Stop Sending Yourself Reminder E-Mails
A physical object is a more effective way to jog your memory

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Mammal testing could be cut by moth larvae
The number of mammals used in animal testing could be cut dramatically and replaced with moth larvae.
Last year two University of Exeter scientists founded BioSystems Technologies Ltd, which provides moth larvae to researchers—offering a cheap and effective way to carry out tests that would normally be done on mammals such as mice.Now a £12,000 grant from the NC3Rs CRACK IT Solutions scheme will su

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Viruses overheard talking to one another
For the first time, viruses have been found to communicate with one another, leaving short “posts” for kin and descendants. The messages help the viruses reading them decide how to proceed with the process of infection, according to research.
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Film af plantestivelse gør robotten varmefølsom som en slange
Forskere har udviklet en biofilm af pektin, der giver robotter mulighed for at skelne temperaturvariationer på få millikelvin, på samme vis som slanger spotter deres bytte på afstand.
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Whale sharks’ secrets revealed by live-tracking aquatic drones
Whale sharks dive deep and swim far, making them hard to monitor.
A Honduras project is using aquatic drones to track the world’s biggest fish in real time
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Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), CIEMAT (Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research), Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, in collaboration with the firm BioDan Group, have presented
a prototype for a 3-D bioprinter that can create totally functional human skin. This skin is adequate for transplanting to patients or for use in research or th

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How plant cells regulate growth shown for the first time
Researchers have managed to show how the cells in a plant, a multicellular organism, determine their size and regulate their growth over time.
The findings overturn previous theories in the field and are potentially significant for the future of agriculture and forestry -- as it reveals more about one of the factors which determine the size of plants and fruits.

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Virtual out-of-body experience reduces your fear of death
After a near-death experience, people often describe floating out of their bodies. Recreating the sensation with VR can make people less anxious about dying

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Could Radiation Be a Deal Breaker for Mars Missions?
New studies show cosmic radiation could be even more damaging to astronauts' brains than we thought.
Can humanity still live and travel among the stars?

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Immune defense without collateral damage
Researchers have clarified the role of the enzyme MPO. In fighting infections, this enzyme, which gives pus its greenish color, produces a highly aggressive acid that can kill pathogens without damaging the surrounding tissue.
The findings may provide new approaches for immunity strengthening therapies.

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Tumor-suppressing protein actually promotes cancer
The protein PHLDB3, thought to be a potential tumor suppressor, actually allows cancer cells to thrive in pancreatic, prostate, colon, breast, lung, and other common cancers, researchers have found. The discovery could explain how cancer is able to overcome p53 -- a key tumor-suppressing protein.

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Injections of sex-related hormone increase arousal in the brain
Injections of a hormone called kisspeptin can enhance the response of young men’s brains to sexual or romantic pictures of couples
- a small study has found

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Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecules
Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecule
Chemists at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that synthetic nanoparticles can achieve the same level of structural complexity, hierarchy and accuracy as their natural counterparts - biomolecules. The study, published in Science, also reveals the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly.

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80-million-year-old dinosaur collagen confirmed
Utilizing the most rigorous testing methods to date, researchers from North Carolina State University
have isolated additional collagen peptides from an 80-million-year-old Brachylophosaurus.
The work lends further support to the idea that organic molecules can persist in specimens tens of millions of years longer than originally believed and has implications for our ability to study the fossil re

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Researchers identify receptor that has key role in umami or amino acid taste in insects
Researchers identify receptor that has key role in umami or amino acid taste in insects -
Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food.

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Scientists create first stable semisynthetic organism
Scientists create first stable semisynthetic organism.
Life's genetic code has only ever contained four natural bases. These bases pair up to form two "base pairs"—the rungs of the DNA ladder—and they have simply been rearranged to create bacteria and butterflies, penguins and people. Four bases make up all life as we know it.

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Scientists Discover Prehistoric Giant Otter Species In China
Six million years ago, giant otters weighing more than 100 pounds lived among birds and water lilies in the wooded wetlands of China's Yunnan province. The discovery sheds light on how otters evolved.

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New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft—and back again
When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of University of Michigan researchers have developed a new way to design a "metamaterial" that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.

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Hidden Heart Risks? Masked Hypertension May Affect 17 Million
Nearly one in eight Americans who think that they have normal blood pressure may have a type of high blood pressure that doesn't show up at the doctor's office, a new study finds.

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Sharks gather off Israel in pilgrimage to warm waters
Sharks have gathered off a coastal electricity plant in northern Israel where the Mediterranean waters are warmer, prompting authorities on Monday to warn people to keep away.

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Dwarf galaxies shed light on dark matter
The first sighting of clustered dwarf galaxies bolsters a leading theory about how big galaxies such as our Milky Way are formed, and how dark matter binds them, researchers said Monday.

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From tiny phytoplankton to massive tuna: How climate change will affect energy flows in ocean ecosystems
Phytoplankton are the foundation of ocean life, providing the energy that supports nearly all marine species. Levels of phytoplankton in an ocean area may seem like a good predictor for the amount of fish that can be caught there, but a new study by Nereus Program researchers finds that this relationship is not so straightforward.

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Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forests
A very important article co-authored by WCS scientist Tony Lynam has been published in this week's Science about a crisis emerging in Asia from snaring, which is wiping out wildlife in unprecedented numbers.

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The New iOS Update Fixes Big Security Holes, So Get It Now
Apple just released an iOS update full of security fixes that you need to jump on

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We Have a Bad Feeling About That Sith-Red Star Wars Logo
The new Star Wars titles are red instead of yellow. What does it mean?! The post We Have a Bad Feeling About That Sith-Red Star Wars Logo appeared first on WIRED .

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Physicists uncover clues to mechanism behind magnetic reconnection
Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has published a paper showing that magnetic reconnection—the process in which magnetic field lines snap together and release energy—can be triggered by motion in nearby magnetic fields. By running computer simulations, Ebrahimi gathered evidence indicating that the wiggling of atomic parti

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Scientists find advanced geometry no secret to prehistoric architects in US Southwest
Imagine you are about to plan and construct a building that involves several complicated geometrical shapes, but you aren't allowed to write down any numbers or notes as you do it. For most of us, this would be impossible.

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Not just funny: Satirical news has serious political effects
Satirical news programs, often dismissed as mere entertainment, have real political effects on the people who watch them, new research suggests.

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Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment
Opioid abuse is rising fast among those who live in rural areas. Research suggests the drugs' illicit use there spreads rapidly via social networks, which could be part of the solution, too.

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New technique IDs micropollutants in New York waterways
Cornell University engineers have developed a new technique to test for a wide range of micropollutants in lakes, rivers and other potable water sources that vastly outperforms conventional methods.

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Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores
When spring comes to the Arctic, the breakup of the cold winter ice sheets starts at the surface with the formation of melt ponds. These pools of melted snow and ice darken the surface of the ice, increasing the amount of solar energy the ice sheet absorbs and accelerating melt. A team including University of Utah mathematician Kenneth Golden has determined how these melt ponds form, solving a par

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Archaeologists uncover new clues to Maya collapse
Using the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, archaeologists have developed a high-precision chronology that sheds new light on patterns leading up to the two major collapses of the ancient civilization.

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New steps in the meiosis chromosome dance
Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? For a start, none of us sexually reproducing organisms would be here, because that's how sperm and eggs are made. And when meiosis doesn't work properly, it can lead to infertility, miscarriage, birth defects and developmental disorders.

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'Why Time Flies' Investigates How Humans Experience Time
NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Alan Burdick about his book, Why Time Flies . It's an investigation of the sometimes contradictory ways we experience time.

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Using simulation tools to optimize soft robotic systems
Simulation is a valuable tool to improve the energy efficiency of machines and it is now being used to analyze and optimize soft robotic systems to increase their utility, as described in an article published in Soft Robotics, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Soft Robotics website until February 20, 2017.

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New ‘Harry Potter’ crab species casts a spell
Animals Meet Harryplax severus There’s a new crab in town, and it’s no muggle.

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Basic Income Could Be the Safety Net Mistreated Employees Need
A universal basic income (UBI) policy could change how we evaluate the meaning and quality of work in our society.


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Catalyst adds fluorine-containing groups to make new compounds
Drugs that contain one or more fluorine atoms tend to be more stable, more powerful, and easier for the body to absorb. For those reasons, drug developers would like to be able to incorporate fluorine or a fluorine-containing unit known as trifluoromethyl into new experimental drugs, but this has been very difficult to do.

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Trees supplement income for rural farmers in Africa
Trees may be easy to spot on the plains of Africa but they are often overlooked as a source of income for farmers. A University of Illinois study shows trees on farms may help reduce rural poverty and maintain biodiversity.

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Increasing energy efficiency of metal-air batteries
Scientists have introduced a new way to increase energy efficiency of metal-air batteries.

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Cybersecurity in the Age of Digital Transformation
As companies embrace technologies such as the Internet of Things, big data, cloud, and mobility, security must be more than an afterthought. But in the digital era, the focus needs to shift from securing network perimeters to safeguarding data spread across systems, devices, and the cloud.

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Research describes missing step in how cells move their cargo
Every time a hormone is released from a cell, every time a neurotransmitter leaps across a synapse to relay a message from one neuron to another, the cell must undergo exocytosis. This is the process responsible for transporting cellular contents via lipid-encapsulated vesicles to the cell surface membrane and then incorporating or secreting them through membrane fusion. Insights into this cellula

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New findings on carbon cycle feed climate research
A Florida State University researcher is taking a deep dive into the carbon cycle and investigating how carbon moves from the ocean surface to greater depths and then remains there for hundreds of years.

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Scientists want to give the world a second chance at Caspian tigers
Animals Or at least something close It's too late to save the Caspian tiger, but the Siberian tiger, a close relative, might be able to fill the ecological hole it left behind.

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A private Chinese space company just scored a foreign contract for the first time
From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The agreement was signed with a Danish nanosatellite maker. Landspace signs an agreement with Gomspace, a Danish nanosat maker, to start launching its satellites in 2018.

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Wasps, ants, and Ani DiFranco
A University of California, Riverside graduate student has discovered several news species of wasps, including one that she named after musician Ani DiFranco.

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Lab charts the anatomy of three molecular channels
Using a state-of-the-art imaging technology in which molecules are deep frozen, scientists in Roderick MacKinnon's lab at Rockefeller University have reconstructed in unprecedented detail the three-dimensional architecture of three channels that provide a path for specific types of ions to travel across a cell's protective membrane. Because such ions are central to biochemical messaging that allow

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Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein
A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's research light source PETRA III, the scientists could watch just how small protein pieces, called nanofibrils, lock together to form a fibre. Surprisingly, the best fibres are not formed by the longest protein pieces. Instead, the strongest "silk" ...

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Lab charts the anatomy of three molecular channels
By determining the three-dimensional structures of these molecules down to the level of atoms, the researchers have unlocked key details as to how they function in the body.

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Genetic Testing Offers New Hope for Children with Brain Cancer
More than half of pediatric cancer patients have genetic faults that could affect their diagnosis or be targeted by drugs.


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Accio Crab! Newfound Crab Honors Harry Potter and Professor Snape
A newfound crab named after "Harry Potter" wizards may not be magical, but its discovery is certainly enchanting.

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Online media use shows strong genetic influence
Online media use such as social networking and gaming could be strongly influenced by our genes, according to a new study.

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Bioinvasion is jeopardizing Mediterranean marine communities
Non-indigenous species are harming indigenous species and habitats in the Mediterranean Sea, impairing potentially exploitable marine resources and raising concern about human health issues, according to a new study.

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Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores
A team of researchers, including a mathematician, has determined how Arctic melt ponds form, solving a paradoxical mystery of how a pool of water actually sits atop highly porous ice.

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Quantum optical sensor tested in space for the first time, with a laser system from Berlin
For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequisite for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

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Your Android device's Pattern Lock can be cracked within five attempts
The popular Pattern Lock system used to secure millions of Android phones can be cracked within just five attempts -- and more complicated patterns are the easiest to crack, security experts reveal.

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Clinical trial testing new technique to treat life-threatening ventricular tachycardia
A landmark clinical trial is evaluating a new procedure to treat a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder called ventricular tachycardia.

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A gene's journey from covert to celebrated
Unmasking a previously misunderstood gene, scientists discover an unlikely potential drug target for gastrointestinal cancers.

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80-million-year-old dinosaur collagen confirmed
Utilizing the most rigorous testing methods to date, researchers have isolated additional collagen peptides from an 80-million-year-old Brachylophosaurus.

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Princess Leia Gave the Women’s March a New Hope
Princess Leia iconography was seen at many women's marches this weekend


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Astronomers to Search for Alien Life at Nearby 'Habitable' Exoplanet
The Wolf 1061 star system is only 14 light-years away and a team of astronomers are doing the groundwork to begin looking for signs of extraterrestrial biology in one of its planet's atmospheres.

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Research targets cookstove pollution using supercomputers and NASA satellites
New air quality research is investigating a major, but often overlooked contributor to outdoor pollution and climate: burning of solid fuel for cooking and heating.


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College athletes aren’t getting enough sleep
A simple intervention can improve the sleep of college athletes, report researchers. In a survey of 189 student-athletes, researchers found that 68 percent reported poor sleep quality, with 87 percent getting less than or equal to eight hours of sleep a night and 43 percent getting less than seven hours. About 23 percent of the athletes surveyed reported experiencing excessive levels of fatigue.

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Trilobites: A Pioneering Woman of Science Re-Emerges After 300 Years
Maria Sibylla Merian captivated Europeans with her studies of insects, only to later have her work largely dismissed. Now, her findings are being celebrated again.

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Should teens sleep in on school days?
Delaying school start times could help teenagers sleep better, say experts, and could give them a better chance at success later. A new study shows that students who attend schools that start earlier in the day sleep less, are less likely to meet the national sleep recommendations for their age, and are more often tired in the morning. “It is time that we have a conversation about school start ti

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Earth from Space: New 'Blue Marble' Photo Is Jaw-Dropping
A new weather satellite is sharing high-definition images from the heavens.

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Huge Under-Ice Valleys Are Melting Antarctic Glaciers from Below
The so-called oceanic troughs expose the glaciers to warm water from the surrounding oceans.

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New crab species shares name with two 'Harry Potter' characters and a hero researcher
While not much is known about the animals living around coral reefs, ex-Marine turned researcher Harry Conley would often take to the island of Guam, and dig deep into the rubble to find fascinating critters as if by magic learnt at Hogwarts. Years after his discoveries and his death, a secret is revealed -- a new species and genus of crab, Harryplax severus.

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Stjerneforsker: Stor dansk talentmasse men arbejdsmoralen halter
Flere udenlandske forskere kan bringe dansk hjerneforskning op i den internationale elite ved også at inspirere de studerende, mener den internationalt anerkendte hjerneforsker Maiken Nedergaard.

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Want to get more exercise? Join a gym
Most people who resolved to exercise more in 2017 have given up already or are on the verge of doing so. New research suggests joining a gym could prevent that fate. “It’s not surprising that people with a gym membership work out more, but the difference in our results is pretty dramatic,” says Duck-chul (DC) Lee, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. “Gym members were 1

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Astronomers find seven dwarf-galaxy groups, the building blocks of massive galaxies
A team of astronomers has discovered seven distinct groups of dwarf galaxies with just the right starting conditions to eventually merge and form larger galaxies, including spiral galaxies like the Milky Way.

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How B cell metabolism is controlled: GSK3 acts as a metabolic checkpoint regulator in B cells
New research addresses the lack of knowledge about how B cell metabolism adapts to each of their various environments -- development in the bone marrow, proliferation and hypermutation in the lymph nodes and spleen and circulation in the blood. New findings show that the protein GSK3 acts as a metabolic sensor, or checkpoint, that promotes the survival of circulating B cells while limiting growth

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Microscopic submarines for your stomach
Tiny 'submarines' that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs. The technique is based on proton-driven micromotors with a pH-dependent polymer coating that can be load

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A new index for the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic. There is not only a great interest worldwide to understand the causes and consequences of fatty liver disease, but also to diagnose fatty liver disease at an early stage. Researchers have now generated a new index from clinical data which can predict the presence of fatty liver disease with high accuracy.

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Engaging fathers in parenting intervention improves outcomes for both kids and fathers
A parenting program where fathers engage with their children through reading was found to boost the fathers' parenting skills while also improving the preschoolers' school readiness and behavior, finds a new study.

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Medical assistance in dying will not increase health care costs in Canada
Providing medical assistance in dying to people in Canada will not increase health care costs, and could reduce spending by between $34.7 and $138.8 million, according to a new research paper. The savings exceed the $1.5 million to $14.8 million in direct costs associated with implementing medical assistance in dying.

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New treatment recommendations for a high-risk pediatric leukemia
Medical researchers have identified genetic alterations that can be used to guide treatment of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, which has a dismal prognosis.

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Når byens borgere får en hel skov
Middelfart Kommune overtog i december en gammel produktionsskov. Nu er byens borgere taget med på råd, så brugerinddragelsen kan gøre skoven til et godt sted for alle.

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To get a man on the moon, China's program takes cues from the Apollo lunar lander
From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The country is looking to launch in 2032. China tests the landing gear for its manned lunar lander, as part of a 15-year journey to humanity's lunar return.

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Living environment a powerful factor in the lives of Rwanda's orphans
A population study establishes that orphanages are important for Rwanda's orphans mainly because of lower stigma and marginalization they faced from the community. Children in orphanages are emotionally healthier, suffer less from mental distress and are less prone to high-risk behavior than orphans living under other circumstances.

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We need to talk about school start times
Later start times could help Canadian teens’ grades and health, research indicates. Researchers found that students from schools that started earlier slept less, were less likely to meet the national sleep recommendations for their age, and were more often tired in the morning.

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Where belief in free will is linked to happiness
Free will describes the ability to make independent choices, where the outcome of the choice is not influenced by past events. In this study, researchers show that Chinese teenagers who believe in free will also show increased happiness, suggesting that this phenomenon is not influenced by Western/Asian cultural differences.

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How do people choose what plants to use?
There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. Humans use approximately 10-15% of them to cover our basic needs, such as food, medicine and shelter, as well as other needs, such as recreation, art, and craft. But why and how have humans selected only a small fraction of all plants to utilize?

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World still 'grossly underprepared' for infectious disease outbreaks
The world remains 'grossly underprepared' for outbreaks of infectious disease, which are likely to become more frequent in the coming decades, warn a team of international experts.

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The Download, Jan 23, 2017: Samsung Battery Fail, China’s Global Gadget Grab, and Fighting Bad Science
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

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Why Poker Is a Big Deal for Artificial Intelligence
Playing poker involves dealing with imperfect information, which makes the game very complex, and more like many real-world situations.

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Wolf-size extinct otter discovered: 6.24 million years old
A large extinct otter, Siamogale melilutra, has been found in the Miocene Shuitangba site in northeastern Yunnan Province in China. The new prehistoric otter was the size of a modern wolf and is one of the largest otter species known to science.

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Experiment resolves mystery about wind flows on Jupiter
A team of geophysicists has recreated Jupiter's jets in the laboratory for the first time and shown that they likely extend thousands of kilometers below Jupiter's visible atmosphere.

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Not just funny: Satirical news has serious political effects
Satirical news programs, often dismissed as mere entertainment, have real political effects on the people who watch them, new research suggests. A study found that people chose satirical news that matched their pre-existing attitudes -- liberal or conservative -- and that watching satirical news reinforced those attitudes as much as watching serious news.

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Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPV
New details of the structure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) may lead to better vaccines and HPV anti-viral medications, according to research.

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Nutritional considerations for healthy aging, reduction in age-related chronic disease
Improving dietary resilience and better integration of nutrition in the health care system can promote healthy aging and may significantly reduce the financial and societal burden of the “silver tsunami,” report authors of a new report.

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The unintended consequences of centralized blood banking and what to do about it
In the late 1990s, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a policy requiring the establishment of centralized blood banking facilities in Sub-Saharan African countries. One researcher says that this policy is now having unintended negative consequences.

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Pre-operative liquid feeding reduces complications following Crohn's disease surgery
Despite improvements in medical care, about two-thirds of patients with Crohn's disease develop complications requiring intestinal surgery, and post-operative healing can be complicated. Clinicians now report that pre-operative optimization of patients with Crohn's disease with exclusive enteral nutrition (liquid nutrition formula) gives better results.

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Breathtaking Earth Images Delivered By New NOAA Satellite | Video
The first set of images from the GOES-16 satellite have been released by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (N0AA). The geostationary satellite will be used for weather forecasting, severe storm tracking and more.

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New research on wine fermentation could lead to better bouquet
The taste of wine arises from a symphony of compounds that are assembled as yeast ferment the must from grapes. But much of what happens in this process remains obscure. Now a team of researchers from France, a country that is synonymous with good wine, has begun to unveil the outlines of how yeast manage nitrogen, an essential element that comprises about 16 percent of proteins, and four percent

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Trilobites: Ancient Bits of Rock Help Solve an Asteroid Mystery
Scientists have a new explanation for why the composition of meteorites — pieces of space rock that land on Earth — is different from orbiting asteroids.

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Crop achilles' heel costs farmers 10 percent of potential yield
Scientists assumed leaves at the top of a plant would be the best at turning higher levels of light into carbohydrates—through the process of photosynthesis—while the lower shaded leaves would be better at processing the low light levels that penetrate the plant's canopy of leaves. Turns out that in two of our most productive crops, these shaded leaves are less efficient than the top leaves, limit

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Designing a chatbot: male, female or gender neutral?
Picture a virtual assistant that helps find directions, schedules appointments or plays music, and the soothing yet robotic sound of a female voice likely comes to mind.

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Samsung Explains the Details Behind the Galaxy Note 7’s Fiery End
Bad battery design and questionable manufacturing were to blame, but management culture may have enabled the problem to slip through the net.

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Exotic black holes caught turning into a superfluid
A model of a higher-dimensional black hole matches what happens when liquid helium loses all its stickiness, a coincidence that could help study both oddities

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Formulas show how metallic glass morphs under stress
When under stress, the atoms of a metallic glass will shift, slide, and ultimately form bands that leave the material more prone to breaking. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences lays a foundation to calculate how all types of glass morph over time when they are put under mechanical stress. The formulas could help scientists and manufacturers make glass better for sp

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Forests 'held their breath' during global warming hiatus, research shows
Global forest ecosystems, widely considered to act as the lungs of the planet, 'held their breath' during the most recent occurrence of a warming hiatus, new research has shown.

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Military Program Produces Gadget That Detects Machinery from Behind a Concrete Wall
The device from U.K. researchers picks up the changing magnetic fields caused by electric motors, combustion engines, and fans—including the kind found inside computers.

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AI Voice Assistant Apps are Proliferating, but People Don’t Use Them
Limited to just audio, users of Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant don’t seem to stick with apps that run on their helper’s software. Would a screen help?

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Paris tests electric driverless minibus to fight pollution
In a city hit by chronic pollution and traffic problems, Paris officials are experimenting with a self-driving shuttle linking two train stations in the French capital.

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UNIST researchers get green light to commercialize metal-air batteries
A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently announced that they have successfully developed a new way to increase energy efficiency of metal-air batteries which are next-generation energy devices by using a conducting polymer.

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Despair Not This Earth
Rational thinking, creativity and wonder are powerful tools in the universe

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Can the donut-shaped magnet 'CAPPuccino submarine' hunt for dark matter?
Scientists have clarified that toroidal magnets can also look for axions, one of the particle candidates for the mysterious dark matter.

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New crab species shares name with two 'Harry Potter' characters and a hero researcher
While not much is known about the animals living around coral reefs, ex-Marine turned researcher Harry Conley would often take to the island of Guam, western Pacific Ocean, and dig deep into the rubble to find fascinating critters as if by magic learnt at Hogwarts. Almost 20 years after his discoveries and his death, a secret is revealed on the pages of the open access journal ZooKeys—a new specie

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Babies with eczema may have tooth decay later
Infants with eczema are three times more likely to develop tooth decay at 2 and 3 years of age, experts warn. The good news is that tooth decay is highly preventable. “Our latest findings will give parents and caregivers of babies with eczema early warning of increased risk of developing tooth decay in toddlers,” says Stephen Hsu, associate professor of dentistry at the National University of Sin

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Noninvasive ultrasound pulses used to precisely tweak rat brain activity
Biomedical engineers report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound.

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Team digitally reconstructs Tasmanian tiger’s brain
The last known Tasmanian tiger died in 1936, but scientists are getting a fresh look at the extinct animal’s brain architecture and wiring by scanning preserved brains to create a digital reconstruction. They compared the results to the animal’s closet living relative, the Tasmanian devil, and found that the Tasmanian tiger, also known as the thylacine, had more cortex devoted to planning and dec

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Molecule skimmed from sea may alter fossil record
Scientists thought a fatty molecule was unique to flowering plants, but it’s turned up in bacteria skimmed from the Adriatic Sea. The surprising finding solves a 20-year-old paleontological mystery and could affect how scientists interpret the presence of this molecule in the ecological record. Where once it suggested the presence of land and flowering plants, it could indicate marine or freshwat

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Lots more rain once fell on the Sahara
Between 5,000 and 11,000 years ago, much higher levels of rain made a “Green Sahara.” The area was home to hunter-gathers who made their living off the animals and plants living in the region’s savannas and wooded grasslands. “It was 10 times as wet as today,” says Jessica Tierney, associate professor of geosciences at the University of Arizona. Annual rainfall in the Sahara now ranges from about

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Identifying early markers of cardiac dysfunction in pregnancy
Preeclampsia, which affects 3-8 percent of all pregnancies, is a disease specific to pregnancy that is characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine. Research studies have clearly shown that there is a link between a history of preeclampsia in a pregnancy and developing heart disease later in life. In fact, a history of preeclampsia is as much of a risk factor for heart disease as

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Experiment resolves mystery about wind flows on Jupiter
One mystery has been whether the jets exist only in the planet's upper atmosphere—much like the Earth's own jet streams—or whether they plunge into Jupiter's gaseous interior. If the latter is true, it could reveal clues about the planet's interior structure and internal dynamics.

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Mummy visualization impresses in computer journal
Using visualization technology, visitors to the British Museum can reveal the murder of the mummified Geberlein Man, 5,500 years ago.

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Destructive Storms Soak, Batter And Bury Communities Around The Country
Apparent tornadoes killed at least 19 people in the South, nearly 4 inches of rain caused mudslides in California and a storm is dumping snow and rain from the Mid-Atlantic through the Northeast. (Image credit: Rogelio V. Solis/AP)

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Paresh Dave: Snapchat in 2017: 7 predictions about what's to come
As Snap Inc. moves toward an expected initial public offering this year, it's natural to expect increased predictability and transparency from a company that has thrived so far without much of either.

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The ethical dilemma of designer babies | Paul Knoepfler
Creating genetically modified people is no longer a science fiction fantasy; it's a likely future scenario. Biologist Paul Knoepfler estimates that within fifteen years, scientists could use the gene editing technology CRISPR to make certain "upgrades" to human embryos -- from altering physical appearances to eliminating the risk of auto-immune diseases.


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Bird is evolving to be less flashy in response to global warming
White patches on male collared flycatchers' heads have been shrinking, as climate change mysteriously makes those with big patches less likely to survive

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Q&A: A Scientific Lens on Copper
Copper bracelets and other folk remedies, like magnetic straps, were no more effective against arthritis than a placebo, a study found.

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Car crash-test dummies move beyond young, thin and male
Using medical data collected by trauma experts, elderly and obese dummies are being used to help car manufacturers create safer vehicles for today's drivers.

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Judge rules Snapchat immune from distracted driver claim
A judge has dismissed claims against Snapchat that blamed the social media company's "speed filter" for a highway crash. The judge said the Communications Decency Act provides the social media company with immunity.

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Oceanographic analysis offers potential crash site of MH370
A group of oceanographers offers a new analysis of the potential crash site of flight Malaysian Airlines flight 370 in the southern Indian Ocean. The researchers, which included scientists from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, used data from buoys that monitor ocean conditions.

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Network of molecular interactions in brain cells infected by Zika virus reveals new therapeutic targets
Zika virus interferes with the cellular machinery controlling cell division and alters the expression of hundreds of genes responsible for guiding the formation and development of brain cells, according to new research findings.

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Patients with severe chronic rhinosinusitis show improvement with Verapamil treatment
A clinical trial studying the use of Verapamil (a drug currently in use for cardiovascular disease and cluster headache) in alleviating chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps revealed significant improvement in the symptoms of this subset of patients.

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Improving prognoses for a sustainable future
Whether it's electric automobiles, renewable energy, carbon tax or sustainable consumption, sustainable development requires strategies that meet people's needs without harming the environment. Before such strategies are implemented, their potential impact on environment, economy, and society needs to be tested. These tests can be conducted with the help of computer models that depict future demog

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Codes of ethics cause problems for overseas operations
Corporate codes of ethics can have reverse effects and mask anomalies or social evils in operations outsourced to low-wage countries, suggests a new study.

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Is Social Media Leading to Tired Students?
Many teens are showing up to school sleep-deprived from late night social media use, and it may be hurting their academic performance. Researchers find that " over a third of young people appear to be waking up during the night to send or check messages via social media."

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11 Ways Processed Food Is Different from Real Food
What exactly makes processed food unhealthy?

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Today's rarest space rocks were once common clods
Space Unfortunately for us, meteorites still come in all shapes and sizes The history of our solar system is a history of collisions. Massive collisions.

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Carbon Monoxide is Toxic, but Could It Treat Tissue Damage?
A few early-stage clinical trials are underway

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National cluster helps companies tap on new 3D printing technologies
Tissue implants customized to a patient could soon be printed using a new type of 3D-printer, say developers.

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Physicists show that real-time error correction in quantum communications is possible
Nature Physics today, Monday, 23 January 2017, published online the research by a team led by physicists from the School of Physics at Wits University. In their paper titled: Characterising quantum channels with non-separable states of classical light the researchers demonstrate the startling result that sometimes Nature cannot tell the difference between particular types of laser beams and quantu

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First big-picture look at meteorites from before giant space collision 466 million years ago
Four hundred and sixty-six million years ago, there was a giant collision in outer space. Something hit an asteroid and broke it apart, sending chunks of rock falling to Earth as meteorites since before the time of the dinosaurs. But what kinds of meteorites were making their way to Earth before that collision? In a new study in Nature Astronomy, scientists have tackled that question by creating t

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Which Personality Traits Are Most Predictive of Well-Being?
The real link between personality and well-being

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This is what it would look like to land on Pluto
Space Based on NASA's best photos, anyway NASA has stitched together 100 photos from the approach and flyby into a color video that shows roughly what it might look like to land on Pluto.
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Survey: Most women don't know age heart screenings should begin
When should women start getting heart screenings? A new U.S. national survey shows most women wait way too late.

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Comparing skin closure options for cesarean delivery
Researchers tested two types of sutures -- poliglecaprone 25 (monocryl® suture) and polyglactin 910 (vicryl® suture). Monocryl is an absorbable, single filament suture with low tissue reactivity which dissolves slowly and loses strength. Vicryl is an absorbable, braided suture with low tissue reactivity which dissolves quickly but maintains strength.

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Transplanted neurons incorporated into a stroke-injured rat brain
Today, a stroke usually leads to permanent disability – but in the future, the stroke-injured brain could be reparable by replacing dead cells with new, healthy neurons, using transplantation. Researchers have taken a step in that direction by showing that some neurons transplanted into the brains of stroke-injured rats were incorporated and responded correctly when the rat’s muzzle and paws were

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Dried-up slime could help microbes survive briny waters on Mars
Colonies of bacteria called biofilms live longer in Mars-like waters – especially if they were dried out first, as they would be after hitching a ride through space

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China Will Launch Moon-Sampling Mission In November
Ahead of a separate plan to visit the moon's far side, China hopes to return lunar samples to Earth in late 2017. (Image credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

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Norsk projektleder: Vi bygger verdens sikreste tunnel
Nye tunnelkrav, der begrænser den maksimale hældning til fem procent, gør den kommende tunnel under Romsdalsfjorden 2,5 km længere og 500 mio. kr. dyrere – men også meget sikker.

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Evaluation of the effects of laser tissue welding for spina bifida repair
Spina Bifia is a birth defect where there is incomplete closure of the backbone and membranes around the spinal cord. It affects more than 4,000 children born each year in the U.S. and is associated with hydrocephalus (excessive accumulation of fluid on the brain), developmental delay, lifelong disability and death. This preliminary study hoped to determine the effects of laser tissue welding on u

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Evaluation of the use of human umbilical cord for in-utero spina bifida repair
Spina Bifida is a birth defect where there is an incomplete closure of the backbone and the coverings around the spinal cord. It affects more than 4,000 children born each year in the United States and is associated with hydrocephalus (fluid in the brain), developmental delay, lifelong disability and death. Spina Bifida is also associated with a need for shunt placement. In-utero surgery has been

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Discrepancy between the theoretical, experimental results of a system of biological interest is resolved
A piece of research has resolved the tautomeric equilibrium of a model system of great biological interest. The work was made possible by setting up a piece of equipment that they themselves developed to characterize sets of molecules in a very accurate way. The research has thus put an end to the controversy that existed between the prior experiments and theoretical calculations that yielded cont

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What Could Replace the Clean Power Plan?
Trump could soon issue an executive order directing the EPA to consider the Clean Power Plan illegal and stop any work related to the regulation

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Beyond Pluto: NASA's New Horizons Spacecraft Heads to Next Adventure
Nearly two years after its historic encounter with the dwarf planet Pluto, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is getting ready for its next big adventure in the icy outskirts of the solar system.

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Melting solid below the freezing point
Researchers have discovered a new phenomenon of so-called metastability in a liquid phase. This state is common in supercooled liquids, which are liquids that cool below the freezing point without turning into a solid or a crystal. These scientists report the first experimental evidence of creating a metastable liquid directly by melting a high-pressure solid crystal of the metal bismuth via a dec

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Preterm birth risk: New method for filtering results from genetic studies
Researchers have verified genetic results from one large study of women with spontaneous preterm birth, and highlighted 13 key genes in both mothers and babies which may be involved in preterm birth while also identifying 123 genes as top candidates for further study.

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Glucose supplementation significantly reduces length of induced labor in childbirth
Prolonged labor can be harmful to maternal and fetal health. Few medical interventions are known to shorten labor duration. Because muscle performance is known to be improved by glucose supplementation, the researchers tested whether adding glucose to the intravenous hydration solution women receive during labor could accelerate labor.

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Skin closure options for cesarean delivery: Glue vs. subcuticular sutures
Cesarean delivery rates have increased during the last few decades and it has become the most common surgery during a woman's reproductive years. There is currently no definite evidence regarding the best method for skin closure after a cesarean surgery. Safety of the operation, healing and cosmetic outcomes are important and should influence the physician's choice of skin closure methodology.

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Study finds recurrent hypertensive disease of pregnancy associated with early mortality
Researchers have long determined that pregnancy can provide insight into future health. Because of the stress it puts on the body, pregnancy may unmask an underlying predisposition to health problems.

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Reduction of the most common cause of maternal death worldwide
Researchers have developed a series of maternal safety toolkits aimed at responding to the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality including reducing complications from obstetric hemorrhage, severe hypertension and early elective delivery.

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Day of delivery linked to maternal-fetal mortality
Based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United States maternal mortality ratio is three to four times higher than that of most other developed nations. The maternal mortality ratio is increasing, reaching 21-22 per 100,000 live births in 2014 (more than double from 1990.) Although much has been written about this problem, few solutions have been forthcoming.

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Getting closer to an effective treatment for Parkinson's
A study shows new mechanisms behind Parkinson's disease, which can be key mechanisms for future treatment. More than 10 million people worldwide have Parkinson´s disease.

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Conserved role for ovo protein in reproductive cell development in mice and fruit flies
Germline cells are the only cells that develop into eggs or sperm, while somatic cells develop into the body. Progenitors of the germline, known as primordial germ cells (PGCs), differentiate into eggs or sperm after embryonic development. The expression of a select group of genes occurs in the PGCs of a number of different animal groups, indicating a possible conserved mechanism of germline gene

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‘You never said my peer review was confidential’ — scientist challenges publisher
Open-science advocate says journals should be clearer to peer-reviewers about terms and conditions. Nature 541 446 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21342

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Calorie Intake and Health: Major Study Reveals a New Relationship
Understanding the biology of aging can help us develop strategies to slow or even overcome it.

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Cervical cancer mortality rates may be underestimated
A new analysis reveals that for most women, the risk of dying from cervical cancer is higher than previously thought. Unlike prior estimates that also included women who had undergone a hysterectomy and were therefore no longer at risk, this analysis only included women with a cervix. The study also revealed significant racial differences in the risk of dying from cervical cancer.

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Limiting gestational weight gain did not improve pregnancy complications
Researchers will trial an intervention to prevent excess gestational weight gain in overweight and obese women.

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Use of fetal genetic sequencing increases the detection rate of genetic findings
Researchers have found that, in preliminary data, fetal genomic (whole exome) sequencing (WES) as a diagnostic test for women with pregnancies complicated by major fetal congenital anomalies increased the detection rate of genetic findings by between 10 to 30 percent.


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Asus lancerer kraftfuld konkurrent til Raspberry Pi
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/asus-lancerer-kraftfuld-konkurrent-raspberry-pi-1072186 Asus’ mikrocomputer Tinker Board kan afspille video i 4K. Version2

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Peruvian potatoes to join world's largest banana collection in Belgium
For 30 years, KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) has been home to an impressive collection of bananas that already contains over 1,500 varieties and is the biggest in its kind. The collection is recognised as world heritage and will soon be expanded with another food crop: 8,000 potato varieties of the International Potato Centre in Peru are coming to Leuven.

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Noninvasive ultrasound pulses used to precisely tweak rat brain activity
Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound. The method first "cages" a drug inside tiny, biodegradable "nanoparticles," then activates its release through precisely targeted sound waves, such as those used to painlessly and noninvasiv

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Calabrese says mistake led to adopting the LNT model in toxicology
Edward Calabrese, the University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental toxicologist who has long been a critic of the current linear no-threshold (LNT) approach to risk assessment for radiation and toxic chemicals, argues in a new publication that the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) made an error in adopting the LNT because the research findings on which they relied contained a fundamenta

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In African 'fairy circles,' a template for nature's many patterns
Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous "fairy circles" of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency.

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Provocative prions may protect yeast cells from stress
Prions have a notorious reputation. They cause neurodegenerative disease, namely mad cow/Creutzfeld-Jakob disease. And the way these protein particles propagate—getting other proteins to join the pile—can seem insidious.

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UNIST embarks on journey to develop ultrafast train
Earlier today, UNIST has signed a multi-year strategic partnership agreement with seven research institutes to accelerate the realization of government's new plan to build a new form of futuristic transportation system.

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Mysterious Desert 'Fairy Circles' Explained by Math
Termite colonies and self-organizing plants might not be mutually exclusive explanations for the barren patches known as fairy circles.

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Neutrons and a 'bit of gold' uncover new type of quantum phase transition
The discovery of a new type of quantum phase transition has been announced by researchers. This unique transition happens at an elastic quantum critical point, or QCP, where the phase transition isn't driven by thermal energy but instead by the quantum fluctuations of the atoms themselves.

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Dansk Fjernvarme: Afgifter bremser mulighederne for at at udnytte spildvarme
Dansk Fjernvarme er glade for en ny kortlægning, der viser potentialet i overskudsvarme til opvarmning. Men Skats afgifter står i vejen.

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New genital herpes vaccine candidate provides powerful protection in preclinical tests
Approximately 500 million people around the world are infected with the genital herpes virus known as herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2). A vaccine that could bring an end to this global pandemic is needed desperately, yet no candidate vaccine has ever performed well in clinical trials. Now scientists have shown that a new type of vaccine provides powerful protection in standard guinea pig and monkey m

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Amid angst, tech industry innovates
CES is nearly a week-long party celebrating the tech industry. But in recent years, the annual tech show, held earlier this month, has had a palpable sense of anxiety as much as excitement.

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The Hard Road: Find Deeply Shared Values to Tackle Divisive Problems
Political leaders must spend the next four years solving tough problems based on shared values, not divisive ones

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How aging changes the fat in our cells
The fat content of cells changes as they age, new research shows. Aging also appears to alter how cells produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids. “Traditionally, lipids have been thought of as structural components: They store energy and form the membranes of cells,” says G. Ekin Atilla-Gokcumen, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University at Buffalo. “Our res

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Sprint in streaming deal to boost fledgling Tidal (Update)
Telecom giant Sprint said Monday it would buy one-third of rap mogul Jay Z's Tidal streaming platform, breathing new life into a service whose star power has failed to translate into market dominance.

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Limited window to change commuting habits
Over 128 million daily commuters in the U.S. and 75% report they drive alone. From improving traffic flow to air quality, convincing people to choose a possibly "greener" mode of transportation presents many challenges. Psychology researcher Gregory Thomas (Cardiff University) shows that if people are going to change their commuting habit, it needs to happen within the first three months of a move

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One of the brightest distant galaxies known discovered
An international team led by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL) has discovered one of the brightest "non-active" galaxies in the early universe. Finding BG1429+1202 was made possible by the "help" of a massive elliptical galaxy along the line of sight to the object, which acted as a kind of lens, amplifying the brightness and disto

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Quentin Willson encouraging the use of electric cars
Motoring journalist Quentin Willson calls for cheaper and simpler prices to encourage the use of electric cars.

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How to Learn Morse Code--Semiconsciously
Wearable computers delivering tactile cues may offer a way to learn manual skills without paying much attention

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Liberal tænketank: Forbyd de mest skadelige brændeovne
Den borgelig-liberale tænketank Cepos foreslår, at elafgiften sænkes med det halve for at øge brugen af varmepumper. Og så skal der indføres forbud mod brændeovne i visse områder.

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Real-life psychopaths actually have below-average intelligence
submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]

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SEC probing Yahoo over cyberattacks: media
The US Securities and Exchange Commission has opened an investigation into whether Yahoo should have informed investors sooner about two major data breaches, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday, citing people familiar with the matter.

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The Achingly Cute Fish With a Suction Cup on Its Belly
What oh what will a nearly spherical fish do to avoid being swept away? Suction itself to the seafloor, that's what

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Enigmatic Pterosaur Was a Terrestrial Stalker
This unusual saurian is worthy of horror movie fame

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Electrocatalysis can advance green transition
The world population is growing, as is energy demand, and we have long been able to see the consequences of climate change caused by the world's consumption of fossil resources. The IEA reports that global demand for energy was around 18 terawatts (TW) in 2013. This corresponds to 18,000,000 megawatts. Demand is expected to rise to around 25 TW in 2040. This means that our carbon emissions will be

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Review: Apple takes innovation to new levels with AirPods
Apple has a knack for examining a product market and introducing its own version that leapfrogs the established competition.

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Image: Frost build-up near Mars north pole
This animated gif shows the build up of frosts in a 73 x 41 km section of the north polar ice cap of Mars between November and December 2004.

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Polar Bear Cubs at High Risk from Toxic Industrial Chemicals, Despite Bans
Levels in young animals elevated to 1,000 times the acceptable amount in people

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Professors reflect on the issue of climate change in Trump's administration
ManMohan Sodhi, Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management commented on climate change and how the rise of natural disasters could impact the US economy.

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Camera able to capture imagery of an optical Mach cone
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has built a camera apparatus capable of capturing moving imagery of an optical Mach cone. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their image capturing system and other possible applications of the technology.

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How to make a survival whistle from a soup can
DIY This simple beacon can help you in the wild Learn to make a quick, effective emergency whistle in a pinch.

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Rumors Swirl about Trump's Science Adviser Pick
Climate sceptic William Happer and ardent critic of academia David Gelernter have met with the president

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National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week: Jan. 23-29
Every year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) creates initiatives to raise awareness about drug and alcohol abuse in the US. Today, until January 29, is officially “ National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week ,” an annual health observance that links students with scientists and other experts to offset false information about drugs and alcohol that is widely circulated from the internet, soci

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To better understand animals, borrow from human language research, says paper
Humans have a remarkable ability to tailor our speech to our audience. In many cases, these changes can improve communication. For example, humans often change their speaking voices to a higher-pitched "baby talk" when communicating with their young or their pets, and this higher pitch serves to attract and maintain the recipient's attention.

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Big cities warm up during the week as commuters flock in
People warm up large cities such as Melbourne and Sydney by an average of 0.3°C each week, and temperatures drop over the weekends

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The Military May Soon Buy the Same Drones You Do
The Pentagon may find a glimpse of future scout drones in commercial off-the-shelf technologies

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New research debunks honey bee pesticide study
A study by a global agrochemical company that concluded there was only a low risk to honey bees from a widely used agricultural pesticide has been described as "misleading" in new research published by statisticians at the University of St Andrews.

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Air Force missile reconnaissance satellite SBIRS GEO 3 launched
A vital missile reconnaissance satellite for the U.S. Force soared to space atop an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral at dinnertime Friday night, Jan. 20, 2017.

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New business tool reveals star products
Expert decision analysts have turned one of the ABC's of business on its head and devised a brilliant new tool to help improve the bottom line.

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Cosmologists a step closer to understanding quantum gravity
Cosmologists trying to understand how to unite the two pillars of modern science – quantum physics and gravity – have found a new way to make robust predictions about the effect of quantum fluctuations on primordial density waves, ripples in the fabric of space and time.

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Succesfuldt samarbejde får flere gennem hjerte­rehabilitering
I to år har Aalborg Universitetshospital og Aalborg Kommune på forsøgsbasis arbejdet tæt sammen om at sikre hjertepatienter gode rehabiliteringsforløb. Det har vist sig at være en så gavnlig løsning, at samarbejdet nu fortsætter permanent.

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Samsung blames battery flaws for Galaxy Note 7 smartphone fires
Issues with two different lithium-ion batteries led to short circuits in Samsung Galaxy Note 7s which caused them to catch fire, says the company

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Indbygget brandslukker i lithium-ion batterier på vej
Amerikanske forskere har fundet en metode til at forhindre for eksempel fremtidige Samsung-telefoner i at bryde i brand, fordi batteriet får hedeslag.

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World's first primary standard developed for molecular radiotherapy
Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have developed the world's first primary standard for molecular radiotherapy (MRT) to ensure its safe, effective use in the treatment of cancer.

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Bringing energy-hungry buildings up to date
As buildings evolve from energy consumers to energy producers, architecture is seeing a major paradigm shift, with building renovations becoming a real challenge. EPFL researchers explore this fundamental issue in a new book and course.

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The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results of a system of biological interest is resolved
Research in which UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry collaborated has resolved the tautomeric equilibrium of a model system of great biological interest. The work was made possible using equipment designed to characterise sets of molecules with high accuracy. The research settles a controversy that existed between prior experiments and theoretical calculations that yielded contradictory an

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Oaks may replace pines in severely burned 'Lost Pines' region without human intervention
Without human help, the "Lost Pines" may lose some of what it is known for after wildfire ripped through that region almost six years ago, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife study.

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Beautiful Literary Star Charts Map Famous First Sentences
Data artist Nick Rougeux's sentence diagrams look like star charts

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Inside the Torture Chamber Where Trains Prove They’ll Weather Anything
Snow, heat, wind, rain—all indoors. Welcome to the climatic wind tunnel

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Become Your Very Own Coach With These 5 Athletic Gadgets
Athletes can employ a variety of wearable body sensors to get useful coaching advice

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Remarkable Photos Capture the Light That Plants Emit
Sometimes, plants glow

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So, What the Hell Was That Twist at the End of Split?
Look, we've come to expect twists from M. Night Shyamalan, but that was nuts

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Asteroid Mining Sounds Hard, Right? You Don’t Know the Half of It
Until asteroid mining companies can actually mine asteroids, they're staying solvent by playing in Earth's orbit

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Cantina Talk: Disney Won’t CGI Carrie Fisher Into Future Star Wars Movies
Lucasfilm has officially put that rumor to rest

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Catalysis with a light touch
Pairing two catalysts in a single, illuminated reaction flask proves to be a light-bulb moment for organic synthesis.


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Lanzarote Journal: Undersea Museum Keeps Fish Feeding and Its Social Commentary Biting
An installation of 300 statues off a Spanish island forms an artificial reef and addresses issues like Europe’s migration crisis, and the destruction of ocean reefs.

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Extracting more from wastewater
Fresh water scarcity and energy security are two critical global challenges facing us today. Researchers at KAUST have now created an advanced material that can address both problems simultaneously by producing clean water and hydrogen from wastewater.

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Signs of Alien Air Herald a New Era of Exoplanet Discoveries
New efforts hint that nearby world GJ 1132 b may have an Earth-like atmosphere with water and methane

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Folding reconfigurable materials: Toolkit to design metamaterials with programmable shape and function
During his PhD research at Harvard University, AMOLF group leader Bas Overvelde developed a smart method for designing and investigating new metamaterials. For such materials the microstructure determines the function, rather than the molecular composition. The ideal metamaterial changes shape autonomously to achieve the desired functionality. Overvelde and his American colleagues developed a tool

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Can the donut-shaped magnet 'CAPPuccino submarine' hunt for dark matter?
Although it sounds hard to believe, everything we see with the naked eye or through microscopes and telescopes accounts for just 4 percent of the known universe. The rest comprises dark energy (69 percent) and dark matter (27 percent). Although there seems to be more dark matter than visible matter in the universe, we still have not been able to directly detect it. The reason is that dark matter d

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Possible Medieval 'Synagogue' Uncovered Near Sea of Galilee
A medieval building that may have been used as a synagogue has been uncovered at the site of Huqoq near the Sea of Galilee in Israel.

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Ny rapport baner vejen for uranminer i Grønland
Australsk selskab med kinesisk storaktionær kan nu roligt indsende en ansøgning om minedrift efter uran og sjældne jordarter. Det er muligt at drive moderne uranminer uden større miljøproblemer, konkluder ny dansk rapport.

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Adsorbent that can selectively remove water contaminants
Professor Cafer T. Yavuz and his team at the Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water, and Sustainability (EEWS) of Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have developed an adsorbent that can selectively capture soluble organic contaminants in water.

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Gator aid
Texan Christy Kroboth used to have a quiet job in a dentist's surgery. Now she spends her time jumping on animals many times her size - and taping their jaws tightly shut.

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Fire of Australia: The return of the world's finest uncut opal
The opal dubbed the Fire of Australia is back on public display after 70 years in a safe deposit box.

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Mummy visualisation impresses in computer journal
Using visualisation technology developed at Linköping University under the auspices of Visualization Center C, visitors to the British Museum can reveal the murder of the mummified Geberlein Man, 5,500 years ago. This world-leading technology has been described in a prestigious journal of computer science, Communications of the ACM.

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Shape-shifting nucleosomes open new avenues for epigenetics research
The textbook description of chromatin, the condensed form DNA takes when it is not in use, consists of rigid building-blocks called nucleosomes, which act as spindles on which inactive DNA can be spooled and archived. But a new UCSF study promises to overturn this understanding, demonstrating that nucleosomes actively change their shape as part of the larger process of epigenetic regulation of gen

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How can high-energy physics help the water shortage?
It might be hard to imagine what link there could be between a huge scientific machine underneath Geneva and a field of tomatoes in Lebanon but both need advanced technology to achieve their best results. Even if they seem light years apart, they face the same technical challenges.


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Study identifies a key to preventing disruptive behavior in preschool classrooms
Young children who display disruptive behavior reduce those behaviors when their teacher spends extra time playing individually with them, according to a new University of Virginia study published in December in the journal Child Development.

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Three theories for what's causing the global productivity slowdown
There is a wide recognition by economists and policy-makers that "the large differences in income per capita observed across countries mostly reflect differences in labour productivity".

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New stem cell technique shows promise for bone repair
A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has developed a new method of repairing injured bone using stem cells from human bone marrow and a carbon material with photocatalytic properties, which could lead to powerful treatments for skeletal system injuries, such as fractures or periodontal disease.
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Surprise emergence of the first cabbage white butterfly of 2017
The emergence of the first cabbage white butterfly of 2017 was a surprise even to the researcher who has been charting their flight since 1972.

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Conserved role for Ovo protein in reproductive cell development in mice and fruit flies
Germline cells are the only cells that develop into eggs or sperm, while somatic cells develop into the body. Progenitors of the germline, known as primordial germ cells (PGCs), differentiate into eggs or sperm after embryonic development. The expression of a select group of genes occurs in the PGCs of a number of different animal groups, indicating a possible conserved mechanism of germline gene

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Modifying the composition of magnetite to enable it to convert sunlight into electrical current
Mined to make the first compass needles, the mineral magnetite is also made by migratory birds and other animals to allow them to sense north and south and thus navigate in cloudy or dark atmospheric conditions or under water. A team of scientists has compositionally modified magnetite to capture visible sunlight and convert this light energy into electrical current. This current may be useful to

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Airbus Plans to Test a Flying Car by the End of the Year
Airbus Group CEO Tom Enders announced last week that the company plans to test a prototype of a “flying car” by the end of the year.

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Melting solid below the freezing point
Phase transitions surround us—for instance, liquid water changes to ice when frozen and to steam when boiled. Now, researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science have discovered a new phenomenon of so-called metastability in a liquid phase. A metastable liquid is not quite stable. This state is common in supercooled liquids, which are liquids that cool below the freezing point without turning

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Study finds parrotfish are critical to coral reef health
An analysis of fossilized parrotfish teeth and sea urchin spines by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego showed that when there are more algae-eating fish on a reef, it grows faster.

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Blodprøve kan afsløre kræft
Ny forskning fra Hvidovre Hospital viser lovende potentiale for kræftscreening ved hjælp af blodprøver.

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Enkle trafikpriser gør sjællænderne rundtossede
Kontrollører, buschauffører og ikke mindst passagererne selv har svært ved at finde hoved og hale i, hvad den kollektive trafik på Sjælland koster.

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Samsung: Batteri var skyld i Galaxy Note 7-brande
Efter måneders undersøgelser af 200.000 smartphones bekræfter Samsung årsagen til, at flere telefoner er overophedet og brudt i brand.

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Kalundborg: Hellere 24 grader fra varmt spildevand end 90 graders spildvarme fra industri
Kalundborg satser på en varmepumpe, der skal hive varme ud af byens spildevand, selv om Statoil kan levere varmen uden pumper. Man ved jo ikke, om rafinaderiet bliver i byen.

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China cracks down on bids to bypass online censorship
China has announced a 14-month campaign to "clean up" internet service providers and crack down on devices such as virtual private networks (VPNs) used to evade strict censorship.

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På besøg hos Facebook i Sverige: Hvor skyen bliver fysisk
Den lille svenske by Luleå har fået et boost, efter Facebook byggede et datacenter i byen, fortæller lokal erhvervsformand.

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Danske kvinder bruger mest prævention på recept i Norden
Nordisk forskningsprojekt afdækker forskelle på, hvilke typer prævention nordiske kvinder bruger.

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Dansk astronom får stor forskerpris
Jens Hjorth, professor og leder af Dark Cosmology Centre på Københavns Universitet, modtager...

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Smertemidler får generelt tilskud
Duloxetin og gabapentin får fra 30. januar generelt tilskud.

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How reproducible is basic lab research in cancer biology?
When deciding what to write about this week, I had thought about expounding on, for instance, my concerns regarding vaccine policy given the new administration, but I think I’ve done enough of that for the moment at my not-so-super-secret other blog. Besides, there will be plenty of time and many opportunities to return to my concerns in that area over the next four years. Also, on Thursday I hap

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Brimming toxic pit nears critical level after bird deaths
It was an unusual and unfortunate confluence of events: A larger-than-normal number of geese was making a later-than-normal migration over Montana when a snowstorm blew in at the wrong time and sent them soaring to the wrong place.

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China's online population reaches 731 million
The number of internet users in China—already the world's highest—reached 731 million in December, authorities said, as e-commerce drives consumer demand across the Asian giant.

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Psychological 'vaccine' could help immunize public against 'fake news' on climate change
In medicine, vaccinating against a virus involves exposing a body to a weakened version of the threat, enough to build a tolerance.

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Samsung blames Galaxy Note 7 fires on faulty batteries (Update)
The world's biggest smartphone maker Samsung blamed faulty batteries on Monday for the fires that hit its flagship Galaxy Note 7 device last year, as it sought to draw a line under the humiliating recall.

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Why Do Political Figures Lie So Blatantly?
Are They Pathological Liars? Narcissists? Psychopaths? “Masterful Manipulators”? Trump Spokesman’s Lecture on Media Accuracy Is Peppered With Lies Nearly all American politicians lie, but few as blatantly as those affiliated with the present administration. How do they do it? Are they lacking a conscience? Do they believe their own lies? Do they start with small falsehoods, stretch the

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Cambridge scientists consider fake news 'vaccine'
Concern at fabricated stories on websites prompts a psychological study to help people spot fake news.

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This App Offers Personal Recommendations While Keeping Your Data Private
A small study found that the app’s recommendations weren’t quite as good as those from Google News, but is the trade-off worth it?

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Machine learning skal forudsige, hvor og hvornår det næste strømsvigt rammer Danmark
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/machinelearning-skal-forudsige-hvor-hvornaar-naeste-stroemsvigt-rammer-danmark-1072025 Hvis de mange data fra elnettet bruges til machine learning kan algoritmer måske hjælpe med at træffe beslutninger om, hvad der skal ske i tilfælde af nedbrud i fremtiden, lyder det fra it-direktør hos energinet.dk. Version2

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Samsung Finally Reveals Why the Note 7 Kept Exploding
The smartphone maker offered an explanation today regarding the Galaxy Note 7's combustion problems

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Bodywide immune response important for fighting cancer, researchers say
Effective anti-tumor activity requires a systemic, rather than only a local, immune response at the tumor site. The findings from a new study may help clinicians pinpoint why only some cancer patients respond to immunotherapies.

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Obesity is barely covered in medical students' licensing exam
Obesity is one of the most significant threats to health in the U.S. and is responsible for the development of multiple serious medical problems such as diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer. Yet obesity is barely covered in medical training, according to a new study. The licensing exams for graduating medical students have a surprisingly limited number of test items about obesity preve

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New England's 1816 'Mackerel Year' and climate change today
Aquatic ecologists, climate scientists and environmental historians in New England recount their many-layered, multidisciplinary investigation into the catastrophic effects of the 1815 eruption of the Indonesian volcano Tambora on coastal fish and commercial fisheries in the Gulf of Maine. They say the tale may carry lessons for intertwined human-natural systems facing climate change around the wo

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Study uses social media, internet to forecast disease outbreaks
When epidemiological data are scarce, social media and Internet reports can be reliable tools for forecasting infectious disease outbreaks, according to a study.

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A role for mutated blood cells in heart disease?
A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis.

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Balance may rely on the timing of movement
Zebrafish learn to balance by darting forward when they feel wobbly, a principle that may also apply to humans. Researchers hope their work will one day help therapists to better treat balance problems.

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HPV prevalence rates among US men, vaccination coverage
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various cancers, and a new study estimates the overall prevalence of genital HPV infection in men ages 18 to 59.

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Computer-based cognitive training program may help patients with severe tinnitus
Researchers evaluated the effect of a cognitive training program on tinnitus, and report positive results.

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Quantitative modeling and analysis of bifurcation-induced bursting
Modeling and parameter estimation for neuronal dynamics are often challenging because many parameters can range over orders of magnitude and are difficult to measure experimentally. Moreover, selecting a suitable model complexity requires a sufficient understanding of the model's potential use, such as highlighting essential mechanisms underlying qualitative behavior or precisely quantifying reali

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Scientists aim to create the world's largest sickle cell disease stem cell library
Scientists are creating an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based research library that opens the door to invaluable sickle cell disease research and novel therapy development.

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Processing speed training can improve cognitive ability, lift depression in the elderly
A new Processing Speed Training Game (PSTG) has been developed for a Tablet PC, which they say can significantly improve processing speed and inhibition among healthy older adults, while also reducing their depressive moods when played regularly.

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Testing the water
A new theoretical model reveals how droplets grow around tiny particles on a surface.

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Caffeine Intake Is Associated With Longevity, Say Stanford Researchers
Diabetes, certain forms of cancer, and other conditions may also be inhibited.

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Integrated information and dimensionality in continuous attractor dynamics
There has been increasing interest in the integrated information theory (IIT) ofconsciousness, which hypothesizes that consciousness is integrated information withinneuronal dynamics. However, the current formulation of IIT poses both practical andtheoretical problems when we aim to empirically test the theory by computingintegrated information from neuronal signals. For example, measuring integra

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Sådan undgår du at blive smittet af kollegernes stress
https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-undgaar-du-at-blive-smittet-kollegernes-stress-6109 Stress smitter, men det er heldigvis muligt at styrke dit følelsesmæssige immunsystem. Læs her hvordan Jobfinder

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John Arnold Made a Fortune at Enron. Now He’s Declared War on Bad Science
After making millions for Enron, launching his own hedge fund, and becoming a billionaire, John Arnold retired at 38. His next act? Fix terrible science

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Are potatoes now a cancer risk? Here’s what you need to know
A UK health campaign is taking aim at a substance found in starchy foods cooked at high temperatures. But what exactly is the case against acrylamide?

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The SCAM Week in Review 1.22.2017
Points of Light, Points of Interest Selections from Society for Science-Based Medicine Points of Interes t with comments. Not every article and study that pops up my feeds in the world of pseudo-medicine is worthy of a complete blog post. But they need to be noticed and commented upon. Duty Calls . What’s the Harm Red Yeast Rice, Sold as Statin Alternative, Has Similar Risks . Those events were m

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Did This Medieval African Empire Invent Human Rights?
UNESCO recognized the Mande Charter in 2009.

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Trump's victory creates uncertainty for wind and solar power
President Donald Trump has disputed climate change, pledged a revival of coal and disparaged wind power, and his nominee to head the Energy Department was once highly skeptical of the agency's value. What this means for states' efforts to promote renewable energy is an open question.

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Taiwan's Foxconn chief confirms mulling $7 bn US investment
The head of Taiwan's tech giant Foxconn confirmed Sunday he is considering a $7 billion investment to make TV flat panels in the United States in a joint project with Japan's SoftBank.

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Giant Australian Creatures, the Megafauna, Were Wiped Out By Humans, Not Climate Change
A new study may explain why the Australian megafauna went extinct around 45,000 years ago.

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Lost Dark Ages Fort Found in Scotland
A fort destroyed in a deliberate conflagration in the seventh century may have been the seat of the lost kingdom of Rheged.

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India turns to AI as cyber warfare threats grow
In the darkened offices of a tech start-up, a handful of computer engineers sifts through a mountain of intelligence data that would normally be the work of a small army of Indian security agents.

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Strong quake hits Solomons; some damage but no tsunami
A powerful magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck deep under Papua New Guinea on Sunday, causing damage and blackouts but no tsunami hours after the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued an alert for nearby islands.

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Many farmers still need training after Lake Erie algae
Ohio's agriculture leaders say thousands of farmers have completed training that will be required for putting fertilizer on fields, but many more face a September deadline to finish the program aimed at combating the toxic algae fouling Lake Erie.

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Chinese human rights lawyers set their sights on smog
Toxic smog has found itself in the dock in China, as the authorities are taken to court over a problem that has choked entire regions, put public health at risk and forced the closure of schools and roads.

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Singapore 2G switchoff highlights digital divide
When Singapore pulls the plug on its 2G mobile phone network this year, thousands of people could be stuck without a signal—digital have-nots left behind by the relentless march of technology.

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'Droneboarding' takes off in Latvia
Skirted on all sides by snow-clad pine forests, Latvia's remote Lake Ninieris would be the perfect picture of winter tranquility—were it not for the huge drone buzzing like a swarm of angry bees as it zooms above the solid ice surface.

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Facts, beliefs, and identity: The seeds of science skepticism
Psychological researchers are working to understand the cognitive processes, ideologies, cultural demands, and conspiracy beliefs that cause smart people to resist scientific messages. Using surveys, experiments, observational studies and meta-analyses, the researchers capture an emerging theoretical frontier with an eye to making science communication efforts smarter and more effective.

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Evolution, Climate and Vaccines: Why Americans Deny Science
Americans like science. So why do they reject scientific conclusions?

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Off Long Island, Wind Power Tests the Waters
The nation’s biggest offshore wind project is up for approval, a test of how far states can pursue a clean-energy agenda in the Trump era.

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Extending Descartes to Embody Our Social Rational Souls
Descartes’ solitary, inward-facing mindset misconstrues the social nature of our thinking. Social Cartesianism better captures the soul of what matters in distinguishing humans from animals or machines.

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Study: Fast Talkers Convey the Same Amount of Information as Slow Talkers
A study analyzes the relationship between how fast people speak and how much information they actually relate.

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Bizarre Caterpillar That Makes Own Leafy 'Armor' Seen for 1st Time
A caterpillar recently discovered in Peru wears a leafy tube of protective "armor."

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The Mirror of Our Better Selves – Bernard-Henri Lévy - Think Again Podcast #82
Spontaneous talk on surprise topics. French philosopher and filmmaker "BHL" on evil, complacency, and the necessity of outsider thinking.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 21, 2017)
This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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The skin cure fad threatening Myanmar's elephants
Under the shadow of Myanmar's famed "Golden Rock" punters haggle for the latest traditional medicine cure—slices of skin from the country's fast disappearing wild elephants sold for a few dollars a square inch.

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Facts About Baboons
Baboons are the world’s largest monkeys. They have distinctive faces and butts.

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Cassini Gets Up Close and Personal With Saturn's 'Wavemaker' Moon Daphnis
As NASA's Saturn mission skims the gas giant's rings, it's seeing incredible detail in the interactions between ring particles and a tiny moon's gravity.

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Did Trump Dump Climate Change? White House Website Scrubbed Clean
Climate scientists reacted with dismay, but not necessarily surprise, upon learning that President Donald Trump's new administration had removed the climate change page from the White House website.

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Rare Bird Flu Strikes Cats: What You Need to Know
The death of a shelter cat in New York was just the start of a recent investigation.

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Icelandic Study Suggests That Maybe We Are Getting Dumber
A new genetic study sees us getting gently stupider over time.

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President Trump Takes Immediate Aim at Obama’s Climate Action Plan
Shortly after Donald Trump took office, climate change and clean energy disappeared from the White House website.

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Trump Presidency: How US Leaders Stack Up
What makes a great U.S. president? Anything from a peanut farmer to a former male model.

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Data Mining Solves the Mystery of Your Slow Wi-Fi Connection
Chinese researchers have worked out the reasons for why Wi-Fi can take so long to connect.

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This Restaurant Rehabilitates Ex-Cons Better than Prison
Rates of crime and recidivism in America are very high. One Cleveland-based French restaurant, however, leads the way in helping ex-cons to thrive and not reoffend after their sentences.

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Iceman Ötzi's Last Meal Was 'Stone Age Bacon'
The famous frozen mummy apparently ate a slice or two of dried goat meat before he was killed more than 5,000 years ago.

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President Trump's 'Mysteries of Space' Joins Inaugural Speech Tradition
President Donald Trump took the oath of office in Washington D.C. today (Jan. 20) and mentioned space exploration — if for one fleeting moment — as one of the paths forward to make America great again.

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Trilobites: Tasmanian Tigers’ Brains Yield Clues Long After Extinction
The last thylacine died in a zoo in 1936, but neural scans of preserved specimens revealed that they may have been more intelligent than previously believed.

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FDA Mulls Tighter Regulation of Gene-Edited Animals
The regulator has suggested that it treat every edit of an animal’s genome like a new drug, but some scientists think it could slow progress.

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The President’s New Smartphone
Donald Trump has been forced to hand over his old phone for a more secure device—which might make tweeting a little harder.

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Climate Data Preservation Efforts Mount as Trump Takes Office
Universities host hackathons to save environmental information amid fears the Trump administration will scrub data that undercuts its views.

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FDA Mulls Tighter Gene-Edited Animal Regulation
The regulator has suggested that it treat every edit of an animal’s genome like a new drug, but some scientists think it could slow progress.

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N.Y.C. Nature: English Ivy, Spread by Admiring Humans and Hungry Birds
The plant’s thick green foliage, seemingly immune to winter’s freezes, has had longstanding appeal, while its berries are valuable food for wildlife.

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A Conversation With: What Did Neanderthals Leave to Modern Humans? Some Surprises
Genes inherited from Neanderthals may have made some modern humans heartier, but also more prone to depression and other diseases.

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Chinese BioMedical Research: Sturgeon’s Law In Action
A liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth. – Aesop Not even the Bocca della Verità can tell if a Chinese medical study is fabricated. I do not have much to write about this week. Nothing came across my feeds that inspired me to prolonged pontification and much of my time this week has been spent at the local outdoor store trying to purchase weapons for my children. Both of them a

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Cybersecurity Experts Uncover Dormant Botnet of 350,000 Twitter Accounts
A massive botnet secretly infiltrated the Twitterverse in 2013 but has lain mysteriously dormant since then, say researchers.

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New U.K. Surveillance Law Will Have Worldwide Implications
Even if you don’t live in Britain, the U.K.’s new “Snooper’s Charter” is worth watching. It could inspire other democratic nations to adopt aggressive surveillance policies.

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Lies of Omission: Trump, Sexual Assault, and Media Blindness
Of the questions Donald Trump proved willing to answer in 2016, the toughest came from CNN's Anderson Cooper during the second presidential debate. This was in October, shortly after the leak of a 2005 tape on which Trump had been caught saying : "You know I’m automatically attracted to beautiful—I ...

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Editorial: Rick Perry Studies His Job Description
The nominee for energy secretary discovers that the job involves overseeing a vast nuclear weapons complex.

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Trilobites: How Some Frolicking Fish Got Stuck in a Moment
A picture of fish seemingly trapped in a frozen wave on a South Dakota lake has amazed and bewildered viewers on social media. Here’s what happened.

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Perhaps We Should Eat Crickets
Over 2 billion people worldwide eat insects, such as crickets. Crickets are easy to harvest , high in protein, and nutrient rich. In an age of growing environmental awareness about the significant resources needed for raising livestock, crickets would seemingly be the food of the future. Why aren't they on your dinner plate?

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The Business of Blockchain: A New MIT Technology Review Conference
Our one-day conference will explore the opportunities and challenges associated with blockchains.

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Lies of Omission: Trump, Sexual Assault, and Media Blindness
Of the questions Donald Trump proved willing to answer in 2016, the toughest came from CNN's Anderson Cooper during the second presidential debate. This was in October, shortly after the leak of a 2005 tape on which Trump had been caught saying : "You know I’m automatically attracted to ...

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Scientists Glimpse New York’s Perilous Path in an Ancient Patch of Marsh
In a rare urban remnant of wetlands and its 1,500 years of sediment, climate experts find more proof of rising seas, a looming hazard for much of the region.

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Trilobites: Fishing for Clues to Solve Namibia’s Fairy Circle Mystery
The new study suggests that both termites and plants may be jointly responsible for forming fairy circle landscapes in Namibia.

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Ticks, Thriving in Warm Weather, Take a Ghastly Toll on New England Moose
Researchers say droves of winter ticks, which flourish when fall is warm and the winter comes late, are killing moose calves. They have “wasted away.”

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A 45.7-Meter Field Goal? The Indy 805K? Florida Stokes the Metric Debate.
Florida’s high schools will apparently become the first in the country to measure field events using the metric system.

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Junk science helps homeopathic remedy company win class action
Created by ccPixs.com . In 2012, Kim Allen and other consumers filed suit against Hyland’s , a wholly-owned subsidiary of Standard Homeopathic Co., for false advertising in a California federal district court. (Allen v. Hylands Inc., Case No. 2:12-cv-01150-DMG(MANx), U.S. District Court for the Central District of California) The judge certified a plaintiff class of purchasers of ten Hyland’s hom

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Cleveland Clinic Fully Embraces Pseudoscience
Last week the Director of the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Center, Daniel Neides, wrote a crank anti-vaccine screed in a column for a local news outlet. This prompted an immediate backlash of criticism from professionals who care about the integrity of science in medicine. It also prompted some immediate damage control by the Cleveland Clinic, who released the following statement: Cleveland Clinic i

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Bellevue
Bellevue is the iconic public hospital in New York City. When it first opened in 1818 it consisted of an almshouse, an orphanage, a lunatic asylum, a prison, and an infirmary. It developed into a world-renowned hospital, a training and research institution that has always provided the best medical care to all comers regardless of their ability to pay. Everyone from the criminally insane to indige

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Donald Trump and Peter Thiel vs. the FDA: Be afraid. Be very afraid.
Here at the Science-Based Medicine blog, we argue that the best medicine is based on rigorous science. In today’s technological age, it’s easy to forget that, throughout most of its history, medicine was not very scientific at all. Ancient Egyptian physicians, for instance, were invariably also priests, and for the thousands of years after them medicine tended to be based in anecdote and mystical

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Science-Based Satire: Invertebrate Research Reveals Clue to Evolutionary Origins of the Chiropractic Subluxation
Researchers studying members of an extant animal species with a link to the distant past, specifically a chordate subphylum consisting of organisms with a complex nervous system but lacking spinal bones, may have uncovered a new clue to the early development of the subluxation and solved one of the greatest mysteries in chiropractic science. “One of the toughest challenges we face in the field of

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Peanut Allergy Prevention Advice Does a 180
Peanut allergies, once rare, have become much more common. The Epi-Pen is used to treat life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Severe food allergies, in particular peanut allergies, have become a significant public health issue. Peanut butter sandwiches, once a staple of school lunches, are disappearing as schools and daycares are declared “nut-free zones”. Children today are forbidden from sha

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Trump Meets with RFK Jr. To Discuss “Vaccine Safety”
Donald Trump is the Republican president-elect, and now champion of the far right. Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is a staunch Democrat, a member of perhaps the most prominent family of that party, who just five months ago referred to Trump as “dangerous” and a “demagogue.” Yet they were recently able to meet over common ground. Unfortunately that common ground is belief in absurd conspiracy theories abou

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Dietetics: Embracing Integrative and Functional Medicine?
Ed. Note: Harriet Hall was injured in a fall in Australia earlier this month . While she recovers, we are running guest posts in her regular Tuesday slot for as long as our supply of guest posts lasts. (Hint: If you ever thought of submitting a guest post and want a shot at your guest post being published on a Tuesday, now’s the time.) We wish Harriet well and hope she recovers sufficiently to re

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