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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New findings on how plants manage immune responseNew research has uncovered apreviously unknown means by which plants are able to regulate how their immune systems respond to pathogens.

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Ingeniøren

Østeuropæiske vognmænd i NOx-svindel: Sætter AdBlue-killer i lastbilerneEn tysk tv-station har sammen med polsk politi afsløret, hvordanvognmænd ved at tilføje en elektronisk komponent til motoren sparer det additiv, der skal fjerne NOx fra udstødningen.Konsekvenserne for miljøet er større end VW-skandalen.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New findings on how plants manage immune responseNew research has uncovered apreviously unknown means by which plants are able to regulate how their immune systems respond to pathogens.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood test can predict life or death outcome for patients with Ebola virus diseaseScientists have identified a 'molecular barcode' in the blood of patients with Ebola that can predict whether they are likely to survive or die from the viral infection.Scientists have used blood samples taken from infected and recovering patients during the 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak to identify gene products that act as strong predictors of patient outcome.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists initiate first ethical guidelines for organs cultivated in vitroScientists have created an ethical guideline for research into human organ models.

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Popular Science

Report: Tesla's fatal crash can't be blamed on software errors Cars Humans shouldn't treat autopilot like a self-driving car A review of a fatal Tesla crash found it was human error, and not vehicle failure, that caused the crash.
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WIRED

How Silicon Valley Utopianism Brought You the Dystopian Trump Presidency The basic precepts that drive Silicon Valley philosophically and economically got subverted---easily---by an authoritarian presidential campaign.

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WIRED

The CES Download It's been a couple of weeks since CES---just enough time to fully process everything we saw there. The post The CES Download appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Popular Science

Going to space helped teach the world to work together Space NASA was founded on the principle that "activities in space should be devoted to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all mankind" Popular Science and XPRIZE are teaming up to explore and explain technologies that make us say "The Future Is Now" in a video series called Future First .
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Futurity.org

Alliance with therapist can mean fewer ‘drinking days’ A positive, trusting relationship between counselor and patient, known as a “therapeutic alliance,” can be key to successful treatment of alcohol use disorder, a new study finds. Researchers studied more than five dozen people taking part in a 12-week program of cognitive behavior therapy for alcohol use disorder. Patients who reported the most positive relationships with their counselors on a se
2h
Futurity.org

Blood test might predict who can survive Ebola The Ebola outbreak that spread across western Africa in 2014 ultimately killed more than 11,000 people. In the Republic of Guinea, the epicenter of the epidemic, around 60 percent of those infected with Ebola died. While the outbreak taught physicians and scientists much about Ebola, it’s not clear why some survived and others didn’t. Researchers know that some obvious factors, like supportive ho
2h
WIRED

Beer Yoga (Beer Yoga) and the Week’s Other Miracles We're proud to bring NextDraft—the most righteous, most essential newsletter on the web—to WIRED.com. The post Beer Yoga ( Beer Yoga) and the Week's Other Miracles appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

While You Were Offline: The Internet Can’t Look Away From Kellyanne Conway’s Outfit This is what happens when your buttons are cats. The post While You Were Offline: The Internet Can't Look Away From Kellyanne Conway's Outfit appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Popular Science

Spandex exosuits, a hugging robot, and other amazing images of the week Science Newsworthy eye candy Our favorite images from this week in science, health, and technology news.
2h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Rumours swirl about Trump's science adviser pick Climate sceptic William Happer and ardent critic of academia David Gelernter have met with the president. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21336
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cosmic Inflation Theory Faces ChallengesThe latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Enzyme firm invests in NgAgo protein at centre of gene-editing row Danish company Novozymes enters agreement with Chinese genome-editing centre. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21343
3h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Scientists on their hopes and fears for Trump administration Comments about the new US president and the importance of science flowed under the #USofScience and #SciTrump hashtags. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21344
4h
Popular Science

New York City is tackling literal garbage fires with giant vacuums Technology But they still suck a lot less than a delayed train New York City is testing two portable vacuums to suck up the 80,000 pounds of trash left in in the subway everyday.
4h
WIRED

The New LinkedIn Looks Just Like Facebook. Smart Move. The resemblance is uncanny, intentional, and smart on multiple levels. The post The New LinkedIn Looks Just Like Facebook. Smart Move. appeared first on WIRED .
4h
Futurity.org

Infections that stick around can be good for you Many infectious diseases are one and done—people get sick once and then they are protected from another bout of the same illness. For some of these infections—chickenpox, for example—a small number of microbes persist in the body long after the symptoms go away. Often, such microbes can reactivate when the person’s immunity has waned with age or illness, and cause disease again. Now, researchers
4h
WIRED

Netflix Is Killing It—Big Time—After Pouring Cash Into Original Shows Netflix is killing it. And its strategy is actually shockingly simple: spend aggressively, dominate, and make it way too difficult to compete. The post Netflix Is Killing It—Big Time—After Pouring Cash Into Original Shows appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

After Probing Tesla’s Deadly Crash, Feds Say Yay to Self-Driving Tesla's Autopilot system isn't defective, investigators say—and it's stopping crashes. The post After Probing Tesla's Deadly Crash, Feds Say Yay to Self-Driving appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Popular Science

California’s snowpack is good news for the parched state—for now Environment It's still early in the season, and the drought isn't ending California's snowpack is getting deeper. But will it last into the summer?
6h
WIRED

Watch a Surprisingly Touching Stream of Unwatched YouTube Videos This new website lets you peek into the lives of strangers, one obscure YouTube clip at a time. The post Watch a Surprisingly Touching Stream of Unwatched YouTube Videos appeared first on WIRED .
6h
New Scientist - News

Intergalactic collision birthed a sparkling ring of young starsThe Large Magellanic Cloud is encircled by bright young stars that are likely to have formed after another galaxy powered past, compressing gas
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why the lights don't dim when we blinkEvery few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn't blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New, old science combine to make faster medical testMagnetic nanoparticles are coated with an antibody, then aligned in formation within a magnetic field and tallied under laser optics. The result could lead to speedy diagnoses for infectious diseases.
6h
WIRED

Anne Hathaway Makes a Kaiju Dance in New Colossal Trailer In Nacho Vigalondo's upcoming film, Anne Hathaway realizes she's controlling a city-crushing monster. The post Anne Hathaway Makes a Kaiju Dance in New Colossal Trailer appeared first on WIRED .
6h
New Scientist - News

Spitting archerfish shoot at prey above and beneath the waterThe aquatic sharpshooters are famous for blasting powerful jets at insects above the surface – now experiments show they targetunderwater prey, too
6h
Futurity.org

Does telecommuting mean more work for same pay? Telecommuting give employees flexibility to work outside the office, but there’s evidence it add hours to the workweek with little to no extra pay. A new study based on a long-running national survey of American workers with a standard 40-hour work week finds that people who opt to work at least part of the time away from the office ended up working an average of three hours more per week, taking
6h
Popular Science

Even the 'most transparent administration in history' failed to pardon Snowden Military Obama is out of time. Despite the promise of a radically transparent government, Barack Obama has failed to pardon Edward Snowden. Read on.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Need Science-Informed LeadershipWhat can you do about? A lot. So go get started... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Scaly-Headed Moth Named after TrumpThe new species, native to California and Mexico, sports a pompadour of yellowish-white scales -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
TEDTalks (video)

How to have better political conversations | Robb WillerRobb Willer studies the forces that unite and divide us. As a social psychologist, he researches how moral values -- typically a source of division -- can also be used to bring people together. Willer shares compelling insights on how we might bridge the ideological divide and offers some intuitive advice on ways to be more persuasive when talking politics.
7h
WIRED

Here’s a Bright Idea: A Lamp That Lights Up When You Whistle The most delightful way to turn on the light? Pucker up and blow. The post Here's a Bright Idea: A Lamp That Lights Up When You Whistle appeared first on WIRED .

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WIRED

Dear Angelica Is the Film—and Filmmaking Tool—VR Needs Making a female-led VR experience sets a precedent for the industry, and the animation tool Quill puts the creative power in VR users' hands.
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Scientific American Content: Global

If Trump Keeps His Promise on Paid Family Leave, Will Working Women Feel They Can Take It?An analysis reveals that the percentage of new mothers who use family leave has remained flat since 1994
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Ingeniøren

Fond kræver sine penge for skrottet forskningsrapport tilbagePromilleafgiftsfonden forlanger, at lobbyorganisationen Bæredygtigt Landbrug tilbagebetaler en del af støtten til et omstridt forskningsprojekt, som CBS endte med at skrotte.

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Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Crop Harvests Could Suffer with Climate ChangeFuture harvests of wheat, soybeans and corn could drop by 22 to 49 percent, mostly due to water stress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plan A is to get patients to stick to their blood pressure pillsThere is value in starting off patients with high blood pressure on an all-in-one pill. Researchers found more value in fixed-dose combination pills that contain more than one type of medication, rather than separate pills for each drug.


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Ingeniøren

Syge svenskere udsat for skjulte eksperimenter med moderkagecellerForskere fra svenske Karolinska Instituttet og Karolinska Universitetshospitalet står bag ny skandale. Knap 70 patienter, heraf flere syge børn, er blevet behandlet med moderkageceller med uvis virkning.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea-surface temps during last interglacial period like modern tempsSea-surface temperatures during the last interglaciation period were like those of today, a new study reports. The trend is worrisome, as sea levels during the last interglacial period were between six and nine meters above their present height.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jumbled chromosomes may dampen the immune response to tumorsHow well a tumor responds to immunotherapy may depend in part on whether its chromosomes are intact or in a state of disarray, a new study reports. The finding could help doctors better pinpoint which cancer patients would benefit from immunotherapy.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As cells age, the fat content within them shiftsAs cells age and stop dividing, their fat content changes, along with the way they produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids. By providing broad insights into the connection between lipids and cellular aging, the findings open the door for additional research that could support the development of lipid-based approaches to preventing cell death or hastening it in cancerous

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brief interventions help online learners persist with courseworkNew research shows people in underdeveloped parts of the world are not as likely to complete massive open online courses, or MOOCs. But small psychological activities could help motivate them, closing the global achievement gap.

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Viden

Australske kæmpedyrs liv og død kortlagt via gammel svampNy forskning peger på, at megafaunaen led under menneskets ankomst til Australien.

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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Indvielse af Mærsk Tårnet i billederDet Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet indledte et nyt kapitel, da Mærsk Tårnet officielt...

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armorScientists have discovered how a unique bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key weapons in its fight against infection.

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New Scientist - News

We mustn’t let a superpower turn its back on rationalityProtesting the incoming Trump administration’s anti-science agenda may not be easy – but it’s vital not just for the US, but the world

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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Trump embraces fossil fuels and 'the mysteries of space' as he takes over White HouseUS president reiterated his promise to roll back climate regulations on his first day in office. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21339

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Futurity.org

Electromagnets act like a scalpel to improve memory Brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel, rather than like a hammer, to cause a specific improvement in precise memory, a new study shows. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing details such as the specific color, shape, and location of a building you are looking for, rather than simply knowing the part of town it’s in. This type of memory is crucial for normal fu SE TIDLIGERE ARTIKEL

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Ingeniøren

Airbus vil teste flyvende biler sidst i 2017Administrerende direktør i Airbus Tom Enders proklamerede på en tech-messe i München, at Airbus vil teste flyvende biler med autopilot sidst i 2017. Æraen for flyvende biler er uundgåelig, fortalte han.

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Popular Science

Here's what the Obama administration did for science Science "Being pro-science is the only way we make sure that America continues to lead the world." As America prepares for the Trump administration to begin, Popular Science takes a last look at the Obama administration’s greatest scientific achievements.

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New Scientist - News

Real-life psychopaths actually have below-average intelligenceThey may be manipulative, dishonest and callous, but the typical psychopath is no Hannibal Lecter. In fact, they tend to get lower scores on intelligence tests

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Popular Science

Climate change threatens American agriculture Environment Will America's breadbasket go stale? As temperatures increase under climate change, yields from crop staples wheat, corn, and soy will decline.

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Scientific American Content: Global

How Trump Could Unravel Obama's Science LegacyFrom stem-cell law to national monuments, the president-elect has myriad opportunities to transform the research landscape
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Scientific American Content: Global

NIH Director Francis Collins to Stay On under Trump, for NowThe 45th president may still name a different permanent director -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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BBC News - Science & Environment

Gore 'hoping for best' from Trump over climateEx-US Vice President Al Gore, who has made a new climate change film, says he thinks campaigners will "win" the debate.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeking structure with metagenome sequencesScientists now report that structural models have been generated for 12 percent of the protein families that had previously had no structural information available.

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Popular Science

What happens to your body when you die in space? Space And should colonists on Mars be allowed to eat each other? NASA isn't sure what to do with corpses in space, but they may need to figure it out soon. Read on.

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surgical site infections are the most common and costly of hospital infectionsResearchers updated guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of surgical site infections, which affect as many as 300,000 patients per year in the United States.

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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Lost kingdom' linked to GallowayArchaeological research at a site in Galloway suggests it may have been at the heart of a "lost kingdom" from the Dark Ages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Official abortion rate declined in Texas after law restricted access to clinicsIn Texas, increases in travel distance to the nearest abortion clinic caused by clinic closures were closely associated with decreases in the official number of abortions, report investigators.





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