Dansk masseeksperiment: Musikalske børn husker bedre
Undersøgelse blandt 20.000 elever viser, at de, der synger og spiller, har lettere ved at lære.

¤

Shorter DNA ‘caps’ in people who got sick as babies
People who had more infections as babies harbor a key marker of cellular aging as young adults, report researchers. The protective stretches of DNA that “cap” the ends of their chromosomes are shorter than those of adults who were healthier as infants. The findings, published in the American Journal of Human Biology , shed new light on how the intricate interplay between genetics and environment

¤

Scientists Grow Mouse Pancreas Inside a Rat
The strategy of growing the organs of one species inside the body of another could one day help to produce transplantable human organs.


¤

Advanced materials power next-generation molecular separations
Chemical separation processes account for as much as 15 percent of the world's total energy consumption. Development of next-generation molecularly-selective synthetic membranes will be among the drivers for more efficient, large-scale CHEMICAL-separation processes that could dramatically reduce that number.

¤

Antioxidant compounds mimic effective graphene agents, show potential for therapies
Treated particles of graphene derived from carbon nanotubes have demonstrated remarkable potential as life-saving antioxidants, but as small as they are, something even smaller had to be created to figure out why they work so well.

¤

New class of materials could revolutionize biomedical, alternative energy industries
Polyhedral boranes, or clusters of boron atoms bound to hydrogen atoms, are transforming the biomedical industry. These manmade materials have become the basis for the creation of cancer therapies, enhanced drug delivery and new contrast agents needed for radioimaging and diagnosis. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has discovered an entirely new class of materials based on boranes (polyhedral bor-containing materials) t

¤

Electron holography of individual proteins
Proteins are the tools of life. In future, scientists may be able to examine single molecules with an especially gentle method to determine how they are constructed, how they perform their functions in cells, and how they interact with potential drugs. This is possible thanks to holograms of proteins that, for the first time, have produced using very slow electrons by scientists at the University

¤

New study suggests guidelines for takeover time in automated vehicles
Many recent human factors studies of takeover time in automated vehicles have looked at how long it takes a driver to switch out of automation mode, usually in critical situations. Alexander Eriksson and Neville Stanton at the University of Southampton, focusing on automation takeover time in noncritical situations, took what is likely the first in-depth look at how long it takes drivers to transi

¤

Development of a hydraulic-driven, high-power artificial muscle
An artificial muscle using rubber tubing is extremely powerful but lightweight, with strong resistance to impact and vibration, allowing for the most compact and energy efficient tough robots ever created. Researchers expect that this will lead to the smallest, lightest, and most powerful consumer robots ever created in the near future.


¤

This is LSD attached to a brain cell serotonin receptor
A tiny tab of acid on the tongue. A daylong trip through hallucinations and assorted other psychedelic experiences For the first time, researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have discovered precisely what the drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) looks like in its active state when attached to a human serotonin receptor of a brain cell, and their first-ever crystal structure revealed a major cl
SAMME EMNE:
Ever Had a Really Long Acid Trip? Now Science Knows Why
A new paper finally reveals the secret of the LSD Trip Gone Far Too Long: The drug binds to receptors in your brain in a fascinating way.
SAMME EMNE:
LSD's Long, Strange Trip Explained
When LSD binds to serotonin receptors, it pulls a 'lid' closed behind it, locking it in place for hours, and explaining its long-lasting effects.

¤


Researchers prove protein synthesis and mRNA degradation are structurally linked
Protein synthesis is programmed by messenger RNAs, and when enough of a given protein has been made, the mRNAs that encode it are destroyed. LMU researchers have now shown that protein synthesis and mRNA degradation are structurally linked.

¤

Scientists map the genetic evolution of dinoflagellates for the first time
A group scientists have used new genetic sequencing data to understand how an ancient organism that lived alongside the dinosaurs has evolved over millions of years. A four-year effort by a genetic research team from a dozen universities has uncovered for the first time the biology and evolution of dinoflagellates, tiny but complex organisms primarily known as marine plankton.

¤

How strong is an egg?
Why does holding an egg between two hands and pressing along its long axis make it almost impossible to break? Professor Marc Andre Meyers was first puzzled by this as a child growing up in Brazil. He subsequently proposed the problem to his students which resulted in the paper 'Nature's technical ceramic: the avian eggshell' published today in Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

¤

Gene-blocking therapy reverses Alzheimer’s-like symptoms in mice
An antisense therapy that targets tau protein tangles in the brain has improved memory and extended lifespan in mice, and successfully targeted tau in monkeys
¤

Some specialized neurons are for processing faces
Neurons specialized for processing faces in the human brain are controlled by attention, according to a new study.

¤

Controlling adhesive material remotely with light
Adhesive mechanisms in the natural world have many advantages: they are always strongly adhesive -- and without any glues or residues. Scientists are researching how these mechanisms can be artificially created. An interdisciplinary research team has now succeeded in developing a bioinspired adhesive material that can be controlled remotely by using UV light. This way it is possible to precisely t

¤

Diabetes accounts for more US deaths than previously thought, study shows
Diabetes now makes up 12 percent of US deaths, a higher number than previously thought, according to new research.

¤

'Knitted muscles' provide power: Normal fabric with electroactive coating adds 'muscle'
Researchers have coated normal fabric with an electroactive material, and in this way given it the ability to actuate in the same way as muscle fibers. The technology opens new opportunities to design 'textile muscles' that could, for example, be incorporated into clothes, making it easier for people with disabilities to move.

¤

Delaying marijuana smoking to age 17 cuts risks to teens' brains, new study suggests
Adolescents who smoke marijuana as early as 14 do worse by 20 points on some cognitive tests and drop out of school at a higher rate than non-smokers. But if they hold off until age 17, they're less at risk.

¤

Antibody combination puts HIV on the ropes
Researchers have shown that a combination of three antibody drugs can completely suppress HIV in infected mice. The antibodies were isolated from a patient whose immune system mounted an unusually effective response against the virus.

¤

New insights into brain circuit for hunger responses during starvation
Researchers uncover mechanism by which hypothalamic neural signaling drives hunger responses to survive starvation.

¤

New CLOSTRIUM difficile treatment reduces recurrent infections by 40%
A new treatment for Clostridium difficile infections reduces recurrent infections by nearly 40%, a large study has found.

¤

Mature heart muscle cells created in the laboratory from stem cells
Generating mature and viable heart muscle cells from human or other animal stem cells has proven difficult for biologists.

¤

Brain shape linked to personality differences
The shape of your brain can influence personality traits, according to a new study.

¤

Critical anti-viral role of biological molecule discovered
The scientists discovered a key role of a 'protector' molecule that fights the common flu. The biological molecule - STAT3 - is key in fighting a whole suite of viruses. This discovery may lead to new anti-viral therapeutic options.

¤

Novel risk genes for bipolar disorder
Researchers conducted a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder (BD), and identified novel risk genes. One of these genes (FADS) is related to lipid metabolism (e.g., omega3/6 polyunsaturated fatty acids); therefore, they concluded that lipid abnormality may be involved in bipolar disorder pathophysiology [MANIODEPRESSIV]. Elucidating an independent association between these two phenotypes provides a foundation for ne

¤

Two Infants Treated with Universal Immune Cells Have Their Cancer Vanish
In a medical first, the children were treated with genetically engineered T-cells from another person (universal immune cells destroy cancer).

¤

3-D-Printed Skin Leads the Way Toward Artificial Organs
Researchers claim that additive manufacturing can now produce functional skin, and the first internal organs may be ready within six years.

¤


New findings highlight promise of chimeric organisms for science and medicine
Rapid advances in the ability to grow cells, tissues and organs of one species within an organism of a different species offer an unprecedented opportunity for tackling longstanding scientific mysteries and addressing pressing human health problems, particularly the need for transplantable organs and tissues.


¤

Taking materials into the third dimension
To create more efficient catalysts, scientists would like to start with porous materials with controlled atomic-scale structures as random defects can hamper performance. Now a team has created a one-pot method that produces the structures.

¤

What we don't know about Europe's Muslim kids | Deeyah Khan
As the child of an Afghan mother and Pakistani father raised in Norway, Deeyah Khan knows what it's like to be a young person stuck between your community and your country. In this powerful, emotional talk, the filmmaker unearths the rejection and isolation that many Muslim kids growing up in the West feel -- and the deadly consequences of not embracing our youth before extremist groups do.

¤

How 1,000 new genetic variants were discovered in blood groups
One thousand new mutations in the blood group genes: that is what a physician and former programmer found in his research study in which he developed new software and investigated blood group genes in 2,504 people.

¤

Echolocation: Sizing up spaces by ear
Humans can be trained to use echolocation to estimate the sizes of enclosed spaces. Researchers now show that the learning process involves close coordination between sensory and motor cortex.

¤

Common medication restores social deficits in autism mouse model
Reducing the function of the autism-associated gene Pcdh10 leads to impairments in social behavior, according to a study. Reducing Pcdh10 function also disrupted the structure and function of circuitry in the amygdala, a brain region implicated in the behavior symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

¤

The secret of the supervolcano
Researchers have now found an explanation for what triggered the largest volcanic eruption witnessed by humankind. The volcano’s secret was revealed by geochemical clues hidden inside volcanic quartz crystals.

¤

'Takeover time' in driverless cars crucial to safety
The length of time needed for a driver to switch from automated vehicle control to manual vehicle control is crucial for the safety of future automated vehicles, research shows.

¤

Agricultural fires in Brazil harm infant health, a warning for the developing world
Exposure to pollution from agricultural fires in the last few months of gestation leads to earlier birth and smaller babies, researchers have found. The results offer a warning to the developing world, where such fires are common.

¤

Why we may be closer to breaching global warming targets than we thought
Global temperature rise may be closer to the limit recently imposed by world leaders than previously thought, new research has revealed.

¤

Rhino genome results: Frozen Zoo collection has same diversity as living population
Genetic Resources Banked in the Frozen Zoo Hold Key to Recovery for Critically Endangered Northern White Rhinoceros

¤

Coming next in domotics—houses that decipher voice commands
In the race for a smart everything, houses seem to be gathering more attention every year. Voice control is one of the features that high-tech companies are willing to invest in and - while technological solutions are still in their early stages - an EU-funded project is looking to blow their mind by going a step further: voice control spiced up with automated speech recognition.

¤

15 risks and opportunities to global conservation
or the eighth year running, an international team of experts with experience in horizon scanning, science communication and research have produced a report that identifies arising global conservation issues. The team included Fauna & Flora International's Dr Abigail Entwistle and the results were published in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution.

¤

Fat shaming linked to greater health risks
Body shaming is a pervasive form of prejudice, found in cyber bullying, critiques of celebrities’ appearances, at work and school, and in public places for everyday Americans. People who are battling obesity face being stereotyped as lazy, incompetent, unattractive, lacking willpower, and to blame for their excess weight. The pain of these messages may take a toll on health and increase risk of ca

¤

Study indicates 'Alala calls have changed
A study published in the January edition of the journal Animal Behaviour documents significant changes in the vocalizations that 'alalā make today, when compared with those recorded in the wild more than a decade ago. The study indicates that although the vocal repertoire continues to be rich and varied, it has changed significantly over time. "This is a significant cultural change in the species,

¤

Giving surplus supermarket food to charities will not solve hunger or waste problems, new paper claims
Supermarkets and the UK government cannot provide a long-term solution to poverty or food waste by giving away surplus products to food banks and charities, academics have concluded in a new paper.

¤

More than a quarter of U. S. adults, roughly 9 percent of U. S. youth use tobacco
More than 1 in 4 adults and nearly 1 in 10 youth use tobacco, according to findings from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. The study is a uniquely large, nationally representative longitudinal study designed to examine tobacco use behaviors and health among the U.S. population over multiple years of follow-up.

¤

CIA løfter sløret: UFO'er, overtroiske ingeniører og spionfly på dansk jord
Det amerikanske efterretningsvæsen for udenlandske efterretninger har lagt 12 millioner tidligere fortrolige sider online. Hovedparten er avisudklip og overnaturligt nonsens. Enkelte tekniske dokumenter er dog læsværdige.

¤

Et udlandsophold er en investering for livet
Studerende Uddannelse

¤

Trumps miljøchef vil gøre op med krav til biler
Kravene til bilers brændstofeffektivitet kan blive slækket, hvis det står til Trumps nominerede til chef for Miljøstyrelsen.

¤

The Shape-Shifting Army inside Your Cells
Proteins work like rigid keys to activate cellular functions—or so everyone thought

¤

Image: Juno's close look at the Little Red Spot
The JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft snapped this shot of Jupiter's northern latitudes on Dec. 11, 2016 at 8:47 a.m. PST (11:47 a.m. EST), as the spacecraft performed a close flyby of the gas giant planet. The spacecraft was at an altitude of 10,300 miles (16,600 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops.

¤

Tests reveal major variation in flood risk models
The first ever comparison of six of the major global flood risk monitoring computer models has revealed wide discrepancies between the information they provide.

¤

Rapid gas flares discovered in white dwarf star for the first time
Incredibly rapid gas flares from a white dwarf binary star system have been detected for the first time by Oxford University scientists. The first sighting of such activity, it suggests that our current understanding of star habits and their capabilities is incomplete.

¤

Mobile torrefaction technology that can convert biomass into clean-burning fuel
India has millions of small farms, many an acre or less in size, cultivating rice, wheat, sugarcane, and other staple crops. And twice a year, when the harvest is done, these farms go up in flames.

¤

Studying human generosity around the globe
Rutgers anthropologist Lee Cronk has been working in remote stretches of Arizona and New Mexico, studying the ways in which ranchers are working together to manage the risks of their trade.

¤

Image: Visualization of proposed temple atop Shackleton Crater
A near-perpetually sunlit peak close to the Moon's south pole has been selected by ESA's artist-in-residence as the site of a building like no other.

¤

Pluto's Moon Charon Had Its Own, Icy Plate Tectonics
Surface cracks look like seafloor-spreading zones or rift valleys on Earth

¤

Scientists Are Planning the Next Big Washington March
In just two days, more than 300,000 people join a Facebook planning group

¤

AI agony aunt learns to dole out relationship advice online
A Japanese tech company trained an AI to answer questions about love, which requires it to deal with “non-factoid” queries that are often long and complex

¤

Similar-looking ridges on Mars have diverse origins
Thin, blade-like walls, some as tall as a 16-story building, dominate a previously undocumented network of intersecting ridges on Mars, found in images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

¤

Buried Treasure: Ancient Grave Found Brimming with Jewels
An Iron Age tomb brimming with treasures fashioned out of gold, bronze and amber was recently uncovered after lying undisturbed by the Danube River for nearly 2,600 years, archaeologists report.

¤

Photos: Gold, Amber and Bronze Treasures Found in Iron Age Grave
Nearly 2,600 years ago, the Celts buried a woman in a grave that was brimming with treasures.

¤

Cleaning the Air with Plastic [Excerpt]
Scientists and engineers are trying inventions such as artificial trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere

¤

Rapidly identifying life-threatening bacteria in hospitals
Soon, hospitals will be able to identify the bacterial species responsible for a patient's developing infection in a matter of just a few minutes. A new, easy-to-adapt and inexpensive analytical procedure has been developed by researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. The main role is played by innovative bioconjugates—luminescent, magnetic m

¤

MHI Vestas presser sin 8 MW-mølle op på 9 MW
Selskabet vil - ved specielle lokale forhold hos kunderne - kunne udskifte 8 MW-generatoren på sin offshoremølle med én på 9 MW - med samme rotorareal, oplyser selskabet.

¤

Combining the past and future of a change process in fractional calculus
A raindrop is a sphere. It may not look like it, what with its pointy head and rounded bottom, but it is. Fractional calculus can prove it.

¤

Scientists determine the molecular mechanism of an anti-cancer therapeutic candidate
An international team of scientists, including MIPT researchers, has defined how promising anti-cancer molecules work. The research findings will help to optimize these new agents in order to develop drug candidates that are effective and safe for healthy tissue.

¤

Giant flying reptile was top predator like a winged T. rex
Strong neck bones suggest a pterosaur was top predator on lost world island in Transylvania, swooping in to swallow dwarf dinosaurs the size of a small horse

¤

100 millioner år gammelt insekt fanget i rav
Forskere har fundet et forhistorisk insekt med et sært udseende i en lille klump rav.

¤

Novozymes i samarbejde med kinesiske forskere om kontroversielt genredigeringsværktøj
Biotekgiganten Novozymes undersøger mulighederne for redigering af mikroorganismer ved hjælp af et kontroversielt kinesisk protein.

¤

Smog pushes Beijing residents to innovate for the world
Beijing residents concerned about breathing the capital's thick gray air are adapting, inventing and even creating businesses to protect the health of their families and others. Some of their efforts could help people around the world.

¤

SK Hynix reports Q4 profit jump on rising chip prices
South Korean chipmaker SK Hynix saw Q4 profits leap nearly 90 percent, it said Thursday, fuelled by a pickup in global demand from smartphone manufacturers coupled with rising chip prices.

¤

Pigs and chocolate: Using maths to solve problems in farming
Improving cocoa yields for the chocolate industry, estimating the quality of meat in pigs and refining the design of a hydroponics system, were three farming challenges tackled by academics at a recent workshop hosted by the University of Bath's Institute for Mathematical Innovation (IMI).

¤

Facts About Zirconium
Properties, sources and uses of the element zirconium.

¤

Kludetæppe af digitale medier afløser den gamle ‘Gå indenfor og tænd for DR’
Forsvindende flow-tv og luftbåren radio medfører en ny æra for beredskabsmeddelelserne. Men ingen ved, hvor sikre de nye metoder er.

¤

Elon Musk Reveals a Mystery Tunneling Project
Elon Musk's cryptic messages about a mysterious tunneling project in California are getting more substantive. Read More

¤

Specialized physical therapy helps teens with scoliosis get ahead of the curve
Researchers advocate for exercise management to be added to the standard of care for scoliosis for patients in Canada.

¤

Decoding Epileptogenesis in a Reduced State Space
We describe here the recent results of a multidisciplinary effort to design a biomarker that can actively and continuously decode the progressive changes in neuronal organization leading to epilepsy, a process known as epileptogenesis. Using an animal model of acquired epilepsy, wechronically record hippocampal evoked potentials elicited by an auditory stimulus. Using a set of reduced coordinates,

¤

Learning from Label Proportions in Brain-Computer Interfaces: Online Unsupervised Learning with Guarantees
Objective: Using traditional approaches, a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) requires the collection of calibration data for new subjects prior to online use. Calibration time can be reduced or eliminated e.g.~by transfer of a pre-trained classifier or unsupervised adaptive classification methods which learn from scratch and adapt over time. While such heuristics work well in practice, none of them c

¤

Learning Mid-Level Auditory Codes from Natural Sound Statistics
Interaction with the world requires an organism to transform sensory signals into representations in which behaviorally meaningful properties of the environment are made explicit. These representations are derived through cascades of neuronal processing stages in which neurons at each stage recode the output of preceding stages. Explanations of sensory coding may thus involve understanding how low

¤

A complete mean-field theory for dynamics of binary recurrent neural networks
Recurrent networks of binary units provide a prototype for complex interactions in neuronal networks. In the theoretical analysis of their collective dynamics, it is often assumed that unit interactions in the network are homogeneous. Here, we derive a unified theory that encompasses the macroscopic dynamics of recurrent networks with arbitrary connectivity architectures. We identify conditions to

¤

Harnessing the Web for Population-Scale Physiological Sensing: A Case Study of Sleep and Performance
Human cognitive performance is critical to productivity, learning, and accident avoidance. Cognitive performance varies throughout each day and is in part driven by intrinsic, near 24-hour circadian rhythms. Prior research on the impact of sleep and circadian rhythms on cognitive performance has typically been restricted to small-scale laboratory-based studies that do not capture the variability o

¤

Synchronization and long-time memory in neural networks with inhibitory hubs and synaptic plasticity
We investigate the dynamical role of inhibitory and highly connected nodes (hub) in synchronization and input processing of leaky-integrate-and-fire neural networks with short term synaptic plasticity. We take advantage of a heterogeneous mean-field approximation to encode the role of network structure and we tune the fraction of inhibitory neurons $f_I$ and their connectivity level to investigate

¤

Measures of Entropy and Complexity in altered states of consciousness
Quantification of complexity in neurophysiological signals has been studied using different methods, especially those from information or dynamical system theory. These studies revealed the dependence on different states of consciousness, particularly that wakefulness is characterized by larger complexity of brain signals perhaps due to the necessity of the brain to handle varied sensorimotor info

¤

As US scrutinizes joint replacements, study finds no way to predict risk
The American federal government has started a program that penalizes hospitals for readmission of joint replacement patients within 90 days, but a new study finds there is no good index for assessing that risk.

¤

Umbrellas Plus Sunscreen Best Bet to Beat Burns
Sunscreen or beach umbrellas alone were unable to completely prevent sunburns—so researchers suggest combining the methods instead. Christopher Intagliata reports.

¤

Nu er det bevist: Belastet arbejdsmiljø øger risikoen for disse sygdomme
https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/nu-bevist-belastet-arbejdsmiljoe-oeger-risikoen-disse-sygdomme-6166 Den gode nyhed er, at et job med høje krav og jobusikkerhed beviseligt ikke fører til øget risiko astma eller kræft. Til gengæld er der tre andre sygdomme, som banker på Jobfinder

¤

Trump’s Still Using His Old Android Phone. That’s Very, Very Risky
The list of things that could go wrong is very long.

¤

The War on Facts Is a War on Democracy
In a time when facts don’t matter, and science is being muzzled, American democracy is the real victim

¤

Aerial drones reveal sharks in shallow water
Answers about shark populations could come from the skies, new research finds.

¤

Doctors Remove 6-Foot-Long Tapeworm from Man's Gut
Doctors in India removed a lengthy pork tapeworm from a man's gut, according to a recent report of the man's case.

¤

Trump Administration Backtracks on Plan to Take Down EPA Climate Web Page
A source at the EPA said the agency’s Office of General Counsel is now "walking through pages on the site" to see what is legally removable, and what legally needs to remain

¤

The Idea is AI Ears That Are Better Than Your Own
New Here One earbuds aim to bring enhanced human hearing to market. Read More

¤

Engineering students aim to brew beer on the moon
Space Now that's what we call a light beer Space is definitely BYOB.

¤

Maggots Metamorphosing Into Blowflies: X-Ray Time-Lapse Video
Scientists used X-ray video imaging to observe several specimens of the bluebottle blowfly (Calliphora vicina) as they went through the transformation process.

¤

X-Ray Video Captures Maggot Metamorphosis
Using X-ray imaging, scientists have peered inside a pupa to capture time-lapse video of a maggot transforming into an adult blowfly.

¤

EPA science under scrutiny by Trump political staff
The Trump administration is mandating that any studies or data from scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency undergo review by political appointees before they can be released to the public.

¤

Rolling robots could soon be making deliveries in Virginia
Robots about the size of a beer cooler could soon be rolling down Virginia sidewalks to deliver sandwiches, groceries or packages.

¤

Antarctic bottom waters freshening at unexpected rate
In the cold depths along the sea floor, Antarctic Bottom Waters are part of a global circulatory system, supplying oxygen-, carbon- and nutrient-rich waters to the world's oceans. Over the last decade, scientists have been monitoring changes in these waters. But a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) suggests these changes are themselves shifting in unexpected ways, with


¤

The strings that bind us: Cytofilaments connect cell nucleus to extracellular microenvironment
It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, but new images of structural fibers inside a cell may represent more than a million words from hundreds of research papers spanning the past three decades.

¤

Ancient, scary and alien-looking specimen forms a rarity in the insect world—a new order
Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a 100-million-year-old insect preserved in amber with a triangular head, almost-alien and "E.T.-like" appearance and features so unusual that it has been placed in its own scientific "order" - an incredibly rare event.

¤

Invasive beetle species in Hawaii can now be identified faster with new genetic test
Researchers at the University of Hawaii have developed a new genetic-testing method for identifying the invasive coconut rhinoceros beetle, which promises to be much faster than existing physical identification methods. The new tool, reported in the Journal of Economic Entomology, could be a significant step toward keeping the species—a damaging pest to coconut palm trees that was first seen in Ha

¤

Elon Musk Sees Brain-Computer Systems in Humans' Future
Elon Musk has a plan to help humans keep up with artificial intelligence.

¤

Genetic study identifies fourteen new developmental disorders in children
The largest ever genetic study of children with previously undiagnosed rare developmental disorders has discovered 14 new developmental disorders. The research also provided diagnoses of rare conditions for over a thousand children and their families. These diagnoses allow families with the same genetic conditions to connect and access support, and help inform better clinical management.

¤

Can a Roommate's Genes Influence Your Health?
Your partner's or roommate's genes have a sizable effect on how your own genes are expressed, according to a study on caged mice.

¤

Triggering the brain's auto-focusa
Environmental cues don't just trigger actions, like reaching for our phones when they buzz; they can also trigger our brains to enter a more focused state. Researchers combined brain imaging with a celebrity naming game to pinpoint the structure in the brain responsible for forming these links between stimuli and focus. This structure, called the caudate nucleus, is also known to play an important

¤



Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.