Earth’s water must have arrived here earlier than we thoughtOur best theory said meteorites brought water to Earth 4.5 million years ago, now it seems they struck far earlier, while our planet’s core was still forming
For the first time mouse pancreases have developed in rats, with islet cells used to cure mouse diabetes. This raises hopes we could grow human organs in pigs
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Drug compound halts Alzheimer's-related damage in mice
In some people, the normal brain protein tau collects into toxic tangles that damage brain cells and contributes to diseases such as Alzheimer's. Now, researchers report that they have found a drug can lower tau levels and prevent some of the neurological damage. The findings suggest a potential treatment for tau-related neurodegenerative diseases.
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Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice
Mouse pancreases grown in rats generate functional, insulin-producing cells that can revers diabetes when transplanted into mice with the disease, according to researchers.
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New Exosuit Fabric Could Boost Mobility in People with Disabilities
Knitting and weaving artificial muscles could help create soft exoskeletons that people with disabilities could wear under their clothes to help them walk, according to new research.
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Physicists patent detonation technique to mass-produce graphene
A detonation technique has been patented that can mass-produce graphene with three ingredients: hydrocarbon gas, oxygen and a spark plug.
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New tuberculosis therapy could be more potent than current treatments
Researchers have devised a potential drug regimen for tuberculosis that could cut the treatment time by up to 75 percent, while simultaneously reducing the risk that patients could develop drug-resistant TB.
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If These Trees Don't Get Time To Chill, Farmers Will Be Out On A Limb
Tree crops like pistachios, peaches and almonds need a certain amount of cold weather every year. But scientists say that California's climate may become too warm for them to grow there.
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Gene editing has saved the lives of two children with leukaemia
Two young girls are both doing well more than a year after being treated with gene-edited cells. Clinical trials of the therapy are now getting started
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Insidious wasp gets ahead by tunneling through host's head
A newly discovered wasp victimizes gall wasps by modifying their behavior and tunneling to freedom through their heads. It's a rare example of a parasite infecting a parasite, a process known as hypermanipulation, according to scientists.
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Climate change is messing with how these fish breed
One of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, report researchers. This could impact the ecology of northern lakes, which already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. For the study in Global Change Biology , researchers analyzed reproductive patterns of three-spine stickleback fish over half a century in Alaska’s B
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Urban collection of modern-day micrometeoritesMore than 100 billion micrometeorites (MMs) fall to Earth each year. Until now, scientists have believed that these particles could only be found in the cleanest environments, such as the Antarctic. Now they show that, contrary to that expectation, micrometeorites can be recovered from city rooftops and that, unlike those from the Antarctic, they are the youngest collected to date.
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Novel mechanism to stop tsunamis in their tracks proposed
Devastating tsunamis could be halted before hitting the Earth's shoreline by firing deep-ocean sound waves at the oncoming mass of water, new research has proposed.
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'Protective' DNA strands are shorter in adults who had more infections as infants
People who had more infections as babies harbor a key marker of cellular aging as young adults: the protective stretches of DNA which "cap" the ends of their chromosomes are shorter than in adults who were healthier as infants, report researchers.
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Murine study finds potential boost for ovarian cancer drug OlaparibResearchers have discovered that the metabolic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) helps cancer cells repair their DNA and found that inhibiting PGAM1 sensitizes tumors to the cancer drug Olaparib (Lynparza). Their findings suggest that this FDA-approved ovarian cancer medicine has the potential to treat a wider range of cancer types than currently indicated.
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Stink Bugs Could Add Cilantro Flavor to Red Wine
A stink bug-infused Pinot Noir may be just what wine drinkers need.
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Animals that grow designer organs for humans are a step closer
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AI rivals dermatologists at spotting early signs of skin cancer
A neural network performs as well as dermatologists at spotting cancerous moles and could let people check any skin lesions at home with an app
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Switching between freezing and flightAndreas Lüthi and his group at the FMI have identified two types of neurons in the amygdala, each of which generates a distinct fear response – freezing or flight. In addition, these two cell types interact, thus creating a balance, which shifts in one direction or the other, depending on the particular situation.
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Cancer cells grow by exploiting their neighbours
Cancer cells grow by stealing energy from neighboring cells, researchers have discovered.
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African trees kill both malaria mosquitos and the parasiteMalaria is one of the world’s most serious infectious diseases and affects more than 200 million people each year. Scientists have examined the bark from two African trees and found substances that can kill both the mosquitoes that transmit malaria, and the parasite itself.
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Split brain does not lead to split consciousnessA new research study contradicts the established view that so-called split-brain patients have a split consciousness. Instead, the researchers behind the study have found strong evidence showing that despite being characterized by little to no communication between the right and left brain hemispheres, split brain does not cause two independent conscious perceivers in one brain.
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Early onset of winter triggers evolution towards smaller snow voles in GraubündenResearchers have succeeded in documenting an extremely rare case of evolutionary adaptation “in action” among wild snow voles. The selective pressure triggered by several consecutive winters with early snowfall resulted in a genetic decrease in body weight. The reason: Smaller voles are fully grown by the time the weather conditions deteriorate.
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'Listening' to single cells may uncover cancer origins
Scientists have developed a method that allows them to accurately determine the genes expressed in single cells.
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Study shows how HIV breaches macrophage defenses, could be step towards cureScientists have identified how HIV is able to infect macrophages, a type of white blood cell integral to the immune system, despite the presence of a protective protein. They discovered a treatment that can maintain macrophage defenses which could be a key part of the puzzle of reaching a complete cure for HIV/AIDS.
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Scientists discover a way to sequence DNA of rare animals
Rare and extinct animals are preserved in jars of alcohol in natural history museum collections around the world, which provide a wealth of information on the changing biodiversity of the planet. But, scientists have not been able to effectively sequence DNA from these specimens until now - with a new way.
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Expanding point-of-care disease diagnostics with ultrasoundFast, accurate and inexpensive medical tests in a doctor's office are only possible for some conditions. To create new in-office diagnostics for additional diseases, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new technique that uses ultrasound to concentrate fluorescently labeled disease biomarkers otherwise impossible to detect with current equipment in a doctor's office setting. The markers' signal co
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Engineers develop 'smart glasses' that automatically focus on what wearer sees
The days of wearing bifocals or constantly swapping out reading glasses might soon come to an end.
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Fruit fly ‘growth spurt’ shares molecule with cancer cells
Scientists have discovered that the extreme growth experienced by fruit flies in their earliest stage of life shares biochemical similarities with the growth of cancer cells. The finding could offer a powerful new tool in the study of a molecule known to play a role in certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. “We found that the same molecule implicated in human cancers is also pr
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Økologi mindsker risiko for fedme og allergiDugfrisk EU-rapport slår fast, at økologiske fødevarer giver lavere risiko for helbredsproblemer som allergi, eksem og overvægt. Rapporten konkluderer ligeledes, at den økologiske produktion mindsker risikoen for udvikling af antibiotikaresistente bakterier.
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Low-cost iron hydroxide coatings can clean heavily contaminated waterAs one of the primary components of rust, iron hydroxides normally pose corrosive risks to health. An A*STAR team has found a way to turn iron hydroxides into an environmentally friendly coating that repeatedly absorbs large amounts of pollutants, such as dyes, from drinking water at room temperature.
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Light microscopy provides a deep look into protein structureLight microscopy continues to reveal the microscopic world at an ever increasing resolution. Using a new method coined COLD, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Erlangen have now visualized protein structures with a resolution of around 5 Å. COLD achieves this unprecedented resolution by operating at a temperature of minus 270 degrees Celsius. At such low temperature
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Area of brain linked to bipolar disorder pinpointed
A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain's hippocampus -- long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing -- was linked to bipolar disorder in a new study.
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Statins may hold keys to future cancer treatment, reseachers find
High doses of drugs commonly used to fight high cholesterol can destroy a rogue protein produced by a damaged gene that is associated with nearly half of all human cancers, researchers have found.
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Science Reveals That Hypnosis is Real
Ever lose yourself in a great book or movie? This is a form of hypnosis.
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iBiology and NRMN Q&A: Building Your Own Research Program
This Q&A, presented by iBiology in collaboration with the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN), will discuss strategies to help trainees interested in becoming principal investigators (PIs) build their own research programs. From: iBiology
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Log On, Sleep Better? Online Therapy for Insomnia Shows Promise
For Americans with insomnia, help falling asleep may soon be available online: A recent clinical trial found that a web-based therapy for insomnia was effective at helping people get more sleep.
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New MRI method aids long-term concussion prognosis
For concussion sufferers, physicians may now be able to predict early on who is more likely to continue experiencing symptoms months or years after the head-jarring event, using a new non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method
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Can prostate cancer metastasis be stopped before it starts?Metastasis, or spread of a tumor from the site of origin to additional organs, causes the vast majority of cancer-related deaths, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind metastasis remains limited. A research team has examined the multistep process that leads to metastasis and their work illuminates the role of prostate cancer stem cells that promote tumor growth and metastasis.
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Researchers discover potential new target for treating glioblastoma
Scientists have found a way to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer with low survival rates, by targeting a protein that drives growth of brain tumors, according to research.
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Light-speed camera snaps light’s “sonic boom” for the first time
A camera system that mimics a beam of light breaking its own speed limit could find uses in everything from medical imaging to astronomy
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Brain scan before antidepressant therapy may predict response
A functional MRI brain scan may help predict which patients will respond positively to antidepressant therapy, according to a new study.
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Researchers discover BRCA1 gene is key for blood forming stem cells
Researchers have found that the BRCA1 gene is required for the survival of blood forming stem cells, which could explain why patients with BRCA1 mutations do not have an elevated risk for leukemia. The stem cells die before they have an opportunity to transform into a blood cancer.
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How satellite data changed chimpanzee conservation efforts
Approximately 345,000 or fewer chimpanzees remain in the wild, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a substantial decline from the more than two million that existed a hundred years ago. Humans' closest genetic cousins, chimpanzees are an endangered species and scientists and conservationists are turning to the NASA-U.S. Geological Survey Landsat satellites to help
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Do Pheromones Affect Humans? An Israeli study found that the smell of women’s tears sunk men’s testosterone levels and sex drive.
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Social environment has sizable impact on health of miceFor the first time, research in mice shows that the genetic makeup of an individual's social partners contributes to their state of health. Unexpectedly, the genetics of social partners were found to affect wound healing and body weight as well as behavior. The methods used to detect 'social genetic effects' help future research into the mechanisms whereby one individual influences another.
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First step towards photonic quantum networkAdvanced photonic nanostructures are well on their way to revolutionizing quantum technology for quantum networks based on light. Researchers have now developed the first building blocks needed to construct complex quantum photonic circuits for quantum networks.
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Deep learning algorithm does as well as dermatologists in identifying skin cancerIn hopes of creating better access to medical care, researchers have trained an algorithm to diagnose skin cancer.
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Genome secrets of elusive human malaria species revealedThe genomes of the two least common species of human malaria parasites have been revealed. These sequences will enable improved surveillance and diagnosis of these rarer parasites that still cause more than 10 million malaria cases every year.
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Ancient, scary and alien-looking specimen forms a rarity in the insect world -- a new orderResearchers have discovered a 100-million-year-old insect preserved in amber with a triangular head, almost-alien and 'E.T.-like' appearance and features so unusual that it has been placed in its own scientific 'order' -- an incredibly rare event.
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Antarctic bottom waters freshening at unexpected rateIn the cold depths along the sea floor, Antarctic Bottom Waters are part of a global circulatory system, supplying oxygen-, carbon- and nutrient-rich waters to the world's oceans. Over the last decade, scientists have been monitoring changes in these waters. But a new study suggests these changes are themselves shifting in unexpected ways, with potentially significant consequences for the ocean an
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Jumping spiders court in colorBiologist discovers unique visual diversities for rare color vision in two groups of jumping spiders.
SAMME EMNE:
'Knitted muscles' provide powerResearchers have coated normal fabric with an electroactive material, and in this way given it the ability to actuate in the same way as muscle fibres. The technology opens new opportunities to design "textile muscles" that could, for example, be incorporated into clothes, making it easier for people with disabilities to move. The study, which has been carried out by researchers at Linköping Unive
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Why Fancy Baby Monitors Aren't Needed for Healthy BabiesToday's high-end baby monitors offer to measure babies' vital signs and send all the data to your phone. But does this help your baby?
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Scientists Plan Washington March in Response to TrumpWhat began as a political conversation on Reddit is turning into a national movement: Scientists are planning to march on Washington to express their support for rigorous scientific research.
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‘Resist’: Greenpeace Activists Hang Giant Banner in View of White HouseClimbers scaled a 300-foot crane to unfurl a sign protesting the policies of President Trump.
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Corralling stink bugs could lead to better wineTo wine makers, stink bugs are more than a nuisance. These tiny pests can hitch rides on grapes going through the wine making process, releasing stress compounds that can foul the smell and taste of the finished product. Now scientists report the threshold of stink bugs per grape cluster that will impact the integrity of the wine.
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Anxiety impairing quality of life for postmenopausal women, new study showsWhether anxiety increases common menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and sleep disruption or whether these symptoms cause increased anxiety remains an ongoing debate. Regardless of which comes first, multiple studies confirm that increased anxiety occurring during the menopause transition adversely affects a woman's quality of life. Now a new study documents the same association in postmenopaus
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This moon looks just like the Death Star, which isn't suspicious at all
Space Keep an eye on Tethys Everything is fine and totally normal, and Saturn's moon looks exactly like a planet-killing weapon of mass destruction.
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Two amazing fossil skeletons belong to new lizard Paleontologists picking through a bounty of fossils from Montana have discovered something unexpected—a new species of lizard from the late dinosaur era, whose closest relatives roamed in faraway Asia. They say the ancient lizard, which lived 75 million years ago in a dinosaur nesting site, fills in significant gaps in our understanding of how lizards evolved and spread during the dinosaur era. “
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Protesting Trump, Christo Halts River Project in ColoradoThe artist spent $15 million and more than 20 years on a vast artwork in Colorado to rival his masterpiece, “The Gates.” Now he’s walking away.
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World’s foremost institute on death and disease metrics gets massive cash boost Centre evaluates how public-health spending can improve mortality rates and disease burden, but many countries still do not record how people die.
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Climate change paper studies carbon uptake in ecosystemsA new report delves into one of the great uncertainties in predicting future climate: carbon uptake in ecosystems.
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Immigration fears among Latinos can impact baby size at birthWith deportation and discrimination fears currently on the minds of many in the United States, a study shows that the stress from an historic immigration raid is associated with Latina mothers delivering babies with lower birth weights, and sometimes early.
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Failing kelp forests can be rescued by nearby neighborsFailing kelp forests can be rescued by nearby neighbors, new research indicates. Investigators found that kelp forests can bounce back from destructive storms when the forests are in reasonably close proximity to healthy beds.
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If You Look at X-Rays or Moles for a Living, AI Is Coming for Your Job Pattern-recognition algorithms promise to drastically change the job description for doctors who decipher diagnoses from images.
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Studies offer new hope for diagnosis of Chiari-malformation in toy dog breedsResearchers from the University Of Surrey School Of Veterinary Medicine have made advances in the study of the Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia disorder in toy dogs.
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Expansion of Australian reserves for fairy possums might be at expense of other speciesCurrent nature reserves are not very suitable for the critically endangered Critically Endangered Leadbeater's Possum, but expansion of nature reserves might come at the expense of other Australian forest species, according to a study published January 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chris Taylor and Natasha Cadenhead from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues.
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NASA displays Apollo capsule hatch 50 years after fatal fireA relic from America's first space tragedy is finally going on display this week, 50 years after a fire on the launch pad killed three astronauts at the start of the Apollo moon program.
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Cosmic lenses support findings on accelerated universe expansionThe Hubble constant—the rate at which the Universe is expanding—is one of the fundamental quantities describing our Universe. A group of astronomers from the H0LiCOW collaboration, led by Sherry Suyu, Max Planck professor at the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and other telescopes in spac
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When it comes to predators, size mattersMarine reserves play an important role in sustaining ecosystem diversity and abundance. Their presence enables certain species to return to a natural size structure, which enables predators to control destructive prey.
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Earth's water must have arrived here earlier than we thoughtOur best theory said meteorites brought water to Earth 4.5 million years ago, now it seems they struck far earlier, while our planet’s core was still forming
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Dried-up slime could help microbes survive briny waters on MarsColonies of bacteria called biofilms live longer in Mars-like waters – especially if they were dried out first, as they would be after hitching a ride through space
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Vacuum transfer advance will help redefine kilogram next yearAbandoning the old prototype kilogram stored in Paris will require accurate mass measurements in a vacuum, something new techniques will make easier
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New hermit crab has candy-stick legs and a giant spoon-like clawA previously unknown Caribbean crab has been seen – it’s just a few millimetres long, sports bright red and white stripes, and has a large scoop-like claw
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Exceptionally preserved Jurassic sea life found in new fossil siteA trove of exceptionally preserved Jurassic marine fossils discovered in Canada, rare for recording soft-bodied species that normally don't fossilize, is expanding scientists' view of the rich marine life of the period.
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Are social networking sites good platforms for providing social support?A critical review of 10 years of research on social support via social networking sites led to the identification of current trends and the development of recommendations to guide future research. Key themes, including the role of social networks as avenues of social support and the dynamic relationship between the two, are examined in an article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social
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After 2015’s record year, fewer shark attacks in 2016 After 2015’s record-busting 98 shark attacks, scientists reported 81 unprovoked attacks worldwide in 2016 , in line with the five-year average of about 82 incidents annually. “The ocean is a foreign environment to humans, and when we enter the sea, we’re entering a wilderness.” Attacks worldwide remain on a slow upward trend as the human population grows and aquatic sports become more popular, sa
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First step towards photonic quantum networkAdvanced photonic nanostructures are well on their way to revolutionising quantum technology for quantum networks based on light. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have now developed the first building blocks needed to construct complex quantum photonic circuits for quantum networks.
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Study reveals that climate change could dramatically alter fragile mountain habitatsMountain regions of the world are under direct threat from human-induced climate change which could radically alter these fragile habitats, warn an international team of researchers
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Genome secrets of elusive human malaria species revealedThe genomes of the two least common species of human malaria parasites are revealed today in Nature. These sequences will enable improved surveillance and diagnosis of these rarer parasites that still cause more than 10 million malaria cases every year.
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Tonsillectomies offer only modest benefits, studies findRemoving tonsils modestly reduced throat infections in the short term in children with moderate obstructive sleep-disordered breathing or recurrent throat infections, according to a systematic review.
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New study reveals solidification cracking during welding of steelNew research has made a novel breakthrough in understanding how solidification cracking occurs during the welding of steel, an important engineering alloy.
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How water can split into two liquids below zeroDid you know that water can still remain liquid below zero degrees Celsius? It is called supercooled water and is present in refrigerators. At even smaller temperatures, supercooled water could exist as a cocktail of two distinct liquids. Unfortunately, the presence of ice often prevents us from observing this phenomenon. So physicists had the idea of replicating the tetrahedral shape of water mol
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Switching is not so simple: 100% renewable energy sources require overcapacityGermany decided to go nuclear-free by 2022. A CO2-emission-free electricity supply system based on intermittent sources, such as wind and solar - or photovoltaic (PV) - power could replace nuclear power. However, these sources depend on the weather conditions. In a new study published in EPJ Plus, Fritz Wagner from the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Germany analysed weather conditions
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Invasive sedge protects dunes better than native grass, study findsThe invasive species Carex kobomugi, or Asiatic sand sedge, was first found along the East Coast of the United States at New Jersey's Island Beach State Park in 1929. The species is aggressive, outcompeting native vegetation and reducing local biodiversity. In many places, land managers have made great efforts to remove it.
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Northumbria Uni fined after 'life-threatening' caffeine testUniversity is fined £400,000 after students are given 100 times too much caffeine in an experiment.
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Passing the chemical Turing test: Making artificial and real cells talkThe classic Turing test evaluates a machine's ability to mimic human behavior and intelligence. To pass, a computer must fool the tester into thinking it is human -- typically through the use of questions and answers. But single-celled organisms can't communicate with words. Now researchers have demonstrated that certain artificial cells can pass a basic laboratory Turing test by 'talking' chemica
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Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'The 'Green Revolution' of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production. Now researchers report a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer that could contribute to
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Diabetes drug takes aim at cancer's fuel sourceTo understand how metformin changes the biology of cancer cells, researchers have tested tumor cells before and after metformin treatment in non-diabetic cancer patients.
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Where is cybercrime really coming from? | Caleb BarlowCybercrime netted a whopping $450 billion in profits last year, with 2 billion records lost or stolen worldwide. Security expert Caleb Barlow calls out the insufficiency of our current strategies to protect our data. His solution? We need to respond to cybercrime with the same collective effort as we apply to a health care crisis, sharing timely information on who is infected and how the disease i
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Trashed electronics are piling up across Asia Environment E-waste has risen by 63 percent in just 5 years In East and Southeast Asia, e-waste volume increased by 63 percent between 2010 and 2015.
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Rise of the Immigrant Robo-LaborersFrom factories to oil rigs, robot workers present a tricky situation for a president that aims to be both pro-business and populist.
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Scientists use tumor-derived dendritic cells to slow tumor growthIn the human body, so-called dendritic cells are responsible for activating our immune system. While researchers previously believed that tumors could repress these dendritic cells – blocking an adequate natural cancer defense mechanism – a new study has painted a more positive picture.
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Direktør: Geotermi bør indsluses med forretningsmodel fra NordsøenErfaringer fra Nordsøens borearbejde og leverancemodeller skal implementeres i fjernvarmesektoren, hvis der skal gang i brugen af geotermisk energi. Det påpeger direktør i offshore-selskab
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How Being Bored Out of Your Mind Makes You More Creative An unoccupied mind might be the most fruitful mind. But boredom is harder and harder to come by.
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Inside the Shop Turning Ancient Rides into Sleeper Supercars Jonathan Ward's ICON takes out the engine, leaves the patina.
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NASA restarts rigorous vibration testing on the James Webb Space
TelescopeTesting on the James Webb Space Telescope successfully resumed last week at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland.
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Plant Biologists Welcome Their Robot OverlordsOld-school areas of plant biology are getting tech upgrades that herald more detailed, faster data collection
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Cheap carbon ‘roses’ pull radioactivity from water A new way to extract radioactivity from water could help purify the hundreds of millions of gallons of contaminated water stored after the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, say researchers. The team reports that their oxidatively modified carbon (OMC) material is inexpensive and highly efficient at absorbing radioactive metal cations, including cesium and strontium, toxic elements released into t
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Florida corals tell of cold spells and dust bowls past, foretell weather to comeScientists seeking an oceanic counterpart to tree rings that record past weather on land found one in Dry Tortugas National Park, where corals contain chemical signals of past water temperatures. Researchers found coral core evidence that the 60- to 85-year-long cycle called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) has taken place since the 1730s, influencing mainland rainfall, droughts, hurric
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Advanced geometry no secret to prehistoric architects in US SouthwestNew research reveals that the prehistoric Pueblo people of the American Southwest, despite not having a written language or number system, created architectural complexes using advanced geometry -- with incredible mathematical accuracy.
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Brain study shows impulsivity may weigh down some individualsResearchers have found a link between having an impulsive personality and a high body mass index (BMI).
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Study of electron movement on helium may impact the future of quantum computingThe future of quantum computing is a hot topic not only for experts but also in many commercial and governmental agencies. Rather than processing and storing information as bits in transistors or memories, which limit information to the binary '1' or '0', quantum computers would instead use quantum systems, such as atoms, ions, or electrons, as 'qubits' to process and store "quantum information" i
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When should doctors treat short children and teens with growth hormone?When is it appropriate to treat short children with growth hormone? The answer is not always clear-cut, with social, medical and ethical concerns coming into play. Experts in pediatric endocrinology have issued a new set of clinical guidelines for managing children and teens who have growth failure.
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Senior manager at cybersecurity firm arrested in MoscowA manager in charge of investigating hacking attacks at Russia's biggest cybersecurity firm has been arrested, the company said Wednesday.
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How enzymes braved the cold a billion years ago Some three billion years ago, when life on Earth was still in its infancy, hot springs, geysers, and volcanic hydrothermal vents were burgeoning with single-cell organisms. Temperatures hovered around a burning hot 180 degrees. In a few hundred million years, the basic elements of our genetic code and cellular machinery all came into being. Then it started to get colder. Standing on the equator 1
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Google Goes After Bad Ads and Bad Sites That Profit From Them Google wants you to know that it's on a rampage against bad ads—a problem that has become especially pressing as fake news sites try to cash in on clicks.
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Big science has a buzzword problem Moonshots, road maps, frameworks and more are proliferating, but few can agree on what these names even mean. Nature 541 450 doi: 10.1038/541450a
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BILLEDER Før og nu: Jorden er under voldsom forandringUrbanisering, oversvømmelser og rydning af regnskov. Ny billedserie fra NASA viser klodens forvandlig over tid.
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Symposium skyder gang i demenshandlingsplan Politikere og aktører samles torsdag på Christiansborg, hvor demenhandslingsplanen vil blive præsenteret og debatteret.
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Florida corals tell of cold spells and dust bowls past, foretell weather to comeScientists seeking an oceanic counterpart to the tree rings that document past weather patterns on land have found one in the subtropical waters of Dry Tortugas National Park near the Florida Keys, where long-lived boulder corals contain the chemical signals of past water temperatures. By analyzing coral samples, USGS researchers and their colleagues have found evidence that an important 60- to 85
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The apple maggot fly—how an altered sense of smell could drive the formation of new species"Two months ago, we were congratulating ourselves on a fair crop of winterapples. To all appearance, they were freer from worms than we had known them in this section for years. But, alas! our hopes are again blasted. The apple-maggot seems to be as prolific as ever. Two weeks ago, we overhauled two hundred and fifty bushels of apples that we had gathered and placed in store for winter use; and of
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Testing the waters: Assessing impact of hydraulic fracturing on aquatic animalsResearchers at the University of Alberta have conducted the first-ever study to use hydraulic fracturing fluids to examine effects on aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout. Horizontal drilling with high-volume hydraulic fracturing is a practice used globally for extracting oil and gas from tight reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing uses large quantities of water and poses many environmental hazards i
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New guide helps public understand role of DNA in criminal investigationsResearchers from King's working with the European Forensic Genetics Network of Excellence (EUROFORGEN) are launching a guide in partnership with the charity Sense about Science, to address misconceptions about DNA analysis and profiling and share exciting new developments in this area.
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Cash crunch for anti-Armageddon asteroid missionA mission to smash a spacecraft into an asteroid moon to alter its trajectory, a possible dry-run for an exercise in saving the Earth from Armageddon, has run into a cash crunch.
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Abrupt climate change events from the past could help predict the ones aheadCoping with climate change will already be difficult enough without worrying about Dansgaard-Oescheger (DO) events that could come on top of it. However, their possible occurrence cannot be dismissed: We need to know more about these events, how they impacted our planet in the past, and how they could continue to do so in the future. The world's most well-preserved ice cores could provide all this
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Your next social network could pay you for postingYou may well have found this article through Facebook. An algorithm programmed by one of the world's biggest companies now partially controls what news reaches 1.8 billion people. And this algorithm has come under attack for censorship, political bias and for creating bubbles that prevent people from encountering ideas they don't already agree with.
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Smart cities and the quality of life in post-apartheid GautengThe Gauteng City-Region Observatory (GCRO) is a partnership between Wits, the University of Johannesburg and the Gauteng provincial and local government.
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Scientists reveal game of thrones in crab worldCrabs that invade smaller crab species' habitat overpower and evict incumbents from their burrows, but the two species ultimately co-exist and join forces against other invading crabs in a game of thrones once they establish territorial boundaries, new research finds.
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Gene transcription found to increase after death for some cells(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that gene transcription in an organism that has died continues for several days. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Biology, the team describes their work analyzing gene expression in animals after their death.
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Possible way to test black hole information paradox in the lab(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers, one with National Taiwan University, the other with École Polytechnique in France has come up with a way to test the idea of Hawking radiation and the information paradox in a lab setting. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Pisin Chen and Gerard Mourou describe their idea and the likely difficulties that researchers would face in tryi
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Brain Awareness Week 2017: New Downloadable Materials Brain Awareness Week 2017 (March 13-19) is approaching and new materials are now available for both adults and kids on the Brain Awareness Week (BAW) website! The fact sheets are easy for BAW partners to print and distribute and provide an easy way to disseminate concise information on the brain to a broad audience. The Dana Alliance’s newly translated materials are particularly useful for intern
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Making distributed storage highly consistentOne of the fundamental open challenges in computer science is effective data storage. The socio-economic value and scale of information increases day by day and researchers at the Madrid research institute IMDEA Networks have been working to identify ways to ensure not only that digitally stored data endures, but also that it is readily available, reliable and, above all, consistent.
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What trade deals can teach us about the animal kingdomFrom Brexit to Donald Trump's first acts as US president, the news has been full of discussion about trade agreements recently. But trade agreements aren't just relevant to human politics. Exchange of commodities happens in the animal world too, both within and between species. And by applying theories derived from human economics, we can understand why some animals behave as they do.
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A Theory of Nothing—a novel approach to exposing how science really worksHave you ever wondered what inspired the United States to initiate the mission to put a man on the Moon? Or who first thought of building the Large Hadron Collider or the massive Square Kilometre Array radio telescope?
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Machine-learning program predicts public transport use in SingaporeFrom schools and shops to hospitals and hotels, a modern city is made of many different parts. Urban planners must take account of where these services are located when designing efficient transit networks. A*STAR researchers have developed a machine-learning program to accurately recreate and predict public transport use, or 'ridership', based on the distribution of land-use and amenities in Sing
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Acupuncture for Infantile Colic A recent study [PDF] looks at the use of acupuncture in the treatment of infantile colic. If it seems counterintuitive to stick needles into a crying baby, in this case your intuition is a reasonable guide. Time reports about the study in an article titled “ The Soothing Benefit of Acupuncture for Babies ,” which begins: Acupuncture may help babies who cry too much, according to a new study publi
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WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Broadchurch It's time you got into this suspenseful British whodunit.
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Monero, the Drug Dealer’s Cryptocurrency of Choice, Is on Fire As the black market caught on to its anonymity properties, Monero became the fastest growing cryptocurrency of 2016.
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California vs. Trump: La Résistance Could Fall Victim to La Récession California has the US's largest single economy, so its fortunes affect everyone.
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A Très Dinky Self-Driving Shuttle Nudges Paris Into the Future The world of self-driving cars has to start somewhere.
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Massive database collates information about human proteinsMuch remains to be understood about how proteins in the human body works in unison; however a newly developed resource is giving scientists a more complete picture of how the proteome makes us uniquely human. MissingProteinPedia, a database developed by a collaborative research group lead by scientists at Macquarie University, could not only help researchers learn more about the location and use –
Rapport: Ekstreme forandringer i klimaet er her nu - og det bliver værreMyndighederne skal tænke klimaændringerne ind overalt, opfordrer professor Jørgen E. Olesen på baggrund af en ny dyster EU-rapport.
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The Alzheimer’s problem: Why are we struggling to find a cure?Touted breakthroughs keep coming to nothing. Are we close to a cure, or have we got the disease all wrong? The results of three trials should tell us
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Plants' chemical messages keep pests movingWhen leaf beetle larvae eat goldenrod, the damaged plant emits a chemical message, which informs the insect that the plant is damaged and is a poor source of food. The airborne chemicals are also noticed by undamaged neighboring plants, warning them to produce their own chemical defenses so they are ready for approaching enemies.
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D-Wave: Scientists Line Up for World's Most Controversial Quantum ComputerDespite skepticism about their full potential, many researchers are eager to use D-Wave's machines
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Hit threatening asteroids’ bright spots to deflect themPaler, softer rock is the best target if we want to knock incoming asteroids off course, suggests a study of the Chelyabinsk meteor that blew up over Russia
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Become a citizen scientist and help preserve California's biodiversityWould you like to become a volunteer citizen scientist helping to document and analyze California's rich biodiversity? If so, you can be among 1,000 volunteers who will collect 18,000 samples of soil and aquatic sediment from across the state through a new University of California program called CALeDNA that intends to revolutionize conservation in California by the end of this year.
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Religious education contributes to community cohesionReligious education is key to community cohesion finds new research following a survey of nearly 12,000 13- to 15-year-old students attending schools across the United Kingdom.
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Voice Analysis Should Be Used with Caution in CourtAlthough voice recognition is often presented as evidence in legal cases, its scientific basis can be shaky
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Speeding up the rate of reaction of a potential catalyst for energy storageOne reason we can't bottle summer sunshine and save the solar energy for rainy days is that we don't have an efficient way to store it. Nature stores energy in chemical bonds, like when plants photosynthesize our food. Researchers are trying to design catalysts based on inexpensive metals to store energy like nature does.
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Computer cluster will calculate gravitational waves faster than the institute's previous supercomputerThe new supercomputer "Minerva" has been put into operation at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute, AEI). With 9,504 compute cores, 38 TeraByte memory and a peak performance of 302.4 TeraFlop/s it is more than six times as powerful as its predecessor. The scientists of the department "Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity" can now compute significantly
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NuSTAR finds new clues to 'chameleon supernova'"We're made of star stuff," astronomer Carl Sagan famously said. Nuclear reactions that happened in ancient stars generated much of the material that makes up our bodies, our planet and our solar system. When stars explode in violent deaths called supernovae, those newly formed elements escape and spread out in the universe.
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NASA's Aurora-Watching Rocket Campaign Blasts OffNASA is launching rockets into auroras.
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Early Meteorite Bits Reveal Clues About Solar System's EvolutionMany meteorites found on Earth are remnants of one titanic solar-system collision that took place more than 460 million years ago. But researchers have found the composition of space rocks before then are quite different than those today.
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Using Big Data to understand immune system responsesAn enzyme found in many bacteria, including the bacterium that gives us strep throat, has given mankind a cheap and effective tool with which to edit our own genes. This technology, called CRISPR, is also being used to understand how the immune system responds to a viral attack.
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Can IBM’s principles for taming AI win over public doubts?Technology giant IBM has unveiled key pledges to encourage us to trust in artificial intelligence. Will it work, wonders Jamais Cascio
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Ny præsident: Amerikanske forskere får mundkurv påMemo til forskerne: Tal ikke med offentligheden, og hold jer fra de sociale medier indtil videre.
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Fixes: If Sugar Is Harmless, Prove ItThe science writer Gary Taubes says the evidence linking sugar to obesity and diabetes is inconclusive, but that doesn’t mean sugar is safe.
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Taiwan economy rallies thanks to electronics demandTaiwan's economy notched up its best performance in almost two years in the final quarter of 2016, with strong demand for electronics offsetting a plunge in mainland tourists, according to official data released Wednesday.
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Americans distrustful after hacking epidemic: surveyNearly two-thirds of Americans have experienced some kind of data theft or fraud, leaving many mistrustful of institutions charged with safeguarding their information, a poll showed Wednesday.
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France issues first 'green bonds' with record 7 bln euro saleFrance has issued its first "green bonds" with a record seven billion euro ($7.5 billion) sale, paving the way for the establishment of a genuine market in renewable energy bonds.
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Climate-ravaged corals recover poorly: studyCoral reefs that survive rapid bleaching fuelled by global warming remain deeply damaged, with little prospect of full recovery, researchers said Wednesday.
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New moth in Europe: A southern hemisphere species now resident in PortugalAs travelling in the 21st century is easier than ever, so is for species to make their way to new areas, sometimes increasing their distributional range, or even establishing whole new habitats. On the other hand, when they leave their natural predators and competitors behind, and find abundance of suitable resources somewhere else, they are running the risk of becoming invasive.
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Ubiquitous but overlooked, fluid is a source of muscle tensionTouch your toes. Feel that familiar tension in your leg muscles? A new Brown University study suggests that one source of the tension might be something that scientists have always known was in your muscle fibers, but never accounted for: fluid.
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New paper explains consequences of plant disappearance in salt marshes on the Atlantic coastAn important new research paper, titled "Response of Sediment Bacterial Communities to Sudden Vegetation Dieback in a Coastal Wetland," examines the consequences of plant disappearance and changes in salt marsh soil communities following Sudden Vegetation Dieback (SVD).
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Bedre kræftbehandling med tidlig PET-scanning PET-scanninger kan give hurtigere diagnosticering og dermed en mere effektiv opsporing og behandling af kræftsygdomme.
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Region støtter forskning i lokalbehandling af hudkræftNyt forskningsprojekt vil forsøge at kombinere særlig laserteknik med medicinsk behandling.
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This App Will Be a Game-Changer for Getting Birth Control without the ACANurx provides birth-control prescriptions and delivery, helping reach even women in health-care deserts.
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Early Menopause Linked to a Woman's Reproductive HistoryThe age at which women enter menopause may be influenced by earlier events in their reproductive life.
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Målinger af radon bør laves omNy undersøgelse af radonsug fastslår, at de gængse kontrolmålinger af passive sugemetoder ikke er tilstrækkelige.
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Dapper Snapper vs Gassy Bass If you were a fish, what kind would you be? A suave red snapper with a penchant for upscale style? Or a silly bass with an intestinal problem? Pick your team and let the best fish swim to victory! Dapper Snapper Did you know? – Red snapper can grow to about 40 inches, weigh up to 50 pounds and live more than 50 years. Gassy Bass Did you know? – Bass have a “sixth sense”, called the “lateral line,
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Climate Change Activist’s Barefoot Walk Across America Ends in TragedyMark Baumer of Rhode Island was 100 days into his trek to bring attention to environmental issues when he was struck and killed by an S.U.V. in Florida.
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Sparse models for Computer VisionThe representation of images in the brain is known to be sparse. That is, as neural activity is recorded in a visual area ---for instance the primary visual cortex of primates--- only a few neurons are active at a given time with respect to the whole population. It is believed that such a property reflects the efficient match of the representation with the statistics of natural scenes. Applying su
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Study links teacher training, improved student writing skillsA correlation between teacher professional development and improvements has been found in academic writing by English learners in grades 7-12.
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Designing diagnostic labs that are safe, specific and sustainableTo detect an outbreak early — whether Ebola, Zika or influenza — healthcare workers must have a local, trustworthy diagnostic lab, say researchers who are working on improving these measures.
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Bill Gates May Be a Trillionaire in 25 Years Bill Gates may be the world's first trillionaire in 25 years. That's according to a projection by Oxfam, using an 11% rate of return that has been typical in recent years for the world's most wealthy individuals.
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Starting periods at a young age is linked to early menopauseGirls who begin menstruating before their 12th birthday may be more likely to hit the menopause before age 40, and find it more difficult to have children
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The folds in your brain may be linked to how neurotic you areBrain scans of 500 people have revealed an association between the thickness and structure of the cortex, and how neurotic or open a person is
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Cats may be as intelligent as dogs, say scientistsCats are as good as dogs at certain memory skills and may be just as smart, say scientists.
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“Excellence R Us”: university research and the fetishisation of excellence submitted by /u/Bubblbu [link] [comments]
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Five Teams Race to the Moon by Year's EndFinalists in the Google Lunar X Prize have until December 31st to liftoff
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Fake News 'Vaccine' Could Stop Spread of False InformationWarning people that they may see misleading information can nudge them toward the truth.
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On Energy, Trump Heads in the Opposite Direction from Public OpinionA new report suggests Americans overwhelmingly believe that renewable energy should be prioritized over fossil fuels.
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US scientists raise bar for sea level by 2100In the last days of Barack Obama's administration, US government scientists warned even more sea level rise is expected by century's end than previously estimated, due to rapid ice sheet melting at the poles.
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Pope spurs Republicans to shift climate viewsAfter Pope Francis framed climate change as a moral issue in his second encyclical, conservative Republicans shifted and began to see environmental dilemmas in the same way, according to a new study led by Cornell University communication researchers.
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On Energy, Trump Heads in the Opposite Direction of Public OpinionA new report suggests Americans overwhelmingly believe that renewable energy should be prioritized over fossil fuels.
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Social Media Made the World Care About Standing Rock—and Helped It Forget Donald Trump's memo on the Dakota Access Pipeline is more powerful than a hashtag.
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With Manchester by the Sea’s Oscar Nods, Amazon’s Big Bet Pays Off Going all-in on theatrical release helped Amazon Studios grab the first Best Picture nod for any streaming service.
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How Far Will Optimism Get Us? According to Tali Sharot, our innate optimism bias is necessary, but needs to be taken in doses.
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Does Your Brain Lag in the Morning? Put On Your Thinking Cap-puccino Does a shot of espresso before walking into an exam make a difference?
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Are New Drugs for Hepatitis C Safe? A Report Raises ConcernsDrugs approved in recent years that can cure hepatitis C may have severe side effects, including liver failure, a new report suggests.
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The great unknown: Risk-taking behaviour in adolescentsAdolescents are more likely to ignore information that could prompt them to rethink risky decisions. This may explain why information campaigns on risky behaviors such as drug abuse tend to have only limited success, conclude researchers.
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A brain wide chemical signal that enhances memoryHow does heightened attention improve our mental capacity? This is the question tackled by new research, which reveals a chemical signal released across the brain in response to attention demanding or arousing situations.
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Human rotavirus manipulates immune response to maintain infectionUsing a laboratory model of the human gut, scientists have found that although human rotavirus does not succeed at preventing initial steps of the defense response, it is able to minimize subsequent steps that could stop its growth. Using a model of the live human gut, the scientists showed strategies to counter the viral response.
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Is There an Element Zero?Is it possible to make an element zero? Does it already exist?
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What holds the heart together: Optical tweezers unveil a secret of muscle powerOur hearts beat a life long. With every beat our heart muscle contracts and expands. How this can work throughout an entire life remains largely a mystery. Researchers have now measured the forces acting between the building blocks titin and ?-actinin which stabilize the muscle.
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Law aiding infants at risk for hearing lossA Utah law has led to increased early identification of infants with hearing loss due to a congenital infection, according to a new study. The study is the first to assess how implementation of a state-wide screening can pick up hearing loss in infants due to congenital cytomegalovirus.
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How satellite data changed chimpanzee conservation effortsChimpanzees are an endangered species and scientists and conservationists are turning to the NASA-US Geological Survey Landsat satellites to help bolster their efforts to preserve their forest homes.
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The contradictory catalystUsing a natural catalyst from bacteria for inspiration, researchers have now reported the fastest synthetic catalysts to date for hydrogen production-- producing 45 million hydrogen molecules per second.
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Watching gene editing at work to develop precision therapiesEngineers have developed methods to observe gene editing in action, and they’re putting those capabilities to work to improve genetic engineering techniques.
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Positive social support from a spouse could have negative consequences, new research showsOffering your spouse what you believe to be positive support could have negative physiological effects on them, according to new research.
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Head injuries in football can cause unexpected consequences years laterSport-related concussion, particularly in youth athletes, and the ethical implications of risky sports participation for children, have been the focus of recent research. Investigators report that the longterm effects of repeated head injuries may not surface until years after the injury.
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Emotion + Reason May Be Evolution’s 1-2 Punch Scientific American video explains the evolutionary value of human emotions.
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Speedy TB Treatment Could Combat Drug ResistanceTB treatments stretch over nine months, so many people don't stick to their meds, and antibiotic resistance develops. But now doctors may have found a way to speed up the treatment
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‘Sip’ info from your smartwatch, ‘whoosh’ it to your phone With their small screens and our bulky fingers, smartwatches aren’t the easiest devices to control. Researchers have invented new ways to interact with them that ease the fumbling, however. Among their enhancements to LG and Sony watches: Scrolling through apps running your fingers along the watch band Launching eight smartwatch apps by tapping key points on the watch case (or bezel) Rejecting ph
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Predator or not? Invasive snails hide even when they don't knowRecognizing the signs of a predator can mean the difference between living to see another day and becoming another critter's midday snack.
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Medical, scientific image analysis vastly improved by new softwareMany current medical and scientific practices involve the analysis of highly complicated images, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in order to study medical problems for patients or biochemical processes for scientific research. Previously, doctors and scientists would have to spend hours, days or even weeks painstakingly analyzing these ima
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Is Burnt Toast Bad for You? The Science of Cancer and AcrylamideA new warning about the health risks of eating browned potatoes and burnt toast draws a link between a chemical called acrylamide and an increased risk of cancer.
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Deep brain stimulation studies in Alzheimer's disease pose ethical challengesPromising, early studies of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease have paved a path for future clinical trials, but there are unique ethical challenges with this vulnerable population regarding decision making and post-study treatment access that need to be addressed as they ramp up, researchers argue.
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In utero conditions can affect a teen's brain developmentWhat happens to a fetus in the womb can affect the brain later in life, new research confirms. The research team followed pairs of genetically identical twins from birth into their teenage years. They measured the twins' weight at birth to assess whether different environmental factors had affected them while in the womb.
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Study unveils new way to starve tumors to deathScientists have exploited a common weak point in cancer cell metabolism, forcing tumor cells to reveal the backup fuel supply routes they rely on when this weak point is compromised. Mapping these secondary routes, the researchers also identified drugs that block them. They now are planning a small clinical trial in cancer patients to evaluate this treatment strategy.
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Pressmedd.


​Bebisknapp ska ge plats i kollektivtrafiken

Bebisknappen - 2017-01-25 06:29 CET
Nu lanseras Bebisknappen, en knapp som ska underlätta för alla gravida att göra sin graviditet synlig, till exempel i kollektivtrafiken.

Life Sciences BPO Market to reach US$ 505 Billion by 2024 : Coherent Market Insights

Coherent Market Insights Pvt Ltd - 2017-01-24 03:02 EST
Life Sciences BPO Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast to 2024

Pressinbjudan: Örebro kommun och Polisen i samarbete för ett tryggare Vivalla

Örebro kommun - 2017-01-25 08:00 CET

Fujitsu tar fram säkerhetslösningar åt Hydro

Fujitsu Sverige - 2017-01-24 13:11 CET
Fujitsu Finland Oy har tecknat ett avtal om att leverera säkerhetslösningar till Norsk Hydro ASA, ett av världens största produktionsbolag för integrerad aluminiumframställning. Fujitsu kommer att förse Hydro med dygnet runt supporten Global Security Incident Response för att riskreducera, möta utökade och ändrade efterlevnads- och lagkrav samt säkra känslig data mot de växande cyberhoten.

Fler anmälningar om bluffakturor under 2016

Visma - 2017-01-25 07:15 CET
Förra året gjordes 14 600 polisanmälningar om bluffakturor, en ökning med drygt två procent jämfört med året före. Det visar en sammanställning som Visma gjort av ny statistik från Brottsförebyggande rådet, Brå.

LED-strålkastare återkallas från konsument

Elsäkerhetsverket - 2017-01-24 11:29 CET
En LED-strålkastare uppvisar flera allvarliga brister, bland annat att jordkabeln inte är ansluten. Elsäkerhetsverket har därför beslutat att företaget Sunshineled AB ska återkalla alla sålda exemplar.

BioCool vann Årets Grandpris

BioCool AB - 2017-01-24 23:25 CET
Vid invigningen av årets Västerbottensdagar på Grand Hôtel tilldelades Maria Forssell, vd för Biocool årets Grandpris.

Slik lever du 10 år lengre

Cappelen Damm - 2017-01-24 16:48 CET
En kort guide til et langt liv. I den lettleste boken "10 tips om helse" får du tips for hvordan du kan forbedre din helse, føle deg bedre og leve lenger. Studier har vist at når det gjelder livslengde, utgjør genetikken cirka 25 prosent, mens betydningen av livsstil utgjør 75 prosent. Livsstilen din er avgjørende, og det er altså du selv som avgjør hvordan du vil, eller ikke vil, eldes.

POSK satsar på kyrkomusiken i kyrkovalet

Partipolitiskt obundna i Svenska kyrkan (POSK) - 2017-01-23 08:18 CET
Under helgen den 21-22 januari har Partipolitiskt obundna i Svenska kyrkan (POSK) haft kyrkodagar i Råsunda kyrka i Solna. Drygt 60 medlemmar från hela landet samlades för att lyssna på föredrag av professor emeritus Oloph Bexell, Peter Sjunnesson, programchef för kyrkomusikerprogrammet, och professor emeritus Sven-Erik Brodd som knöt an till POSKs tre valfrågor som presenterades under helgen.

Antacid Medications Market - Global Industry Insights, Trends and Opportunity Analysis, 2016–2024

Coherent Market Insights Pvt Ltd - 2017-01-24 06:00 EST
Antacid Medications Market report categorizes the global market by end-user and geography. It also gives information on the Industry Insights, Trends, Outlook, and Opportunity Analysis

En ny ultrakompakt industridator C6015 för små utrymmen

Beckhoff Automation AB - 2017-01-24 08:15 CET
Extremt kostnadseffektiv och kompakt. Erbjuder flexibla monteringslösningar även för användningsområden som på grund av kostnader eller plats, hittills inte varit möjligt inom industri-PC tekniken. C6015 som endast är 82 x 82 x 40 mm stor med flerkärning processor speciellt avsedd för tuffa industrimiljöer, visar på styrkan i skalbarhet av PC-baserad styrteknik från Beckhoff.

3D Printing for Medical Sector Market to Surpass US$ 1.1 Billion by 2024

Coherent Market Insights Pvt Ltd - 2017-01-25 01:01 EST
3D Printing for Medical Sector Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast to 2024

MediClin Standort Bad Düben stellt Weichen für Zukunft

MediClin - 2017-01-24 10:04 CET
2017 Investitionen in Höhe von über 4 Mio. Euro geplant

Global Market Status - Toy Model Sales 2017 (Wood, Plastic, Metal, Others) Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 08:01 EST

QNet supported the idea of the Council to combat illegal schemes / QNet поддержала идею Совета по борьбе с нелегальными схемами

QNET - 2017-01-25 13:50 SGT

Global Market Status - Industrial Fire Brigade Training Program and Services 2017 Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 02:25 EST

​Lotta Schibbye Fredrikson ska utveckla ledarskapet på UR

UR - Sveriges Utbildningsradio AB - 2017-01-24 11:00 CET
Nu är det klart att Lotta Schibbye Fredrikson blir chef för kultur och ledarskap på UR. En nyinrättad chefsroll som innebär att hon får ansvaret för att leda utvecklingen av kultur, ledarskap och medarbetarskap på UR. Lotta Schibbye Fredrikson kommer närmast från Hammer & Hanborg Sverige AB där hon varit vd. Hon tillträder sin nya tjänst på UR i mars.

Zenitel ensures safety onboard Norway`s busiest ferries (norsk versjon vedlagt)

Zenitel - 2017-01-24 13:08 CET
OSLO, NORWAY, – Zenitel, an international leader in critical communication solutions, have delivered safety communications and entertainment equipment as part of Norway`s largest ferry contract.

A Bard act to follow

VisitScotland - 2017-01-24 16:01 GMT
Get inspired on a monumental journey this Burns night, Wednesday 25 January!

Global Impregnated Activated Carbon Market Research Report 2017 ( Water&Wastewater Treatment , Air Filtration , Others ) - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 04:30 EST

Europe Food Can Coatings Market Report 2017 ( Phenolic Resins , Epoxy Coating , Acrylic Resin Coating , Others ) - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 01:37 EST

Peluang lanjut pengajian guna panduan Pameran Pendidikan Facon

QNET - 2017-01-24 09:03 GMT

Global Electrical Insulating Varnish Market Research Report 2017 (Motors , Transformers , Home Appliance , Others ) - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 00:54 EST

Offizielles Kompendium zu Affinity Designer in deutscher Sprache veröffentlicht

Affinity - 2017-01-24 10:03 GMT
Das offizielle Kompendium zu Affinity Designer ist nun in englischer und deutscher Sprache verfügbar. Beide Versionen sind momentan als Sonderangebot zur Erstauflage mit 20 % Rabatt erhältlich.

Allt fler sällskapsdjur får tillgång till CT

Evidensia Djursjukvård - 2017-01-24 10:18 CET
Nu kan även Evidensia Valla Djursjukhus i Linköping erbjuda CT för sällskapsdjur. CT (även kallat skiktröntgen och datortomografi) har funnits på humansidan i många år, men inom djursjukvård är det fortfarande bara ett fåtal djursjukhus som har denna typ av diagnostiska utrustning. Sedan CT blev tillgänglig kan fullständiga diagnoser ställas på ett helt annat sätt än tidigare.

Tallink Silja: Schiffe auf der Route Stockholm-Riga ab sofort ab Värtahamnen

Tallink Silja GmbH - 2017-01-24 11:09 CET
Ab Dienstag, 24. Januar 2017, legen alle Tallink Silja-Schiffe, die Stockholm anlaufen, im modernisierten Värtahamnen an. Die Schiffe der Route Riga-Stockholm – Romantika und Isabelle – werden ebenfalls von Frihamnen dorthin verlegt.

Ökat intresse för SUV:ar bidrar till Ford Europas försäljningsökning på 5 procent för 2016

Ford Motor Company AB - 2017-01-24 09:30 CET
Under 2016 sålde Ford nära 1,4 miljoner fordon på sina 20 europeiska marknader, och ökade därmed sin försäljning med fem procent jämfört med fjolåret. De positiva siffrorna går bland annat att härleda till ett ökat intresse för Fords SUV:ar, och företagets starka position på transportbilsmarknaden. Även på den svenska marknaden ökade Ford sina marknadsandelar jämfört med föregående år.

Her er Norges morsomste skademeldinger

If Skadeforsikring - 2017-01-24 12:14 CET
«For å unngå kollisjon kjørte jeg på den andre bilen.» Skademeldingene til forsikringsselskapene kan lett bli ufrivillig morsomme. Her er de beste.

Global Market Status - Home Textiles 2017 (Baffeta, Ramie cotton fabric, Silk fabric) Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 08:01 EST

Atria lanserar Lagerbergs kyckling på foodservice

Atria Scandinavia - 2017-01-24 08:30 CET
Atria lanserar svensk kyckling under varumärket Lagerbergs på foodservicemarknaden. Kyckling är ett omtyckt och klimatsmart måltidsalternativ och det finns en stor efterfrågan på svensk kyckling.

Global Thin Clients in Hardware Sales Market 2017 By Application, Product, Sales and Forecast 2022 Report By Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 04:33 EST

Global Chlorothalonil Market Research Report 2017 ( Vegetable , Fruiter , Oil Crops , Other ) - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 02:59 EST

Podden Hållbart: Eldriven lådcykel alternativ till bilen i Brf Blicken i Haninge

Riksbyggen - 2017-01-25 07:50 CET
I Brf Blicken i Haninge driver Riksbyggen tillsammans med Vinnova och KTH ett forskningsprojekt för att kunna minska bilberoendet och därmed även antalet p-platser. I det senaste avsnittet av podcasten Hållbart intervjuar Riksbyggens hållbarhetschef Charlotta Szczepanowski Peter Ekman, projektledare för Brf Blicken om forskningsprojektet.

Global Medical Absorbent Lap Sponges Market 2017

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 05:23 EST

​Mobilparkering i Malmö ökar med 90 procent

EasyPark AB - 2017-01-25 08:00 CET
Att använda mobilen som betalmedel vid parkering fortsätter att öka kraftigt i Malmö. Färska siffror visar att ökningen under 2016 var 90 procent jämfört med 2015.

Europe HBTU Market 2017 (Pharmaceutical grade, Chemical grade and Others) Sales, Share, Consumption, Import, Export, Price, Cost, Gross Margin (Demands, Trends) : Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 01:06 EST

AFVARSLENDE BEREDSKABSMEDDELELSE VEDR. BRAND PÅ FYN

Rigspolitiet - 2017-01-24 12:29 CET

I Linköping ska alla få vara delaktiga på lika villkor

Linköpings kommun - 2017-01-24 14:08 CET
I dag, 24 februari, antar kommunfullmäktige i Linköping ett nytt funktionshinderpolitiskt program. Målet för programmet "Ett delaktigt Linköping" är att skapa ett samhälle där alla kan delta och leva på lika villkor.

Europe Erythropoietin Market 2017 (Epoetin-alfa, Epoetin-beta, Darbepoetin-alfa and Others) Size, Share, Trends and Forecast 2022 Research Report : Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 01:46 EST

Global Market For Synthetic Hair Extension Sales 2017 (Animal feed, Chemicals intermediate, Foods and flavors) Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 08:28 EST

Global Nano Silver Market Research Report 2017: By Product, Application, Manufacturer, Sales and Segmentation - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 00:16 EST

Global Whiteboard Magnet Market Research Report 2017: By Product, Application, Manufacturer, Sales and Segmentation - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 02:35 EST

Global Market Status - Smart Ticketing 2017 (Ticket Machine, E-Ticket, E-Kiosk) Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 05:12 EST

Global Steering Knuckles Market 2017 (Passenger Vehicle And Commercial Vehicle) By Manufacturers Analysis And Forecast: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 01:43 EST

​Mobilparkering i Lund ökar med 147 procent

EasyPark AB - 2017-01-25 08:00 CET
Att använda mobilen som betalmedel vid parkering fortsätter att öka kraftigt i Lund. Färska siffror visar att ökningen under 2016 var 147 procent jämfört med 2015.

Global Acrylic Paint Market Research Report 2017: By Product, Application, Manufacturer, Sales and Segmentation - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-25 01:03 EST

Global Market Status - Packaging Printing 2017 (Molded Case, Miniature) Analysis by Application, Size, Production, Market Share, Consumption, Trends and Forecast 2022: Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 05:19 EST

Global Artificial Grass Turf Market Research Report 2017: By Product, Application, Manufacturer, Sales and Segmentation - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 03:35 EST

Ekstrands nya utställning av dörrar & fönster med integrerat “hybrid”-kontor

EKSTRANDS - 2017-01-24 16:00 CET
I de flesta nyetableringar av kontor förs livliga diskussioner om för- & nackdelar med kontorslandskap visavi slutna kontorsrum. I utvecklingen av vårt nya kontor med integrerad utställning har vi försökt ta till oss av alla argument. Målet var en fräsch utställning där vi integrerar arbetsplatser så öppet som möjligt. Resultatet blev en lyckad hybrid mellan kontorslandskap och slutna kontorsrum.

Global Dipentaerythritol Market Research Report 2017 ( Coating Industry , Photosensitive Resin Film , lubricating Oil , Others ) - Global QYResearch

Global Energy - 2017-01-24 02:51 EST