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Gizmodo
Trump Supporters Cry Bias After NPR Tweets the Declaration of Independence (Photo by Olivier Douliery - Pool/Getty Images) NPR tweeted the entire Declaration of Independence in 140-character chunks yesterday to celebrate Independence Day. But more than a few people thought that the tweets were a political stance against Donald Trump. Seriously . The Declaration of Independence is one of the most cherished documents in the United States. We even make movies about it like
5h
Ingeniøren
Volvo: Alle vores biler bliver elektriske fra 2019Den kinesisk-ejede svenske bilproducent vil om få år kun udvikle el- og hybridbiler.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A future without fakes thanks to quantum technologyCounterfeit products are a huge problem - from medicines to car parts, fake technology costs lives.
4h

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Competency-based' service training for flight attendants improves passenger satisfactionSpecialized "competency-based" cabin service training for airline flight attendants seems to improve customer satisfaction levels, according to a study in the July 2017 edition of the double-blind, peer-reviewed Journal of Aviation/Aerospace Education & Research (JAAER), published by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving the paintbrush lily from extinctionA major effort is underway to conserve the last remaining 60 individual paintbrush lilies (Haemanthus pumilio) in the Duthie Nature Reserve in Stellenbosch, South Africa, as well as increase the population through micropropagation.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish prefer to swim with sporty shoalmatesJust like humans, many fish like to surround themselves with active companions - but frisky friends also make for fierce competition. New research from PhD student, Ms Anna Persson, and a team of researchers from the University of Glasgow, UK reveals that minnows would rather swim with their most active friends, even if they pose more of a threat.
2min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sex now needs to be included as a biological variable in NIH-funded research, but how?The National Institutes of Health (NIH) instituted a policy that now expects sex to be considered as a variable, much like a subject's age or weight, in the biomedical research it funds, but researchers appear unclear what this should entail.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a few drops of blood led to a breakthrough in immunologyScientists from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre may have cracked the code to understanding the function of special cells called regulatory T Cells. These cells control and regulate our immune system to prevent excessive reactions. The findings, published in Science Immunology, could have a major impact in our understanding and treatment of all autoimmune diseases and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intervention for caregivers of dementia patients can lead to substantial Medicaid savingsA new study published in The Gerontologist finds that states could save tens of millions of dollars -- and help more Americans with dementia remain in their communities -- if their caregivers took part in a program designed to improve their emotional and physical well-being so that they were able care for their spouses or partners effectively at home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medica Research Institute finds provider consolidation can lead to higher physician pricesThe research team analyzed the impact on physician prices when two IDSs acquired three multispecialty clinic systems in the Minneapolis-St Paul market in 2007. To track prices, the team used commercial claims data from Medica health plans from 2006 to 2011.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: No link seen between traumatic brain injury and cognitive declineAlthough much research has examined traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a possible risk factor for later life dementia from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), little is known regarding how TBI influences the rate of age-related cognitive change. A new study now shows that history of TBI (with loss of consciousness) does not appear to affect the rate of cognitive change over t
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish prefer to swim with sporty shoalmatesJust like humans, many fish like to surround themselves with active companions -- but frisky friends also make for fierce competition. New research from PhD student, Ms Anna Persson, and a team of researchers from the University of Glasgow, UK reveals that minnows would rather swim with their most active friends, even if they pose more of a threat.
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Futurity.org
3 ways plant-based biofuel can be more sustainable A few key principles for managing environmental tradeoffs could make cellulosic biofuels—liquid energy derived from grasses and wood—better for the climate and economy. “The climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels is actually much greater than was originally thought,” says Phil Robertson, professor of ecosystem science at Michigan State University and lead author of the study. “But that benefit de
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Gizmodo
Shooting the Moon With a Game Boy Camera Is Really Hard Why yes, that’s a Game Boy strapped to a 179 year old telescope (Image: Alex Pietrow) By modern standards the Nintendo Game Boy Camera is crap. It takes 2-bit 128×112 pixel photos in crisp black and white. Intended to be viewed on the simple display of a Game Boy, the images the Game Boy Camera takes are always super pixelated and often require squinting just to figure out what the heck the subje
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Gizmodo
Saturn's Moon Enceladus Has Toxic Booze On Its Breath Image: NASA You think you have it rough because you spent the weekend eating tequila-soaked watermelon? That’s Juicy Juice compared to what Saturn’s moon Enceladus has been steeping itself in. Astronomers have spotted the organic molecule methanol surrounding the icy moon. Methanol, in case you forgot, is a highly toxic form of alcohol that can literally leave you blind—but after millions of year
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global erosivity map shows differences between climatic regionsThe first ever global erosivity map gives new insights into the geography of the rain's impact on soil erosion. The underlying JRC research, published in the Nature Group's Scientific Reports, highlights differences between climatic regions and calls for global action to protect our soils.
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Futurity.org
Dementia doesn’t have to mean the end of friendship Janelle Taylor started researching dementia about 10 years ago, after her father died and she and her siblings had to step up to care for their mother, who had been diagnosed with dementia some years before. Hearing the same question, “Does she recognize you?” over and over sparked Taylor’s interest, she says. Over time, Taylor realized that the answer didn’t matter, and from that her research in
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Gizmodo
Players Are Trying To Unlock A Mysterious Steam Achievement For A Game's Source Code A screenshot from my playthrough of Intelligent Design. Sean Walton, the developer of the ecosystem-creation game Intelligent Design , promises that he will release some of the game’s source code if someone manages to unlock the game’s final Steam achievement. Despite being out since May, no one has cracked the mystery yet. Intelligent Design: An Evolutionary Sandbox is a game where you play as a
14min
Science | The Guardian
Feathered dinosaurs from China visit the UK | Susannah Lydon An exhibition including iconic – and infamous – feathered dinosaur specimens comes to Europe for the first time Feathered dinosaurs are rarely out of the news and are a regular topic for our blog. For those in the UK, there’s a rare opportunity to see some of the original feathered dinosaur specimens this summer in Nottingham. The exhibition – Dinosaurs of China: Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyer
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The Atlantic
​​​​​​​The Diminishing Role of Art in Children's Lives “ Ik ben ik ”—I am me—was the classroom theme when my son started preschool in the Netherlands two years ago. He painted a portrait of himself, with exaggerated teeth only on the bottom row and three strands of wiry hair on his head (“hair is hard,” he later told me). He went on to depict his home life: our canal-side house more wavy than erect; his father and I standing beside a cat we do not ow
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Science | The Guardian
Men: forget younger women, and face up to the fact that sperm goes off too | Christina PattersonRecent research shows that male fertility declines after the age of 40. Perhaps we all need to be a bit more honest about the choices we make • Christina Patterson is a writer, broadcaster and columnist You know what it’s like. You walk into a bar. You gaze around the room. You try to hide the embarrassment that’s written on your face. And then you spot a man in the corner. He is hunched. He is li
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Smart' transformers could make reliable smart grid a realityA new study using complex computational models finds that smart solid-state transformers could be used to make a stable, reliable 'smart grid' -- allowing the power distribution system to route renewable energy from homes and businesses into the power grid.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher BMI linked with increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetesResults of a new study add to the evidence of an association between higher body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global erosivity map shows differences between climatic regionsThe first ever global erosivity map gives new insights into the geography of the rain's impact on soil erosion. The underlying JRC research, published in the Nature Group's Scientific Reports, highlights differences between climatic regions and calls for global action to protect our soils.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria collaborate to propel the ocean 'engine'Essential microbiological interactions that keep our oceans stable have been fully revealed for the first time, by researchers at the University of Warwick.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital, office physicians have differing laments about electronic recordsWith frustration and chagrin, many physicians said in a new study that electronic records hinder their relationships with patients, but they cited different main reasons depending on whether they were office- or hospital-based.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saving the paintbrush lily from extinctionSince the 1990s, the Duthie Reserve in Stellenbosch, South Africa, is home to the only remaining viable population of Haemanthus pumilio in the world. A major project is now underway to conserve the remaining 60 individuals.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin plays significant role in spread of leishmaniasisScientists at the University of York have discovered that parasites responsible for leishmaniasis -- a globally occurring neglected tropical disease spread by sand flies -- are mainly acquired from the skin rather than a person's blood.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Competency-based' service training for flight attendants improves passenger satisfactionSpecialized 'competency-based' cabin service training for airline flight attendants seems to improve customer satisfaction levels, according to a study in the June 2017 edition of the double-blind, peer-reviewed Journal of Aviation/Aerospace Education & Research (JAAER), published by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Currently, individual airlines determine whether flight attendants receive 'c
26min
Gizmodo
Samsung's Bixby Assistant Delayed Again Because It Can't Learn English: Report Image: Samsung Samsung claims its AI-based virtual assistant is smart enough to execute 15,000 tasks, use augmented reality to shop for you, and learn from your app usage. Yet, apparently it’s not capable of learning English. The launch date for Bixby has been pushed back yet again. The virtual assistant is struggling to understand English, according to the Korea Herald . The report says Samsung
38min
Latest Headlines | Science News
A quarter century ago, the qubit was bornThe invention of the qubit a quarter century ago enabled the quantum information revolution.
42min
Gizmodo
Seven Marine Animals That Look Exactly Like Dicks Image: Ryan Bodenstein /Flickr The ocean is full of mystery. It is also full of penises. And biologists have taken note. Some marine animals look especially phallic—to the point that no one’s even trying to hide the truth behind a veil of innuendo. By that I mean there are literally sea creatures whose scientific names have the word “penis” in them. So, while you may have been surprised when a re
44min
New on MIT Technology Review
Twitter’s Glass Ceiling Revealed for Women and Minority RacesThe most popular people on Twitter are disproportionately white males, according to the first study of race and gender inequality in the Twitterverse.
47min
Ars Technica
Samsung’s “Bixby” still can’t speak English, plans speaker hardware anyway Enlarge / The hardware Bixby button on the Galaxy S8. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Voice assistant smart speakers are all the rage these days, and if Samsung is good at anything, it's at doing what everyone else is doing. To join the smart speaker lineup alongside the Amazon Echo , Google Home , Apple HomePod , and a Microsoft Cortana box , Samsung is apparently planning a smart speaker with its "Bixby"
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The misappropriation of the identities of famous people on TwitterThe development of supposed self-image on the part of those who are parodied, attacks on the image of internet users and the threats to image by third parties are the most common strategies from users of these profiles,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vegetable colouring agent may suppress inflammationLutein, a nutrient found in several highly coloured vegetables and fruits, can suppress inflammation, according to a new study by researchers at Linkoping University, Sweden. The results, published in Atherosclerosis, suggest that lutein itself has anti-inflammatory effects in patients with coronary artery disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bowel cancer diagnosis delayed by other illnessA new study revealed that additional serious long-term health conditions, such as heart disease, can push a bowel cancer diagnosis back by up to twenty six days.The latest figures suggest that around 70% of people have at least one of these potentially serious long-term health conditions at the time they are diagnosed with cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Remote Amazonian cities more vulnerable to climate changeRoadless cities have been found to be more vulnerable to the effects of flooding, because they tend to be less-developed and have inadequate sanitation, exposing inhabitants to environmental pollution and contaminated water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with tic disorders at increased suicide riskPeople with Tourette's disorder or chronic tic disorder are over four times more likely to die by suicide than the general population, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry. Dr. David Mataix-Cols of Karolinska Institute, Sweden, led the study of the largest group of patients with tic disorders in the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Training can improve athletes' stereo visionStereo vision allows individuals to perceive depth differences in their surroundings. Important to pedestrians and drivers, for example, depth perception plays a key role in many sporting activities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Drosophila fly brings to light the role of morphogens in limb growthScientists at IRB Barcelona clarify the function of the genes that drive wing development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.Published in the journal eLife, this study unveils that the Dpp morphogen is necessary for wing growth but that its gradient does not govern this process.Understanding the development of limbs in Drosophila paves the way to research into congenital defects in vertebrat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remote Amazonian cities more vulnerable to climate changeAmazonians living in remote cities are more vulnerable to flooding and droughts than more accessible centres, researchers at Lancaster University have discovered.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Crime Labs Race to ID New, Lethal OpioidsIdentifying what’s on the streets may help solve cases and save lives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops sprayable sensing network technology for structural health monitoringThe Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) research team developed a novel breed of nanocomposites-inspired sensors which can be sprayed directly on flat or curved engineering structural surfaces, such as train tracks and aeroplane structures. The sprayed sensors can be networked, to render rich real-time information on the health status of the structure under monitoring. Due to its light weight
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dazzling spiral with an active heartESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has captured a magnificent face-on view of the barred spiral galaxy Messier 77. The image does justice to the galaxy's beauty, showcasing its glittering arms criss-crossed with dust lanes—but it fails to betray Messier 77's turbulent nature.
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Gizmodo
How a Massive Asteroid Strike Helped Frogs Inherit the Earth Red-eyed tree frog (Wikimedia) Frogs have been around for nearly 200 million years, but it wasn’t until a 10-mile-wide asteroid struck our planet, wiping out three-quarters of all life on Earth—including the dinosaurs—that these crafty amphibians were able to make their big evolutionary move, according to new research. A study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week
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Futurity.org
Mutation keeps cells from stopping immune overreactions Scientists have discovered that a mutation in the FOXP3 gene may keep regulatory T cells, also called Treg cells, from correctly performing their function within the immune system. Treg cells are a special kind of white blood cells or lymphocytes that prevent other immune cells from attacking the body’s own tissues, as well as controlling immune responses against microbes and other non-pathogenic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists read Maxwell's Demon's mindPioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics.
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Chinese rocket failure, Fukushima trial and discarded fish The week in science: 30 June–6 July 2017. Nature 547 10 doi: 10.1038/547010a
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The Atlantic
The First Court Victory for Environmentalists Under Trump Republicans hit another roadblock on Monday in their quest to repeal or weaken recent environmental rules restricting methane emissions. In a split ruling, the federal appeals court for Washington, D.C., told EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt that he cannot suspend enforcement of the agency’s “methane rule” while his staff considers whether to rewrite it. The ruling is a rare victory for climate adv
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Scientific American Content: Global
Democrat Tackles Climate Change Issues, Defying GOP LeadershipCongressperson Eddie Bernice Johnson plans to hold a series of round tables on critical science issues, including ocean acidification and environmental justice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient fungi could help Canada's future northern forestsAs Canada's vast boreal and tundra ecosystems experience dramatic warming due to climate change, trees are rapidly spreading north. New research from UBC's Okanagan Campus suggests some of these trees could be getting help from a surprising source: fungi that have lain dormant underground for thousands of years.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in dating Viking fortressIn 2014 archaeologists from the Museum of South East Denmark and Aarhus University discovered the previously unknown Viking fortess at Borgring south of Copenhagen. Since then the search has been on to uncover the life, function, destruction and, not least, the precise dating of the Viking fortress. Now a new find has produced a break-through in the investigation.
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Popular Science
5 troubleshooting tips for fixing your own computer DIY DIY computer repair. Before you call for some professional help, use these common troubleshooting tips to see if you can get your issues fixed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multichannel EEG recordings enable precise brain wave measurement of fishToday, zebrafish is rising as a new experimental animal model that can replace or supplement rodents such as mice. Research team led by Professor Sohee Kim succeeded in measuring multichannel EEG of zebrafish using non-invasive method, which enables precise observation and study on the generation of EEG in specific area of the brain and the direction of EEG propagation. The technique is expected t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research could give insight into genetic basis of of the human muscle disease, myopathyPioneering research using the tropical zebrafish could provide new insights into the genetic basis of myopathy, a type of human muscle disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists read Maxwell's Demon's mindPioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tenofovir alafenamide in chronic hepatitis B: Added benefit not proven, data incompleteNo added benefit can be derived from the incompletely submitted data for adolescents or adults. The postulated better tolerability is not proven.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spinning around: A room temperature field-effect transistor using graphene's electron spinGraphene Flagship researchers based at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden have published in Nature Communications a research paper showing a graphene-based spin field-effect transistor operating at room temperature. Using the spin of the electrons in graphene and other layered material heterostructures the researchers have produced working devices as a step towards integrating
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A whole-genome sequenced rice mutant resource for the study of biofuel feedstocksResearchers at the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute, in collaboration with the Joint Genome Institute, are reporting the first whole-genome sequence of a mutant population of Kitaake, a model variety of rice. Their high-density, high-resolution catalog of mutations facilitates the discovery of novel genes and functional elements that control diverse biological pathways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Know your enemy: Exposing threatened species to predators improves evasive behaviorsA study of burrowing bettongs in the Australian desert has shown for the first time that exposing threatened native animals to small numbers of predators in the wild teaches them how to avoid their enemies. The new findings, by a UNSW-led team of scientists, could assist in the successful reintroduction of bettongs back onto the mainland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marijuana and vulnerability to psychosisAn UdeM study confirms the link between marijuana use and psychotic-like experiences in a Canadian adolescent cohort.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PolyU develops sprayable sensing network technology for structural health monitoringThe Hong Kong Polytechnic University research team developed a novel breed of nanocomposites-inspired sensors which can be sprayed directly on flat or curved engineering structural surfaces, such as train tracks and airplane structures. The sprayed sensors can be networked, to render rich real-time information on the health status of the structure under monitoring.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flowers' genome duplication contributes to their spectacular diversityScientists at the University of Bristol have shed new light on the evolution of flowers in research published today in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dazzling spiral with an active heartESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has captured a magnificent face-on view of the barred spiral galaxy Messier 77. The image does justice to the galaxy's beauty, showcasing its glittering arms criss-crossed with dust lanes -- but it fails to betray Messier 77's turbulent nature.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers with history of herpes can protect their offspring from neurological infectionPregnant women with a previous history of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection maintain active antibodies against the virus, and researchers have found that this protection can pass to the nervous systems of their offspring.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on new Lyme disease-causing bacteriaA new species of bacteria that causes Lyme disease needs the same amount of time for transmission after a tick bite compared to previously implicated bacteria, according to new research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Existing guidelines for frequent tick checks and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the same.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-precision control of printed electronicsPrinted electronic transistor circuits and displays, in which the colour of individual pixels can be changed, are two of many applications of ground-breaking research at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University. New groundbreaking results on these topics have been published in the prestigious scientific journal Science Advances.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AAS publishes a special issue on Chinese Carbon Budget ProgramA special issue on outcomes of Chinese Academy of Sciences Carbon Budget and Climate Change Program is published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences.
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Futurity.org
We want ‘natural’ food but can’t define it Whether or not people think a food is “natural” primarily determines whether it succeeds in the market, but the word “natural” can mean a lot of different things. “The importance of naturalness for foodstuffs is of great practical relevance, yet it has never been the subject of in-depth research,” says Michael Siegrist, professor for consumer behavior at ETH Zurich and author of the study in Tren
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Higgs Boson: Searching for the God ParticleUpdated 2017 Edition! For the fifth anniversary of one of the biggest discoveries in physics, we’ve updated this eBook to include our continuing analysis of the discovery, of the questions it... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Local views key to unlocking ways to fairer and more successful nature conservationNew research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how a policy aimed at ensuring the world's protected areas are "equitably managed" has potential to improve nature conservation and outcomes for local people, although current practices that treat it as a 'check box' exercise put the global goal at risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A whole-genome sequenced rice mutant resource for the study of biofuel feedstocksRice is a staple food for over half of the world's population and a model for studies of candidate bioenergy grasses such as sorghum, switchgrass, and Miscanthus. To optimize crops for biofuel production, scientists are seeking to identify genes that control key traits such as yield, resistance to disease, and water use efficiency.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New breakthrough opens doors to treat melanin-linked skin conditionsNew breakthrough opens doors to treat melanin-linked skin conditions
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Gizmodo
Guy Upgrades Toy Firetruck To Start Blazes Instead of Putting Them Out GIF If you’re going to call something a firetruck, should its sole purpose really be to extinguish flames? That’s like a food truck driving around and disposing of people’s lunches. It just doesn’t make any sense, which is why YouTube’s PeterSripol upgraded a toy firetruck with a functional flamethrower so that at least one the vehicles can finally live up to its name. In addition to adding the a
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Science | The Guardian
Conspiracy theories about Grenfell are understandable, but unhelpful Disasters like Grenfell offend our sense of control over the world, and challenge the unconscious faith we have in a ‘system’ that cares about us Walk into the street, right now. Keep walking past the first hundred or so properties that you see. Look at them. Count the doors and the windows. Note the number of cars parked on driveways, in garages, or on the road. Look for cracks of light or flick
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Ingeniøren
Esben Lunde bruger tvivlsomme oplysninger om plastaffald i haveneMinisteren siger, at der i 2050 vil være mere plastik end fisk i havene, hvis udviklingen fortsætter. Estimatet bygger på forældede tal, og tre oppositionspartier har fornyligt fået ørerne i maskinen hos DR Detektor for samme påstand.
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Gizmodo
The Best Smart Scale For Fitbit Owners Is Back On Sale Fitbit Aria Smart Scale , $100 Today you can grab a Fitbit Aria smart scale on Amazon for $100 , within $10 of the best price they’ve ever listed. It only really makes sense to buy this scale if you own (and regularly use) a Fitbit, but if you do, the Aria sync your weight, BMI, and body fat % to the Fitbit app to track your goals and progress over time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK can lead the way in labor rights post-Brexit, says new academic reportIn a joint report from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and led by the University of Warwick, the authors set out a series of principles to 'protect, promote and empower' labour rights in post-Brexit trade deals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Muscles can 'ask' for the energy they needMuscles require energy to perform all of the movements that we do in a day, and now, for the first time, researchers at the Texas A&M College of Medicine have shown how muscles "request" more energy from fat storage tissues in fruit fly models. They also discovered that this circuit is dependent on circadian rhythms, which could have implications for obesity in humans. Their findings published tod
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Powerful new technique can clone thousands of genes at onceScientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible. The new technology, they say, speeds up the creation of proteins, the final products of genes, and is likely to le
1h
Ars Technica
Russia has a plan to compete with SpaceX, but it has a flaw Enlarge / The head of Roscosmos, Igor Komarov (right), talks to former cosmonaut Alexander Volkov. (credit: NASA) For a long time, with its low production costs and efficient fleet of rockets, Russia has been the leading player in the global market for satellite launches. Some recent failures with its Soyuz and Proton boosters have not helped, but the biggest threat to Russia's preeminence now cl
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The Atlantic
Volvo's Electric Future Volvo, the Chinese-owned Swedish automaker, announced Tuesday that starting in 2019 it will only make fully electric or hybrid cars. “This announcement marks the end of the solely combustion engine-powered car,” Håkan Samuelsson, Volvo’s president and chief executive, said in a statement. The move is a significant bet by the carmaker that the age of the internal-combustion engine is quickly comin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who'll win at Wimbledon? Just listen to the pitch of the gruntsNever mind counting aces and killer shots. If you want to predict the outcome of a tennis match, pay attention to the players' grunts.
1h
Ars Technica
A year in, millions still play Pokémon Go (and will likely attend its festival) Pokémon Go You can't even escape Pokémon Go at your local craft beer bottle store . (credit: Nathan Mattise) Just one year ago , Pokémon Go was let loose upon the hapless denizens of Earth. The augmented reality game took gamers by storm by challenging players to catch pokémon IRL. Within just a few days, the title captured an absolutely insane 45 million daily users. And by the end of that first
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient fungi could help Canada's future northern forestsAs Canada's vast boreal and tundra ecosystems experience dramatic warming due to climate change, trees are rapidly spreading north. New research from UBC's Okanagan Campus suggests some of these trees could be getting help from a surprising source: fungi that have lain dormant underground for thousands of years.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gaze direction affects sensitivity to soundsListening to something while looking in a different direction can slow down reaction times while the brain works harder to suppress distractions, finds a new UCL study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIC scientists discover an essential mechanism in the immune responseScientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have discovered that the transcriptional regulator CTCF plays an essential role in antibody production. The study, led by Dr. Almudena Ramiro and published in Nature Communications, demonstrates that CTCF is essential for the ability of B lymphocytes to correctly protect the body against infection by pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Australian study uses new technique to challenge brain development hypothesisA new study involving The University of Queensland, which might be useful for biomedical research, rewrites parts of the rulebook on how mammalian brains -- including our own -- could have evolved. It includes the possibility that distinctive dominance of our own cerebral hemispheres is not, as previously suggested, just a side-effect that forces brains of a particular size to have particular prop
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New breakthrough opens doors to treat melanin-linked skin conditionsSpots resulting from too much sun exposure and other effects of dysfunctional melanin production may become a thing of the past. Scientists have solved the structure of one of the three enzymes that generate melanin in humans, opening doors to the design of whitening compounds to remove discolorations of the skin. The study was published in Angewandte Chemie.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advance directive and medical power of attorney are often missingFor most patients in intensive care, the patient records contain neither an advance directive nor a medical power of attorney. This is the finding of a survey of 998 intensive care patients at a university hospital, reported on by Geraldine de Heer and coauthors in the current issue of the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 363-70).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough in dating Viking fortressIn 2014 archaeologists from the Museum of South East Denmark and Aarhus University discovered the previously unknown Viking fortress at Borgring south of Copenhagen. Since then the search has been on to uncover the life, function, destruction and, not least, the precise dating of the Viking fortress. Now a new find has produced a breakthrough in the investigation.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extreme weather conditions and climate change account for 40 percent of global wheat production variabilityJRC scientists have proposed a new approach for identifying the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on the variability of global and regional wheat production. The study analyzed the effect of heat and water anomalies on crop losses over a 30-year period. It finds that heat stress concurrent with drought or water excess can explain about 40 percent of the changes in wheat yields from one
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Local views key to unlocking ways to fairer and more successful nature conservationNew research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how a policy aimed at ensuring the world's protected areas are 'equitably managed' has potential to improve nature conservation and outcomes for local people, although current practices that treat it as a 'check box' exercise put the global goal at risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK can lead the way in labor rights post-Brexit, says new academic reportLeading academics have today published a set of proposals for the protection of workers' rights in post-Brexit UK trade agreements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scanning the surface of lithium titanateResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tohoku University and the University of Tokyo have applied advanced scanning methods to visualize the previously unexplored surface of a superconductor: lithium titanate (LiTi2O4).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nataliyamalikite: Scientists discover a new mineralIn the harshest of environments in far-east Russia, Monash scientists have played a leading role in the discovery of a new mineral, which could revolutionise the future of the mining industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists provide support for retrocausal quantum theory, in which the future influences the past(Phys.org)—Although there are many counterintuitive ideas in quantum theory, the idea that influences can travel backwards in time (from the future to the past) is generally not one of them. However, recently some physicists have been looking into this idea, called "retrocausality," because it can potentially resolve some long-standing puzzles in quantum physics. In particular, if retrocausality i
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Problem with Being a Top PerformerResearch demonstrates the ways coworkers punish star employees -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chemical synthesis method can produce an exciting range of novel compoundsChemists at Nagoya Institute of Technology have developed an innovative chemical reaction system, which could have applications for developing starter molecules for additional synthetic procedures in organic chemistry, as well as pharmaceutical candidates with a potentially wide range of biological activities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One-step protein purification achieves high yields, purity and activityA novel method to improve the high-yield, high-purity, high-activity purification of complex proteins by 10- to 500-fold has been developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's WeChat fans can chat on the go in EuropeChinese tourists can now use the popular WeChat messaging app while soaking up the sights in Europe this summer thanks to Dutch telecoms provider KPN.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baidu CEO's self-driving car stunt stumps police: mediaChinese internet giant Baidu's roll-out of a new self-driving car may have police trying to figure out who to ticket, local media reported Wednesday, after CEO Robin Li took one of the vehicles for a joy-ride on a Beijing highway.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Fra luksusliv til tavshed og selvpiskningI 1600-tallets Frankrig tog folk fra overklassen jævnligt på religiøst refugium på...
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Ingeniøren
25 stillinger i Europas kulturhovedstad. Se dem her Aarhus er udråbt til Europas Kulturhovedstad i 2017. Uanset om du er softwareudvikler eller stærkstrømsingeniør byder byen på spændende jobmuligheder. Se bare her https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/25-stillinger-europas-kulturhovedstad-se-dem-her-8946 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Popular Science
Scientists are scrutinizing city sewage to study our health Science It's not just useless crap. Scientists are combing through sewage to monitor public health. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome sequence of a diabetes-prone rodentSequencing the genome of the sand rat, a desert rodent susceptible to nutritionally induced diabetes, revealed an unusual chromosome region skewed toward G and C nucleotides. This region includes the Pdx1 homeobox gene, a transcriptional activator of insulin, which has undergone massive sequence change, likely contributing to diabetes and adaptation to low caloric intake, implying that mutation ra
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shocking case of indigestion in supermassive black holeA multi-wavelength study of a pair of colliding galaxies has revealed the cause of a supermassive black hole's case of 'indigestion.' Results will be presented by Dr. Hayden Rampadarath at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who'll win at Wimbledon? Just listen to the pitch of the gruntsA new University of Sussex study has revealed that grunts produced by players during tennis matches they lost were higher in voice pitch than during the matches they won.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Through fossil leaves, a step towards Jurassic ParkFor the first time, researchers have succeeded in establishing the relationships between 200-million-year-old plants based on chemical fingerprints. Using infrared spectroscopy and statistical analysis of organic molecules in fossil leaves, they are opening up new perspectives on the dinosaur era.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inhibition of tau protein aggregation by rhodanine-based compoundsThe design of tailored peptide-polymer conjugates as drug-specific formulation additives offers access to next generation precision additives that can render problematic small organic drugs water-soluble and improve bioavailability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping genes could improve cancer diagnosisLarge-scale changes to the structure of the genome are often seen in cancer cells. Scientists have found a new way to detect these changes, which could enhance cancer diagnosis and aid the use of targeted treatments.A technique called Hi-C allows scientists to map genetic material inside cells. By analysing this information, researchers can reliably identify major genetic changes that other method
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The role of electrochemotherapy in radiosensitization of tumor cellsUsing targeted drug delivery along with selective sensitizing tumors to therapeutic agents are the pioneering scientific efforts in cancer treatment. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the radiosensitizing effects of electrochemotherapy (ECT) to ionization radiation in different tumors and clinical perspectives are discussed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Praying mantises hunt down birds worldwideA study by zoologists from Switzerland and the US shows: praying mantises all over the globe also include birds in their diet. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology has just published the results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Motivation through punishmentTo goal of punishment usually is to stop undesirable behaviour. But in fact punishment may also have a facilitative to motivating effect as researchers at the Institute of Psychology of the University of Würzburg have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do blind people express their emotions in the same way as people who can see?Facial expressions play a powerful role in social interactions and are articulated and understood thanks to universal codes. Common sense sees this enterprise as an act of imitation: children imitate their parents by reproducing the facial expression linked to each emotion. But if this is the case, does the same hold true for people who were born blind? The UNIGE researchers analyzed 21 scientific
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can satellites be used as an early warning system for landslides?Researchers from Newcastle University (UK), Chengdu University of Technology, Tongji University, China Academy of Space Technology and Wuhan University (China) have been tracking the massive landslide which struck Xinmo Village, Maoxian County, Sichuan Province in China.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chemical synthesis method can produce an exciting range of novel compoundsResearchers at Nagoya Institute of Technology have established a reaction catalyzed by Bis(imidazoline)/zinc whereby 2H-azirines react with phosphite, yielding aziridines at a high enantiomeric ratio. Given the value of existing aziridines as chemical building blocks as well as medications such as the chemotherapy agent mitomycin C and the antibiotics azicemicins, this reaction system could provid
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Get the glow: the secret to deep-water corals’ radiance Organisms use red fluorescent protein to optimize light for photosynthesis. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22259
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Your brain on mesh: Injectable flexible probe melds with neurons, causes little or no chronic immune response(Phys.org)—Neuroprostheses, neural probes and other intraneural tissue implants have offered remarkable benefits to recipients in a number of areas in neuroscience research and biomedical applications, therapeutic examples being not only Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and other neurological/neurologically-related conditions, as well as cognition, memory
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Live Science
How the Nazis Destroyed the First Gay Rights MovementThe 1920s and early ‘30's looked like the beginning of the end for centuries of gay intolerance. Then came fascism and the Nazis.
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Ars Technica
China’s crazy car-straddling elevated bus is just a giant scam, police say Last August we wrote about a crazy elevated bus that straddles road traffic in the Chinese city of Qinhuangdao near Beijing. In the weeks that followed, we received reports from readers that something about the Transit Elevated Bus (TEB) wasn't quite right: while the vehicle did roll up and down the road a few times, it had since been abandoned in the middle of the street. In December, CNN report
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Gizmodo
TCL's New Roku 4K TV Is Very Good and Beautifully Cheap All photos: Adam Clark Estes The TCL P-Series sounds too good to be true. At almost half the price of similarly outfitted sets, these Roku-powered 4K TVs feature high-end features like full-array local dimming, high dynamic range (HDR) , and Dolby Vision . All that, and a 55-inch model will only set you back $650. So is it really too good to be true? A little bit. But only a little bit. We’ve wri
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Gizmodo
Another Iconic Comics Location Could Appear in X-Men: Dark Phoenix Is Sony planning a reboot of Close Encounters of the Third Kind ? Game of Thrones ’ final season could bring feature-length episodes. Scarlett Johansson teases a devastating storyline for Black Widow in Infinity War . Plus, new footage from Spider-Man: Homecoming and Ducktales . To me, my spoilers! X-Men: Dark Phoenix Nerdist reports that Genosha—the infamous African island first introduced in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Powerful new technique can clone thousands of genes at onceScientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One-step protein purification achieves high yields, purity and activityA novel method to improve the high-yield, high-purity, high-activity purification of complex proteins by 10- to 500-fold has been developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.The new method offers crucial advantages to both researchers and the pharmaceutical industry, and is potentially the most efficient and universal tool for high-throughput studies of many significant biological systems
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers make significant progress in engineering digestive system tissuesResearchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have reached important milestones in their quest to engineer replacement tissue in the lab to treat digestive system conditions -- from infants born with too-short bowels to adults with inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, or fecal incontinence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small-molecule therapeutic boosts spatial memory and motor function in Rett syndrome miceRett syndrome is a neurological disorder affecting learning and development, caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene triggering decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Previous research has shown that treatment with a small-molecule BDNF mimetic, LM22A-4, can lead to improvements in respiratory problems associated with the disease. Now, new research reveals that LM22A-4 may al
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scanning the surface of lithium titanateResearchers have applied advanced scanning methods to visualize the previously unexplored surface of a superconductor: lithium titanate.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not so pretty after all: New pestivirus that attacks the nervous system of Austrian pigsShaking piglets show symptoms similar to classical swine fever, with extensive damage to the brain and the spinal cord. Viral origin of the disease was clarified only recently after discovering an atypical porcine pestivirus. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna now discovered a further new virus in Austrian shaking piglets. The pathogen, named LINDA-Virus (Lateral shaking Inducing NeuroDegenerative Ag
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monash Earth Scientists involved in discovery of a new mineralIn the harshest of environments in far-east Russia, Monash scientists have played a leading role in the discovery of a new mineral, which could revolutionise the future of the mining industry.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
On the road to creating an electrodeless spacecraft propulsion engineExperiments by researchers give clues about the behavior of plasma in different environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscles can 'ask' for the energy they needMuscles require energy to perform all of the movements that we do in a day, and now, for the first time, researchers at the Texas A&M College of Medicine have shown how muscles 'request' more energy from fat storage tissues in fruit fly models. They also discovered that this circuit is dependent on circadian rhythms, which could have implications for obesity in humans. Their findings published tod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study calls into question theories on pulsar phenomenaResearchers at the University of Southampton have cast doubt over established explanations for certain behaviors in pulsars -- highly magnetized rotating neutron stars, formed from the remains of supernovae.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why does a Yellowstone microorganism prefer meager rations over rich ones?A microorganism that thrives in a hot spring draws its nutrients from low-energy sources rather than rich ones -- and scientists can't figure out why.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Size of animals dating back 100-350 million years ago inferred from resurrected proteinsThe Ikerbasque researcher Raúl Pérez-Jiménez of nanoGUNE's Nanobiomechanics group has led a piece of research in which, starting from the sequences of the titin protein of a selection of modern day animals, they inferred the phylogenetic tree of tetrapods (all animals with four limbs including mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians), and reconstructed the sequence that this protein would have had
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Wired
How New York City Can Fix Its Busted SubwayTaking advice from cities around the world.
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The Atlantic
Hollywood Has a Bad-Movie Problem Take a quick glance at the box-office returns for June, and you could draw an easy conclusion: Hollywood has a franchise problem. Films like Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales , Transformers: The Last Knight , The Mummy , and Cars 3 have all underperformed, each making hundreds of millions less than their immediate forebears (or, in the case of The Mummy , a Brendan Fraser film that
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How to build a human cell atlas Aviv Regev is a maven of hard-core biological analyses. Now she is part of an effort to map every cell in the human body. Nature 547 24 doi: 10.1038/547024a
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Futurity.org
How this common virus evades the immune system Scientists now know how respiratory syncytial virus evades the immune system, a discovery that could potentially lead to a vaccine or treatment. By age two, most children have been infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which usually causes only mild cold symptoms. But people with weakened immune systems, including infants and the elderly, can face serious complications, including pneum
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Gizmodo
The Scientists Who Look for Nothing to Understand Everything Physicist Usama Hussain laughed uncomfortably every time the conversation even got close to the question, “Do you look for nothing?” His professors would kill him if they heard him agree with that. After all, he’s technically looking for a brand new particle that may or may not exist, with the hopes that it might help explain some of the Universe’s weirdness. But hunting for a new particle (even
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radio emission detected from a gamma-ray pulsar(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Yogesh Maan of the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON) has discovered radio emission from the gamma-ray pulsar known as J1732−3131. The study, presented in a paper published June 26 on arXiv.org, provides more details about J1732−3131, which was originally detected as a radio-quiet pulsar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colored glasses may provide light sensitivity relief post-concussionFollowing a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may suffer from light sensitivity or photophobia, making it challenging to return to normal activities. A new study from University of Cincinnati found wearing certain color-tinted lenses may be a good alternative to dark sunglasses.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is Dark Matter Made of Black Holes?A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Germany’s power sector making serious strides in renewable energy Enlarge / A young woman looks at a photovoltaic installation at a booth at the InterSolar Europe trade fair in the southern German city of Munich on June 1, 2017. (credit: Chrisof Stache/AFP/Getty Images) The German Renewable Energy Federation (known as the “Bundesverband Erneuerbare Energie” or BEE in Germany ) has good news and bad news. The good news? From January to June, the country produced
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Boxes of TurtlesWarm hues of yellow, gold, and orange form unique, colorful patterns on each Eastern box turtle's carapace.
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Ingeniøren
Forskere slår fast: Flere havbrug øger risikoen for lakselusHele den jyske østkyst er i risiko for lakselus, hvis der kommer flere havbrug. Det vurderer forskere i en risikoanalyse, hvor de blandt andet anbefaler at iværksætte et overvågningsprogram af lus hos både opdrættede og vilde fisk
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early moon model shows heavy metal atmosphere(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a model meant to show what the early moon may have looked like. As they note in their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, study of rocks from the area between the near and far side of the moon could bolster their theory—and if it is found likely to be correct, it could impact theories regarding ho
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Gizmodo
Holy Crap, Amazon's Selling Refurbished Echo Dots For $30 Today Refurb Echo Dot , $30 Amazon usually sells certified refurbished Echo Dots for $5 less than new models, but today only, that discount has increased to $20 for Prime members. Refurbished Dots still carry the same warranty as new ones, so there’s really no downside to going this route if you want to sprinkle these around your home on a budget . Amazon will be offering over 100 Alexa-exclusive deals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Higher precision measurements show proton mass less than thought(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has developed a new way to measure the mass of a proton and found the particle to be approximately 30 billionths of a percent less than previously thought. The group has written a paper describing their process and results and have uploaded it to the prepress server arXiv.
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Futurity.org
How ‘machine’ untangles messed up proteins to save cells Scientists have taken near-atomic resolution, 3D snapshots that show how a key biological machine works to fix potentially toxic, problematic proteins. The machine is a protein complex called a disaggregase. It helps pull apart the threads of misfolded proteins that can accumulate and become toxic to cells—like the amyloid proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The recovered proteins are t
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Science : NPR
United By The Sun: A Solar Event For All Americans To Share Skywatchers and astrophysicists are already gearing up for next month's "Great American Solar Eclipse." (Image credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic
North Korea Crisis: U.S. and South Korea Respond The U.S. and South Korea conducted a ballistic-missile drill Wednesday, a day after North Korea tested a missile that experts say could reach Alaska. “Self restraint, which is a choice, is all that separates armistice and war,” General Vincent Brooks, commander of U.S. forces Korea, said in a joint statement with General Lee Sun Jin, the chairman of South Korea’s joint chiefs. “As this Alliance m
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Do We Know If a Drug Actually Works?The term “effective” doesn’t have a precise definition—and that can be a problem -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Stephen Hawking: Earth Could Turn Into Hothouse Planet Like VenusStephen Hawking recently described a runaway climate scenario in which Earth turns into a hothouse planet like Venus, but most climate experts say it is a gross exaggeration.
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Popular Science
A heartless sea creature could help us figure out why humans can't regenerate limbs Science Starlet sea anemones are great at rebranding. Biologists have discovered a genetic feedback loop present in humans which may explain why humans cannot regenerate after injuries like starlet sea anemones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye dropsQuantum dots are transforming electronic displays on TVs and tablets. But now, one group reports in ACS Nano that these tiny structures may someday provide relief for eye infections resulting from contact lens wear, trauma or some types of surgeries.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The comeback kid -- black phosphorus and its new potentialWhen it was discovered over a century ago, black phosphorus was considered relatively useless. Over the past five years, however, the engineers and chemists have become intrigued by the material for its potential as an ultra-thin semiconductor, possibly ushering in a new age of flexible and smaller electronics. Now, one group reports in Nano Letters that some commonly held assumptions about black
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Nanolock' detects cancer mutation; could lead to early diagnoses, personalized therapiesThe moment when healthy cells turn into cancer cells is a critical point. And if caught early enough, many cancers can be stopped in their tracks. One group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed an accurate and sensitive method that can recognize a particular mutation in the genetic code that has been implicated in the disease. It could help physicians diagnose cancers earlier and treat
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Viden
Kunstige 3D-knogler snyder kroppenDanske forskere har 3D-printet knogler, som kan gro sammen med naturlige knogler og endda danne marv.
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Futurity.org
Is fact-checking ‘fake news’ a waste of time? A new study suggests that fact-checking has little influence on what online news media covers, and fact-checks of false news stories spreading online—”fake news”—may use up resources newsrooms could better use covering substantive stories. “Faculty and students have been agonizing recently about the emergence of fake news—false information packaged to deceive the public into thinking it was produ
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Wired
To End Distracted Driving, MIT Figures Out How People Really DriveNew research works to unlock human "attentional awareness."
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The Atlantic
Are Gel Manicures Going to Give Me Skin Cancer? Recently, I quit getting gel manicures. I pretended the reasons were virtuous, even ambitious— to save money, and maybe to become an Instagram-famous nail artist in my own right. I told myself the trendy no-makeup makeup look applies to nails, too, and bought a basically-clear polish that cost so much I can’t talk about it. But the real reason I abandoned my gel manicure habit in favor of self-ri
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Science-Based Medicine
Amish Farmer Jailed for Selling SnakeoilAn Amish farmer is convicted of selling a caustic poison as patent medicine (and of witness tampering) and yet is defended by "alternative medicine" proponents who apparently want the freedom to be defrauded and harmed.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The comeback kid—black phosphorus and its new potentialWhen it was discovered over a century ago, black phosphorus was considered relatively useless. Over the past five years, however, the engineers and chemists have become intrigued by the material for its potential as an ultra-thin semiconductor, possibly ushering in a new age of flexible and smaller electronics. Now, one group reports in Nano Letters that some commonly held assumptions about black
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Nanolock' detects cancer mutation; could lead to early diagnoses, personalized therapiesThe moment when healthy cells turn into cancer cells is a critical point. And if caught early enough, many cancers can be stopped in their tracks. One group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed an accurate and sensitive method that can recognize a particular mutation in the genetic code that has been implicated in the disease. It could help physicians diagnose cancers earlier and treat
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye dropsQuantum dots are transforming electronic displays on TVs and tablets. But now, one group reports in ACS Nano that these tiny structures may someday provide relief for eye infections resulting from contact lens wear, trauma or some types of surgeries.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeological sites in Athens to shut for strikeAll archaeological sites and most museums in the Greek capital, including Athens' famed Acropolis, will remain shut Thursday morning due to a strike by site guards demanding the payment of overtime and the hiring of more staff.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spin currents switch at terahertz frequenciesThe technology of spintronics is based on the intrinsic spin of electrons. In the medium term, it is set to replace electronics as the basis for technical devices. DESY scientist Lars Bocklage has discovered a new way of producing ultrafast spin currents. His calculations, which have now been published in the Physical Review Letters, suggest that the spin current can operate at terahertz frequenci
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Gizmodo
North Korean Missile Confirmed As ICBM, US Responds With Missile Tests in South Korea GIF Footage of the new Hwasong-14 North Korean missile that was launched on July 4, 2017, which the US has now confirmed was an ICBM (GIF made from KCNA video) It’s official. North Korea’s latest rocket has been confirmed by US authorities as an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), meaning that it has a range of at least 3,400 miles (5,500 kilometers). And the US has responded with its own
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Popular Science
How Jill Tarter helped bring SETI's alien-seeking Allen Telescope Array to life Space Excerpt: Making Contact The following is an excerpt from "Making Contact: Jill Tarter and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence" by Sarah Scoles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Outcry as Turkey moves evolution from curriculumA move by the Turkish education ministry to remove evolution from the national school curriculum has sparked an outcry and accusations the government is "brainwashing" students.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Huge Antarctic ice block poised to snap offA chunk of ice bigger than the US state of Delaware is hanging by a thread from the West Antarctic ice shelf, satellite images revealed Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fresh look at desalination plants uncovers bacterial blocksA new study by a Murdoch researcher may help keep desalination plants flowing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria collaborate to propel the ocean 'engine'Essential microbiological interactions that keep our oceans stable have been fully revealed for the first time, by researchers at the University of Warwick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The spin in graphene can be switched offBy combining graphene with another two-dimensional material, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have created a prototype of a transistor-like device for future computers, based on what is known as spintronics. Spin as the information carrier can result in electronics that are significantly faster and more energy efficient. It can also lead to more versatile components capable of both
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of nanosheets with the highest-ever hydroxyl ion conductivityA NIMS research group led by associate principal investigator Renzhi Ma and director Takayoshi Sasaki of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA) discovered that layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets have exceptionally high hydroxyl ion (OH-) conductivity (as high as 10-1 S/cm). This OH- conductivity is 10 to 100 times higher than that of conventional OH- conductors, an
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Wired
Thanks to Augmented Reality, Your Desk Will Soon Be a Computer TooDesktopography projects an interactive AR interface onto your desk that you can tap, swipe, and control just like a screen.
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Wired
Jill Tarter Never Found Aliens—But Her Successors MightThe long-time leader of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence—and inspiration for the movie Contact—has scores of astronomical devotees.
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Wired
How the Large Hadron Collider Almost Didn't WorkWhen physicists first switched on the particle collider, the world worried about black holes. But they ran into a totally different kind of problem.
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Wired
Overhauling Facebook Groups Won't Help Mark Zuckerberg Build CommunitiesGroups, as it stands now, cannot build the communities Mark Zuckerberg wants it to.
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Wired
Filtering the Movies You Watch With VidAngel Might Be Understandable—But It's Not HelpfulScrubbing the bad stuff from your social media and movies won't make the world better. And it might make you worse.
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Ars Technica
Volvo says from 2019 all new models it introduces will be electric or hybrid Enlarge / Volvo's current plug-in hybrid range, the S90, V90, XC60, and XC90 T8s. (credit: Volvo Cars) On Wednesday, Volvo Cars announced that all new models introduced from 2019 will feature some form of electric propulsion. The news follows an announcement in May that diesel engines have no future with the brand , in part because of ever-stricter EU carbon emissions targets, but also because of
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The Atlantic
How to Beat Asthma DENVER, Colorado—I had my first asthma attack in 10 years while working on this story about asthma. The day had been a grind. I flew to Denver early on a March morning, hoping to give myself a full day to acclimate to the air before I did some jogging and hiking the next day. From the moment I touched down and took a Lyft away from the Denver airport, that unlucky hellhorse , the afternoon was a
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Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, a millionth of a degree above absolute zero seemed coldToday, scientists have reached temperatures less than a billionth of a degree above absolute zero.
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Wired
Search Algorithms Kept Me From My Sister for 14 YearsSearch algorithms on Google and Facebook can keep people apart just as easily as they can bring them together. This writer learned that the hard way.
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Wired
The Lawsuit That Could Pop Alphabet’s Project Loon BalloonsIn a reversal of Alphabet's case against Uber, a competitor just scored a big win against Alphabet's Project Loon in a suit over trade secrets.
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Wired
Wolfram Alpha Is Making It Extremely Easy for Students to CheatTeachers are being forced to adapt to Wolfram Alpha, which executes homework perfectly and whose use almost impossible to detect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Naturalness as a success factor"Naturalness" is a construct – but according to a new study from the ETH Consumer Behavior group, a product's success on the food market is primarily defined by whether or not consumers perceive it as natural.
4h
Live Science
What Were the First Records of Solar Eclipses?People have been describing and documenting eclipses for thousands of years.
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Live Science
Spam, Lovely Spam! Mystery Meat Celebrates 80th Spam-iversarySpam has maintained its popularity (or notoriety) for nearly a century.
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Live Science
10 Solar Eclipses That Changed ScienceAlthough they were once feared as an evil omen, solar eclipses have helped to shape human history.
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Live Science
Adults with ADHD May Face Higher Risk of DementiaAdults with ADHD may have an increased risk of developing dementia later in life, a new study from Taiwan finds.
4h
Ingeniøren
Her er Danmarks plan for reduceret brug af antibiotikaDanmark får – som resten af EU – nu en national antibiotikahandlingsplan. Bedre hygiejne, 'vent og se-recepter' og information skal stoppe udviklingen af resistente bakterier hos mennesker.
5h
Wired
Why You Will One Day Have a Brain Computer InterfaceBrain computer interface is the hot new thing in tech—and Bryan Johnson things it could happen within the next decade.
5h
Wired
What the Next Uber CEO Needs to SayThe cofounder of Zipcar argues that re-establishing trust is the only way for Uber's bold plans to succeed.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Quantum Computers Compete for "Supremacy"Two technologies may be on the verge of surpassing even the most powerful digital computers in a year or so, but key challenges remain unsolved -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant iceberg in the makingAll eyes are on Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf as a deep crack continues to cut across the ice, leaving a huge chunk clinging on. When it eventually gives way, one of the largest icebergs on record will be set adrift. Even before the inevitable happens, ESA's CryoSat mission can reveal some of the future berg's vital statistics.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
City planning suffers growth pains of Australia's population boomAustralia has the highest rate of population growth of all the medium and large OECD countries. And more than three-quarters of the growth is in four cities: Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth. But urban planning for this growth is often inadequate.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers developing monitoring system to expose modern slaveryThe sight of people cleaning cars in disused petrol stations and by the side of the road is now a common scene in towns and cities across the country, but have you ever stopped and thought about whether the person polishing your car is being treated fairly?
5h
New Scientist - News
Children who sleep less may age faster at a cellular levelThe less sleep kids get, the shorter the telomeres that cap off their chromosomes are – a sign of ageing that has been linked to cancer and heart disease
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drosophilia brings to light the role of morphogens in limb growthResearchers working in the Development and Growth Control Lab at IRB Barcelona reveal that the Dpp gene (BMP in humans) plays a double role in the structural organisation and growth of the wings of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This study, which has been published in the journal eLife, demonstrates that Dpp is necessary for tissue growth but that "its gradient does not direct wing growth,
5h
Science | The Guardian
NHS attended to 9,000 FGM cases in England last year, report reveals Report reveals slight drop on figures from 2016 – but Royal College of Nursing says number is not falling fast enough More than 9,000 attendances to NHS services in England last year involved the identification or treatment of female genital mutilation, a report has revealed. The data, released by NHS Digital and covering the period from April 2016 to March 2017, includes figures from both NHS tr
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Concrete from woodHouses can be made of wood, as they were in the past – or of concrete, as they are today. To build for tomorrow, the two building methods are being combined: These hybrid structures, which contain both wood and concrete elements, are becoming increasingly popular in contemporary architecture.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum sensors herald new generation of wearable brain imaging systemsScientists at the University of Nottingham are working with University College London (UCL) on a five year project which has the potential to revolutionise the world of human brain imaging.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-precision control of printed electronicsPrinted electronic transistor circuits and displays in which the colour of individual pixels can be changed, are two of many applications of ground-breaking research at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University. New groundbreaking results on these topics have been published in the prestigious scientific journal Science Advances.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liberia takes a major step forward in protecting its elephantsFantastic news for Liberian forest elephants as the President gives her formal signature for the immediate implementation of a National Elephant Action Plan.
5h
Ingeniøren
Iværksættersucces: Algoritme beregner optimal pris på fremstilling af komponenterStore spillere investerer millioner af kroner i amerikansk softwareplatform, som via algoritmer analyserer 3D-tegninger af dine mekaniske emner, finder en pris og angiver den bedste fremstillingsmetode.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children in single-mother-by-choice families do just as well as those in two-parent familiesA study comparing the well-being of children growing up in single-mother-by-choice and heterosexual two-parent families has found no differences in terms of parent-child relationship or child development. However, the study did find that the single-mothers-by-choice did have a greater social support network.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of yeast could help beer brewers reach new heightsResearchers at the University of Manchester have discovered a new species of yeast that could help brewers create better lager.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teaching threatened species to be wary of predatorsA study of burrowing bettongs in the Australian desert has shown for the first time that exposing threatened native animals to small numbers of predators in the wild teaches them how to avoid their enemies.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flowers' genome duplication contributes to their spectacular diversityScientists at the University of Bristol have shed new light on the evolution of flowers in research published today in the Royal Society journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Drone antenna testThis 6 m-wingspan unmanned aircraft is supported in mid-air within ESA's Hertz radio-frequency test chamber, as if suspended in flight, to check it can maintain contact with its controller through satellite links.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmic farmingA third prototype of the AstroPlant citizen science initiative made its debut at the Border Sessions festival in the Netherlands last week. The desktop greenhouse allows people to help collect data on potential crops to grow in space.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Ii Hamina cemetery reveals adaptation to the environmentThe medieval cemetery in Ii Hamina in northern Finland on the Iijoki river was originally discovered by accident. A recent study examined the isotope compositions of the teeth of the dead. It turned out that the population in the small village survived throughout the 15th and 16th centuries despite the Little Ice Age.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Peru reconstructs face of woman who ruled 1,700 years agoIntroducing the Lady of Cao: using high-tech 3-D printing and based on the skull of an ancient mummy, scientists have reconstructed the face of a woman who governed in northern Peru 1,700 years ago.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volvo to only make electric-powered cars from 2019Swedish car maker Volvo says all its new cars from 2019 will have an electric motor, ending altogether the manufacture of automobiles that have only a combustion engine.
6h
The Atlantic
A Conservative Christian Battle Over Gender For much of her adult Christian life, Christina Edmondson has felt like “a unicorn”: At any given time, she told me, she might be the only black woman present at a professional meeting or worship session. She and her husband live in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she works as a dean at Calvin College, a small Christian liberal-arts school, and he pastors an Orthodox Presbyterian church plant. This
6h
Science | The Guardian
So forgetting is good for you. But why does it have to be my friends’ names? | Michele HansonScientists say memory lapses keep your brain healthy. But if it’s so clever, surely it should erase mundane or unpleasant minutiae • Michele Hanson is an author and Guardian columnist Some marvellous news from the University of Toronto: memory lapses are good for your brain , they are part of its efficiency and an important part of being intelligent. Nothing to do with old age. What a relief for m
6h
Ingeniøren
Ukrainske servere beslaglagt: Globalt cyberangreb spredte sig via bagdør Cyberangrebet, som for nylig ramte en række globale virksomheder, ser ud til at være startet gennem en bagdør i et stykke ukrainsk software, som bagmændene har udnyttet i månedsvis. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/servere-beslaglagt-hos-ukrainsk-softwarefirma-notpetya-spredte-sig-via-bagdoer-1078106 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
DSB om forureningen fra diesel-tog: Rygning er farligere end ultrafine partiklerDSB stopper arbejdet med at reducere forureningen fra de gamle MR-tog, som udsætter togpersonalet for store mængder sundhedsskadelige ultrafine partikler. Forureningen fra DSB-tog er mindre farlig end tobaksrygning, forklarer DSB.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fertility treatment does not increase the risk of divorceDespite repeated claims that the disappointments of infertility and stress of treatment can put intolerable strain on relationships, a large nationwide study involving more than 40,000 women has found that fertility treatment does not increase the risk of divorce.
7h
Viden
Kinesisk raket styrter i havet - igenDet tegner ikke godt for Kinas plan om at lande et ubemandet køretøj på Månen i år.
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The trickiest family tree in biology Scientists are striving for a deeper view of development, from embryo to adult, cell-by-cell. Nature 547 20 doi: 10.1038/547020a
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US-Cuba sea mission finds healthy reefs, invasive lionfishA joint U.S.-Cuban expedition to explore the island's coral reefs uncovered a surprisingly healthy ecosystem and large schools of mackerel with significant commercial value, scientists involved in the mission said Tuesday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Herbicide boost for tadpoles: studyMaligned as a bee-killer and possibly cancer-causing, a common herbicide has turned out to be a boon for tadpoles making them more toxic to predators, researchers said Wednesday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Troubled China tech giant LeEco confirms assets frozenAssets linked to Chinese tech giant LeEco have been frozen in a dispute with a creditor, a unit of the troubled company has confirmed, highlighting its perilous financial state.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dubai's Emirates says US has exempted it from laptop banDubai-based Emirates airlines says the U.S. has exempted it from a ban on laptops in airplane cabins.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea shells for sale: A new source of sustainable biomaterialsOver 7 million tonnes of mollusc shells are discarded by the seafood industry each year as unwanted waste - and the vast majority of these shells are either thrown in landfills or dumped at sea. Dr James Morris and a team of CACHE researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences are looking at environmentally and economically sustainable options for these biomaterials.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetics may lie at the heart of crop yield limitationYou might think that plants grow according to how much nutrition, water and sunlight they are exposed to, but new research by Dr Nick Pullen and a team from the John Innes Centre, UK shows that the plant's own genetics may be the real limiting factor.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whale attack simulations reveal prey escape strategiesHumpback whales feed from a range of species that have adapted to escape their fate in a variety of ways. As much as humans track their prey according to the species they are stalking, so whales lunge open-mouthed in different ways depending on the target they are hunting.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A twist in the tail: Flying fish give clues to 'tandem wing' airplane designRibbon halfbeak are a species of fish with the ability to fly above the sea surface - but unlike true 'flying fish', they lack the necessary hind wing fins. So how do they fly? Dr Yoshinobu Inada from Tokai University, Japan says, "Investigating the design of ribbon halfbeak could provide useful information for the optimal design of tandem wing airplanes."
8h
Science | The Guardian
Caesar’s Last Breath by Sam Kean review – the air we breathe and why heaven is hotter than hellAn epic scientific story, from the Earth’s first days to your most recent inhalation, is told with a helluva high level of informality We are creatures of light and air. Life’s a gas, in every sense. We are oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen, packed together with the carbon that photosynthesising life has plucked, one molecule at a time, from the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide. At cremation,
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winging it: How do bats out-maneuver their prey?Bats catch food 'on the wing' without touching the ground, but how do they do it? A new study by Per Henningsson at Lund University, Sweden is the first of its kind to analyse the aerodynamics of bats performing manoeuvers during flight.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sticking your neck out: How did plesiosaurs swim with such long necks?When dinosaurs ruled the land, plesiosaurs ruled the oceans. Famous for their incredibly long necks - some of which were up to 7 metres long - plesiosaurs have remained an evolutionary mystery for hundreds of years. Pernille V. Troelsen, a PhD student at Liverpool John Moores University, UK is simulating plesiosaur locomotion with a 3D model to understand how they could swim with such long necks.
8h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Qatar blockade hits helium supply Researchers braced for shortages as Gulf state forced to close its refineries. Nature 547 16 doi: 10.1038/547016a
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Europe’s next big science-funding programme urged to double its budget Influential report suggests simpler, more citizen-friendly system for post-2020 EU research funding. Nature 547 17 doi: 10.1038/547017a
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Italy’s anti-nepotism drive picked up in surname study Statistical study of how names are geographically distributed suggests fewer professors are hiring relatives after 2010 clampdown. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22242
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Germany and Poland launch research ‘twinning’ effort Bilateral partnership may provide new blueprint for EU east-west collaboration. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22250
9h
Ingeniøren
Kodning for skolebørn: Skridtet efter programmering med blokke er svært Der er ingen helt glidende overgang fra de første skridt ud i programmering med blokke i Scratch til fuld kodeskrivning i Python eller Javascript. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/programmering-skoleboern-naeste-skridt-efter-scratch-svaert-1077894 Version2
9h
Science | The Guardian
Bone to pick: volunteers invited to rebuild 157-year-old whale skeleton Whale Weekender at Grant Zoology Museum calls on public to clean then reassemble bones of 8-metre mammal The public is invited to help reassemble a giant jigsaw in a London museum, 157 years after two Somerset fishermen went out to catch a “great fish” and brought back a northern bottlenosed whale more than eight metres (26ft) long. Their catch was a local sensation: the carcass went on a west co
9h
Ingeniøren
Karriererådgiver: Husk dig selv og dine drømme Balance er vigtigt for at have et godt familie- og arbejdsliv. Karrierekonsulent i IDA opfordrer alle til at skabe bedre balance i deres hverdag og øge deres livskvalitet. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/karriereraadgiver-husk-dig-selv-dine-droemme-8810 Emner Arbejdsmiljø Jobfinder
10h
Science | The Guardian
Tying loose ends? Gravitational waves could solve string theory, study claims New paper suggests that the hotly contested physics thesis, which involves the existence of six ‘extra dimensions’, may be settled by cutting-edge laser detectors String theory makes the grand promise of weaving together all of physics into a single sublime framework. The only downside is that scientists have yet to find any experimental proof that it is right – and critics question whether its p
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Near-zero-power' temperature sensor could make wearables, smart devices less power-hungryElectrical engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a temperature sensor that runs on only 113 picowatts of power -- 628 times lower power than the state of the art and about 10 billion times smaller than a watt. This near-zero-power temperature sensor could extend the battery life of wearable or implantable devices that monitor body temperature, smart home monitoring sys
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with Parkinson's should be monitored for melanoma Mayo study findsPeople with the movement disorder Parkinson's disease have a much higher risk of the skin cancer melanoma, and vice versa, a Mayo Clinic study finds. While further research is needed into the connection, physicians treating one disease should be vigilant for signs of the other and counsel those patients about risk, the authors say. The findings are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meaningless accelerating scores yield better performanceSeemingly any behavior can be 'gamified' and awarded digital points these days, from tracking the steps you've walked to the online purchases you've made and even the chores you've completed. Tracking behavior in this way helps to spur further action and new research shows that even meaningless scores can serve as effective motivators, as long as those scores are accelerating. The findings are pub
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-driving cars may soon be able to make moral and ethical decisions as humans doA ground-breaking new study challenges the assumption that moral decisions are strongly context dependent and cannot be modeled or described algorithmically, finding that human behavior in dilemma situations can be modeled by a simple value-of-life-based model. The research suggests that human moral behavior can be well-described by algorithms and used by machines to manage moral dilemmas on the r
11h
Ingeniøren
Ny teori: Mælkevejens hurtigste stjerner stammer fra Den Store Magellanske SkyDet er ikke Mælkevejens centrale sorte hul, der er årsag til, at visse stjerner i Mælkevejen har abnormt store hastigheder. De er derimod en form for projektiler skudt ind i Mælkevejen fra vores nabogalakse Den Store Magellanske Sky, mener britiske astronomer.
11h
Ingeniøren
Solcelleinvestor kræver erstatning af staten: Det er grumt, skummelt og ulovligtAnders Ztorm, som ville mere end femdoble solkraften herhjemme, har foreløbig fået at vide, at Energiklagenævnet behandler en del af hans sag. Men det er kun begyndelsen, for han har tabt for mange penge til at lade stå til.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetics may lie at the heart of crop yield limitationYou might think that plants grow according to how much nutrition, water and sunlight they are exposed to, but new research by Dr. Nick Pullen and a team from the John Innes Centre, UK shows that the plant's own genetics may be the real limiting factor.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Whale attack simulations reveal prey escape strategiesHumpback whales feed from a range of species that have adapted to escape their fate in a variety of ways. As much as humans track their prey according to the species they are stalking, so whales lunge open-mouthed in different ways depending on the target they are hunting.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sticking your neck out: How did plesiosaurs swim with such long necks?When dinosaurs ruled the land, plesiosaurs ruled the oceans. Famous for their incredibly long necks -- some of which were up to 7 meters long -- plesiosaurs have remained an evolutionary mystery for hundreds of years. Pernille V. Troelsen, a Ph.D. student at Liverpool John Moores University, UK is simulating plesiosaur locomotion with a 3-D model to understand how they could swim with such long ne
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Winging it: How do bats out-maneuver their prey?Many bat species catch food 'on the wing' without touching the ground, but how do they do it? A new study by Per Henningsson at Lund University, Sweden is the first of its kind to analyze the aerodynamics of bats performing maneuvers during flight.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A twist in the tail: Flying fish give clues to 'tandem wing' airplane designRibbon halfbeak are a species of fish with the ability to fly above the sea surface -- but unlike true 'flying fish', they lack the necessary hind wing fins. So how do they fly? Dr. Yoshinobu Inada from Tokai University, Japan says, 'Investigating the design of ribbon halfbeak could provide useful information for the optimal design of tandem wing airplanes.'
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea shells for sale: A new source of sustainable biomaterialsOver 7 million tonnes of mollusc shells are discarded by the seafood industry each year as unwanted waste -- and the vast majority of these shells are either thrown in landfills or dumped at sea. Dr. James Morris and a team of CACHE researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences are looking at environmentally and economically sustainable options for these biomaterials.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Raw waste water use on farms is '50% higher' than estimatedFarmers are using far greater amounts of untreated waste water on crops, posing risks to public health.
13h
Science | The Guardian
Climate Change Authority loses last climate scientist | Planet Oz David Karoly says without an expert to replace him, the CCA will struggle to fulfil its legal mandate Imagine, if you will, a government board to champion Australian arts without any artists on it, or an agency to advise on medical research without any medical researchers. Or perhaps even, imagine a government authority set up to provide expertise on climate policy without any actual climate scie
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removal of invasive shrub could be an easy way to help reduce malaria transmissionRemoving the flowers of an invasive shrub from mosquito-prone areas might be a simple way to help reduce malaria transmission, according to a new study published in the open access Malaria Journal. Removing the flowers from villages in Mali decreased the local mosquito vector population by nearly 60 percent.
15h
Big Think
Has Science Conquered Metaphysics, and All of Philosophy? What - if anything - makes metaphysics still relevant? And what's the relationship between science and metaphysics? Read More
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise methanol detection points to an evolving story of Enceladus's plumesA serendipitous detection of the organic molecule methanol around an intriguing moon of Saturn suggests that material spewed from Enceladus undertakes a complex chemical journey once vented into space. This is the first time that a molecule from Enceladus has been detected with a ground-based telescope. Dr. Emily Drabek-Maunder, of Cardiff University, will present the results on Tuesday, July 4, a
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global use of wastewater to irrigate agriculture at least 50 percent greater than thoughtThe use of untreated wastewater from cities to irrigate crops downstream is 50 percent more widespread than previously thought, according to a new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fastest stars in the Milky Way are 'runaways' from another galaxyA group of astronomers have shown that the fastest-moving stars in our galaxy -- which are travelling so fast that they can escape the Milky Way -- are in fact runaways from a much smaller galaxy in orbit around our own.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fastest stars in the Milky Way are 'runaways' from another galaxyA group of astronomers have shown that the fastest-moving stars in our galaxy - which are travelling so fast that they can escape the Milky Way - are in fact runaways from a much smaller galaxy in orbit around our own.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global use of wastewater to irrigate agriculture at least 50 percent greater than thoughtThe use of untreated wastewater from cities to irrigate crops downstream is 50 percent more widespread than previously thought, according to a new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters.
16h
Ars Technica
This giant crocodile was an apex predator 166 million years ago Fabio Manucci For decades, paleontologists have wondered about a mysterious, toothy jaw fragment discovered on the island of Madagascar. Dating to the mid-Jurassic period about 166 million years ago, the jaw was clearly from a large predatory animal—but what kind, exactly? Now scientists have finally identified the species, Razanandrongobe sakalavae (nicknamed Razana), as an enormous crocodile an
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Air pollution issues go back to courtEnvironmental legal group Client Earth says minsters failed to conduct their recent public consultation on clean air properly.
17h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Hammerhead Sharks Have a Built-In Meal Detector | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Dropped your phone in the water? A hammerhead shark could find it. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter:
17h
Gizmodo
Zynga Co-Founder Wants To Make American Politics More Like FarmVille Do you remember Mark Pincus ? He co-founded Zynga and led the burgeoning online games company as CEO until 2013 when he was replaced by then czar of Xbox entertainment , Don Mattrick. After returning to the company for a short stint in 2015, Pincus now has a new pet project: making the Democratic Party more like a Zynga game. The tech entrepreneur has decided to apply his business acumen and game
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gigantic crocodile with T. rex teeth was a top land predator of the Jurassic in MadagascarLittle is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage. Deep and massive jaw bones armed with enormous serrated teeth that are similar in size and shape to those of a T. rex strongly suggest that these animals fed also on hard tissue such as b
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Theories on pulsar phenomena called into question by studyResearchers have cast doubt over established explanations for certain behaviors in pulsars - highly magnetized rotating neutron stars, formed from the remains of supernovae.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making waves: Computer scientists use wave packet theory to develop realistic, detailed water wave simulations in real timeComputer scientists have introduced a novel representation of waves that improves computational efficiency by at least an order of magnitude. Based on principles of theoretical physics, their method allows for significantly more visual detail as well as a greater degree of user control.
17h
NYT > Science
Hamburg Is Ready to Fill Up With Hydrogen. Customers Aren’t So Sure.A nearly empty fuel station, one of several bets on hydrogen in Hamburg, Germany, reflects the great appeal, and challenge, of this clean fuel.
18h
Gizmodo
The League of Lonely Geologists Is Like No Man's Sky For Rock Lovers Image Source: Takorii Have you ever wanted to dig up rocks, give them a classification and then shoot them through a space portal? Yes? Then we’ve got a game for you. The League of Lonely Geologists is a pay-what-you-like game for Windows by a designer named Takorii . It’s similarity to No Man’s Sky is limited to the way you make discoveries and name them. In No Man’s Sky , you discover planets.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sufferers of both Type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea could lose eyesight within four yearsPatients who suffer from both Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea are at greater risk of developing a condition that leads to blindness within an average period of less than four years, new research has found.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better bacteria-busting techniques could make oil extraction greener, cheaperSimple tweaks to oilfield practice could provide the offshore industry with a more sustainable, money-saving solution to health and safety, environmental and commercial threats posed by harmful bacteria in subsea oil deposits.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flipping the switch on height variationA genetic 'switch' that changes the activity of a key skeletal gene related to height has been discovered by a team of researchers, who have also pinpointed a genetic variant in the switch that favors shortness and is far more prevalent among Eurasian populations than expected. The study also uncovered a surprising link - between the sequence that favors shortness and an increased risk of osteoart
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D-printed robot aims to fight cancerThe world’s smallest and most accurate 3D-printed biopsy robot has been revealed by developers.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New dental materials developed, with bioactive glass doped with fluoride, to stop degradation of demineralized dentin and evoke remineralizationInnovative new dental biomaterials have now been developed for the regeneration of dental hard tissues, outlines a new report.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CT scans find possible tunnel in Mexico's Teotihuacan ruinsArchaeologists at Mexico's Teotihuacan ruins site say they have found evidence that the city's builders may have dug a tunnel beneath the Pyramid of the Moon.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not so pretty after all: New pestivirus that attacks the nervous system of Austrian pigsSo-called “shaking piglets” have symptoms that resemble those of the classical swine fever, with extensive damage to the brain and the spinal cord. The viral origin of the disease was clarified only recently with the discovery in Europe and the USA of an atypical porcine pestivirus. Researchers have now discovered a further new virus in shaking piglets on an Austrian farm. The pathogenic agent, na
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do blind people express their emotions in the same way as people who can see?Facial expressions play a powerful role in social interactions from birth to adulthood. Fear, joy, anger — all our emotions are articulated and understood thanks to universal codes. Common sense sees this enterprise as an act of imitation: children imitate their parents by reproducing the facial expression linked to each emotion. But if this is the case, does the same hold true for people who were
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Differences in US infant mortality rates among black, white babiesTrends in overall and cause-specific infant mortality rates between non-Hispanic black and white infants have been the object of recent study because infant mortality is an important indicator of population health, report investigators.
19h
Gizmodo
Hear the Animated Justice League Reunite for an Awesome Live-Read The live-action Justice League movie may end up being a stinker, but at least we’ll always have the animated TV series. At this past weekend’s Denver Comic Con, the voice cast reunited to do a live reading of the three-part series finale, “Starcrossed,” and it’s great. Warning, though: After you see it, you may need to binge watch a few episodes, too. You can watch (or listen, I guess) to the con
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ensuring carpoolers are compatible is key to ridesharing successEnsuring that would-be carpoolers are riding with people they actually like could potentially decrease car use by nearly 60 percent, Canadian research has found.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shingles increases risk of heart attack, strokeContracting shingles, a reactivation of the chickenpox virus, increases a person's risk of stroke and heart attack, according to a research letter.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finnish mothers discovered to have gene variants that protect them from pre-eclampsiaSome Finnish mothers carry rare gene variants that protect them from pre-eclampsia, also known as toxaemia of pregnancy, suggests new research.
19h
Viden
Kørende droner kan bane vej for flyvende bilerFlyvende biler venter nok ikke lige om hjørnet, men forskere forventer, at droner med hjul kan være et skridt på vejen.
20h
Gizmodo
NASA Is Moving Ahead With an Ambitious Plan to Deflect an Asteroid GIF A mission to demonstrate an asteroid deflection technique just got a NASA promotion to the design phase. Called DART, the plan would see a refrigerator-sized spacecraft smash into a non-threatening asteroid, causing it to move ever so slightly from its original orbital path. The project is seen as an important first step in developing a planetary shield against incoming asteroids. DART, which
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viruses over antibiotics: Determining the 3D structure of phages at atomic resolution closer thanks to new methodPhages have become a focus of research in the battle against antibiotic resistance. These bacteria-eating viruses have already proven effective in experiments against multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, the atomic structure of these small helpers is unknown. Researchers have now succeeded in developing a new method that makes it possible to determine the complex structure in detail, down to the
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
State revenue declines lead to cuts in children's Medicaid benefits, education spendingState spending cuts during economic downturns fall more heavily on children than the elderly, according to new research.
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Science : NPR
Appeals Court Says EPA Can't Keep Delaying Obama-Era Methane Rules The U.S. Court of Appeals for D.C. notes the EPA can choose to rewrite a rule designed to prevent leaks from natural gas facilities. But it can't just put it off for two years, the judges decided. (Image credit: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
Conversations With God: How Chris Obi Deals With (Playing) Death on American Gods Most times when we see the personification of death in fiction, it’s presented as a cold or grim persona. Not so for Anubis on the TV show adaptation of American Gods. Here, the Egyptian god of the afterlife is stoic but unexpectedly warm; he has a job to do, one that fills most people with dread, but he doesn’t seem like that bad a guy. And that’s largely due to the performance of actor Chris Ob
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emirates, Turkish Airlines try to join Etihad off laptop banAt Abu Dhabi International Airport, travelers bound for the United States on Tuesday enjoyed something many others flying out of the Middle East can't—walking onto an airplane with their laptop.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helium ions reveal how viruses attack bacteriaBacteria and viruses can be imaged with helium ions in contrast to electrons which are the standard workhorse in nanoscale microscopy, report scientists. Helium ions, being more massive than electrons, can be focused to a much tighter spot down to the atomic length scales. By measuring the electrons generated by the ion bombardment, an image can be formed from the sample with biological features v
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Ii Hamina cemetery reveals adaptation to the environmentThe medieval cemetery in Ii Hamina in northern Finland on the Iijoki river was originally discovered by accident. A recent study examined the isotope compositions of the teeth of the dead. It turned out that the population in the small village survived throughout the 15th and 16th centuries despite the Little Ice Age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fungi are key players of the deep biosphereIn addition to the life on the surface of the Earth and in its oceans, ecosystems have evolved deep under us in a realm coined the “deep biosphere” which stretches several kilometers down into the bedrock. Down there, the conditions are harsh and life is forced to adjust to a lifestyle that we at the surface would call extreme. One major difference to surface conditions is the lack of oxygen; a co
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping genes could improve cancer diagnosisLarge-scale changes to the structure of the genome are often seen in cancer cells. Scientists have found a way to detect these changes, which could enhance cancer diagnosis and aid the use of targeted treatments.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Oyster wranglers' scout rivers for signs of shellfish lifeA New Jersey environmental group that has had success re-establishing oyster colonies in struggling waterways is trying a new tactic in two rivers at the Jersey shore: checking the water to see if oysters are already there.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forgotten archives reveal street-level impact of 1918 Puerto Rico earthquake and tsunamiRepair petitions filed in the wake of the 1918 Puerto Rico earthquake and tsunami, stored and forgotten in the San Juan archives for nearly 100 years, are giving scientists a house-by-house look at the damage wrought by the magnitude 7.3 event.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Franklin's Lightning Rod Served Political EndsWhether lightning rods should have rounded or pointy ends became a point of contention between rebellious Americans and King George III. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ca2+, the intercellular signal in arteriolesCa2+ entry into vascular smooth muscle activates Ca2+ signaling in the endothelium to protect tissue blood flow.
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Gizmodo
Servers Seized at Ukrainian Firm Where 'Petya' Attack Began, Charges Being Considered Photo: Getty On Monday, reports emerged that the head of the Ukrainian Cyber Police is seeking criminal charges against the Ukrainian tax software company that was the first victim of the crippling NotPetya malware attack. Now, it has come to light that the firm’s servers have been seized by authorities. Last week , a vicious piece of malware began spreading around the globe that was initially be
21h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Think You'd Risk Your Life For A Chainsaw? | Homestead Rescue Homestead Rescue | Wednesdays at 10/9c Jay Crum needs an easy exit from his remote homestead due to his life-threatening condition. Marty risks his own life to ensure the quickest commute from the mountains of Oregon down to medical facilities. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/homestead-rescue/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More
21h
The Atlantic
Celebrating the Fourth of July in 1941, in Vale, Oregon Photographer Russell Lee, while working for the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information, visited the small town of Vale, in eastern Oregon, on the Fourth of July in 1941. On that day, he photographed holiday preparations, a parade, carnival rides, and more, as the small town of about 1,100 celebrated Independence day 76 years ago. Today, on the 241 st anniversary of the independe
22h
Viden
Aldersforsker: Ingen grænse for menneskers alderDet er optimistisk at tro, at mennesker kan blive 1.000 år gamle. Men det er pessimistisk at mene, at vi højst kan blive 115 år, siger forsker fra Center for Sund Aldring.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Brightest minds' key to future science successThe new research funding body sets out its vision for the future amid the changing world of science.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Sweeping SandsLet's visit some dunes I have known—including some frozen in time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Praying mantises hunt down birds worldwidePraying mantises are carnivorous insects with powerful raptorial front legs that usually depend on arthropods such as insects or spiders as their primary prey. Now new research indicates that praying mantises all over the globe include birds in their diet.
23h
Gizmodo
The First Trailer for the FLCL Sequel Is Weird, But Not in the Way I Expected FLCL , a six-episode anime series that’s a stirring coming-of-age tale complete with great rock music, giant robots that grow out of kids’ heads, and aliens that hit people with bass guitars, was announced to be getting not one but two sequels series last year. Now we have the footage, and it looks weird... but in an unexpectedly weird way. Here’s the brief trailer that ran at Anime Expo this pas
23h
Popular Science
You probably abuse your ice cream. Here’s how to stop. Science And other odd information from ‘ice cream boot camp’ The first time I tried to make ice cream, I forgot to add the cold. Read on.
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NYT > Science
Matter: In Neanderthal DNA, Signs of a Mysterious Human MigrationA new genetic analysis finds that ancient Africans walked into Europe 270,000 years ago, much earlier than previously known, and interbred with Neanderthals.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forgotten archives reveal street-level impact of 1918 Puerto Rico earthquake and tsunamiRepair petitions filed in the wake of the 1918 Puerto Rico earthquake and tsunami, stored and forgotten in the San Juan archives for nearly 100 years, are giving scientists a house-by-house look at the damage wrought by the magnitude 7.3 event.
23h
New Scientist - News
We may have mated with Neanderthals more than 219,000 years agoAnalysis of DNA from a fossilised Neanderthal bone suggests modern human ancestors entered Europe and interbred with locals more than 219,000 years ago
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combining antibiotics proves more effective against common infectionThe common and highly resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium is a fatal threat to weakened and ill patients. A new study now shows that a combination treatment using two different types of antibiotics can reduce mortality up to five times.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Through fossil leaves, a step towards Jurassic ParkThe relationships between 200-million-year-old plants have been established for the first time, based on chemical fingerprints. Using infrared spectroscopy and statistical analysis of organic molecules in fossil leaves, they are opening up new perspectives on the dinosaur era.
23h
Gizmodo
Praying Mantises Are More Badass Than We Realized A praying mantis making a meal of an unfortunate Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Image: “What’s That Bug?”, Randy Anderson/University of Basel). Praying mantises are among the most frightening insects on the planet, equipped with powerful front legs which they use to snatch unwary insects, spiders, and even the odd amphibian or reptile. But as new research reveals, praying mantises are also proficient
23h
New Scientist - News
Real reform must follow ruling on flawed NHS-DeepMind data dealThe NHS has been censured for the way it shared patient data with DeepMind. Meaningful checks on big tech's healthcare ambitions must follow, says Hal Hodson
23h
The Atlantic
Syrian Fighters Breach a Historic Wall in Raqqa U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) blasted two openings in a historic 7 th century wall in Raqqa on Tuesday as they advanced on ISIS fighters. The U.S. military said ISIS had used the Rafiqah Wall as a defensive position, and that the group had placed mines and improvised explosives in the existing openings of the wall, which serves as a portal to Raqqa’s Old City. The breach was called t
23h
Viden
Mus ser verden med knurhåreneForskere har undersøgt, hvordan mus bruger knurhår til at danne et kort over deres omgivelser.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise methanol detection points to evolving story of Saturn's moon Enceladus's plumesA serendipitous detection of the organic molecule methanol around an intriguing moon of Saturn suggests that material spewed from Enceladus undertakes a complex chemical journey once vented into space. This is the first time that a molecule from Enceladus has been detected with a ground-based telescope.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving the preservation of amphibians in the Brazilian Atlantic ForestThe 90% of the biodiversity related to the amphibian populations in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest -- one of the most threatened tropical forests -- is not a protected area yet, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extreme weather conditions and climate change account for 40% of global wheat production variabilityA new approach for identifying the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on the variability of global and regional wheat production has been proposed by researchers. The study analyzed the effect of heat and water anomalies on crop losses over a 30-year period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shocking case of indigestion in supermassive black holeA multi-wavelength study of a pair of colliding galaxies has revealed the cause of a supermassive black hole’s case of ‘indigestion’.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Owls' wings could hold the key to beating wind turbine noiseInspiration from owls' wings could allow aircraft and wind turbines to become quieter, suggests a new study. Researchers studied the serrations in the leading edge of owls' wings, gaining new insight into how they work to make the birds' flight silent. Their results point towards potential mechanisms for noise suppression in wind turbines, aircraft, multi-rotor drones and other machines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel mechanism underlying efficacy of common heart failure drug identifiedBeta-blocker drugs serve a key role in the treatment of heart failure, preventing bombardment of the heart by catecholamines -- substances like epinephrine and norepinephrine -- which overexcite and stress the heart. But not all HF patients respond to beta-blockers, for reasons that are unclear. Now, researchers show that dysfunction of beta-adrenergic receptor 3 and consequent decreases in a crit
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Science : NPR
Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed A scientist tested his peers' ability to pick which cancer experiments would pan out. They failed more often than not, which doesn't say much for intuition or efficiency in the scientific process. (Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)
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cognitive science
Learning to exploit a hidden predictor in skill acquisition: Tight linkage to conscious awareness <- There is no such thing as learning rules subconsciously. submitted by /u/cbeak [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from AfricaAncient mitochondrial DNA from the femur of an archaic European hominin is helping resolve the complicated relationship between modern humans and Neanderthals. The genetic data, recovered by a team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the University of Tuebingen, and others, provides a timeline for a proposed migration out of Africa that occurred after the ancestors of N
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Viden
Sådan griller du uden at skade dit helbredBehandler du din grillmad forkert, kan det medføre bakterieinfektioner og øget risiko for kræft.
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Ars Technica
A year at Jupiter: Juno has revealed the giant of the Solar System NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran Scientists get as excited as anyone about seeing new pictures of the mysterious worlds that populate our vast Solar System—from Mercury's day-and-night terminator to Pluto's icy mountains. For far longer than most people, astronomers imagined what these diverse planets, dwarf planets, and moons must look like from up close. It's true that pla
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Musical sun reduces range of magnetic activityThe layer in which the significant magnetic activity is located has grown thinner in recent years, a study of the sun using sound waves suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Little Cub' gives astronomers rare chance to see galaxy demiseA primitive galaxy that could provide clues about the early universe has been spotted by astronomers as it begins to be consumed by a gigantic neighboring galaxy.
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Live Science
'Placenta Pills' Led to Bacterial Infection in BabyA woman who ate her placenta in encapsulated form retransmitted a potentially deadly infection to her baby, a new case report reveals.
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The Atlantic
An Appeals Court Blocks the EPA's Delay on Methane Regulations A federal appeals court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) did not have the authority to delay an Obama-era rule that placed regulations on methane emissions leaking from oil and gas wells. Scott Pruitt, head of the EPA, had placed a 90-day delay on the regulation as part of his effort to rescind many of the environmental protections made during the previous administration. The
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Gizmodo
Report: Apple Hopes to Replace Fingerprints With a 3D Face Scanner on iPhone 8 GIF GIF: Gizmodo Yesterday, a leak from one of the most reliable Apple rumor sleuths claimed that the iPhone 8 won’t feature a fingerprint scanner integrated into the display. That feature has been expected for some time. But if a new report is correct, it seems that fingerprints are going to be replaced with 3D facial recognition. Citing people familiar with the product who did not want to be na
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from AfricaAncient mitochondrial DNA from the femur of an archaic European hominin is helping to resolve the complicated relationship between modern humans and Neanderthals. The genetic data recovered by the research team, led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tübingen, provides a timeline for a proposed hominin migration out of Africa that occ
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The most detailed scan of the wiring of the human brainThe brain's wiring as never seen before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beech trees native to Scotland after all, scientists discoverBeech trees should be considered native to Scotland -- despite a long-running debate over their national identity, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Menstruation doesn't change how your brain works -- periodIt has long been assumed that your period affects your brain's performance. A new study set out to determine whether changes in hormones during the menstrual cycle really do change how well brains work. By increasing the sample size and following participants over more than one menstrual cycle, they found evidence that your brain's performance isn't affected by your cycle.
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Popular Science
Philips Hue Wellness and Wellner lamp review: They’re (kinda) lit Gadgets We tested two stand-alone lamps in the Philips Hue smart lighting system. We bask in the adjustable glow of the Philips Wellness and Wellner stand-alone smart lamps.
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Ingeniøren
Træ er tilbage: Fra skammekrogen til hovedrollen bag nye højhuseEfter at have været ugleset i adskillige årtier er træ ved at vende tilbage som et gængs konstruktionsmateriale. Godt eksempel på hvordan viden og metoder udvikler sig, siger udviklingschef.
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Ars Technica
Intel Core i9-7900X review: The fastest chip in the world, but too darn expensive Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Intel's latest 10-core, high-end desktop (HEDT) chip—the Core i9-7900X—costs £900 /$1000. That's £500/$500 less than its predecessor, the i7-6950X. In previous years, such cost-cutting would have been regarded as generous. You might, at a stretch, even call it good value. But that was at a time when Intel's monopoly on the CPU market was as its strongest, before a re
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Live Science
11 Animals Named After US PresidentsIn honor of the birth of American independence, here are U.S. presidents who have been immortalized in "life's filing system."
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New Scientist - News
Ukraine claims Russia launched NotPetya ransomware attackNotPetya hit Ukraine hard, and the authorities there claim to have evidence of Russian involvement – though extorting payments may not have been the main goal
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Ingeniøren
Mobiltelefoner placerede festivalgæster i andre dele af landetDeltagerne på dette års Roskilde Festival oplevede, at deres mobiltelefoner placerede dem i forkerte landsdele, ja, i få tilfælde sågar i udlandet. Det kan der være flere grunde til.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pulling the plug on huge hackingSalim Neino had been waiting for something like WannaCry.
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Wired
Celebrate the 4th in the Most Northern City in AmericaThe sun doesn't set in the summer in Utqiagvik, Alaska. But locals prove you don't need fireworks to be patriotic.
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Gizmodo
This Is Why Antarctic Sea Ice Crashed This Year Image: British Antarctic Survey The disappearance of Arctic sea ice is a well-documented trend with a well-established cause . But this past summer, Earth scientists were startled to see Antarctic sea ice take a nosedive, too. Now, scientists at the British Antarctic Survey are blaming the event on a spate of freak weather, underscoring how much we still have to learn about what controls ice arou
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Gizmodo
The Best Fourth of July Deals: Robotic Vacuums, Coffee Storage, Lightning Cables, and More Anker PowerLine Lightning cables , ultra-affordable robotic vacuums , and a great container for your coffee lead off the best Fourth of July Deals. Looking for all of the best Fourth of July apparel sales? We’ve collected all of them on this post . Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerLine Lightning 3-Pack , $18 with code PRIME258 While Ank
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cases of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection are soaringThe most difficult C. difficile cases, known as multiple recurring C. difficile infections (mrCDI), are rapidly becoming more common, evidence suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotoninBlood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study. The finding raises the possibility that a test could be developed to distinguish SIDS cases from other causes of sleep-related, unexpected infant death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why research on mice may not work on humans: We really are differentNew research could explain why diabetes drugs which have worked in animal experiments are not equally successful in humans. The researchers discovered differences -- but also unknown similarities - in the function of insulin-producing beta cells.
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