Popular Science

How to choose the best fitness tracker for you DIY Find the fitness tracker to help hit your goals. Somewhere out there is a fitness tracker with your name on it, but how do you find it among the many options available? We'll show you how.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thai reform body suggests tight regulations on social mediaA policy-writing body advising Thailand's military government has suggested imposing stringent restrictions on internet usage, intended in part to identify the posters of all content on services such as Facebook and YouTube.
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Viden

Kunstig intelligens kan snart hjælpe kræftpatienterDanske forskere har udviklet en ny teknologi, der kan give den helt rigtige diagnose til bl.a. mennesker med tarmkræft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing the colored light: Bee brains open way for better camerasCameras in drones and robots have trouble dealing with detecting color when the light is changing. But bees, it turns out, have a mechanism that solves this problem and that can be used to improve cameras.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Utah is home to earliest use of a wild potato in North AmericaPotato starch residues have been discovered in the crevices of a 10,900-year-old stone tool in Escalante, Utah -- the earliest evidence of wild potato use in North America. This is the first archaeological study to identify Solanum jamesii, a wild species native to the southwestern United States, as an important part of ancient human diets. The long history could mean that the species was transpor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The transfer of chromosomally 'abnormal' embryos can still result in pregnancy in IVFIVF embryos whose cells have mixed chromosomal profiles -- one normal, another abnormal -- still have the potential to implant in the uterus and become a healthy pregnancy, according to a study presented today at the 33rd Annual Meeting of ESHRE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds automated embryo assessment system more accurate than that of embryologistsEmbryo quality has long been considered the main determinant of implantation and pregnancy in IVF. Morphology -- a visual assessment of an embryo's shape and development -- has since the very first days of IVF been the key to measuring this embryo quality, and only in recent years has this morphological grading been made somewhat more scientific with the introduction of time-lapse imaging.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Our obsession with eminence warps research Many decisions about whose work is recognized are at least partially arbitrary, and we should acknowledge that, argues Simine Vazire. Nature 547 7 doi: 10.1038/547007a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Traffic found to be a major source of atmospheric nanocluster aerosols(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Finland has found that automobile traffic can be a major source of atmospheric nanocluster aerosols. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they obtained air samples from several locations in Helsinki and elsewhere and looked for extremely small traffic-originated
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Ars Technica

Next iPhone might use 3D face-scanning tech instead of TouchID Enlarge (credit: Veniamin Geskin) The next iPhone (the iPhone 7S, iPhone 8?), which is due to be released in September, might replace the TouchID fingerprint sensor with whole-face 3D scanning. According to Bloomberg , which is usually quite reliable when it comes to Apple rumours, the face-scanning tech will allow iPhone users to log in, authenticate payments, and unlock secure apps. This will b
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Gizmodo

North Korea Claims Successful Test of Intercontinental Missile This unverified photo distributed by the North Korean government shows the apparent launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea’s northwest, Tuesday, July 4, 2017. (Image: AP) Just in time for the Fourth of July, North Korea says it has successfully tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). The country voted most likely to start WWIII says it
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Popular Science

8 essential items to help you survive any storm Gadgets Apocalypse later. Find your inner prepper. Read on.
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Ingeniøren

Norge går elbil-amok: 6 ud af 7 mest solgte biler er nu elektriskeElbilerne udgjorde mere end en fjerdedel af bilsalget i juni og har nu for første gang lagt sig i spidsen som den mest populære biltype hos vores nordlige naboer.
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Wired

'Sci-Fi,' Dystopia, and Hope In the Age of Trump: a Fiction Roundtable With Jeff VanderMeer, Lidia Yuknavich, and Omar El AkkadA wide-ranging discussion about how speculative fiction imagines the future—and grapples with the present.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual laboratory—fast, flexible and exactDuring the forming process, sheet metal materials are often stressed to their limits. Computer simulations are used to test how far it is possible to go in production. However, the simulation is only ever as exact as the data on which it is based. Fraunhofer scientists have now developed a virtual test laboratory that allows them to examine different load states for metal materials and determine p
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Big Think

Tour de France 2017: A Cool Map of the Tour's Route The Tour is both the oldest and most popular of the world's major cycling races. The Tour has been to Holland more often than it has been to Corsica. Read More
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Ars Technica

The first self-driving grocery delivery van Sebastian Anthony I stand on a curb in Greenwich, admiring some reasonably attractive new-build homes. Everything is a bit too clean, a little like Disneyland. Young professionals mill around. In the distance, I can hear the hum of the Thames Clipper river bus service that goes up and down the river. And then, out of frickin' nowhere, a van stealthily crawls around a nearby corner. The vehicle is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative bracing for durable structuresAcross the world, severe earthquakes regularly shake entire regions. More than two billion people live in danger zones – many of them in structures not built to withstand an earthquake. Together with partners from industry, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research WKI are developing building materials designed to prevent buildings from collapsing in a natural disaster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helium ions reveal how viruses attack bacteriaAn interdisciplinary research consortium from the Nanoscience Center at University of Jyvaskyla in Finland (group leaders Dr. Lotta-Riina Sundberg and Prof. Ilari Maasilta) has found that bacteria and viruses can be imaged with helium ions in contrast to electrons, which are the standard workhorse in nanoscale microscopy. Helium ions, being more massive than electrons, can be focused to a much tig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme weather conditions and climate change account for 40% of global wheat production variabilityJRC scientists have proposed a new approach for identifying the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on the variability of global and regional wheat production. The study analysed the effect of heat and water anomalies on crop losses over a 30-year period.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telescope for detecting optical signals from gravitational waves launchedA state-of-the-art telescope for detecting optical signatures of gravitational waves - built and operated by an international research collaboration, led by the University of Warwick - has been officially launched.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists explain ancient Rome's long-lasting concreteResearchers unlock the chemistry of Roman concrete which has resisted the elements for thousands of years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mobile control with facial gesturesMobile devices play an increasingly important role in our lives; in some situations, though, they cannot be adequately managed and even accepting a call is a real challenge. In a study, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD in Rostock, Germany have evaluated which alternative control concepts are suitable to supplement the conventional use of mobile devices. Ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Andean orchids – not so ancientThe Andes are the world's most species rich biological diversity hotspot, containing an astounding 15% of the world's plant species, despite making up only 1% of the earth's surface. Orchids are a key element of Andean plant life, but despite their importance and abundance, particularly epiphytic orchids (plants that grow on other plants) their origin has not yet been studied in great detail. "Orc
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Science : NPR

In Russia's Siberian Silicon Valley, Business Is Good But Risks Can Be High The Soviet Union built research institutes in Siberia as innovation centers during the Cold War. Since then, there's been a brain drain. Tech innovators remain, but some have faced legal challenges. (Image credit: Lucian Kim/NPR)
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day:Feathery FireworksFeather stars, or crinoids, are equipped with at least five colorful arms that aren't just for show-these marine invertebrates use their picturesque limbs to gather food.
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Science | The Guardian

Dinosaur skeleton discovered under Surrey brick factory Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigation The near-complete fossilised skeleton of a dinosaur, thought to have lived about 132m years ago, has been unearthed at a brick factory in Surrey. Paleontologists say they discovered the bones during a routine visit to the site of the Wienerberger
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Ingeniøren

TDC: DDoS-angreb mod danske virksomheder tiltager i styrke På et år er styrken af DDoS-angreb rettet mod TDC-kunder steget fra 2,9 Gbit/s til 4,5 Gbit/s i snit. Angrebene bliver i højere grad udført ved hjælp af inficerede internetopkoblede enheder såsom videokameraer. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tdc-ddos-angreb-mod-danskerne-tiltager-styrke-1078085 Version2
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Giant croc had teeth like a T. rexResearchers have described new fossils belonging to an extinct crocodile-like creature that had a set of serrated teeth like those of a T. rex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defect-free coatings for silicon spheresThe prototype kilogram – to which all scales are calibrated to – is losing weight. International efforts are striving to redefine the base unit for measuring mass and, in future, redefine the kilogram on natural constants. For this purpose, the Avogadro experiment determines the number of atoms in almost perfect silicon spheres. Fraunhofer researchers have recently succeeded in homogeneously coati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's young gamers face 'King of Glory' playing time limitsAll-night gaming marathons will soon end for some Chinese kids: internet giant Tencent began limiting daily playing times on its smartphone smash hit "King of Glory" on Tuesday to "ensure children's healthy development".
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Wired

Airbus' New Black Boxes Will Eject From Crashing Planes, So They're Easier to FindThe deployable flight data recorders will help investigators locate wreckage, and work out what happened.
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Live Science

Hybrid Driving-Flying Robots Could Go Beyond the Flying CarWhether they're swooping in to deliver packages or spotting victims in disaster zones, swarms of flying robots could have a range of important applications in the future.
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Ars Technica

Ubisoft wishes Watch Dogs 2 players a terrible Fourth of July [Updated] Enlarge / USA-themed update to Watch Dogs 2 is making people's dogs bark thanks to surround-sound barrage. Cool, Ubisoft. (credit: Ubisoft) Update, 3:15 p.m.: Following our article's publication, Ubisoft pushed a patch to remove Watch Dogs 2 's temporary, super-loud fireworks altogether. It'll cost you roughly 11GB of download to undo what Ubisoft calls an "annoying bug that snuck into our Indepe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imperial academic discusses his work on algae fuel factoriesDr Antonio Del Rio Chanona from the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London is working on a new, rapid and cost effective way of creating biofuels. If successful his work may help sectors like the transport industry to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Communication in times of crisisResearchers at the TU Darmstadt around Professor Matthias Hollick are experimenting with technologies designed to empower the civilian population in times of crisis. They aim at establishing basic communications and means to share information, thus facilitating human cooperation and mutual aid even following wide-spread power and Internet outages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU states have right to ban Uber: top lawyerEU member states can ban ride-hailing pioneer Uber without informing the European Commission because at heart it is an ordinary transport company under their jurisdiction, a top EU lawyer said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly-discovered plant enzymes open the door to novel compound productionA wealth of previously undescribed plant enzymes have been discovered by scientists at the John Innes Centre. The team who uncovered the compounds hope that harnessing the power of these enzymes will unlock a rich new vein of natural products, including potential drug leads.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New system promises more rapid and accurate prediction of rainfallUsing a powerful technique known as "3-D nowcasting," an international team including scientists from the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) has begun to provide, on an experimental basis, forecasts that predict the likelihood of precipitation in a given location ten minutes in advance. The group will use the system to determine if the experimental forecasts, based on data t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Through fossil leaves, a step towards Jurassic ParkFor the first time, researchers have succeeded in establishing the relationships between 200-million-year-old plants based on chemical fingerprints. Using infrared spectroscopy and statistical analysis of organic molecules in fossil leaves, they are opening up new perspectives on the dinosaur era.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungi are key players of the deep biosphereIn addition to the life on the surface of the Earth and in its oceans, ecosystems have evolved deep under us in a realm coined the "deep biosphere" which stretches several kilometers down into the bedrock. Down there, the conditions are harsh and life is forced to adjust to a lifestyle that we at the surface would call extreme. One major difference to surface conditions is the lack of oxygen; a co
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Gizmodo

Declare Independence From Vacuuming (and Even Mopping) For As Low As $135, Today Only ECOVACS Gold Box , $135-$170 Because there are few things more American than pawning off things we don’t want to do to robots, Amazon’s kicking off Independence Day with big savings on ECOVACS robotic vacuums . While they lack the brand recognition of Roombas, and we can’t personally vouch for them like we can for the Eufy RoboVac 11 , these ECOVACS vacuums have solid reviews, and are insanely af
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shocking case of indigestion in supermassive black holeA multi-wavelength study of a pair of colliding galaxies has revealed the cause of a supermassive black hole's case of 'indigestion.' Results will be presented by Dr Hayden Rampadarath at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tencent's plans to list its answer to Kindle Store in Hong KongChinese internet giant Tencent is to list China Literature, the country's biggest online publishing business, in Hong Kong with a report saying it could raise as much as half-a-billion dollars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hidden red dwarf discovered in dust of giant starCW Leonis, a red giant star 500 times the size of the sun is located in the Leo constellation 300 light years away. This is an evolving star that is ejecting significant amounts of dust forming an enveloping cloud many times the size of our solar system. It has been the subject of hundreds of studies over the years, but only now has the existence of a smaller red dwarf star been found within the d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan panda fans get latest fix of cute with new footageJapan's panda-obsessed public got their latest fix of cute Tuesday as a Tokyo zoo released footage of its 20-day-old helpless cub, who has ballooned in size since its birth last month.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan typhoon grounds flights, injures threeA typhoon slammed into Japan on Tuesday, grounding dozens of flights, injuring at least three people and prompting authorities to issue evacuation warnings on fears of landslides and floods.
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Ingeniøren

Ingen regler beskytter togpersonale mod ultrafine partiklerLovgivningen om arbejdsmiljø indeholder ingen grænseværdier for de ultrafine partikler, som DSB’s gamle diesellokomotiver sender ind i togvognene, og som ifølge undersøgelser øger togpersonalets risiko for lungekræft og hjertekarsygdomme.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vietnam's capital to ban motorbikes by 2030Officials in Vietnam's traffic-choked capital Hanoi vowed on Tuesday to banish motorbikes by 2030 to ease environment and congestions woes, a decision that swiftly divided a city where two-wheelers are the main means of transportation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oklahoma City zoo celebrates orangutan's 50th birthdayOklahoma City's zoo is celebrating the 50th birthday of one of its most popular residents: a Sumatran orangutan named Toba.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Musical sun reduces range of magnetic activityA study of the sun using sound waves suggests that the layer in which the significant magnetic activity is located has grown thinner in recent years. Prof Yvonne Elsworth will present results at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull on Tuesday, 4th July.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low temperature increases risk of DNA damage from UV radiationUltraviolet (UV) radiation exposure can cause DNA damage and may be one of the contributing factors in the global amphibian extinction crisis. New research from Prof Craig Franklin and a team of researchers from The University of Queensland, Australia shows how tadpoles living at low temperatures are more at risk of DNA damage than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gigantic crocodile with T. rex teeth was a top land predator of the Jurassic in MadagascarLittle is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage. Deep and massive jaw bones armed with enormous serrated teeth that are similar in size and shape to those of a T. rex strongly suggest that these animals fed also on hard tissue such as b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung to invest $18 billion in memory chip businessSamsung Electronics will invest nearly $18 billion in its chip business, the South Korean firm said Tuesday, as it seeks to expand its lead in the global memory chip and smartphone markets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China rocket failure likely to set back next space missionsThe failure of China's Long March 5 rocket deals a rare setback to China's highly successful space program that could delay plans to bring back moon samples and offer rival India a chance to move ahead in the space rankings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beech trees native to Scotland after all, scientists discoverBeech trees should be considered native to Scotland - despite a long-running debate over their national identity, researchers at the University of Stirling and Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ensuring carpoolers are compatible is key to ridesharing successEnsuring that would-be carpoolers are riding with people they actually like could potentially decrease car use by nearly 60 per cent, research from a professor at the University of Waterloo has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists study magnetic impurities in topological insulatorsA group of physicists from MIPT and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences are now one step closer to finding applications for topological insulators—materials with remarkable electrical properties, which until recently, were regarded as merely hypothetical. The researchers gained insights into the interaction between the atoms of magnetic impurities in suc
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The Atlantic

Stephen Florida Reveals the Dark Toll of Athletic Greatness In 2012, the NFL linebacker Jovan Belcher took his life in front of his teammates after fatally shooting his girlfriend. Months earlier, the Hall-of-Famer Junior Seau killed himself three years after retirement. They, like many other football players, showed symptoms of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head. Signs of the disease are no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA plans to test asteroid deflection technique designed to prevent Earth impactNASA is moving forward with a plan to develop a refrigerator-sized spacecraft capable of deflecting asteroids and preventing them from colliding with Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better bacteria-busting techniques could make oil extraction greener and cheaperSimple tweaks to oilfield practice could provide the offshore industry with a more sustainable solution to environmental and commercial threats posed by harmful bacteria in subsea oil deposits.
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Wired

Hot Dogs: What's the Right Way to Eat Them, According to Science?What is the perfect condiment for a hot dog? Science should be able to answer that. One writer goes on a quest to figure this out, once and for all.
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Wired

Mr. Know-It-All: Should I Let My Spouse Look at My Browser History?Your significant other probably doesn't deserve to see your web wanderings—but why they want to look might say something.
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Wired

Juno Shatters Scientists' Jupiter Theories in Just 365 DaysNASA's Juno mission DGAF about scientific expectations. Here's what it's accomplished after only a year in orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gigantic crocodile with T. rex teeth was a top land predator of the Jurassic in MadagascarLittle is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar, published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by Italian and French paleontologists, begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's smallest and most accurate 3-D-printed biopsy robotThe world's smallest and most accurate 3-D-printed biopsy robot was revealed last week.
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Gizmodo

Nightmarish Crocodile Relative Terrorized Dinosaurs in Prehistoric Madagascar Paleoartistic restoration of the head of Razanandrongobe sakalavae. Unlike extant crocodilians, this terrestrial predator had a deep skull. Credit: Fabio Manucci. Roughly 165 million years ago during the mid-Jurassic, Madagascar is an alien place. The famously large island has yet to fully cleave itself tectonically from India and Africa, still crammed together with the rest of the southern super
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New on MIT Technology Review

Augmented Reality on Your Desk—All You Need Is a Lightbulb SocketA prototype device uses a small projector, a depth sensor, and a computer to project multi-touch displays onto any surface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Size of animals dating back 100-350 million years ago inferred from resurrected proteinsTitin is one of the proteins that make up the muscles of all vertebrates; it is an elastic protein that acts as a spring by refolding and returning to its original state. "Protein evolution has been studied from many points of view: its thermal stability, function and structure, but no one had ever studied the evolution of the mechanical properties of a protein. For titin this is a particularly ap
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovering the "third generation" of bioplasticsThe ongoing revolution in packaging is the use of 100% organic materials obtained from the leftovers of agricultural production. An expert from the Italian National Research Council (CNR) says that in the early 2020s these bioplastics may become as competitive as traditional ones, even if not suitable for all uses
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New Scientist - News

North Korea claims test of an intercontinental ballistic missileThe missile was launched into Japanese waters, but analysts suggest it could potentially be used to hit Alaska, raising the stakes once more in North Korea’s nuclear efforts
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On computer science—a turbo in the algorithmA new "Interview on Computer Science". Serge Abiteboul and Christine Froidevaux interview Claude Berrou, computer engineer and electronics engineer, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Claude Berrou is a professor at IMT Atlantique. He is best known for his work on turbo codes, which has been used extensively in mobile telephony. His current research focus is on informational neuroscie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New pestivirus that attacks the nervous system of Austrian pigsSome newly born piglets shiver even when they are kept warm. So-called "shaking piglets" have symptoms that resemble those of the classical swine fever, with extensive damage to the brain and the spinal cord. The viral origin of the disease was clarified only recently with the discovery in Europe and the USA of an atypical porcine pestivirus. Researchers at the Vetmeduni Vienna have now discovered
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Science : NPR

Research Shows Birth Order Really Does Matter Compared to older siblings, second-born boys are more likely to go to prison, get suspended in school and enter juvenile delinquency. Why? Parents of first-borns are more invested in their upbringing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Praying mantises hunt down birds worldwideA study by zoologists from Switzerland and the US shows praying mantises all over the globe include birds in their diet. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology has just published the results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny 'micro drop' chemical reactors are helping to revolutionise scientific experimentsScience is getting smaller. From two-dimensional new materials to nano-robots, many of the latest advances are being made at scales impossible to see with the human eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular springs produce a fly's sense of touch and hearingAs senses go, there's nothing so immediate and concrete as our sense of touch. So it may come as a surprise that, on the molecular level, our sense of touch is still poorly understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detecting forged parts of photographs faster and more accuratelyResearchers at India's Jaypee University of Information Technology have developed a new way to detect 'copy-move forgery' in photographs that is more successful and faster than currently available methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprise organic molecule detection paints complex picture of Saturnian moonScientists reveal the first detection of a molecule from Enceladus with a ground-based telescope, with implications for the search for life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercool breakthrough brings new quantum benchmarkBy gently prodding a swirling cloud of supercooled lithium atoms with a pair of lasers, and observing the atoms' response, researchers at Swinburne have developed a new way to probe the properties of quantum materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wiping out bacteria with nanoparticle-cotton fibersSilver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for more than 100 years. Today, silver in the form of nanoparticles is incorporated in such products as plastic food containers, medical materials, and clothing. In textiles, however, preventing the nanoparticles' antimicrobial properties from washing away has always been a problem. But not anymore.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study calls into question theories on pulsar phenomenaResearchers at the University of Southampton have cast doubt over established explanations for certain behaviours in pulsars - highly magnetised rotating neutron stars, formed from the remains of supernovae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists put new spin on computer technologyNew research from a team of DU physicists has the potential to serve as the foundation for next-generation computer technology.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Google spin-off deploys wearable electronics for huge health study Large projects explore how to integrate data from smart devices with other health metrics. Nature 547 13 doi: 10.1038/547013a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flow of material observed for the first time around a young eruptive starEvery year, about two Earth masses of material flows to the disk of the young star V346 Nor from its surroundings, to end up on the star causing brightening. The hard-to-see phenomenon was captured by a Hungarian-led research group using ALMA, the largest astronomical telescope on Earth. The observation helps in the understanding of a key phenomenon: how circumstellar disks evolve and ultimately f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shining light on solar energetic particles and jetsA team of astronomers, led by PhD researcher Malcolm Druett of Northumbria University at Newcastle, have taken a big step forward in understanding a 30-year-old mystery in the process of formation of solar flares. Druett will present their work on Monday 3 July at the National Astronomy Meeting in Hull, and the research appears in a paper in Nature Communications on the same day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Little Cub' gives astronomers rare chance to see galaxy demiseA primitive galaxy that could provide clues about the early universe has been spotted by astronomers as it begins to be consumed by a gigantic neighboring galaxy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify link between plant nitrogen uptake and reduction in greenhouse gas emissionsPurdue University scientists released research findings that indicate corn management processes contributing to optimal levels of plant nitrogen uptake could result in fewer nitrous oxide emissions, long identified as one of the most potent greenhouse gases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar cell design using diverse plant pigmentsA member of the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, in cooperation with colleagues, has optimized and characterized TiO₂-based solar cell design using diverse plant pigments. The study involved two types of solar cells with two photosensitizers, thylakoid membrane preparations and anthocyanin-enriched raspberry extracts. The project results have been published in the Inter
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Ingeniøren

Ny olie- og gasstrategi: Virksomheder skal samarbejde om NordsøenDet skal være nemmere for nye virksomheder at få adgang til den eksisterende infrastruktur i Nordsøen, som ejes af andre selskaber. Det fremgår af den olie- og gasstrategi, som regeringen præsenterede i dag.
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The Atlantic

Baby Driver Is a Rare Heist Movie With a Heart This story contains major plot spoilers for Baby Driver. The title character of Walter Hill’s 1978 classic heist movie The Driver might as well be making his entrance from the pits of hell. The opening shot of the movie sees Ryan O’Neal rise into focus, riding a one-man valet elevator in a parking garage, as the dirge-like score hums atonally. The Driver doesn’t have a name—nobody in the film doe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spain now sets the pace of assisted reproduction in Europe with more than 100,000 treatments a yearSpain is Europe's most active country in assisted reproduction. ESHRE has collected the national registry data of ART cycles performed in Europe since 1997 and for its latest report (for 2014) found that a record 109,275 treatment cycles were performed in Spain, which now sets the pace of European ART ahead of Russia (94.985 cycles) and former front runner France (90,434). The cycles monitored by
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New Scientist - News

Dams can lead the way to a better relationship with natureWe cannot restore the environment to a pristine state, but we can be better stewards of change. Making dams work for us and for nature is a good start
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Viden

Video: Se ulvemor med sine otte ungerLokal jæger optog søndag en video med ulveunger. Nu tør han ikke lade børnene cykle alene til naboen.
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Ingeniøren

Nordkoreansk missil kan nu ramme Alaska - men næppe resten af USADe første analyser tyder på, at Nordkoreas seneste missiltest ikke var med en interkontinental raket, men yderligere undersøgelser er nødvendige for at fastslå Nordkoreas nuværende teknologiske formåen.
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Ingeniøren

Så steg regningen for britisk atomkraft med yderligere 19 milliarderRegningen for at bygge det britiske atomkraftværk Hinkley Point er på få måneder steget med 10 procent til 166 milliarder kroner.
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The Atlantic

Trump Can't Reverse the Decline of White Christian America Down the home stretch of the 2016 presidential campaign, one of Donald Trump’s most consistent talking points was a claim that America’s changing demographics and culture had brought the country to a precipice. He repeatedly cast himself as the last chance for Republicans and conservative white Christians to step back from the cliff, to preserve their power and way of life. In an interview on Pat
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The Atlantic

Why Trump Should Embrace America's Immigrant Soldiers The men who declared American independence 241 years ago today were largely landowners and merchants, already well established in society. Not so, however, for many of the soldiers who helped secure that independence over the course of the Revolutionary War. From the nation’s very first days, some of its finest soldiers have been immigrants and, yes, even foreigners. As President Trump and his te
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Science | The Guardian

The Paris climate deal won’t save us – our future depends on de-growth The success of the Paris climate deal depends on ‘negative emission’ technologies that have never been proven at scale When Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate deal , the world reacted with outrage. And rightly so: the agreement represents a remarkable achievement in international diplomacy – a breakthrough after 20 years of failed climate negotiations. But as we rally
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Ingeniøren

Så er det alvor for frielektronlaser i HamborgTo måneder før den officielle indvielse overgår Europas nye superkraftige røntgenkilde nu til driftsfasen.
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Big Think

Researchers Figure Out What Kind of Smiles Are Most Successful A new study looks at how to make a successful smile. Read More
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Ingeniøren

Nyt skridt i kampen mod resistente bakterier: Inficér dem med viraSærligt modificerede vira skal vende bakteriers immunforsvar mod dem selv og forhåbentlig få bugt med antibiotikaresistente bakterier.
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Science-Based Medicine

Fun for the FourthIs it OK to laugh when we encounter a ridiculous claim in alternative medicine? This video lecture highlights some hilarious claims and encourages both laughter and appreciation of the human creativity involved.
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Ingeniøren

Datatilsynet: Opbevaring af bloddonorers fingeraftryk som bitmap-filer er ikke godt nok Region Hovedstaden opbevarer bloddonorers fingeraftryk som bitmap-filer sammen med personnummer og i 30 år. Det er ikke en ordentlig behandling af bloddonorers personlige oplysninger, mener Datatilsynet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/datatilsynet-opbevaringen-bloddonorers-fingeraftryk-ikke-god-nok-1077991 Version2
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Science | The Guardian

Make DNA tests routine, says England's chief medical officer Sally Davies calls for making genomic testing as common as blood tests to usher in the era of precision medicine to treat cancers and rare diseases Genomic testing should become a normal part of NHS care, beginning with cancer patients and those with rare diseases, says the chief medical officer, Dame Sally Davies. In her annual report, Davies stresses her enthusiasm for the genomic revolution wh
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK research chief 'will not direct science'The new head of UK research has said that he won't centrally direct scientific research.
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Science | The Guardian

Why Roman concrete still stands strong while modern version decays Scientists have cracked the secret to Roman water-based structures’ strength – and findings could help today’s builders Their structures are still standing more than 1,500 years after the last centurion snuffed it: now the Romans’ secret of durable marine concrete has finally been cracked. The Roman recipe – a mix of volcanic ash, lime (calcium oxide), seawater and lumps of volcanic rock – held t
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Science | The Guardian

UK warned not to cut science and research links with EU after Brexit Former EU commissioner Pascal Lamy calls for post-Brexit framework in which the UK can remain in the European Research Area The British government has been warned by a Brussels political veteran not to make the “mistake” of cutting itself adrift from EU scientific programmes after Brexit. Pascal Lamy, a former EU commissioner and two-time head of the World Trade Organisation, said everyone would
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Science | The Guardian

People taking heartburn drugs could have higher risk of death, study claims Research suggests people on proton pump inhibitors are more likely to die than those taking different antacid or none at all Millions of people taking common heartburn and indigestion medications could be at an increased risk of death, research suggests. The drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), neutralise the acid in the stomach and are widely prescribed, with low doses also available w
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The Atlantic

North Korea Says it Tested ICBM Updated at 1:55 a.m. ET North Korea says the missile it tested earlier Tuesday was its first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), a claim that would put the continental United States within its range. North Korea is “a full-fledged nuclear power that has been possessed of the most powerful inter-continental ballistic rocket capable of hitting any part of the world,” a North Korean televisio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized metabolic therapy treatment shows improvement on atypical Rett syndromeAdministration of the amino acid D-serine, a dietary supplement, contributes to the improvement of the cognitive and motor capacity of a patient with a mutation that affects glutamate receptors
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ensuring carpoolers are compatible is key to ridesharing successEnsuring that would-be carpoolers are riding with people they actually like could potentially decrease car use by nearly 60 percent, research from a professor at the University of Waterloo has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup increased in Canada after tariffs lowered in NAFTALower tariffs on high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) were linked to higher supply and likely consumption of added sweeteners in Canada, including HFCS, found new research published in CMAJ.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Menstruation doesn't change how your brain works -- periodIt has long been assumed that your period affects your brain's performance. Professor Brigitte Leeners and her team studied a sample of women in Zürich and Hannover to determine whether changes in hormones during the menstrual cycle really do change how well brains work. By increasing the sample size and following participants over more than one menstrual cycle, they found evidence that your brain
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Ingeniøren

Risiko for skimmelsvamp: Videncenter trækker efterisolerings-løsninger tilbageEfterisolering af krybekældre og terrændæk øger risikoen for kondens og skimmelsvamp. Derfor trækker Videncenter for Energibesparelser i Bygninger nu to vejledninger tilbage.
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Science | The Guardian

Nanomaterial magic: from a window to a mirror with the flick of a switch Australian National University team says the breakthrough could protect satellites from radiation and create energy-efficient homes Australian scientists have developed a technique to create temperature-controlled nanomaterial that could be used to turn a window into a mirror at the push of a button. The method, developed by a team of 12 at the Australian National University, could be used to pro
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The Atlantic

Nine Killed, Dozens Abducted in Suspected Boko Haram Attack At least nine people have been killed and around 40 people taken hostage after gunmen attacked a village in southeast Niger. The fighters are said to belong to the Islamist militant group Boko Haram, which often wages attacks in Nigeria and its neighboring countries. Local residents told the Associated Press that the attackers arrived late Sunday on camels and horses before firing in all directio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What's in a name? Big Data reveals distinctive patterns in higher education systemsUsing lists of names collected from publicly available websites, two researchers have revealed distinctive patterns in higher education systems, ranging from ethnic representation, to gender imbalance in the sciences, to nepotism in Italian universities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low temperature increases risk of DNA damage from UV radiationUltraviolet (UV) radiation exposure can cause DNA damage and may be one of the contributing factors in the global amphibian extinction crisis. New research from Prof Craig Franklin and a team of researchers from The University of Queensland, Australia shows how tadpoles living at low temperatures are more at risk of DNA damage than previously thought.
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Gizmodo

Assassination Plot Discovered By Video Game Forum A 23-year-old man has been arrested after his plot to try and assassinate the French President was uncovered by the users of a video game forum. The man, who was arrested last week, threatened police with a knife when they arrived at his home, and had planned to kill the newly-elected President Macron during France’s Bastille Day celebrations later this month, which US President Donald Trump is e
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Ars Technica

Congressional panel puts plans for a US Space Corps in 2018 defense budget Enlarge (credit: Touchstone Pictures) Don't get your hopes up too high about becoming a space marine quite yet. But if the House of Representatives' version of the 2018 defense budget goes through, you may soon be able to enlist in the US Space Corps. Back in January of 2001, days before the inauguration of President George W. Bush, a commission headed by future Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tilted microscopy technique better reveals protein structuresA new cryo-EM method facilitates a better understanding of proteins involved in disease, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How babies' environments lead to poor health laterNew research underscores how environmental conditions early in development can cause inflammation in adulthood -- an important risk factor for a wide range of diseases of aging, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and dementia. Beyond that, the research helped to explain a key unanswered question about the poorly understood mechanisms shaping the development and regula
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Generic drug prices increase when market competition decreasesDecreased market competition causes generic drug prices to rise significantly, according to an article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Freeze-frames of enzymes in action have implications for a new cancer treatment conceptStructural biologists shed light on how a family of enzymes called TUTases regulate let-7, an essential regulator of development that is dyregulated in lung and kidney cancers, among others. The team used x-ray crystallography to capture the equivalent of freeze-frames of TUTases, at the resolution of individual atoms, interacting with other molecules to regulate the activity of let-7. this work w
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The Atlantic

And Back Where We Started The picture below is how it looked six months ago, when we were headed westward from Gaithersburg airport, outside Washington, to Redlands, California, where we’ve spent the intervening months. (This note follows up on two previous cross-country flying reports, here and here .) It was below freezing back then; the wind was howling; we had an electric heater (the yellow cord) plugged into the plan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dinosaurs' loss was frogs' gain: The upside of a mass extinctionBased on earlier studies, biologists believed that the vast majority of today's frogs originated in a blossoming of new species 100 million years ago. New and more complete genetic data pinpoints this radiation much earlier: 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, precisely when much of life on Earth was wiped out by a comet or asteroid. Frogs took advantage of flourishing angio
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The Atlantic

Syrian Army Declares Brief Truce Ahead of Peace Talks The Syrian army, led by President Bashar al-Assad, temporarily halted its combat operations in the nation’s southern provinces ahead of a series of peace talks in the Kazakh capital of Astana, the army announced Monday. In a statement on state television, the army said the ceasefire commenced at midday on Sunday and would continue until midnight on Thursday. The latest round of Russian-sponsored
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beech trees native to Scotland after all, scientists discoverBeech trees should be considered native to Scotland -- despite a long-running debate over their national identity, researchers at the University of Stirling and Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is concussion associated with abnormal menstrual patterns in young women?Concussion is associated with increased risk of having two or more abnormal menstrual bleeding patterns, according to an article and based on a study of nearly 130 girls and young women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What are outcomes later in life for high school football players?In a study of men who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957, playing high school football was not adversely associated with cognitive impairment or depression later in life, according to an article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studies compare types of insulin for reducing episodes of low blood sugar for patients with Type 1 or 2 diabetesTreatment with the insulin degludec compared to glargine U100 for 32 weeks resulted in a reduced rate of hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes among patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes and at least one risk factor for hypoglycemia, according to two studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Applying electric current to nerve for chronic low back pain does not provide clinically important improvementTreatment of chronic low back pain with radiofrequency denervation, a procedure that can be performed with different techniques including the application of an electric current to the pain-conducting nerve, resulted in either no improvement or no clinically important improvement in chronic low back pain, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Certain OTC, less expensive hearing aids provide benefit similar to conventional hearing aidA comparison between less-expensive, over-the-counter hearing assistance devices and a conventional hearing aid found that some of these devices were associated with improvements in hearing similar to the hearing aid.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Partying Under the Midsummer Arctic Sun, Unless You’re a Worm“White nights” and sun that barely sets near the Arctic Circle are an occasion to celebrate for some living things. But a night crawler might want to stay in its burrow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Owls' wings could hold the key to beating wind turbine noiseA new study has revealed how inspiration from owls' wings could allow aircraft and wind turbines to become quieter. Researchers from Japan and China studied the serrations in the leading edge of owls' wings, gaining new insight into how they work to make the birds' flight silent. Their results, published today in the journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, point towards potential mechanisms for no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Musical sun reduces range of magnetic activityA study of the sun using sound waves suggests that the layer in which the significant magnetic activity is located has grown thinner in recent years. Professor Yvonne Elsworth will present results at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull on Tuesday, July 4.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Little Cub' gives astronomers rare chance to see galaxy demiseA primitive galaxy that could provide clues about the early universe has been spotted by astronomers as it begins to be consumed by a gigantic neighboring galaxy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alcohol consumption putting vast majority of Europeans at risk of digestive cancersAlcohol & Digestive Cancers, a report launched today by United European Gastroenterology, revealed that the average daily intake of alcoholic drinks was 'moderate' (between 1 and 4 drinks per day) in all 28 EU states, placing these citizens at a heightened risk of both colorectal and esophageal cancer. No countries within the EU were found to have 'light' alcohol consumption (on average, less than
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Global Governance What We’re Following In the Middle East: Saudi Arabia and its allies have extended the deadline for Qatar to respond to a list of demands that could, if Qatar fails to meet them, result in serious diplomatic sanctions. Many of those 13 demands are targeted at cutting off Qatar’s relationship with the Muslim Brotherhood , which the Gulf monarchies see as an existential threat. Meanwhile, Iraqi tro
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Live Science

Common Heartburn Meds Linked to Increased Risk of DeathTaking a popular type of heartburn drug may increase a person's risk of death, a new study finds.
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Science : NPR

Natural Disasters May Widen Income Gap, Report Says Scientific American concludes that disasters correlate to a 1-percentage-point increase in poverty in the affected areas. It also finds that the rich leave disaster-prone areas but the poor can't. (Image credit: Eric Gray/AP)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drugs to curb excess stomach acid may be linked to heightened risk of deathProton pump inhibitors (PPIs) -- a widely available class of drug designed to curb excess stomach acid production -- may be linked to a heightened risk of death, indicates research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Naturally produced testosterone gives female athletes 'significant' competitive edgeHigh levels of testosterone that are naturally produced by some elite female athletes give them a 'significant' competitive edge in athletics events that depend on stamina and visuospatial abilities, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death riskMillions of US residents take proton pump inhibitors which are widely prescribed to treat heartburn, ulcers and other gastrointestinal problems. The drugs also are available over the counter under brand names that include Prevacid, Prilosec and Nexium. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that long-term use of the popular drugs carries an increased risk
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Science | The Guardian

Caster Semenya could be forced to undertake hormone therapy for future Olympics Study shows performance-boosting effects of testosterone in female athletes, reopening controversial debate about intersex and hyperandrogenous competitors Using testosterone to categorise male and female athletes isn’t perfect, but it’s the best solution we have Caster Semenya, the Olympic 800m champion, may be banned from competing at future Games unless she undergoes hormone replacement therap
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Science | The Guardian

Using testosterone to categorise male and female athletes isn't perfect, but it's the best solution we have | Joanna Harper An important new study could lead to the reinstatement of rules imposing a maximum level of male sex hormones in athletes competing as female Caster Semenya could be forced to undertake hormone therapy for future Olympics While it has long been recognised that testosterone (T) level differences are the principle cause of the athletic advantage that men hold over women, there has been little publi
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Gizmodo

This Valerian Clip Shows What's Possible When 3000 Alien Species Live Together Valerian and Laureline enter Alpha in Valerian. Image: STX Though it’s easier to simply call Luc Besson’s new movie “Valerian,” that’s not the full title. The full title is “ Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets ,” and a new clip from the film explains the title in detail. This clip features Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) landing on that titular city of a thousand p
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New Scientist - News

Demise of dinosaurs opened the doors to the age of tree frogsFrogs leaped to take advantage of the global catastrophe that killed off the dinosaurs 66 million years ago
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The Scientist RSS

White House Science Office in FluxAn administration official counters news of an unstaffed division at the Office of Science and Technology Policy, admits the agency is still adjusting.
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The Scientist RSS

Sudden Infant Death Tied to SerotoninOne-third of babies who died of SIDS had higher-than-normal levels of the neurotransmitter in their blood serum, according to a study.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

How to Survive a Shark Attack | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 When sharks get a little too curious... shark attacks rarely happen, but here's how to survive. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/
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NYT > Science

Court Blocks E.P.A. Effort to Suspend Obama-Era Methane RuleThe ruling, on a regulation to restrict emissions from new oil and gas wells, signaled that President Trump’s plans to simply delay environmental actions are likely to face an uphill battle.
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The Atlantic

Why the Media's Defense Against Trump Has Proven So Ineffective Donald Trump has a knack for choosing weak adversaries. He recognized the potential in taking advantage of undocumented workers . He used the element of surprise to take out Vince McMahon . Then he cut through a field of supposedly formidable Republicans as though they were Lilliputians, setting himself up for a general-election match-up against Hillary Clinton—who, it turned out, was a notably w
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Live Science

How Do Fireworks Get Their Glorious Colors?Each firework is packed with just the right mix of chemicals to create their colorful lights.
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Gizmodo

Bee Brains May Be the Model For the Next Evolutionary Leap in Camera Technology Photo: Getty The beleaguered honey bee is normally championed for its vital powers of pollination but a new study shows that we could soon be thanking them for inspiring more accurate color imaging in digital photography. A group of researchers published the results of their investigation into how bees perceive color today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ). T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cases of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection are soaringResearchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that the most difficult C. difficile cases, known as multiple recurring C. difficile infections (mrCDI), are rapidly becoming more common.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Generic drug prices increase when market competition decreasesDecreased market competition causes generic drug prices to rise significantly, according to an article published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
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Big Think

What Independence Needs: A Quick Holiday Quiz Key logic in America’s founding documents is now too often neglected. Do you know what “the Declaration” lists as the first justification for America’s Independence? Read More
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Gizmodo

That Is One Fancy Zelda-Themed Switch GIF The people over at MakoMod have put together a Switch that looks like it came straight out of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild . It’s pretty meta. In the game, Link uses the Sheikah Slate to take pictures, look at maps, and figure out where he needs to go. It was pretty clearly designed to mimic the Wii U’s gamepad, but then the Switch came out which didn’t have a dedicated second scre
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Frog evolution linked to dinosaur asteroid strikeThe huge diversity of frogs we see today is mainly a consequence of the asteroid strike that killed off the dinosaurs, a study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why does a Yellowstone microorganism prefer meager rations over rich ones?Arizona State University geoscientist Everett Shock has collaborated with a team of life scientists from Montana State University to discover a puzzle at the junction of geochemistry and biology.
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Big Think

What If Anxiety or Depression is Masking a More Urgent Problem? Research shows that people with heart problems and diabetes are being misdiagnosed. Solving that is going to take an overhaul of our medical system. Read More
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Science : NPR

Biologists Divided Over How To Save Endangered Pangolin The pangolin is a tiny snake-like creature. It's in great demand for its meat and scales, and it is in danger of extinction. Biologists can't agree on whether zoos should play a role in saving it.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Strange Mammals That Stumped Darwin Finally Find a HomeFossils of bizarre creatures called Macrauchenia have long baffled scientists, who used DNA to confirm when they diverged from horses, rhinos and tapirs.
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NYT > Science

Counseled by Industry, Not Staff, E.P.A. Chief Is Off to a Blazing StartMuch of President Trump’s policy agenda is mired in delay, but Scott Pruitt has already achieved a major regulatory rollback.
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Science : NPR

Another July 4th Anniversary: Pathfinder's Landing On Mars In 1997, the spacecraft's mission paved the way for the more sophisticated rovers operating on the Red Planet today. (Image credit: NASA/JPL)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europe's Galileo satnav identifies problems behind failing clocksInvestigators have uncovered the problems behind the failure of atomic clocks onboard satellites belonging to the beleaguered Galileo satnav system, The European Commission Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jay-Z album boosts his Tidal streaming siteJay-Z's upstart Tidal streaming service has enjoyed a surge of interest after the rap mogul released his latest album exclusively on the platform.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK pilots warn of disaster, seek tougher rules for dronesThe British Airline Pilots Association is warning of a looming catastrophe unless drones are subject to tougher regulations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon Valley's sexism problem: Could the tide be turning?Sexism in Silicon Valley has been an open secret for years. What's changing: A growing number of women are coming forward with personal stories of sexual harassment and discrimination, prompting apologies, resignations and plenty of hand-wringing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tilted microscopy technique better reveals protein structuresThe conventional way of placing protein samples under an electron microscope during cryo-EM experiments may fall flat when it comes to getting the best picture of a protein's structure. In some cases, tilting a sheet of frozen proteins—by anywhere from 10 to 50 degrees—as it lies under the microscope, gives higher quality data and could lead to a better understanding of a variety of diseases, acco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular electronics scientists shatter 'impossible' recordAn international research team that includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco, Damien Thompson of the University of Limerick and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore has cracked an important limitation that for nearly 20 years has prevented the practical use of molecular diodes.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural complexity and molecular heterogeneity of a butterfly ejaculate reflect a complex history of selection [Evolution]Male ejaculates are often structurally complex, and this complexity is likely to influence key reproductive interactions between males and females. However, despite its potential evolutionary significance, the molecular underpinnings of ejaculate structural complexity have received little empirical attention. To address this knowledge gap, we sought to understand the biochemical and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A null model for microbial diversification [Evolution]Whether prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea) are naturally organized into phenotypically and genetically cohesive units comparable to animal or plant species remains contested, frustrating attempts to estimate how many such units there might be, or to identify the ecological roles they play. Analyses of gene sequences in various closely related prokaryotic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionary radiation of lanthipeptides in marine cyanobacteria [Evolution]Lanthipeptides are ribosomally derived peptide secondary metabolites that undergo extensive posttranslational modification. Prochlorosins are a group of lanthipeptides produced by certain strains of the ubiquitous marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Unlike other lanthipeptide-producing bacteria, picocyanobacteria use an unprecedented mechanism of substrate promiscuity for t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiple layers of heterogeneity and subset diversity in human MAIT cell responses to distinct microorganisms and to innate cytokines [Immunology and Inflammation]Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a large innate-like T-cell subset in humans defined by invariant TCR Vα7.2 use and expression of CD161. MAIT cells recognize microbial riboflavin metabolites of bacterial or fungal origin presented by the monomorphic MR1 molecule. The extraordinary level of evolutionary conservation of MR1 and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Virus-induced inflammasome activation is suppressed by prostaglandin D2/DP1 signaling [Microbiology]Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an eicosanoid with both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties, is the most abundantly expressed prostaglandin in the brain. Here we show that PGD2 signaling through the D-prostanoid receptor 1 (DP1) receptor is necessary for optimal microglia/macrophage activation and IFN expression after infection with a neurotropic coronavirus. Genome-wide expression...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Boosting CNS axon regeneration by harnessing antagonistic effects of GSK3 activity [Neuroscience]Implications of GSK3 activity for axon regeneration are often inconsistent, if not controversial. Sustained GSK3 activity in GSK3S/A knock-in mice reportedly accelerates peripheral nerve regeneration via increased MAP1B phosphorylation and concomitantly reduces microtubule detyrosination. In contrast, the current study shows that lens injury-stimulated optic nerve regeneration was significantly co
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hypocretin (orexin) is critical in sustaining theta/gamma-rich waking behaviors that drive sleep need [Neuroscience]Hcrt gene inactivation in mice leads to behavioral state instability, abnormal transitions to paradoxical sleep, and cataplexy, hallmarks of narcolepsy. Sleep homeostasis is, however, considered unimpaired in patients and narcoleptic mice. We find that whereas Hcrtko/ko mice respond to 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) with a slow-wave sleep (SWS) EEG δ...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sex-specific early survival drives adult sex ratio bias in snowy plovers and impacts mating system and population growth [Population Biology]Adult sex ratio (ASR) is a central concept in population biology and a key factor in sexual selection, but why do most demographic models ignore sex biases? Vital rates often vary between the sexes and across life history, but their relative contributions to ASR variation remain poorly understood—an essential step...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Saito et al., Investigation of hindwing folding in ladybird beetles by artificial elytron transplantation and microcomputed tomography [Correction]APPLIED BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, ENGINEERING Correction for “Investigation of hindwing folding in ladybird beetles by artificial elytron transplantation and microcomputed tomography,” by Kazuya Saito, Shuhei Nomura, Shuhei Yamamoto, Ryuma Niyama, and Yoji Okabe, which appeared in issue 22, May 30, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:5624–5628; first published May...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Lan et al., Long-read sequencing uncovers the adaptive topography of a carnivorous plant genome [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Long-read sequencing uncovers the adaptive topography of a carnivorous plant genome,” by Tianying Lan, Tanya Renner, Enrique Ibarra-Laclette, Kimberly M. Farr, Tien-Hao Chang, Sergio Alan Cervantes-Pérez, Chunfang Zheng, David Sankoff, Haibao Tang, Rikky W. Purbojati, Alexander Putra, Daniela I. Drautz-Moses, Stephan C. Schuster, Luis Herrera-Estrella, and Victor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Koch et al., Genetic rescue models refute nonautonomous rod cell death in retinitis pigmentosa [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Genetic rescue models refute nonautonomous rod cell death in retinitis pigmentosa,” by Susanne F. Koch, Jimmy K. Duong, Chun-Wei Hsu, Yi-Ting Tsai, Chyuan-Sheng Lin, Christian A. Wahl-Schott, and Stephen H. Tsang, which appeared in issue 20, May 16, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:5259–5264; first...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Mattei et al., Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning [Correction]PHYSIOLOGY Correction for “Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning,” by Alexandra L. Mattei, Mark L. Riccio, Frank W. Avila, and Mariana F. Wolfner, which appeared in issue 27, July 7, 2015, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (112:8475–8480;...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Presenilin 1 and Alzheimer’s disease pathology Aβ plaque accumulation (green) due to defective autophagy in mouse brain tissue. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, afflicts more than 5 million people in the United States and is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles and the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mammal domestication and the symbiotic spectrum [Social Sciences]In their paper in PNAS, Weissbrod et al. (1) conclude that mice adapted to the temporary sedentary lifestyle of humans during the Late Pleistocene and underwent a domestication process driven by a competitive advantage for commensal mice in the evolving, long-term human settlements. The authors expand the possibility of an...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Dekel et al.: Preagricultural commensal niches for the house mouse and origins of human sedentism [Social Sciences]In their letter, Dekel et al. (1) comment on our recent findings on the origin of house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) 15,000 y ago, ecological impacts of the first settled hunter-gatherers, and insights that this study provides on early domestication processes (2). They maintain that mice were parasitic with humans...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Social norms: More details, please [Social Sciences]The words we use matter. The concept of a social norm exists in many social and behavioral science disciplines and research traditions (1). Because the general term “social norm” is a hypernym, an explicit definition is crucial to discussions of its place and usefulness in solving complex social–environmental issues (cf....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Robert Townsend [QnAs]Household businesses and small enterprises are a staple of villages in Thailand. In the late 1990s, Robert Townsend, an economic theorist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, ventured into Thai villages to document household finances and sketch the ties linking family and village finances to regional and national economies. For...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Wolfgang Lutz [QnAs]In 2015, 193 nations came together to define 17 sustainable development goals. However, the large number of specific development targets renders prioritizing the use of development resources a challenging endeavor. Demographer Wolfgang Lutz, of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna, Austria, and a recently elected member of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robert Treat Paine III (1933-2016) [Retrospectives]Robert Treat Paine III passed away June 13 in Seattle surrounded by family and friends. RTP, as he was known, was an emeritus Professor at the University of Washington, where he developed a career that helped define the field of community ecology. Ever an avid naturalist who paid close attention...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Counteracting dysfunction of regulatory T cells in organ transplantation [Immunology and Inflammation]Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are central in controlling adaptive immunity. The importance of Tregs in preventing autoimmunity has been demonstrated both in experimental models and in patients with mutations in the essential transcription factor Foxp3 (1). This has now been translated to strategies that can exploit this capacity in clinical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Versatility of presenilin 1 [Neuroscience]Mutations in PSEN1 and PSEN2 genes, encoding presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2), respectively, cause autosomal-dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) (1, 2). The precise mechanism by which PS1 mutations lead to AD is under active investigation. Multiple theories have been suggested to explain the role of PS1 and PS2 mutations...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cloning the sigma2 receptor: Wandering 40 years to find an identity [Pharmacology]Scientists have endeavored to understand sigma receptors for over 40 y. Although most agree that they are important, there is little agreement on anything else. In their behavioral classification of opioid receptors in 1976, Martin et al. (1) proposed three groups of compounds illustrating three distinct opioid receptor classes (mu,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recombinant silicateins as model biocatalysts in organosiloxane chemistry [Chemistry]The family of silicatein enzymes from marine sponges (phylum Porifera) is unique in nature for catalyzing the formation of inorganic silica structures, which the organisms incorporate into their skeleton. However, the synthesis of organosiloxanes catalyzed by these enzymes has thus far remained largely unexplored. To investigate the reactivity of these...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transitional-turbulent spots and turbulent-turbulent spots in boundary layers [Engineering]Two observations drawn from a thoroughly validated direct numerical simulation of the canonical spatially developing, zero-pressure gradient, smooth, flat-plate boundary layer are presented here. The first is that, for bypass transition in the narrow sense defined herein, we found that the transitional–turbulent spot inception mechanism is analogous to the secondary...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinguishing attosecond electron-electron scattering and screening in transition metals [Physics]Electron–electron interactions are the fastest processes in materials, occurring on femtosecond to attosecond timescales, depending on the electronic band structure of the material and the excitation energy. Such interactions can play a dominant role in light-induced processes such as nano-enhanced plasmonics and catalysis, light harvesting, or phase transitions. However, to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Application of metabolic controls for the maximization of lipid production in semicontinuous fermentation [Applied Biological Sciences]Acetic acid can be generated through syngas fermentation, lignocellulosic biomass degradation, and organic waste anaerobic digestion. Microbial conversion of acetate into triacylglycerols for biofuel production has many advantages, including low-cost or even negative-cost feedstock and environmental benefits. The main issue stems from the dilute nature of acetate produced in such...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tetrahydrobiopterin regulates monoamine neurotransmitter sulfonation [Biochemistry]Monoamine neurotransmitters are among the hundreds of signaling small molecules whose target interactions are switched “on” and “off” via transfer of the sulfuryl-moiety (–SO3) from PAPS (3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate) to the hydroxyls and amines of their scaffolds. These transfer reactions are catalyzed by a small family of broad-specificity enzymes—the human cytosolic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of human Fe-S assembly subcomplex reveals unexpected cysteine desulfurase architecture and acyl-ACP-ISD11 interactions [Biochemistry]In eukaryotes, sulfur is mobilized for incorporation into multiple biosynthetic pathways by a cysteine desulfurase complex that consists of a catalytic subunit (NFS1), LYR protein (ISD11), and acyl carrier protein (ACP). This NFS1–ISD11–ACP (SDA) complex forms the core of the iron–sulfur (Fe–S) assembly complex and associates with assembly proteins ISCU2,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of the CBP catalytic core in intramolecular SUMOylation and control of histone H3 acetylation [Biochemistry]The histone acetyl transferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and its paralog p300 play a critical role in numerous cellular processes. Dysregulation of their catalytic activity is associated with several human diseases. Previous work has elucidated the regulatory mechanisms of p300 acetyltransferase activity, but it is not known whether CBP activity is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural characterization of the Rabphilin-3A-SNAP25 interaction [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Membrane fusion is essential in a myriad of eukaryotic cell biological processes, including the synaptic transmission. Rabphilin-3A is a membrane trafficking protein involved in the calcium-dependent regulation of secretory vesicle exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, but the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structures and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uncovering BRD4 hyperphosphorylation associated with cellular transformation in NUT midline carcinoma [Cell Biology]The epigenetic reader BRD4 plays a vital role in transcriptional regulation, cellular growth control, and cell-cycle progression. Dysregulation of BRD4 function has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of cancers. However, how BRD4 is regulated to maintain its normal function in healthy cells and how alteration of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bacteria-mediated hypoxia functions as a signal for mosquito development [Developmental Biology]Mosquitoes host communities of microbes in their digestive tract that consist primarily of bacteria. We previously reported that several mosquito species, including Aedes aegypti, do not develop beyond the first instar when fed a nutritionally complete diet in the absence of a gut microbiota. In contrast, several species of bacteria,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TCTE1 is a conserved component of the dynein regulatory complex and is required for motility and metabolism in mouse spermatozoa [Developmental Biology]Flagella and cilia are critical cellular organelles that provide a means for cells to sense and progress through their environment. The central component of flagella and cilia is the axoneme, which comprises the “9+2” microtubule arrangement, dynein arms, radial spokes, and the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC). Failure to properly assemble...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reconstruction and evolutionary history of eutherian chromosomes [Evolution]Whole-genome assemblies of 19 placental mammals and two outgroup species were used to reconstruct the order and orientation of syntenic fragments in chromosomes of the eutherian ancestor and six other descendant ancestors leading to human. For ancestral chromosome reconstructions, we developed an algorithm (DESCHRAMBLER) that probabilistically determines the adjacencies of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stem caecilian from the Triassic of Colorado sheds light on the origins of Lissamphibia [Evolution]The origin of the limbless caecilians remains a lasting question in vertebrate evolution. Molecular phylogenies and morphology support that caecilians are the sister taxon of batrachians (frogs and salamanders), from which they diverged no later than the early Permian. Although recent efforts have discovered new, early members of the batrachian...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Red Queen and King in finite populations [Evolution]In antagonistic symbioses, such as host–parasite interactions, one population’s success is the other’s loss. In mutualistic symbioses, such as division of labor, both parties can gain, but they might have different preferences over the possible mutualistic arrangements. The rates of evolution of the two populations in a symbiosis are important...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The deep, hot biosphere: Twenty-five years of retrospection [Microbiology]Twenty-five years ago this month, Thomas Gold published a seminal manuscript suggesting the presence of a “deep, hot biosphere” in the Earth’s crust. Since this publication, a considerable amount of attention has been given to the study of deep biospheres, their role in geochemical cycles, and their potential to inform...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Monte Carlo sampling for stochastic weight functions [Applied Mathematics]Conventional Monte Carlo simulations are stochastic in the sense that the acceptance of a trial move is decided by comparing a computed acceptance probability with a random number, uniformly distributed between 0 and 1. Here, we consider the case that the weight determining the acceptance probability itself is fluctuating. This...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation for off-grid water purification [Applied Physical Sciences]With more than a billion people lacking accessible drinking water, there is a critical need to convert nonpotable sources such as seawater to water suitable for human use. However, energy requirements of desalination plants account for half their operating costs, so alternative, lower energy approaches are equally critical. Membrane distillation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rhodium metalloinsertor binding generates a lesion with selective cytotoxicity for mismatch repair-deficient cells [Biochemistry]The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway recognizes and repairs errors in base pairing and acts to maintain genome stability. Cancers that have lost MMR function are common and comprise an important clinical subtype that is resistant to many standard of care chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin. We have identified a family...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synthesis of asymmetrical multiantennary human milk oligosaccharides [Biochemistry]Despite mammalian glycans typically having highly complex asymmetrical multiantennary architectures, chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis has almost exclusively focused on the preparation of simpler symmetrical structures. This deficiency hampers investigations into the biology of glycan-binding proteins, which in turn complicates the biomedical use of this class of biomolecules. Herein, we descr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Analysis of a dual domain phosphoglycosyl transferase reveals a ping-pong mechanism with a covalent enzyme intermediate [Biochemistry]Phosphoglycosyl transferases (PGTs) are integral membrane proteins with diverse architectures that catalyze the formation of polyprenol diphosphate-linked glycans via phosphosugar transfer from a nucleotide diphosphate-sugar to a polyprenol phosphate. There are two PGT superfamilies that differ significantly in overall structure and topology. The polytopic PGT superfamily, represented by MraY and.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biosynthesis of isonitrile lipopeptides by conserved nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters in Actinobacteria [Biochemistry]A putative lipopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster is conserved in many species of Actinobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. marinum, but the specific function of the encoding proteins has been elusive. Using both in vivo heterologous reconstitution and in vitro biochemical analyses, we have revealed that the five encoding biosynthetic enzymes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Convergent immunological solutions to Argentine hemorrhagic fever virus neutralization [Biochemistry]Transmission of hemorrhagic fever New World arenaviruses from their rodent reservoirs to human populations poses substantial public health and economic dangers. These zoonotic events are enabled by the specific interaction between the New World arenaviral attachment glycoprotein, GP1, and cell surface human transferrin receptor (hTfR1). Here, we present the structural...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How members of the human gut microbiota overcome the sulfation problem posed by glycosaminoglycans [Biochemistry]The human microbiota, which plays an important role in health and disease, uses complex carbohydrates as a major source of nutrients. Utilization hierarchy indicates that the host glycosaminoglycans heparin (Hep) and heparan sulfate (HS) are high-priority carbohydrates for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent member of the human microbiota. The sulfation patterns...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Energetics and dynamics of a light-driven sodium-pumping rhodopsin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The conversion of light energy into ion gradients across biological membranes is one of the most fundamental reactions in primary biological energy transduction. Recently, the structure of the first light-activated Na+ pump, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2), was resolved at atomic resolution [Kato HE, et al. (2015) Nature 521:48–53]. To...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Understanding the mechanical response of double-stranded DNA and RNA under constant stretching forces using all-atom molecular dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Multiple biological processes involve the stretching of nucleic acids (NAs). Stretching forces induce local changes in the molecule structure, inhibiting or promoting the binding of proteins, which ultimately affects their functionality. Understanding how a force induces changes in the structure of NAs at the atomic level is a challenge. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

qSVA framework for RNA quality correction in differential expression analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful approach for measuring gene expression levels in cells and tissues, but it relies on high-quality RNA. We demonstrate here that statistical adjustment using existing quality measures largely fails to remove the effects of RNA degradation when RNA quality associates with the outcome of interest....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enhancing T1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast with internalized gadolinium(III) in a multilayer nanoparticle [Chemistry]Multifunctional nanoparticles for biomedical applications have shown extraordinary potential as contrast agents in various bioimaging modalities, near-IR photothermal therapy, and for light-triggered therapeutic release processes. Over the past several years, numerous studies have been performed to synthesize and enhance MRI contrast with nanoparticles. However, understanding the MRI enhancement m
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient switching of mCherry fluorescence using chemical caging [Chemistry]Fluorophores with dynamic or controllable fluorescence emission have become essential tools for advanced imaging, such as superresolution imaging. These applications have driven the continuing development of photoactivatable or photoconvertible labels, including genetically encoded fluorescent proteins. These new probes work well but require the introduction of new labels that may interfere...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient transport of tropospheric aerosol into the stratosphere via the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]An enhanced aerosol layer near the tropopause over Asia during the June–September period of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) was recently identified using satellite observations. Its sources and climate impact are presently not well-characterized. To improve understanding of this phenomenon, we made in situ aerosol measurements during summer 2015 from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heat exchange between a bouncing drop and a superhydrophobic substrate [Ecology]The ability to enhance or limit heat transfer between a surface and impacting drops is important in applications ranging from industrial spray cooling to the thermal regulation of animals in cold rain. When these surfaces are micro/nanotextured and hydrophobic, or superhydrophobic, an impacting drop can spread and recoil over trapped...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New perspective on spring vegetation phenology and global climate change based on Tibetan Plateau tree-ring data [Ecology]Phenological responses of vegetation to climate, in particular to the ongoing warming trend, have received much attention. However, divergent results from the analyses of remote sensing data have been obtained for the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the world’s largest high-elevation region. This study provides a perspective on vegetation phenology shifts during...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: How saving some of the Southeast’s oldest trees might help scientists monitor climate change [Environmental Sciences]In the swampy floodplains of North Carolina’s Black River stand ancient trees with a story to tell. Many of these bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) were well over a millennium old when Columbus discovered the Western Hemisphere. As it turns out, their locale has greatly promoted their longevity: by being relatively...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reducing secondary organic aerosol formation from gasoline vehicle exhaust [Environmental Sciences]On-road gasoline vehicles are a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban areas. We investigated SOA formation by oxidizing dilute, ambient-level exhaust concentrations from a fleet of on-road gasoline vehicles in a smog chamber. We measured less SOA formation from newer vehicles meeting more stringent emissions standards. This...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Toll-like receptor pathway evolution in deuterostomes [Evolution]Animals have evolved an array of pattern-recognition receptor families essential for recognizing conserved molecular motifs characteristic of pathogenic microbes. One such family is the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). On pathogen binding, TLRs initiate specialized cytokine signaling catered to the class of invading pathogen. This signaling is pivotal for activating adaptive immunity...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Population-genomic inference of the strength and timing of selection against gene flow [Evolution]The interplay of divergent selection and gene flow is key to understanding how populations adapt to local environments and how new species form. Here, we use DNA polymorphism data and genome-wide variation in recombination rate to jointly infer the strength and timing of selection, as well as the baseline level...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionary strata on young mating-type chromosomes despite the lack of sexual antagonism [Evolution]Sex chromosomes can display successive steps of recombination suppression known as “evolutionary strata,” which are thought to result from the successive linkage of sexually antagonistic genes to sex-determining genes. However, there is little evidence to support this explanation. Here we investigate whether evolutionary strata can evolve without sexual antagonism using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Measuring shared variants in cohorts of discordant siblings with applications to autism [Genetics]We develop a method of analysis [affected to discordant sibling pairs (A2DS)] that tests if shared variants contribute to a disorder. Using a standard measure of genetic relation, test individuals are compared with a cohort of discordant sibling pairs (CDS) to derive a comparative similarity score. We ask if a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

G9a drives hypoxia-mediated gene repression for breast cancer cell survival and tumorigenesis [Genetics]G9a is an epigenetic regulator that methylates H3K9, generally causing repression of gene expression, and participates in diverse cellular functions. G9a is genetically deregulated in a variety of tumor types and can silence tumor suppressor genes and, therefore, is important for carcinogenesis. Although hypoxia is recognized to be an adverse...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IL-2 therapy restores regulatory T-cell dysfunction induced by calcineurin inhibitors [Immunology and Inflammation]CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs constitute a heterogeneous lymphocyte subpopulation essential for curtailing effector T cells and establishing peripheral tolerance. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) are among the most effective agents in controlling effector T-cell responses in humans. However, CNIs also reduce the size of the Treg pool. The functional consequences of this negative effect...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Autoantibody profiling on a plasmonic nano-gold chip for the early detection of hypertensive heart disease [Medical Sciences]The role of autoimmunity in cardiovascular (CV) diseases has been increasingly recognized. Autoimmunity is most commonly examined by the levels of circulating autoantibodies in clinical practices. Measurement of autoantibodies remains, however, challenging because of the deficiency of reproducible, sensitive, and standardized assays. The lack of multiplexed assays also limits the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PI3K-p110{alpha} mediates the oncogenic activity induced by loss of the novel tumor suppressor PI3K-p85{alpha} [Medical Sciences]Mutation or loss of the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is emerging as a transforming factor in cancer, but the mechanism of transformation has been controversial. Here we find that hemizygous deletion of the PIK3R1 gene encoding p85α is a frequent event in breast cancer, with PIK3R1 expression...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Geospatial analysis of nonmedical vaccine exemptions and pertussis outbreaks in the United States [Medical Sciences]Because of increased numbers of recorded pertussis cases in the United States, this study sought to understand the role of nonmedical vaccine exemptions and waning immunity may have had on the resurgence of pertussis in the United States at the community level. We used geospatial scan statistics, SaTScan, version 9.4,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targeting reactive nitrogen species suppresses hereditary pancreatic cancer [Medical Sciences]Germline mutation of BRCA2 induces hereditary pancreatic cancer. However, how BRCA2 mutation specifically induces pancreatic tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we have examined a mouse model of Brca2-deficiency–induced pancreatic tumors and found that excessive reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitrite, are generated in precancerous pancreases, which induce massive DNA damage,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pig model mimicking chronic hepatitis E virus infection in immunocompromised patients to assess immune correlates during chronicity [Microbiology]Chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals such as organ transplant recipients, although the mechanism remains unknown because of the lack of an animal model. We successfully developed a pig model of chronic HEV infection and examined immune correlates leading to chronicity. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

{Delta}20 IFITM2 differentially restricts X4 and R5 HIV-1 [Microbiology]CCR5 (R5)-tropic, but not CXCR4 (X4)-tropic, HIV-1 is associated with primary HIV-1 infection and transmission. Recent studies have shown that IFN-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins, including IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3, restrict a broad range of viruses. Here, we demonstrate that an IFITM2 isoform (Δ20 IFITM2) lacking 20 amino acids at the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A prokaryotic viral sequence is expressed and conserved in mammalian brain [Microbiology]A natural and permanent transfer of prokaryotic viral sequences to mammals has not been reported by others. Circular “SPHINX” DNAs <5kb were previously isolated from nuclease-protected cytoplasmic particles in rodent neuronal cell lines and brain. Two of these DNAs were sequenced after Φ29 polymerase amplification, and they revealed significant...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Microbial glycoside hydrolases as antibiofilm agents with cross-kingdom activity [Microbiology]Galactosaminogalactan and Pel are cationic heteropolysaccharides produced by the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. These exopolysaccharides both contain 1,4-linked N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and play an important role in biofilm formation by these organisms. Proteins containing glycoside hydrolase domains have recently been identified within the
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Subunit-specific role for the amino-terminal domain of AMPA receptors in synaptic targeting [Neuroscience]The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) accounts for approximately 50% of the protein, yet its functional role, if any, remains a mystery. We have discovered that the translocation of surface GluA1, but not GluA2, AMPAR subunits to the synapse requires the ATD. GluA1A2 heteromers in which the ATD...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bidirectional regulation of A{beta} levels by Presenilin 1 [Neuroscience]Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which is generated through sequential proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), first by the action of β-secretase, generating the β-C-terminal fragment (βCTF), and then by the Presenilin 1 (PS1) enzyme in the γ-secretase complex, generating Aβ. γ-Secretase...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphorylated Presenilin 1 decreases {beta}-amyloid by facilitating autophagosome-lysosome fusion [Neuroscience]Presenilin 1 (PS1), the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex, cleaves βCTF to produce Aβ. We have shown that PS1 regulates Aβ levels by a unique bifunctional mechanism. In addition to its known role as the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex, selective phosphorylation of PS1 on Ser367 decreases Aβ...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Green mamba peptide targets type-2 vasopressin receptor against polycystic kidney disease [Pharmacology]Polycystic kidney diseases (PKDs) are genetic disorders that can cause renal failure and death in children and adults. Lowering cAMP in cystic tissues through the inhibition of the type-2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) constitutes a validated strategy to reduce disease progression. We identified a peptide from green mamba venom that exhibits...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of the gene that codes for the {sigma}2 receptor [Pharmacology]The σ2 receptor is an enigmatic protein that has attracted significant attention because of its involvement in diseases as diverse as cancer and neurological disorders. Unlike virtually all other receptors of medical interest, it has eluded molecular cloning since its discovery, and the gene that codes for the receptor remains...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Potential high-Tc superconducting lanthanum and yttrium hydrides at high pressure [Physics]A systematic structure search in the La–H and Y–H systems under pressure reveals some hydrogen-rich structures with intriguing electronic properties. For example, LaH10 is found to adopt a sodalite-like face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, stable above 200 GPa, and LaH8 a C2/m space group structure. Phonon calculations indicate both are dynamically...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

1T-TaS2 as a quantum spin liquid [Physics]1T-TaS2 is unique among transition metal dichalcogenides in that it is understood to be a correlation-driven insulator, where the unpaired electron in a 13-site cluster experiences enough correlation to form a Mott insulator. We argue, based on existing data, that this well-known material should be considered as a quantum spin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How selective severing by katanin promotes order in the plant cortical microtubule array [Plant Biology]Plant morphogenesis requires differential and often asymmetric growth. A key role in controlling anisotropic expansion of individual cells is played by the cortical microtubule array. Although highly organized, the array can nevertheless rapidly change in response to internal and external cues. Experiments have identified the microtubule-severing enzyme katanin as a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SUPERMAN prevents class B gene expression and promotes stem cell termination in the fourth whorl of Arabidopsis thaliana flowers [Plant Biology]The molecular and genetic networks underlying the determination of floral organ identity are well studied, but much less is known about how the flower is partitioned into four developmentally distinct whorls. The SUPERMAN gene is required for proper specification of the boundary between stamens in whorl 3 and carpels in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Childhood social class and cognitive aging in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]In this report we analyzed genetically informative data to investigate within-person change and between-person differences in late-life cognitive abilities as a function of childhood social class. We used data from nine testing occasions spanning 28 y in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging and parental social class based on the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trust is heritable, whereas distrust is not [Social Sciences]Why do people distrust others in social exchange? To what degree, if at all, is distrust subject to genetic influences, and thus possibly heritable, and to what degree is it nurtured by families and immediate peers who encourage young people to be vigilant and suspicious of others? Answering these questions...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global Sustainable Development priorities 500 y after Luther: Sola schola et sanitate [Sustainability Science]Martin Luther succinctly summarized his theology in sola statements, such as sola scriptura, viewing the Bible (scriptura) as the only valid source of information about God rather than what he viewed as the extraneous, corrupting church doctrine of the time. As a secular side effect of this focus on individual...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To buzz or to scrabble? To foraging bees, that's the questionBiologists have discovered that for a hard-working bumblebee, foraging for pollen versus nectar is very different -- and tougher than you might think.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft plans layoffs in sales force shake-up: reportsMicrosoft is planning layoffs as it refocuses its sales force on making the software colossus a pivotal part of businesses relying on cloud computing, according to media reports.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Once More Unto the Beach Today in 5 Lines In a tweet, President Trump offered help to a terminally ill infant in the United Kingdom who has been at the center of a legal battle. Trump is expected to meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel this week, according to a German government spokesperson. Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno blasted New Jersey Governor Chris Christie after images emerged of him and his family loungi
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Gizmodo

The Lord of the Rings Lawsuit Comes to an End in a Decidedly Unexciting Way Image: Warner Bros. After years of fighting, with twists and turns and reams of legal writing to rival the books that caused them, the legal battle between Warner Bros. and estate of J.R.R. Tolkien has been settled. The legal cases surrounding the Lord of the Rings movies is basically as never-ending as the ending of Return of the King. Back in 2007 , Peter Jackson and New Line settled a lawsuit
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Scientific American Content: Global

Incredible Elephant Seals, Part 2Anyway, what sort of seal is an elephant seal exactly? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

How Frogs Benefited From The Dinosaurs' Extinction Frogs are "master survivors," able to take advantage of the ecological vacuum left behind by extinct animals. Scientists say 9 in 10 frog species descended from three surviving frog lineages. (Image credit: Peng Zhang, Sun Yat-Sen University)
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Ars Technica

Aztec tower of skulls turns out to be no myth An ongoing excavation in the heart of Mexico City, once the great Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, has revealed a legendary tower inlaid with hundreds of skulls. This tower was first described by Europeans in the early 16th century, when a Spanish soldier named Andres de Tapia came to the city with Hernan Cortez' invading force. In his memoirs, de Tapia described an "edifice" covered in tens of thousa
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The Atlantic

Emmanuel Macron's State of the Union French President Emmanuel Macron promised a “profound transformation” of the country’s political system in a rare address Monday to both chambers of Parliament at the Palace of Versailles. The 90-minute address, which drew comparisons to the U.S. State of the Union, laid out proposals Macron said would serve as a roadmap for his five-year term, including shrinking the number of lawmakers in both
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The Atlantic

What Does 'Community' Mean? For much of the 20th century, if you asked someone to define “community,” they’d very likely give you an answer that involved a physical location. One’s community derived from one’s place—one’s literal place—in the world: one’s school, one’s neighborhood, one’s town. In the 21st century, though, that primary notion of “community” has changed. The word as used today tends to involve something at o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jupiter: Atmosphere and aurora in unprecedented detailSubaru Telescope images reveal weather in Jupiter's atmosphere in the mid-infrared. High-resolution thermal imaging of Jupiter is providing information that extends and enhances the information that the Juno mission is gathering in its unprecedented mission to probe that planet's interior and deep atmospheric structure together with details of the magnetosphere and its auroral interactions with th
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Inside Science

Secrets of Longevity: Roman Concrete Secrets of Longevity: Roman Concrete The same salty seawater spray that strengthened ancient Roman piers millennia ago makes modern coastal concrete constructions crumble -- here’s why. RomanConcrete_topNteaser.jpg Ruins of a concrete Roman bath in Caesarea Maritima in Israel. Image credits: James Cocks via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Culture Monday, July 3, 2017 - 14:00 Ch
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Big Think

Climate Change Will Lead to the Largest Transfer of Wealth in the Country's History A pioneering study provides a detailed look at how the U.S. economy will suffer from climate change. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greater understanding of plant hormone results in stem cells that grow shootsFinding on how cytokinin targets genes could allow scientists to establish organ-growing stem cells for grains and may ultimately lead to solutions to agricultural problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extinction event that wiped out dinosaurs cleared way for frogsThe mass extinction that obliterated three-fourths of life on Earth, including non-avian dinosaurs, set the stage for the swift rise of frogs, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing the colored light: Bee brains open way for better camerasCameras in drones and robots have trouble dealing with detecting color when the light is changing. But bees, it turns out, have a mechanism that solves this problem and that can be used to improve cameras.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dinosaurs' loss was frogs' gain: The upside of a mass extinctionBased on earlier studies, biologists believed that the vast majority of today's frogs originated in a blossoming of new species 100 million years ago. New and more complete genetic data pinpoints this radiation much earlier: 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, precisely when much of life on Earth was wiped out by a comet or asteroid. Frogs took advantage of flourishing angio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotoninBlood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The finding raises the possibility that a test could be developed to distinguish SIDS cases from other causes of sleep-related, unexpected infant death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds new light on extinction risk in mammalsAn international research team led by Colorado State University successfully measured habitat fragmentation for over 4,000 species of land-dwelling mammals. They discovered that species with more habitat fragmentation are at greater risk of extinction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Utah is home to earliest use of a wild potato in North AmericaResearchers have discovered potato starch residues in the crevices of a 10,900-year-old stone tool in Escalante, Utah -- the earliest evidence of wild potato use in North America. This is the first archaeological study to identify Solanum jamesii, a wild species native to the southwestern United States, as an important part of ancient human diets. The long history could mean that the species was t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frogs illustrate the creative destruction of mass extinctionsUsing the largest set of frog genetic data ever evaluated for evolutionary relationships, researchers discover not one but three explosions of new frog species, all concentrated in the aftermath of the mass die-off of most dinosaurs and many other species about 66 million years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How babies' environments lead to poor health laterNew Northwestern University research underscores how environmental conditions early in development can cause inflammation in adulthood -- an important risk factor for a wide range of diseases of aging, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and dementia. Beyond that, the research helped to explain a key unanswered question about the poorly understood mechanisms shaping th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's in a name? Big Data reveals distinctive patterns in higher education systemsUsing lists of names collected from publicly available websites, two University of Chicago researchers have revealed distinctive patterns in higher education systems, ranging from ethnic representation, to gender imbalance in the sciences, to nepotism in Italian universities.
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Gizmodo

The Best Fourth of July Apparel and Lifestyle Deals Sales from H&M, Athleta, Under Armour, LOFT, and more lead the best Fourth of July apparel and lifestyle deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. The Big Sales 4th of July Sale The hot days of summer are here and with deals as low as $4 at H&M’s 4th of July Sale , you can be ready for the weather for cheap. There’s a ridiculous amount to choose from, including me
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Live Science

Dinosaur Extinction Allowed Frogs to Conquer the PlanetThe massive extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs paved the way for frogs to explode in diversity, new research suggests.
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Gizmodo

Germany Is Investigating Whether Facebook's Terms of Service Qualify As Extortion Photo: Getty One of the downsides of being a worldwide tech juggernaut with two billion monthly users is that day-to-day business means playing legal whack-a-mole at all times. For Facebook, one legal problem has ended and another has just begun. Late on Friday, a judge in San Jose, California ruled that Facebook was not guilty of privacy violations with its practice of tracking users activity on
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The Atlantic

The Link Between SIDS and Serotonin Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is not common, exactly, but it isn’t rare either. And despite a considerable decline in SIDS over the past 20 years, it remains the leading cause of death among babies between 1 month old and 1 year old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . At the same time, the underlying reasons for SIDS have remained a mystery, even after decades of study.
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The Atlantic

How the Democratic Republic of the Congo Beat Ebola in 42 Days As anti-climaxes go, it was a most welcome one. On May 11, the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) notified the World Health Organization that one of its citizens had been infected with the Ebola virus . The announcement marked the start of the country’s first Ebola outbreak since the historically unprecedented West African epidemic that infected 28,000 people between
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Ars Technica

Déjà vu all over again: SpaceX scrubs at nearly the last second [Updated] Enlarge / The Falcon 9 rocket, with the Intelsat 35e payload on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center. (credit: SpaceX) 8:50pm ET / 01:50am Update : Everything lined up perfectly for SpaceX on Monday evening. The Florida sunset provided a backdrop of pink and purple hues. The weather cleared. And the rocket was good to go. Until it wasn't. Almost exactly like Sunday's initial launch attempt, the
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Scientific American Content: Global

Born in Catastrophe: Silver LakeA serene little Pacific Northwest lake has a violent origin -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing the colored light: Bee brains open way for better camerasNew research into the way that honeybees see colour could pave the way for more accurate cameras in phones, drones and robots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What's in a name? Big Data reveals distinctive patterns in higher education systemsUsing lists of names collected from publicly available websites, two University of Chicago researchers have revealed distinctive patterns in higher education systems, ranging from ethnic representation and gender imbalance in the sciences, to the presence of academic couples, and even the illegal hiring of relatives in Italian universities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds new light on extinction risk in mammalsResearchers have long assumed that habitat fragmentation contributes to extinction risk for animals, but until now, they have not been able to measure it for a major group of animals on a global scale. In a first-of-its-kind study, an international research team led by Colorado State University successfully measured habitat fragmentation for over 4,000 species of land-dwelling mammals. Among the f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greater understanding of plant hormone results in stem cells that grow shootsResearchers at Dartmouth College have identified how a well-known plant hormone targets genes to regulate plant growth and development. The finding could allow scientists to establish organ-growing stem cells for grains like rice and corn, and may ultimately lead to solutions to stubborn agricultural problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Utah is home to earliest use of a wild potato in North AmericaThe town of Escalante in southern Utah is no small potatoes when it comes to scientific discovery; a new archaeological finding within its borders may rewrite the story of tuber domestication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extinction event that wiped out dinosaurs cleared way for frogsThe mass extinction that obliterated three-fourths of life on Earth, including non-avian dinosaurs, set the stage for the swift rise of frogs, a new study shows.
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The Atlantic

The Senate's Plan Makes Medicaid a Time Bomb In the least economically defensible argument in favor of the Better Care Reconciliation Act, some Republicans have taken to pointing to an increase in nominal Medicaid spending as a defense against claims that the Senate’s Obamacare repeal cuts Medicaid. Last Wednesday, President Trump tweeted that Medicaid spending “actually goes up,” citing a chart showing nominal expenditures rising until 202
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The Atlantic

How Germany Managed to Avoid Populism Last year’s Brexit vote followed by the election of Donald Trump resulted in the idea that populism was sweeping the West. Elections were scheduled in 2017 for Austria, the Netherlands, France, and Germany, leading to fears among the establishment in those countries that the center-left-center-right consensus that had dominated politics for much of the past half century was in peril. The results
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The Atlantic

The Best Business Reads of June At the end of each month, the editors of The Atlantic’ s Business Channel shares the most interesting pieces of journalism about money and economics from around the web. This month’s picks include looks at how the vast economic divide between blacks and whites was spurred by property policy; a peak inside a building that houses Washington D.C.’s past, present, and future; and a lamentation for th
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The Atlantic

Grand Canyon Gives In to Creationist Suing for Religious Discrimination Updated on July 3 at 3:30 p.m. ET Back in May, Andrew Snelling sued Grand Canyon National Park officials after a failed, years-long attempt to get a research permit to collect rocks in the park. Snelling trained as geologist and he is young-Earth creationist who believes in a literal interpretation of the Bible. In his view, the Grand Canyon formed after Noah’s flood. Snelling has now dropped his
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial bile ducts grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver diseaseScientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug discovery: Alzheimer's and Parkinson's spurred by same enzymeAlzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are different. But at the biochemical level, these two neurodegenerative diseases start to look similar. This is how Emory scientists landed on a potential drug target for Parkinson's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protecting astronauts from radiation in spaceScientists have designed a new nano material that can reflect or transmit light on demand with temperature control, opening the door to technology that protects astronauts in space from harmful radiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Greening the city: A measurement for a mindful environmentScientists have developed the world's first Tranquillity Rating Prediction Tool (TRAPT), a scientific process for measuring how relaxing urban environments and public spaces are.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-fat diet in pregnancy increases breast cancer risk over generations in animal studyFeeding pregnant female mice a diet high in fat derived from common corn oil resulted in genetic changes that substantially increased breast cancer susceptibility in three generations of female offspring, report scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Temple researchers identify novel mechanism underlying efficacy of common heart failure drugBeta-blocker drugs serve a key role in the treatment of heart failure, preventing bombardment of the heart by catecholamines -- substances like epinephrine and norepinephrine -- which overexcite and stress the heart. But not all HF patients respond to beta-blockers, for reasons that are unclear. Now, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University show that dysfunction of bet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shingles increases risk of heart attack, strokeContracting shingles, a reactivation of the chickenpox virus, increases a person's risk of stroke and heart attack, according to a research letter published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printed models could improve patient outcomes in heart valve replacementsHeart valve models created with advanced 3-D printers could soon assist cardiologists in preparing to perform life-saving heart valve replacements.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique 'sees' radioactive material even after it's goneA new technique allows researchers to characterize nuclear material that was in a location even after the nuclear material has been removed -- a finding that has significant implications for nuclear nonproliferation and security applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improved representation of solar variability in climate modelsFor upcoming climate model studies, scientists can use a new, significantly improved data set for solar forcing. Scientists have now published the details of the new reconstruction of this reference dataset. A significantly enhanced influence of solar cycle effects is expected, particularly in the stratosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Female cancer survivors are one-third less likely to achieve pregnancy than women in general populationFor the first time, a large population study has quantified the chance of pregnancy after treatment for cancer diagnosed in girls and women aged 39 or under. This landmark study, which linked all cancers diagnosed in Scotland between 1981 and 2012 to subsequent pregnancy, found that the cancer survivors were 38 percent less likely to achieve a pregnancy than women in the general population. This d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of bloodA new portable device can quickly find markers of deadly, unpredictable sepsis infection from a single drop of blood. The device is the first to provide rapid, point-of-care measurement of the immune system's response, without any need to process the blood. This can help doctors identify sepsis at its onset, monitor infected patients and could even point to a prognosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Delivery rates in IVF are affected by the age of the male partnerA few studies have found that the chance of natural conception can be affected by the age of the male partner, particularly in the genetic health of sperm cells, but the celebrity examples of Charlie Chaplin or Luciano Pavarotti have kept alive the notion that male fertility goes on forever. Now, a new study from the USA in IVF couples shows quite clearly that live birth outcome is clearly affecte
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Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: June 2017 Is this the longest stats post ever? Who knows! This last month was a really big one for Eyewire; we both completed a very respectable 72 cells and launched gameplay on the Mystic expansion, inaugurating our first brand new class of players in a while. You can see the full list of Mystics below, along with our other June promotions and numbers, numbers, numbers! New Scouts: JousterL crazyman4865
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flipping the switch on height variationA new Harvard study has discovered a genetic 'switch' that changes the activity of a key skeletal gene related to height, and pinpointed a genetic variant in the switch that favors shortness and is far more prevalent among Eurasian populations than expected. The study also uncovered a surprising link - between the sequence that favors shortness and an increased risk of osteoarthritis.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

The Diesel Brothers' New MLB Bullpen Vehicle Is A Home Run #DieselBrothers Together with the American League UTV and a custom gooseneck trailer, this build is ready to hit the diamond. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Diesel! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follo
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The Scientist RSS

Officials Declare Congos Ebola Outbreak OverInternational agencies responded quickly to the crisis, but some public health officials say the world may not be ready for a bigger outbreak.
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Live Science

Maria Menounos' Brain Tumor: 5 Things to KnowTV host Maria Menounos had surgery to remove a brain tumor last month, according to People magazine.
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The Atlantic

Archeologists in Mexico Find an Aztec Tower of Skulls Archeologists in Mexico City say they’ve discovered part of the long-rumored Huey Tzompantli, a rack of humans skulls believed to measure some 200 feet in diameter. The tower sat on the edge of the Templo Mayor, a temple devoted to the Aztec god of sun, war, and human sacrifice. While its existence has been talked about since the conquest of Hernan Cortes, now that researchers have uncovered the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient concrete: Learning to do as the Romans didA new look inside 2,000-year-old Roman concrete has provided new clues to the evolving chemistry and mineral cements that allow ancient harbor structures to withstand the test of time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Perfect storm' led to 2016 Great Barrier Reef bleachingResearchers say unprecedented oceanographic conditions in 2016 produced the perfect storm of factors that lead to a mass coral bleaching.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable electronics: Superstretchable, supercompressible supercapacitorsFlexible, wearable electronics require equally flexible, wearable power sources. Scientists have now introduced an extraordinarily stretchable and compressible polyelectrolyte which, in combination with carbon nanotube composite paper electrodes, forms a supercapacitor that can be stretched to 1,000 percent in length and compressed to 50 percent in thickness with even gaining, not losing capacity.
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Science | The Guardian

Man with ALS who inspired ice bucket challenge is still alive, despite reports Peter Frates posted a video of himself in a hospital bed while Pearl Jam’s Alive played in the background after multiple newspapers announced he had died The man who helped raise over $100m to combat the neurodegenerative disease ALS by encouraging millions of people to pour icy buckets of water over their heads is still alive, despite reports to the contrary, and has posted a video to Twitter to
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Gizmodo

Doctor Who's Season Finale Wrapped Up a Three-Year-Long Character Arc Perfectly All images: BBC Doctor Who rarely does big character arcs. By its very nature it’s a transitory program: every week a new adventure, every few years a new Doctor and new companions. That means that a character, especially the Doctor, is established quickly and stays like that till they leave. But this weekend’s season ten finale put a wonderful bookend on an evolution that’s been in the works for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular electronics scientists shatter 'impossible' record of rectification rateResearchers have far surpassed a theoretical limit on the rectification rate in the field of molecular electronics -- an accomplishment that was thought to be impossible.
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