'll pay a lot for that red dot. The post Leica Debuts Its New M10 Camera and, Yep, It's Gorgeous appeared first on WIRED .

**Images of 2 pulsars could clear up geometry debate**
8Futurity.org / by Matt Swayne-Penn State / 19h
Pulsars are a type of neutron star born in supernova explosions when massive stars collapse. Astronomers first discovered them 50 years ago. Recent images of two pulsars—Geminga and B0355+54—could shed light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as well as their often perplexing geometry. Astronomers detect pulsars by their lighthouse-like beams of radio emission and beams of high-en

**Neil Gaiman’s Very Necessary Apocalypse Comedy Good Omens Is Coming to Amazon**
500+WIRED / by Charley Locke / 19h
Welcome to the End Times. The post Neil Gaiman's Very Necessary Apocalypse Comedy Good Omens Is Coming to Amazon appeared first on WIRED .

**Great differences in the view of withdrawing futile intensive care**
12Latest Science News / 19h
The views among physicians and the general public when it comes to deciding whether to withhold or withdraw treatment of terminally ill patients differ greatly. However, in a hypothetical case study of a clearly hopeless medical case, great unanimity among physicians’ and the public’s assessments could be seen with regards to cancelling treatment or offering relief at the final stages of life.

**New study will help find the best locations for thermal power stations in Iceland**
15Latest Science News / 19h
A new research article gives indications of the best places in Iceland to build thermal power stations.

**Green Sahara's ancient rainfall regime revealed**
79Latest Science News / 19h
Rainfall patterns in the Sahara during the 6,000-year 'Green Sahara' period have been pinpointed by analyzing marine sediments. From 5,000 to 11,000 years ago, what is now the Sahara Desert had ten times the rainfall it does today and was home to hunter-gatherers who lived in the region's savannahs and wooded grasslands. The new research is the first to compile a continuous record of the region's

**Regional sea-level scenarios: Helping US Northeast plan for faster-than-global rise**
100+Latest Science News / 20h
Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions will rise significantly faster than the global average, according to a new report. In a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100, according to the report, which lays out six scenarios intended to inform national and regional planning.

**Mars and Venus on the therapist's couch**
18Latest Science News / 20h
Generally speaking, men want a quick fix from psychological therapy and women want to talk about their feelings, concludes a new study.

**Caves in central China show history of natural flood patterns**
15Latest Science News / 20h
Researchers have found that major flooding and large amounts of precipitation occur on 500-year cycles in central China. These findings shed light on the forecasting of future floods and improve understanding of climate change over time and the potential mechanism of strong precipitation in monsoon regions.

**Creating atomic scale nanoribbons**
16Latest Science News / 20h
A recent study has demonstrated the first important step toward integrating atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (APGNRs) onto nonmetallic substrates.

**Insecticides mimic melatonin, creating higher risk for diabetes**
400+Latest Science News / 20h
Synthetic chemicals commonly found in insecticides and garden products bind to the receptors that govern our biological clocks researchers have found.

**Ants can find their way home walking backwards, but they have to peek first**
300+Popular Science / by Sara Chodosh / 20h
Animals Ants may have a complex understanding of their place in space You'd have to, too.

**This machine lets your smartphone analyze DNA**
12Popular Science / by Sophie Bushwick / 20h
Health There's an app for that? This $500 device enables a smartphone to identify DNA sequences.

**Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health**
2KScience : NPR / by Alex Smith / 20h
Once an elite swimmer and a Yale grad, Siphiwe Baleka now coaches 3,000 fellow truckers on the best ways to work out, eat right and stay connected on the road. Drivers say his wellness plan works. (Image credit: Alex Smith)

**Ants use Sun and memories to navigate**
400+BBC News - Science & Environment / 20h
Scientists say ants can plot a route home even when travelling backwards.

**Lap band surgery benefits very obese adolescents**
15Latest Science News / 20h
Lap band surgery has significant benefits for severely obese teenagers and, despite its controversial nature, should still be considered as a first option to manage obesity during adolescence, a new study has found.

**Gene-edited animals face US regulatory crackdown**
NatureNews / by Amy Maxmen / 20h
Last-minute proposal from Obama administration addresses CRISPR and other cutting-edge technologies. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21331

**Do You Speak Virus? Phages Caught Sending Chemical Messages**
1KScientific American Content / by Ewen Callaway / 20h
A virus that infects bacteria listens to messages from its relatives when deciding how to attack its hosts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**How Kids Catch Our Social Biases**
500+Scientific American Content / by Allison L. Skinner / 20h
The nonverbal messages we send, sometimes unconsciously, can play a surprisingly large role -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Precision medicine advances pediatric brain tumor diagnosis and treatment**
26Latest Science News / 20h
In the largest clinical study to date of genetic abnormalities in pediatric brain tumors, researchers performed clinical testing on more than 200 tumor samples and found that a majority had genetic irregularities that could influence how the disease was diagnosed and/or treated with approved drugs or agents being evaluated in clinical trials.

**It's not in your head: The weather is weirder, and climate change is the reason why**
3KPopular Science / by Mark D. Kaufman / 20h
Environment But don’t point any fingers at one particular flood. Or drought. Or hurricane. Or heatwave. If it seems like you’re regularly reading about devastating floods, droughts and storms, it’s because these extreme events are actually happening more frequently, so…

**Magnetic moment of a single antiproton determined with greatest precision ever**
19Latest Science News / 20h
Physicists have published the most accurate measurement of a fundamental property of the antiproton to date. This research represents a contribution to the matter-antimatter debate.

**Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior**
100+Latest Science News / 20h
One of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate, research suggests.

**Making AI systems that see the world as humans do**
100+Latest Science News / 20h
An artificial intelligence system has been developed that performs at human levels on a standard intelligence test.

**One in five adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts**
21Latest Science News / 20h
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission.

**The $2.4-Billion Plan to Steal a Rock from Mars**
200+Scientific American Content / by Alexandra Witze / 21h
NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the Red Planet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**13 Must-See Flicks Coming to Sundance This Year**
100+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter / 21h
These are the films coming to Park City, Utah that we're most psyched about. The post 13 Must-See Flicks Coming to Sundance This Year appeared first on WIRED .

**Abortion rate halves if women have to go extra 100 miles**
500+New Scientist / 21h
A law that closed many abortion clinics in Texas has led to a drop in the rate of abortions. On average, the nearest clinic is now 80 kilometres further away

**Disability risk rises after older adults visit E.R.**
7Futurity.org / by Ziba Kashef-Yale / 21h
Older adults who go to the emergency department for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, research shows. Most adults aged 65 and older who visit the emergency department each year are treated and sent home. Earlier research has shown that these patients are more likely to experience disability and declines in function

**Art made of the air we breathe | Emily Parsons-Lord**
200+TEDTalks (video) / by contact@ted.com (TED Conferences LLC) / 21h
Emily Parsons-Lord re-creates air from distinct moments in Earth's history -- from the clean, fresh-tasting air of the Carboniferous period to the soda-water air of the Great Dying to the heavy, toxic air of the future we're creating. By turning air into art, she invites us to know the invisible world around us. Breathe in the Earth's past and future in this imaginative, trippy talk.

**Scientists saw nanocubes self-heal**
5Futurity.org / by Taylor Kubota-Stanford / 21h
Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers have recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. The work could someday help our phone batteries last longer and our electric vehicles go farther on a single charge. In a lab 18 feet underground, researchers in the Dionne lab at Stanford University conducted the arduous experiments—sometimes requiring 30 con

**Mandarin makes you more musical?**
16Latest Science News / 21h
Mandarin makes you more musical -- and at a much earlier age than previously thought. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don't' rush just yet to sign your kids up for Chinese lessons instead of piano.

**Blood-repellent materials: A new approach to medical implants**
200+Latest Science News / 21h
Medical implants like stents, catheters and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection -- a perpetual problem for many patients. Engineers now offer a potential solution: A specially grown, 'superhemophobic' titanium surface that's extremely repellent to blood. The material could form the basis for surgical implants with lower risk of rejection by the body.

**How estrogen modulates fear learning**
41Latest Science News / 21h
Low estrogen levels may make women more susceptible to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while high estrogen levels may be protective. New research provides insight into how estrogen changes gene activity in the brain to achieve its protective effects.

**Why baboon males resort to domestic violence**
18Latest Science News / 21h
Some baboon males vying for a chance to father their own offspring expedite matters in a gruesome way -- they kill infants sired by other males and attack pregnant females, causing them to miscarry, researchers report. Infanticide has been documented in other animals including baboons, lions and dolphins, but rarely feticide. The perpetrators are more prone to commit domestic violence when forced

**Changes in blood-brain barrier, intestinal permeability found in individuals with autism**
39Latest Science News / 21h
A new study finds reduced expression of genes involved in integrity of the blood-brain barrier, intestinal barrier in those with autism spectrum disorder.

**The tasmanian tiger had a brain structure suited to a predatory life style**
12Latest Science News / 21h
Brain scans suggest the action-planning part of the cortex was large in these extinct predators.

**Seafloor valleys discovered below West Antarctic glaciers**
12Latest Science News / 21h
Glaciologists have uncovered large valleys in the ocean floor beneath some of the massive glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica. Carved by earlier advances of ice during colder periods, the troughs enable warm, salty water to reach the undersides of glaciers, fueling their increasingly rapid retreat.

**Meeting the challenges of nanotechnology: Nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology**
19Latest Science News / 21h
Scientists show nanoscale modifications to the edge region of nanocontacts to nanowires can be used to engineer the electrical function of the interfaces.

**Four ways Trump could unravel Obama's science legacy**
NatureNews / by Lauren Morello / 22h
From stem-cell law to national monuments, the president-elect has myriad opportunities to transform the research landscape. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21327

**Watch a giant robot use 8-foot-long knives to chop veggies**
6Popular Science / by Sophie Bushwick / 22h
DIY MegaBots built a giant version of Simone Giertz's terrifying machine To build a mega version of Simone Giertz's vegetable-chopping machine, MegaBots attached eight-foot-long knife arms to their giant robot.

**Billion-Dollar Project Aims to Prep Vaccines before Epidemics Hit**
400+Scientific American Content / by Declan Butler / 22h
Early targets include Nipah virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**How Trump’s erratic nuclear policy could spark a new arms race**
14New Scientist / 22h
The red “button” might not be safe under Trump's finger – but the new presidency brings some strange and surprising silver linings

**More than half of atrial fibrillation patients become asymptomatic after catheter ablation**
13Latest Science News / 22h
More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure.

**The New Logan Trailer Plays (Violently) Against Type**
2KWIRED / by Graeme McMillan / 22h
The latest Wolverine movie is going to be unlike any superhero movie out there. The post The New Logan Trailer Plays (Violently) Against Type appeared first on WIRED .

**New theory may explain mystery of Fairy Circles of Namibia**
100+Latest Science News / 22h
One of nature's greatest mysteries -- the 'Fairy Circles' of Namibia -- may have been unraveled by researchers. The study suggests that the interaction between termite engineering and the self-organization of vegetation could be jointly responsible for the phenomenon.

**Eco-HAB: New quality in research on neuronal basis of social behavior**
15Latest Science News / 22h
How the brain controls social behaviors and what exactly the neuronal impairments causing its pathologies are, is yet to be determined. To better understand mechanisms in play, scientists perform thousands of tests of social interactions, usually conducted in mice. However, such assays are highly irreproducible, which significantly impedes making new discoveries. To address this issue scientists h

**Major Viking Age manor discovered at Birka, Sweden**
55Latest Science News / 22h
For centuries it has been speculated where the manor of the royal bailiff of Birka, Herigar, might have been located. New geophysical results provide evidence of its location at Korshamn, outside the town rampart of the Viking Age proto-town Birka in Sweden.

**Mapping brain in preemies may predict later disability**
23Latest Science News / 22h
Scanning a premature infant’s brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain’s white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study.

**Foxes may confuse predators by rubbing themselves in puma scent**
300+New Scientist / 22h
Gray foxes in the mountains of California rub in the scent of pumas, possibly to absorb their smell and confuse predators to give themselves a chance to run

**Cutting Greenhouse Gases Would Help Trump Achieve His Economic Goals**
300+Scientific American Content / by Michael E. Mann / 22h
The new administration could cut greenhouse gases and achieve its economic goals all at once -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Raw materials for meatballs, falafel from mealworms and crickets**
52Latest Science News / 22h
A research team has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavor, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity also in Europe, they say.

**Molecule flash mob**
14Latest Science News / 22h
Neurotransmitter transporters are some of the most popular transport proteins in research as they play a major role in the processing of signals in the brain. A new study has now successfully demonstrated for the first time the structural impact of membrane lipids on medically relevant serotonin transporters.

**3 strategies for surviving intimate partner violence**
6Futurity.org / by Bert Gambini-Buffalo / 22h
Interviews show that African-American women in abusive relationships use a variety of strategies pulled from three general categories to survive intimate partner violence. “There’s this stereotype that African-American women who experience abuse are probably reacting to it a certain way, but there is a range of responses,” says Noelle M. St. Vil, an assistant professor in the University at Buffal

**Protein complex prevents genome instability**
17Latest Science News / 22h
An international research collaboration is investigating the repair process of a serious form of DNA damage that can lead to instability of genetic material and tumor formation. The researchers are studying the roles of groups of proteins that control the repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA that occur from internal or external sources, such as UV irradiation.

**School curricula are a reflection of society's expectations**
15Latest Science News / 23h
In a pioneering project, researchers studied the development of school curricula in Switzerland’s three main language regions. This project clearly showed that ever since the Swiss school system was created in 1830 the importance and content of every subject in the curriculum, whether language, history, handicraft or physical education, has been in flux.

**Structure of atypical cancer protein paves way for drug development**
16Latest Science News / 23h
The elusive structure of a cancer cell receptor protein has been uncovered by researchers. This protein can be leveraged to fight disease progression, say investigators.

**Connected Devices Give Spies a Powerful New Way to Surveil**
300+WIRED / by Shay Hershkovitz and Roey Tzezana / 23h
Opinion: A pair of Israeli security researchers argue that the advent of connected home devices presents a new opportunity for spy agencies. The post Connected Devices Give Spies a Powerful New Way to Surveil appeared first on WIRED .

**Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump**
39KWIRED / by Zoë Schlanger / 23h
The incoming Trump administration's EPA transition team intends to remove some climate data from the agency's website. These researchers are swooping in to help. The post Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump appeared first on WIRED .

**The Ultimate Cure for the Fake-News Epidemic Will Be More Skeptical Readers**
3KScientific American Content / by David Pogue / 23h
New algorithms will help—but users' skepticism is the ultimate weapon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Proposed Presidential Autism–Vaccine Panel Could Help Spread Disease**
8KScientific American Content / by John McQuaid / 23h
Committee mentioned in a Trump meeting last week could scare people away from protective immunizations, scientists say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**How to Overcome Unconscious Bias**
500+Scientific American Content / by Jordan Axt / 1d
We all have prejudices we're not even aware of—but they don't have to govern our behavior -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Slovakia’s Hyperloop Moves a Step Closer to Not Being a Joke**
1KWIRED / by Alex Davies / 1d
Hyperloop Transportation Technologies strikes a deal to explore extending its plans to the Czech Republic. The post Slovakia's Hyperloop Moves a Step Closer to Not Being a Joke appeared first on WIRED .

**Fighting Cancer’s Crisis of Confidence, One Study at a Time**
200+WIRED / by Megan Molteni / 1d
The Reproducibility Project announces its initial cancer study results today. The post Fighting Cancer's Crisis of Confidence, One Study at a Time appeared first on WIRED .

**Will mega-cities swallow up vital farmland?**
8Futurity.org / by Keith Randall-Texas A&M / 1d
The increase of mega-cities in some parts of the world is almost certain to eliminate huge areas of farmland critical for food production by 2030, say researchers. This shift could have severe implications worldwide. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that some urban areas located near key farmland producing regions will triple in size, resulting in huge impl

**Think Trump Will Be More Inclusive after Winning?**
500+Scientific American Content / by Samir Nurmohamed / 1d
Behavioral research suggests the answer is probably no -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Robotic sleeve 'hugs' failing hearts**
1KBBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
US scientists develop a robotic sleeve that can help hearts pump when they fail to work properly.

**The Magnificent Refuges That Hide Humanity’s Information**
500+WIRED / by Charley Locke / 1d
What do data centers and monasteries have in common? Data storage apparently. The post The Magnificent Refuges That Hide Humanity’s Information appeared first on WIRED .

**Now You Can Save the Democratic Party for the Low, Low Price of $4.68 a Month**
500+WIRED / by Emily Dreyfuss / 1d
On the eve of Trump's inauguration, Democrats are falling apart. For the price of a latte, one political techie thinks he can bring them back together. The post Now You Can Save the Democratic Party for the Low, Low Price of $4.68 a Month appeared first on WIRED .

**The Touchy Task of Making Robots Seem Human—But Not Too Human**
72WIRED / by Margaret Rhodes / 1d
On the anthropomorphic spectrum, is there a sweet spot for robotic assistants? The post The Touchy Task of Making Robots Seem Human—But Not Too Human appeared first on WIRED .

**A Wall Alone Can’t Secure the Border, No Matter Who Pays for It**
500+WIRED / by Lily Hay Newman / 1d
Border patrol technology is the future whether Trump acknowledges that or not. The post A Wall Alone Can’t Secure the Border, No Matter Who Pays for It appeared first on WIRED .

**Review: Yuneec Breeze 4K**
71WIRED / by Scott Gilbertson / 1d
With the new Breeze 4K, Yuneec has launched a drone made just for newcomers. The post Review: Yuneec Breeze 4K appeared first on WIRED .

**3 Questions for Rick Perry, Trump’s Pick to Lead the Um… Um… Oh Yeah, the Department of Energy**
79WIRED / by Nick Stockton / 1d
Rick Perry once couldn't remember the name of the agency he's been nominated to lead. The post 3 Questions for Rick Perry, Trump's Pick to Lead the Um... Um... Oh Yeah, the Department of Energy appeared first on WIRED .

**Inside the Weird, Industry-Shaking World of Donald Glover**
3KWIRED / by Allison Samuels / 1d
Childish Gambino. Atlanta. Lando Calrissian. Glover has just about every performance space covered, and all his projects intersect in strange ways. The post Inside the Weird, Industry-Shaking World of Donald Glover appeared first on WIRED .

**Stephen Hawking says he has a way to escape from a black hole**
40KNew Scientist / 1d
Researchers have long struggled to resolve what happens to information when it falls inside a black hole, but the famous physicist says he has a solution

**Brain's "Helper" Cells Turn Toxic in Injury and Disease**
1KScientific American Content / by Moheb Costandi / 1d
The Jekyll-and-Hyde behavior of astrocytes may point the way to treatments for degenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s and MS -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Brainwaves could act as your password – but not if you’re drunk**
500+New Scientist / 1d
EEG authentication is touted as a potential biometric alternative to passwords, but a test involving shots of whisky suggests it won’t work if you’re tipsy

**Why are we running out of courgettes?**
500+BBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
Bad weather in Italy and Spain is significantly increasing the price of vegetables across northern Europe

**How to Watch Trump’s Presidential Inauguration**
100+WIRED / by Emma Grey Ellis / 1d
Here's how you can tune in for the first moments of Trump's presidency. The post How to Watch Trump's Presidential Inauguration appeared first on WIRED .

**BBC Breakfast presenters meet 'Orangu-cam'**
500+BBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
The Breakfast team have been monkeying around with one of the stars of new series 'Spy in the Wild'.

**Fujifilm’s Excellent Digital Cameras Just Got Even Excellenter**
100+WIRED / by Tim Moynihan / 1d
Our favorite compact camera gets a little bump for 2017. The post Fujifilm's Excellent Digital Cameras Just Got Even Excellenter appeared first on WIRED .

**Knot Not Easy to Knot**
13Scientific American Content / by Christopher Intagliata / 1d
Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Mapping the mind of worms**
39Latest Science News / 1d
Biologists have identified signals that drive distinct behavior in microscopic nematode worms, and which may hold lessons for human brains.

**Intense industrial fishing**
31Latest Science News / 1d
A new study examines how China maintains large catches and what it means for fishery management elsewhere

**Pruitt Says He Backs Biofuels Program, but Is Open to Tweaks**
Scientific American Content / by Valerie Volcovici / 1d
Trump's choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency tells Senate he would honor the intent of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Study provides new evidence on role of person-to person transmission in drug-resistant TB**
18Latest Science News / 1d
A study of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB)in KwaZulu province, South Africa, builds on a growing body of evidence showing person-to-person transmission, not just inadequate treatment, is driving the spread of XDR TB.

**Could better eye training help reduce concussion in women's soccer?**
25Latest Science News / 1d
With the ever-growing popularity of women's soccer, attention to sports-related concussions is also a growing concern. High school female soccer players incur a higher concussion rate than males, and researchers noticed in photographs of female soccer players, the players often had their eyes closed. They wanted to quantify whether female athletes closed their eyes more frequently than male counte

**Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen**
18Latest Science News / 1d
Production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2, an international team of researchers has discovered.

**Trump EPA Pick Expresses Doubts about Climate Change, Defends Oil Industry Funding**
2Scientific American Content / by Valerie Volcovici / 1d
Pruitt tells Senate he would seek to ensure environmental protections are effective without hurting development -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Scientists Needn't Get A Patient's Consent To Study Blood Or DNA**
400+Science : NPR / by Rob Stein / 1d
In its update of ethics rules aimed at protecting patients, the Obama administration decided against a provision that scientists said would hinder research. Consumer advocates aren't happy. (Image credit: Dana Neely/Getty Images)

**Seals hunt down hidden fish by sensing their breath in the sand**
400+New Scientist / 1d
The only way for flatfish hidden under the sand on the sea floor to avoid harbour seal predators might be to hold their breath

JAN 18
**Trump's EPA nominee Scott Pruitt grilled on oil company ties**
52BBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
Donald Trump's choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has faced some tough questioning at his confirmation hearing.

**Billion-dollar project aims to prep vaccines before epidemics hit**
NatureNews / by Declan Butler / 1d
Massive effort plans to stockpile vaccines against future outbreaks. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21329

**Many more people could still die from mad cow disease in the UK**
500+New Scientist / 1d
A man who has died of vCJD has shown that the disease can affect a second genetic subtype of people. It’s likely these people take longer to develop symptoms

**Patients with chronic conditions face big deductibles**
10Futurity.org / by Kara Gavin-U. Michigan / 1d
For tens of millions of Americans, the start of a new year means the counter has gone back to zero on their health insurance deductibles. If they need health care, they’ll pay for some of it out of their own pockets before their insurance takes over. But what do those plans mean for people with common chronic health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, joint problems, and heart disease? The short

**Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging**
500+Latest Science News / 1d
Elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older than their chronological age by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary, research shows.

**Small intestine GIST associated with better prognosis in younger patients**
50Latest Science News / 1d
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are tumors that arise is the wall of the digestive tract, and most often occur in the stomach or small intestine. Though more common in later in life, GISTs can occur in adolescents and young adults (AYA) under 40 years old as well. Researchers report findings from the first population-based analysis of AYA patients with GIST.

**Swamphens signal dominance through fleshy faces**
9Latest Science News / 1d
What's in a face? In addition to their plumage, Pukeko -- large purple swamphens found in New Zealand -- convey information about their status through their faces. A new study shows that the strongest predictor of male dominance in Pukeko is the size of their frontal shield, a fleshy ornament on their bill that can change quickly.

**2016 Was the Hottest Year on Record**
200+Scientific American Content / by Andrea Thompson / 1d
Both NASA and NOAA declare that our planet is experiencing record-breaking warming for the third year in a row -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**U.S. Report Confirms 2016 Was The Hottest Year On Record**
24Science : NPR / by Geoff Brumfiel / 1d
2016 was the warmest year on record, according to a new report by the U.S. government. This is the third year in a row that global temperatures have soared above the 20th century average. The report comes ahead of the inauguration of Donald Trump, who has at times, referred to global warming as a "hoax."

**States Could Take Lead On Environmental Regulation Under Trump**
100+Science : NPR / 1d
NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Dallas Burtraw, senior fellow with the nonpartisan think tank Resources for the Future, about what role states have traditionally played in environmental regulation, and what a decentralized approach under the Trump administration would look like.

**EPA Nominee Scott Pruitt Acknowledges Existence Of Climate Change**
30Science : NPR / by Nathan Rott / 1d
Trump's pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency has acknowledged that human activity plays "some" role in the changing climate. In his confirmation hearing on Wednesday, Scott Pruitt said he wants to work with states to protect the environment while also encouraging economic growth.

**3 Critical Questions Tom Price Didn’t Answer at the Health and Human Services Hearing**
100+WIRED / by Megan Molteni / 1d
These are the important points to consider when Price faces his formal confirmation hearing on January 24. The post 3 Critical Questions Tom Price Didn't Answer at the Health and Human Services Hearing appeared first on WIRED .

**Delirium could accelerate dementia-related mental decline**
20Latest Science News / 1d
When hospitalized, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.

**The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells**
200+Quanta Magazine / by Alla Katsnelson / 1d
Structure equals function: If there’s one thing we all learned about proteins in high school biology, that would be it. According to the textbook story of the cell, a protein’s three-dimensional shape determines what it does — drive chemical reactions, pass signals up and down the cell’s information superhighway, or maybe hang molecular tags onto DNA. For more than a century, biologists have thou

**From the archives: In 1999, Eugene Cernan knew we'd make it to Mars**
300+Popular Science / by Popular Science, July 1999, by Frank Vizard / 1d
Space In memory of "the last moonwalker" In memory of Eugene Cernan, who passed away on January 16, 2017, we're republishing our 1999 Q&A with him—"The Last Moonwalker."…

**Global threat to primates concerns us all**
40Latest Science News / 1d
In cooperation with an international team of experts, scientists demand immediate measures to protect primates.

**Soft robot helps the heart beat**
100+Latest Science News / 1d
A customizable soft robot that fits around a heart and helps it beat has now been developed by researchers, potentially opening new treatment options for people suffering from heart failure.

**Northern Quebec lichen yields two unique molecules and several antibacterial compounds**
15Latest Science News / 1d
Two unique molecules have been discovered by researchers in a species of lichen growing in northern Quebec. A number of compounds with interesting antibacterial properties have also been isolated from the lichen, according to an article.

**It’s Time to Stand Up for the Climate—and for Civilization**
10KWIRED / by Bill McKibben / 1d
Bill McKibben argues that protecting science's legacy of climate research is a matter of protecting civilization itself. The post It's Time to Stand Up for the Climate—and for Civilization appeared first on WIRED .

**Finally, Miles Morales Will Get to Be a Big Screen Spider-Man**
400+WIRED / by Graeme McMillan / 1d
Step aside, Peter Parker. The post Finally, Miles Morales Will Get to Be a Big Screen Spider-Man appeared first on WIRED .

**Out of Places to Stick Diamonds, Rolls-Royce Starts Infusing Cars With Gold**
200+WIRED / by Alex Davies / 1d
Built to ferry guests around Macau, these Phantoms are stuffed with Au. The post Out of Places to Stick Diamonds, Rolls-Royce Starts Infusing Cars With Gold appeared first on WIRED .

**Mississippi River: Reviving floodplain to reduce Gulf of Mexico's dead zone**
31Latest Science News / 1d
Researchers are reviving one of the Mississippi River's main filters: the floodplain. The result is a unique environment that removes nitrogen, a contributor to the Gulf of Mexico's dead zone.

**Study identifies molecular signal for maintaining adult neuron**
32Latest Science News / 1d
Research in mice points to better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders, report researchers.

**'Collateral' lethality may offer new therapeutic approach for cancers of the pancreas, stomach and colon**
14Latest Science News / 1d
Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as 'collateral lethality,' which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers.

**Nintendo Switch Ain’t for Mom and Pop—It’s for Die-Hard Fans**
500+WIRED / by Chris Kohler / 1d
Nintendo is courting a new sort of player with its new hybrid console: the people who already like Nintendo. The post Nintendo Switch Ain’t for Mom and Pop—It’s for Die-Hard Fans appeared first on WIRED .

**2016 was the hottest year on record**
8Popular Science / by Kendra Pierre-Louis / 1d
Environment The temps trump all historical records Climate data reveals that 2016 was the hottest year since we began keeping temperature records.

**Researchers develop ways to improve machining, milling processes**
17Latest Science News / 1d
Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers – and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created.

**Novel mechanism identified that protects pancreas from digestive enzymes**
11Latest Science News / 1d
Researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas.

**Cancer treatment for transplant patients discovered**
19Latest Science News / 1d
Nephrologists have published a letter that profiles a novel drug combination with the potential to help prevent rejection of a donor kidney in transplant patients undergoing cancer treatment.

**The Future of Global Risk: A View from Davos**
20Scientific American Content / by Erwann Michel-Kerjan / 1d
The latest edition of a report from the World Economic Forum updates its annual lists of global threats -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**3D simulation could replace some zebrafish in labs**
4Futurity.org / by James Devitt-NYU / 1d
Scientists have developed the first data-driven modeling framework capable of simulating zebrafish swimming in three dimensions. It is rooted in real-life data and robust enough to potentially replace animals in some types of research, particularly neurobehavioral studies that are critical to understanding the brain. Every year, approximately 20 million animals are used in scientific research. In

**Meet China's Sharp Sword, a stealth drone that can likely carry 2 tons of bombs**
3KPopular Science / by Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer / 1d
From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal It just won a technology prize, so China's pretty proud of it. The Sharp Sword won a big national technology award, showcasing China's secretive research into stealth drones.

**2016 Was the Hottest Year on Record, and Humans Are to Blame**
2KWIRED / by Damian Carrington / 1d
2016 was the hottest year on record, setting a new high for the third year in a row, with scientists firmly putting the blame on human activities. The post 2016 Was the Hottest Year on Record, and Humans Are to Blame appeared first on WIRED .

**Soft Robot Exosuits Will Give You Springier Steps**
100+WIRED / by Nick Stockton / 1d
Rigid exoskeletons to help the movement-impaired heavy, and they have a hard time aligning with human joints. A soft robotic wearable could be the fix. The post Soft Robot Exosuits Will Give You Springier Steps appeared first on WIRED .

**What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?**
1KScience : NPR / by Richard Harris / 1d
Results from some key cancer studies were different when the experiments were redone in different labs. Scientists don't yet know why but say the answer could have health implications for patients. (Image credit: Tom Werner/Getty Images)

**Here's a plan to turn bullfighting arenas into drone hubs**
95Popular Science / by Kelsey D. Atherton / 1d
Aviation No bull. Can we turn a bullfighting arena into a drone hub? Read on.

**Primates facing 'extinction crisis'**
1KBBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
Primates are facing an extinction crisis, according to researchers who have found that 60% of species are under threat.

**Super-resolution imaging offers fast way to discern fate of stem cells**
17Latest Science News / 1d
A new way to identify the state and fate of individual stem cells earlier than previously possible has now been developed by a team of scientists.

**Which facebook 'friends' help most when looking for a job? Depends where you live in the world**
16Latest Science News / 1d
Research used anonymous Facebook data from almost 17 million social connections in 55 countries to determine that the role of weak and strong ties in job searches is important around the world, but the value of a single strong tie is even more important for job seekers in countries with pronounced income inequality.

**Massive sea lion, fur seal hunting in the Patagonian coasts is altering Southern Atlantic Ocean ecosystems**
45Latest Science News / 1d
Sea lion hunting by the Europeans at the Atlantic coasts of South America – it started in the 19th Century and continued up to the second half of the 20th century in Argentina and Uruguay – changed its nutrition guidelines of these pinnipeds as well as the structure of the coastal trophic network, according to new research.

**Gestational diabetes increases risk for postpartum depression**
100+Latest Science News / 1d
Gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression in first-time mothers, researcher have concluded.

**Study finds new target for controlling cell division**
10Latest Science News / 1d
Modern genome sequencing methods used to measure the efficiency of synthesis of individual protein during cell division has found that the enzymes that make lipids and membranes were synthesized at much greater efficiency when a cell is ready to split.

**Majority of primate species may vanish in next 25 to 50 years**
2KNew Scientist / 1d
The latest review of primate survival prospects shows that habitat loss from farming and human expansion is putting our closest evolutionary relatives at risk

**Stretchy robotic suit reduces energy used to walk by 23 per cent**
500+New Scientist / 1d
A lightweight textile exoskeleton that assists the leg muscles could be a boon for people who find it difficult to get around

**Traffic jam in empty space**
85Latest Science News / 1d
An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made by researchers in Germany. The team of scientists has now shown how to manipulate the electric vacuum field and thus generate deviations from the ground state of empty space which can only be understood in the context of the quantum theory of light.

**Severe side effects of approved multiple sclerosis medication**
59Latest Science News / 1d
The multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy alemtuzumab can trigger severe, unpredictable side effects. Scientists report on two patients for whom the infusion of alemtuzumab significantly worsened symptoms. The team also describes a treatment that successfully curbed the harmful side effects.

**This soft robot hugs your heart to help keep it pumping**
3KPopular Science / by Sarah Fecht / 1d
Health It could help you survive heart failure About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, meaning their hearts don't pump blood as well as they should. A squishy, air-powered robot might be able to help.

**Scientists Must Become More Involved in the Political Process**
3KScientific American Content / by Shaughnessy Naughton / 1d
The dearth of lawmakers who bring a scientific perspective to national issues of energy, climate change, national security and technology deeply concern me as a scientist and as an American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Prehistoric mega-lake sediment offers key insight into how inland regions responded to ‘super-greenhouse’ event**
26Latest Science News / 1d
Sediment found at the site of one of the largest lakes in Earth's history could provide a fascinating new insight into how inland regions responded to global climate change millions of years ago.

**Toxic brain cells may drive many neurodegenerative disorders, study finds**
75Latest Science News / 1d
While most of us haven't heard of astrocytes, these cells are four times as plentiful in the human brain as nerve cells. Now, a team led by researchers has found that astrocytes, which perform many indispensable functions in the brain, can take on a villainous character, destroying nerve cells and likely driving many neurodegenerative diseases.

**New data show heightened risk of birth defects with antidepressants prescribed during pregnancy**
43Latest Science News / 1d
Antidepressants prescribed to pregnant women could increase the chance of having a baby with birth defects, new research indicates.

**Harnessing the energy of fireworks for fuel**
18Latest Science News / 1d
The world relies heavily on gasoline and other hydrocarbons to power its cars and trucks. In search of an alternative fuel type, some researchers are turning to the stuff of fireworks and explosives: metal powders. And now one team is reporting a method to produce a metal nanopowder fuel with high energy content that is stable in air and doesn't go boom until ignited.

**Driving factors behind changes between local and global carbon cycles**
16Latest Science News / 1d
Pioneering new research has provided a fascinating new insight in the quest to determine whether temperature or water availability is the most influential factor in determining the success of global, land-based carbon sinks. The research, carried out by an international team of climate scientists has revealed new clues on how land carbon sinks are regulated on both local and global scales.

**Slack’s New Threaded Messages Tame Your Meandering Chats**
300+WIRED / by Davey Alba / 1d
Finally. Slack has just released threaded messaging, a way to connect related messages within a chatroom. The post Slack's New Threaded Messages Tame Your Meandering Chats appeared first on WIRED .

**What You Need to Know From Ryan Zinke’s Interior Secretary Hearing**
100+WIRED / by Megan Molteni / 1d
With a history of voting to expand fossil fuel exploration on public lands and weakening regulations, Zinke curries no favor with environmentalists. The post What You Need to Know From Ryan Zinke's Interior Secretary Hearing appeared first on WIRED .

**Stranded With a Million Dollars: How MTV Spied on Contestants for Real-Life Hunger Games**
500+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter / 1d
If you think this sounds like the Hunger Games, you're not alone there. The post Stranded With a Million Dollars : How MTV Spied on Contestants for Real-Life Hunger Games appeared first on WIRED .

**International effort announced to try to save the world's most endangered marine mammal**
48Latest Science News / 1d
An ambitious, emergency plan to help save the vaquita porpoise from extinction in the northern Gulf of California has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA). The plan involves relocating some of the remaining vaquitas to a temporary sanctuary, while crucial efforts aimed at eliminating illegal fishing and removing gillnets from their environment con

**Heat from earth’s core could be underlying force in plate tectonics**
55Latest Science News / 1d
For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth's tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth's core. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries b

**Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records**
47Latest Science News / 1d
Researchers have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat.

**Researcher examines effect of exercise on breast cancer survivors**
34Latest Science News / 1d
A new study has focused on the effects of exercise and physical activity on postmenopausal breast cancer survivors taking AIs -- hormone-therapy drugs that stop the production of estrogen. The work concludes that a combination of resistance and aerobic exercise helps mitigate the side effects of AIs and improves health outcomes in breast cancer survivors, particularly their body composition.

**Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed**
31Latest Science News / 1d
Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless 'smart' patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The device has been tested on mice.

**Childbirth: Delayed clamping prevents anemia, study suggests**
16Latest Science News / 1d
When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study.

**Controversial patient-consent proposal left out of research-ethics reforms**
NatureNews / by Sara Reardon / 1d
US agency releases finalized ‘Common Rule’, which governs human-subjects research. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21330

**Magnetic recording with light and no heat**
23Latest Science News / 1d
A strong short light pulse can record data on a magnetic layer of yttrium iron garnet doped with Co-ions. The novel mechanism outperforms existing alternatives allowing ever fastest write-read magnetic recording accompanied by unprecedentedly low heat load, researchers report.

**A toolkit for transformable materials**
17Latest Science News / 1d
Researchers have developed a general framework to design reconfigurable metamaterials. The design strategy is scale independent, meaning it can be applied to everything from meter-scale architectures to reconfigurable nano-scale systems such as photonic crystals, waveguides and metamaterials to guide heat.

**What's behind the durian fruit's notorious stench?**
21Latest Science News / 1d
Most people who have tried durian either love it or hate it. The fruit's yellowish flesh is sweet and custard-like, but it comes with an overpowering stench of garbage. Scientists studying the unique fruit have now analyzed a set of 20 stinky and fruity chemical ingredients and found that a mere two compounds can re-create the overall smell.

**A new study explains the origin of mysterious 'fairy circles' in the desert**
300+Popular Science / by Sara Chodosh / 1d
Environment These mystical rings may be created by termites Yet another debunking, this time with complex computer modeling!

**A female shark had a bunch of babies without male contact**
500+Popular Science / by Rachel Feltman / 1d
Animals It's not the first time a female animal has taken matters into her own fins A female shark had babies without any sperm, which isn't as weird as it sounds…

**First evidence of dwarf galaxy merger boosts two cosmic theories**
500+New Scientist / 1d
Astronomers have found dwarf galaxies that seem about to merge, backing ideas about how large galaxies form and the scattered nature of dark matter

**Mysterious fairy circles in Namibian desert explained at last**
500+New Scientist / 1d
Patterns in desert vegetation have been puzzling ecologists for years, but now it seems to have been finally cracked: both water and termites are at play

**Under Pressure, Scientists Seek Solutions to Human-Caused Earthquakes**
300+Scientific American Content / by Anna Kuchment / 1d
Wastewater injection has created seismic problems in states like Oklahoma and Texas—but there are ways to mitigate the rumbling -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Cancer reproducibility project releases first results**
NatureNews / by Monya Baker / 1d
An open-science effort to replicate dozens of cancer-biology studies is off to a confusing start. Nature 541 269 doi: 10.1038/541269a

**Do you speak virus? Phages caught sending chemical messages**
4KNatureNews / by Ewen Callaway / 1d
A virus that infects bacteria listens to messages from its relatives when deciding how to attack its hosts. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21313

**Why busy college counseling centers aren’t a bad sign**
8Futurity.org / by Heather Robbins-Penn State / 1d
Increased demand at college counseling centers doesn’t necessarily mean students are less well than in the past. Instead, the increase may be due to national prevention and awareness efforts over the past decade. “The results we are seeing are the outcomes we would expect to see from suicide prevention efforts over the last decade,” says Ben Locke, executive director of the Center for Collegiate

**Deep-space mission to metal asteroid**
51Latest Science News / 1d
Scientists are planning to send a deep-space probe to a metal asteroid, enabling them to see what is believed to be a planetary core. Psyche, an asteroid orbiting the sun between Mars and Jupiter, is made almost entirely of nickel-iron metal.

**US army wants to fire swarm of weaponised drones from a missile**
500+New Scientist / 1d
A swarm of drones equipped with munitions could locate and attack targets after being released from a missile mid-flight, according to an army proposal

**New System Could Connect Cell Phones to Real Cells and Treat Disease**
69Scientific American Content / by William Bentley / 1d
Cells, as medicine, now can be switched on and off with electricity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Male fruit flies rationally choose how to rank mates**
5Futurity.org / by James Urton-Washington / 1d
A complex series of experiments shows that male fruit flies, when presented with a pair of females as potential mating partners, display a key component of rational choice: transitivity. “Transitivity is a hallmark of rational decision-making,” says senior author Daniel Promislow, a professor of pathology and biology at the University of Washington. “Essentially, it is the process of establishing

**High school isn’t too late to get teens into STEM**
13Futurity.org / by Mark Peters-U. Chicago / 1d
Parents can increase their high schooler’s competency and career interest in STEM fields by talking to them about the relevance of math and science, new research shows. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , show a 12 percentage point increase on the math and science ACT for students whose parents received information on how to effectively convey the impo

**Visualizing the Medical Isotope Crisis**
300+Scientific American Content / by Amanda Montañez / 1d
Information graphics help to clarify a little-known but critical challenge to the health care industry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Evolution’s winning groups have these 3 traits**
11Futurity.org / by Daniel Stolte-Arizona / 1d
Scientists now have answer to an obvious yet elusive question: Why have some groups on the evolutionary tree of animals branched into a dizzying thicket of species while others split into a mere handful and called it a day? For millennia, humans have marveled at the seemingly boundless variety and diversity of animals inhabiting the Earth. So far, biologists have described and catalogued about 1.

**2016 confirmed as the hottest year on record**
1KNew Scientist / 1d
The global average temperature in 2016 was 1.1°C higher than pre-industrial levels and about 0.07°C higher than the previous record set in 2015

**2016 warmest year on record globally, NASA and NOAA data show**
500+Latest Science News / 1d
Earth's 2016 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and NOAA. This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.

**New avenue for anti-depressant therapy discovered**
1KLatest Science News / 1d
Researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. In so doing, they identified a new molecule that alleviates anxiety and depressive behavior in rodents.

**Finding ways to fix the climate before it is too late**
27Latest Science News / 1d
Scientists and policymakers rely on complex computer simulations called Integrated Assessment Models to figure out how to address climate change. But these models need tinkering to make them more accurate.

**Milestone in graphene production**
14Latest Science News / 1d
For the first time, it is now possible to produce functional OLED electrodes from graphene. The OLEDs can, for example, be integrated into touch displays, and the miracle material graphene promises many other applications for the future.

**DNA-testing smartphone aims to tackle drugs resistance**
500+BBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
A smartphone attachment that analyses DNA could help improve cancer and tuberculosis treatments.

**Patients face 'surprise' medical bills from out-of-network specialists**
15Latest Science News / 1d
The average anesthesiologist, emergency physician, pathologist and radiologist charge more than four times what Medicare pays for similar services, often leaving privately insured consumers stuck with surprise medical bills that are much higher than they anticipated, new research suggests.

**Wheat virus crosses over, harms native grasses**
12Latest Science News / 1d
Once upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses.

**Giant Stationary Wave Spied in Atmosphere of Venus**
84Scientific American Content / by Elizabeth Howell / 1d
The phenomenon, called a gravity wave, is likely produced by winds flowing over a mountain on the planet's surface -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Jungle Patrol: Shooting Real Hunger Games**
100+WIRED / by Angela Watercutter / 1d
Here's a field guide to all the gadgets MTV used to make its new reality show. The post Jungle Patrol: Shooting Real Hunger Games appeared first on WIRED .

**Five-minute chats in the waiting room may prompt families to eat more fruits, vegetables**
33Latest Science News / 1d
Low-income families were more likely to use their federal food assistance on nutritious food after learning that their dollars can be doubled for more fruits and vegetables, a new study finds.

**In Rett syndrome model, team shows how adult learning is impaired in females**
14Latest Science News / 1d
In mouse models of Rett syndrome -- which in humans is seen overwhelmingly in females -- researchers have demonstrated how failure of Mecp2, the mouse equivalent of the human gene of the same name, has biological consequences that prevent adult females from learning how to gather newborn pups in the days immediately following the pups' birth. They reversed the defect.

**Talking to children about STEM fields boosts test scores and career interest**
75Latest Science News / 1d
Parents who talk with their high schoolers about the relevance of science and math can increase competency and career interest in the fields, a report suggests.

**Nanofibers developed for healing bone fractures**
19Latest Science News / 1d
In future, it may be possible to use nanofibres to improve the attachment of bone implants, or the fibers may be used directly to scaffold bone regeneration. This would aid the healing of fractures and may enable the care of osteoporosis. This is detailed in a new dissertation.

**A big nano boost for solar cells**
40Latest Science News / 1d
Solar cells convert light into electricity. While the sun is one source of light, the burning of natural resources like oil and natural gas can also be harnessed.

**Vitamin B-12, and a knockoff version, create complex market for marine vitamins**
19Latest Science News / 1d
Vitamin B-12 exists in two different, incompatible forms in the oceans. An organism thought to supply essential vitamin B-12 in the marine environment is actually churning out a knockoff version.

**Luminescent proteins provide color to ecological and cheap bio-displays**
20Latest Science News / 1d
Mobile phone, computer and TV displays all use very expensive color filters and other components, which cannot be easily recycled. Scientists have designed a new screen, which is cheaper and ecological as it uses a hybrid material. This material's luminescent proteins can be used in backlighting systems and color filters made using a 3-D printing technique.

**Protein involved in blood clotting stimulates liver repair**
40Latest Science News / 1d
A new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair has been uncovered by researchers. Using an experimental model of high-dosage acetaminophen, the team found that liver injury activated blood clotting, which then stimulated liver repair.

**Adoptees advantaged by birth language memory**
100+Latest Science News / 1d
Language learning very early on in life can be subconsciously retained even when no conscious knowledge of the early experience remains. The subconscious knowledge can then be tapped to speed up learning of the pronunciation of sounds of the lost tongue, report scientists.

**The $2.4-billion plan to steal a rock from Mars**
NatureNews / by Alexandra Witze / 1d
NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the red planet. Nature 541 274 doi: 10.1038/541274a

**New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates**
23Latest Science News / 1d
A protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1, researchers have discovered.

**Delhi's health system: Inadequate progress for a global city**
9Latest Science News / 1d
Access to effective care remains insufficient to overcome the crushing poverty and inequalities within Delhi, suggest a new report.

**India's First GM Food Crop Held Up by Lawsuit**
100+Scientific American Content / by Sanjay Kumar / 1d
Scientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**How online abuse of women has spiraled out of control | Ashley Judd**
19KTEDTalks (video) / by contact@ted.com (TED Conferences LLC) / 1d
Enough with online hate speech, sexual harassment and threats of violence against women and marginalized groups. It's time to take the global crisis of online abuse seriously. In this searching, powerful talk, Ashley Judd recounts her ongoing experience of being terrorized on social media for her unwavering activism and calls on citizens of the internet, the tech community, law enforcement and leg

**Space Weather Forecast to Improve with European Satellite**
72Scientific American Content / by Elizabeth Gibney / 1d
Probe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Moth with 'golden flake hairstyle' named after Donald Trump**
12KBBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
The moth, which has a wingspan of just over a centimetre, was discovered in California.

**Interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products helps investors make better choices**
7Latest Science News / 1d
The first online, interactive 'nutrition label' for financial products has been developed. Like the ubiquitous information nutrition panels on food and packaged goods, it is simple, easy to read and uncluttered. What's more, the financial label is interactive, allowing people to easily get a sense of the long-term implications of choices they make today.

**Young predators can have bigger impact in the pond**
3Futurity.org / by Jade Boyd-Rice / 1d
Smaller, younger predators can have an outsized effect on their ecosystem, report ecologists. “We live in a world where humans are impacting species at different stages of their lives, and this work shows the importance of considering the entire life cycle of a species rather than just looking at a snapshot in time,” says ecologist Volker Rudolf, associate professor in Rice University’s departmen

**Climate change: Data shows 2016 likely to be warmest year yet**
10KBBC News - Science & Environment / 1d
Temperature data for 2016 shows it is likely to have edged ahead of 2015 as the world's warmest year.

**Is it freezing inside that tornado?**
100+Latest Science News / 1d
With winter upon us in full force, outdoor temperatures are plummeting. But inside an intense tornado, it's always chilly -- no matter the time of year. A new study demonstrates why that's the case.

**A better way to make renewable hydrogen**
18Latest Science News / 1d
Scientists have developed a method which boosts the longevity of high-efficiency photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices.

**2016 Was The Hottest Year Yet, Scientists Declare**
21KScience : NPR / by Nell Greenfieldboyce / 1d
Global temperatures soared above the 20th century average last year, as the climate continues to change. It's the hottest it has been since scientists started tracking global temperatures in 1880. (Image credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR)

**Marijuana's benefits, Antarctic ice cracks and a $500-million donation**
NatureNews / 1d
The week in science: 13–19 January 2017. Nature 541 264 doi: 10.1038/541264a

**Trump nominees talk science: As it happened**
NatureNews / by Jeff Tollefson / 1d
President-elect's picks to lead environment and health agencies testify before Congress. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21319

**New insights in genetic defect allow prevention of fatal illnesses in children**
14Latest Science News / 1d
A team of scientists was able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. This mutation causes patients to be extremely vulnerable to normally mild childhood illnesses such as rotavirus and enterovirus. The comprehensive analysis of the genetic defect allows clinicians to provide children with the proper therapies before illnesses prove fatal.

**Food security threatened by sea-level rise**
31Latest Science News / 1d
Coastal countries are highly prone to sea-level rise, which leads to salt-water intrusion and increased salinity levels in agricultural land. Also typical for these regions are floods and waterlogging caused by cyclones and typhoons, as well as prolonged drought periods.

**Scientists identify early impact of Ebola virus on immune system**
7Latest Science News / 1d
A new mouse model of early Ebola virus (EBOV) infection has shown scientists how early responses of the immune system can affect development of EBOV disease. The model could help identify protective immune responses as targets for developing human EBOV therapeutics.

**Climate Change Will Lower the Number of Perfect Weather Days**
41Scientific American Content / by Scott Waldman / 1d
Mild weather days worldwide could decline by up to 13 percent by the end of the century due to global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Victims’ Families Sue Japan for Failing to Warn of Eruption**
100+WIRED / by Erik Klemetti / 1d
Families of some of the victims of the 2014 eruption of Mt. Ontake are suing the local government, claiming that they downplayed the volcano's threat. The post Victims’ Families Sue Japan for Failing to Warn of Eruption appeared first on WIRED .

**Introducing Mozilla’s New Logo, Moz://a. Get It?**
500+WIRED / by Margaret Rhodes / 1d
When a big tech company unveils its new identity, it usually does so with a surprise announcement. Not this time. The post Introducing Mozilla’s New Logo, Moz:
a. Get It? appeared first on WIRED .
**Heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters brain electrical activity**
500+Latest Science News / 1d
Long-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, according to a new study. These alterations were observed in physically and mentally healthy but heavy-drinking adolescents, who nevertheless did not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for a substance abuse disorder.

**'Bring it back,' but within bounds: Retrieval strains the forelimbs of dogs**
22Latest Science News / 1d
Hunting dogs such as the popular breed retriever are ideally suited for retrieving birds or small game. However, the weight the dogs carry strains their locomotor system. A motion study has shown that the dogs tilt forwards like a seesaw when they carry the prey in their mouths. This can make already existing joint and tendon damage worse. Therefore, adjusted weights should be used for the trainin

**Climate change might mean nicer weather in some places—but don't get too excited**
300+Popular Science / by Marlene Cimons / 1d
From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Most parts of the country will want to spend less time outside While numerous climate studies in recent years have examined the influence of global warming on extreme weather events , there has been little attention directed at the…

**New reconstruction of an ancient ice sheet**
25Latest Science News / 1d
A new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.

**Women’s access to birth control and abortion fading under Trump**
14New Scientist / 1d
There are ways for women to take back their reproductive rights - but they might have to go to Mexico

**Is the 5-Second Rule True?**
100+Scientific American Content / by Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt / 1d
Should you really abide by the famous 5-second rule? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**A New Series About the Visionary Designers Who Shape Our World**
4KWIRED / by Scott Dadich / 1d
We're moving to a future of intentionality. That's a key tenet of design thinking, the main force shaping and pushing tech and innovation of all kinds. The post A New Series About the Visionary Designers Who Shape Our World appeared first on WIRED .

**How the FDA Will Help Lead the Next Medical Revolution**
100+WIRED / by Robert M. Califf / 1d
Smart regulation and early engagement with developers can foster innovation, says FDA commissioner Robert Califf. The post How the FDA Will Help Lead the Next Medical Revolution appeared first on WIRED .

**Viral escape hatch could be treatment target for hepatitis E**
13Latest Science News / 1d
The technique that the hepatitis E virus -- an emerging liver virus historically found in developing countries but now on the rise in Europe -- uses to spread could present a weak spot scientists can exploit to treat the disease, according to a new study.

**Why scientists should research emojis and emoticons :-P**
23Latest Science News / 1d
More than 90 percent of online populations now incorporate emojis and emoticons into their texts and emails, and researchers are wondering what the use of (~_^), (>_<), or =D can reveal about human behavior. Emojis and emoticons can be used as tools for evaluating how we relate to each other in the digital age.

**Pitching in: Biologists study development of division of labor among bees**
15Latest Science News / 1d
Biologists tested a variation of the reproductive ground plan hypothesis in solitary, ground-nesting bees of south central Washington State. Their findings could shed light on development of division of labor in social bees.

**Preclinical research sheds light on tumor-progression in lung cancer**
15Latest Science News / 1d
Preclinical research shows that the tumor-promoting properties of neuropilin-2 reside predominantly on isoform NRP2b, while NRP2a has the opposite effects in non-small cell lung cancer. In mouse models, NRP2a inhibited tumor cell proliferation, while NRP2b promoted metastasis and progression. This new understanding may lead to improved therapies that specifically target NRP2b, while sparing the tu

**See how immune cells break through blood vessel walls**
13Latest Science News / 1d
In any given second, thousands of immune cells are poking holes in your blood vessels as they travel out of the blood stream to survey your organs for problems or join the fight against a pathogen. Despite the constant assault, the damage is negligible.

**Is China's Ivory Ban a Sign of Hope for Elephants?**
300+Scientific American Content / by John R. Platt / 1d
China’s legal ivory market will close this year, but elephants are still being slaughtered -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Highly gifted children benefit from explanation as much as their peers**
30Latest Science News / 1d
We often assume that highly gifted children always perform at maximum capacity. However, new research shows that this group also benefits from training and explanation. Strangely enough, the benefits are the same for both groups.

**Trump's 5 Most "Anti-Science" Moves**
2KScientific American Content / by Andrea Marks / 1d
The president-elect has taken what is widely seen as a hostile stance toward the scientific community. Here’s why -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Controversial website that lists ‘predatory’ publishers shuts down**
NatureNews / by Andrew Silver / 2d
Librarian Jeffrey Beall won’t say why he has unpublished his widely read blog. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21328

**Flawed hunt for flight MH370 shows need for new tracking system**
100+New Scientist / 2d
The troubled search for the Malaysian airliner that vanished in 2014 highlights the need for better technology and coordination, says Paul Marks

**Climate scientists brace themselves for a Trump-led witch-hunt**
14New Scientist / 2d
Trump can now target scientists he doesn't like using archaic laws. Here's how they can fight back

**Why I'm Joining the March on Washington**
5KScientific American Content / by Joan E. Strassmann / 2d
I'll be there to protest Mr. Turmp's clear and dangerous disrespect for human beings and for scientific evidence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Designers Reinvent the (Steering) Wheel for the Age of Autonomy**
100+WIRED / by Jack Stewart / 2d
10 and 2 may not matter anymore, but the wheel is still the interlocutor between human and machine just yet. The post Designers Reinvent the (Steering) Wheel for the Age of Autonomy appeared first on WIRED .

**Trump's CDC May Face Serious Hurdles**
500+Scientific American Content / by Dina Fine Maron / 2d
The nation’s public health agency is battling on several fronts, including an Obamacare repeal -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Microsoft Thinks Machines Can Learn to Converse by Making Chat a Game**
100+WIRED / by Cade Metz / 2d
Microsoft just bought a startup that's embracing an AI technique typically used to master games---so it can teach machines to carry on a conversation. The post Microsoft Thinks Machines Can Learn to Converse by Making Chat a Game appeared first on WIRED .

**Review: Asus ZenWatch 3**
100+WIRED / by Christopher Null / 2d
A sensible Android Wear watch comes along just as the platform is about to see an update. The post Review: Asus ZenWatch 3 appeared first on WIRED .

**Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It’s Not the Russians**
300+WIRED / by Brian Barrett / 2d
A site that chronicles animals versus the power grid makes a good point about cyberwar hype, but an attack would still be serious business. The post Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It's Not the Russians appeared first on WIRED .

**Alexa Is Conquering the World. Now Amazon’s Real Challenge Begins**
500+WIRED / by Liz Stinson / 2d
Amazon's Alexa is about to be everywhere, but ubiquity comes with its own set of challenges. The post Alexa Is Conquering the World. Now Amazon’s Real Challenge Begins appeared first on WIRED .

**Eerie Photos Take You Down China’s Neon-Lit Alleyways**
1KWIRED / by Laura Mallonee / 2d
Marilyn Mugot captures a world bathed in blues, purples, and pinks. The post Eerie Photos Take You Down China's Neon-Lit Alleyways appeared first on WIRED .

**Inside IMAX’s Big Bet to Rule the Future of VR**
2KWIRED / by David Pierce / 2d
The company that turns cinema to spectacle is betting big on the future of face-computers. The post Inside IMAX's Big Bet to Rule the Future of VR appeared first on WIRED .

**North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA**
400+WIRED / by Eric Niiler / 2d
From sea level rise to polluted stormwater drainage, the state faces a host of environmental conflicts that rely on the EPA. And Pruitt's agency would be a toothless one. The post North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA appeared first on WIRED .

**First baby born using 3-parent technique to treat infertility**
3KNew Scientist / 2d
These are the first photos of a girl born in Kiev who was made using a mitochondrial replacement technique to get around her mother’s infertility problems

**When It Comes to Safety, Autonomous Cars Are Still "Teen Drivers"**
68Scientific American Content / by Jeremy Hsu / 2d
Automakers ask drivers to trust and share the nation’s roadways with autonomous vehicles, but there is no easy answer as to when they will be considered ”safe” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

**Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failures**
300+BBC News - Science & Environment / 2d
The onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.

**IVF: First three-parent baby born to infertile couple**
500+BBC News - Science & Environment / 2d
A technique designed to help parents affected by genetic disorders is used to tackle infertility.

**Obama administration gives $500m to UN climate change fund**
1KBBC News - Science & Environment / 2d
The payment to the UN Green Climate Fund was announced three days before Donald Trump takes office.

**Space-weather forecast to improve with European satellite**
70NatureNews / by Elizabeth Gibney / 2d
Probe could give early warnings of catastrophic solar storms heading for Earth. Nature 541 271 doi: 10.1038/541271a

**India’s first GM food crop held up by lawsuit**
100+NatureNews / by Sanjay Kumar / 2d
Scientists accused of deceiving the public about benefits of transgenic mustard. Nature 541 267 doi: 10.1038/541267a

**Moving up the food chain can beat being on top**
11Latest Science News / 2d
When it comes to predators, the biggest mouths may not take the biggest bite. According to a new study from bioscientists, some predators have their greatest ecological impacts before they reach adulthood.

**Movin' on up? Views on social mobility shape Americans' faith in the status quo**
25Latest Science News / 2d
How Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society -- such as social and economic policies, laws, and institutions -- psychologists have found.

**Climate change forecast: More intense deluges and downpours Down Under**
51Latest Science News / 2d
Expect strong increases in rainfall during extreme precipitation events in Australia as a result of global warming making Dorothy Mackellar's now classic view of Australia as a country of droughts and flooding rains truer than ever.

**Scientists make plastic from pine trees**
200+Latest Science News / 2d
Most current plastics are made from oil, which is unsustainable. However, scientists have now developed a renewable plastic from a chemical called pinene found in pine needles.

**Discovery could lead to jet engines that run hotter -- and cleaner**
16Latest Science News / 2d
Researchers have made a discovery in materials science that sounds like something from the old Saturday morning cartoon Super Friends: they've found a way to deactivate 'nano twins' to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys that are used in jet engines.

**Largest Populus SNP dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, metabolites**
12Latest Science News / 2d
Researchers have released the largest-ever single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset of genetic variations in poplar trees, information useful to plant scientists as well as researchers in the fields of biofuels, materials science, and secondary plant metabolism.

**'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's**
28Latest Science News / 2d
In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.

**Trade-offs between economic growth and deforestation**
17Latest Science News / 2d
In many developing countries, economic growth and deforestation seem to go hand in hand -- but the links are not well understood. In a new study, researchers use an innovative methodology to quantify the relationship.

**Study applies game theory to genomic privacy**
19Latest Science News / 2d
A new study presents an unorthodox approach to protect the privacy of genomic data, showing how optimal trade-offs between privacy risk and scientific utility can be struck as genomic data are released for research. The framework can be used to suppress just enough genomic data to persuade would-be snoops that their best privacy attacks will be unprofitable.

**Scientists discover drug that increases 'good' fat mass and function**
51Latest Science News / 2d
An FDA-approved drug has been identified that can create the elusive and beneficial brown fat. Mice treated with the drug had more brown fat, faster metabolisms, and lower body weight gain, even after being fed a high-calorie diet. The researchers say the technique, which uses cellular reprogramming, could be a new way to combat obesity and type II diabetes.

**Calorie restriction lets monkeys live long and prosper**
500+Latest Science News / 2d
Settling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives.

**Mounting challenge to brain sex differences**
500+Latest Science News / 2d
A meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes reveals no significant difference between the sexes. The study strengthens the case for gender similarity in the human brain and psychological abilities.

**Successful antibody trial in HIV individuals**
19Latest Science News / 2d
A research team has tested a new HIV neutralizing antibody, called 10-1074, in humans. The results of the trial have just been published.

**Must-see-TV: Educational shows that entertain have greater impact on faithful viewers**
9Latest Science News / 2d
A study of viewing audiences shows that the television programs most effective at imparting an educational message about social behaviors are the ones that keep people watching engaged and coming back for more.

**Racial bias in a heartbeat: How signals from the heart shape snap judgments about threat**
23Latest Science News / 2d
Our heartbeat can increase pre-existing racial biases when we face a potential threat, according to new research.

**Signs of hope for endangered sea turtles**
84Latest Science News / 2d
Bones from dead turtles washed up on Mexican beaches indicate that Baja California is critical to the survival of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles, which travel some 7,500 miles from their nesting sites in Japan to their feeding grounds off the coast of Mexico.

**A tale of two pulsars' tails: Plumes offer geometry lessons to astronomers**
300+Latest Science News / 2d
Like cosmic lighthouses sweeping the universe with bursts of energy, pulsars have fascinated and baffled astronomers since they were first discovered 50 years ago. In two studies, international teams of astronomers suggest that recent images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of two pulsars -- Geminga and B0355+54 -- may help shine a light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as w

**San Francisco Bay Area methane emissions may be double what we thought**
26Latest Science News / 2d
Emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas, in the San Francisco Bay Area may be roughly twice as high as official estimates, with most of it coming from biological sources, such as landfills, but natural gas leakage also being an important source, according to a new study,

**Antimicrobial sutures can prevent surgical site infections and save money**
6Latest Science News / 2d
New analyses of the published clinical studies indicate that antimicrobial sutures are effective for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs), and they can result in significant cost savings.

**Conditions right for complex life may have come and gone in Earth's distant past**
200+Latest Science News / 2d
Conditions suitable to support complex life may have developed in Earth's oceans -- and then faded -- more than a billion years before life truly took hold, a new study has found.

**New tool can help policymakers prioritize information needs for synthetic biology tech**
9Latest Science News / 2d
New technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the marketplace before policymakers can determine how or whether they should be governed. Now researchers have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products, well before they are ready for the market, to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.

**Structures dating to King Solomon discovered**
89Latest Science News / 2d
New discoveries at Tel Aviv University's Timna Valley excavation have revealed intact defensive structures and livestock pens that provide insight into the complexity of Iron Age copper production.

**Dietary supplement may carry both benefits and risks associated with statins**
58Latest Science News / 2d
Red yeast rice (RYR) is contained in dietary supplements that are often used by patients with high cholesterol, and it is often proposed as an alternative therapy in those who experience side effects from statins. A new study found that it is not a good choice for statin-intolerant patients: RYR was linked with muscle and liver injury, which can also occur with statin use.

**Hip fractures may have both short and long-term effects on survival in elderly individuals**
8Latest Science News / 2d
A new analysis of numerous studies indicates that men and women aged 60 years and older who have experienced a hip fracture are at increased risk of dying not only in the short term after the fracture, but also a number of years later.

**Age-related GABA decline is associated with poor cognition**
15Latest Science News / 2d
Diminishing levels of GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, may play a role in cognitive decline as we age, according to a new study. The study shows an association between higher GABA concentrations in the frontal lobe, a brain region important for complex cognitive functioning, and superior performance on a cognitive test in healthy older adults.

**Opioids produce analgesia via immune cells**
39Latest Science News / 2d
Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells.

**Whether our speech is fast or slow, we say about the same**
300+Latest Science News / 2d
Fast talkers tend to convey less information with each word and syntactic structure than slower-paced speakers, meaning that no matter our pace, we all say just about as much in a given time, a new study finds.

**Metabolic pathway regulating key stage of embryo development revealed**
10Latest Science News / 2d
Researchers showed that the mevalonate pathway is essential for embryonic development by promoting primitive streak formation, a key landmark for establishing embryo symmetry and gastrulation. The pathway induces farnesylation of lamin-B, which is implicated in inducing expression of primitive streak genes. The findings expand understanding of how embryos transition from a featureless ball of cell

**Why 'platonic' flies don't copulate and what that could mean for humans**
22Latest Science News / 2d
By studying the sexual behavior of a mutant strain of fruit fly called 'platonic,' researchers have found parallels between humans and flies in the neural control of copulation.

**Malaria drug successfully treats 26-year-old brain cancer patient**
3KLatest Science News / 2d
The anti-authophagy drug chloroquine may be a unique way to resensitize some cancer patients to treatment.

**Inception of the last ice age**
37Latest Science News / 2d
A new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.

**Imposing 'meaningful work' can lead to staff burnout**
26Latest Science News / 2d
Strategies to boost staff performance and morale by manipulating our desire for meaningful work often achieve the opposite -- damaging organizations and alienating employees -- a new study suggests.

**Sweat bees on hot chillies: Native bees thrive in traditional farming, securing good yield**
25Latest Science News / 2d
Farming doesn't always have to be harmful to bees: Even though farmers on the Mexican peninsula of Yucatan traditionally slash-and-burn forest to create small fields, this practice can be beneficial to sweat bees by creating attractive habitats. The farmers profit also since they depend on bees to pollinate their habanero chillies.

**Tiny fruit flies use cold hard logic to select mates**
200+Latest Science News / 2d
Fruit flies -- the tiny insects that swarm our kitchens over the summer months -- exhibit rational decision making when selecting mates, according to new research. Scientists observed different combinations of fruit flies mate about 2,700 times, and were surprised to discover that male flies almost always pick the female mate that would produce the most offspring. The study provides the first evid

**Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armor**
67Latest Science News / 2d
In a new study, researchers are investigating why hair is incredibly strong and resistant to breaking. The findings could lead to the development of new materials for body armor and help cosmetic manufacturers create better hair care products.

**Researchers zero-in on cholesterol's role in cells**
56Latest Science News / 2d
For the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.

**Aeolus wind mission heads for test and launch**
200+BBC News - Science & Environment / 2d
UK engineers finish the assembly of a wind-observing satellite that meteorologists expect to have a major impact on weather forecasts.

**Babies remember their birth language - scientists**
6KBBC News - Science & Environment / 2d
Babies learn language in the early months of life, and retain this knowledge, say scientists.

**Ford’s 2018 Mustang Gets Shapelier and High-Techier**
500+WIRED / by Alex Davies / 2d
Better aero, smarter computer. The post Ford’s 2018 Mustang Gets Shapelier and High-Techier appeared first on WIRED .

**New species of moth named in honor of Donald Trump ahead of his swearing-in as president**
400+Latest Science News / 2d
Days before Donald J. Trump steps forward on the Presidential Inauguration platform in Washington on Jan. 20, an evolutionary biologist has named a new species in his honor. The researcher hopes that the fame around the new moth will successfully point to the critical need for further conservation efforts for fragile areas such as the habitat of the new species.