New on MIT Technology Review
The Machines Are Getting Ready to Play DoctorAn algorithm that spots heart arrhythmia shows how AI will revolutionize medicine—but patients must trust machines with their lives.
10h
Ingeniøren
Landbrugspakken: Rent drikkevand vil koste en kvart milliard ekstraLandmændene har fået lov til at gøde mere, og det går ud over drikkevandet. Kommuner og forbrugere får lov til at betale regningen på 250 millioner.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds Earth's magnetic field 'simpler than we thought'Scientists have identified patterns in the Earth's magnetic field that evolve on the order of 1,000 years, providing new insight into how the field works and adding a measure of predictability to changes in the field not previously known.
2h

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Hemmeligheder vristet ud af jernJern er magnetisk og burde være en dårlig superleder. Alligevel rummer visse nye materialer...
8min
Gizmodo
Mike Pence Touches NASA Equipment Labeled 'Do Not Touch', Becomes Instant Meme Mike Pence touring the Orion clean room at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (Original photo before alteration by Mike Brown/Reuters) Vice President Mike Pence made a big mistake during his tour of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center yesterday. He touched a piece of critical space flight hardware in the Orion clean room, despite the fact that there was a sign that clearly read, “DO NOT TOUCH.” So, of course,
9min
New on MIT Technology Review
The Gaping, Dangerous Hole in the Trump AdministrationWithout science and technology advisors in the White House, President Trump could struggle to respond to crises.
10min
Viden
Dinosaurernes død gav frøerne fremgangMasseudryddelsen, der for 66 millioner år siden udslettede trefjerdedel af livet på jorden, gav frøerne plads til at udvikle sig.
20min
Science | The Guardian
Australian creationist uses Trump order to get permission to take rocks from Grand Canyon Geologist Andrew Snelling sued US Department of the Interior when it initially turned down his plan to prove the Bible’s great flood story is true An Australian geologist who is trying to prove the existence of the biblical great flood will be allowed to collect rock samples from the Grand Canyon. Andrew Snelling was awarded a PhD by the University of Sydney in 1982 and is the director of researc
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden lake discovery sheds light on alien huntEvidence of new strains of bacteria in a lake hidden under an Icelandic glacier far from the sun has revealed how life might thrive in sub-surface oceans on the icy moons around Saturn and Jupiter.
51min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple test predicts return of bladder cancerScientists have devised a simple test for an earlier and more accurate warning of returning bladder cancer than existing methods, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer today.
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meniscus-assisted technique produces high efficiency perovskite PV filmsA new low-temperature solution printing technique allows fabrication of high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with large crystals intended to minimize current-robbing grain boundaries. The meniscus-assisted solution printing (MASP) technique boosts power conversion efficiencies to nearly 20 percent by controlling crystal size and orientation.
53min
The Atlantic
All the Promises Automakers Have Made About the Future of Cars Yet another announcement came yesterday: Volvo, the Swedish slash Chinese car company, announced that it will only offer electric or hybrid vehicles by 2019 . It was widely hailed as a bold move. Previously, the company had committed to selling 1 million hybrid and fully electric vehicles by 2025 . Right now, hybrids have 2 percent of the passenger car market in the U.S., and completely electric
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meniscus-assisted technique produces high efficiency perovskite PV filmsA new low-temperature solution printing technique allows fabrication of high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with large crystals intended to minimize current-robbing grain boundaries. The meniscus-assisted solution printing (MASP) technique boosts power conversion efficiencies to nearly 20 percent by controlling crystal size and orientation.
57min
Ars Technica
Struggling for survival, SoundCloud closes San Francisco, London offices Enlarge / Alexander Ljung, CEO and co-founder of SoundCloud, seen here in 2013. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images) SoundCloud announced Thursday that it would be closing its San Francisco and London offices—firing 173 employees, or around 40 percent of its staff. The Berlin-based company has been struggling for years: it reported losses of over €51 million ($58.1 million) in 2
1h
The Atlantic
Putin, Establishment Politician As Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump prepare for their first face-to-face meeting in Germany, it’s easy to imagine the Russian president gloating over the disarray he’s sown across the world. He has upended the post-Cold War security order in Europe. His armies of cyber warriors have threatened democracy across the continent. His military has saved Bashar al-Assad’s regime, making a mockery of the
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study offers new approach to evaluating agricultural development programsAs the old saying goes, teaching someone to fish is far more helpful than just giving them a fish. Now, research from WorldFish and MIT takes that adage a step further: Better yet, the study found, is working with the fishermen to help develop better fishing methods.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do values and attitudes influence economic development?New research indicates that diversity in cultural values has a negative association with regional economic development within European countries.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What factors contribute to academic success in students living in poverty?High-achieving, low-income 12- and 13-year-old students report that several protective factors contribute to their academic success despite the presence of adversity: reciprocal peer relationships, teachers who care, family and community assets, and multiple sources of motivation.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baits may be bolstering bear populationsNew research reveals that baits used by hunters have become a substantial portion of black bears' diets. In northern Wisconsin, over 40% of the diet of harvested animals consisted of bait subsidies.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surveying sea floor animals for offshore renewable energyThere is growing interest in developing offshore wind and wave energy facilities in the Pacific Northwest. But not much is known about the sediment and animal life along the sea floor in the region.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pence vows 'new era' in US space exploration, but few detailsUS Vice President Mike Pence vowed Thursday to usher in a "new era" of American leadership in space, with a return to the Moon and explorers on Mars, but offered few details.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qualcomm steps up legal battle with Apple, asks iPhone banQualcomm on Thursday escalated its legal battle with Apple, filing a patent infringement lawsuit and requesting a ban on the importation of some iPhones, claiming unlawful and unfair use of the chipmaker's technology.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chile salmon industry swims against currentSalmon are leaping in their millions from Chilean fish farms to US, Japanese and European dining tables—but surging demand and environmental concerns have Chile wriggling on the hook.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk's Tesla to build world's largest battery in AustraliaElon Musk's Tesla will build what the maverick entrepreneur claims is the world's largest lithium ion battery within 100 days, making good on a Twitter promise to ease South Australia's energy woes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung on a roll as data demand for memory chips soarsSamsung Electronics is on a roll thanks to booming sales of memory chips required by the increasingly data-based economy.
3h
cognitive science
Researchers have made AI that can link sound, sight, and text to understand the world submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
4h
cognitive science
How Nature Solves Problems Through Computation submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do values and attitudes influence economic development?New research indicates that diversity in cultural values has a negative association with regional economic development within European countries.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What factors contribute to academic success in students living in poverty?High-achieving, low-income 12- and 13-year-old students report that several protective factors contribute to their academic success despite the presence of adversity: reciprocal peer relationships, teachers who care, family and community assets, and multiple sources of motivation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baits may be bolstering bear populationsNew research reveals that baits used by hunters have become a substantial portion of black bears' diets. In northern Wisconsin, over 40 percent of the diet of harvested animals consisted of bait subsidies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some patients with dementia may experience delayed-onset PTSDDelayed-onset post-traumatic symptoms in the elderly may be misdiagnosed as falling under the umbrella of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), according to a recent review.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindfulness-based therapy may reduce stress in overweight and obese individualsIn a randomized clinical trial of women who were overweight or obese, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) increased mindfulness and decreased stress compared with health education. In addition, fasting blood sugar levels decreased within the MBSR group, but not within the health education group.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast-feeding peer support services are lacking in many UK regionsPeer support is recommended by the World Health Organization for the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding, but in a survey of 136 service managers with jobs related to infant feeding across UK NHS Trust and Health Board areas, breastfeeding peer supporters were available in only 56 percent of NHS areas.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healthy lifestyle may help older adults preserve their independenceIn a study of men with an average age of 71 years, lifestyle factors such as never smoking, maintaining a healthy diet, and not being obese were associated with survival and high functionality over the next 16 years.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marker may improve lung cancer screening and detectionInvestigators have found a new marker that might be used for diagnosing a common form of lung cancer, especially at late stages.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family-based treatments may help address obesity in childrenResearchers found that a family-based treatment for obesity in children -- which included nutritional advice, exercise, and behavioral counseling -- was effective.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teaching old drugs new tricks in the fight against infectious diseasesA new article looks at how currently available drugs for various conditions might be repurposed alone or in combination with other drugs to treat infectious diseases.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sand in public playgrounds may play a role in transmitting infectionsInvestigators have revealed that the Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile is widely distributed in soil samples from children's and dogs' sandboxes located within the metropolitan area of Madrid.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Educating' patients' immune cells may help combat diabetesNew research reveals that a treatment called Stem Cell Educator therapy is safe and effective for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heavier birthweight linked to increased risk of obesity in early school-aged childrenIn a recent study, babies who were large at birth had an increased likelihood of being obese when they were in kindergarten to second grade (age 5 to 8 years).
5h
Science | The Guardian
UK survey reveals lack of breastfeeding peer support for millions of mothers Dearth of ‘mentors’ is leaving many mothers without the help they need but social attitude towards breastfeeding is also having an impact, says researchers Millions of mothers are missing out on valuable peer support that encourages breastfeeding, according to a UK-wide survey. The World Health Organisation recommends that infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life,
6h
Ingeniøren
Skimmelsvamp i muselort overrasker antibiotika-forsker: »Der er et enormt potentiale«Skimmelsvamp leverede verdens første antibiotikum – penicillin. Dansk-svensk forskning viser, at svampene rummer uendelig mange andre slags antibiotika.
6h
Wired
Hackers Targeted a US Nuclear Plant (But Don't Panic Yet)Hackers have reportedly targeted US energy utilities, and may be laying the groundwork for blackouts. But they may yet be a long way from that goal.
6h
Ars Technica
FBI-DHS “amber” alert warns energy industry of attacks on nuke plant operators (credit: Nuclear Regulatory Commission ) The Department of Homeland Security and FBI have issued a joint report providing details of malware attacks targeting employees of companies that operate nuclear power plants in the US, including the Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, the New York Times reports . The attacks have been taking place since May, as detailed in the report issued by feder
6h
The Atlantic
More Than 70 Officers Injured in G20 Protests More than 70 police officers were wounded Thursday in violent protests ahead of the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, where world leaders will convene on Friday and Saturday to discuss policy issues pertaining to the global economy, international trade, and more. Thursday’s demonstrations, titled “Welcome to Hell,” featured around 12,000 protesters, many of whom rallied against capitalism and Presi
7h
New Scientist - News
UK and Irish seabirds search area size of Spain for foodSeas off Scotland have been identified as especially important habitats for seabirds and important to conserve
8h
Futurity.org
New tool lets archaeologists ‘hear’ the past A new tool lets researchers model the sound of an archaeological landscape, called a “soundscape,” to better explore how people may have experienced their surroundings in the past. Their results have more fully animated the ancient world and opened a discussion about how people at various locations, at sites ranging from sacred to political, experienced their soundscapes. The findings ultimately
10h
NYT > Science
New York Hospital Offers to Treat British Baby With Rare DiseaseOfficials at a leading academic medical center in Manhattan have agreed to admit 11-month-old Charlie Gard as an inpatient, under certain conditions.
10h
Ars Technica
RED teases a modular, $1600 titanium Android phone with a 3D screen Enlarge / Red's teaser image. (credit: RED ) RED, the ultra high-end camera company with a flair for dramatic product designs, has announced an Android smartphone called the " RED Hydrogen ." The press release is very light on details and written in RED's typical maximum-hype style, declaring that phone "shatters the mold of conventional thinking" and "features nanotechnology." There are a few de
10h
Gizmodo
Make Stubbed Toes a Thing of the Past With Anker's Discounted Night Lights 3-Pack Stick-Anywhere Lumi Night Lights , $12 | 4-Pack Plug-In Lumi Night Lights , $10 Anker’s settings its sights on the affordable LED lighting market with the release of its new Lumi night lights, and you can save 20% at launch for a limited time. This sale is valid for both the battery-powered and plug-in models , but you should note that the stick-anywhere battery lights include a motion sen
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Untreatable gonorrhoea on the rise worldwide Non-profit group helps marshal trial of a new antibiotic in an attempt to beat back resistant infections. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22270
10h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Of Warheads and Warsaw What We’re Following U.S. President in Poland: Donald Trump criticized Russia and affirmed his commitment to NATO’s mutual-defense provision in a highly anticipated speech today in Warsaw. That affirmation may come as some relief to critics who worried its omission at the NATO summit in May signaled a withdrawal from global leadership—yet as James Fallows writes , it emphasized racial and religio
10h
Live Science
Parasitic Worm in Walrus Meat Infects 10 People in AlaskaTen people in Alaska were recently infected with a relatively rare parasitic worm that they got from eating walrus meat.
10h
NYT > Science
CERN Physicists Find a Particle With a Double Dose of CharmThe discovery could provide new insight into how quarks, the building blocks of protons and neutrons, interact with each other.
10h
Wired
Volvo’s Electric Car Plan Isn’t as Bold or Crazy as It SeemsIt’s the first major automaker to announce a serious shift to electric.
11h
Big Think
People Love To Identify As "Introverts" — But What Does That Term Actually Mean? The popular concept of introversion often differs from how psychologists define the term, but a new model seeks to clarify exactly what being an introvert means. Read More
11h
Gizmodo
Illinois Wants To Ban Location Tracking Without Consent Source: Getty It’s increasingly difficult to do anything on your phone nowadays without sharing your geolocation information. Certain Snapchat filters, Facebook status updates, Instagrams, and even text messages are all potentially tied to geolocation data. It’s relatively simple for app developers to build in geolocation functionality—and many services require users to opt-in to sharing location
11h
The Atlantic
How American Presidents Used to Speak Overseas Is America an idea? Or is it a specific “people” or ethnic group? On the diverging answers to that question turn some of the biggest disputes in U.S. history. Our current president began his trip to Europe with a speech in Poland that minimized the role of ideals in American identity, and maximized the importance of what he called “civilization” but which boils down to ties of ethnicity and blood
11h
The Atlantic
Turkish Police Detain Activists on Suspicion of Terrorist Affiliations Ten people, including the local director of Amnesty International, are being detained across various police stations in Istanbul after Turkish police forcibly removed them from a human rights workshop on Wednesday morning. The workshop, which took place at a hotel in Buyukada, an island south of Istanbul, was scheduled to discuss digital security and information management. Turkish police now say
11h
NYT > Science
Whiteboard? Check. Lab Rats? They’re the Actors.How a theater troupe called Improbable dramatizes psychological experiments described in a controversial 2004 book.
12h
Ars Technica
Mike Pence appears bullish on efforts by SpaceX and others Enlarge / Vice President Mike Pence addresses NASA employees on Thursday at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. (credit: NASA ) As he continues to visit key space facilities around the country, Vice President Mike Pence spent a few hours at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Thursday. During the visit, Pence spoke to the NASA workforce inside the iconic Vertical Assembly Building and, for the most part,
12h
Gizmodo
Fly Through This Real Hotel Like It Was Scanned by an Enormous Medical Machine GIF Using strong magnetic fields and radio waves, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines let us peer inside the human body as if it were sliced into thousands of layers. The same effect has been achieved here, letting you fly through the massive Sofa Hotel in Istanbul. But do they make MRI machines that big? Obviously not. This video, as well as an interactive 3D model , were created by rebuil
12h
Live Science
Photos: The Incredible Life and Times of Amelia EarhartAmelia Earhart remains one of the most celebrated aviators in history. Check out these photos of her incredible life and career.
12h
Gizmodo
15 Years Later, Here's Why A Gamer Was Duct-Taped To A Ceiling Photo courtesy: Brian Schaeffer Few photos from the forum ages of online gaming live in greater infamy than one of what appears to be a human duct taped to the ceiling of a dimly lit basement, his arms reaching out to lightly graze the keys of a Dell mechanical keyboard. Many have laid claim to this image. “I was there,” they say. “It was me, I took this photo,” others declared. We reached out to
12h
NYT > Science
Opinion: My Depressing Summers in BelizeI spend the hot months in the water, studying ocean ecosystems. What I see happening to our coral reefs is deeply alarming.
12h
The Atlantic
The Republican Backlash Against Trump's Vote-Fraud Commission Republicans officials and officeholders were, for the most part, not pleased about the rise of Donald Trump as their party’s candidate, but they found themselves powerless to stop his winning the nomination and then the presidency. Since Trump became president, however, Republicans have become some of his most effective antagonists, stymieing a range of efforts. House members defeated a first att
12h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Shaub’s Over Today in 5 Lines During a joint news conference with Polish President Andrzej Duda in Warsaw, President Trump said he’s considering a “pretty severe” response to North Korea’s recent missile tests. When questioned about Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election, Trump said he thinks other countries could also be to blame, adding “nobody really knows.” Attorneys general from 18 states
12h
The Atlantic
The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump's Warsaw Speech In his speech in Poland on Thursday, Donald Trump referred 10 times to “the West” and five times to “our civilization.” His white nationalist supporters will understand exactly what he means. It’s important that other Americans do, too. The West is not a geographic term. Poland is further east than Morocco. France is further east than Haiti. Australia is further east than Egypt. Yet Poland, Franc
12h
Gizmodo
You Can Own the Original 'Just Two Years Away' Flying Car for Five Million Bucks After spending 40 years and unspeakable amounts of investor money to make his dream a reality, Paul Moller’s flying car is finally available for purchase. But because flying cars are perpetually “just two years away,” Moller is actually auctioning off his original prototype, not a production model. You’ve probably seen the G90 M400 Skycar before. As our own Matt Novak has pointed out , Moller has
12h
Ars Technica
France wants to ban sale of gas and diesel cars by 2040, end coal by 2022 Enlarge / PARIS, FRANCE - JULY 06: French Minister of Ecological and Inclusive Transition Nicolas Hulot holds a press conference in order to present his climate plans on July 6, 2017 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images ) In an address on Thursday, France’s environment minister, Nicolas Hulot, said that the country would aim to phase out electricity
12h
The Scientist RSS
Surface of Mars Hostile to MicrobesResearchers confirm that chemicals present in the dust of the Red Planet are highly toxic to bacteria.
12h
Big Think
A Trip from the Sun to Jupiter at the Speed of Light. Bring a Sandwich. Watch what it might look like to travel from the sun to Jupiter at the speed of light. Read More
12h
Gizmodo
Emails Show Travis Kalanick Worried For Years About Google's Self-Driving Car Efforts Photo: Getty Emails contained in a new legal filing show Uber’s former CEO, Travis Kalanick, fretted for years about other companies outstripping Uber in the race to develop autonomous vehicles and use them for ridesharing, and once sought a partnership with Google to ensure that Uber could win the race. In one email, Kalanick complained to Google chief legal officer and senior vice president of
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When butterfly male sex-bias flaps its wingsIn butterflies, sex is determined by chromosome differences. But unlike in humans with the familiar X and Y, in butterflies, it is the females that determine the sex of offspring. Males are ZZ, while females are ZW.How do females compensate for the loss of genetic information? New research shows that, contrary to previously inconsistent findings, in all species studied, that the expression of Z-li
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biopsy tests may lead to inappropriate discards of donated kidneysResearchers have found that discarding donated kidneys on the basis of biopsy findings may be inappropriate.
12h
Ars Technica
Hobby Lobby must pay $3 million for smuggling ancient cuneiform artifacts United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Hobby Lobby, the US crafts supply company known for its pro-Christian branding, apparently has a side interest in smuggling rare archaeological artifacts. The company made headlines when it won a Supreme Court case in which it argued that the family-owned company should not have to pay for birth control for employees under the ACA, becau
12h
Gizmodo
How CNN Made Its Own Reporting Sound Like Blackmail Image credit: Donald Trump via HanAssholeSolo On July 2, President Donald Trump tweeted out a video showing himself, as he had appeared in a 2007 WrestleMania event, attacking a person whose head had been replaced with the CNN logo. Two days later, CNN reporter Andrew Kaczynski wrote an article about the origins of the video and the anonymous Reddit user who had made it. The article quickly turne
13h
Inside Science
The Fragile Ground Beneath 66 Million Barrels of Oil The Fragile Ground Beneath 66 Million Barrels of Oil Wastewater from oil drilling is triggering earthquakes, and no one can predict where they will strike or how hard they will shake. fracking_final.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Earth Thursday, July 6, 2017 - 17:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writ
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When butterfly male sex-bias flaps its wingsIn butterflies, sex is determined by chromosome differences between males and females. But unlike in humans with the familiar X and Y, in butterflies, it is the females that determine the sex of offspring.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digitally remastered wire art to be showcased at SIGGRAPH 2017A new image-based method captures the complexities of thin structures, providing an innovative technique to reconstruct wiry objects digitally -- just from a few input images. The novel computational method is poised for wide reach, by animators to depict the behavior of any wire- or cable-like object or by the medical practitioners to examine networks of thin structures, like a network of blood v
13h
Ars Technica
Facebook, Snapchat could pay millions for World Cup 2018 highlight rights (credit: Ron Amadeo ) Live sports streaming is a hot commodity for Internet companies, and now some have their sights on the 2018 World Cup. According to a Bloomberg report , Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat are looking to obtain online streaming rights for World Cup game highlights. Fox Sports is the exclusive rights holder for the 2018 World Cup, to be hosted by Russia, and those social media we
13h
Ars Technica
Judge denies DOJ effort to halt Twitter lawsuit over national security orders Enlarge (credit: Michael Nagle / Bloomberg / Getty Images News ) A federal judge in California has decided to allow Twitter’s lawsuit against the attorney general’s office to go forward. She rejected arguments that the social media giant should not be allowed to be precise in its transparency reports when describing how it responds to the government’s requests for user data. Twitter has argued th
13h
NeuWrite San Diego
A nerve-racking issue[En español] In 1936, a scientist named Gerhard Schrader was hired by the German government to end a bothersome and destructive beetle pest that was devastating German farms. Mixing different molecules (because that’s what we scientists do) he came across the recipe for the deadly nerve agent tabun. Even though his purpose was to create […]
13h
Live Science
How Opioid Prescriptions Have Changed Recently: New ReportToo many Americans are prescribed too many opioids for too long, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surveying sea floor animals for offshore renewable energyResearchers are using chunks of sediment from the ocean floor to analyze animal life and determine environmental impact from offshore energy facilities.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study offers new approach to evaluating agricultural development programsInvolving locals in figuring out how to improve their farming and fishing methods provides more lasting and widespread benefits than just introducing new technologies or methods, new MIT research shows.
13h
Gizmodo
Archaeologists Unearth ‘Grave of Giants’ in China Image: University of Shandong Researchers in China have uncovered the skeletal remains of an unusually tall group of individuals who lived in China’s Shandong province some 5,000 years ago. With some reaching heights well over six feet, these Neolithic humans were a sign of things to come. As reported in Xinhua , an archaeological dig at Jiaojia village in Jinan City’s Zhangqiu District has unear
13h
Live Science
Blood in the Water: Drone Video Films Whale-Hunting OrcasA pod of orcas recently pursued and killed a minke whale off the coast of Kamchatka, Russia.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds Earth's magnetic field 'simpler than we thought'Scientists have identified patterns in the Earth's magnetic field that evolve on the order of 1,000 years, providing new insight into how the field works and adding a measure of predictability to changes in the field not previously known.
13h
The Scientist RSS
Bioethicist and Law Professor DiesJohn Robertson was known for his contributions to reproductive medicine ethics and for solidifying the scholarly connection between biomedicine and law.
13h
Gizmodo
France Plans To Ban Sales Of Gasoline And Diesel Vehicles By 2040 Photo: AP France—particularly, Paris, with its dreadful air quality—has staked a battle against cars over the past several years, with car-free days , older-car bans , and diatribes against owning a personal vehicle . Now, the government of France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, wants to ban the sale of all gasoline and diesel vehicles by 2040, saying it’s a “veritable revolution” to “fight air
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New mysteries surround New Horizons' next flyby targetNASA's New Horizons spacecraft doesn't zoom past its next science target until New Year's Day 2019, but the Kuiper Belt object, known as 2014 MU69, is already revealing surprises.
13h
Ars Technica
Custom cancer vaccines safely fight and kill tumors in early human trials Enlarge / Melanoma cells. (credit: NCI ) With swift shots to the arm, doctors safely and effectively prime our immune systems to fight off deadly infectious diseases. Now, with tightly crossed fingers, they plan to do the same for cancers. In two early clinical trials involving 19 patients with skin cancer, personalized vaccines appeared safe and effective at spurring immune responses to attack a
14h
Live Science
Amelia Earhart: Biography & DisappearanceAmelia Earhart's disappearance during an attempt to fly around the world remains a mystery, but recent expeditions may have found clues to her fate.
14h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Ancient-genome studies grapple with Africa’s past Clutch of DNA analyses show ancient humans moved around on the continent far more than has been appreciated. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22272
14h
Big Think
Resting Rich Face Your resting expression may reveal your socio-economic status. Read More
14h
Gizmodo
After Criticism, US Defense Department Will Implement New Encryption Standards Next Year Photo: Getty One year from now, the US Department of Defense (DoD) expects to implement a new infrastructure to increase security around the way it communicates electronically, Gizmodo has learned. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), which manages the Pentagon’s email systems, says it intends to adopt, by default, STARTTLS, an encryption protocol designed to prevent the interception of
14h
Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Guest Room With a $100 Queen Foam Mattress Zinus 6" Queen Foam Mattress , $100 6" probably isn’t thick enough for a mattress you’ll sleep on every day, but it’s just fine for a kid’s room or guest room, and $100 for a queen is an insanely good price when it comes to foam mattresses.
14h
Science : NPR
Physics For Toddlers There's a dearth of books about science and math for young children. As part of our series on kids' media we take a look at some books that introduce rocket science and physics to toddlers and babies.
14h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Pin-drop test pops Greek amphitheater’s acoustic claimsAnalysis of an ancient Greek amphitheater’s ability to carry sounds reveals overblown tour guide claims.
14h
Gizmodo
New Particle Discovery Reignites Decade-Old Physics Controversy It’s sort of hard to get a good picture of LHCb to be honest (Image; Ryan F. Mandelbaum) Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland have discovered an exciting new particle—or rather, an exciting combination of particles. It doesn’t have quite the same impact that the Higgs Boson (the one people called the God Particle) did five years ago. But it does have people talking, and many fol
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Gizmodo
If You Have Only One Day at San Diego Comic-Con, Here's What You Need to Do Photo by Frazer Harrison/ Getty Images . Hey, letter... folks. Sorry for suddenly taking ill last week. Normally I’d try to do an extra-sized “Postal” to make up for it, but 1) I’m still recovering and 2) this year’s San Diego Comic-Con is approaching, which does not bode well for the already shaky reliability of the mailbag. But let’s start by addressing the con itself, the chaotic mess that is
14h
Ars Technica
State Department concocting “fake” intellectual property “Twitter feud” Enlarge (credit: Nora Karol Photography/Getty Images) The US State Department wants to team up with other government agencies and Hollywood in a bid to create a "fake Twitter feud" about the importance of intellectual property rights. As part of this charade, the State Department's Bureau of Economic Affairs says it has been seeking the participation of the US Office of Intellectual Property Enfo
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traumatic brain injury in veterans -- differences from civilians may affect long-term careVeterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) differ from civilians with TBI in some key ways -- with potentially important implications for long-term care and support of injured service members and their families. New research from the Veterans Administration TBI Model System is assembled in the July/August special issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers often distracted during breast and bottle feedingAs innovation expands the accessibility of technology, the potential for distraction increases as well. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior assesses the level and type of distractions that affect mothers during infant feeding and discusses the potential impact on mothers and babies. Researchers found that distractions occurred in close to half of feedings, with
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Ars Technica
Ending carpool-only roads made all trips worse Enlarge (credit: flickr user: VasenkaPhotography ) If you’ve ever been skeptical about whether carpool policies actually work, Indonesia would like to have a word with you. Jakarta, one of the biggest metropolitan areas on Earth, had a carpool policy that seemed to be particularly susceptible to abuse. Abruptly, in March 2016, the Jakarta government announced that the policy would end in a week.
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Live Science
Did Amelia Earhart Survive Crash? New Photo May Offer Tantalizing ClueA newly found back-and-white photo taken on the Marshall Islands may help solve the mystery of Amelia Earhart's disappearance, but not everyone is convinced that the famous aviator is in the photo.
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Gizmodo
New Observations Suggest Our Galaxy Contains 100 Billion Failed Stars Brown dwarfs—not quite a planet, not quite a star. (NASA / JPL-Caltech) New research suggests our galaxy contains as many as 100 billion brown dwarfs—a type of celestial object that didn’t have quite what it takes to become a full-fledged star. The finding shows just how ubiquitous brown dwarfs really are, and how many false starts are involved in the formation of new stars. Brown dwarfs exist in
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E.U. to Identify Endocrine Disrupters in PesticidesThe proposed criteria for seeking out the chemicals were criticized by a number of groups, including scientific societies and environmental advocates.
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The Scientist RSS
Personalized Cancer Vaccines Show Promise for MelanomaIn two early trials, vaccines tailored to the mutations in individuals' cancers appeared to protect 12 of 19 patients against relapse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How wheat lost the evolutionary battle against its deadly fungal nemesisA University of Kentucky plant pathologist is part of an international team of researchers who have uncovered an important link to a disease which left unchecked could prove devastating to wheat. UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment faculty member Mark Farman co-authored an article being published today in Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists begin to unravel how the protein tau transitions from a soluble liquid state to solid fibrous tanglesWhile much about Alzheimer's disease remains a mystery, scientists do know that part of the disease's progression involves a normal protein called tau, aggregating to form ropelike inclusions within brain cells that eventually strangle the neurons. Yet how this protein transitions from its soluble liquid state to solid fibers has remained unknown—until now.
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New Scientist - News
France plans to ban all new petrol and diesel cars by 2040The country’s environment minister has pledged to phase out coal by 2022, and end sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 204
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Live Science
The World Is on the Brink of an Electric Car RevolutionThe internal combustion engine had a good run.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: A Breakthrough Tool for Studying Superconductors BRIEF: A Breakthrough Tool for Studying Superconductors Scientists have learned how to measure the relationship between superconductivity and vibrating electrons. SLAC_FeSe_top-image-loop.gif An infrared laser beam, shown as an orange glow, triggers atomic vibrations in a thin layer of iron selenide. Image credits: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Physics Thursday, July 6, 2017 -
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mercury mission: BepiColombo gets ready to launchA mission to Mercury is getting closer to the launch pad.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists put sound back into a previously silent pastMany attempts to explain how past people experienced their wider world have focused on sight at the expense of sound, but researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble pushed beyond limits to spot clumps of new stars in distant galaxyWhen it comes to the distant universe, even the keen vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can only go so far. Teasing out finer details requires clever thinking and a little help from a cosmic alignment with a gravitational lens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Falls lead to declines in seniorsMore than half of elderly patients (age 65 and older) who visited an emergency department because of injuries sustained in a fall suffered adverse events -- including additional falls, hospitalization and death -- within 6 months. The results of a study examining how risk factors predict recurrent falls and adverse events were published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Revisit, S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State researchers study link between Pokémon GO and a healthier lifestyleKent State University researchers found that playing a popular physically-interactive, smartphone based game, like Pokémon GO, may actually promote exercise. The researchers suggest that while many smartphone functions may promote sedentary activity, they are hopeful that playing physically-interactive, smartphone based video games like Pokémon GO may help promote walking and reduce sitting in col
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The Atlantic
The Case for Testing Zika Vaccines on Pregnant Women Zika is a disease whose burden falls most heavily on pregnant women. In most people who come down with it, the virus is symptomless, and passes through the body with the person none the wiser. When symptoms do bloom, they are unpleasant, but not particularly dangerous to most. If someone who’s pregnant gets Zika, however, the consequences for the fetus can be devastating. The virus causes underde
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The Atlantic
What Can China Do About North Korea? President Trump meets with the leaders of South Korea and Japan Thursday evening to discuss the North Korean crisis. Absent from their dinner is Chinese President Xi Jinping, who Trump has said is key to resolving the impasse over Pyongyang’s nuclear-weapons and missile programs. His absence is reportedly intended to put pressure on Beijing over its perceived inaction on North Korea. Trump has ma
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Futurity.org
To survive cold, some plants kill part of their roots Some plants may selectively kill part of their roots in order to survive cold weather conditions, researchers have found. This approach allows the plants to withstand chilling stress and to recover faster when the weather turns better. The discovery and understanding of this survival approach could pave the way for the development of novel strategies to improve the growth and yield of crops that
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Gizmodo
A Pedal-Powered Elevator Will Make You Less Guilty About Not Taking the Stairs GIF Can’t shake that nagging, guilty feeling that you should have dragged your butt up the stairs every time you take the elevator? Then you’re in luck, because Vycle creators Elena Larriba and Jon Garcia have come up with a pedal-powered elevator alternative that helps you get in shape as you travel between floors. Like a bicycle, the Vycle has a gearing system that makes it relatively easy to c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ceria-zirconia nanoparticles as enhanced multi-antioxidants are effective in sepsis treatmentDuring sepsis, cells are swamped with reactive oxygen species generated in an aberrant response of the immune system to a local infection. If this fatal inflammatory path could be interfered, new treatment schemes could be developed. Now, Korean scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie that zirconia-doped ceria nanoparticles act as effective scavengers of these oxygen radicals, promoting
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Popular Science
How jellyfish use high-powered 'syringes' to shoot venom into your skin Animals Someday, we could use those mechanics for drug delivery or advanced tech. Float like a jellyfish, sting like a jellyfish. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A steady pulseFor perhaps the first time ever, the world's oceans have a health record -- and it's revealing clues about what might be behind symptoms of ocean improvements or declines alike.
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Hubble pushed beyond limits to spot clumps of new stars in distant galaxyBy applying a new computational analysis to a galaxy magnified by a gravitational lens, astronomers have obtained images 10 times sharper than what Hubble could achieve on its own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel PET tracer detects small blood clotsBlood clots in veins and arteries can lead to heart attack, stroke, and pulmonary embolism, which are major causes of mortality. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's July 2017 issue, German researchers show that targeting GPIIb/IIIa receptors, the key receptor involved in platelet clumping, with a fluorine-18 labeled ligand is a promising approach for diagnostic imaging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A biophysical smoking gunWhile much about Alzheimer's disease remains a mystery, scientists do know that part of the disease's progression involves a normal protein called tau, aggregating to form ropelike inclusions within brain cells that eventually strangle the neurons. Yet how this protein transitions from its soluble liquid state to solid fibers has remained unknown -- until now.
15h
Ars Technica
Scientists revisit a strange result from one of the Soviet Venus landers Enlarge / And you thought that sulfuric acid clouds were weird. (credit: ISAS/JAXA ) Venus' atmosphere is rightfully famous for a combination of being stunningly hot and containing sulfuric acid. Those conditions, not surprisingly, have ensured that every bit of hardware we've sent through said atmosphere has had an extremely short lifespan. But at least one of those pieces of hardware—the Soviet
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Gizmodo
Fan Fiction Is a Bad Television Show's Best Friend The hair. The katana. It’s so fucking 90s. (Image: Highlander: The Series, CBS) Recently, I was engaging in one of my favorite pastimes: rewatching TV shows I loved when I was a kid. Thanks to the various streaming websites, it’s really, really easy to relive old passions without breaking the bank on DVD sets. (My god was it expensive to watch every episode of a show back when a season cost rough
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Gizmodo
Here's The Disgusting Mess That Happens If You Fill Your Engine With Washer Fluid Instead Of Oil The engine in your car is much like you: quite fussy about what fluids go where. Just like you’d freak out if, say, your tear ducts became full of urine or blood, you average engine doesn’t want, say, washer fluid where oil should go. Which just happens to be what happened to this poor, now-disgusting Mini. These pictures come to us from the Club BMW Région Centre , a French BMW Facebook group. Y
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The Atlantic
A Ghost Story Is a Haunting Modern Fable The unnamed protagonist of A Ghost Story looks like a melancholic cartoon character: a figure in a white sheet that extends past his feet, with two miserable eye-holes in lieu of a face. A Halloween-ish creature turned into an avatar of grief and loss, he’s played by Casey Affleck, who would be a lock to win the Oscar for Best Wordless Shuffling if such a category existed. For the 92-minute runni
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Live Science
Hobby Lobby to Pay $3 Million, Give Up Artifacts Smuggled from IraqHobby Lobby bought thousands of objects, including cuneiform tablets and and clay stamp seals, that were smuggled out of Iraq, according to federal authorities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeologists put sound back into a previously silent pastMany attempts to explain how past people experienced their wider world have focused on sight at the expense of sound, but researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK's Farman is co-author of important wheat disease studyA University of Kentucky plant pathologist is part of an international team of researchers who have uncovered an important link to a disease which left unchecked could prove devastating to wheat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Preschoolers learn from math games -- to a pointWhat is the best way to help poor schoolchildren succeed at math? A study co-authored by researchers at MIT, Harvard University, and New York University now sheds light on the ways preschool activities may -- or may not -- help children develop cognitive skills.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Without HOV policies, urban traffic gets much, much worseCities plagued with terrible traffic problems may be overlooking a simple, low-cost solution: High-occupancy vehicle (HOV) policies that encourage carpooling can reduce traffic drastically, according to a new study co-authored by MIT economists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposing newborn mice to general anesthetic disrupts brain developmentNew research publishing July 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Eunchai Kang, David Mintz and colleagues now shows that early postnatal mice exposed to isoflurane -- a standard and widely used inhaled general anesthetic agent -- leads to chronic, abnormal activation of the mTOR pathway, a signaling system critical for normal brain development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find new method to fight malariaScientists have discovered a new way to slow down malaria infections, providing a possible new target for antimalarial drugs. The team are already working with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new antimalarials -- an important step in the battle against drug resistant malaria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists get first direct look at how electrons 'dance' with vibrating atomsScientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first direct measurements, and by far the most precise ones, of how electrons move in sync with atomic vibrations rippling through an exotic material, as if they were dancing to the same beat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How wheat lost the evolutionary battle against its deadly fungal nemesisResearchers have identified a gene in wheat that protects against a deadly fungus, but which was lost from many wheat crops in the 1980s.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In preschools in India, math games boost math understandingWorking with children at more than 200 preschools in India, researchers found that those who took part in math games for four months became more skilled at math assessments similar to those they'd see in primary school - an effect that lasted for up to a year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life in the fast lane requires carpoolingAn abrupt halt to a policy aimed at reducing traffic delays in Jakarta has provided researchers with valuable insights into how carpooling affects traffic flow within the megacity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wheat genome sequencing provides 'time tunnel' -- boosting future food production & safetyA global team of researchers has published the first-ever Wild Emmer wheat genome sequence in Science magazine. Wild Emmer wheat is the original form of nearly all the domesticated wheat in the world, including durum (pasta) and bread wheat. Wild emmer is too low-yielding to be of use to farmers today, but it contains many attractive characteristics that are being used by plant breeders to improve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electron orbitals may hold key to unifying concept of high-temperature superconductivityA team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different copper- and iron-based 'parent' materials can develop the ability to carry electrical current with no resistance at strikingly high temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How humans transformed wild wheat into its modern counterpartA sophisticated sequencing study reveals genetic changes that emerged in wheat as it became domesticated by agricultural societies in the Fertile Crescent, roughly 10,000 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lymph node metastases may not always be the source of cancer's spread to other organsA study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that the traditional model for the spread of carcinoma, the deadliest form of cancer -- from the primary tumor, to nearby lymph nodes, to other organs -- may not apply in all cases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune system cell clones created before birth may last for decadesKey immune system cells produced before birth may survive well into adulthood, according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Defensive bacterial symbionts of fruit flies attack ribosomes of parasitic waspsBacteria of the Spiroplasma genus produce toxic, ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) that appear to protect their symbiotic host flies against parasitic wasps, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Snakebites cost Sri Lanka more than $10 millionSnakebites are a major public health problem in many rural communities around the world, often requiring medical care and affecting victims' ability to work. Every year, snakebites cost the Sri Lankan government more than US$10 million, and lead to economic loss of nearly US$4 million for individuals, according to a new study in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three Gorges Dam alters downstream schistosomiasis ratesThe Three Gorges Dam is a massive hydroelectric dam that spans the Yangtze River in central China and became fully operational in 2010. Ecological changes caused by the dam have altered the distribution of snails -- including those that carry the Schistosoma parasites -- researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A newly identified complex of Tau and RNA suggests a path to aggregationThe hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases is the formation of protein aggregates, yet how and why these aggregates form remains a mystery. In a study publishing July 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by the laboratories of Songi Han and Kenneth S. Kosik at the University of California Santa Barbara, the authors identify a novel property of tau, the aggregation-prone protein associate
15h
Futurity.org
More U.S. veterans are getting hospice care Substantially more US veterans are using hospice following a US Department of Veterans Affairs initiative to improve care at the end of life. The VA wanted to know the effects of its four-year Comprehensive End-of-Life Care (CELC) initiative, which began in 2009. The findings of a new study, published in Health Affairs , show that the initiative encouraged more hospice use among military veterans
15h
The Atlantic
Exit the Government Ethics Chief Walter Shaub, who as head of the federal government’s top ethics watchdog has clashed repeatedly with the Trump administration, will step down later this month, exiting office nearly six months before his term was to finish. Shaub, the head of the Office of Government Ethics, will leave office on July 19, he announced in a letter posted to Twitter . He confirmed his departure to The Washington Po
15h
The Atlantic
Kesha's Comeback Message: Love Thy Enemy Kesha’s recent troubles would seem to sit alongside a few other famous narratives about women accusing men of sexual misconduct to little legal avail. Donald Trump is in office despite allegations of predatory behavior; Bill Cosby took his mistrial as a reason to swagger. Dr. Luke, the recording name of the influential pop producer Lukasz Sebastian Gottwald, has thus far fended off Kesha’s vividl
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Wired
Meet Salto, the One-Legged Robot With an Incredible LeapSalto is a tiny robot with an outrageous leap and a bright future in rescue operations.
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Viden
Europæisk mission sender to satellitter til Merkur - samtidigt!Et nyt europæisk-japansk samarbejde sender to satellitter til Solsystemets inderste planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Defensive bacterial symbionts of fruit flies attack ribosomes of parasitic waspsBacteria of the Spiroplasma genus produce toxic, ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) that appear to protect their symbiotic host flies against parasitic wasps, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wild wheat genome sequencing provides 'time tunnel' capable of boosting future food production and safetyA global team of researchers has published the first-ever Wild Emmer wheat genome sequence in Science magazine. Wild Emmer wheat is the original form of nearly all the domesticated wheat in the world, including durum (pasta) and bread wheat. Wild emmer is too low-yielding to be of use to farmers today, but it contains many attractive characteristics that are being used by plant breeders to improve
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists get first direct look at how electrons 'dance' with vibrating atomsScientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first direct measurements, and by far the most precise ones, of how electrons move in sync with atomic vibrations rippling through an exotic material, as if they were dancing to the same beat.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electron orbitals may hold key to unifying concept of high-temperature superconductivityA team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings, described in the journal Science, provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different "parent" materials—insulating copper-based compounds and metallic iron-based compounds—can develop the ability to carry electrical curr
16h
Gizmodo
Corsair Gaming K95 RPG Platinum Review: A Very Gaming Keyboard Many of today’s mechanical “gaming” keyboards are innocuous devices that are just at home in an office as they are a game room. Corsair’s K95 RGB Platinum is not one of those. It’s a brushed aluminium boat of a keyboard with dedicated macro keys, a silver volume wheel and extra RGB lighting, just in case. With my personal keyboards getting smaller and smaller each day, I was unprepared for Corsai
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Futurity.org
‘Competing’ ocean bacteria may collaborate instead Two of the most abundant types of microorganism in the oceans—phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria—collaborate rather than compete, new research suggests. The finding contradicts the popular scientific belief that these bacteria compete over the scarce nutrients found in seawater. Phototrophic bacteria use light to “fix” carbon dioxide from the air, and convert this into organic matter—which l
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antioxidants against sepsisDuring sepsis, cells are swamped with reactive oxygen species generated in an aberrant response of the immune system to a local infection. If this fatal inflammatory path could be interfered, new treatment schemes could be developed. Now, Korean scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie that zirconia-doped ceria nanoparticles act as effective scavengers of these oxygen radicals, promoting
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New NAM publication examines improving outcomes, reducing costs for 'high-needs patients'New National Academy of Medicine special publication offers opportunities for improving outcomes and reducing costs in the treatment of 'high-needs patients' -- those who make up 5 percent of all patients but account for nearly half of all health care spending.
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Science | The Guardian
ESA unveils third mission to Mercury to investigate water ice and volcanoes BepiColombo spacecraft will also attempt to explain why the solar system’s smallest planet appears to be shrinking The BepiColombo spacecraft, which will become the third probe to visit Mercury, has been unveiled ahead of a mission that will tackle some of the deepest mysteries of our solar system. The spacecraft, scheduled to launch in October 2018, will investigate the existence of water ice at
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Science | The Guardian
ESA’s BepiColombo Mercury mission thrives on ambition and co-operation The European Space Agency unveils its ambitious €1.3bn Bepi Colombo mission to inner planet Mercury I raised a sceptical eyebrow when Alvaro Gimenez, ESA director of science, said that BepiColombo mission to Mercury is the most complicated science mission ever performed by the agency. What could be more difficult than ESA’s Rosetta and Philae mission, I thought, which navigated around a comet and
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The Atlantic
Mosul in Ruins Iraqi forces have been closing in on Mosul’s Old City for months, but remain hampered by difficult terrain and hundreds of remaining ISIS fighters now encircled in a small area with a large civilian population trying to escape. Eight months of warfare have taken an enormous toll on Iraq’s second city and its citizens. Much the same as other cities in the region once overrun by ISIS, then retaken
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The Atlantic
Can Liberal Activists Keep Attention on the Republican Health-Care Bill? Senate Republicans could be on the verge of passing legislation to dismantle former President Barack Obama’s signature health-care law, the Affordable Care Act. The question for liberal activists who want to stop that from happening is whether the rest of the country will be paying attention. Activists must contend with crowded news cycles and limited opportunities to lobby lawmakers face-to-face
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Gizmodo
'Game of Thrones' Is Now Available Through Hulu Thanks to HBO Add-On Photo: Helen Sloan/HBO You now have one more way to watch Game of Thrones . Just ten days before the premiere of HBO’s most popular show, the network has made a deal with Hulu and will offer its content and services as an add-on. HBO, along with Cinemax, can now be added to Hulu’s existing subscription. HBO will cost $15 per month (basically the same price you’d pay anywhere else) and Cinemax wil
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Brown Family Has A Devastating Choice To Make | Alaskan Bush People #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Ami and Billy sit down to make a difficult decision: To risk Ami's health and return to Browntown, or abandon their remote lifestyle to be near medical resources. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://
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Framework materials can dew it
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Cognitive science in the field: A preschool intervention durably enhances intuitive but not formal mathematics Many poor children are underprepared for demanding primary school curricula. Research in cognitive science suggests that school achievement could be improved by preschool pedagogy in which numerate adults engage children’s spontaneous, nonsymbolic mathematical concepts. To test this suggestion, we designed and evaluated a game-based preschool curriculum intended to exercise children’s emerging sk
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Origins of lymphatic and distant metastases in human colorectal cancer The spread of cancer cells from primary tumors to regional lymph nodes is often associated with reduced survival. One prevailing model to explain this association posits that fatal, distant metastases are seeded by lymph node metastases. This view provides a mechanistic basis for the TNM staging system and is the rationale for surgical resection of tumor-draining lymph nodes. Here we examine the
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Science current issue
Quantized electric multipole insulators The Berry phase provides a modern formulation of electric polarization in crystals. We extend this concept to higher electric multipole moments and determine the necessary conditions and minimal models for which the quadrupole and octupole moments are topologically quantized electromagnetic observables. Such systems exhibit gapped boundaries that are themselves lower-dimensional topological phase
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Science current issue
Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shif
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Science current issue
Femtosecond electron-phonon lock-in by photoemission and x-ray free-electron laser The interactions that lead to the emergence of superconductivity in iron-based materials remain a subject of debate. It has been suggested that electron-electron correlations enhance electron-phonon coupling in iron selenide (FeSe) and related pnictides, but direct experimental verification has been lacking. Here we show that the electron-phonon coupling strength in FeSe can be quantified by comb
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Science current issue
Discovery of orbital-selective Cooper pairing in FeSe The superconductor iron selenide (FeSe) is of intense interest owing to its unusual nonmagnetic nematic state and potential for high-temperature superconductivity. But its Cooper pairing mechanism has not been determined. We used Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference imaging to determine the Fermi surface geometry of the electronic bands surrounding the = (0, 0) and X = (/ a Fe , 0) points of FeS
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Science current issue
Evolution of the wheat blast fungus through functional losses in a host specificity determinant Wheat blast first emerged in Brazil in the mid-1980s and has recently caused heavy crop losses in Asia. Here we show how this devastating pathogen evolved in Brazil. Genetic analysis of host species determinants in the blast fungus resulted in the cloning of avirulence genes PWT3 and PWT4 , whose gene products elicit defense in wheat cultivars containing the corresponding resistance genes Rwt3 an
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Science current issue
Neurodevelopmental protein Musashi-1 interacts with the Zika genome and promotes viral replication A recent outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil has led to a simultaneous increase in reports of neonatal microcephaly. Zika targets cerebral neural precursors, a cell population essential for cortical development, but the cause of this neurotropism remains obscure. Here we report that the neural RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 (MSI1) interacts with the Zika genome and enables viral replication. Zika inf
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Science current issue
Citywide effects of high-occupancy vehicle restrictions: Evidence from "three-in-one" in Jakarta Widespread use of single-occupancy cars often leads to traffic congestion. Using anonymized traffic speed data from Android phones collected through Google Maps, we investigated whether high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) policies can combat congestion. We studied Jakarta’s "three-in-one" policy, which required all private cars on two major roads to carry at least three passengers during peak hours. Aft
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Science current issue
Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication Wheat ( Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent more than 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat’s domestication requires knowledge about the genome of its allo-tetraploid progenitor, wild emmer ( T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides ). We report a 10.1-gigabase assembly of
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Multipotent peripheral glial cells generate neuroendocrine cells of the adrenal medulla Adrenaline is a fundamental circulating hormone for bodily responses to internal and external stressors. Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla (AM) represent the main neuroendocrine adrenergic component and are believed to differentiate from neural crest cells. We demonstrate that large numbers of chromaffin cells arise from peripheral glial stem cells, termed Schwann cell precursors (SCPs). SC
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Corner-dwelling topological states
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Science current issue
Genomics and domestication of wheat
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Science current issue
Intercellular signal for vasodilation
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Science current issue
Function follows form
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Science current issue
A sizzling mantle under the Galapagos
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Science current issue
The interaction of solitons
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Science current issue
Metabolic memory in Mycobacterium
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Gizmodo
Finally Put a Dash Cam In Your Car For Just $56 Aukey Dash Cam , $56 with code AUKEYDR1 We’ll probably be a Russian colony soon, so you might as well start assimilating to the culture by buying a dash cam. This one from Aukey includes a 1080p Sony sensor and 170 degree field of view, a design that tucks behind your rear view mirror, and capacitors that are rated to work in temperatures from -4°F to 149°F.
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Wired
Getting High: Scientists Map the Receptor That Makes Weed WorkA better understanding of the on-switch for cannabis could help researchers design THC-like molecules without the side effects.
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Ars Technica
Construction costs are falling for renewable and natural gas plants (credit: Minnesota.gov ) Numbers from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflect the extent of renewable energy development in the US over the past several years. Construction costs per kilowatt for solar, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric projects have fallen, in some cases steeply, since 2013 , and natural gas generators are also getting cheaper to build despite getting more expensive y
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Futurity.org
Engineered enzymes could make gas cheaper Researchers have shown how to design and genetically engineer enzyme surfaces so they bind less to corn stalks and other cellulosic biomass, reducing enzyme costs in the production of biofuels like the ethanol in US gasoline. “The bottom line is we can cut down the cost of converting biomass into biofuels,” says Shishir P. S. Chundawat, senior author of the study and an assistant professor in the
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Ars Technica
Halo backward-compat news may spell death knell for Master Chief Collection [Updated] Enlarge / Older Halo games are coming to Xbox One... again. Is this good news or bad news for Master Chief Collection owners? (credit: 343 Industries) By the end of this year, the Xbox One's backward compatibility program will finally include all of the Halo games released on the Xbox 360. Microsoft announced this news as part of its "Halo Summer Celebration" news update on Thursday, and while it
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Science | The Guardian
Stephen Morley obituary My father, Stephen Morley, who has died of cancer aged 67, was a highly respected academic who made it his life’s work to understand and treat chronic pain. His research involved providing the evidence to support psychological treatments for chronic pain. He created novel methods now used worldwide for helping people live with pain. He was passionate about science being relevant to individuals, a
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Ars Technica
OneDrive has stopped working on non-NTFS drives Enlarge OneDrive users around the world have been upset to discover that with its latest update, Microsoft's cloud file syncing and storage system no longer works with anything other than disks formatted with the NTFS file system. Both older file systems, such as FAT32 and exFAT, and newer ones, such as ReFS, will now provoke an error message when OneDrive starts up. To continue to use the softwa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Some' job cuts confirmed by MicrosoftMicrosoft said Thursday it was cutting an unspecified number of jobs amid reports the US tech giant was reorganizing its global sales operations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers show how to make your own supernovaOne of the most extreme astrophysical events, Supernova explosions are the violent deaths of certain stars that scatter elements heavier than hydrogen and helium into surrounding space. Our own solar system is thought to have formed when a nearby supernova exploded distributing these elements into a cloud of hydrogen that then condensed to form our sun and the planets. In fact, the very atoms that
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Quanta Magazine
How Nature Solves Problems Through Computation There are many patterns of collective behavior in biology that are easy to see because they occur along the familiar dimensions of space and time. Think of the murmuration of starlings. Or army ants that span gaps on the forest floor by linking their own bodies into bridges. Loose groups of shoaling fish that snap into tight schools when a predator shows up. Then there are less obvious patterns,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conversation cards© a useful tool in pediatric weight managementConversation Cards© were developed to help families think about and prioritize key challenges regarding pediatric weight management. They also create points of reference for providers, which could help to create treatment plans for families based on their priorities. Using Conversation Cards©, researchers from the University of Alberta conducted a study that reviewed the way families use the cards
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Europe pauses funding for €500 million fusion research reactor Italian scientists eager to go it alone on experiment to tackle ‘waste heat’ problem. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22165
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: They Were Shorter and at Risk for Arthritis, but They Survived an Ice AgeA genetic mutation that knocks a centimeter off height and increases the risk for arthritis may have helped early humans in Europe and Asia to survive, a new study shows.
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The Atlantic
The Book That Predicted Trump’s Rise Offers the Left a Roadmap for Defeating Him Twenty years ago, in a series of lectures on the history of American civilization, the philosopher Richard Rorty offered a prediction. His words languished in relative obscurity until the unexpected rise of Donald Trump made them seem prescient. Labor unions and unskilled workers will sooner or later realize that “their government is not even trying to prevent wages from sinking or to prevent job
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Big Think
Where Did the First Light in the Universe Come From? Astrophysicists Now Know Studies using advanced space telescopes paint a fascinating picture of our early universe. Read More
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Ars Technica
PlayStation Now updated with PS4 game support—and a hint at its future Enlarge / There they are! PS4 games, ready for your paid-streaming pleasure. Sony's paid game-streaming service, PlayStation Now, launched a significant update on Thursday with support for current-gen PlayStation 4 games. The feature is live for anybody who pays for an ongoing PS Now subscription, either on PS4 consoles or Windows PCs, and it adds 20 PS4 games to the service's hundreds of PS3 gam
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Ars Technica
Encrypt all the webpages: Let’s Encrypt to offer wildcard certificates for free Enlarge / Free locks coming for all those HTTP web servers in January. Let's Encrypt, the free and open certificate authority (CA) launched as a public service by the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG), says it will begin providing free "wildcard" certificates for Internet domains in January 2018. Wildcard certificates allow anyone operating a domain to link a single certificate to multiple
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New Scientist - News
AI photo check exposes scale of diversity problem at top firmsNeural networks automatically detected the age, race and sex of the board members of the world’s 500 largest companies to quantify biases
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Gizmodo
RED's 'Holographic Media Machine' Feels Like an April Fools' Joke RED, makers of some of the most advanced cinema cameras used in Hollywood, revealed an entirely new product today in the form of an Android smartphone—sorry, “Holographic Media Machine” —that lets you view 3D content without glasses, among other buzzwordy features. Specific details about the new device/platform are slim at the moment, save for a one-sheet on RED’s website detailing some of the Hy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin D may improve sunburn, according to new clinical trialHigh doses of vitamin D taken one hour after sunburn significantly reduce skin redness, swelling, and inflammation, according to double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show how to make your own supernovaResearchers from the University of Oxford are using the largest, most intense lasers on the planet, to for the first time, show the general public how to recreate the effects of supernovae, in a laboratory.
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Science : NPR
To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert NASA plans to send people to the Red Planet in the 2030s. In the meantime, a remote location in southern Utah serves as a non-NASA training ground for the Mars-minded. (Image credit: Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Dive deep to discover unexpected connectionsReaders often praise Science News for its brevity. But some ideas need more space, writes acting editor in chief Elizabeth Quill.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
States sue over EPA's decision to keep pesticide on marketSeveral states are seeking to join a legal challenge to a Trump administration decision to keep a widely used pesticide on the market despite studies showing it can harm children's brains.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers intrigued by Mars' far-out birthReaders sent feedback on the Red Planet's formation, jumping genes and more
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The Atlantic
The Student Who Got Away This is the fourth installment in an audio series called What My Students Taught Me, which features teachers reflecting on one of their most challenging students—counterbalanced by the student’s version of the same events. What My Students Taught Me will return with a fifth episode in August. Chris Zajac’s story epitomizes the mundane heroics of school teaching. The author Tracy Kidder spent a ye
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The Atlantic
How Princeton Is Trying to Get More Women to Be Student Leaders In the fall of 2009, there were nine candidates for president of Princeton’s freshman class. All nine were white men. Concerned by this fact, a group of Princeton faculty and administrators began gathering data about gender diversity on campus. They found that, over the past 29 years, Princeton had only six female chairs of the honor committee, nine female editors-in-chief of the college newspape
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Scientific American Content: Global
North Korea Missile Test: Best Response May Be Surprisingly Low-TechSecurity expert offers a scientific perspective on realistic options for the U.S. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
10 Questions We're Worried Game of Thrones Is Never Going to Answer Game of Thrones returns for season seven on July 16, and there are plenty of major questions fans have had for years that will likely be answered during its seven-week run. However, there are still some confounding moments that have fled north of the Wall, and we’re beginning to suspect their explanations might never return. Again, these aren’t the big mysteries we’re pretty sure will be addresse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infosys plans 2,000 new tech Jobs in North Carolina by 2021India-based Infosys, an information technology outsourcing firm, announced Thursday it will hire 2,000 workers over the next four years for a technology hub in North Carolina, the second of four planned hubs in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From Mozart to Botzart: when machines write our musicMachines are already taking our jobs, will they soon be writing our music too?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber takes break in Finland ahead of new legislationRide-hailing service Uber is taking a yearlong break in Finland because legislation that's expected to open the transportation market for new businesses does not come into force until July 2018.
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Popular Science
Learn python programming for under $25 in this four-course bundle Sponsored Post Get a head start in computer science and watch the career doors open. Learn python programming for under $25 in this four-course bundle. Get a head start in computer science and watch the career doors open.
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Popular Science
10,000 years ago, North Americans were chowing down on potatoes—some things never change Science We go way, way back. Archaeologists discover evidence suggesting that North Americans have been eating potatoes for at least 10,000 years. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling memory by triggering specific brain waves during sleepIBS researchers find that manipulating the pulses of electrical activity in the thalamus during non-REM deep sleep make mice remember or forget
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How plants grow like human brains3-D scanning reveals similar statistical laws at work in both shoots and neurons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Weedy' fish species to take over our future oceansUniversity of Adelaide researchers have for the first time demonstrated that the ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small 'weedy' species dominating marine environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers publish new findings on influence of high-fat diet on colorectal cancerIn a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a specific molecular pathway that plays a key role in the link between a high-fat diet and tumor growth in the colon.In the July 6 issue of Stem Cell Reports, the team showed in pre-clinical models that cancer stem cell growth in the colon was enhanced by a high-fat, Western diet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term sexual intimidation may be widespread in primate societiesAfter observing the mating habits of chacma baboons living in the wild over a four-year period, researchers have found that males of the species often use long-term sexual intimidation to control their mates. The findings reported in Current Biology on July 6 suggest that this mating strategy has a long history in primates, including humans, and may be widespread across social mammals -- especiall
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New genetic syndrome identified; may offer some answers for puzzled parentsResearchers have identified a rare genetic syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, seizures, an abnormal gait and distinctive facial features. The scientists pinpointed variants in the WDR26 gene as causes for this distinctive, yet unnamed condition. Their early research provides initial information for counseling patients and families coping with uncertainties for children with the rar
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NYT > Science
Animal Welfare Groups Have a New Tool: Virtual RealityTwo organizations have just released videos showing mistreatment in the meat industry, and others plan to join in.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How strike-slip faults form, the origin of earthquakesStructural geologist Michele Cooke calls it the "million-dollar question" that underlies all work in her laboratory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst: what goes on deep in the earth as strike-slip faults form in the crust? This is the fault type that occurs when two tectonic plates slide past one another, generating the waves of energy we sometimes feel as earthquakes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changes in conservation planning can benefit vulnerable mammalsRight now, a prairie dog in Colorado is busy increasing soil carbon retention, increasing water infiltration, and clipping vegetation that will help maintain local grasslands and provide nutritious forage for large herbivores like cattle and bison. And, somewhere in Mexico, a pollinating bat is ensuring agave plants make good tequila.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plants grow like human brainsPlants and brains are more alike than you might think: Salk scientists discovered that the mathematical rules governing how plants grow are similar to how brain cells sprout connections. The new work, published in Current Biology on July 6, 2017, and based on data from 3D laser scanning of plants, suggests there may be universal rules of logic governing branching growth across many biological syst
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The Atlantic
How Trump Sows Confusion and Doubt Why do reporters keep asking President Trump whether he accepts that Russia interfered in the 2016 election? The shortest answer is that he keeps giving interesting answers. During a press conference in Warsaw Thursday, NBC’s Hallie Jackson asked the question once more. On its face, Trump’s rambling answer was almost incoherent, or at least, self-contradictory. Read closely, however, it illuminat
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The Scientist RSS
Snake Sex Determination Dogma OverturnedResearchers find that boas and pythons use an XY sex chromosome system, rather than the previously assumed ZW system found in some other snakes.
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Futurity.org
For more trustworthy AI, we may need an ‘interpreter’ A team of researchers is working to build trust between humans and artificial intelligence (AI) by creating an “interpreter” that can explain how an AI arrived at the answer to a specific question. In an age of self-driving cars and autonomous drones, AI is becoming a bigger part of our lives. It’s also getting increasingly savvy. Today, AI can recognize text, distinguish people by their faces, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A cosmic barbecue: Researchers spot 60 new 'hot Jupiter' candidatesYale researchers have identified 60 potential new "hot Jupiters"—highly irradiated worlds that glow like coals on a barbecue grill and are found orbiting only 1% of Sun-like stars.
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Gizmodo
Saturn's Moon Titan May Have the Perfect Landing Spot For Spacecraft Image: NASA/JPL/Univ. Arizona/Univ. Idaho Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is a giant nightmare beach. While its electrically charged sand wouldn’t make for a relaxing vacation, new research suggests the planet might not be as hostile to robotic visitors as we think. Although its lakes are full of ultra-cold liquid methane and ethane, they could be placid enough for future space probe to land on. St
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Gizmodo
Artist Recreates His Trip to Tokyo Through 30 Charming Short Animations GIF Having previously shown us what living in Los Angeles and New York City is like through a series of perfectly-looped GIFs, artist James Curran has now brought Tokyo to life with another adorable collection of animations, this time based on his experiences while living in Japan for a month. Tokyo Gifathon recreates 30 uniquely Japanese experiences—everything from sumo wrestling, to vending mac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-term sexual intimidation may be widespread in primate societiesAfter observing the mating habits of chacma baboons living in the wild over a four-year period, researchers have found that males of the species often use long-term sexual intimidation to control their mates. The findings reported in Current Biology on July 6 suggest that this mating strategy has a long history in primates, including humans, and may be widespread across social mammals—especially w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Weedy' fish species to take over our future oceansUniversity of Adelaide researchers have for the first time demonstrated that the ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small 'weedy' species dominating marine environments.
18h
Wired
Fountain Pen Buying Guide: 7 Options Under $30Our buying guide rounds up selections priced between $5 and $30
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Wired
Google Blocks, the Company's Newest VR Play, Is All About *Stuff*, ManBlocks is more than an intuitive creative tool—it's a way to turn us all into architects of a virtual universe.
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Gizmodo
Gene Editing Controversy Reminds Us Just How Much Money Influences Science Image: Getty Images Recently, a kerfuffle in the world of CRISPR illustrated just how easily money—and our perception of it—can impact science. In late May, a paper came out questioning how effective the gene-editing technology really is. Working with mice, researchers found that edits made with CRISPR can also result in thousands of unintended changes to a genome. The study cast serious doubt on
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Nintendo Tees, Amazon Tap, Tool Kit, and More Uniqlo Nintendo tees , $70 Amazon Taps , and a 210-piece tool set lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Refurb Amazon Tap , $70 While it’s definitely the least popular of the original Amazon Echo trifecta, the battery-powered Amazon Tap is worth a look with this $70 refurbished deal . The big knock ag
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Player Atani Invited to Speak at NIH Citizen Science Symposium Two years ago, Eyewire Executive Director Amy Robinson Sterling gave a presentation at a US Senate briefing on crowdsourcing science. This helped pass legislation that encourages Federal Agencies to use citizen science. On July 14 in Bethesda, MD, the NIH (National Institutes of Health) will hold an inaugural Citizen Science Symposium that will be opened by a joint presentation from Eyewire playe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How strike-slip faults form, the origin of earthquakesStructural geologist Michele Cooke calls it the 'million-dollar question' that underlies all work in her laboratory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst: what goes on deep in the earth as strike-slip faults form in the crust? This is the fault type that occurs when two tectonic plates slide past one another, generating the waves of energy we sometimes feel as earthquakes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Narcotics diversion results in outbreak of serratia marcescens bacteriaAn illegal diversion of opioids by a hospital nurse tampering with syringes was responsible for a cluster outbreak of Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative bacteria, according to research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Five patients admitted to five different hospital wards within University Hos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes in conservation planning can benefit vulnerable mammalsNew research from Colorado State University underscores the viewing of global conservation priority areas through three lenses: taxonomy, traits and evolutionary history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Terminal cancer patients can be unwilling to face prognosisIn a recent study, published in The Oncologist, just under 10% of patients diagnosed with terminal cancer did not know their prognosis and had no interest in finding out.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How humans (maybe) domesticated themselvesPrior to taming other species, humans selected for more docile traits among fellow Homo sapiens, a slew of recent studies suggest.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin storiesDNA studies are rewriting the how-we-met stories of domestication.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Robotic Knee Surgery Competition Heats UpProponents say the systems’ precise techniques may help speed patient recovery -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Court Says Undocumented Minors Have the Right to a Bond Hearing Unaccompanied and undocumented immigrant children have the right to a court hearing to determine whether they can be released, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The three-judge panel on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed with the government’s argument that laws passed after the 1997 Flores v Reno Supreme Court case replaced the bond hearing requirement by giving a federal agency
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Live Science
In Photos: Searching for Amelia EarhartPhotos from a search expedition to solve the mystery of Amelia Earhart's disappearance.
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Gizmodo
This Life-Changing Instant Pot Just Got Its Biggest Discount Yet Instant Pot IP-LUX60 V3 , $66 The newest version of the top-selling Instant Pot pressure cooker hasn’t seen a ton of discounts, but you can get it for an all-time low $66 right now on Amazon, down from its usual $80. This V3 model is the same Instant Pot you know and love, but with the addition of cake and egg cooking modes, and the ability to pressure cook for up to four hours straight, as oppos
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Ars Technica
White House could use AT&T/Time Warner deal as “leverage” against CNN Enlarge / President Donald Trump tweeted a video of himself wrestling CNN. (credit: President Donald Trump ) AT&T seems to be on track to close its purchase of Time Warner Inc., but President Donald Trump's hatred of Time Warner property CNN could still be a "wild card" in the deal. Trump's feud with CNN was described yesterday in a New York Times article titled " The Network Against the Leader o
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Popular Science
Do we need to do a weekly series on things you shouldn't put in your vagina now? Health Glitter bombs are the unicorn frappuccino of sexual health products. Let's learn how to accept our bodies instead of sparkle-ifying them.
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Gizmodo
Hackers Created Fake News Sites in Attempt to Phish Reporters Covering China Photo: Getty Researchers at Citizen Lab have unearthed a broad campaign aimed at infiltrating Chinese language news sites after discovering a phishing campaign targeting journalists at the US-based China Digital Times. Digital espionage operations targeting news organizations have become commonplace with numerous attacks traced to China-based operators. In 2013, for example, The New York Times re
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Gizmodo
American Gods' Slow-Motion Shots Turn Blood and Gore Into Stunning Works of Art GIF Image: Starz Starz’s American Gods series isn’t an entirely faithful adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s original novel as much as it’s a distinct piece piece of visual art largely defined by its bold and arresting visuals. While blood, gore, and battered flesh are some of the more commonly recurring themes that shaped American Gods ’ first season, there were other, more subtle aesthetic choices made
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A cosmic barbecue: Researchers spot 60 new 'hot Jupiter' candidatesYale researchers have identified 60 potential new 'hot Jupiters' -- highly irradiated worlds that glow like coals on a barbecue grill and are found orbiting only 1% of Sun-like stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A future without fakes thanks to quantum technologyScientists have created unique atomic-scale ID's based on the irregularities found in 2-D materials like graphene.On an atomic scale, quantum physics amplifies these irregularities, making it possible to 'fingerprint' them in simple electronic devices and optical tags.For the first time, the team will be showcasing this new technology via a smartphone app which can read whether a product is real o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study identifies gene that could play key role in depressionDepression affects more than 300 million people annually. Now, a new study has pinpointed how one particular gene plays a central role -- either protecting from stress or triggering a downward spiral, depending on its level of activity.
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Live Science
Lunch on the Wing: Mantises Snack on Birds (Photos)Praying mantises primarily hunt insects and spiders, but a new study found that for many large mantises, birds are also on the menu.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Wind-Propelled Waters Drove Antarctic Melting for MillenniaDuring the past 11,000 years, wind patterns have pushed warm waters from the deep ocean onto Antarctica's continental shelf -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
A history of human creativity: the good, the bad, and the ugly – Science Weekly podcast Ian Sample delves into our evolutionary past to explore the role creativity and collaboration may have played in early human societies Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter It is held up as a trait that sets us apart from the rest of the animals: the ability to think creatively and to use our powerful imagination
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Futurity.org
Anxiety meds more likely after breast cancer scare Women who get a false-positive mammogram result are newly prescribed anxiety or depression medication at a rate 10 to 20 percent higher than patients who receive an immediate negative result, research shows. The findings highlight the importance of swift and accurate follow-up testing to rule out a breast cancer diagnosis. A false-positive result is one where a suspicious finding on the screening
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
A history of human creativity: the good, the bad, and the ugly – Science Weekly podcastIan Sample delves into our evolutionary past to explore the role creativity and collaboration may have played in early human societies
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jellyfish invasion stirs debate over Egypt's Suez CanalSwarms of jellyfish have descended on Egypt's northern coast, keeping vacationers out of the water and stirring debate over a recent expansion of the Suez Canal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars surface 'more uninhabitable' than thought: studyHopes of finding life on Mars, at least on the surface, were dealt a blow Thursday by a study revealing that salt minerals present on the Red Planet kill bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
QVC parent buying HSN as shopping shifts onlineQVC's parent company is taking control of the Home Shopping Network for about $2.6 billion in stock to create what they say will be the third-largest e-commerce company in the United States.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New material may help cut battery costs for electric cars, cellphonesIn the battle of the batteries, lithium-ion technology is the reigning champion, powering that cellphone in your pocket as well as an increasing number of electric vehicles on the road.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Central Atlantic Ocean's forming Tropical Depression 4As Tropical Depression 4 was getting organized in the central Atlantic Ocean the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM satellite peered into the storm and measured rainfall within. The system became Tropical Depression 4 on July 6.
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Live Science
Secret Tunnel Discovered Beneath the Ancient Temple of the MoonA secret passageway discovered near the Pyramid of the Moon in the ancient city of Teotihuacan may have been a way for the people there to emulate the underworld, archaeologists said.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Dion Waiters Is Rich Now And I’ve Been Brutally Owned | Jezebel Blac Chyna’s Lawyer Is ‘Exp Deadspin Dion Waiters Is Rich Now And I’ve Been Brutally Owned | Jezebel Blac Chyna’s Lawyer Is ‘Exploring All Legal Remedies’ Against Rob Kardashian | The Root Everything You Wanted to Know About the Umar Johnson Memes but Were Afraid to Ask | Fusion United Airlines Messed Up Again |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lighting the way to optimal photocatalysisOne afternoon, Carnegie Mellon University Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)'s Mohammad Islam walked into colleague Paul Salvador's office and asked what the biggest problem was in photocatalysis that he'd like to be able to solve. Salvador's answer: He'd like to determine how the oxidation and reduction reactions in photocatalysis could be separated into distinct channels in order to increas
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Wired
The Physics Behind that One-Ton Wrecking Ball Trick on 'Outrageous Acts of Science'Whether you do it with a bowling ball or a wrecking ball like the guys on 'Outrageous Acts of Danger,' the science is the same.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New material may help cut battery costs for electric cars, cellphonesIn the battle of the batteries, lithium-ion technology is the reigning champion, powering that cellphone in your pocket as well as an increasing number of electric vehicles on the road. But a novel manganese and sodium-ion-based material developed at The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with Seoul National University, might become a contender, offering a potentially lower-cost, more
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Central Atlantic Ocean's forming Tropical Depression 4As Tropical Depression 4 was getting organized in the central Atlantic Ocean the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM satellite peered into the storm and measured rainfall within. The system became Tropical Depression 4 on July 6.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlled temperature change inside ear can prevent migrainesThe application of gentle cooling and warming currents inside the ear canal can provide relief for migraine sufferers, new research at the University of Kent has helped show.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain hit by deadly bacteria threatening olive treesA deadly bacteria that infected thousands of olive trees in Italy has been detected for the first time in mainland Spain, the world's top producer of olive oil, a regional government official said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla's stock shaping up to possibly have worst week of yearTesla's shares are shaping up to possibly have their worst week of the year so far as lower-than-expected production, increased competition and a review from an industry group weigh on the electric carmaker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nanmadol's Japan rainfall ratesAlthough the remnants of Tropical Storm Nanmadol have pushed into the north central Pacific Ocean, the rainfall it left behind caused flooding in Japan. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite calculated the rate in which rain was falling over the area.
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore DNA folding, cellular packing with supercomputer simulationsA biological mystery lies at the center of each of our cells, namely: how one meter of DNA can be wadded up into the space of a micron (or one millionth of a meter) within each nucleus of our body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Into the quantum world with a tennis racketQuantum technology is seen as an important future-oriented technology: smaller, faster and with higher performance than conventional electronics. However, exploiting quantum effects is difficult because nature's smallest building blocks have properties quite distinct from those we know from our everyday world. An international team of researchers has now succeeded in extracting a fault tolerant ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Undersea life holds promise for killing tuberculosisA team of researchers at the University of Central Florida has discovered a potential new weapon in the fight against tuberculosis, and it lives in the Little Mermaid's realm.
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New on MIT Technology Review
By 2040, More Than Half of All New Cars Could Be ElectricPlummeting battery prices will make electric vehicles cheap—and therefore popular.
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Ingeniøren
Minister efter britisk storbrand: Vi har styr på sikkerheden i DanmarkPlastmaterialerne, som blev benyttet i det nedbrændte højhus i London, er også tilladt i Danmark. Alligevel er der ingen grund til frygte, at en storbrand kan sprede sig i bygninger herhjemme, fastslår Ole Birk Olesen.
19h
Futurity.org
App eases stress of becoming new parents Researchers have developed an application for smartphones that delivers postnatal education programs and provides postnatal supportive care for new parents returning home from the maternity ward. Findings from a pilot test showed that new parents who use the app experienced significantly better parenting outcomes. The Home-but-not Alone app was developed to address the current gap in the continui
19h
New on MIT Technology Review
Listen in as Obama’s Energy Secretary Denounces Trump PoliciesErnest Moniz criticizes the White House’s decisions to withdraw from the Paris climate accords, cut federal research spending.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital discharge program improves patient experience leaving the hospitalA standardized, in-hospital discharge planning program, known as Project ReEngineered Dishcharge (RED), improves patient experience as they leave the hospital, according to researchers at Boston Medical Center.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nanmadol's Japan rainfall ratesAlthough the remnants of Tropical Storm Nanmadol have pushed into the north central Pacific Ocean, the rainfall it left behind caused flooding in Japan. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite calculated the rate in which rain was falling over the area.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kinky biologyHow and why proteins fold is a problem that has implications for protein design and therapeutics. Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch are exploring protein folding in bacteriophage DNA and other systems using advanced computing resources at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. Recent studies suggest the introduction of 'kinks' into configurations of DNA packaged within spherica
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists lay the groundwork for a reliable marijuana breathalyzerScientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have taken an important step toward a reliable marijuana breathalyzer by measuring the vapor pressure of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -- a measurement that, due to the compound's chemical structure, is very difficult and has not been accomplished before.
19h
The Atlantic
North Korea and the Trouble With China President Trump’s Twitter account is once again getting him into trouble, this time on North Korea. After decrying the Obama administration’s timidity with respect to Syria’s chemical weapons, the president now faces his own red line problem. Despite Trump tweeting in January that North Korea getting a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile “won’t happen” under his presidency, it look
19h
Gizmodo
Why Did Montana Experience a Powerful Earthquake Last Night? Image: USGS Last night, planet Earth rumbled in a place where it usually doesn’t rumble: Montana. But it also rumbled in the Philippines. Come to think of it, it rumbled in Vanuatu and Japan too. The Earth rumbles a lot. Folks were especially surprised by the earthquake that registered a 5.8 on the Richter scale in Montana. Why? Well, we’re America, and weird stuff that happens to us tends to mak
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Gizmodo
Add 210 Tools To Your Collection For Just $75, Today Only Stanley Mixed Tool Set, 210 Piece , $75 The bar we generally use for a very good deal on a tool set is roughly $.50 per tool, so when you can get a 210-piece set for $75 , you should jump at the opportunity. That gets you ratchets, screwdrivers, pliers, a tape measure, and more. Just add a hammer, and you’ve got everything you need to perform most basic DIY tasks around your home and garage. Just
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your hands may reveal the struggle to maintain self-controlIt takes just a few seconds to choose a cookie over an apple and wreck your diet for the day. But what is happening during those few seconds while you make the decision? In a new study, researchers watched in real time as people's hands revealed the struggle they were under to choose the long-term goal over short-term temptation. The work represents a new approach to studying self-control.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A computer that reads body languageResearchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have enabled a computer to understand the body poses and movements of multiple people from video in real time -- including, for the first time, the pose of each individual's fingers.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning with music can change brain structure, study showsUsing musical cues to learn a physical task significantly develops an important part of the brain, according to a new study.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Less myocardial infarctions during summer vacation -- more on Mondays and winter holidaysTime periods by calendar related to perceived stress are associated with the incidence rate of myocardial infarction (MI), says a new nationwide registry study of 156 000 people of the Swedish population, in the database SWEDEHEART. Compared to control days, the daily incidence rate of MI was higher during the winter holidays, and on Mondays, whereas rates were lower during weekends and during the
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are we still jealous? Infidelity in the age of social mediaWhen men and women find social media messages indicating that their partner has been cheating on them, they show the same type of jealousy behaviour as finding offline evidence. This is according to Michael Dunn and Gemma Billett of Cardiff Metropolitan University in the UK, who investigated how jealousy manifests between the sexes when people find compromising messages on their partner's social m
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Into the quantum world with a tennis racketQuantum technology is seen as an important future-oriented technology: smaller, faster and with higher performance than conventional electronics. However, exploiting quantum effects is difficult because nature's smallest building blocks have properties quite distinct from those we know from our everyday world. An international team of researchers has now succeeded in extracting a fault tolerant ma
19h
Futurity.org
Spacecraft to practice nudging asteroids away from us NASA has given the go-ahead for work to design a spacecraft that will test nudging an Earth-threatening asteroid out of its menacing orbit. The space agency’s OK kicks off the preliminary design phase for DART, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test mission. “DART is a critical step in demonstrating we can protect our planet from a future asteroid impact,” says Andy Cheng. He is co-leader of the pr
19h
Futurity.org
3D printing helps predict if new heart valves will leak Heart valve models created with advanced 3D printers could soon help cardiologists prepare to perform life-saving heart valve replacements. Researchers are using standard medical imaging and new 3D-printing technologies to create patient-specific heart valve models that mimic the physiological qualities of the real valves. Their aim is to improve the success rate of transcatheter aortic valve rep
20h
Wired
15,000 UFO Enthusiasts Space Out Hard in RoswellPeople descended upon the town of Roswell, New Mexico for the 22nd annual UFO Festival.
20h
Wired
7 Smart Suitcases To Streamline Your Summer TravelTravel can be unpredictable, but these technology-packed cases make the journey a little less stressful.
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Wired
How to Protect Your Digital Self: 2FA, Password Managers, Safe BrowsingYou can't lock down all the things all the time. But you can build a personal protection plan that makes sense for you.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Undersea life holds promise for killing tuberculosisA team of researchers at the University of Central Florida has discovered a potential new weapon in the fight against tuberculosis, and it lives in the Little Mermaid's realm.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
False-positive mammogram results linked to spike in anxiety prescriptionsWomen who experience a false-positive mammogram result are more likely to begin medication for anxiety or depression than women who received an immediate negative result, according to a study led by Penn State.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common insurance plans leave care at America's top cancer hospitals out of reachCancer patients in the United States may be unable to access care at the nation's top hospitals due to narrow insurance plan coverage -- leaving patients to choose between lower premiums or access to higher-quality cancer care. A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows common, so-called 'narrow network' insurance plans -- lower-premium plans with redu
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH and collaborators identify the genomic cause for Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndromeAn international team of researchers has identified genomic mutations for Carey-Fineman-Ziter (CFZS) syndrome, a very rare inherited muscle disorder. Findings provide insight into the development of an embryo's muscles and the regeneration of muscle cells after injury.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fern fossil data clarifies origination and extinction of speciesThroughout the history of life, new groups of species have flourished at the expense of earlier ones and global biodiversity has varied dramatically over geologic time. A new study led by the University of Turku, Finland, shows that completely different factors regulate the rise and fall of species.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virus-derived expression vectors as gene therapy vehiclesEven as new viruses are being identified, the emerging field of virus discovery, identification of their nucleotide sequences, gene expression patterns and complexities of virus-host interactions at the molecular level are being used in recent years towards applications in the human medicine as well as veterinary, agricultural and other biotechnological purposes.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First discovery of an exoplanet with SPHERE/VLTAn international team of astronomers, including members of the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, discovered an exoplanet by direct imaging using SPHERE, an instrument designed and developed by a consortium of 12 European institutes on the Very Large Telescope ESO, based in Chile. The instrument, which corrects in real time the terrestrial atmospheric turbulences and occults the light of t
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
The U.S. Supreme Court Stymies Science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Gizmodo
PSA: Check Your Subscriptions So You Don't Get Stung Image: jarmoluk/Pixabay Thanks to the helter-skelter pace of modern living it can be all too easy to sign up for a free trial or a month’s worth of a particular service, and then before you know it, you’re getting billed for a ton of apps you’re not using and don’t really need . Checking up on your subscriptions could save you a serious chunk of change—here’s how to do it. Get cancellation fever
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Role of cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions revealed in real-time monitoringHydrophobic interactions is one major type of intermolecular force that plays a vital role in many life processes in Chemistry and Physics. In biological systems, hydrophobic interactions can stabilize the internal cores of proteins and form lipid vesicles that store nutrients in our cells.In proteins, hydrophobic interactions can stabilize the internal cores and form lipid vesicles that store nut
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops new ways to create and deliver medications for a wide range of immune-medicated neuropathiesResearchers at LSTM are looking at new ways to create and deliver medications for a wide range of immune-medicated neuropathies, by developing new synthetic versions of the treatment currently seen as the last resort option by doctors; intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.
20h
Popular Science
The surface of Mars is probably too toxic for bacteria to survive Space But the search for life on the red planet isn't over yet. Under Mars-like conditions, perchlorates are toxic to the microbes. What does this mean for our future Mars colonies?
20h
The Atlantic
Trump, in Warsaw Speech, Criticizes Russia's 'Destabilizing' Role in Ukraine, Syria President Trump called Russia a “destabilizing” influence in Europe and the Middle East, and urged it to “join the community of responsible nations,” in his strongest remarks yet against the regime of Vladimir Putin, whom he is scheduled to meet Friday in Hamburg for the first time. His remarks in Warsaw’s Krasinski Square, which marks the 1944 Warsaw uprising against the Nazis, came after the U.
20h
The Atlantic
Why Won't the Democrats Challenge Trump on North Korea? On domestic policy, the Democratic Party is moving left. On foreign policy, the Democratic Party barely exists. Yes, Democrats like climate change agreements and oppose banning refugees. But those are extensions of the party’s domestic commitments. Yes, Democrats support a hard line against Vladimir Putin. But that’s mostly because he helped elect Donald Trump. What is the Democratic position on
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pizza bytes! Pakistan enchanted by first robot waitressesPakistan's first robot waitresses are serving up smiles for customers at an upscale pizza restaurant in the ancient city of Multan, better known for its centuries-old Sufi shrines, mango orchards and handicrafts.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spacecraft unveiled for first Europe mission to MercuryEuropean and Japanese scientists Thursday proudly unveiled the BepiColombo spacecraft ahead of its seven-year journey to Mercury, to explore one of the Solar System's most enigmatic planets.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France to end sales of petrol, diesel vehicles by 2040France will end sales of petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040 as part of an ambitious plan to meet its targets under the Paris climate accord, new Ecology Minister Nicolas Hulot announced Thursday.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UNESCO keeps Great Barrier Reef off 'in danger' listUNESCO said Thursday its World Heritage Committee (WHC) had decided not to place the Great Barrier Reef on its list of sites "in danger" despite concern over coral bleaching.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nokia maker partners with Zeiss on smartphone opticsHMD Global, the company that's licensed to produce Nokia phones and tablets, says it is partnering with Germany-based Zeiss to produce high quality optics on its new Nokia smartphones.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Role of cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions revealed in real-time monitoringIn a breakthrough, scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology overcame designed an innovative microfluidic mixer that monitors the fluorescence induced by hydrophobic aggregation. This scientific advance not only allows the quantification of molecular hydrophobic interaction and its cooperativity in bulk solution, but also provides a clear and quantitative evidence for the
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ways to create and deliver medications for immune-medicated neuropathiesResearchers at LSTM are looking at new ways to create and deliver medications for a wide range of immune-medicated neuropathies, by developing new synthetic versions of the treatment currently seen as the last resort option by doctors; intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-gravity treadmills get patients running again after knee surgeryUsing space age technology in the Sports Ready clinic at Medway Park, Gillingham, Dr Karen Hambly, an international expert on knee rehabilitation, works with clients who have been given the all clear to start to return to sporting activities but may have concerns about moving from being a patient with an injury to being an athlete again. Her report titled Return to running following knee osteochon
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds' migration genes are conditioned by geographyThe genetic make-up of a willow warbler determines where it will migrate when winter comes. Studies of willow warblers in Sweden, Finland and the Baltic States show that 'migration genes' differ -- depending on where the birds breed in the summer. The willow warblers that breed in southern Sweden migrate to West Africa, while those in northern Sweden, Finland and the Baltic States fly to southern
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new molecular scissors act like a GPS to improve genome editingResearchers from the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), led by the Spanish researcher Guillermo Montoya, have discovered how Cpf1, a new molecular scissors unzip and cleave DNA. This member of the CRISPR-Cas family displays a high accuracy, capable of acting like a GPS in order to identify its destination within the intricate map of the genome. The high precision of Cpf1 will improve the use of t
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two significant warming intervals in southern China since 1850Scientists reconstructed the annual temperature anomaly in southern China during 1850-2009 based on the southern limit of snowfall recorded in Chinese documents, chronologies of tree-ring width, and tree-ring stable oxygen isotope.This multi-proxy-based temperature reconstruction shows robust centennial warming, with a linear trend of 0.47°C (100 yr)?1 during 1871-2009.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Falling sea level caused volcanos to overflowDuring the transition to the last ice age approximately 80,000 years ago global temperature declined, while the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere remained relatively stable. An international research team led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Alfred-Wegener-Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research has now discovered that a falling sea level may h
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychological effect against pushing and shovingA large crowd of people at the entrance of concert or sport venues can easily result in a dangerous situation. In such cases, it might help to put up artificial barriers to prevent high densities and pushing of people, as has been demonstrated in experiments conducted by researchers from Jülich. The observed effect cannot be explained in purely physical terms; rather, it can only be understood if
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For rodents, seeing is believingSpatial cognition or visual sense -- which one are rats more likely to use when they have to navigate an unfamiliar location?
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photo-responsive protein hydrogels as agent for controlled stem cell/protein releaseIn a recent research, a group of scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology created a B12-dependent light-sensing hydrogel by covalently stitching together the photoreceptor C-terminal adenosylcobalamin binding domain (CarHC) proteins under mild conditions. This direct assembly of stimuli-responsive proteins into hydrogels represents a versatile solution for designing "smar
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working together to reduce infection in extreme weather eventsResearchers have called for health professionals and climate forecasters to work more closely together ahead of extreme weather events and gradual climate change to help prevent the spread of infections.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photo-responsive protein hydrogels as agent for controlled stem cell/protein releaseHydrogels, noted for their biomimetic properties, are the leading materials for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery and stem cell therapy. Traditional hydrogels made up of either synthetic polymers or natural biomolecules often serve as passive scaffolds for molecular or cellular species, which render these materials unable to fully recapitulate the dynamic signaling involved in biologi
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA study of southern humpback finds calving ground loyalty drives population differencesScientists conducting the first circum-global assessment of mitochondrial DNA variation in the Southern Hemisphere's humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) have found that whales faithfully returning to calving grounds year after year play a major role in how populations form, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), the American Museum of Natural History, and a number of other contribu
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study uses computer vision algorithm to study Google Street View images for signs of urban changeHarvard scientists are among the co-authors of a new study that uses computer vision algorithms to examine millions of Google Street View images to measure whether and how urban areas are changing. The study both found that two key demographic characteristics - high density and high education - play important roles in urban improvement, and showed support for three classical theories of urban chan
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making acid chloride precursors using shuttle catalysis(Phys.org)—The synthesis of carboxylic acid derivatives from unsaturated carbon compounds is important for making chemicals used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, polymers, and agrochemicals. In industry this reaction is done using high pressure carbon monoxide along with the appropriate catalyst for the job. While this may be possible in certain facilities, the use of a poisonous gas is not feasible
20h
Popular Science
10 privacy gadgets to help you keep a secret Gadgets Fend off nosy neighbors, curious co-workers, and anyone else who tries to pry into your stuff. The best ways to keep your skeletons in the closet. Keep your secrets a secret. Read on.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds' migration genes are conditioned by geographyThe genetic make-up of a willow warbler determines where it will migrate when winter comes. Studies of willow warblers in Sweden, Finland and the Baltic States show that "migration genes" differ - depending on where the birds breed in the summer. The willow warblers that breed in southern Sweden migrate to West Africa, while those in northern Sweden, Finland and the Baltic States fly to southern o
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new molecular scissors act like a GPS to improve genome editingResearchers from the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), led by the Spanish researcher Guillermo Montoya, have discovered how Cpf1, a new molecular scissors, unzips and cleaves DNA. This member of the CRISPR-Cas family displays high accuracy, and is capable of acting like a GPS in order to identify its destination within the intricate map of the genome. The high precision of Cpf1 will improve the
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First discovery of an exoplanet with SPHERE/VLTAn international team of astronomers, including members of the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, discovered an exoplanet by direct imaging using SPHERE, an instrument designed and developed by a consortium of 12 European institutes on the Very Large Telescope ESO, based in Chile. The instrument, which corrects in real time the terrestrial atmospheric turbulences and occults the light of t
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LHCb experiment announces observation of a new particle with two heavy quarksToday at the EPS Conference on High Energy Physics in Venice, the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider has reported the observation of Ξcc++ (Xicc++) a new particle containing two charm quarks and one up quark. The existence of this particle from the baryon family was expected by current theories, but physicists have been looking for such baryons with two heavy quarks for many years. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemist develops device to train canine units on odor detectionMan's best friend returned to the silver screen this June in the film "Megan Leavey," a story based on the true events about young Marine Megan Leavey and her combat canine, Rex. The film shines light on the importance of canine units throughout the military, whether it is aiding soldiers in combat situations or using their keen sense of smell to detect explosives in the field.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When crime drops, the demands on the police don't necessarily fallOn a day-to-day basis, the exposure citizens have to the police is often fleeting, with officers passing by in a blur as they respond to emergency calls. Official crime figures can be disputed, but the long-term trend appears to be that levels of crime in England and Wales are heading downward. Yet it is a myth to think that an apparent drop in crime relieves some of the pressures placed on police
20h
New Scientist - News
CRISPR gene editing technique is probably safe, study confirmsA study claiming CRISPR gene editing can cause thousands of unwanted mutations may have got it wrong, meaning the technique could be safe for treating people
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Futurity.org
DNA copying is more random than we thought For the first time, scientists have been able to watch individual steps in the replication of a single DNA molecule and found that the process contains much more randomness than previously thought. Almost all life on Earth is based on DNA being copied, or replicated, and understanding how this process works could lead to a wide range of discoveries in biology and medicine. “It’s a different way o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cats and cows protect farm children from asthmaIt is a known fact that microbes on farms protect children from asthma and allergies. But even non-microbial molecules can have a protective effect: Immunologists from the University of Zurich have shown that a sialic acid found in farm animals is effective against inflammation of lung tissue. This study opens up a wide variety of perspectives for the prevention of allergies.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sorting complicated knotsDelving into an untapped area of mathematics, IBS mathematicians provide a new operation for a particular type of knots.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change threatens domestic bee speciesGlobal warming changes the flowering times of plants and the moment when bees hatch -- sometimes with severe consequences for the bees. This was shown by a new study conducted by ecologists from the University of Würzburg.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA study of southern humpback finds calving ground loyalty drives population differencesScientists conducting the first circum-global assessment of mitochondrial DNA variation in the Southern Hemisphere's humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) have found that whales faithfully returning to calving grounds year after year play a major role in how populations form, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), the American Museum of Natural History, and a number of other contribu
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Late teen years are key period for bone growthThe late adolescent years are an important period for gaining bone mineral, even after a teenager attains his or her adult height. Scientists analyzing a racially diverse, multicenter sample from a large, federally funded national study say their findings reinforce the importance of diet and physical activities during the late teen years, as a foundation for lifelong health.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steroids may do more harm than good in some cases of severe asthmaNew findings have important clinical implications, suggesting that corticosteroids, the main treatment for asthma, may worsen the disease in this group of patients.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing street changeHarvard scientists are among the co-authors of a new study that uses computer vision algorithms to examine millions of Google Street View images to measure whether and how urban areas are changing. The study both found that two key demographic characteristics - high density and high education - play important roles in urban improvement, and showed support for three classical theories of urban chan
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibodies halt placental transmission of CMV-like virus in monkeysResearchers from Duke University School of Medicine and Tulane National Primate Research Center report findings in monkeys that demonstrates a CMV vaccine approach that appears to be capable of protecting the animal's fetus from infection.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early-life pain may lead to obesity risk, especially in females, study findsInflammatory pain at birth changes how the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with memory and eating behavior, works later in life, and this pain also causes adult rats to eat more frequently and in larger amounts, according to a study by Georgia State University and the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chances of surviving malaria may be higher when host consumes fewer caloriesResearch published in the current issue of the journal Nature finds that the chances of surviving a malaria infection may be higher when the infected individual consumes fewer calories. The study revealed that, in mice, the malaria parasite can sense and adapt to its host's nutritional status, reducing the number of offspring it produces. Mice that ate 30 percent fewer calories had a significantly
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing stress, optimizing coping strategies may diminish need for opioids following ankle surgeryHelping patients to better manage stress and improve coping strategies related to pain may minimize the need for opioids following ankle fracture surgery, according to new research appearing in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
20h
Ars Technica
At the boundary between chaos and order, order rules (eventually) Enlarge / Chaos looks different for everyone (Hitchcock included), but order can sneak up on you as quick as a deadly bird. (credit: Alfred Hitchcock / Archive Photos / Getty Images) Back in the dark days of the last century when I was a university undergraduate, chaos theory was my first love. Quantum mechanics was, to me, a mess of contradictions, but I felt like I might actually understand som
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA analyses reveal secrets about the Pacific oysterThe Pacific oyster is picky about temperature in most of its life stages. For maturation and spawning to be completed, temperatures higher than 16-20 degrees are required for several days in a row. After hatching, the larvae, too, are very sensitive to low temperatures. Therefore, it has been assumed that Skagerrak has functioned as a temperature barrier against the northward spreading of larvae p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Summer heat to test Copernicus programme's prediction serviceThe ECMWF-run Copernicus Climate Change Service is testing a new service that will make available seasonal forecasts and longer-term climate change predictions of river flow and other hydrological conditions.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sorting complicated knotsFrom bow ties and shoelaces to sailing boats and climbing ropes, knots are not only very useful for our daily lives, but for mathematics too. IBS researchers from the Center for Geometry and Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) reported a new mathematical operation to catalog a special kind of mathematical knots, known as Legendrian singular knots. Their study, accepted by the Jou
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New superglue allows for bonding stretchable hydrogels(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Johannes Kepler University Linz has developed a new type of glue that can be used to bond hydrogels to other hard or soft objects. In their paper published on the open-access site Science Advances, the group explains their development process, the structure of the glue, how it works and in what ways.
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The Scientist RSS
Googles DeepMind, UKs NHS Criticized for Sharing DataTwo reports raise concerns about privacy and proper consent during a controversial data-sharing agreement, but find that only the National Health Service broke the law.
20h
Science | The Guardian
Mars covered in toxic chemicals that can wipe out living organisms, tests reveal Discovery has major implications for hunt for alien life on the red planet as it means any evidence is likely to be buried deep underground The chances of anything coming from Mars have taken a downward turn with the finding that the surface of the red planet contains a “toxic cocktail” of chemicals that can wipe out living organisms. Experiments with compounds found in the Martian soil show that
21h
Wired
'Spider-Man: Homecoming': Where Did Spidey and Iron Man’s Bromance Come From? Not the ComicsTony Stark and Peter Parker are friends in the new Spider-Man flick—but the haven't always been BFFs.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
LHC double heavy particle to shine light on strong forceScientists have detected a new particle at the Large Hadron Collider at Cern
21h
Gizmodo
Luke Cage Season 2 Adds Two Retro Comic Book Supervillains Adam Wingard talks about localizing Death Note . Another familiar face could return for Doctor Who ’s Christmas special. Sophie Turner teases Sansa’s journey in the next season of Game of Thrones . Plus, fully-suited set pictures from Deadpool 2 , and even more wacky teasers for the return of Rick and Morty . Spoilers, assemble! Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen According to The Wrap , Lionsgate i
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence discovered for two distinct giant planet populationsIn a paper published in Astronomy & Astrophysics, a team of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA3) discovered observational evidence for the existence of two distinct populations of giant planets.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How I showed that snails use their shells to trap and kill parasitesFarmers and gardeners spend much of the year in a constant battle to stop slugs and snails eating their vegetables. But these animals have been locked in their own co-evolutionary arms race for millions of years – a fight against parasites, specifically nematode worms. Now my latest research has shown that snails evolved to use their shells in this battle as a way to encapsulate and kill the paras
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Your Marvelous Mind -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Tennessee's "Monkey Law" Finally Repealed, 50 Years AgoInnovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
Dansk plastikpose skal sikre rent drikkevand til AfrikaEn enkelt pose kan fjerne bakterier i op til 500 liter drikkevand.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study offers clue to memory formation in the brainIn a new study published on July 5 in Neuron, a research group led by Professor CAO Peng of the Institute of Biophysics (IBP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provides some clues as to memory formation in the brain.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't let lower back injuries take you down for the countNearly one in three competitive athletes experiences low back pain. According to a literature review in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, lower (lumbar) back pain is a commonly reported symptom among the general population; however, low back pain among elite athletes who play varsity or professional sports requires additional important consideratio
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method helps fighting future pandemicsBy developing a new technique for labeling the gene segments of influenza viruses, researchers now know more about how influenza viruses enter the cell and establish cell co-infections -- a major contributing factor to potential pandemic development.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visualizing whole-body cancer metastasis at the single-cell levelResearchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBic) and the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) have developed a method to visualize cancer metastasis in whole organs at the single-cell level. Published in Cell Reports, the study describes a new method that combines the generation of transparent mice with statistical analysis to create 3-D maps of cancer cells throughout the body and organs.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists manipulate light to make flat surfaces appear as 3-D objectsScientists have created new 2-D nanostructured surfaces which appear as realistic 3-D objects – including shading and shadows - using cutting edge nano-engineering.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chances of hypersonic travel heat up with new materials discoveryResearchers at The University of Manchester in collaboration with Central South University (CSU), China, have created a new kind of ceramic coating that could revolutionise hypersonic travel for air, space and defense purposes.
21h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor trænger UVB-stråler ikke gennem vinduet?En læser har hørt, at UVB ikke trænger igennem vinduesruder. Hvordan kan det være? Det svarer Glasfakta på.
21h
Ingeniøren
Ny version af Skype slagtes af brugerne rugerne raser og taler om ‘den værste opdatering nogensinde’. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ny-version-skype-slagtes-brugerne-1078135 Version2
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New book reveals how nature is fighting backA University of York academic has written a new book that challenges us to look positively at the impact of humans on the natural world.
21h
Gizmodo
The Amazon Tap Now Has An Always-Listening Mode, and It's Never Been Cheaper Refurb Amazon Tap , $70 While it’s definitely the least popular of the original Amazon Echo trifecta, the battery-powered Amazon Tap is worth a look with this $70 refurbished deal . The big knock against the Tap was that it required you to press a button to activate Alexa, whereas you could conjure her with your voice on the Echo and Dot. So if you dismissed it at launch because of that fatal fla
21h
Futurity.org
Banned flame retardants show up in new babies Trace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the United States for more than a decade, are still passing through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies. The chemicals are linked to a variety of health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight. PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, were commonly used flame retardants in building materials, electronics, and textiles
21h
Gizmodo
Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is About to Reveal Its Mysteries Image: NASA Jupiter is the biggest, angriest cup of coffee in the solar system. In snapshots from NASA’s Juno spacecraft, Jupiter’s swirling clouds look divinely creamy —but the planet is anything but placid. Jovian storms, chaotic and spectacular as they are, offer a stark reminder of how awesome and terrifying the universe really is. Goddamn are they both. While there’s a lot to gape at when it
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single molecule microRNA technology proves useful for liver toxicity detectionPLOS ONE has published a proof-of-concept single probe method for detecting microRNA biomarkers associated with liver toxicity. The study details a clinically meaningful method for detecting drug-induced liver injury using the Single Molecule Array Detection technology, or Simoa™, developed by Quanterix, in association with the 'SMART Nucleobase' and probe chemistry by DestiNA.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding what's right with children who grow up in high-stress environmentsA new research article proposes that more attention be given to what's right with children who grow up in high-stress environments so their unique strengths and abilities can be used to more effectively tailor education, jobs and interventions to fit them.
21h
New Scientist - News
LHC pops out a new particle that could test the strong forceResearchers on the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider have found a new particle, unlike any other seen yet, which could help study one of the universe's four fundamental forces
21h
The Atlantic
Trump Weighs a 'Pretty Severe' Response to North Korea's ICBM Test President Trump warned of “some pretty severe things” in response to North Korea’s test this week of a long-range missile, raising the rhetoric over Pyongyang’s launch of what it called an intercontinental ballistic missile. “We’ll see what happens. I don’t like to talk about what we have planned, but I have some pretty severe things that we’re thinking about,” Trump said in Warsaw at a news conf
21h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Messy EaterThe Jurassic predator Razanandrongobe sakalavae used its colossal, ragged teeth to rip through the muscles and bones of its prey.
22h
Live Science
Antarctica's Larsen C Iceberg Will Tower 600 Feet Over the OceanScientists have estimated the size of the soon-to-be iceberg calving off Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf.
22h
Wired
A ‘Neurographer’ Puts the Art in Artificial IntelligenceGoogle's in-house artist shows how code that can understand images can also be made to play with them.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Using Big Data to Hack AutismResearchers scour datasets for clues to autism—needles in a genetic haystack of 20,000 people -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Popular Science
Cockatoos make their own lil drumsticks to play music Animals It's just another way to woo a mate. A study published in Science Advances shows how some male cockatoos create drumsticks and then make steady, percussive rhythm in a way only seen in humans.
22h
Futurity.org
Doctors say electronic health records hurt patient care Many physicians believe that maintaining electronic health records (EHRs) undermines their connection with patients, new research finds. The analysis also shows, however, that hospital-based physicians most often decried how EHRs take time away from patient contact, while office-based physicians most often lamented that EHRs detract from the quality of their patient interactions. The analysis, no
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change threatens domestic bee speciesThere are around 550 different bee species in Germany. Most of them are solitary bees. They don't live in large beehives like the honeybee, but each female bee often builds multiple nests and feeds her offspring alone. Solitary bees use their short lifespan of a few weeks exclusively to reproduce and to provide food for their brood to develop into adult bees. Bees depend on the availability of pol
22h
Ingeniøren
Disse 2 formuleringer skader dit CV Ved at omformulere to misbrugte vendinger kan du gøre dit CV mere fokuseret og opgradere din jobansøgning. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/disse-2-formuleringer-skader-dit-cv-4339 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
22h
Live Science
Aryan Invasion May Have Transformed India's Bronze-Age PopulationA new genetic analysis reveals that ancient invaders from the steppes of Central Asia may have swept across Northern India about 3,500 years ago.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deep water corals glow in the dark to surviveCorals in shallow waters glow because of fluorescent proteins that act as sunblock, protecting the endangered species from the sun's intense rays.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia's dry June is a sign of what's to comeThis June was the seventh-warmest and second-driest on record for Australia. Parts of the southwest and southeast saw record dry conditions as frontal systems passed further south than normal and high pressure exerted its influence on the continent.
22h
Live Science
Oozing Methane Blasts Holes in Siberian TundraNew craters in Siberia have formed amid local reports of fiery explosions.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tailgating blamed for rear-end crashes, queue-jumping blamed for tailgatingTailgating is the leading cause of rear-end crashes with one-in-two drivers failing to keep a safe following distance, a new QUT report has revealed.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why the climate is more sensitive to carbon dioxide than weather records suggestOne of the key questions about climate change is the strength of the greenhouse effect. In scientific terms this is described as "climate sensitivity". It's defined as the amount Earth's average temperature will ultimately rise in response to a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Skeptics Poke Holes in Claim That Birds Mistake Plastic for FoodIdea was that birds are drawn to smell of plastic garbage, but research may have looked at the wrong birds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A boost for permanent magnetsScientists at TU Darmstadt explored on an atomic level how changes in iron content influence the micro-structure of samarium-cobalt based permanent magnets. Their results were published in Nature Communications. In the long run they could contribute to the development of permanent magnets with improved magnetic performance. These magnets can be found in microwave tubes, gyroscopes and satellite co
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adventures in acoustic cosmologyA project that explores whether there is a musical equivalent to the curvature of spacetime will be presented on Thursday 6 July by Gavin Starks at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull.
22h
Live Science
Bug vs. Bird: Praying Mantises Feast on Feathered PreyFor a dozen species of praying mantises, birds aren't the predators — they're the prey.
22h
Live Science
In Photos: Flashy Collared Lizards of the North American DesertsNorth America has 155 species of lizards classified into eight families native to the continent. Check out some of these amazingly colorful creatures.
22h
Live Science
If the Sun Is 93 Million Miles Away, Why Can't We Look Directly at It?During next month's solar eclipse, you may be tempted to gaze directly at the sun, but you absolutely should not do this without the proper eye protection.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does Scott Pruitt have a solid case for repealing the Clean Water Rule?On June 27, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a proposed rule rescinding the Obama administration's "Clean Water Rule." This regulation is designed to clarify which streams, lakes, wetlands and other water bodies fall under the protection of the Clean Water Act.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Working together to reduce infection in extreme weather eventsResearchers have called for health professionals and climate forecasters to work more closely together ahead of extreme weather events and gradual climate change to help prevent the spread of infections.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass spectrometry for general useCustoms officials want to detect contraband. Doctors want to know how quickly a patient is metabolizing a therapeutic drug. And suppliers of organic products, from nutritional supplements to honey, want to know their raw materials are pure. Each case calls for mass spectrometry – a technique that identifies molecules based on their mass – but current instruments are bulky, expensive, and typically
22h
Science : NPR
Montana Earthquake Is Felt For Hundreds Of Miles Early Thursday The earthquake was the strongest to hit western Montana in years; it was followed by at least 10 measurable temblors with magnitudes of up to 4.9. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey)
22h
New Scientist - News
Hazardous waste identified and sorted using simple barcodesBleach, paint and other items we throw out are often indiscriminately burned, but a system that reads any barcodes present can help sort them for disposal
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Personalized Cancer Vaccines Vanquish Melanoma in Small StudyThe therapy trains the immune system to attack tumors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
The Atlantic
Spider-Man: Homecoming Is One of the Best Superhero Movies in Years “When’s our next mission?” “We’ll call you.” Peter Parker, a.k.a. Spider-Man, has just completed his first mission with the Avengers, and he’s eager for further adventures. But Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man, thinks Peter could use a bit more seasoning—he’s only 15, after all—and encourages the boy to work on being a “friendly neighborhood Spider-Man” for a while before getting called back up to the
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students' test scores tell us more about the community they live in than what they knowEvery year, policymakers across the U.S. make life-changing decisions based on the results of standardized tests.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team finds light is key to promising materialA Florida State University research team has discovered that light can significantly alter the structure of a promising material that scientists believe could make more efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers and other photon-based technologies.
23h
Wired
How Heavy Lift Ships Could Bring the Damaged USS Fitzgerald Home for RepairsThese semi-submersible ships also carry things like oil rigs around the ocean.
23h
Wired
Nothing Bums Me Out Like Scott Walker's Instagram FeedWe're diving into corners of the internet you didn't know you should care about. You're welcome.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist conducts first comparison study of central pit impact craters throughout solar systemAs part of the first comparison study of central pit impact craters throughout the solar system, professor Nadine Barlow of NAU's Department of Physics and Astronomy recently published findings revealing insights into the environmental conditions governing the formation of these craters.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists lay the groundwork for a reliable marijuana breathalyzerMarijuana is now legal for recreational or medicinal use in at least 28 states and the District of Columbia. But driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal no matter which state you're in. To enforce the law, authorities need a simple, rigorous roadside test for marijuana intoxication.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How 'green' is your waterproof jacket?In the face of unpredictable weather conditions, waterproof jackets have become key items in many people's wardrobes.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facts versus feelings isn't the way to think about communicating scienceIn a world where "post-truth" was 2016's word of the year, many people are starting to doubt the efficacy of facts. Can science make sense of anti-science and post-truthism? More generally, how can we understand what drives people's beliefs, decisions and behaviors?
23h
Ingeniøren
Indsatsleder: Med plastisolering var Gigantium brændt ned til grundenBranden i Aalborgs multihal onsdag bredte sig i hulrummet under facadens ydre regnskærm af stålplader. Havde der også været plastisolering, ville beredskabet kun have haft minimale chancer for at redde bygningen.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which native animals should Australians eat?This story contains imagery of butchered animals. All shown samples were collected as road-kill and used for research with the relevant permissions.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The impact of solar lighting in rural KenyaWhile climate change has led many high-income countries to increase their efforts to improve energy efficiency and to invest in renewable energies, households in low-income countries still face another energy challenge: more than 1 billion people lack access to electricity. Could solar lights offer a solution?
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
What to Believe in Antarctica's Great Ice DebateAlthough not all the studies agree, most climate scientists argue that, yes, Antarctica is losing mass in a warming world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new way to practice passing in soccerIn soccer, the ability to anticipate the arrival of teammates' passes, receive the ball, and quickly and accurately redirect it is essential to executing a game plan. But it can be difficult for individual players to develop and measure these skills without multiple players to simulate game scenarios while training.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-term study links tree seeds, rodent population fluctuationsUsing data from a 33-year population study, University of Maine researchers have found evidence that various tree species can affect rodent populations in different ways.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy-efficient accelerator was 50 years in the makingWith the introduction of CBETA, the Cornell-Brookhaven ERL Test Accelerator, Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory scientists are following up on the concept of energy-recovering particle accelerators first introduced by physicist Maury Tigner at Cornell more than 50 years ago.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprising nature of quantum solitary waves revealedSolitary waves – known as solitons – appear in many forms. Perhaps the most recognizable is the tsunami, which forms following a disruption on the ocean floor and can travel, unabated, at high speeds for hundreds of miles.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising temperatures are curbing ocean's capacity to store carbonIf there is anywhere for carbon dioxide to disappear in large quantities from the atmosphere, it is into the Earth's oceans. There, huge populations of plankton can soak up carbon dioxide from surface waters and gobble it up as a part of photosynthesis, generating energy for their livelihood. When plankton die, they sink thousands of feet, taking with them the carbon that was once in the atmospher
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum sensor with improved resolution can now identify individual atoms in biomoleculesNuclear magnetic resonance scanners, as are familiar from hospitals, are now extremely sensitive. A quantum sensor developed by a team headed by Professor Jörg Wrachtrup at the University of Stuttgart and researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, now makes it possible to use nuclear magnetic resonance scanning to even investigate the structure of individual pro
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellites reveal melting of rocks under volcanic zone, deep in Earth's mantleVolcanoes erupt when magma rises through cracks in the Earth's crust, but the exact processes that lead to the melting of rocks in the Earth's mantle below are difficult to study.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How mountains hold carbonMountain forests are better at storing carbon – well, actually, they're better at everything – according to a new study by researchers at NSF-funded projects CyVerse, Jetstream, and the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Organic chemist uses blow fly eggs as forensics toolDeath investigators may soon be able to rely on tiny insect eggs to rapidly estimate a corpse's time-of-death.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's 'artificial sun' sets world record with 100 second steady-state high performance plasmaChina's Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) made an important advance by achieving a stable 101.2-second steady-state high confinement plasma, setting a world record in long-pulse H-mode operation on the night of July 3rd.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The misappropriation of the identities of famous people on TwitterProfessor Ana Mancera Rueda from the Department of Spanish Language, Linguistics and Literary Theory at the University of Seville has carried out research on false profiles, or 'fakes', of famous people on the social network Twitter and the use of language on these profiles. The study addresses whether the misappropriation of the identities of famous people is normal practice on Twitter, in what c
23h
Ingeniøren
Ansøgningsfristen er slut: Flere unge vil være ingeniørerMere end 90.000 unge har i år søgt ind på en videregående uddannelse. Teknologi, naturvidenskab og it oplever større interesse end sidste år, mens det samlede ansøgertal er faldet med 3 procent.
23h
Gizmodo
Bomb Discovered In New York Turns Out To Be a Time Capsule The bomb time capsule discovered yesterday in New York by crews digging up the street (Screenshot from CBS2 via Cliff Russell) Construction crews in New York shut down a street in the Flatiron district yesterday after accidentally digging up a bomb. But they soon discovered that this bomb wasn’t filled with explosives. Surprisingly, the strange, metal artifact was filled with paper letters and ph
23h
Wired
Luc Besson Tests the Outer Limits With Sci-Fi Epic _Valerian_With his latest film, the legendary director injects indie spirit—and funding—into an insanely ambitious, Euro-flavored, alien-riddled, space spectacle.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How to eavesdrop on kelpSounds reverberating through a kelp bed can be linked to environmental factors, suggesting a low-key way to monitor undersea communities.
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Viden
Dværggalakse kan afsløre viden om det tidlige universAstronomer har opdaget en primitiv galakse med stjerner, der ikke længere findes i vores egen galakse. Det sker sjældent, siger dansk forsker.
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Popular Science
What would it take to invent a rain-deflecting forcefield? Science Better hold on to your umbrella. An energy field that halts your enemy—or a downpour—would be neat. But sadly, it defies the laws of physics. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hong Kong seizes 7.2 tonnes of ivoryMore than seven tonnes of ivory worth over US$9 million was seized in Hong Kong, officials said Thursday, the largest bust of its kind in the city in three decades.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New DNA-based strategy shows promise against a range of influenza virusesA novel, DNA-based strategy to provide protection against an array of influenza viruses has been developed in preclinical models by scientists at Wistar, MedImmune and Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. These study results highlighting this promising strategy are published in npj Vaccines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
California projected to get wetter through this centuryUnder business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions, climate models predict California will get warmer during the rest of the century and most also predict the state will get drier. But, new research published in Nature Communications predicts California will actually get wetter. The scientists from the University of California, Riverside predict the state will get an average of 12 percent more preci
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cognitive science
The Problem with Being a Top Performer: Research demonstrates the ways coworkers punish star employees submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren
Miljøstyrelsen: Ingen sundhedsrisiko ved 3D-print3D-printede produkter afgiver sjældent kemiske stoffer og kun i så små mængder, at det ikke udgør en sundhedsrisiko. Det viser en undersøgelse fra Miljøstyrelsen, der dog anbefaler, at man lufter ud, mens man printer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
6.5-magnitude quake hits central Philippine island: USGS (Update)A 6.5-magnitude earthquake rattled the central Philippines Thursday, US seismologists said, with shaking reported although residents in two major cities reported no major damage.
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Science : NPR
Physics For Toddlers There's a dearth of books about science and math for young children. As part of our series on kids' media we take a look at some books that introduce rocket science and physics to toddlers and babies.
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Science : NPR
Damage From Wayward Weedkiller Keeps Growing As many as 2 million acres of soybeans may have been harmed by a popular weedkiller drifting into neighboring fields. Arkansas' proposed ban on the herbicide, dicamba, is awaiting final approval. (Image credit: Scott Sinklier/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California projected to get wetter through this centuryUnder business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions, climate models predict California will get warmer during the rest of the century and most also predict the state will get drier.
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The Atlantic
Will the 'Trump 10' Pay a Price in 2018? Apparently, no one has informed Bob Casey and Claire McCaskill that they should be running scared. Casey and McCaskill are among the 10 Democratic senators facing reelection next year in states that President Trump carried in 2016, often by commanding margins. After that performance, many in both parties assumed they would be the Senate Democrats most vulnerable to White House pressure. During th
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New Scientist - News
A cholera pandemic has raged for 56 years. Time to stamp it outYemen is the latest victim of a cholera pandemic that began in 1961, one that could wreak havoc widely for decades to come, says Seth Berkley
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Ingeniøren
Datasikkerheden halter i Googles adgang til 1,6 millioner digitale sundhedsjournaler Samarbejdet mellem det britiske sundhedsvæsen og det Google-ejede firma DeepMind bliver nu mødt med kritik, da panelet med ansvar for samarbejdet påpeger flere fejl og mangler i datasikkerheden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/deepmind-giver-problemer-sikkerheden-med-patientdata-1078122 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Western Montana rattled by strong earthquakesAn earthquake strong enough to rouse sleeping residents more than 30 miles (48 kilometers) from its epicenter struck western Montana early Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Germany shuts down darknet child porn site, makes arrestsGerman authorities say they have shut down an online child porn site that had more than 87,000 members and arrested the man suspected of running it.
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Viden
Slut med overbehandling: Hvor kan du skære penicillinen fra?Overforbrug af antibiotika fører til alvorlig resistens. Med ny handleplan vil regeringen derfor have danske læger til at skære ned. Men hvornår kan du egentlig - med fordel - undvære antibiotika?
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Ingeniøren
DTU udvikler nyt røntgenmikroskop til stort europæisk forskningscenterMed det nye røntgenmikroskop kan forskere ikke blot se på overflader af materialer, men også ind i tingene og derved hurtigt registrere ændringer efter forskellige brugssituationer.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Baby pygmy hippo takes a tumble at Chile zoo debutA two-week-old pygmy hippopotamus steps out under the care of its mum, at an animal park in Santiago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change could make Sahel wet: studyClimate change could transform one of Africa's driest regions, the Sahel, into a very wet one, a study showed Wednesday. But this is not necessarily good news.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thailand leads the pack for Asia's abused tourist elephantsTwice as many elephants work in Thailand's tourism industry as the rest of Asia combined, with the vast majority kept in "severely inadequate conditions", a new report revealed Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flood death toll worsens in India's AssamThe death toll from worsening monsoon floods in India's Assam state has hit 18 with hundreds of thousands in makeshift camps and no letup in the deluge, officials said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Check it out: a baby pygmy hippoTalk about a cute critter: a hippo small enough to fit in a pet cage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qatar Airways joins Gulf carriers off US laptop ban listQatar Airways joined two other major long-haul Gulf carriers on Thursday in getting off a U.S. ban on laptops and large electronics in airplane cabins, despite facing logistical challenges amid the country's diplomatic dispute with several Arab nations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Second pack of gray wolves spotted in Northern CaliforniaA female gray wolf, her mate and at least three pups are the second pack of wolves spotted in Northern California since the species went extinct there in 1924, state wildlife officials said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After two delays, SpaceX launches broadband satellite for IntelSatSpaceX on Wednesday deployed a broadband communications satellite for IntelSat, after twice ditching launch plans in the final seconds before liftoff earlier this week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smarter control for border patrolAs the United States expands surveillance technologies on, above and below its 1,900-mile-long border with Mexico, operating them effectively grows more challenging.
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Science | The Guardian
Stem cell therapies: medical experts call for strict international rules Experts from 15 countries say regulation needed to prevent vulnerable patients pursuing unproven and potentially deadly treatments Medical and legal experts from around the world have united to call for more stringent regulation of stem cell therapies to prevent people pursuing unproven and potentially deadly treatments overseas. In a perspective piece for the US journal Science Translational Med
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Science | The Guardian
Freudian slips: the secrets hidden inside Emma Hart's ceramic art Venus flytraps, socks with mouths and giant heads … as the artist’s new show Mamma Mia! opens, she tells us about putting therapy into clay At Emma Hart’s studio, two assistants are helping the artist with last-minute touches to graphic patterns inside a group of outsized ceramic heads. The heads appear to be consuming them as they lean deep inside, torches strapped to their foreheads, delicate p
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Gizmodo
8Bitdo Controllers: The Kotaku Review 8Bitdo’s small, portable control pads are perfect for those times when...look, let’s be real, for when you’re playing emulated Nintendo games on a mobile device. WHAT THEY’RE FOR : Most 8Bitdo controllers are not frontline control pads, designed to replace stuff like a DualShock 4 or Switch Pro. These are small, light controllers designed primarily for use with stuff like phones (both Android and
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Science-Based Medicine
Chiropractic clinical training with pediatric patients or complicated cases: slim to noneChiropractors may never have seen a pediatric patient or a complicated medical case in clinical training, yet they are allowed to go into practice with no age limits on who they see and few on the conditions they treat.
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Science | The Guardian
1.2 million people in England and Wales will have dementia by 2040 – study Predicted rise of disease down to people living longer, but research unravelling biomarkers of Alzheimer’s give hope of finding a cure More than 1.2 million people are expected to be living with dementia in England and Wales by 2040, up from almost 800,000 today, research suggests. Researchers say the predicted rise in the prevalence of dementia is largely down to people living longer, but add th
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The Atlantic
Lawmakers Injured in Violent Attack on Venezuelan Assembly Seven opposition politicians were injured Wednesday during a violent attack on Venezuela’s democratically-elected National Assembly. The attacks, led by supporters of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, took place as the rest of the country celebrated their nation’s annual Independence Day. The assembly’s president, Julio Borges, said around 350 politicians, journalists, and guests were trapped
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NYT > Science
Jerry Brown Announces a Climate Summit Meeting in CaliforniaThe California governor, continuing his defiance of President Trump, said that states and cities would continue climate efforts even as Washington backed away.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly half of China cancer deaths attributable to potentially modifiable risk factorsNearly half of all cancer deaths in men in 2013 in China and more than a third of those in women were attributable to a group of potentially modifiable risk factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Systematic research investigates effects of money on thinking, behaviorIn a new research article, scientists present results from three experiments that systematically explore money-priming effects, finding inconsistent evidence for the effect of money primes on various measures of self-sufficient thinking and behavior. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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Ars Technica
Newegg fought its way through two appeals to win fees from this patent-holder Newegg's former Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng. (credit: Newegg ) In 2010, AdjustaCam LLC filed suit (PDF) in Eastern Texas against dozens of companies, saying that they infringed US Patent No. 5,855,343 , which describes a type of movable camera clip. AdjustaCam is a subsidiary of Acacia Research Corporation, the biggest public patent-holding company. The AdjustaCam lawsuit included camera makers
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Is it safe to reuse your water bottle?The BBC's Jan Bruck has you covered.
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Ingeniøren
DSB gør klar til konkurrence: Lejer sine egne togEt nyt selskab skal eje alle DSB's kommende tog. Dermed kan de også lejes ud til andre selskaber, hvis der bliver konkurrence på skinnerne.
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Gizmodo
Someone Could Make a Killing Selling This Keychain-sized Game Boy GIF GIF Source: Vincent Buso Look at it, you want it. And you can build it. YouTuber Vincent Buso uploaded this short video demo of the Keymu. What you see is what you get. It’s basically the clamshell design of the Game Boy Advance SP shrunk down to an ultra-portable keychain size. It has four buttons instead of two and it runs ROMs using an Intel Edison chip. Photo: Vincent The developer was in
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Gizmodo
Valerian's Opening Scene Is So Crazy, Luc Besson Recruited an Army of His Own Film Students to Explain It Image: STX Films/Europacorp The job of a director can be a tough one at times—especially when it comes to shooting complex action sequences, and making sure everyone involved behind the camera is on the same page. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets director Luc Besson had a problem explaining one such scene to his crew... so he recruited his own film students to help do it for him. Besso
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BBC News - Science & Environment
BepiColombo: Joint Mercury mission ready for 'pizza oven'Europe and Japan say their joint space mission is ready to face the inferno of working at Mercury.
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New Scientist - News
Eating lots of sugar when pregnant may raise risk of allergiesPregnant women who eat large amounts of sugar are twice as likely to have children who go on to develop allergic asthma, according to a study of 9,000 women
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Elephant tourism is 'fuelling cruelty'Rising numbers of people want selfies riding elephants, but a new study says many are kept in "severely cruel" conditions.
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The Atlantic
Hundreds of ISIS Fighters Remain in Mosul Around 300 ISIS fighters are being held in a 5,400-square-foot territory in Mosul—the militant group’s de facto capital in Iraq—Iraqi special forces announced Wednesday. The Iraqi government, backed by a U.S.-led coalition, is currently in the final stage of an eight-and-a-half-month offensive to overtake the western half of Mosul. Less than two weeks ago, Iraqi forces recaptured the Great Mosque
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Gizmodo
Congressman Is Sorry About His YouTube Rant From Inside the Gas Chambers at Auschwitz Screengrab: YouTube Say what you want about Trump’s tweets, new media has given us a new way to see into the psychotic hearts of our politicians. The latest representative to fall into the trap of oversharing is Clay Higgins of Lousiana. Over the weekend Higgins used his visit to Auschwitz as an opportunity to broadcast some Islamophobia. But now he’s sorry. Despite the fact that signs at the Aus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One fin in the grave: Necrobiome poses a health threat to fishSewage-contaminated water is even more harmful for wildlife than previously thought. "Decaying fish can act as a sink for the spread of harmful bacteria to scavenging fish and birds. Fish caught in areas downstream of effluent outlets may also pose a health risk to anglers", says Dr Paul Craig whose research team from the University of Waterloo, Canada is the first to examine the effects of the ba
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cognitive science
Peering into Neural Networks submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian
It's time to inject some sense into the nonsense peddled by the anti-science crowd | Melissa Davey Children need to be taught health literacy in school so they can analyse, interpret and question pseudoscience Parents of infants could be forgiven for panicking if they read reports about “needle-like”, “potentially dangerous” and “toxic” nanoparticles in Australian infant formula products. Sounds pretty horrifying. There were calls to pull infant formula from shelves this week after the eco-act
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How washing our clothes is polluting oceansOur clothing and laundry are polluting the marine environment, UK research reveals.
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Gizmodo
Yes, Jennifer Connelly Is the Voice of Spider-Man's Homecoming Suit Instead of a Spider-sense, Peter Parker has an in-suit AI named Karen, voiced by Jennifer Connelly. Image: Sony There has been a little confusion about this over the past few weeks, so let’s put this to bed. Yes, Jennifer Connelly is the voice of Spider-Man’s suit in Spider-Man: Homecoming . Minor spoilers ahead. In the film, Peter Parker eventually figures out how to override the “Training Wheel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar intake during pregnancy is associated with allergy and allergic asthma in childrenHigh maternal sugar intake during pregnancy may increase the risk of allergy and allergic asthma in the offspring, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London involving almost 9,000 mother-child pairs.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dirty laundry: Are your clothes polluting the ocean?Our clothing and laundry are polluting the marine environment, UK research reveals.
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The Atlantic
Hobby Lobby Purchased Thousands of Ancient Artifacts Smuggled Out of Iraq Hobby Lobby purchased thousands of ancient artifacts smuggled out of modern-day Iraq via the United Arab Emirates and Israel in 2010 and 2011, attorneys for the Eastern District of New York announced on Wednesday. As part of a settlement, the American craft-supply mega-chain will pay $3 million and the U.S. government will seize the illicit artifacts. Technically, the defendants in the civil-forf
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Gizmodo
Save 20% On Anker's Blood Pressure Monitor. Yes, Anker's Blood Pressure Monitor. Eufy BodySense Blood Pressure Monitor , $32 with code KINJA703 Anker makes a smart blood pressure monitor now , because of course they do, and our readers can get it for just $32 today, a 20% discount. The Eufy BodySense Blood Pressure Monitor works with the same app you use for the company’s popular smart scale , so you can keep all of your data in one place...or export it to whatever app you wa
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Wired
North Korea's Latest Missile Launch Hastens the Day It Can Launch Nuclear WeaponsDespite its frequent missteps, experts agree that North Korea will achieve the ability to launch a nuclear missile.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Missiles and Methane What We’re Following Fire Power: The U.S. and South Korea conducted a ballistic-missile drill in the Sea of Japan after North Korea said it successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile on Tuesday. That claim would put the U.S. within North Korea’s firing range, and it’s alarmed the U.S. and its allies. But as Mark Bowden writes, the new weapons test hasn’t greatly altered the militar
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Gizmodo
Doctors: Yeah, Don't Put Glitter in Your Vagina Photo: Getty With a few exceptions, it’s just generally a good rule of thumb not to put random stuff in your vagina. In the latest cautionary tale, a predatory company has been pushing a sold out product called “Passion Dust” that doctors warn you should definitely not put in your vagina. Pretty Women Inc. is the manufacturer of Passion Dust, a product that it touts on its website as a capsule th
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Live Science
Psychopaths' Brains Reveal Secrets of Their Immoral BehaviorKnown for their superficial charms but lack of empathy, psychopaths behave in impulsive ways. Now, a new brain scan study may reveal why.
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Ars Technica
Diablo 3: Rise of the Necromancer review—roll them bones Enlarge / That's... that's just a heart, y'all! It feels like a million years ago now, but there was a time when one of the hottest topics among the video game community was over whether Diablo 3 looked too colorful . In early pre-release screenshots, some saw Diablo 's grim and decayed world of Sanctuary slipping down the rubbery, cartoonish path of Blizzard's own Warcraft universe. You can't ge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Re-making planets after star-deathAstronomers Dr Jane Greaves, of the University of Cardiff, and Dr Wayne Holland, of the UK Astronomy Technology Centre in Edinburgh, may have found an answer to the 25-year-old mystery of how planets form in the aftermath of a supernova explosion. The two researchers will present their work on Thursday 6 July at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull, and in a paper in Monthly No
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Milky Way could have 100 billion brown dwarfsOur galaxy could have 100 billion brown dwarfs or more, according to work by an international team of astronomers, led by Koraljka Muzic from the University of Lisbon and Aleks Scholz from the University of St Andrews. On Thursday 6 July Scholz will present their survey of dense star clusters, where brown dwarfs are abundant, at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First look at gravitational dance that drives stellar formationSwirling motions in clouds of cold, dense gas have given, for the first time, an active insight into how gravity creates the compact cores from which stars form in the interstellar medium. The results will be presented today, Thursday 6 July, by Gwen Williams at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull.
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Live Science
Charlie Gard Controversy: What Causes Infant's Rare Condition?Charlie Gard has a rare genetic condition that usually results in death in the first few months of life. Here's why the condition has such devastating effects on the body.
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The Atlantic
British Hospital Declines Vatican’s Offer to Treat Charlie Gard The British hospital that plans to remove 11-month-old Charlie Gard from life support declined an offer from a Vatican-owned pediatric hospital to treat the terminally ill infant on Wednesday, citing legal barriers. A day earlier, the Vatican’s Bambino Gesu Children’s Hospital offered to accept Charlie into their care, promising to keep the infant on life support and allow his parents, Chris Gard
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes increasing at alarming rates in sub-Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan Africa is in the midst of a rapidly expanding diabetes epidemic that could have devastating health and economic consequences for the region unless quick and decisive action is taken to turn the tide, according to a major new report from a Lancet commission co-led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Over 1.2 million people in England and Wales will be living with dementia by 2040By 2040, there will be over 1.2 million people living with dementia in England and Wales (an increase of 57 percent from 2016), largely due to increased life expectancy, say researchers in The BMJ today.
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Gizmodo
The U.S. Has Fewer Options With North Korea Than Ever After This Latest Missile Test This photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea’s northwest, Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this photo. North Korea claimed to have tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile in a launch Tuesday, a potenti
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Big Think
What Do We Do with All the Chemical Elements? This Ingenious Periodic Table Shows You An interactive periodic table with pictures makes it easy to see how each element is used. Read More
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Ars Technica
CNN implied threat against redditor over Trump-CNN GIF ignites Internet The alleged source of the animated GIF of Donald Trump beating down WWE Chief Executive Vince McMahon with a CNN logo superimposed on McMahon's face deleted many of his posts to Reddit. He also issued an apology on /r/the_donald for his trolling activities after being tracked down by the production team of CNN's KFile . CNN reported on the source , who uses the Reddit username "HanAssholeSolo," a
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Gizmodo
Cool Off With These 18 Horror Movies Set in the Freezing Cold Universal Pictures John Carpenter’s The Thing , which turned 35 at the end of June, is always the first movie we turn to during a summer heat wave—or any time we feel like watching something both figuratively and literally chilling But it’s by no means the only great horror film set in freezing conditions. Beat the summer heat by making your blood run cold with these movies. 18) Alien vs. Predato
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Gizmodo
This Game of Thrones KFC Commercial Has a Twist Even More Shocking Than Hodor's Death KFC UK and Ireland In Game of Thrones ’ sixth season, Hodor (Kristian Nairn) died much in the same way he lived: being helpful, overworked, and generally misunderstood by the people around him. Even by Game of Thrones standards, Hodor’s fate was a sad one, but not nearly as dark as this Hodor-themed KFC commercial. On the show, Hodor dies holding the door against a swarm of White Walkers and wigh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even light oiling is like flying with a ball and chain for birdsIt's a depressingly familiar sight when an oil well blows or a tanker runs aground: thousands of stranded, helpless animals wallowing in cloying crude oil. 'Birds are often used as the poster children for the deadly effects of oil', says Ivan Maggini from Western University, Canada, recalling the shocking images of struggling animals that accompanied the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon oil spill in
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Ars Technica
Satellite temperature record update closes gap with surface records Enlarge (credit: ESA ) Satellites seem like an obvious technological solution to the considerable challenge of tracking changes in Earth’s climate. But Earth-observing ain’t easy. A single instrument can zoom over the locations of thousands of stationary thermometers—but that puts thousands of eggs in one instrumental basket. Measuring temperatures from space takes a lot more than some mercury in
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Dive In To Shark Week With The 13 Best Shark Videos | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 From leaping sharks to close calls in the deep, check out these unbelievable shark encounters caught on home video. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https
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The Scientist RSS
Study: Microglia Tied to Weight Gain in MiceJust by activating these immune cells in the brain, scientists could make mice eat more and burn fewer calories.
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Ars Technica
Backdoor built in to widely used tax app seeded last week’s NotPetya outbreak Enlarge (credit: National Police of Ukraine ) The third-party software updater used to seed last week's NotPetya worm that shut down computers around the world was compromised more than a month before the outbreak. This is yet another sign the attack was carefully planned and executed. Researchers from antivirus provider Eset, in a blog post published Tuesday , said the malware was spread through
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Gizmodo
These Crowdfunded Nintendo Switch Docks Sure Look Like Rebranded USB-C Adapters Photos: Kickstarter - Switch-Con & Indiegogo SFANS The Nintendo Switch seems like it could be the perfect portable gaming console—were it not for the bulky dock required to connect it to a TV. That’s why gamers have gotten excited about a pair of compact Switch HDMI adapters currently being crowdfunded, but you might be better off spending your money elsewhere. When Nintendo finally released the
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump Heads to the Poles Today in 5 Lines The United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Wednesday in response to North Korea's test-launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile. Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis said the missile was “not one we’ve seen before.” President Trump arrived in Poland where he will deliver a speech in Warsaw before attending the G-20 summit in Germany. The Senate Judic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From dry to wet: Rainfall might abruptly increase in Africa's SahelClimate change could turn one of Africa's driest regions into a very wet one by suddenly switching on a Monsoon circulation. For the first time, scientists find evidence in computer simulations for a possible abrupt change to heavy seasonal rainfall in the Sahel, a region that so far has been characterized by extreme dryness.
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Gizmodo
Once More Around the Trump Bullshit Merry-Go-Round GIF Image: Reddit Escaping the shrieking maw of Twitter aboard the hashtag #CNNblackmail, a story started circulating today about the news network threatening to release the personal information of a 15-year-old who made a gif tweeted by Donald Trump. Every one of those details, however, is utterly false, as was the case with the last dozen or so stories invented by the internet’s pro-Trump spher
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Self-Driving Project That Could Help China Leapfrog the WestBaidu opens up its software, a stark departure from the normally secretive world of commercial AI development.
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Does Your Intelligence Peak?Are we really at our smartest in our 20s? What about the wisdom and experience that come with age? At what age do we strike the right balance between cognitive ability and expertise? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Missile Test-Launched by North Korea Was an ICBM, US Officials ConfirmNorth Korea did indeed test-launch an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) yesterday, as the nuclear-armed nation claimed, U.S. officials said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Figuring out how fast Greenland is meltingA new analysis of Greenland's past temperatures will help scientists figure out how fast the island's vast ice sheet is melting, according to a new report from University of Arizona atmospheric scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate first hot plasma edge in a fusion facilityTwo major issues confronting magnetic-confinement fusion energy are enabling the walls of devices that house fusion reactions to survive bombardment by energetic particles, and improving confinement of the plasma required for the reactions. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), researchers have found that coating tokamak walls with lithium— a light, s
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Gizmodo
Disturbing New Visualization Shows Cancer Cells Coursing Through a Mouse GIF Biologists in Japan have a developed an innovative scanning technique that makes tissues and vital organs transparent, allowing them to track cancer as it spreads throughout the bodies and brains of mice. The new technique, described in the latest issue of Cell Reports , was developed by researchers from the University of Tokyo and the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, and it’s allowing scie
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Ars Technica
Neanderthal DNA suggests yet another wave of human migration out of Africa Enlarge / The entrance to the cave where the Neanderthal thigh bone was found in 1937. (credit: Wolfgang Adler, © Photo Museum Ulm ) Modern humans and Neanderthals have a confusing genetic relationship. One set of data suggests our two species diverged around 650,000 years ago—but other clues point to an ongoing close (that is, sexual) relationship between our ancestors that persisted until aroun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combo immunotherapy may herald new standard of care for kidney cancerCombination therapy with two immunotherapy drugs produces an unprecedented doubling of response rates from 20 percent to 40 percent, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Illinois researchers combat VR eye strain with new display methodLiang Gao, an assistant professor electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and graduate student Wei Cui have created a new optical mapping 3-D display that makes VR viewing more comfortable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transfer of atomic mass with a photon solves the momentum paradox of lightA novel discovery solves the centennial momentum paradox of light. In a recent publication, Aalto University researchers show that in a transparent medium each photon is accompanied by an atomic mass density wave. The optical force of the photon sets the medium atoms in motion and makes them carry 92 percent of the total momentum of light, in the case of silicon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PPPL researchers demonstrate first hot plasma edge in a fusion facilityArticle describes first experimental finding of constant temperature in a fusion plasma.
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The Atlantic
Why Fact-Checking Doesn't Faze Trump Fans The era of Donald Trump has brought with it what one might view as either a golden moment or a dark age for fact-checking. The president’s extremely loose regard for the truth, even for a politician, has produced a surfeit of fresh grist to verify—or more often, debunk. Yet it doesn’t seem to make a great deal of difference. Trump’s approval rating is in the basement, but it’s his inability to ge
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New Scientist - News
Serious head injuries nearly double your risk of dementiaThe risk of developing non-Alzheimer’s dementia is nearly twice as high for people who sustain severe head injuries than for those who have mild ones
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New Scientist - News
Bad eczema flare-ups may be caused by strains of bacteriaHealthy skin has a mix of bacteria living on it, but increases in particular strains of Staphylococcus has been linked to bad eczema flare-ups in children
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jailbird: Swiss collector sentenced for filching feathersA Swiss hawk enthusiast was on Wednesday sentenced to three years behind bars for stealing more than 10,000 bird feathers worth an estimated $6 million from European museums.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Figuring out how fast Greenland is meltingA new analysis of Greenland's past temperatures will help determine how fast the island's vast ice sheet is melting. Other research shows the accelerated melting of Greenland's ice sheet is contributing to sea level rise. The new study provides the most accurate estimates of Greenland's 20th century temperatures by combining the best two of previous analyses. The finding will help improve climate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Krill hotspot fuels incredible biodiversity in Antarctic regionThere are so many Antarctic krill in the Southern Ocean that the combined mass of these tiny aquatic organisms is more than that of the world's 7.5 billion human inhabitants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First battery-free cellphone makes calls by harvesting ambient powerUniversity of Washington researchers have invented a cellphone that requires no batteries—a major leap forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones. Instead, the phone harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons detect elusive Higgs amplitude mode in quantum materialA team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used sophisticated neutron scattering techniques to detect an elusive quantum state known as the Higgs amplitude mode in a two-dimensional material.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by ironIron particles catching a ride on glacial meltwater washed out to sea by drifting currents is likely fueling a recently discovered summer algal bloom off the southern coast of Greenland, according to a new study.
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Popular Science
These saucer-shaped clouds look just like UFOs Head Trip But they don't come from outer space. The disc-shaped formations lot like UFOs, but this alien atmospheric phenomenon starts right here on Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Krill hotspot fuels incredible biodiversity in Antarctic regionA perfect combination of tides and wind is responsible for a hotspot of Antarctic krill along the western Antarctic Peninsula.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guideline on pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy -- Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy presents evidence-based recommendationsPelvic girdle pain (PGP) is a common condition that causes pain and physical impairment, most frequently during the antepartum (before delivery) period. A new guideline for evidence-based physical therapy practice for PGP during pregnancy appears in the Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy, official journal of the Section on Women's Health (SOWH) of the American Physical Therapy Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First battery-free cellphone makes calls by harvesting ambient powerUW engineers have designed the first battery-free cellphone that can send and receive calls using only a few microwatts of power, which it harvests from ambient radio signals or light. It's a major step forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutrons detect elusive Higgs amplitude mode in quantum materialA team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used sophisticated neutron scattering techniques to detect an elusive quantum state known as the Higgs amplitude mode in a two-dimensional material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by ironIron-rich meltwater from Greenland's glaciers are helping fuel a summer bloom of phytoplankton.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two out of three US adults have not completed an advance directiveAdvance directives are the primary tool for individuals to communicate their wishes if they become incapacitated and are unable to make their own health care decisions, particularly near the end of life. Despite this, 63 percent of American adults have not completed one, reports the most comprehensive study to date on the subject from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the Universit
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Science : NPR
Top Performers Risk Being Undermined By Peers, Studies Show Studies highlighted in Scientific American indicate a propensity for less-well-performing employees to take aim at the efforts of their star coworkers. (Image credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)
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Gizmodo
A Major Dark Net Market Is Down and Users Are Worried They Got Scammed AlphaBay Market, a prominent dark web marketplace that facilitates the sale of drugs and other illegal items, went down last night and users are panicking , afraid the moderators have shut down the site for good and run off with the loot. But it doesn’t seem like users need to worry—at least not yet. This wouldn’t be the first time administrators of an online black market pulled off such an exit
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Ars Technica
EPA must enforce methane emissions rules immediately after court decision Enlarge / In some cases, stray methane is burned to limit how much escapes into the atmosphere. (credit: Lawrence Berkeley Lab ) The Trump administration suffered a legal blow on Monday when the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled (PDF) that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must enforce methane emissions rules that were finalized by the Obama administration in mid-2016
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Popular Science
What moral code should your self-driving car follow? From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Teaching a robot to make ethical decisions is pretty complicated. Scientists say it is possible to program self-driving cars to make ethical decisions the same way humans would. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New brain cancer drug targets revealedResearchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and The Cleveland Clinic designed a way to screen brain tumor cells and identify potential drug targets missed by other methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Mexico firm uses motion of the ocean to bring fresh water to coastal communitiesHurricane Katrina whipped up huge, powerful waves that caused severe destruction in 2005 along the U.S. Gulf Coast. Their size and strength convinced Phil Kithil of Santa Fe, New Mexico, there had to be a way to harness that energy.
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Gizmodo
Hypnotic Video Simulates How Earth Gets Its Magnetic Field Spaghetti planet (Image: N. Schaeffer/ISTERRE The Earth is a giant magnet, with a north and a south pole just like any magnet you’ve ever played with. But the Earth’s magnetic field plays a vital role: It field helps to prevent powerful solar particles from destroying us. Scientists think the magnetic field comes from something called the dynamo, liquid metal moving throughout the planet’s outer
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Gizmodo
These Ultra-Affordable LED Bulbs Will Pay For Themselves 6-Pack TaoTronics LED Bulbs , $13 with code BS52P2JO Still haven’t made the transition to LED? Amazon will sell you a 6-pack of highly rated TaoTronics soft white bulbs for just $13 right now with promo code BS52P2JO. These put out the brightness equivalent of a 60W incandescent, but with only 9W of electricity each. Plus, many local utility companies offer rebates when you buy these things, so t
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Ars Technica
Next Windows 10 update won’t include the most exciting promised feature Resuming an activity in Windows Timeline. (video link) Arguably the most interesting forthcoming Windows 10 features that Microsoft showed off at its Build developer conference this year were "Timeline" and "Pick Up Where I Left Off ." Timeline lets you both go "back in time"—to recreate prior working environments and restore opened documents and files—while PUWILO would enable a working session
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Custom-made clothes for all within reach says top designerJapanese designer Yuima Nakazato claimed Wednesday that he has cracked a digital technique which could revolutionise fashion with mass made-to-measure clothes.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Your Pet’s Disease Could Be Cured by Gene TherapyGenetic medicine isn’t just for people with life-threatening diseases—pet dogs are now being treated with it, too.
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Ars Technica
Quantum mechanics can’t smell my unwashed armpits… probably Enlarge / Ugh... do you smell that? (credit: Jeremy Tarling - Flickr ) The sense of smell is a very distant fifth place in our senses: sight, hearing, taste, and touch all come before smell in our thoughts. Because of that, we underestimate both its sensitivity and its influence. Our sense of smell is what makes food tasty and repels us from rotting things. Our sense of smell evokes some of our s
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Live Science
Super Croc with T. Rex Teeth May Have Chowed Down on DinosaursA scary representative of a Jurassic "ghost lineage" appears in Madagascar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kinect scan of T. rex skull addresses paleontological mysterySystem with $150 worth of hardware offers alternative to 3-D scanners that cost 200 times as much.
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Big Think
What 46 Years of Hostage Data Tells Us About Religious Terrorism New research claims religious terrorism is on the rise, and it appears that it's going to get worse before we see a decline in such horrendous acts. Read More
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Big Think
High Childhood IQ Linked to Lower Death Rates The largest study of its kind show a direct link between intelligence and mortality. The implications are huge. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UNESCO urges Poland to stop logging ancient forestUNESCO on Wednesday "strongly" urged Poland to stop logging the older parts of the ancient Bialowieza forest, a world heritage site that includes some of Europe's last primeval woodland.
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Gizmodo
SpaceX Saved Its Fourth of July Rocket For National Hangover Day Image: SpaceX If you spent the long weekend drinking enough rum to kill a pirate army, you’re not alone. Fifth of July, colloquially known as National Hangover Day, is a time for reflecting and repenting. Luckily for all our dumb asses, there’s a bright spot: Tonight, SpaceX will attempt to relaunch the rocket it was supposed to launch yesterday. It’s a Fifth of July miracle! This weekend, SpaceX
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sixth MOX nuclear shipment leaves France for JapanA cargo of reprocessed nuclear fuel containing highly radioactive plutonium left the French port of Cherbourg for Japan under heavy security on Wednesday as demonstrators protested against the transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The big ecological roles of small natural featuresEcologists and conservationists have long recognized that keystone species have major ecological importance disproportionate to their abundance or size. Think beavers, sea stars and prairie dogs—species that keep a ecosystem balanced.
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About Phone and TV Display Tech Image: Rodion Kutsaev/Unsplash The technology powering the display on your phone, or even your TV, is a lot different than it was even ten years ago. More colors, more pixels, and a whole lot more acronyms and complex terms that mean something—even if you have no idea what that something is. Display technology in 2017 is a complicated business, but if you understand some basic concepts and a few
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New framework accounts for conflicting estimates of global temperature increasesHarvard University researchers have resolved a conflict in estimates of how much the Earth will warm in response to a doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the egg, American bullfrogs learn how to avoid becoming lunchWhen exposed to potential predators as an embryo, the invasive American bullfrog becomes harder to kill when it becomes a tadpole, according to a new study by Oregon State University researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot imagery of wintering bats suggests group behavior for battling white-nose syndromeHot new imagery from temperature-sensing cameras suggests that bats who warm up from hibernation together throughout the winter may be better at surviving white nose syndrome, a disease caused by a cold-loving fungus ravaging insect-eating bat populations in the United States and Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Substance P' in tears -- a noninvasive test for diabetes-related nerve damage?Levels of a nerve cell signaling molecule called substance P -- measured in tear samples -- might be a useful marker of diabetes-related nerve damage (neuropathy), suggests a study in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Inside Science
Sound Recorders Track Seabirds by the Seashore Sound Recorders Track Seabirds by the Seashore Using computers to sift through the cacophony of seaside sounds could help conservationists save species. Seagull-AnoNuevo.jpg Año Nuevo Island, a small isolated island off the coast of Northern California, is an important breeding site for western gulls and other seabirds. Image credits: Abe Borker Creature Wednesday, July 5, 2017 - 14:30 Teresa L.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Handshaking viewed more positively by Westerners than by East AsiansWesterners view handshaking more positively than do East Asians, researchers report in a new study. Western men also rate handshakes initiated by men and women differently, the study found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Relationship builder, selfie, town crier or window shopper: What kind of Facebook user are you?On an average day, 1.28 billion people check it. Monthly? Nearly 2 billion. And according to one recent estimate, the average Facebook user spends 35 minutes a day on the platform—which makes for a whole lot of daily and monthly minutes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers provide new insights on the connection between autophagy and lifespanResearchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have undertaken the first ever comprehensive analysis of autophagy in a living animal during aging. "Autophagy," which means "self-eating" based on its Greek roots, is the normal physiological process the body's cells use to remove viruses, bacteria, and damaged material from the cell. Autophagy also helps cells "clean house"
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Air quality: Challenge against government plan rejectedThe case was brought over cutting levels of nitrogen dioxide.
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The Scientist RSS
Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early StartMitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman: Virus Particle DensityHow do you tell a full virus particle from an empty one?
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman: Protein PurificationDon't let insufficiently purified protein stand between you and your research aims.
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Ars Technica
Cox expands home Internet data caps, while CenturyLink abandons them Data cap cash. (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images ) There's good news and bad news on data caps for home Internet users. Cox, the third largest US cable company, last week started charging overage fees to customers in four more states. Internet provider CenturyLink, on the other hand, recently ended an experiment with data caps and is giving bill credits to customers in the state of Washington
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient animal thought to be first air breather on land loses claim to fameSome good scientific sleuthing by an undergraduate at The University of Texas at Austin has helped rewrite one of the earliest chapters in the planet's evolutionary history. The research, led by the UT Jackson School of Geosciences, has shown that the millipede thought to be the world's oldest known air-breathing land creature is in fact about 14 million years younger than previously thought and c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The surprising trend in extramarital sex in AmericaAmerica's generation gap is surfacing in a surprising statistic: rates of extramarital sex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calm lakes on Titan could mean smooth landing for future space probesThe lakes of liquid methane on Saturn's moon, Titan, are perfect for paddling but not for surfing. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that most waves on Titan's lakes reach only about 1 centimeter high, a finding that indicates a serene environment that could be good news for future probes sent to the surface of that moon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cutting the cost of ethanol, other biofuels and gasolineBiofuels like the ethanol in U.S. gasoline could get cheaper thanks to experts at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Michigan State University.
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The Atlantic
Is 'Self-Restraint' Really All That's Stopping a War With North Korea? North Korea’s announcement Tuesday that it had test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), a weapon that could potentially be fitted with a nuclear device, drew widespread condemnation around the world and prompted General Vincent Brooks, the commander of U.S. Forces Korea, to say : “Self restraint, which is a choice, is all that separates armistice and war.” Notwithstanding the Trum
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Science | The Guardian
Advances and lapses in cancer treatment | Letters Carolyn Rogers on fertility problems, Cliff O’Gorman on whole-gene screening and Martyn Cornell on the effects of alcohol It was interesting to read the latest research from Edinburgh University revealing that women who have survived cancer in the past 30 years are a third less likely to become pregnant ( Report, July 4 ). It shines a light on the urgent need for a conversation between women and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The big ecological roles of small natural featuresSmall natural features have big ecological roles but are often overlooked, according to an international team of researchers exploring the disproportionate ecological importance of the small, but unique, environmental elements that provide significant ecological and economic impacts.
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Gizmodo
Science Reveals the Secret to Ancient Rome's Indestructible Concrete Geologists drilling at a marine structure in Portus Cosanus, Tuscany. (Image: University of Utah) Roman concrete is famous for its durability, lasting for thousands of years and seemingly stronger with each passing year. New research has uncovered the chemical processes responsible for the sturdiness of this ancient building material—a finding that could inspire modern engineers to revive this fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greener molecular intermediates may aid drug designScientists at Rice University have simplified their approach to synthesize a highly versatile family of precursors en route to biologically active compounds. Their method should make drug design and development cheaper and more environmentally friendly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2-D layered devices can self-assemble with precisionSquid-inspired proteins can act as programmable assemblers of 2D materials, like graphene oxide, to form hybrid materials with minute spacing between layers suitable for high-efficiency devices including flexible electronics, energy storage systems and mechanical actuators, according to an interdisciplinary team of Penn State researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Investigating folding stability and dynamics of proteinsHydrogels are polymer materials that can absorb a large amount of water, making them flexible like human tissue. They are used in a number of medical applications, including contact lenses, wound dressings, and facial reconstruction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When temps rise, Japanese quail require a breezeTiny Japanese quail eggs are a small niche market in the United States, but they're a big business in Brazil where they are sold fresh in grocery stores in egg cartons that hold 30 of the small, speckled delicacies, and are a hard-boiled staple on restaurant salad bars. Recent research from the University of Illinois helps Brazilian producers understand the birds' behavior under wind and temperatu
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Ars Technica
On its third try, SpaceX delivers a heavy satellite to high orbit Enlarge / Will the third time be a charm for SpaceX and its Intelsat 35e payload? (credit: SpaceX) Update, 8:10pm ET (01:10am UK) : Finally, SpaceX did it. During its third launch attempt from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the rocket company successfully delivered the 6.7-ton Intelsat 35e communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit. The mission went off nearly flawlessly. Remarkabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthetic horns may save rhinos if they are not like the real thingEvery eight hours, a rhinoceros is slaughtered in South Africa. Rhino poaching in South Africa surged from 83 in 2008 to a record 1,215 in 2014 to meet demands by newly-affluent Asian countries, where the horn is a key ingredient in traditional medicines.
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Futurity.org
After dinosaur extinction, frogs hopped to it If the comet or asteroid calamity had not wiped the planet clean of dinosaurs and most other terrestrial life 66 million years ago, 88 percent of the frog species we have today wouldn’t be here. A new study shows that nine out of 10 species of frogs descended from just three lineages that survived the mass extinction. The results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers find way to evaluate green roofsGreen infrastructure is an attractive concept, but there is concern surrounding its effectiveness. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using a mathematical technique traditionally used in earthquake engineering to determine how well green infrastructure works and to communicate with urban planners, policymakers and developers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Penn interactive map shows community traits built from more than 37 billion tweetsIt's no secret that communities across the United States differ greatly. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's World Well-Being Project sought a simple way to capture, explore and share such differences on a large scale. Their end goal: to provide individuals with valuable insights about where they live and offer comparisons to other communities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personal neoantigen vaccine prompts strong anti-tumor response in patients, study showsA personal cancer treatment vaccine that targets distinctive 'neoantigens' on tumor cells has been shown to stimulate a potent, safe, and highly specific immune anti-tumor response in melanoma patients, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2-D layered devices can self-assemble with precisionSquid-inspired proteins can act as programmable assemblers of 2-D materials, like graphene oxide, to form hybrid materials with minute spacing between layers suitable for high-efficiency devices including flexible electronics, energy storage systems and mechanical actuators, according to an interdisciplinary team of Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reconciling predictions of climate changeHarvard researchers have resolved a major conflict in estimates of how much the Earth will warm in response to a doubling of CO2 in the atmosphere -- finding that the lower range of estimates offered by historical observations does not take into account long-term patterns of warming. The research finds a range of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius, even up to 6 degrees, may also be possible due to a doubl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine parasites: Different strokes for different folksThe bigger the host, the better for its guests. That certainly holds for parasitic barnacles. A new study confirms the link and reveals the strategy adopted by these unusual crustaceans in the early phases of the evolution of their lifestyle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical tourism in spotlight as experts call for tighter regulationCountries should unite to tackle unscrupulous advertising of unproven therapies involving stem cells, experts say. An international group of leading experts has called for tighter regulation of so-called stem cell tourism. This involves patients traveling to other countries, where medical regulations are less strict, for treatment with potentially unsafe therapies. Researchers say the practice ris
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worldwide health authorities urged to rethink vitamin D guidelinesWorldwide health authorities are being urged to rethink official guidance around vitamin D following the publication of a ground breaking study from the University of Surrey, which dispels the myth that vitamin D2 and D3 have the same nutritional value.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple blood test predicts anemia risk after malaria treatmentResearchers have adapted an existing diagnostic test for malaria to predict the dangerous complications that sometimes arise after the parasite is eradicated from patients' blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reconciled: Climate sensitivity estimates between models and historical dataScientists have devised an approach to compare the short- and long-term responses, or 'sensitivities,' of the climate to greenhouse gasses, ultimately showing that climate models and historical data are in good agreement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traumatic brain injury associated with dementia in working-age adultsAccording to a study encompassing the entire Finnish population, traumatic brain injury associated with an increased risk for dementia in working-age adults. Yet, no such relationship was found between traumatic brain injury and later onset of Parkinson's disease or ALS. The researchers believe that these results may play a significant role for the rehabilitation and long-term monitoring of trauma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin microbe diversity can vary with forest type and habitat in Brazilian frogsThe diversity of microbes on the skin of frog species in Brazil's Atlantic Forest can vary with habitat, according to a study published July 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ananda Brito de Assis from University of São Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global ocean health relatively stable over past 5 yearsWhile global ocean health has remained relatively stable over the past five years, individual countries have seen changes, according to a study published July 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Benjamin Halpern from University of California Santa Barbara, USA and colleagues.
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Ars Technica
Laptop ban led to 20-percent drop in flights for one Mideast airline Enlarge / Visitors line up to look at an Etihad Airways Airbus A380-800 at the Dubai Air Show in 2015. (credit: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Some of the Middle Eastern airlines barred from having laptops and other electronics in their main cabins have said their rules are returning to normal after receiving approval from US agencies. Turkish Airlines and Emirates Airlines both announ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recreating interstellar ions with lasersTrihydrogen, or H3+, has been called the molecule that made the universe, where it plays a greater role in astrochemistry than any other molecule. While H3+ is astronomically abundant, no scientist understood the mechanisms that form it from organic molecules.
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New Scientist - News
San Francisco is first US city to ban flavoured tobacco productsMenthol cigarettes are disproportionately smoked by black and gay smokers in California, and some hope banning flavoured tobacco will protect these groups
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New Scientist - News
Aid shipments aren’t enough to stop Yemen’s cholera epidemicMore than 1500 people have now died in Yemen’s cholera epidemic. Two years of civil war have placed huge strain on the country’s hospitals and infrastructure
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New Scientist - News
UK’s first public autonomous taxi trial to begin soonThousands of people could be ferried along a 2-kilometre route including the O2 Arena in Greenwich, south London, in a four-week test of driverless shuttles
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New Scientist - News
Cancer vaccines could prime our own bodies to fight tumoursTwo therapies that trigger the immune system into attacking cancer suggest personalised vaccines can eradicate tumours, but bigger trials are needed
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New Scientist - News
Using light to reset the body clock can treat brain disordersHospitals are usually badly lit, but many are starting to use light therapy to treat depression, alleviate Parkinson’s disease, and improve stroke recovery
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New Scientist - News
Next-gen drones will fly and dive into the sea like pelicansUnderwater "glider" drones can travel far on little power, but they're slow. The US navy wants to give them a speed boost by letting them take flight
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Personalized cancer vaccines show glimmers of success Treatments tailored to a person's individual cancer mutations train immune system to attack tumours. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22249
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The Atlantic
Robots at Work and Play Advancements in robotics are continually taking place in the fields of space exploration, health care, public safety, entertainment, defense, and more. These machines—some fully autonomous, some requiring human input—extend our grasp, enhance our capabilities, and travel as our surrogates to places too dangerous or difficult for us to go. Gathered here are recent images of robotic technology, inc
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NYT > Science
Trump May Find Some Allies on Climate Change at G-20 MeetingRussia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Indonesia could side with the United States against the Paris climate accord at the Group of 20 meeting this week.
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NYT > Science
Royal Shakespeare Company to Monitor Heart Rates at ‘Titus Andronicus’The theater company hopes to discover whether audiences are similarly affected at live plays versus cinema screenings.
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Science | The Guardian
Hopes of mild climate change dashed by new research Planet could heat up far more than hoped as new work shows temperature rises measured over recent decades don’t fully reflect global warming already in the pipeline Hopes that the world’s huge carbon emissions might not drive temperatures up to dangerous levels have been dashed by new research. The work shows that temperature rises measured over recent decades do not fully reflect the global warm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calm lakes on Titan could mean smooth landing for future space probesThe lakes of liquid methane on Saturn's moon, Titan, are perfect for paddling but not for surfing. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that most waves on Titan's lakes reach only about 1 centimeter high.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain changes accompany development of metamemory from childhood to adolescenceAbility to assess memory quality appears in children. New study shows metamemory continues to develop to early adolescence. May give insight into effective teaching and learning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting the cost of ethanol, other biofuels and gasolineBiofuels like the ethanol in US gasoline could get cheaper thanks to experts at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Michigan State University. They've demonstrated how to design and genetically engineer enzyme surfaces so they bind less to corn stalks and other cellulosic biomass, reducing enzyme costs in biofuels production, according to a study published this month on the cover of the journal A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigating folding stability and dynamics of proteinsResearchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois recently used Fast Relaxation Imaging (FReI) to investigate the folding stability and dynamics of proteins within polyacrylamide hydrogels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When temps rise, Japanese quail require a breezeTiny Japanese quail eggs are a small niche market in the United States, but they're a big business in Brazil where they are sold fresh in grocery stores in egg cartons that hold 30 of the small, speckled delicacies, and are a hard-boiled staple on restaurant salad bars. Recent research from the University of Illinois helps Brazilian producers understand the birds' behavior under wind and temperatu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skin microbe diversity can vary with forest type and habitat in Brazilian frogsThe diversity of microbes on the skin of frog species in Brazil's Atlantic Forest can vary with habitat, according to a study published July 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ananda Brito de Assis from University of São Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global ocean health relatively stable over past five yearsWhile global ocean health has remained relatively stable over the past five years, individual countries have seen changes, according to a study published July 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Benjamin Halpern from University of California Santa Barbara, USA and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine parasites: Different strokes for different folksThe bigger the host, the better for its guests. That certainly holds for parasitic barnacles. A new study confirms the link and reveals the strategy adopted by these unusual crustaceans in the early phases of the evolution of their lifestyle.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Is the NOLA List Too Slow? Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c According to Kye, the bottom of the big tire list is nowhere near where he wants it to be. So he's bringing in three new guys. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www
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Futurity.org
Lasers recreate ‘molecule that made the universe’ A team of scientists has duplicated the chemical reaction that creates trihydrogen, or H3+, which some call the molecule that made the universe. While H3+ is astronomically abundant, no scientist understood the mechanisms that form it from organic molecules. Until now. “We were able to duplicate in our lab what’s happening in the cosmos as we speak…” The scientists found H3+ when they used a stro
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Ars Technica
Judge tells Shkreli to shut it after secret tweets and trash talk to reporters Enlarge / Martin Shkreli arrives at federal court with his attorney Benjamin Brafman, right, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, US, on Wednesday, July 5, 2017. (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) A frustrated US District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto on Wednesday scolded Martin Shkreli for indiscreetly commenting on his ongoing securities and wire fraud trial and potentially jeopardizing the trial—which is jus
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The Atlantic
The Summer of Cornball Superproducers DJ Khaled’s “Wild Thoughts” featuring Rihanna and Bryson Tiller is one of those song that’s so cheesy that it’s hard to believe it exists. Guitar sampled from Carlos Santana’s 1999 schmaltzy smash “Maria Maria” wails over an itchy Destiny’s Child-esque rhythm while Rihanna, seeming to smack her lips, delivers this bit of crass babytalk: “Know you wanna see me nakey, nakey, naked.” All of which, y
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The Atlantic
The Murder of Miosotis Familia Miosotis Familia, a 48-year-old New York Police Department officer, was shot and killed Wednesday morning by a man who had expressed anger at police in the past. Authorities called the shooting in the Bronx, in which Familia was killed while sitting in a police truck, an “unprovoked” attack. The alleged shooter, Alexander Bonds, was shot and killed by other officers near the scene. Bonds, a forme
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman: Viral Preparation & PurificationIs viral prep & purification different from standard protein prep & purification methods?
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Ars Technica
“Test” data pushed by Nasdaq gets published, creating stock quote surprise Apparently, somebody didn't get the memo. On the afternoon of July 3, the Nasdaq stock exchange closed three hours early in advance of the Independence Day holiday. At that time, Nasdaq—in a test that had been announced to its data partners a week before—pushed out some manufactured stock quote data as part of a test of its systems. However, some of that data was apparently published inadvertentl
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Live Science
Cancer Vaccines Help Patients Get Tumor-Free in 2 StudiesCancer vaccines showed promise in two small new studies.
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Gizmodo
Save $16 On Anker's Most Powerful Flashlight Anker LC130 Flashlight , $44 with code BEST0703 Anker’s 1300 lumen LC130 flashlight is so bright, it ought to be illegal. Luckily, it’s not, and it’s also cheaper than ever today with promo code BEST0703. In addition to the insanely bright bulbs, the LC130 features IP67 dust and water resistance, five different light modes, and a six hour battery that you can recharge over USB (it is Anker, after
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Single-cell biology Analyses of life's most basic elements promise to improve therapies and provide insights into some of the most fundamental processes in biology. Nature 547 19 doi: 10.1038/547019a
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Gizmodo
Things Just Keep Getting Worse For China's Fallen Tech Upstart LeEco Illustration: Angelica Alzona LeEco’s dream of breaking into the US market and competing against Apple is now farther from reality than ever before. The Chinese tech firm’s American operation has had a difficult year with missed payrolls, disappearing employees , and overall poor sales. But the latest development in LeEco’s financial woes is sure to make things go from bad to worse. A Chinese cou
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Popular Science
NASA's Juno spacecraft is about to peer into the depths of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Space We're getting our closest view ever of the 10,000-mile-wide storm. NASA’s Juno spacecraft will come closer to the furious tempest than any spacecraft ever before, hopefully solving some mysteries in the process. Read on.
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Popular Science
Ancient Romans were way better at making concrete Science The ocean didn't break it down— it only made it stronger. Romans were better than us at a lot of things. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the egg, American bullfrogs learn how to avoid becoming lunchWhen exposed to potential predators as an embryo, the invasive American bullfrog becomes harder to kill when it becomes a tadpole, according to a new study.
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Science | The Guardian
Why the Republican Party's climate policy obstruction is indefensible | Dana Nuccitelli It’s unscientific, fails basic risk management, is bad for the economy, and immoral Two weeks ago, Senator Al Franken (D-MN) had an exchange with Trump’s Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry about climate change. Continue reading...
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The Atlantic
Snowfall Considers the Origins of the Crack Epidemic The heart of Snowfall , John Singleton’s new FX series about the origins of the crack epidemic, is Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), a smart, kindhearted teenager who takes care of his mother, keeps the neighborhood kids in line, works nights in a bodega, and sells weed on the side for his uncle Jerome (Amin Joseph). One day, a white friend from his fancy high school in the Valley recruits Franklin
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The Atlantic
The Milky Way's Fastest Stars Might Be Stolen In 2005, astronomers discovered a star unlike any other in the Milky Way. Most of the billions of stars in the galaxy, including our sun, travel at an average speed of about 800,000 kilometers, or 500,000 miles, per hour. But this star? It was moving three times faster than that, hurting across space at 2.5 million kilometers, or 1.6 million miles, per hour. Since then, astronomers have discovere
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Bringing nature into your backyardHow urban gardens are connecting with nature to bring wildlife into the city.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient animal thought to be first air breather on land loses claim to fameSome good scientific sleuthing by an undergraduate at The University of Texas at Austin has helped rewrite one of the earliest chapters in the planet's evolutionary history. The research, led by the UT Jackson School of Geosciences, has shown that the millipede thought to be the world's oldest known air-breathing land creature is in fact about 14 million years younger than previously thought and c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greener molecular intermediates may aid drug designRice University scientists simplify their method to make molecular precursors for biologically active compounds, making it more environmentally friendly in the process. The new technique could be a boon to researchers who synthesize new drugs and other fine chemicals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As competition goes down, generic drug prices rise, study findsIf the cost of your generic prescription drug has risen, it may be due to a lack of competition among drug manufacturers, according to a University of Florida College of Pharmacy study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CHLA Conducts satisfaction survey in the pediatric emergency departmentPhysician researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) surveyed caregivers to understand their expectations and satisfaction of urgent care in a pediatric emergency department (ED). They found that expectations about care delivered in the ED are directly related to satisfaction of care at the end of the visit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved risk recognition expected to enhance fertility preservation for cancer patientsSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital has advanced understanding of risk factors for premature ovarian insufficiency, which should aid identification of cancer patients most likely to benefit from fertility preservation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Homemade lava flows fuse science with artThis week from AGU: Homemade lava flows fuse science with art, the in-flight dynamics of volcanic ballistic projectiles and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2017ORNL-led team integrates Earth systems with human impact data for climate predictions with fewer uncertainties; ORNL to develop secure platform to analyze large health datasets for Dept. of Veterans Affairs; ORNL neutrons used to resolve debate over origins of metallic glass behavior; ORNL studies 3-D printing materials that crosslink without heat; New web-based calculator by ORNL shows energy-sav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three-dimensional chip combines computing and data storageResearchers at Stanford and MIT have used two complementary nanotechnologies to develop a 3-D computer chip that could enable new generation of energy-efficient electronics for data-intensive applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic DJ: Growing cells remix their genesMoving genes about could help cells to respond to change according to scientists. Changing the location of a gene within a cell alters its activity. Contrary to expectations, this latest study reveals that each gene doesn't have an ideal location in the cell but are constantly moving. This work, which has also inspired a musical collaboration, suggests that moving genes could help cells to fine-tu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Less is better: Malaria parasites able to sense their hosts' calorie intakeA new study in Nature has shown that the infectious agent responsible for malaria, the Plasmodium parasite, is able to to sense and actively adapt to the host's nutritional status.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows West Antarctic Ice Sheet loss over the last 11,000 yearsReporting this week in the journal Nature, an international team of researchers led by British Antarctic Survey explains that wind-driven incursions of warm water forced the retreat of glaciers in West Antarctica during the past 11,000 years. These new results enable researchers to better understand how environmental change may impact future sea-level rise from this climate-sensitive region.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sulfide-producing bacteria dominate hydraulically fractured oil and gas wellsResearchers have found that the microbes inhabiting a hydraulically fractured shale formation produce toxic, corrosive sulfide through a poorly understood pathway. The team's findings, published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveal that the oil and gas industry may need new ways to monitor and mitigate sulfide-producing bacteria in fracture
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Gizmodo
Cursed Throwable Camera Is Finally Dead After Six Years of Toil In a time when your average smartphone can capture immersive 360-degree photos using a clever app, how can consumers justify spending $600 on a spherical camera that does the same thing? It turns out they can’t, which is why the creators of the Panono have filed for bankruptcy, and are in the process of selling off the company’s assets. We first brought news of the Panono, then called the Throwab
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The Atlantic
The Bipartisan Fight for Quieter Oceans Updated on July 5 at 2:10 p.m. ET Last night, to celebrate the fourth of July, the air over the U.S. filled with fireworks. The noise they created was extremely loud and, mercifully, brief. But imagine having to listen to even louder explosions once every ten seconds, for days or weeks on end. Starting this fall, that may be the new reality for whales, fish, and other marine life off the eastern
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Gizmodo
New York Times Falls For That Fake North Korea Twitter Account North Korea launched its first ICBM yesterday, putting the world on the brink of nuclear war . But in the rush to get news printed, some journalists were a bit sloppy. The New York Time s mistook a tweet from the North Korea parody account DPRK_News as real. And this isn’t the first time news outlets have been suckered by “news” from this Twitter account. The New York Times story was first publis
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Gizmodo
Scientists Think They’ve Figured Out Where Bizarre Runaway Stars Are Coming From Part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (Public Domain via Flickr) The Sun and Proxima Centauri and most of the stars you’ve heard of orbit the center of the Milky Way galaxy like children peacefully riding a carousel (with some weirdness caused by dark matter that we don’t need to get into). Now, imagine if a few toddlers were sprinting and shrieking across the peaceful scene. Who sent these nightmar
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Gizmodo
That Iron Man and Spider-Man Shot From All the Homecoming Trailers Isn't in the Movie GIF This awesome moment was never in Spider-Man: Homecoming. All Images: Sony The money shot used in almost all of the marketing from Spider-Man: Homecoming isn’t in the movie. You know the one: Iron Man and Spider-Man, both suited up, flying through Queens. But in a new interview, the director of the film did his best to explain why it’s missing. “I think what happened was in the very first trai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sulfide-producing bacteria dominate hydraulically fractured oil and gas wellsResearchers have found that the microbes inhabiting a hydraulically fractured shale formation produce toxic, corrosive sulfide through a poorly understood pathway. The team's findings, published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveal that the oil and gas industry may need new ways to monitor and mitigate sulfide-producing bacteria in fractured
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detailed study reveals genes are constantly rearranged by cellsMoving genes about could help cells to respond to change according to scientists at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, UK and the Weizmann Institute, Israel. Changing the location of a gene within a cell alters its activity. Like mixing music, different locations can make a gene 'louder' or 'quieter', with louder genes contributing more actively to the life of a cell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows West Antarctic Ice Sheet loss over the last 11,000 yearsReporting this week in the journal Nature, an international team of researchers led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS) explains that wind-driven incursions of warm water forced the retreat of glaciers in West Antarctica during the past 11,000 years. These new results enable researchers to better understand how environmental change may impact future sea-level rise from this climate-sensitive region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three-dimensional chip combines computing and data storageAs embedded intelligence is finding its way into ever more areas of our lives, fields ranging from autonomous driving to personalized medicine are generating huge amounts of data. But just as the flood of data is reaching massive proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into useful information is stalling.
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Popular Science
FiberFix repair wrap Is 100 times stronger than duct tape Sponsored Post It's as strong as steel and you can save 31 percent on three-packs. FiberFix repair wrap Is 100 times stronger than duct tape. It's as strong as steel and you can save 31 percent on three-packs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recognition and mechanisms of chemical and environmental sensitivities in ecopsychologyA comprehensive look at the under-recognized problem of environmental sensitivity and related disorders that develop as a result of exposure to chemicals and other toxic factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Handshaking viewed more positively by Westerners than by East AsiansWesterners view handshaking more positively than do East Asians, researchers report in a new study. Western men also rate handshakes initiated by men and women differently, the study found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What kind of Facebook user are you?Researchers from Brigham Young University asked people why they Facebook, then identified four categories of users.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists take a deeper dive into cellular trashSBP researchers provide new insights on the connection between autophagy and lifespan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The surprising trend in extramarital sex in AmericaOlder Americans are cheating on their spouses more than their younger counterparts, with 20 percent of married Americans over age 55 reporting they've engaged in extramarital sex. Just 14 percent of those under age 55 say they've cheated.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Personalized Cancer Vaccines Look Promising in Two New StudiesVaccines tailored to the unique genetic makeup of individuals’ tumors seem to work in a handful of patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaria parasites able to sense their hosts calorie intakeEven though malaria still kills one child every minute, the vast majority of those infected still survive, with roughly 200 million new infections every year. A new study has shown that the infectious agent responsible for malaria, the Plasmodium parasite, is able to to sense and actively adapt to the host's nutritional status. Using mouse models of malaria infection, scientists led by Maria M. Mo
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Ars Technica
States refuse to give Trump commission personal data of registered voters Enlarge (credit: Michael R ) As many as 44 US states are now refusing to hand voter data over to President Donald Trump and his administration citing legal and privacy concerns. This cache includes information such as voters' full names, political affiliations, addresses, dates of birth, criminal records, the last four digits of Social Security numbers, and other personal identifying information.
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Gizmodo
New Video Shows Dramatic Raid of Software Firm Linked to NotPetya Attack Video has emerged of a Ukrainian police raid Tuesday at M.E. Doc, the software firm whose servers have been linked to a series of devastating malware attacks around the world, including the NotPetya attack one week ago. Carrying shotguns and assault rifles, Ukraine’s state security service (SBU) stormed M.E. Doc’s offices in full combat gear before seizing servers suspected of spreading NotPetya
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The Scientist RSS
Olfaction Determines Weight in MiceAnimals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers find way to evaluate green roofsGreen infrastructure is an attractive concept, but there is concern surrounding its effectiveness. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using a mathematical technique traditionally used in earthquake engineering to determine how well green infrastructure works and to communicate with urban planners, policymakers and developers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Toronto study shows our faces reveal whether we're rich or poorA study by social psychologists at University of Toronto shows that people can reliably tell if someone is richer or poorer than average just by looking at a neutral face without any expression. This is due to visibility of the positions of muscles that become etched in the face over time as a result of repeated life experiences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moms, kids and TV: A complicated relationship that's not all badWatching television sometimes gets a bad rap -- especially where children and screen time are concerned -- but not all of it's deserved.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Make up after the break up: Men choose sex, women tears and quality timeIf a man wants to make amends with his girlfriend after an argument, he should dedicate quality time and shed a few tears while asking for forgiveness. However, men consider a kind gesture or receiving sexual favors as the best form of apology. This was revealed in a study led by T. Joel Wade of Bucknell University in the US. The findings were published in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psycholog
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Live Science
How Hot Will Your City Get By 2100?Summers around the world are already warmer than they used to be, and they’re going to get dramatically hotter by century’s end if carbon pollution continues to rise.
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Ars Technica
Report: Xbox One X benchmarks detail 4K capabilities When we got our first hands-on (and eyes-on) experience with the Xbox One X at E3 last month, we weren't exactly in awe of the improved resolutions and graphical effects on display. Now, though, we're starting to see initial reports of just how "the most powerful console ever" improves raw performance on games originally designed for the base Xbox One system. In an extensive report , Digital Foun
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The Atlantic
What Did North Korea's Missile Test Really Change? North Korea’s successful test earlier this week of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) has triggered all of the expected alarms. Even if Kim Jong Un cannot yet mount one with a nuke, his arsenal of chemical and biological weapons now has a longer reach—even, most experts agree, Hawaii or Alaska. But apart from the psychological impact on Americans, the development doesn’t fundamentally a
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The Atlantic
What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut? Updated on July 5 at 4:47 p.m. ET The state of Connecticut has many nicknames. It is the Nutmeg State, the Constitution State, and America’s Country Club, while Hartford, its capital city, has been called the Nation’s Filing Cabinet. But as Connecticut grapples with a deep fiscal crisis, it might as well embrace another moniker: The Rorschach State. For the left and the right, it is the manifesta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthetic horns may save rhinos if they are not like the real thingTo help stem the tide of rhino poaching, some biotech companies are seeking to develop and manufacture synthetic horns that are identical to the real thing. New research shows that, for conservation purposes, it may be beneficial to produce synthetic horns that are engineered to be undesirable but difficult for buyers to distinguish from wild horns to create uncertainty in the market and drive out
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreating interstellar ions with lasersTrihydrogen, or H3+, has been called the molecule that made the universe, where it plays a greater role in astrochemistry than any other molecule. While H3+ is astronomically abundant, no scientist understood the mechanisms that form it from organic molecules.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The costs of coal storage and its impact on disadvantaged communitiesWhile the negative health and environmental effects of mining and burning coal are well documented, simply transporting and storing coal can also adversely affect the health outcomes of individuals living near coal-fired power plants. New research explores the health and environmental costs of coal storage and transportation, finding that increases in the level of coal stockpiles held by US power
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smelling your food makes you fatUC Berkeley researchers developed ways to temporarily eliminate the sense of smell in adult mice, and discovered that those mice that lost smell could eat a high-fat diet and stay a normal weight, while littermates that retained the sense of smell ballooned to twice normal weight. Supersmellers gained more weight than did normal mice on the same high-fat diet. Smell-deficient mice burned excess fa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut bacteria can help to predict how the body will respond to fatty foodsChemical signatures from gut bacteria which show up in urine can be used to predict how the body will respond to a 'junk' diet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Probing psychopathic brainsUsing a mobile MRI scanner to image the brains of prison inmates, Harvard researchers have found that the brains of people who show signs of psychopathy are wired in a way that leads them to over-value immediate rewards and neglect the future consequences of potentially dangerous or immoral actions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain's immune cells may drive overeating and weight gainImmune cells in the brain trigger overeating and weight gain in response to diets rich in fat, according to a new study in mice led by researchers from UC San Francisco and the University of Washington Medical Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Repurposed asthma drug shows blood sugar improvement among some diabeticsAfter 12 weeks of taking an anti-asthma drug, a subset of patients with type 2 diabetes showed a clinically significant reduction in blood glucose during a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Michigan researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For mice, too much muscle glycogen impairs endurance exercise performanceThe basics of glycogen biology are thought to be well established, but a study in rodents published July 5 in the journal Cell Metabolism turns long-standing assumptions on their head. Surprisingly, the researchers found that glycogen synthesis does not require a protein called glycogenin, and that high glycogen levels actually impair endurance muscle performance in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mice lacking a sense of smell stay thinMice engineered to lack a sense of smell lose weight on a high-fat diet, researchers report July 5 in the journal Cell Metabolism. The mice ate just as much as counterparts with unaltered senses, yet lost an average of about 16 percent of their body weight. The weight loss was almost entirely from fat. In addition, mice with an enhanced sense of smell gain more weight than mice with typical olfact
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neuroscientists call for more comprehensive view of how brain forms memoriesNeuroscientists from the University of Chicago argue that research on how memories form in the brain should consider activity of groups of brain cells working together, not just the connections between them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watch cancer spread in a mouseResearchers in Japan have developed a method to image cancer at the single-cell level by using chemical techniques to make whole mouse bodies and organs highly transparent. Combining their preparation with existing imaging technology, they were able view cancer cells multiplying within organs, including the lungs, intestines, and liver, and traveling through the body to and from new tumors in dist
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Quanta Magazine
Lucky Break Leads to Controversial Supernova Discovery It was not a slow death — it lasted a few hours at most. The casualty was a star in a spiral galaxy some 160 million light-years away. Its core collapsed in on itself, triggering a supernova explosion as bright as 100 billion suns. On a cosmic scale, this star was rather ordinary, probably a red supergiant some 10 times more massive than our sun. But on October 6, 2013, when the light from the ex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The costs of coal storage and its impact on disadvantaged communitiesWhile the negative health and environmental effects of mining and burning coal are well documented, simply transporting and storing coal can also adversely affect the health outcomes of individuals living near coal-fired power plants. New research explores the health and environmental costs of coal storage and transportation, finding that increases in the level of coal stockpiles held by U.S. powe
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Gizmodo
Here’s How Samsung's Bixby Compares to All Other Virtual Assistants Image: Samsung In a world where every smartphone seems to come with its own version of Siri, Samsung is finally ready to release its own, fully functioning AI-based virtual assistant. Samsung recently announced Bixby, a digital voice assistant that’s capable of getting smarter depending on how much you engage with it. Bixby is built into the Galaxy S8 smartphone and is nothing like Samsung’s curr
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
French scientist fined for failure to disclose industry ties Pulmonologist Michel Aubier has been found guilty of misleading France’s Senate during an inquiry on air pollution. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22269
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An experimental technique analyzes the functioning of human sperm before being inseminatedThe work of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and Eugin Group succeeds in observing the fertilization capacity of the sperm cell before its insemination in the oocyte. Researchers put male gametes in contact with the cytoplasm of female animal gametes to see if they perform their functions properly. The technology studies the incidence of sperm morphology, concentration, and motility in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International team develops new way to produce pure hydrogen efficientlyAn international team of researchers, including Lehigh University's Christopher J. Kiely, have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). Their discovery is described in a paper published recently in Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digital communication improves young patient engagement, according to new studyUsing texts, emails, Skype and other digital communication methods can improve the health care experience of younger patients.That is the conclusion of new research, led by the University of Warwick and King's College London, which examined case studies from 20 NHS specialist clinical teams from across England and Wales.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Extra-Tropical Cyclone Nanmadol's remnants east of JapanNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on July 5 and captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Depression Nanmadol.
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Wired
How I Got Facebook to Invest in Minority-Owned BusinessesOpinion: Supplier diversity is a great way for women- and minority-owned small businesses to earn money in tech without knowing code.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Double-duty DNA plays a role in birth and deathCoronary artery disease may be the price humans pay for improved fertility.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Get the Glow: The Secret to Deep-Water Corals' RadianceOrganisms use red fluorescent protein to optimize light for photosynthesis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Scientists may finally know why these magnificent corals glow in the dark Science Glow coral, glow. Corals are well known for their bright colors, but it’s remained something of a mystery why deep sea corals are so vibrant.
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Gizmodo
This Homemade Automatic BB Gun Is Even More Dangerous Than It Sounds GIF YouTube’s Giaco Whatever , who previously terrified us with a custom Nerf blaster capable of firing foam darts faster than the speed of sound , has now designed and built an automatic BB gun powered by a 4,000 PSI air tank that’s easily one of the most dangerous creations you’ll find online—so of course you want to see it in action . Watching the BBs blast through a line of wine glasses at 4,
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The Atlantic
A Replacement for Overworked Public Defenders? NORRISTOWN, Pa.—Things were not looking up for Saabir Lewis last August. The 21-year-old faced up to 20 years in prison on charges including assault, trespassing on school property, and armed robbery stemming from incidents in 2015 and 2016. Though no one was badly hurt, the offenses were serious. He is now in a dramatically different circumstance: After 10 months in county jail, Lewis will soon
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The Atlantic
From 'Not in My Backyard' to 'Yes in My Backyard' Real-estate developers are not popular with most of the American public. A recent Stanford paper found that people like developers only slightly more than they like corporate executives. Many progressives object to developers’ business model, which depends on building new units and charging as much as possible for them, even if that makes them unaffordable for longtime residents. But there are si
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking humans in 3-D with off-the-shelf webcamsMany applications require that people and their movements are captured digitally in 3-D in real-time. Until now, this was possible only with expensive systems of several cameras, or by having people wear special suits. Computer scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Computer Science have developed a system that requires only a single video camera. It can even estimate the 3-D pose of a person
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Extra-Tropical Cyclone Nanmadol's remnants east of JapanNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on July 5 and captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Depression Nanmadol.
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New Scientist - News
Should cash-strapped NHS pay for unproven gene sequencing?The UK wants to make genomics a central part of healthcare, but we don't yet know enough about our genes to be sure it will bring benefits
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New Scientist - News
North Korean missiles could soon reach the US. Can we stop them?Kim Jong-un’s regime has tested a missile that could eventually hit the continental US with Hiroshima-sized nuclear weapons. Talks, war or sanctions are the only ways forward
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Star Wars Gear, $30 Echo Dot, Fitbit Scale, and More $30 Echo Dots , Anker’s brightest flashlight , and Fitbit’s Aria smart scale lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Refurb Echo Dot , $30 Update: Sold out Amazon usually sells certified refurbished Echo Dots for $5 less than new models, but today only, that discount has increased to $20 for Prime memb
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Futurity.org
Texts could keep teens connected to their doctors Using texts, emails, Skype, and other digital communication methods may be a way to improve the health care experience of younger patients with chronic conditions. “Digital communication enables timely access for young people to the right clinician at the time when it can make a difference to how they manage their health condition,” says Frances Griffiths, professor at the University of Warwick M
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New on MIT Technology Review
Volvo Is Killing Off Internal Combustion. Kind of.Starting in 2019, all of its cars will contain electric motors—but many of them will still burn gas.
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Science : NPR
Aztec 'Tower Of Skulls' Reveals Women, Children Were Sacrificed Some 650 skulls unearthed in Mexico City are believed to be the legendary Huey Tzompantli, a site for victims of human sacrifice first mentioned by Spanish conquistadors. (Image credit: Hector Montano/AP)
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Science | The Guardian
It’s not racket science: why Wimbledon players use inspirational slogans The motivational phrases beloved of sportspeople might seem trite, but for players from Katie Boulter and Andy Murray to Arthur Ashe, they’re surprisingly important Katie Boulter can console herself that, while she could not beat a player 178 places further up the rankings, her Wimbledon dream did not end because she lacked motivation. There it was, in bold words, underlined for good measure, on
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