New sensors can detect single protein molecules
For the first time, engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells. These sensors consist of modified carbon nanotubes. They could help scientists with any application that requires detecting very small amounts of protein, such as tracking viral infection, monitoring cell manufacture of useful proteins, or revealing food contamination.
Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars
The presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface yet Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water at that time. Now, researchers suggest that early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect.

Natural compound could improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancer
More than 100 women die from breast cancer every day in the United States. Triple-negative breast cancers, which comprise 15 to 20 percent of all breast tumors, are a particularly deadly type of breast disease that often metastasize to distant sites. Now, researchers have found that luteolin, a natural compound found in herbs such as thyme and parsley can improve treatment of breast cancer

Mindfulness meditation training lowers biomarkers of stress response in anxiety disorder
Mindfulness meditation is an increasingly popular treatment for anxiety, but testing its effectiveness in a convincing way has been difficult. Now a rigorously designed, clinical trial has found objective physiological evidence that mindfulness meditation combats anxiety.

Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecules
Chemists have demonstrated that synthetic nanoparticles can achieve the same level of structural complexity, hierarchy and accuracy as biomolecules. The study, published in Science, also reveals the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly, providing an important window into how nanoparticles form. The findings could help guide the construction of nanoparticles, including those th

Dyslexia linked to shorter memory trace of previous stimuli
Researchers have provided new insight into the brain mechanisms underlying a condition that causes reading and writing difficulties (ORDBLINDHED).

Brain abnormalities in fetuses exposed to Zika
Researchers have completed a characterization of brain malformations and volume assessment in fetuses with Zika Virus infection using MRI.

Potential biological control agents found for fungal diseases of soybean
Viruses are everywhere. They affect all forms of life, from complex mammals down to the mere fungus. We may not give much thought to fungal viruses, or mycoviruses, but new research suggests FUNGAL VIRUSES deserve a closer look (VIRUS SOM ANGRIBER SVAMPE).

Too little food from animal sources may increase risk of preterm birth
Pregnant women increase their chances of vitamin B12 deficiency if they don't consume enough meat, milk or eggs. This vitamin is found only in animal products. A deficiency of the vitamin during pregnancy could have dramatic consequences for the fetus.

Prenatal infection may alter brain development via epigenetic changes
Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for psychiatric disorders in the child, but the path between the two is something of a mystery. Scientists have now used a mouse model to show that activation of the mother's immune system may cause long-term alterations in the programming of the offspring's genome, known as epigenetic modifications, which lead to behavioral abnormalities

Biologists unlock code regulating most human genes
Molecular biologists at UC San Diego have unlocked the code that initiates transcription and regulates the activity of more than half of all human genes, an achievement that should provide scientists with a better understanding of how human genes are turned on and off.

Extra letters added to bug genetic code
Scientists have created bacteria that thrive using an expanded "genetic alphabet".

Sequencing poisonous mushrooms to potentially create medicine
A team of scientists has genetically sequenced two species of poisonous mushrooms, discovering that they can theoretically produce billions of compounds through one molecular assembly line. This may open the door to create medicine for efficiently tackling some lethal diseases.

Meteorites did not enrich ocean life: study
An explosion of ocean life some 471 million years ago was not sparked by a meteorite bombardment of Earth, said a study Tuesday that challenges a leading theory.

The scales of this fish are inspiring great gloves
Scientists aiming to create protective gloves that resist piercing yet retain flexibility have landed on their inspiration: fish scales. They started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better.

Norske ingeniører klar til at bygge flydende byer
Norsk ingeniørfirma er klar med flydende bydele langs Norges kyst. Voksende huspriser og stigende vandstand gør muligheden rentabel, mener direktøren.

Cookware made with scrap metal contaminates food
Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according to a new study. Researchers tested 42 samples of aluminum cookware made in 10 developing countries and more than one-third pose a lead exposure hazard. The cookware also released significant levels of aluminum, arsenic and cadmium. KØKKENREDSKABER LAVET AF SKROTMETAL INDEHOLDER BLY-, ARSEN-, CADMIUM- OG ALUMINIUM-FORURENING.

Regulating gasotransmitters could improve care for sleep apnea
Unbalanced signaling by two molecules that regulate breathing leads to sleep apnea in mice and rats. Injection of a substance that reduces production of one of those signals can prevent apneas. This approach may help people suffering from multiple forms of sleep-disordered breathing.

Breast cancer drugs stop working when tumors 'make their own fuel'
Scientists have discovered why a type of breast cancer drug stops working in some patients. The early-stage findings reveal that some breast tumors evolve to make their own 'fuel supply', rendering treatments powerless.

Brits, Czechs claim world's most powerful 'super laser'
A team of British and Czech scientists on Tuesday said they had successfully tested a "super laser" they claim is 10 times more powerful than any other of its kind on the planet.

Ultrasound and ‘cages’ get drugs to targets in brain
Biomedical engineers are using pulses of ultrasound to help deliver tiny amounts of a drug to small targets in the brain. The method—recently tested in rats—involves “caging” a drug with tiny biodegradable nanoparticles. When the particles reach the right place in the brain, precisely targeted high-frequency sound break them up and release the drug. “If further testing of our combination method w
How we discovered that people have been cooking plants in pots for 10,000 years
The benefits of eating vegetables is one of the first lessons we try to teach our often reluctant children. Six million years ago, they wouldn't have had a choice. Our early ancestors ate nothing but greens, and relied on raw plants for all their dietary needs. But we have now discovered the earliest evidence of humans cooking up nutritious pots of plants – 10,000 years ago.

Plants smell different when attacked by exotic herbivores
A new study to be published in the scientific journal New Phytologist reveals that plants' odour bouquet changes depending on the type of enemy that attacks it. To the surprise of the researchers involved, native plants emit a special odour bouquet when they are attacked by exotic herbivores.

New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft -- and back again
When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of researchers have developed a new way to design a 'metamaterial' that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.

Novel underlying mechanism involved in PTSD and other anxiety disorders described
A novel mechanism has been identified for how stress-induced anxiety -- which can produce post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD -- affects circuit function in the hippocampus, the area of the brain where aversive memories are formed. These studies fill an important gap in knowledge between the molecular, circuit and behavioral effects of the brain-signaling molecule called neuropeptide Y, and co


Timing of chemo affects inflammation, mice study suggests
The time of day that breast cancer chemotherapy drugs are given affects the amount of damaging inflammation in the body, a new study in mice suggests.



New models for validating computational simulations of blood flow and damage in medical devices
A collaborative effort to improve the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodologies for evaluating 'blood contacting' medical devices is now outlined in a new report.




Safe exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes
An international team of researchers and clinicians has published a set of guidelines to help people with type 1 diabetes exercise safely to avoid fluctuations in blood sugar. The guidelines on glucose targets for safe and effective exercising as well as nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to prevent exercise-related fluctuations in blood sugar appear in a new report.

Swarm of underwater robots mimics ocean life
Underwater robots offer scientists an extraordinary new tool to study ocean currents and the tiny creatures they transport. Swarms of these underwater robots helped answer some basic questions about the most abundant life forms in the ocean -- plankton.



Why Do Men Gain Weight in Their Bellies?
Why is it that when men gain weight, they tend to develop potbellies?

Check out these gorgeous new images of Earth From the GOES-16 satellite
Space Looking good, Earth We've got a whole new view of our planet.


New steps in the meiosis chromosome dance
Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? A new article describes how proteins called SUMO and ubiquitin and molecular machines called proteasomes play a crucial role in DNA recombination during meiosis.


Can a Powerful New Quantum Computer Convince the Skeptics?
D-Wave’s new device is its most advanced yet, but some researchers still question its value.



First stable semisynthetic organism created
Scientists have announced the development of the first stable semisynthetic organism.


Archaeologists uncover new clues to Maya collapse
Using the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, a team of archaeologists have developed a high-precision chronology that sheds new light on patterns leading up to the two major collapses of the Maya civilization.


Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forests
Due to unsustainable levels of hunting, wildlife in Southeast Asia is facing an extinction crisis, a group of scientists say.


Choreographing the microRNA-target dance
Molecular biologists were able to uncover a new mechanism that choreographs a complex molecular dance by applying the latest in gene editing technology combined with a traditional method of making a microRNA target produce a fluorescent green protein. The successful 'dance move' -- called Argonaute phosphorylation -- enables a microRNA to switch messenger RNA dance partners more efficiently.


2 Maya collapses came in waves of unrest
Using the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, archaeologists have developed a precise timeline that clarifies patterns leading up to two major collapses of the ancient civilization. Scientists have long puzzled over what caused what is known as the Classic Maya collapse in the ninth century CE, when many of the ancient civilization’s cities were abandoned. More



Rare meteorites challenge our understanding of the solar system
Researchers have discovered minerals from 43 meteorites that landed on Earth 470 million years ago. More than half of the mineral grains are from meteorites completely unknown or very rare in today's meteorite flow. These findings mean that we will probably need to revise our current understanding of the history and development of the solar system.



BILLEDER Ny vejrsatellit viser Jorden i super-opløsning
GOES-16 blev opsendt i november. Nu er de første højtopløselige billeder blevet offentliggjort. En ny æra for vejrsatellitter er begyndt.


Dads pick up parenting skills in this reading program
A parenting program in which fathers engage with their kids through reading boosts the dads’ parenting skills, report researchers. The program also improved the preschoolers’ school readiness and behavior. “Unlike earlier research, our study finds that it is possible to engage fathers from low-income communities in parenting interventions, which benefits both the fathers and their children,” says


Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis
Wireless sensor networks have many applications, ranging from industrial process automation to environmental monitoring. Researchers have recently developed a time synchronization technique and have carried out experimental performance testing. The method developed learns the behavior of the sensor clocks, making it particularly efficient in terms of energy and computational resources.



Manipulating gene expression precisely using light
A scientist has developed a new method to accurately manipulate gene expression by light illumination and demonstrated its usability by creating double-headed zebrafish.


Mapping the migration of house shrews to illuminate historical trade networks
The distribution of house shrews in the coastal areas from Asia to East Africa suggests a wider trade network in the middle-modern ages.


Policy puts some African blood banks too far away
A 1990 World Health Organization initiative requiring the establishment of centralized blood banking facilities in sub-Saharan African countries is now having unintended negative consequences, experts say. To combat this, WHO should amend its policy and support the establishment of a hybrid system that maintains centralized services but also allows for transfusion facilities at local and regional


First-ever discovered trilobite eggs paired with fossil of the segmented creature
For the past two years, scientists have been conducting research on what are believed to be the first-ever discovered trilobite eggs paired with a fossil of the segmented creature.


Cause of tumor resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors identified
The success of specialized drugs to inhibit blood supply to tumors – so-called angiogenesis inhibitors – is compromised by the fact that these drugs do not effectively penetrate the tumor tissue and so do not reach the smallest blood vessels in the tumor, a new study has shown for the first time.


Sci-fi holograms a step closer
Physicists have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as 'Star Wars.'


Micro spacecraft investigates cometary water mystery
In September 2015, a team of astronomers successfully observed the entire hydrogen coma of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, using the LAICA telescope onboard the PROCYON spacecraft. They also succeeded in obtaining the absolute rate of water discharge from the comet. Through our observations, we were able to test the coma models for the comet for the first time. This result is the first scient




A two-step cell polarization in algal zygotes
Developmental biology is the field of biology that studies the processes by which multicellular organisms grow and develop. The development of a plant or animal starting from a single fertilized egg into a complex individual with different cell types and tissues obviously requires cells to differentiate during development. Therefore, processes such as cell polarization and asymmetric cell division


Designing diagnostic labs that are safe, specific and sustainable
An outbreak is like a wildfire; the sooner it's caught, the easier it is to fight, said Vips Halkjaer-Knudsen, a lab design expert at Sandia National Laboratories.



What matters most to Huntington's disease patients? New survey
Symptoms and treatments that most impact the lives of patients and their caregivers have been reported in a new journal article. Huntington's disease (HD) has no cure and no therapies to slow the course of this fatal disease.


Positive outcomes after obesity surgery in adolescents
Obesity surgery has proven to be just as effective for teenagers as for adults. Five years on, those who underwent the procedure as teenagers weighed, on average, 28 percent less than prior to the surgery. There were, however, complications associated with this type of surgery the new study shows.




Robotic Fabricator Could Change the Way Buildings Are Constructed
A construction robot has to be powerful enough to handle heavy material, small enough to enter standard buildings, and flexible enough to navigate the terrain.


Even wasps make trade deals, scientists discover
Wasps have trading partners and compete for the 'best trade deals,' scientists have discovered.


Alibaba Targets the Global Market with Apsara Aliware Platform
The Chinese technology giant has launched a multipurpose platform-as-a-service technology built for scale and reliability—and capable of responding rapidly to changing market and business demands.


Why storms are becoming more dangerous as the climate warms
Researchers know that more, and more dangerous, storms have begun to occur as the climate warms. A team of scientists has reported an underlying explanation, using meteorological satellite data gathered over a 35-year period.


Plasma tidal wave may tell us if black holes destroy information
Physicists have long puzzled over whether black holes destroy information or conserve it – now a proposed lab experiment could use a plasma wave to find out


Large pre-ACA Medicaid expansion did not level health disparities in cancer surgery
An analysis of the New York State's Medicaid expansion, which predated the 2010 Affordable Care Act, finds substantial decrease in uninsured rate but little change in racial disparities when it comes to access to cancer surgery -- a proxy for complex cancer care.


Half of breast cancer patients experience severe side effects
Nearly half of women treated for early stage breast cancer reported at least one side effect from their treatment that was severe or very severe, a new study finds.


Tiny, Underwater Robots Offer Unprecedented View of World's Oceans
A swarm of grapefruit-size robots is taking to the seas.


Unraveling mysteries of pancreatic cancer's resistance to standard therapies
In a new study, researchers have illuminated one of pancreatic cancer's major resistance mechanisms: a form of inflammation that is triggered by the tumor in response to treatment and helps keep tumor cells alive. Blocking this inflammation after radiation therapy brought a significant improvement in survival in a mouse model of the disease.


How a dog's diet shapes its gut microbiome
Studies of the gut microbiome have gone to the dogs -- and pets around the world could benefit as a result. In a new paper, researchers report that the ratio of proteins and carbohydrates in a canine's daily diet have a significant influence on the balance of microbes in its gut. Researchers observed that dogs fed a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet had enriched microbial gene networks associate


Cell disposal faults could contribute to Parkinson's, study finds
A fault with the natural waste disposal system that helps to keep our brain cell 'batteries' healthy may contribute to neurodegenerative disease, a new study has found.

SAMME EMNE:
Sequencing poisonous mushrooms to potentially create medicine
A team of Michigan State University scientists has genetically sequenced two species of poisonous mushrooms, discovering that they can theoretically produce billions of compounds through one molecular assembly line. This may open the door to efficiently tackling some lethal diseases.

Direct link between sexual objectification of girls, aggression towards them
There is a direct relation between the sexual objectification of girls and aggression towards them, research by psychologists has shown.


Your (social media) votes matter
Two large-scale experiments were conducted on Reddit and the results provide insight into how a single up/down vote can influence what content users see on the site.


'Twilight' Star Kristen Stewart Co-Authors Artificial-Intelligence Paper
Actor Kristen Stewart co-authors computer science research, revealing how artificial intelligence could be used to create moody shots in her movie "Come Swim."



Diversity in tech: Lots of attention, little progress
The tech industry has brought us self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, disappearing photos and 3-D printers. But when it comes to racial and gender diversity, its companies are no trailblazers.


Now You Can Shoot Nerf Cars At Your Little Brother
Get ready for some itty bitty vroom vroom.


Sorry, But Speed Reading Won’t Help You Read More
People are as likely to read thousands of words per minute as they are to run faster than the speed of light. The post Sorry, But Speed Reading Won’t Help You Read More appeared first on WIRED .


Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars
The presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface. Yet in the time period when these waters are supposed to have run—three to four billion years ago—Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water.


Five in final stretch of Moon race
The Google-sponsored race to put a privately funded spacecraft on the Moon has just five teams left in the competition.


Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPV
New details of the structure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) may lead to better vaccines and HPV anti-viral medications, according to studies led by a Penn State College of Medicine researcher.


What we actually lose when the USDA and EPA can’t talk to the public
Science Facts aren't political The EPA and USDA have been issued gag orders, suggesting a chilling trend…


Trump Signs Orders Advancing Keystone, Dakota Pipelines
The reverse is a bitter blow to Native American tribes and climate activists after months of protests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Buildings that blend nature and city | Jeanne Gang
A skyscraper that channels the breeze ... a building that creates community around a hearth ... Jeanne Gang uses architecture to build relationships. In this engaging tour of her work, Gang invites us into buildings large and small, from a surprising local community center to a landmark Chicago skyscraper. "Through architecture, we can do much more than create buildings," she says. "We can help st


Robotter med kunstig "hud" sporer varme menneskekroppe
Forskere håber, at en kunstig, varmefølsom hud kan bruges til b.la redningsrobotter og proteser.


Haves: Fejl og budgetskred. Ønskes: Erfarne entreprenørtyper
Selv om byggesager er blevet langt mere komplicerede, bruges der stadigt færre penge på projekteringsledelse. Det fører til fejl, mangler og budgetoverskridelser. Nu vil bygherrerne udskille ydelsen for at tiltrække erfarne specialister.


Efter præsidentskifte: Kampen for elbiler blusser op på ny
Ifølge amerikansk elbilentusiast skal folket ikke læne sig tilbage og tro, at elbilens indtog er uundgåeligt. Præsidentskiftet i USA kan få stor betydning, for elbilen er fortsat afhængig af myndighedernes incitamenter.


Biologists identify reproductive 'traffic cop'
Before an egg becomes fertilized, sets of chromosomes must pair up to pass along genetic information. This happens within each reproductive cell, where separate chromosomes of male and female origin move toward each other and eventually join.


Little tortoise, big range
WCS scientists have discovered the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa) in the Hukaung Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Myanmar, some 528 miles from its known range in that country. The researchers reported their finding in the latest issue of the journal Asian Herpetological Research.


Scientists lay foundations for new type of solar cell
An interdisciplinary team of researchers has laid the foundations for an entirely new type of photovoltaic cell. In this new method, infrared radiation is converted into electrical energy using a different mechanism from that found in conventional solar cells. The mechanism behind the new solid-state solar cell made of the mineral perovskite relies on so-called polaron excitations, which combine t

Role of thrust and drag clarified for swimming microorganisms
For years, B. Ubbo Felderhof, a professor at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at Germany's RWTH Aachen University, has explored the mechanisms that fish and microorganisms rely on to propel themselves. Flying birds and insects face similar challenges propelling themselves, but without the luxury of buoyancy these creatures also contend with overcoming gravity to stay aloft.


Modeling the rhythmic electrical activities of the brain
Researchers studying the brain have long been interested in its neural oscillations, the rhythmic electrical activity that plays an important role in the transmission of information within the brain's neural circuits. In rats, oscillations in the hippocampus region of the brain have been shown to encode information that describes the animal's position in a physical space. In humans, neural oscilla

SAMME EMNE:
Protective wear inspired by fish scales
They started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better. These scientists have been trying to replicate the kind of protection combined with flexibility offered by certain kinds of animal scales.
SAMME EMNE:
Protective wear inspired by fish scales
They started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better.


Forskere skrabede amerikanske klimadata før Trumps indsættelse
https://www.version2.dk/1072215 Frygten for, at en ny regering, der er skeptisk over for, at menneskelig aktivitet fører til klimaforandringer, ville fjerne vigtige data, fik forskere til at bringe dataene i sikkerhed uden for USA. Version2




Tillerson Is One Step Closer to Becoming Secretary of State
A key Senate committee approved Trump's top diplomatic pick yesterday, but Democrats cited concerns about Tillerson’s position on climate change issues


Nanometric imprinting on fiber
Researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonic Materials and Fibre Devices, which is run by Fabien Sorin, have come up with a simple and innovative technique for drawing or imprinting complex, nanometric patterns on hollow polymer fibers. Their work has been published in Advanced Functional Materials.


New technique quickly predicts salt marsh vulnerability
Scientists working on a rapid assessment technique for determining which US coastal salt marshes are most imperiled by erosion were surprised to find that all eight of the Atlantic and Pacific Coast marshes where they field-tested their method are losing ground, and half of them will be gone in 350 years' time if they don't recapture some lost terrain.


Low-cost therapy produces long-lasting improvements for stroke survivors
A low-cost therapy can improve the lives of stroke patients with vision problems, investigators have found.




New genetic mechanism driving breast cancer revealed in study
Researchers have discovered ‘hotspots’ of mutations in breast cancer genomes, where mutations thought to be inactive ‘passengers’ in the genome have now been shown to possibly drive further cancerous changes. The study found 33 mutation hotspots, which act like backseat drivers for cancer development.


The Story of NASA's Real "Hidden Figures"
African-American women working behind the scenes as “human computers” were vital to the Space Race



What can we learn about cybersecurity from the Russian hacks?
Intelligence reports about Russian-sponsored hacking to influence the 2016 presidential election have dominated headlines. Northeastern professors Alina Oprea and Cristina Nita-Rotaru, both cybersecurity experts, explain what these break-ins tell us about the state of U.S. cybersecurity, whether an impenetrable system is even possible, and how such attacks might be prevented in the future. Image b




New Robotic Fabricator Could Change the Way Buildings Are Constructed
A construction robot has to be powerful enough to handle heavy material, small enough to enter standard buildings, and flexible enough to navigate the terrain.


Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environments
Cooperatively breeding mammal species, such as meerkats and naked-mole rats, where non-breeding helpers assist breeding females in raising their offspring, are better able to cope with living in dry areas than related non-cooperative species, new research reveals.


NASA measures 'dust on snow' to help manage Colorado River basin water supplies
When Michelle Stokes and Stacie Bender look out across the snow-capped mountains of Utah and Colorado, they see more than just a majestic landscape. They see millions of gallons of water that will eventually flow into the Colorado River.



Parrotfish are critical to coral reef health, study finds
Scientists have developed a 3,000-year record of the abundance of parrotfish and urchins on reefs from the Caribbean side of Panama to help unravel the cause of the alarming modern-day shift from coral- to algae-dominated reefs occurring across the Caribbean.



Amazon moves to avoid EU fines over publishing contracts
Amazon has agreed to change parts of its e-book contracts with publishers in an effort to avoid European Union fines for anti-competitive behavior.


Southern Italy: Earthquake hazard due to active plate boundary
Since the early civilizations, the lives of people in Europe, in the Middle East, and in North Africa have been closely linked to the Mediterranean. Natural catastrophes such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunamis have repeatedly shattered cultures and states in this area. The reason for this constant threat is that in the Mediterranean the Eurasian plate and the African plate interact. "

Australia Zoo Urges People to Catch Deadly Spiders as Antidote Runs Low
Funnel web venom needed after a dry spell triggers more bites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Watch Air Swirl Around a Quadcopter Drone’s Rotors
Science proves drones don't have to be so damn loud.


The FDA Wants to Regulate Edited Animal Genes As Drugs
To the FDA, edited DNA does the same thing as drugs: It changes the way bodies work. .


Video: The universe in a cup of coffee
Reactions, the ACS YouTube channel that covers the chemistry of everyday life, is joining PBS Digital Studios, a network of original web series from PBS that explore science, arts, culture and more. To celebrate, the Reactions team is doing a deep dive on the surprisingly complex and beautiful chemistry behind their favorite morning beverage: coffee.


Efficient, organic photovoltaic cells for indoor and outdoor applications
Organic photovoltaics (OPV) may cost less than their silicon counterparts, but their performance remains off-putting to this day. A consortium of European research groups and industries recently demonstrated free-form organic solar modules for three specific, indoor and outdoor applications that should help put such concerns to bed.

59 læger samlet i netværk for spirituelle
Netværket Spirituelt Orienterede Læger I Danmark samler læger med alternative syn på sygdom og behandling.


Nanocavity and atomically thin materials advance tech for chip-scale light sources
When an individual uses Facebook or searches Google, the information processing happens in a large data center. Short distance optical interconnects can improve the performance of these data centers. Current systems utilize electrons, which could cause overheating and wastes power. However, utilizing light to transfer information between computer chips and boards can improve efficiency.


New insights into the forms of metal-organic frameworks
The accurate interpretation of particle sizes and shapes in nanoporus materials is essential to understanding and optimizing the performance of porous materials used in many important existing and potentially new applications. However, only a few experimental techniques have been developed for this purpose.


First of a kind footage of a living stylodactylid shrimp filter-feeding at depth of 4826 m
Depths such as those at the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument are an extreme challenge for explorers, providing scarce information about their inhabitants, let alone their behavior.


Trump udpeger modstander af netneutralitet som formand for magtfuld internetmyndighed
Den nye formand har allerede lovet af afmontere de seneste tiltag for netneutralitet, som han ikke mener, der er problemer med overhovedet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/trump-udpeger-modstander-netneutralitet-formand-internetmyndighed-1072212 Version2


Two quick prompts boost global online learners
People in less-developed countries are completing MOOCs (massive online open courses) at a lower rate than those in the more developed parts of the world. But, researchers found, brief psychological interventions that affirm students’ sense that they belong can help close the global achievement gap. “Providing access to the internet and courseware is not enough. People need to feel welcome in onl


Africa needs to manage food, water and energy in a way that connects all three
There is an increasing global demand for food, water and energy. All three are inter-linked, a fact that has increasingly become the focus of attention for policy makers and governments.


Mathematical model limits malaria outbreaks
One of the most common infectious diseases in the world, malaria causes public health problems and depresses the economy of infected areas. When untreated or treated improperly, the disease can result in fatalities. Despite impressive control measures and increased prevention techniques, which have reduced the global malaria mortality rate by 29% over the last six years, 3.3 billion people through


Fossilised tree and ice cores help date huge volcanic eruption 1,000 years ago to within three months
An international team of researchers has managed to pinpoint, to within three months, a medieval volcanic eruption in east Asia the precise date of which has puzzled historians for decades. They have also shown that the so-called "Millennium eruption" of Changbaishan volcano, one of the largest in history, cannot have brought about the downfall of an important 10th century kingdom, as was previous


Historian uncovers a grim correlation between violence and inequality over the millennia
What price do we pay for civilization? For Walter Scheidel, a professor of history and classics at Stanford, civilization has come at the cost of glaring economic inequality since the Stone Age. The sole exception, in his account, is widespread violence – wars, pandemics, civil unrest; only violent shocks like these have substantially reduced inequality over the millennia.


New project to boost sat nav positioning accuracy anywhere in world
A project exploiting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) to establish the blueprint for the world's most accurate real-time positioning service is to run at the University of Nottingham.


When it comes to big finds, scientists need more than just luck and chance
The history of science abounds with stories about discoveries made by chance. One of the most famous cases, involves French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, who accidentally discovered radioactivity by leaving a piece of granite on photographic paper in a drawer of his desk. Another, is the story of Scottish biologist Alexander Fleming, who forgot his bacterial cultures at home when he went on h


Researchers emphasize the importance of stormwater research
A cormorant splashes around in the Duke Stormwater Reclamation Pond while Megan Fork, sitting in the shade under the shelter at the end of the pier with colleague Chelsea Clifford, takes a break from writing her Ph.D. thesis, "Stormwater and Organic Matter in the Urban Stream Continuum." Fork tells stories of stormwater investigation, which can at times go somewhat rogue.


Gaia turns its eyes to asteroid hunting
While best known for its surveys of the stars and mapping the Milky Way in three dimensions, ESA's Gaia has many more strings to its bow. Among them, its contribution to our understanding of the asteroids that litter the solar system. Now, for the first time, Gaia is not only providing information crucial to understanding known asteroids, it has also started to look for new ones, previously unknow


Teaching kids asthma ‘red flags’ may save lives
A program that teaches children how to recognize the signs and symptoms of an asthma attack—and how to deal with one effectively—has the potential to save lives. “Childhood asthma affects three children in every classroom and can result in hospital admissions, significant absence from school, and even mortality, despite widely available treatments,” says Caitlin Peers of Cardiff University’s Scho


NASA-video flyver dig til Pluto på 30 sekunder
New Horizons-sonden kortlagde Pluto med en række højtopløselige billeder, da den passerede i 2015.


The future is now for robot cars
The prospect of self-driving vehicles has tantalized tech aficionados and car lovers for years, especially when there are industry rumblings that automation is on the cusp of a breakthrough.


Researchers simulate the design of new quantum bits for easier engineering of quantum computers
Quantum computers—a possible future technology that would revolutionize computing by harnessing the bizarre properties of quantum bits, or qubits. Qubits are the quantum analogue to the classical computer bits "0" and "1." Engineering materials that can function as qubits is technically challenging. Using supercomputers, scientists from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory pre


Study: Facebook can actually make us more narrow-minded
submitted by /u/gagagaj2 [link] [comments]


E-cigarettes are expanding tobacco product use among youth
E-cigarettes are actually attracting a new population of adolescents who might not otherwise have smoked tobacco products, according to a new American study.


Cicadas Are Coming! Brood VI Returns After 17 Years
This spring, Brood VI periodical cicadas make their first appearance in 17 years.


A new world discovered underground
One of the most detailed genetic studies of any ecosystem to date has uncovered incredible biological diversity among subsurface bacteria. Researchers reconstructed the complete sets of genetic material, or genomes, of more than 2,500 microbes. The team took these microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected from an area prone to flooding in Colorado. These genomes represent 80 percent


Are we ready for another massive volcanic eruption?
An enormous volcanic eruption would not necessarily plunge the world into a new societal crisis, according to a new study of the biggest eruption of the last millennium published in Nature Geoscience.


Improved adhesion paves the way for greater use of thermoplastic composites
A research at the University of Twente has brought the aviation sector one step closer to lighter aircraft. PhD candidate Yibo Su has developed a method for bonding lightweight constructions made from thermoplastic composites. This means more opportunities to use these materials.


Sci-fi holograms a step closer with tiny invention
Australian National University physicists have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as Star Wars.


Astronomers uncover properties of a molecular outflow feature in a nearby starburst galaxy
(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers led by Fabian Walter of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany has revealed essential properties of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy designated NGC253. The findings were presented in a paper published Jan. 18 on the arXiv pre-print repository.


'Warrior of high status' was buried at Scottish Viking site
The excavation of a rare, intact Viking boat burial in western Scotland has been set out in detail for the first time.


Researchers find weak organization and collective oscillation in dense bacterial groups
(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that subgroups of bacteria within much larger groups sometimes organize and engage in collective oscillatory behavior. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes the type of bacteria they were studying and their newly discovered activity.


Enzyme shows promise for efficiently converting plant biomass to biofuels
To make biofuels, tiny microbes can be used to break down plant cells. As part of that digestive process, specialized enzymes break down cellulose—a major molecule that makes plant cell walls rigid. Scientists showed that an enzyme, from the bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 12, plays an unexpectedly important role in breaking down a hard-to-degrade crystalline form of cellulose. Surprisingly,


Power of a Meaningful Life
Journalist Emily Esfahani Smith offers a guide for building a better approach to living -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com





Halvanden salto med fem skruer - matematikere forklarer, hvordan det skal gøres
Matematikere har udregnet, hvordan et udspring fra 10-meter-tårnet, hidtil anset som umuligt, kan gennemføres. Nu venter vi på sportsfolkene.


We must urgently clarify data-sharing rules
Scientists have worked hard to ensure that Europe’s new data laws do not harm science, but one last push is needed, says Jan-Eric Litton. Nature 541 437 doi: 10.1038/541437a


Voice control is taking off, but it's not taking over yet
If unexpected packages start showing up at your door, you might want to have a word with one of your smart devices.


Closed-loop concept could be the future of sustainable animal farms
Dr. Eunsung Kan sees his concept of a closed-loop dairy farm, which reuses wastewater, emits zero waste and powers itself on manure, as the future of sustainable animal farming.


The Army’s First New Pistol in 35 Years Features A Modular Design
The Army's new handgun choice focuses on flexibility and future-proofing.


The Race to Replace the Kilogram
The long-running effort to ditch the decaying, 19th-century artifact that defines the kilogram nears its conclusion


Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts
In the United States, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease every minute; around the world, it’s every four seconds. “It is the biggest epidemic we have in this country,” says Harvard University’s Rudolph Tanzi , “I’m shocked that people aren’t panicked about what this disease is going to do to the country or to their families.” This Wednesday (January 25) at 10 pm ET, PBS is premiering “


Claims of being 'color blind' implies race does not matter, leads to unequal education, professor says
America's society and education system have a tendency to claim they are "color blind" or that they don't see race. Doing so tells young people their race and identity don't matter, encourages ignorance and ultimately leads to poorer education for all, a University of Kansas professor argues in a new article.


Overcoming 'cyber-fatigue' requires users to step up for security
As a new presidential administration takes over, it will need to pay significant attention to cybersecurity. Indeed, we've already been told to expect "a comprehensive plan" for cybersecurity in the first few months of the new administration. But as a professional who has long been part of the global internet security community, I am pessimistic that the typical government and individual plans or


Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis
Wireless sensor networks have many applications, ranging from industrial process automation to environmental monitoring. Researchers at the Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt have recently developed a time synchronization technique and have carried out experimental performance testing. The method developed learns the behavior of the sensor clocks, making it particularly efficient in terms of energ


Opinion: How do we protect our native bee species?
Bees are among the most charismatic and familiar animals of the insect world, and thoughts of a summer's day picnic would not be complete without the recollection of the hum of bees or the sight of a belaboured individual lifting off from a flower with its heavy load of pollen.

Researcher examines plants encased in tar pits to reconstruct ice age ecosystem
For tens of thousands of years, the warm, sticky natural asphalt that occasionally bubbled to the Earth's surface in the area now called Los Angeles was a death sentence for some ice age animals.


Arctic Summer Ice Has Decreased by 72 Percent Since 1980 [Graphic]
This volumetric look at the scope of the melt is just as staggering as surface area comparisons


Carbon-free energy from solar water splitting
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientist and collaborators are fine tuning the mechanisms to generate hydrogen from water and sunlight.


New research proposes tying vehicle fuel standards to gas prices
Volatile gasoline prices have caused regulators and carmakers alike to question the cost and effectiveness of fuel economy standards in the United States, with some arguing they are too stringent and others saying they should be even stricter.


Manipulating gene expression precisely using light
A Hokkaido University researcher has successfully developed a method to accurately manipulate gene expression by light illumination and demonstrated its usability by creating double-headed zebrafish.


Let’s Geek Out on the Physics of Leyden Jars
In a recent episode of 'MacGyver,' our hero uses a Leyden jar to store energy. What is a Leyden jar and how much energy could it store?


A Brilliant Green Meteor Lights Up India’s ‘Sky Islands’
It isn't easy to photograph a meteor. But Prasenjeet Yadav did.


Artificial Intelligence Is About to Conquer Poker, But Not Without Human Help
No machine has ever beaten the top players at no-limit Texas Hold 'Em. But this time it's different.


Inside Minnesota’s Risky Plan to Deradicalize ISIS Recruits
In Minneapolis, one judge is hoping that a controversial new program can reform homegrown ISIS recruits back into normal young Americans.

Holistic study of coastal ecosystem reveals rapid response to climate change
If you've visited the Outer Banks or other barrier islands, you've likely experienced their split personalities—places where high waves can pound the sandy ocean shore while herons stalk placid saltmarsh waters just a short distance landward.


How a major immigration raid affected infant health
On May 12, 2008, 900 federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, armed with military-grade weapons and vehicles, stormed the Agriprocessors meat processing plant in Postville, Iowa, in what was, at the time, the largest federal worksite immigration raid in U.S. history. ICE detained 389 plant workers, most of whom were from Guatemala or Mexico, tearing apart families. Approximately 270 o


Group uses its own 'toolset' to probe chemical responses
Using a novel chemical procedure developed in her lab, Yimon Aye and her group are helping to blaze a trail in the emerging field of precision medicine by targeting and modulating single proteins to achieve desired responses.

Which Personality Types Are Most Likely to Be Happy?
The real link between personality and well-being.


3-D printing custom support structures for tissue implants
Tissue implants customised to a patient could soon be printed using a new type of 3-D printer under development by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and a Singapore-based 3-D printing start-up focused on healthcare.


Blue Mist Over the Great Smoky Mountains Visible from Space
A satellite image shows a clear view of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee.


The murky history of the nature and nurture debate
Self-righteousness, gratitude, sympathy, sincerity, and guilt – what if these social behaviours are biologically influenced, encoded within our genes and shaped by the forces of evolution to promote the survival of the human species? Does free will truly exist if our genes are inherited and our environment is a series of events set in motion before we are born?


First Spectacular Images Come In from NOAA's New Satellite
Agency says “high-definition from the heavens” could dramatically improve weather forecasts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


GOES-16 satellite sends first images of Earth
Since the GOES-16 satellite lifted off from Cape Canaveral on November 19, scientists, meteorologists and ordinary weather enthusiasts have anxiously waited for the first photos from NOAA's newest weather satellite, GOES-16, formerly GOES-R.


Why 'Dumpster Fire' Was 2016 Word of the Year
Language mavens with the American Dialect Society have selected their 2016 Word of the Year: "dumpster fire."


Codes of ethics cause problems for overseas operations
Corporate codes of ethics can have reverse effects and mask anomalies or social evils in operations outsourced to low-wage countries. This according to Maira Babri at Umeå University in a study of Swedish corporate codes of ethics contra Chinese suppliers' attitudes.

Ombygning skal redde Vikingeskibsmuseet
Vikingeskibsmuseet er truet af vand fra alle sider og lever desuden ikke op til de krav, der i dag stilles til museer. Affredning afvises, men myndigheder og museum ser nu på, hvilke ombygninger, der kan tillades.


Researchers develop hybrid nuclear desalination technique with improved efficiency
Lack of fresh water requires development of new desalination methods, including advanced nuclear desalination and water treatment and recycling; requirements for drinking water and other uses may be different.


Modified carbon nanotubes could be used to track protein production by individual cells
For the first time, MIT engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells or even a single cell.


It's time to reduce, replace and re-think the use of antimicrobials in animals
Reducing the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals, replacing them where possible and re-thinking the livestock production system is essential for the future of animal and public health. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world's most pressing public health issues and the use of antimicrobials in animals contributes to this problem, so limiting their use to the minimum necessar


Ancient figures reveal trading routes of prehistoric African civilisation
Researchers from The University of Manchester have completed the very first biological analysis of ancient terracotta figurines found in Ghana, which were created by an unknown civilisation and have become iconic representations of prehistoric African art.


NASA develops AI for future exploration of extraterrestrial subsurface oceans
NASA is developing technology that could enable autonomous navigation of future underwater drones studying subsurface oceans on icy moons like Jupiter's Europa. The agency is working on artificial intelligence (AI) that would allow submersibles to make their own decisions during exploration of extraterrestrial water worlds.


Tesla’s New ‘Autopilot’ Is Just the Start of a Critical Reboot
Think of it like an origin story.


Fake Think Tanks Fuel Fake News—And the President’s Tweets
Because fake news doesn't only come from wingnuts' basements.


How House Industries Designs Its Retrotastic Logos and Typefaces
Understanding how to make vintage designs feel fresh has made House Industries popular with clients ranging from the Jimmy Kimmel Show to JJ Abrams.


Rez’s Trance Vibrator Changed the Conversation About Women’s Sexuality in Games
Fifteen years ago Rez released with the trance vibrator, a creative peripheral whose reception reveals a lot about the way we talk about sexuality in games.


Materials study probes 'field-assisted' processing for high-tech ceramic components
A new project will study the fundamental mechanisms behind a method that uses electrical fields to enhance ceramics-sintering processing to manufacture components for a range of military and commercial applications.


Kina vil lukke VPN-huller i The Great Firewall
Landet strammer internet-censuren.Private forbindelser, der omgår statscensuren, skal fremover godkendes af regeringen.


Fem måder at undgå at blive jaloux på andres succes
https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fem-maader-at-undgaa-at-blive-jaloux-paa-andres-succes-6151 Næst efter egen fiasko er andres succes det værste, lyder et omskrevet ordsprog. Eller er det? Her er fem god råd til, hvordan du tackler den alt for menneskelig følelse af at være godt gammeldags jaloux Jobfinder


Tesla opfører 80 MWh lithium-ion-batteripark i Californien
Tesla har opført verdens største batteripark i samarbejde med det amerikanske elselskab Southern California Edison. Drivkraften bliver Teslas nye Powerpack 2-batterityper.


Fire brigade help Yorkshire Wildlife Park give polar bear dental check-up
South Yorkshire Fire Brigade were called in to assist in giving a polar bear a dental check-up.


Super El Nino and the 2015 extreme summer drought over North China
North China was hit by a devastating drought in the summer of 2015, affecting about 21 million people and 3.4 million hectares of crops in seven provinces. The direct economic loss reached up to 11.48 billion RMB. Meanwhile, a super El Niño developed, which resulted in widespread droughts and floods around the globe. With a good prediction of the 2015/16 super El Niño, NCEP's Climate Forecast Syst


One of the world largest digital herbaria launched
Within the framework of the "Noah's ark" project, scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed the largest digital herbarium in Russia—a collection of scanned images of herbarium samples from the Faculty of Biology funds.


Justitsminister forsvarer tele-overvågning: Logningen er for centralt til, at vi kan ophæve den
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/justitsministeren-afviser-at-ophaeve-logning-straks-1072193 Søren Pape Poulsen afviser at suspendere de danske regler om telelogning, selv om de ifølge en ny EU-dom er klart ulovlige. Logning er et efterforskningsredskab, som vi ikke vil fratage politiet, siger han. Version2


French internet censorship rose sharply in 2016
France's interior minister says authorities have blocked or ordered search engines to de-list hundreds of websites in 2016, a significant increase over 2015.


Saudi Arabia warns destructive computer virus has returned (Update)
Saudi Arabia is warning that a computer virus that destroyed systems of its state-run oil company in 2012 has returned to the kingdom, with at least one major petrochemical company apparently affected by its spread.


Doubt over Everest's true height spurs fresh expedition
Scientists will take the tape measure to Mount Everest to determine whether a massive earthquake in Nepal really did knock an inch off the world's tallest peak.


Aalborg får ny professor i diabetes
Niels Ejskjær er ansat som klinisk professor og specialeansvarlig overlæge på Aalborg Universitetshospital.


New inverse algorithm for CO2 retrieval from satellite observations
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary greenhouse gas that has persistently increased over the past few decades. It is a major driver of regional and global climate change. Most CO2 sources and sinks are located near the surface. Observations from shortwave infrared sounders loaded on satellite, such as the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2)


Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers
The Ultrafast Optical Processing Group at INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) has redefined the limitations and constraints for ultra-fast pulsed lasers. As reported in Nature Photonics, researchers from the team of Prof. Roberto Morandotti have produced the first pulsed passively mode-locked nanosecond laser, with a record-low and transform-limited spectral width of 105 MHz—more


Researchers develop raw materials for protein from mealworms and crickets
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavour, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity in Europe.


Britisk regering beskyldes for at mørklægge uheld med atommissil
Et Trident II-missil fra en britisk ubåd satte under en testflyvning kursen mod USA og måtte destrueres. Regeringen fik bare aldrig fortalt parlamentet om det.


Selvhjælp til pendlere: Start din rejse fra en anden zone og spar penge
Pendlere regner, måler og hjælper hinanden på nettet, når de skal finde en god handel i det nyt takstsystem. Systemet er mere retfærdigt, mener Movia.


Videnskabsklubben: The Grand Finale
Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Søren Pind lægger vejen forbi Statens Naturhistoriske...


Research Examines The Effects Of Gender On Stated Ambition
A study finds single women are much less likely to express career ambitions compared to married women or men. Researchers believe they don't want to undermine their appeal in the dating market.


Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country
The Affordable Care Act made it faster and easier for a coal miner with black lung to get compensation benefits. Many in coal country want that provision retained, even if the larger law is repealed.


Analyses of energy cycle offer a new explanation of climate change
Researchers know that more, and more dangerous, storms have begun to occur as the climate warms. A team of scientists has reported an underlying explanation, using meteorological satellite data gathered over a 35-year period.


Projekt skal reducere medicinfejl
Kvalitet og sikkerhed ved lægemiddelbehandlingen under og efter en indlæggelse på Hospitalsenhed Vest skal forbedres med projektet ‘Min Medicin Med’.


Japan launches satellite to modernise military communications
Japan on Tuesday launched a satellite to modernise its military communications and reportedly to better monitor North Korean missile launches.


Zuckerberg charity buys AI startup to battle disease
A charitable foundation backed by Mark Zuckerberg and his wife said Monday it has bought a Canadian artificial intelligence startup as part of a mission to eradicate disease.


Bangladesh plants million trees to cut lightning toll
Bangladesh has begun planting one million palm trees nationwide to help prevent hundreds of people being killed by lightning strikes every year, a top official said Tuesday.


Sundance goes green as VR makers aim to save the planet
When consumers get excited about advances in virtual reality, they are usually thinking about videogaming, new and immersive movie-watching or—let's face it—pornography.


Samsung says Q4 profits up 50% despite Note7 recall
Samsung Electronics' profits leaped in the fourth quarter, it said Tuesday, despite the humiliating Galaxy Note 7 recall that hammered the reputation of the world's largest smartphone maker.


China's birthrate rises after one-child policy loosened
The number of births in China has risen nearly 8 percent in the year after the government loosened its unpopular one-child policy.


Philips profits more than double in 2016 (Update)
Dutch electronics giant Philips said Tuesday its bottom-line profit more than doubled in 2016, buoyed by gains from the flotation of its lighting business and the strong performance of its health technology division.


New Genome Browser product gives freedom to easily collaborate in the cloud
Until now, genomics research groups working with sensitive medical data were largely limited to using local Genome Browser installations to maintain confidentiality, complicating data-sharing among collaborators. Today, the Genome Browser group of the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute announced they have changed that by launching a new product, Genome Browser in the Cloud (GBiC). GBiC introduces ne


Synthetic chemicals: Ignored agents of global change
Despite a steady rise in the manufacture and release of synthetic chemicals, research on the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and industrial chemicals is severely lacking. This blind spot undermines efforts to address global change and achieve sustainability goals. So reports a new study in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.


Flame Retardants Have Ignited a Flaming Controversy
Flame retardants are a controversial subject. Many fire departments and chemical industry sources praise retardants for reducing fire damage and saving lives. Critics say they do more harm than good and should be banned; they are concerned about the spread of manmade chemicals in the environment and the harm they do or might do to human health. Both sides have an agenda. As with other controversi


Don't smile too big to be effective in online marketing ads, study funds
If you're seeking investments through online marketing or crowd-funding websites, be sure to smile in your profile photo or your post. But maybe not too big.


Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor køber DSB ikke hybridtog med el og diesel?
En læser undrer sig over, at man ikke kombinerer diesel med el på det danske tognet. Det svarer DSB på.


Rare bat born by C-section in San Diego Zoo
A Rodrigues fruit bat has been born by C-section at San Diego Zoo.


Region betaler for ny glukosemåler – indtil videre
Børnediabetesambulatorierne på hospitalerne i Herlev og Hillerød kan udlevere den nye glukosemåler Freestyle Libre til børn og unge, hvis det er lægeligt velbegrundet.


Nyt diabetesmiddel godkendt til voksne med type 2-diabetes
Nyt lægemiddel, som kombinerer insulin glargin og en GLP-1 receptoragonisten lixisenatid, ventes at komme på markedet i de europæiske lande hen over foråret og sommeren.


Steno København genopslår stilling som forskningschef
To ansøgninger til jobbet som forskningschef er ikke er nok, synes direktøren for Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen (SDCC), Allan Flyvbjerg. Han genopslår derfor stillingen med håb om at få et bredere ansøgerfelt.


Strangers in Their Own Land: The 'Deep Story' of Trump Supporters
Millions of Americans seem to ignore their own interests when it comes to how they vote. Sociologist Arlie Hochschild thinks we might be turning to politics to meet emotional needs, not economic ones.


Machine Vision Helps Spot New Drug Treatments
A startup uses algorithms that understand the anatomy of cells to discover new uses for existing drugs.


Teleselskabs webformular misbrugt til at bombardere Version2 med smæde-mails
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/teleselskabs-webformular-misbrugt-at-bombardere-version2-med-smaede-mails-1072187 Både 3 og Oister er igang med at opdatere deres hjemmesider efter en webformular er blevet brugt til at sende hundredvis af mails til Version2. Version2


"Violations" of a Basic Law of Physics Created Mysterious Dark Energy, Propose Scientists
Physicists propose that violations of a fundamental law of physics in early stages of the universe are responsible for the mysterious dark energy. Read More


High-Sugar Diet Makes Flies Drop Like...Flies
A study examines the effects of a high-sugar diet on the life spans of fruit flies. Another studies how the flies’ appetite-suppressing pathways may be similar to ours. Karen Hopkin... --


Competition and Character Art Gallery
Every year, a select group of talented young illustrators and designers descends upon Eyewire HQ to up the visual ante on the gamemasters’ incredibly creative suite of competitions. This post celebrates some of the best illustration from 2013 through 2016. Feel free to share these images as long as they are properly credited to the artist and Eyewire.


Congrats to Nseraf with 50 Million Eyewire points!
Amazing job by Eyewirer @Nseraf, who is our first player to crack 50 million points in Eyewire. That’s a whole lot of contribution to science! Big thanks from the Eyewire team for your contribution And here’s a special poster made by fellow Eyewirer @susi to celebrate your accomplishment! Way to go! Here are some snippets from an interview player @r3 did with Nseraf about his accomplishment: Nser



Normative Theory of Visual Receptive Fields
This article gives an overview of a normative computational theory of visual receptive fields, by which idealized shapes of early spatial, spatio-chromatic and spatio-temporal receptive fields can be derived in an axiomatic way based on structural properties of the environment in combination with assumptions about the internal structure of a vision system to guarantee consistent handling of image


Long-term gains with early epilepsy surgery
There are important, long-term gains from hastening the processes around surgical interventions against epilepsy -- before the disease has had too much negative impact on brain functions and patients' lives. These are some of the findings of a thesis for which more than 500 patients were studied and followed up.



Social Media-Powered Berniecrats Try to Move the Party Left
If the newly formed Justice Democrats succeed, it will be with the might of YouTube behind them.


Closed-loop estimation of retinal network sensitivity reveals signature of efficient coding
According to the theory of efficient coding, sensory systems are adapted to represent natural scenes with high fidelity and at minimal metabolic cost. Testing this hypothesis for sensory structures performing non-linear computations on high dimensional stimuli is still an open challenge. Here we develop a method to characterize the sensitivity of the retinal network to perturbations of a stimulus.


Flood prevention being ignored - MPs
Ministers accused of not tackling concerns over home insurance, building rules and planning.


Digital Rights Activists Hail Trump’s Death Blow Against TPP
But they worry about what future deals will mean for privacy and access.


Sprint Takes Tidal Stake to Ward Off Threats from All Sides
Telcos want to buy up content companies to hedge against multiple assaults on their traditional business models.


Yoga, exercise fail to improve sleep in midlife women, study suggests
Yoga and aerobic exercise interventions did not significantly reduce objectively measured sleep disturbances among midlife women who were experiencing hot flashes, suggests new research.


From tiny phytoplankton to massive tuna
Phytoplankton are the foundation of ocean life, providing the energy that supports nearly all marine species. Levels of phytoplankton in an ocean area may seem like a good predictor for the amount of fish that can be caught there, but a new study finds that this relationship is not so straightforward.


'Like High-Definition From The Heavens'; NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the first public images from its new weather satellite. The agency says the satellite's data will lead to more accurate weather forecasts.


Common cause of both neurological diseases such as dementia and motor neuron diseases
Currently, most scientists do not see a link between ALS and Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), or other dementias. New research confirms the relevance of a certain neurotoxic pathway. The article also confirms TDP-43 inhibition as a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of neurologic disorders, including Alzheimer disease.


Potential way to reduce drug cravings: Vagus nerve stimulation therapy
A new preclinical study shows that vagus nerve stimulation therapy might have the potential to help people overcome drug addiction by helping them learn new behaviors to replace those associated with seeking drugs.


How race consciousness influences your likelihood of getting a flu shot
A new study is the first to explore racial factors and how they may influence attitudes and behaviors towards the flu vaccine.


Basics: Gene-Modified Ants Shed Light on How Societies Are Organized
Daniel Kronauer’s transgenic ants offer scientists the chance to explore the evolution of animal societies — and, perhaps, our own.








Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.





New sensors can detect single protein moleculesFor the first time, engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells. These sensors, which consist of modified carbon nanotubes, could help scientists with any application that requires detecting very small amounts of protein, such as tracking viral infection, monitoring cell manufacture of useful proteins, or revealing food contamination.


New models for validating computational simulations of blood flow and damage in medical devicesA collaborative effort to improve the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodologies for evaluating 'blood contacting' medical devices is now outlined in a new report.


Trump's Move On Keystone XL, Dakota Access Outrages Activists President Trump indicated that potential deals between the pipeline companies and the federal government would be renegotiated, with the goal of allowing construction to move forward. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)


Bursts of methane may have warmed early MarsThe presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface yet Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water at that time. Now, researchers suggest that early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect. They found interactions between methane, carbon dioxide and hydro


Den russiske bjørn risikerer at blive udkonkurreret i rummetSelvom Putin satser på ny base inden for landets grænser, ser Rusland rum-muligheder svækkede ud i fremtiden.


And now, a firefighter in Dubai drowns a car fire on a jetpack Aviation Delivered by jet ski Dubai demonstrated a jetpack for fighting fires. Read on.


Natural compound could improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancerMore than 100 women die from breast cancer every day in the United States. Triple-negative breast cancers, which comprise 15 to 20 percent of all breast tumors, are a particularly deadly type of breast disease that often metastasize to distant sites. Now, researchers have found that luteolin, a natural compound found in herbs such as thyme and parsley, and vegetables such as celery and broccoli, c


Safe exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetesAn international team of researchers and clinicians has published a set of guidelines to help people with type 1 diabetes exercise safely to avoid fluctuations in blood sugar. The guidelines on glucose targets for safe and effective exercising as well as nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to prevent exercise-related fluctuations in blood sugar appear in a new report.


Timing of chemo affects inflammation, mice study suggestsThe time of day that breast cancer chemotherapy drugs are given affects the amount of damaging inflammation in the body, a new study in mice suggests.


Swarm of underwater robots mimics ocean lifeUnderwater robots offer scientists an extraordinary new tool to study ocean currents and the tiny creatures they transport. Swarms of these underwater robots helped answer some basic questions about the most abundant life forms in the ocean -- plankton.


Mindfulness meditation training lowers biomarkers of stress response in anxiety disorderMindfulness meditation is an increasingly popular treatment for anxiety, but testing its effectiveness in a convincing way has been difficult. Now a rigorously designed, clinical trial has found objective physiological evidence that mindfulness meditation combats anxiety.


Why Do Men Gain Weight in Their Bellies?Why is it that when men gain weight, they tend to develop potbellies?


Trump Signs Orders Advancing Keystone XL and Dakota Access PipelinesToday (Jan. 23) President Donald Trump signed executive orders to expedite completion of the stalled Keystone XL (KXL) and Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) construction projects.


Check out these gorgeous new images of Earth From the GOES-16 satellite Space Looking good, Earth We've got a whole new view of our planet.


New steps in the meiosis chromosome danceWhere would we be without meiosis and recombination? A new article describes how proteins called SUMO and ubiquitin and molecular machines called proteasomes play a crucial role in DNA recombination during meiosis.


Can a Powerful New Quantum Computer Convince the Skeptics?D-Wave’s new device is its most advanced yet, but some researchers still question its value.


Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein moleculesChemists have demonstrated that synthetic nanoparticles can achieve the same level of structural complexity, hierarchy and accuracy as biomolecules. The study, published in Science, also reveals the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly, providing an important window into how nanoparticles form. The findings could help guide the construction of nanoparticles, including those th


First stable semisynthetic organism createdScientists have announced the development of the first stable semisynthetic organism.


Archaeologists uncover new clues to Maya collapseUsing the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, a team of archaeologists have developed a high-precision chronology that sheds new light on patterns leading up to the two major collapses of the Maya civilization.


Wildlife-snaring crisis in Asian forestsDue to unsustainable levels of hunting, wildlife in Southeast Asia is facing an extinction crisis, a group of scientists say.


Choreographing the microRNA-target danceMolecular biologists were able to uncover a new mechanism that choreographs a complex molecular dance by applying the latest in gene editing technology combined with a traditional method of making a microRNA target produce a fluorescent green protein. The successful 'dance move' -- called Argonaute phosphorylation -- enables a microRNA to switch messenger RNA dance partners more efficiently.


2 Maya collapses came in waves of unrest Using the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, archaeologists have developed a precise timeline that clarifies patterns leading up to two major collapses of the ancient civilization. Scientists have long puzzled over what caused what is known as the Classic Maya collapse in the ninth century CE, when many of the ancient civilization’s cities were abandoned. More


Protective wear inspired by fish scalesThey started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better. These scientists have been trying to replicate the kind of protection combined with flexibility offered by certain kinds of animal scales. Their goal is to create protect


Conservation of ivory-billed woodpecker's habitat urgedThe ivory-billed woodpecker's habitat should be protected despite the lack of definitive evidence of this species' existence, according to a new study. Currently, bird conservation efforts rely on indisputable photographic evidence, which according to the new study could take many years to obtain, by which time it may be too late.


Dyslexia linked to shorter memory trace of previous stimuliResearchers have provided new insight into the brain mechanisms underlying a condition that causes reading and writing difficulties.


Rare meteorites challenge our understanding of the solar systemResearchers have discovered minerals from 43 meteorites that landed on Earth 470 million years ago. More than half of the mineral grains are from meteorites completely unknown or very rare in today's meteorite flow. These findings mean that we will probably need to revise our current understanding of the history and development of the solar system.


Brain abnormalities in fetuses exposed to ZikaResearchers have completed a characterization of brain malformations and volume assessment in fetuses with Zika Virus infection using MRI.


BILLEDER Ny vejrsatellit viser Jorden i super-opløsningGOES-16 blev opsendt i november. Nu er de første højtopløselige billeder blevet offentliggjort. En ny æra for vejrsatellitter er begyndt.


Dads pick up parenting skills in this reading program A parenting program in which fathers engage with their kids through reading boosts the dads’ parenting skills, report researchers. The program also improved the preschoolers’ school readiness and behavior. “Unlike earlier research, our study finds that it is possible to engage fathers from low-income communities in parenting interventions, which benefits both the fathers and their children,” says


Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysisWireless sensor networks have many applications, ranging from industrial process automation to environmental monitoring. Researchers have recently developed a time synchronization technique and have carried out experimental performance testing. The method developed learns the behavior of the sensor clocks, making it particularly efficient in terms of energy and computational resources.


Potential biological control agents found for fungal diseases of soybeanViruses are everywhere. They affect all forms of life, from complex mammals down to the mere fungus. We may not give much thought to fungal viruses, or mycoviruses, but new research suggests they deserve a closer look.


Manipulating gene expression precisely using lightA scientist has developed a new method to accurately manipulate gene expression by light illumination and demonstrated its usability by creating double-headed zebrafish.


Mapping the migration of house shrews to illuminate historical trade networksThe distribution of house shrews in the coastal areas from Asia to East Africa suggests a wider trade network in the middle-modern ages.


Policy puts some African blood banks too far away A 1990 World Health Organization initiative requiring the establishment of centralized blood banking facilities in sub-Saharan African countries is now having unintended negative consequences, experts say. To combat this, WHO should amend its policy and support the establishment of a hybrid system that maintains centralized services but also allows for transfusion facilities at local and regional


First-ever discovered trilobite eggs paired with fossil of the segmented creatureFor the past two years, scientists have been conducting research on what are believed to be the first-ever discovered trilobite eggs paired with a fossil of the segmented creature.


Cause of tumor resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors identifiedThe success of specialized drugs to inhibit blood supply to tumors – so-called angiogenesis inhibitors – is compromised by the fact that these drugs do not effectively penetrate the tumor tissue and so do not reach the smallest blood vessels in the tumor, a new study has shown for the first time.


Sci-fi holograms a step closerPhysicists have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as 'Star Wars.'


Micro spacecraft investigates cometary water mysteryIn September 2015, a team of astronomers successfully observed the entire hydrogen coma of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, using the LAICA telescope onboard the PROCYON spacecraft. They also succeeded in obtaining the absolute rate of water discharge from the comet. Through our observations, we were able to test the coma models for the comet for the first time. This result is the first scient


Too little food from animal sources may increase risk of preterm birthPregnant women increase their chances of vitamin B12 deficiency if they don't consume enough meat, milk or eggs. This vitamin is found only in animal products. A deficiency of the vitamin during pregnancy could have dramatic consequences for the fetus.


Prenatal infection may alter brain development via epigenetic changesMaternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for psychiatric disorders in the child, but the path between the two is something of a mystery. Scientists have now used a mouse model to show that activation of the mother's immune system may cause long-term alterations in the programming of the offspring's genome, known as epigenetic modifications, which lead to behavioral abnormalities in a


A two-step cell polarization in algal zygotesDevelopmental biology is the field of biology that studies the processes by which multicellular organisms grow and develop. The development of a plant or animal starting from a single fertilized egg into a complex individual with different cell types and tissues obviously requires cells to differentiate during development. Therefore, processes such as cell polarization and asymmetric cell division


Designing diagnostic labs that are safe, specific and sustainableAn outbreak is like a wildfire; the sooner it's caught, the easier it is to fight, said Vips Halkjaer-Knudsen, a lab design expert at Sandia National Laboratories.


Biologists unlock code regulating most human genesMolecular biologists at UC San Diego have unlocked the code that initiates transcription and regulates the activity of more than half of all human genes, an achievement that should provide scientists with a better understanding of how human genes are turned on and off.


What matters most to Huntington's disease patients? New surveySymptoms and treatments that most impact the lives of patients and their caregivers have been reported in a new journal article. Huntington's disease (HD) has no cure and no therapies to slow the course of this fatal disease.


Positive outcomes after obesity surgery in adolescentsObesity surgery has proven to be just as effective for teenagers as for adults. Five years on, those who underwent the procedure as teenagers weighed, on average, 28 percent less than prior to the surgery. There were, however, complications associated with this type of surgery the new study shows.


Extra letters added to bug genetic codeScientists have created bacteria that thrive using an expanded "genetic alphabet".


Robotic Fabricator Could Change the Way Buildings Are ConstructedA construction robot has to be powerful enough to handle heavy material, small enough to enter standard buildings, and flexible enough to navigate the terrain.


Even wasps make trade deals, scientists discoverWasps have trading partners and compete for the 'best trade deals,' scientists have discovered.


Alibaba Targets the Global Market with Apsara Aliware PlatformThe Chinese technology giant has launched a multipurpose platform-as-a-service technology built for scale and reliability—and capable of responding rapidly to changing market and business demands.


Why storms are becoming more dangerous as the climate warmsResearchers know that more, and more dangerous, storms have begun to occur as the climate warms. A team of scientists has reported an underlying explanation, using meteorological satellite data gathered over a 35-year period.


Plasma tidal wave may tell us if black holes destroy informationPhysicists have long puzzled over whether black holes destroy information or conserve it – now a proposed lab experiment could use a plasma wave to find out


Large pre-ACA Medicaid expansion did not level health disparities in cancer surgeryAn analysis of the New York State's Medicaid expansion, which predated the 2010 Affordable Care Act, finds substantial decrease in uninsured rate but little change in racial disparities when it comes to access to cancer surgery -- a proxy for complex cancer care.


Half of breast cancer patients experience severe side effectsNearly half of women treated for early stage breast cancer reported at least one side effect from their treatment that was severe or very severe, a new study finds.


Tiny, Underwater Robots Offer Unprecedented View of World's OceansA swarm of grapefruit-size robots is taking to the seas.


Unraveling mysteries of pancreatic cancer's resistance to standard therapiesIn a new study, researchers have illuminated one of pancreatic cancer's major resistance mechanisms: a form of inflammation that is triggered by the tumor in response to treatment and helps keep tumor cells alive. Blocking this inflammation after radiation therapy brought a significant improvement in survival in a mouse model of the disease.


How a dog's diet shapes its gut microbiomeStudies of the gut microbiome have gone to the dogs -- and pets around the world could benefit as a result. In a new paper, researchers report that the ratio of proteins and carbohydrates in a canine's daily diet have a significant influence on the balance of microbes in its gut. Researchers observed that dogs fed a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet had enriched microbial gene networks associate


Cell disposal faults could contribute to Parkinson's, study findsA fault with the natural waste disposal system that helps to keep our brain cell 'batteries' healthy may contribute to neurodegenerative disease, a new study has found.


Sequencing poisonous mushrooms to potentially create medicineA team of scientists has genetically sequenced two species of poisonous mushrooms, discovering that they can theoretically produce billions of compounds through one molecular assembly line. This may open the door to efficiently tackling some lethal diseases.


Direct link between sexual objectification of girls, aggression towards themThere is a direct relation between the sexual objectification of girls and aggression towards them, research by psychologists has shown.


Your (social media) votes matterTwo large-scale experiments were conducted on Reddit and the results provide insight into how a single up/down vote can influence what content users see on the site.


'Twilight' Star Kristen Stewart Co-Authors Artificial-Intelligence PaperActor Kristen Stewart co-authors computer science research, revealing how artificial intelligence could be used to create moody shots in her movie "Come Swim."


Ants Use Celestial Cues to Travel in ReverseThe six-legged savants appear to use celestial cues and three forms of memory, as they blaze a trail back to the nest. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Meteorites did not enrich ocean life: studyAn explosion of ocean life some 471 million years ago was not sparked by a meteorite bombardment of Earth, said a study Tuesday that challenges a leading theory.


Diversity in tech: Lots of attention, little progressThe tech industry has brought us self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, disappearing photos and 3-D printers. But when it comes to racial and gender diversity, its companies are no trailblazers.


Now You Can Shoot Nerf Cars At Your Little Brother Get ready for some itty bitty vroom vroom. The post Now You Can Shoot Nerf Cars At Your Little Brother appeared first on WIRED .


Sorry, But Speed Reading Won’t Help You Read More People are as likely to read thousands of words per minute as they are to run faster than the speed of light. The post Sorry, But Speed Reading Won’t Help You Read More appeared first on WIRED .


Bursts of methane may have warmed early MarsThe presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface. Yet in the time period when these waters are supposed to have run—three to four billion years ago—Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water.


Five in final stretch of Moon raceThe Google-sponsored race to put a privately funded spacecraft on the Moon has just five teams left in the competition.


Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPVNew details of the structure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) may lead to better vaccines and HPV anti-viral medications, according to studies led by a Penn State College of Medicine researcher.


What we actually lose when the USDA and EPA can’t talk to the public Science Facts aren't political The EPA and USDA have been issued gag orders, suggesting a chilling trend…


Trump Signs Orders Advancing Keystone, Dakota PipelinesThe reverse is a bitter blow to Native American tribes and climate activists after months of protests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Buildings that blend nature and city | Jeanne GangA skyscraper that channels the breeze ... a building that creates community around a hearth ... Jeanne Gang uses architecture to build relationships. In this engaging tour of her work, Gang invites us into buildings large and small, from a surprising local community center to a landmark Chicago skyscraper. "Through architecture, we can do much more than create buildings," she says. "We can help st


Robotter med kunstig "hud" sporer varme menneskekroppeForskere håber, at en kunstig, varmefølsom hud kan bruges til b.la redningsrobotter og proteser.


Haves: Fejl og budgetskred. Ønskes: Erfarne entreprenørtyperSelv om byggesager er blevet langt mere komplicerede, bruges der stadigt færre penge på projekteringsledelse. Det fører til fejl, mangler og budgetoverskridelser. Nu vil bygherrerne udskille ydelsen for at tiltrække erfarne specialister.


Efter præsidentskifte: Kampen for elbiler blusser op på nyIfølge amerikansk elbilentusiast skal folket ikke læne sig tilbage og tro, at elbilens indtog er uundgåeligt. Præsidentskiftet i USA kan få stor betydning, for elbilen er fortsat afhængig af myndighedernes incitamenter.


Trump backs Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelinesThe president's support for Keystone XL and Dakota Access proves he is a climate threat, critics say.


Appeals court denies full hearing in data surveillance case (Update)A federal appeals court said Tuesday it won't rehear a panel's decision letting companies like Microsoft refuse to turn over to the government customer emails stored overseas.


Biologists identify reproductive 'traffic cop'Before an egg becomes fertilized, sets of chromosomes must pair up to pass along genetic information. This happens within each reproductive cell, where separate chromosomes of male and female origin move toward each other and eventually join.


D-Wave upgrade: How scientists are using the world’s most controversial quantum computer Scepticism surrounds the ultimate potential of D-wave machines, but researchers are already finding uses for them. Nature 541 447 doi: 10.1038/541447b


Little tortoise, big rangeWCS scientists have discovered the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa) in the Hukaung Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Myanmar, some 528 miles from its known range in that country. The researchers reported their finding in the latest issue of the journal Asian Herpetological Research.


Scientists lay foundations for new type of solar cellAn interdisciplinary team of researchers has laid the foundations for an entirely new type of photovoltaic cell. In this new method, infrared radiation is converted into electrical energy using a different mechanism from that found in conventional solar cells. The mechanism behind the new solid-state solar cell made of the mineral perovskite relies on so-called polaron excitations, which combine t


Swarm of underwater robots mimics ocean lifeUnderwater robots developed by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego offer scientists an extraordinary new tool to study ocean currents and the tiny creatures they transport. Swarms of these underwater robots helped answer some basic questions about the most abundant life forms in the ocean—plankton.


Wasps have trading partners and compete for the 'best trade deals': studyWasps have trading partners and compete for the 'best trade deals'—according to scientists from the University of Sussex.


Role of thrust and drag clarified for swimming microorganismsFor years, B. Ubbo Felderhof, a professor at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at Germany's RWTH Aachen University, has explored the mechanisms that fish and microorganisms rely on to propel themselves. Flying birds and insects face similar challenges propelling themselves, but without the luxury of buoyancy these creatures also contend with overcoming gravity to stay aloft.


Modeling the rhythmic electrical activities of the brainResearchers studying the brain have long been interested in its neural oscillations, the rhythmic electrical activity that plays an important role in the transmission of information within the brain's neural circuits. In rats, oscillations in the hippocampus region of the brain have been shown to encode information that describes the animal's position in a physical space. In humans, neural oscilla


The scales of this fish are inspiring great gloves Scientists aiming to create protective gloves that resist piercing yet retain flexibility have landed on their inspiration: fish scales. They started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better. “The people at the fish market m


New FCC Chief Likes a Good Mega-Merger—Net Neutrality, Not So MuchTrump’s pick to regulate the telecom industry is pro-business, anti-regulation, and relaxed on privacy.


Forskere skrabede amerikanske klimadata før Trumps indsættelse https://www.version2.dk/1072215 Frygten for, at en ny regering, der er skeptisk over for, at menneskelig aktivitet fører til klimaforandringer, ville fjerne vigtige data, fik forskere til at bringe dataene i sikkerhed uden for USA. Version2


Norske ingeniører klar til at bygge flydende byerNorsk ingeniørfirma er klar med flydende bydele langs Norges kyst. Voksende huspriser og stigende vandstand gør muligheden rentabel, mener direktøren.


Cookware made with scrap metal contaminates foodAluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according to a new study. Researchers tested 42 samples of aluminum cookware made in 10 developing countries and more than one-third pose a lead exposure hazard. The cookware also released significant levels of aluminum, arsenic and cadmium.


Tillerson Is One Step Closer to Becoming Secretary of StateA key Senate committee approved Trump's top diplomatic pick yesterday, but Democrats cited concerns about Tillerson’s position on climate change issues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Nanometric imprinting on fiberResearchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonic Materials and Fibre Devices, which is run by Fabien Sorin, have come up with a simple and innovative technique for drawing or imprinting complex, nanometric patterns on hollow polymer fibers. Their work has been published in Advanced Functional Materials.


New technique quickly predicts salt marsh vulnerabilityScientists working on a rapid assessment technique for determining which US coastal salt marshes are most imperiled by erosion were surprised to find that all eight of the Atlantic and Pacific Coast marshes where they field-tested their method are losing ground, and half of them will be gone in 350 years' time if they don't recapture some lost terrain.


Low-cost therapy produces long-lasting improvements for stroke survivorsA low-cost therapy can improve the lives of stroke patients with vision problems, investigators have found.


Regulating gasotransmitters could improve care for sleep apneaUnbalanced signaling by two molecules that regulate breathing leads to sleep apnea in mice and rats. Injection of a substance that reduces production of one of those signals can prevent apneas. This approach may help people suffering from multiple forms of sleep-disordered breathing.


Breast cancer drugs stop working when tumors 'make their own fuel'Scientists have discovered why a type of breast cancer drug stops working in some patients. The early-stage findings reveal that some breast tumors evolve to make their own 'fuel supply', rendering treatments powerless.


New genetic mechanism driving breast cancer revealed in studyResearchers have discovered ‘hotspots’ of mutations in breast cancer genomes, where mutations thought to be inactive ‘passengers’ in the genome have now been shown to possibly drive further cancerous changes. The study found 33 mutation hotspots, which act like backseat drivers for cancer development.


Trump Gives Green Light To Keystone, Dakota Access Pipelines The pipelines had been blocked by the Obama administration, and President Trump's actions reignited the energy vs. environment debate. (Image credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)


The Story of NASA's Real "Hidden Figures"African-American women working behind the scenes as “human computers” were vital to the Space Race -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Brits, Czechs claim world's most powerful 'super laser'A team of British and Czech scientists on Tuesday said they had successfully tested a "super laser" they claim is 10 times more powerful than any other of its kind on the planet.


What can we learn about cybersecurity from the Russian hacks?Intelligence reports about Russian-sponsored hacking to influence the 2016 presidential election have dominated headlines. Northeastern professors Alina Oprea and Cristina Nita-Rotaru, both cybersecurity experts, explain what these break-ins tell us about the state of U.S. cybersecurity, whether an impenetrable system is even possible, and how such attacks might be prevented in the future. Image b


Cyberconscripts: Baltic draftees can choose IT over infantryThe tiny Baltic nation of Estonia is experimenting with the idea of cyberconscription, a move that gives draftees with tech skills the chance to work shoring up their military's electronic infrastructure, an Estonian defense official said Tuesday.


Europe chokes under freezing smogHeavy pollution enveloping much of Europe prompted emergency measures across the continent on Tuesday.


Study shows how a dog's diet shapes its gut microbiomeStudies of the gut microbiome have gone to the dogs—and pets around the world could benefit as a result. In a paper published this week in mBio, researchers from Nestle Purina PetCare Company report that the ratio of proteins and carbohydrates in a canine's daily diet have a significant influence on the balance of microbes in its gut. Among other findings, they observed that dogs fed a high-protei


New Robotic Fabricator Could Change the Way Buildings Are ConstructedA construction robot has to be powerful enough to handle heavy material, small enough to enter standard buildings, and flexible enough to navigate the terrain.


Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environmentsCooperatively breeding mammal species, such as meerkats and naked-mole rats, where non-breeding helpers assist breeding females in raising their offspring, are better able to cope with living in dry areas than related non-cooperative species, new research reveals.


NASA measures 'dust on snow' to help manage Colorado River basin water suppliesWhen Michelle Stokes and Stacie Bender look out across the snow-capped mountains of Utah and Colorado, they see more than just a majestic landscape. They see millions of gallons of water that will eventually flow into the Colorado River.


Ultrasound and ‘cages’ get drugs to targets in brain Biomedical engineers are using pulses of ultrasound to help deliver tiny amounts of a drug to small targets in the brain. The method—recently tested in rats—involves “caging” a drug with tiny biodegradable nanoparticles. When the particles reach the right place in the brain, precisely targeted high-frequency sound break them up and release the drug. “If further testing of our combination method w


Parrotfish are critical to coral reef health, study findsScientists have developed a 3,000-year record of the abundance of parrotfish and urchins on reefs from the Caribbean side of Panama to help unravel the cause of the alarming modern-day shift from coral- to algae-dominated reefs occurring across the Caribbean.


These 5 finalists will race to the moon in Google's Lunar XPrize competition Space One of these spacecraft could become the first private spacecraft to land on the moon The race to the moon is heating up…


How we discovered that people have been cooking plants in pots for 10,000 yearsThe benefits of eating vegetables is one of the first lessons we try to teach our often reluctant children. Six million years ago, they wouldn't have had a choice. Our early ancestors ate nothing but greens, and relied on raw plants for all their dietary needs. But we have now discovered the earliest evidence of humans cooking up nutritious pots of plants – 10,000 years ago.


Amazon moves to avoid EU fines over publishing contractsAmazon has agreed to change parts of its e-book contracts with publishers in an effort to avoid European Union fines for anti-competitive behavior.


Southern Italy: Earthquake hazard due to active plate boundarySince the early civilizations, the lives of people in Europe, in the Middle East, and in North Africa have been closely linked to the Mediterranean. Natural catastrophes such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunamis have repeatedly shattered cultures and states in this area. The reason for this constant threat is that in the Mediterranean the Eurasian plate and the African plate interact. "


Your (social media) votes matterWhen Tim Weninger conducted two large-scale experiments on Reddit - otherwise known as "the front page of the internet" - back in 2014, the goal was to better understand the ripple effects of malicious voting behavior and the impact on what users see and share online.


Australia Zoo Urges People to Catch Deadly Spiders as Antidote Runs LowFunnel web venom needed after a dry spell triggers more bites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Watch Air Swirl Around a Quadcopter Drone’s Rotors Science proves drones don't have to be so damn loud. The post Watch Air Swirl Around a Quadcopter Drone's Rotors appeared first on WIRED .


The FDA Wants to Regulate Edited Animal Genes As Drugs To the FDA, edited DNA does the same thing as drugs: It changes the way bodies work. The post The FDA Wants to Regulate Edited Animal Genes As Drugs appeared first on WIRED .


Oscars 2017: La La Land Lands Record-Tying 14 Nominations Films like 'Moonlight' and 'Manchester By the Sea' also got a lot of love from the Academy. The post Oscars 2017: La La Land Lands Record-Tying 14 Nominations appeared first on WIRED .


Sequencing poisonous mushrooms to potentially create medicineA team of Michigan State University scientists has genetically sequenced two species of poisonous mushrooms, discovering that they can theoretically produce billions of compounds through one molecular assembly line. This may open the door to efficiently tackling some lethal diseases.


Chinese scientists discover a new species of catfish in MyanmarDuring a survey of the freshwater fishes of the Mali Hka River drainage in the Hponkanrazi Wildlife Sanctuary, Myanmar, scientists Xiao-Yong Chen, Tao Qin and Zhi-Ying Chen, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), identified a new catfish species among the collected specimens. It is distinct with a set of morphological features including its mouthparts and coloration. The discovery is publishe


Video: The universe in a cup of coffeeReactions, the ACS YouTube channel that covers the chemistry of everyday life, is joining PBS Digital Studios, a network of original web series from PBS that explore science, arts, culture and more. To celebrate, the Reactions team is doing a deep dive on the surprisingly complex and beautiful chemistry behind their favorite morning beverage: coffee.


Efficient, organic photovoltaic cells for indoor and outdoor applicationsOrganic photovoltaics (OPV) may cost less than their silicon counterparts, but their performance remains off-putting to this day. A consortium of European research groups and industries recently demonstrated free-form organic solar modules for three specific, indoor and outdoor applications that should help put such concerns to bed.


Micro spacecraft investigates cometary water mysteryIn September 2015, a team of astronomers from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, University of Michigan, Kyoto Sangyo University, Rikkyo University and the University of Tokyo successfully observed the entire hydrogen coma of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, using the LAICA telescope onboard the PROCYON spacecraft. They also succeeded in obtaining the absolute rate of water discha


Crime Victims' Institute releases report on victimization in TexasThe Crime Victims' Institute (CVI) released a summary of key indicators of victimization in Texas, which reflects changes in reported incidents, service utilization, and offender accountability over the last five years.


59 læger samlet i netværk for spirituelle Netværket Spirituelt Orienterede Læger I Danmark samler læger med alternative syn på sygdom og behandling.


Nanocavity and atomically thin materials advance tech for chip-scale light sourcesWhen an individual uses Facebook or searches Google, the information processing happens in a large data center. Short distance optical interconnects can improve the performance of these data centers. Current systems utilize electrons, which could cause overheating and wastes power. However, utilizing light to transfer information between computer chips and boards can improve efficiency.


New insights into the forms of metal-organic frameworksThe accurate interpretation of particle sizes and shapes in nanoporus materials is essential to understanding and optimizing the performance of porous materials used in many important existing and potentially new applications. However, only a few experimental techniques have been developed for this purpose.


First of a kind footage of a living stylodactylid shrimp filter-feeding at depth of 4826 mDepths such as those at the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument are an extreme challenge for explorers, providing scarce information about their inhabitants, let alone their behavior.


Trump udpeger modstander af netneutralitet som formand for magtfuld internetmyndighed Den nye formand har allerede lovet af afmontere de seneste tiltag for netneutralitet, som han ikke mener, der er problemer med overhovedet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/trump-udpeger-modstander-netneutralitet-formand-internetmyndighed-1072212 Version2


Two quick prompts boost global online learners People in less-developed countries are completing MOOCs (massive online open courses) at a lower rate than those in the more developed parts of the world. But, researchers found, brief psychological interventions that affirm students’ sense that they belong can help close the global achievement gap. “Providing access to the internet and courseware is not enough. People need to feel welcome in onl


Africa needs to manage food, water and energy in a way that connects all threeThere is an increasing global demand for food, water and energy. All three are inter-linked, a fact that has increasingly become the focus of attention for policy makers and governments.


Mathematical model limits malaria outbreaksOne of the most common infectious diseases in the world, malaria causes public health problems and depresses the economy of infected areas. When untreated or treated improperly, the disease can result in fatalities. Despite impressive control measures and increased prevention techniques, which have reduced the global malaria mortality rate by 29% over the last six years, 3.3 billion people through


Fossilised tree and ice cores help date huge volcanic eruption 1,000 years ago to within three monthsAn international team of researchers has managed to pinpoint, to within three months, a medieval volcanic eruption in east Asia the precise date of which has puzzled historians for decades. They have also shown that the so-called "Millennium eruption" of Changbaishan volcano, one of the largest in history, cannot have brought about the downfall of an important 10th century kingdom, as was previous


Historian uncovers a grim correlation between violence and inequality over the millenniaWhat price do we pay for civilization? For Walter Scheidel, a professor of history and classics at Stanford, civilization has come at the cost of glaring economic inequality since the Stone Age. The sole exception, in his account, is widespread violence – wars, pandemics, civil unrest; only violent shocks like these have substantially reduced inequality over the millennia.


New project to boost sat nav positioning accuracy anywhere in worldA project exploiting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) to establish the blueprint for the world's most accurate real-time positioning service is to run at the University of Nottingham.


When it comes to big finds, scientists need more than just luck and chanceThe history of science abounds with stories about discoveries made by chance. One of the most famous cases, involves French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, who accidentally discovered radioactivity by leaving a piece of granite on photographic paper in a drawer of his desk. Another, is the story of Scottish biologist Alexander Fleming, who forgot his bacterial cultures at home when he went on h


Researchers emphasize the importance of stormwater researchA cormorant splashes around in the Duke Stormwater Reclamation Pond while Megan Fork, sitting in the shade under the shelter at the end of the pier with colleague Chelsea Clifford, takes a break from writing her Ph.D. thesis, "Stormwater and Organic Matter in the Urban Stream Continuum." Fork tells stories of stormwater investigation, which can at times go somewhat rogue.


Gaia turns its eyes to asteroid huntingWhile best known for its surveys of the stars and mapping the Milky Way in three dimensions, ESA's Gaia has many more strings to its bow. Among them, its contribution to our understanding of the asteroids that litter the solar system. Now, for the first time, Gaia is not only providing information crucial to understanding known asteroids, it has also started to look for new ones, previously unknow


Plants smell different when attacked by exotic herbivoresA new study to be published in the scientific journal New Phytologist reveals that plants' odour bouquet changes depending on the type of enemy that attacks it. To the surprise of the researchers involved, native plants emit a special odour bouquet when they are attacked by exotic herbivores.


Climate change altered the natural selection – collared flycatcher's large forehead patch no longer a winnerIn a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of that climate change upends selection of face characteristics in the collared flycatcher. During the study the annual fitness selection on forehead patch size switched from positive to negative, a reversal that is accounted for by rising spring temperatures at the breeding site.


Teaching kids asthma ‘red flags’ may save lives A program that teaches children how to recognize the signs and symptoms of an asthma attack—and how to deal with one effectively—has the potential to save lives. “Childhood asthma affects three children in every classroom and can result in hospital admissions, significant absence from school, and even mortality, despite widely available treatments,” says Caitlin Peers of Cardiff University’s Scho


NASA-video flyver dig til Pluto på 30 sekunderNew Horizons-sonden kortlagde Pluto med en række højtopløselige billeder, da den passerede i 2015.


The future is now for robot carsThe prospect of self-driving vehicles has tantalized tech aficionados and car lovers for years, especially when there are industry rumblings that automation is on the cusp of a breakthrough.


Researchers simulate the design of new quantum bits for easier engineering of quantum computersQuantum computers—a possible future technology that would revolutionize computing by harnessing the bizarre properties of quantum bits, or qubits. Qubits are the quantum analogue to the classical computer bits "0" and "1." Engineering materials that can function as qubits is technically challenging. Using supercomputers, scientists from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory pre


Study: Facebook can actually make us more narrow-minded submitted by /u/gagagaj2 [link] [comments]


E-cigarettes are expanding tobacco product use among youthE-cigarettes are actually attracting a new population of adolescents who might not otherwise have smoked tobacco products, according to a new American study.


Cicadas Are Coming! Brood VI Returns After 17 YearsThis spring, Brood VI periodical cicadas make their first appearance in 17 years.


A new world discovered undergroundOne of the most detailed genetic studies of any ecosystem to date has uncovered incredible biological diversity among subsurface bacteria. Researchers reconstructed the complete sets of genetic material, or genomes, of more than 2,500 microbes. The team took these microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected from an area prone to flooding in Colorado. These genomes represent 80 percent


Are we ready for another massive volcanic eruption?An enormous volcanic eruption would not necessarily plunge the world into a new societal crisis, according to a new study of the biggest eruption of the last millennium published in Nature Geoscience.


Improved adhesion paves the way for greater use of thermoplastic compositesA research at the University of Twente has brought the aviation sector one step closer to lighter aircraft. PhD candidate Yibo Su has developed a method for bonding lightweight constructions made from thermoplastic composites. This means more opportunities to use these materials.


Sci-fi holograms a step closer with tiny inventionAustralian National University physicists have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as Star Wars.


Astronomers uncover properties of a molecular outflow feature in a nearby starburst galaxy(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers led by Fabian Walter of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany has revealed essential properties of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy designated NGC253. The findings were presented in a paper published Jan. 18 on the arXiv pre-print repository.


'Warrior of high status' was buried at Scottish Viking siteThe excavation of a rare, intact Viking boat burial in western Scotland has been set out in detail for the first time.


Researchers find weak organization and collective oscillation in dense bacterial groups(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that subgroups of bacteria within much larger groups sometimes organize and engage in collective oscillatory behavior. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes the type of bacteria they were studying and their newly discovered activity.


Enzyme shows promise for efficiently converting plant biomass to biofuelsTo make biofuels, tiny microbes can be used to break down plant cells. As part of that digestive process, specialized enzymes break down cellulose—a major molecule that makes plant cell walls rigid. Scientists showed that an enzyme, from the bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 12, plays an unexpectedly important role in breaking down a hard-to-degrade crystalline form of cellulose. Surprisingly,


Power of a Meaningful LifeJournalist Emily Esfahani Smith offers a guide for building a better approach to living -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com





Halvanden salto med fem skruer - matematikere forklarer, hvordan det skal gøresMatematikere har udregnet, hvordan et udspring fra 10-meter-tårnet, hidtil anset som umuligt, kan gennemføres. Nu venter vi på sportsfolkene.


We must urgently clarify data-sharing rules Scientists have worked hard to ensure that Europe’s new data laws do not harm science, but one last push is needed, says Jan-Eric Litton. Nature 541 437 doi: 10.1038/541437a


Voice control is taking off, but it's not taking over yetIf unexpected packages start showing up at your door, you might want to have a word with one of your smart devices.


Closed-loop concept could be the future of sustainable animal farmsDr. Eunsung Kan sees his concept of a closed-loop dairy farm, which reuses wastewater, emits zero waste and powers itself on manure, as the future of sustainable animal farming.


The Army’s First New Pistol in 35 Years Features A Modular Design The Army's new handgun choice focuses on flexibility and future-proofing. The post The Army's First New Pistol in 35 Years Features A Modular Design appeared first on WIRED .


The Race to Replace the KilogramThe long-running effort to ditch the decaying, 19th-century artifact that defines the kilogram nears its conclusion -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts In the United States, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease every minute; around the world, it’s every four seconds. “It is the biggest epidemic we have in this country,” says Harvard University’s Rudolph Tanzi , “I’m shocked that people aren’t panicked about what this disease is going to do to the country or to their families.” This Wednesday (January 25) at 10 pm ET, PBS is premiering “


Claims of being 'color blind' implies race does not matter, leads to unequal education, professor saysAmerica's society and education system have a tendency to claim they are "color blind" or that they don't see race. Doing so tells young people their race and identity don't matter, encourages ignorance and ultimately leads to poorer education for all, a University of Kansas professor argues in a new article.


Overcoming 'cyber-fatigue' requires users to step up for securityAs a new presidential administration takes over, it will need to pay significant attention to cybersecurity. Indeed, we've already been told to expect "a comprehensive plan" for cybersecurity in the first few months of the new administration. But as a professional who has long been part of the global internet security community, I am pessimistic that the typical government and individual plans or


Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysisWireless sensor networks have many applications, ranging from industrial process automation to environmental monitoring. Researchers at the Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt have recently developed a time synchronization technique and have carried out experimental performance testing. The method developed learns the behavior of the sensor clocks, making it particularly efficient in terms of energ


Opinion: How do we protect our native bee species?Bees are among the most charismatic and familiar animals of the insect world, and thoughts of a summer's day picnic would not be complete without the recollection of the hum of bees or the sight of a belaboured individual lifting off from a flower with its heavy load of pollen.


Mapping the migration of house shrewsThe distribution of house shrews in the coastal areas from Asia to East Africa suggests a wider trade network in the middle-modern ages.


Researcher examines plants encased in tar pits to reconstruct ice age ecosystemFor tens of thousands of years, the warm, sticky natural asphalt that occasionally bubbled to the Earth's surface in the area now called Los Angeles was a death sentence for some ice age animals.


Arctic Summer Ice Has Decreased by 72 Percent Since 1980 [Graphic]This volumetric look at the scope of the melt is just as staggering as surface area comparisons -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Carbon-free energy from solar water splittingA Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientist and collaborators are fine tuning the mechanisms to generate hydrogen from water and sunlight.


New research proposes tying vehicle fuel standards to gas pricesVolatile gasoline prices have caused regulators and carmakers alike to question the cost and effectiveness of fuel economy standards in the United States, with some arguing they are too stringent and others saying they should be even stricter.


Manipulating gene expression precisely using lightA Hokkaido University researcher has successfully developed a method to accurately manipulate gene expression by light illumination and demonstrated its usability by creating double-headed zebrafish.


Let’s Geek Out on the Physics of Leyden Jars In a recent episode of 'MacGyver,' our hero uses a Leyden jar to store energy. What is a Leyden jar and how much energy could it store? The post Let's Geek Out on the Physics of Leyden Jars appeared first on WIRED .


A Brilliant Green Meteor Lights Up India’s ‘Sky Islands’ It isn't easy to photograph a meteor. But Prasenjeet Yadav did. The post A Brilliant Green Meteor Lights Up India’s ‘Sky Islands' appeared first on WIRED .


Artificial Intelligence Is About to Conquer Poker, But Not Without Human Help No machine has ever beaten the top players at no-limit Texas Hold 'Em. But this time it's different. The post Artificial Intelligence Is About to Conquer Poker, But Not Without Human Help appeared first on WIRED .


Inside Minnesota’s Risky Plan to Deradicalize ISIS Recruits In Minneapolis, one judge is hoping that a controversial new program can reform homegrown ISIS recruits back into normal young Americans. The post Inside Minnesota’s Risky Plan to Deradicalize ISIS Recruits appeared first on WIRED .


Holistic study of coastal ecosystem reveals rapid response to climate changeIf you've visited the Outer Banks or other barrier islands, you've likely experienced their split personalities—places where high waves can pound the sandy ocean shore while herons stalk placid saltmarsh waters just a short distance landward.


How a major immigration raid affected infant healthOn May 12, 2008, 900 federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, armed with military-grade weapons and vehicles, stormed the Agriprocessors meat processing plant in Postville, Iowa, in what was, at the time, the largest federal worksite immigration raid in U.S. history. ICE detained 389 plant workers, most of whom were from Guatemala or Mexico, tearing apart families. Approximately 270 o


Group uses its own 'toolset' to probe chemical responsesUsing a novel chemical procedure developed in her lab, Yimon Aye and her group are helping to blaze a trail in the emerging field of precision medicine by targeting and modulating single proteins to achieve desired responses.


Protective wear inspired by fish scalesThey started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics better.


Which Personality Types Are Most Likely to Be Happy?The real link between personality and well-being.


3-D printing custom support structures for tissue implantsTissue implants customised to a patient could soon be printed using a new type of 3-D printer under development by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and a Singapore-based 3-D printing start-up focused on healthcare.


Blue Mist Over the Great Smoky Mountains Visible from SpaceA satellite image shows a clear view of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee.


The murky history of the nature and nurture debateSelf-righteousness, gratitude, sympathy, sincerity, and guilt – what if these social behaviours are biologically influenced, encoded within our genes and shaped by the forces of evolution to promote the survival of the human species? Does free will truly exist if our genes are inherited and our environment is a series of events set in motion before we are born?


First Spectacular Images Come In from NOAA's New SatelliteAgency says “high-definition from the heavens” could dramatically improve weather forecasts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


GOES-16 satellite sends first images of EarthSince the GOES-16 satellite lifted off from Cape Canaveral on November 19, scientists, meteorologists and ordinary weather enthusiasts have anxiously waited for the first photos from NOAA's newest weather satellite, GOES-16, formerly GOES-R.


Why 'Dumpster Fire' Was 2016 Word of the YearLanguage mavens with the American Dialect Society have selected their 2016 Word of the Year: "dumpster fire."


Codes of ethics cause problems for overseas operationsCorporate codes of ethics can have reverse effects and mask anomalies or social evils in operations outsourced to low-wage countries. This according to Maira Babri at Umeå University in a study of Swedish corporate codes of ethics contra Chinese suppliers' attitudes.


KL truer med at skrotte KMD helt: »Ikke nogen man ønsker at samarbejde med på sigt« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kl-truer-med-at-skrotte-kmd-helt-ikke-nogen-man-oensker-at-samarbejde-med-paa-sigt-1072197 KL’s formand varsler et brud med it-kæmpen KMD efter strid om forsinkede it-systemer. Version2


Ombygning skal redde VikingeskibsmuseetVikingeskibsmuseet er truet af vand fra alle sider og lever desuden ikke op til de krav, der i dag stilles til museer. Affredning afvises, men myndigheder og museum ser nu på, hvilke ombygninger, der kan tillades.


Researchers develop hybrid nuclear desalination technique with improved efficiencyLack of fresh water requires development of new desalination methods, including advanced nuclear desalination and water treatment and recycling; requirements for drinking water and other uses may be different.


Modified carbon nanotubes could be used to track protein production by individual cellsFor the first time, MIT engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells or even a single cell.


It's time to reduce, replace and re-think the use of antimicrobials in animalsReducing the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals, replacing them where possible and re-thinking the livestock production system is essential for the future of animal and public health. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world's most pressing public health issues and the use of antimicrobials in animals contributes to this problem, so limiting their use to the minimum necessar


Ancient figures reveal trading routes of prehistoric African civilisationResearchers from The University of Manchester have completed the very first biological analysis of ancient terracotta figurines found in Ghana, which were created by an unknown civilisation and have become iconic representations of prehistoric African art.


NASA develops AI for future exploration of extraterrestrial subsurface oceansNASA is developing technology that could enable autonomous navigation of future underwater drones studying subsurface oceans on icy moons like Jupiter's Europa. The agency is working on artificial intelligence (AI) that would allow submersibles to make their own decisions during exploration of extraterrestrial water worlds.


Tesla’s New ‘Autopilot’ Is Just the Start of a Critical Reboot Think of it like an origin story. The post Tesla's New 'Autopilot' Is Just the Start of a Critical Reboot appeared first on WIRED .


Fake Think Tanks Fuel Fake News—And the President’s Tweets Because fake news doesn't only come from wingnuts' basements. The post Fake Think Tanks Fuel Fake News—And the President's Tweets appeared first on WIRED .


How House Industries Designs Its Retrotastic Logos and Typefaces Understanding how to make vintage designs feel fresh has made House Industries popular with clients ranging from the Jimmy Kimmel Show to JJ Abrams. The post How House Industries Designs Its Retrotastic Logos and Typefaces appeared first on WIRED .


Rez’s Trance Vibrator Changed the Conversation About Women’s Sexuality in GamesFifteen years ago Rez released with the trance vibrator, a creative peripheral whose reception reveals a lot about the way we talk about sexuality in games. The post Rez's Trance Vibrator Changed the Conversation About Women's Sexuality in Games appeared first on WIRED .


Materials study probes 'field-assisted' processing for high-tech ceramic componentsA new project will study the fundamental mechanisms behind a method that uses electrical fields to enhance ceramics-sintering processing to manufacture components for a range of military and commercial applications.


Pursuits: In Michigan, a Fight Over the Future of a Fabled Trout RiverA fish farm in the city of Grayling has prompted debate (and a legal challenge) about its impact on the Au Sable, a stream revered by anglers.


Researcher calls for conservation of ivory-billed woodpecker's habitatThe Ivory-billed Woodpecker's habitat should be protected despite the lack of definitive evidence of this species' existence, according to a new study published in Heliyon. Currently, bird conservation efforts rely on indisputable photographic evidence, which according to the new study could take many years to obtain, by which time it may be too late.


Kina vil lukke VPN-huller i The Great FirewallLandet strammer internet-censuren.Private forbindelser, der omgår statscensuren, skal fremover godkendes af regeringen.


Fem måder at undgå at blive jaloux på andres succes https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fem-maader-at-undgaa-at-blive-jaloux-paa-andres-succes-6151 Næst efter egen fiasko er andres succes det værste, lyder et omskrevet ordsprog. Eller er det? Her er fem god råd til, hvordan du tackler den alt for menneskelig følelse af at være godt gammeldags jaloux Jobfinder


Tesla opfører 80 MWh lithium-ion-batteripark i CalifornienTesla har opført verdens største batteripark i samarbejde med det amerikanske elselskab Southern California Edison. Drivkraften bliver Teslas nye Powerpack 2-batterityper.


Fire brigade help Yorkshire Wildlife Park give polar bear dental check-upSouth Yorkshire Fire Brigade were called in to assist in giving a polar bear a dental check-up.


Super El Nino and the 2015 extreme summer drought over North ChinaNorth China was hit by a devastating drought in the summer of 2015, affecting about 21 million people and 3.4 million hectares of crops in seven provinces. The direct economic loss reached up to 11.48 billion RMB. Meanwhile, a super El Niño developed, which resulted in widespread droughts and floods around the globe. With a good prediction of the 2015/16 super El Niño, NCEP's Climate Forecast Syst


One of the world largest digital herbaria launchedWithin the framework of the "Noah's ark" project, scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed the largest digital herbarium in Russia—a collection of scanned images of herbarium samples from the Faculty of Biology funds.


Justitsminister forsvarer tele-overvågning: Logningen er for centralt til, at vi kan ophæve den https://www.version2.dk/artikel/justitsministeren-afviser-at-ophaeve-logning-straks-1072193 Søren Pape Poulsen afviser at suspendere de danske regler om telelogning, selv om de ifølge en ny EU-dom er klart ulovlige. Logning er et efterforskningsredskab, som vi ikke vil fratage politiet, siger han. Version2


French internet censorship rose sharply in 2016France's interior minister says authorities have blocked or ordered search engines to de-list hundreds of websites in 2016, a significant increase over 2015.


Saudi Arabia warns destructive computer virus has returned (Update)Saudi Arabia is warning that a computer virus that destroyed systems of its state-run oil company in 2012 has returned to the kingdom, with at least one major petrochemical company apparently affected by its spread.


Doubt over Everest's true height spurs fresh expeditionScientists will take the tape measure to Mount Everest to determine whether a massive earthquake in Nepal really did knock an inch off the world's tallest peak.


Aalborg får ny professor i diabetes Niels Ejskjær er ansat som klinisk professor og specialeansvarlig overlæge på Aalborg Universitetshospital.


New inverse algorithm for CO2 retrieval from satellite observationsAtmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary greenhouse gas that has persistently increased over the past few decades. It is a major driver of regional and global climate change. Most CO2 sources and sinks are located near the surface. Observations from shortwave infrared sounders loaded on satellite, such as the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2)


Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasersThe Ultrafast Optical Processing Group at INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) has redefined the limitations and constraints for ultra-fast pulsed lasers. As reported in Nature Photonics, researchers from the team of Prof. Roberto Morandotti have produced the first pulsed passively mode-locked nanosecond laser, with a record-low and transform-limited spectral width of 105 MHz—more


Researchers develop raw materials for protein from mealworms and cricketsVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavour, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity in Europe.


Britisk regering beskyldes for at mørklægge uheld med atommissilEt Trident II-missil fra en britisk ubåd satte under en testflyvning kursen mod USA og måtte destrueres. Regeringen fik bare aldrig fortalt parlamentet om det.


Selvhjælp til pendlere: Start din rejse fra en anden zone og spar pengePendlere regner, måler og hjælper hinanden på nettet, når de skal finde en god handel i det nyt takstsystem. Systemet er mere retfærdigt, mener Movia.


Videnskabsklubben: The Grand FinaleUddannelses- og forskningsminister Søren Pind lægger vejen forbi Statens Naturhistoriske...


Research Examines The Effects Of Gender On Stated Ambition A study finds single women are much less likely to express career ambitions compared to married women or men. Researchers believe they don't want to undermine their appeal in the dating market.


Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country The Affordable Care Act made it faster and easier for a coal miner with black lung to get compensation benefits. Many in coal country want that provision retained, even if the larger law is repealed. (Image credit: Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting)


Analyses of energy cycle offer a new explanation of climate changeResearchers know that more, and more dangerous, storms have begun to occur as the climate warms. A team of scientists has reported an underlying explanation, using meteorological satellite data gathered over a 35-year period.


Projekt skal reducere medicinfejlKvalitet og sikkerhed ved lægemiddelbehandlingen under og efter en indlæggelse på Hospitalsenhed Vest skal forbedres med projektet ‘Min Medicin Med’.


Japan launches satellite to modernise military communicationsJapan on Tuesday launched a satellite to modernise its military communications and reportedly to better monitor North Korean missile launches.


Zuckerberg charity buys AI startup to battle diseaseA charitable foundation backed by Mark Zuckerberg and his wife said Monday it has bought a Canadian artificial intelligence startup as part of a mission to eradicate disease.


Bangladesh plants million trees to cut lightning tollBangladesh has begun planting one million palm trees nationwide to help prevent hundreds of people being killed by lightning strikes every year, a top official said Tuesday.


Sundance goes green as VR makers aim to save the planetWhen consumers get excited about advances in virtual reality, they are usually thinking about videogaming, new and immersive movie-watching or—let's face it—pornography.


Samsung says Q4 profits up 50% despite Note7 recallSamsung Electronics' profits leaped in the fourth quarter, it said Tuesday, despite the humiliating Galaxy Note 7 recall that hammered the reputation of the world's largest smartphone maker.


China's birthrate rises after one-child policy loosenedThe number of births in China has risen nearly 8 percent in the year after the government loosened its unpopular one-child policy.


Philips profits more than double in 2016 (Update)Dutch electronics giant Philips said Tuesday its bottom-line profit more than doubled in 2016, buoyed by gains from the flotation of its lighting business and the strong performance of its health technology division.


New Genome Browser product gives freedom to easily collaborate in the cloudUntil now, genomics research groups working with sensitive medical data were largely limited to using local Genome Browser installations to maintain confidentiality, complicating data-sharing among collaborators. Today, the Genome Browser group of the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute announced they have changed that by launching a new product, Genome Browser in the Cloud (GBiC). GBiC introduces ne


Synthetic chemicals: Ignored agents of global changeDespite a steady rise in the manufacture and release of synthetic chemicals, research on the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and industrial chemicals is severely lacking. This blind spot undermines efforts to address global change and achieve sustainability goals. So reports a new study in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.


Flame Retardants Have Ignited a Flaming Controversy Flame retardants are a controversial subject. Many fire departments and chemical industry sources praise retardants for reducing fire damage and saving lives. Critics say they do more harm than good and should be banned; they are concerned about the spread of manmade chemicals in the environment and the harm they do or might do to human health. Both sides have an agenda. As with other controversi


Don't smile too big to be effective in online marketing ads, study fundsIf you're seeking investments through online marketing or crowd-funding websites, be sure to smile in your profile photo or your post. But maybe not too big.


Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor køber DSB ikke hybridtog med el og diesel?En læser undrer sig over, at man ikke kombinerer diesel med el på det danske tognet. Det svarer DSB på.


Rare bat born by C-section in San Diego ZooA Rodrigues fruit bat has been born by C-section at San Diego Zoo.


Region betaler for ny glukosemåler – indtil videreBørnediabetesambulatorierne på hospitalerne i Herlev og Hillerød kan udlevere den nye glukosemåler Freestyle Libre til børn og unge, hvis det er lægeligt velbegrundet.


Nyt diabetesmiddel godkendt til voksne med type 2-diabetesNyt lægemiddel, som kombinerer insulin glargin og en GLP-1 receptoragonisten lixisenatid, ventes at komme på markedet i de europæiske lande hen over foråret og sommeren.


Steno København genopslår stilling som forskningschefTo ansøgninger til jobbet som forskningschef er ikke er nok, synes direktøren for Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen (SDCC), Allan Flyvbjerg. Han genopslår derfor stillingen med håb om at få et bredere ansøgerfelt.


Strangers in Their Own Land: The 'Deep Story' of Trump Supporters Millions of Americans seem to ignore their own interests when it comes to how they vote. Sociologist Arlie Hochschild thinks we might be turning to politics to meet emotional needs, not economic ones. (Image credit: MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images)


Machine Vision Helps Spot New Drug TreatmentsA startup uses algorithms that understand the anatomy of cells to discover new uses for existing drugs.


Teleselskabs webformular misbrugt til at bombardere Version2 med smæde-mails https://www.version2.dk/artikel/teleselskabs-webformular-misbrugt-at-bombardere-version2-med-smaede-mails-1072187 Både 3 og Oister er igang med at opdatere deres hjemmesider efter en webformular er blevet brugt til at sende hundredvis af mails til Version2. Version2


Sådan er det bare: Du skal betale 50 kroner for tvunget skift af rejsekortEt rejsekort holder kun fem år, og når det udløber, skal du selv bestille og betale for et nyt. Det skal der ikke ændres på, fastslår selskabet bag, selv om Forbrugerrådet Tænk finder det urimeligt.


"Violations" of a Basic Law of Physics Created Mysterious Dark Energy, Propose Scientists Physicists propose that violations of a fundamental law of physics in early stages of the universe are responsible for the mysterious dark energy. Read More


High-Sugar Diet Makes Flies Drop Like...FliesA study examines the effects of a high-sugar diet on the life spans of fruit flies. Another studies how the flies’ appetite-suppressing pathways may be similar to ours. Karen Hopkin... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Competition and Character Art Gallery Every year, a select group of talented young illustrators and designers descends upon Eyewire HQ to up the visual ante on the gamemasters’ incredibly creative suite of competitions. This post celebrates some of the best illustration from 2013 through 2016. Feel free to share these images as long as they are properly credited to the artist and Eyewire.


Congrats to Nseraf with 50 Million Eyewire points! Amazing job by Eyewirer @Nseraf, who is our first player to crack 50 million points in Eyewire. That’s a whole lot of contribution to science! Big thanks from the Eyewire team for your contribution And here’s a special poster made by fellow Eyewirer @susi to celebrate your accomplishment! Way to go! Here are some snippets from an interview player @r3 did with Nseraf about his accomplishment: Nser


New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft -- and back againWhen a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of researchers have developed a new way to design a 'metamaterial' that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.


Normative Theory of Visual Receptive FieldsThis article gives an overview of a normative computational theory of visual receptive fields, by which idealized shapes of early spatial, spatio-chromatic and spatio-temporal receptive fields can be derived in an axiomatic way based on structural properties of the environment in combination with assumptions about the internal structure of a vision system to guarantee consistent handling of image


Long-term gains with early epilepsy surgeryThere are important, long-term gains from hastening the processes around surgical interventions against epilepsy -- before the disease has had too much negative impact on brain functions and patients' lives. These are some of the findings of a thesis for which more than 500 patients were studied and followed up.


Novel underlying mechanism involved in PTSD and other anxiety disorders describedA novel mechanism has been identified for how stress-induced anxiety -- which can produce post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD -- affects circuit function in the hippocampus, the area of the brain where aversive memories are formed. These studies fill an important gap in knowledge between the molecular, circuit and behavioral effects of the brain-signaling molecule called neuropeptide Y, and co


Social Media-Powered Berniecrats Try to Move the Party Left If the newly formed Justice Democrats succeed, it will be with the might of YouTube behind them. The post Social Media-Powered Berniecrats Try to Move the Party Left appeared first on WIRED .


Forsvaret jagter ingeniører til deres kampfly og flådekanoner: Sådan bliver det dig https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/forsvaret-jagter-ingenioerer-deres-kampfly-flaadekanoner-saadan-bliver-dig-6142 Ingeniører og it-folk fylder mere i Forsvaret, end de fleste tror. Derfor kan op til 60 ingeniører håbe på at få job i Forsvaret i 2017. Læs, hvordan din ansøgning bliver bearbejdet hos den offentlige institution Jobfinder


Closed-loop estimation of retinal network sensitivity reveals signature of efficient codingAccording to the theory of efficient coding, sensory systems are adapted to represent natural scenes with high fidelity and at minimal metabolic cost. Testing this hypothesis for sensory structures performing non-linear computations on high dimensional stimuli is still an open challenge. Here we develop a method to characterize the sensitivity of the retinal network to perturbations of a stimulus.


Flood prevention being ignored - MPsMinisters accused of not tackling concerns over home insurance, building rules and planning.


Digital Rights Activists Hail Trump’s Death Blow Against TPP But they worry about what future deals will mean for privacy and access. The post Digital Rights Activists Hail Trump's Death Blow Against TPP appeared first on WIRED .


Sprint Takes Tidal Stake to Ward Off Threats from All Sides Telcos want to buy up content companies to hedge against multiple assaults on their traditional business models. The post Sprint Takes Tidal Stake to Ward Off Threats from All Sides appeared first on WIRED .


Yoga, exercise fail to improve sleep in midlife women, study suggestsYoga and aerobic exercise interventions did not significantly reduce objectively measured sleep disturbances among midlife women who were experiencing hot flashes, suggests new research.


From tiny phytoplankton to massive tunaPhytoplankton are the foundation of ocean life, providing the energy that supports nearly all marine species. Levels of phytoplankton in an ocean area may seem like a good predictor for the amount of fish that can be caught there, but a new study finds that this relationship is not so straightforward.


'Like High-Definition From The Heavens'; NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the first public images from its new weather satellite. The agency says the satellite's data will lead to more accurate weather forecasts. (Image credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)


Common cause of both neurological diseases such as dementia and motor neuron diseasesCurrently, most scientists do not see a link between ALS and Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), or other dementias. New research confirms the relevance of a certain neurotoxic pathway. The article also confirms TDP-43 inhibition as a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of neurologic disorders, including Alzheimer disease.


Potential way to reduce drug cravings: Vagus nerve stimulation therapyA new preclinical study shows that vagus nerve stimulation therapy might have the potential to help people overcome drug addiction by helping them learn new behaviors to replace those associated with seeking drugs.


How race consciousness influences your likelihood of getting a flu shotA new study is the first to explore racial factors and how they may influence attitudes and behaviors towards the flu vaccine.


Fake News Did Not Affect the Election, Stanford-NYU Study Finds A careful analysis by two economists finds that phony journalism had little influence on voters and the outcome of the election. Read More


Basics: Gene-Modified Ants Shed Light on How Societies Are OrganizedDaniel Kronauer’s transgenic ants offer scientists the chance to explore the evolution of animal societies — and, perhaps, our own.







Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.