Science | The Guardian
Mike Pence touches Nasa equipment right next to 'do not touch' sign US vice-president pictured with his left hand resting on ‘critical space flight hardware’ for the Orion programme Mike Pence has jokingly defended himself after being photographed putting his hand on a piece of Nasa space equipment in contradiction of a “do not touch” sign. Pence was pictured with his left hand resting on part of a spacecraft-in-the-making called the Orion, inches away from a not
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pitted materials in craters could indicate buried ice on asteroidsPitted terrains inside fresh complex craters on Ceres are similar to terrains seen Mars and Vesta, and are likely formed through the rapid evaporation of subsurface H2O, a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Research Scientist Hanna G. Sizemore says.
2h
Ingeniøren
Computing på helt ny måde: Banebrydende 3D-chip kan både beregne, lagre og opsamle dataFlaskehalsen i moderne computere, der ofte er den interne kommunikation mellem CPU og memory-chip, overkommes i ny 3D-chip, der kan lagre data og udføre beregninger i samme enhed. Prototypen virker endog også som sensor for detektion af forskellige gasmolekyler.
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LATEST

The Atlantic
It's Disadvantaged Groups That Suffer Most When Free Speech Is Curtailed on Campus Harvard President Drew Faust gave a ringing endorsement of free speech in her recent commencement address . There was, however, one passage where Faust asserted that the price of Harvard’s commitment to free speech “is paid disproportionately by” those students who don’t fit the traditional profile of being “white, male, Protestant, and upper class.” That point has been illustrated by a few recen
20min
Science | The Guardian
Fizzy milk or crunchy cheese, anyone? The food of the future Food scientists are battling to overcome dairy and carbs’ image problem – but will mealworms and 3D-printed pasta really win consumers back? A man in skinny jeans and a bow tie is standing by a whiteboard with various buzzwords written on it: empathy, respect, create. He is leading a corporate bonding day for about 20 workers in an airy atrium, and moves over to start playing Bon Jovi’s Livin’ On
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending July 8, 2017)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
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The Atlantic
The Department of Justice Stands by Texas's Voter ID Law One of the toughest voter ID laws in the country might soon be back in use, only this time with a stamp of approval from the Department of Justice. On Wednesday, the department submitted a brief to the U.S. District Court in Corpus Christi, Texas, in support of the state’s Senate Bill 5. The legislation is currently facing a lawsuit in that court from plaintiffs who claim it discriminates on the
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VCU inventors' hand-held device brings vast improvements to water testing processElevated levels of uranium in water supplies is an environmental safety and health concern, but current methods of detecting it are cumbersome, costly and time consuming. Gary C. Tepper, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, and Ph.D. student Brandon Dodd are addressing this challenge with a novel portable device that streamlines and expedites the way uranium in wat
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan floods death toll rises to 15The death toll from heavy rains and flooding in southern Japan has risen to 15, a government official said Saturday, as rescuers continued work to evacuate isolated survivors.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birth of wolf cubs in Mexico raises hopes for endangered speciesMexican zoo officials are drooling over the birth of seven cubs of a species of endangered wolf.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Killing cancer in the heat of the momentMineko Kengaku, Tatsuya Murakami, and their colleagues from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed a new method that modifies the surface of nanorods, making them more efficient in transporting cancer-killing genes into cells.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Religious leaders get high on magic mushrooms ingredient – for science Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore enlists priests, rabbis and a Buddhist to test the effects of psychedelic drugs on religious experience A Catholic priest, a Rabbi and a Buddhist walk into a bar and order some magic mushrooms. It may sound like the first line of a bad joke, but this scenario is playing out in one of the first scientific investigations into the effects of psychedelic drugs on
4h
Science | The Guardian
I took my first antidepressant this week. The effects were frightening | Deborah OrrThe number of people with mental health problems is soaring, and the crisis-ridden NHS cannot cope • Deborah Orr is a Guardian columnist Most people know about SSRIs , the antidepressant drugs that stop the brain from re-absorbing too much of the serotonin we produce, to regulate mood, anxiety and happiness. And a lot of people know about these drugs first hand, for the simple reason that they hav
4h
The Atlantic
122 Nations Approve 'Historic' Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapons More than 120 nations adopted the first international treaty banning nuclear weapons on Friday at the United Nations headquarters in New York City. The initiative—led by Austria, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, and New Zealand—was approved by 122 votes, with only the Netherlands opposed, and Singapore abstaining. The nine countries generally recognized as possessing nuclear weapons—the U.S., Russia
5h
NYT > Science
When Will Electric Cars Go Mainstream? It May Be Sooner Than You ThinkA growing number of analysts say pessimism about plug-in cars could be becoming outdated, thanks in part to plunging battery prices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Killing cancer in the heat of the momentResearchers from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed a new method that modifies the surface of nanorods, making them more efficient in transporting cancer-killing genes into cells.
6h
The Atlantic
ISIS Claims Responsibility for Attack on Egyptian Soldiers At least 23 Egyptian soldiers were killed and another 26 wounded after ISIS militants attacked an army outpost in the northern Sinai peninsula on Friday. The attack took place in the early morning, beginning with a suicide bomber driving his vehicle into a military checkpoint outside Rafah, a border town near the Gaza Strip. The violence soon escalated as dozens of masked militants appeared at th
7h
The Atlantic
The Health-Care Cost of Homelessness In the past year, Los Angeles has dedicated billions of dollars towards housing the homeless. The effort is, in part, aimed at addressing the city’s exorbitant health-care spending on this population. Housing is now widely understood to be the best health intervention for the homeless population, who experience far more hospitalizations than those with homes. However, a critical step in this new
8h
NYT > Science
In the Deep, Dark Sea, Corals Create Their Own SunshineCorals that live up to hundreds of feet below the ocean’s surface have worked out a special arrangement with algae that’s mutually beneficial for the two.
9h
Futurity.org
To find how fast Greenland is melting, look at the past Analyzing Greenland’s past temperatures will aid scientists in assessing how quickly the island’s vast ice sheet is melting, new research suggests. The ice sheet has been shrinking since 1900 and the yearly loss of ice has doubled since 2003, other researchers have shown. The accelerated melting of the Greenland ice sheet is contributing to sea level rise. The glaciers and ice sheet of Greenland
10h
Live Science
How Bad Is Gonorrhea's Resistance to Drugs? Some Cases Are UntreatableAround the world, a growing number of cases of gonorrhea are becoming more difficult, or at times even impossible, to treat with antibiotics.
11h
The Atlantic
U.S. and Russia Agree to Cease-Fire in Syria The U.S. and Russia agreed on Friday to establish a cease-fire in southern Syria, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. The cease-fire, which begins Sunday at noon local time, marks the nations’ first joint effort under the Trump administration to curb the violence in Syria’s ongoing, six-year civil war. Tillerson said President Trump and Russian P
11h
Big Think
The Comedy Imagination Retreat Examines Human Creativity Through a Comedic Lens The event brought scholars and comedians together to take a look at what’s funny and why. Read More
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Meet and Diverge What We’re Following When Putin Met Trump: The two presidents sat down together today —for the first time since Trump took office—in Hamburg, Germany, where both leaders were attending the G20 summit. The meeting extended more than an hour and a half past its scheduled time of 35 minutes, and although both governments confirmed they’d agreed upon a ceasefire in Syria, the two accounts differed on
11h
The Atlantic
A Major Victory for the Right to Record Police Americans have a constitutional right to film on-duty police officers in public, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled Friday. The three-judge panel’s decision is not the first of its kind, but it marks a significant milestone: Half of U.S. states are now covered by rulings protecting the videotaping of law enforcement. In its decision in Fields v. City of Philadelphia , the Third Circuit
11h
Live Science
Why NASA Says It's OK That VP Mike Pence Touched Orion CoverIt's A-OK that Vice President Mike Pence touched a piece of titanium equipment destined for outer space, despite a sign on it that stated, "Critical Space Flight Hardware, Do Not Touch," NASA said.
11h
Gizmodo
In This Time of Fear and Confusion, the Babadook and No-Face Must Kiss Causeway Films/Studio Ghibli/Gizmodo/Hudson Hongo We’re just over halfway through 2017, but it feels like it’s already been an eternity, with a news cycle not dissimilar from eating endless apps at a TGI Friday’s in Hell. Against all odds, however, true love appears to be alive and well. In a recent sketch, artist Milly Amaryllis depicted the eponymous Babadook cozying up to No-Face from Spirited
12h
cognitive science
BDNF | Literally Grow The Size Of Your Brain & Improve Your Memory submitted by /u/LizMeyers [link] [comments]
12h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Check Out Shark Week's Baddest Bites! | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Sharks aren't angry, they're just misunderstood! Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.co
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Big Think
What the Early Life of Elon Musk Can Teach Us About Being Great Elon Musk is without doubt one of the great visionaries of our age. But how did he get there? Read More
12h
Big Think
Common Arguments Against Vaccination, and the Answers to Them Anti-vaxers have some questions about vaccine safety, here we give the answers. Read More
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Wired
Review: 'Spider-Man: Homecoming' Is as Light and Powerful as Spidey's WebMarvel hasn't released a movie this delightfully spry since 'Iron Man' in 2008, but better late than never.
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Wired
Renault Marks 40 Years Since the F1 RS01 With a Fancy TeapotGrab yours for $150 when they go on sale in September.
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Gizmodo
Save $24 Now On The Instant Pot IP-DUO Plus, and Thank Us Later Instant Pot IP-DUO Plus , $96 If you don’t own a pressure cooker , today’s a great day to fix that, as Amazon’s knocked the month-old Instant Pot IP-DUO Plus down to $96 today, or $24 less than usual. The Plus’s predecessor, the IP-DUO60 (which had a few fewer cooking options and temperature settings) was one of the most popular items we listed last year, so this is a great chance to get the upgr
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: DisPutin the Facts Today in 5 Lines The United States and Russia announced that a cease-fire in Syria will go into effect on Sunday. Officials present for the first face-to-face meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Germany offered differing accounts of what was discussed. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said if the U.S. policy of “peaceful press
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rx for orphan walrus calf: touch, massage, cuddle, repeatEverybody needs a shoulder to lean on now and then. A walrus calf at the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward, Alaska, is getting one 24 hours per day.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report chemical reaction with potential to speed drug developmentChemists have long sought to develop new reactions for the direct conversion of simple hydrocarbon building blocks into valuable materials such as pharmaceuticals in a way that dependably creates the same chemical bonds and orientations. UT Southwestern researchers have hit upon a novel way to do that.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Litter bugs may protect chocolate supplyThose who crave brownies or hot cocoa may be happy to hear that heroes too small to be seen may help to protect the world's chocolate supply. Scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama found that exposing baby cacao plants to microbes from healthy adult cacao plants reduced the plant's chance of becoming infected with the serious cacao pathogen, Phytopthora palmivor
13h
Live Science
Furry 'Harry Potter' Spider Discovered in Mountain BurrowA newly identified wolf spider looks so much like Aragog, the giant, fictional spider from the "Harry Potter" series, that the creature is being named after the colossal arachnid, a new study reports.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Litter bugs may protect chocolate supplyMother's microbiome seems to protect baby cacao plants, a result with important implications for protecting the world's chocolate supply.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook wants to turn campus into a 'village'Facebook on Friday unveiled plans to transform its Silicon Valley headquarters campus into a "mixed-use village" complete with housing and retail shops.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Save the Vaquita Day marked by bold, coordinated efforts to save the 'panda of the sea'The world is marking International Save the Vaquita Day on July 8 by supporting VaquitaCPR's ambitious, emergency plan to help save the vaquita porpoise from extinction in the northern Gulf of California. The project, which has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA), involves relocating some of the remaining vaquitas to a temporary sanctuary later t
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diatoms have sex after all, and ammonium puts them in the moodNew research shows a species of diatom, a single-celled algae, thought to be asexual does reproduce sexually, and scientists learned it's a common compound - ammonium - that puts the ubiquitous organism in the mood.
13h
The Scientist RSS
Trump Administration Chooses New CDC DirectorThe pick-Georgia Public Health Commissioner and physician Brenda Fitzgerald-is an experienced public health leader, but lacks research chops.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers report chemical reaction with potential to speed drug developmentChemists have long sought to develop new reactions for the direct conversion of simple hydrocarbon building blocks into valuable materials such as pharmaceuticals in a way that dependably creates the same chemical bonds and orientations.
13h
Wired
Gadget Lab Podcast: Tips for Unplugging from the Mobile InternetThis week, the hosts explore the best methods for disconnecting from your phone.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New class of insulating crystals hosts quantized electric multipole momentsResearchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Princeton University have theoretically predicted a new class of insulating phases of matter in crystalline materials, pinpointed where they might be found in nature, and in the process generalized the fundamental quantum theory of Berry phases in solid state systems. What's more, these insulators generate electric quadrupole or oct
13h
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 17. Five rad and random things I found this week. The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 17.
13h
Popular Science
Four far-out plans for taming our weather Environment Including the a rain unmaker. Cloud seeding is just the beginning. Read on.
13h
Science : NPR
Florida Swaps Out Septic Tanks For Sewers To Fight Coastal Pollution Septic tanks, long considered safe and effective, are increasingly seen as a major contributor to coastal pollution. Florida is now starting the costly job of switching hundreds of thousands of homeowners from septic to sewer.
13h
New Scientist - News
Child tooth is fourth fossil clue to mysterious Denisovan humansGenetic analysis shows a tooth from the Denisova cave in Siberia is only the fourth specimen from elusive early humans who lived alongside Neanderthals
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way of predicting kidney function could improve chemotherapy dosingScientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new statistical model which estimates kidney function in patients with cancer. This is the most accurate model for estimating kidney function yet developed and should help cancer specialists treat their patients more safely and improve the accuracy of chemotherapy dosing. The model is now available free online.
14h
Gizmodo
America’s First Free-Roaming Genetically Engineered Insects Are Coming to New York A cute diamondback moth. Image: Wikimedia Commons Diamondback moths may be a mere half-inch in length, but their voracious appetite for Brussels sprouts, kale and cauliflower make them a major pain for farmers. This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a potential solution: moths genetically engineered to contain a special gene that makes them gradually die off. A field trial slated
14h
cognitive science
The Brain: Cosmos in the Cranium, Part 1 -- when the brain's fate hangs by a string of molecules submitted by /u/benbrum [link] [comments]
14h
The Atlantic
Tillerson Backs Policy of 'Peaceful Pressure' on North Korea U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Friday the U.S. policy of “peaceful pressure” on North Korea “takes a little time,” but if it fails, “we don’t have many good options left.” His comments were made in Hamburg, Germany, following a meeting between President Trump and Vladimir Putin, the Russian leader, on the sidelines of the G20 summit. Tillerson said the “peaceful pressure campaign … re
14h
NYT > Science
How to Attach a Video Camera to a Humpback WhaleYou’re going to need a long pole, a quiet boat and proper permits, and it helps if the whale is napping.
14h
Ars Technica
Drone dropped “tools” enabling inmate to escape, prison officials say Enlarge (credit: Peter Linehan ) A South Carolina inmate used wire cutters and other "tools" like mobile phones believed to be dropped from a drone to coordinate his escape from a maximum-security prison. The inmate wasn't noticed missing for 18 hours, prison officials said Friday. Jimmy Causey. (credit: South Carolina Department of Corrections) Jimmy Causey was arrested Friday in Austin, Texas,
14h
Live Science
Snortable Chocolate Claimed to Boost Energy: Is It Safe?A new "snortable" chocolate product is being marketed as a drug-free way to feel energized. But some health experts are wary of the potential health effects.
14h
Live Science
Follow Wild Animals in Real Time in Nat Geo Special This WeekendThis weekend, National Geographic is unveiling a live nature feature that will show viewers dozens of wild animals — including bats, bull sharks and leaf-eating monkeys — in real time as these creatures endure in their quest for survival.
14h
Live Science
Photos: See the Animal 'Olympics of the Natural World'National Geographic invites you to fly with Mexican free-tailed bats, swim with bull sharks and roost with leaf-eating monkeys, all from the comfort of your couch.
14h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic’s Week in Culture Don’t Miss The Story of Jay-Z — Adam Serwer decodes the historical context behind the emcee’s economic nationalism on his new album 4:44. Nintendo Video Games Coming of Age With The Legend of Zelda — Karen Han reminisces about her earliest days with the franchise, which is a particularly apt reflection of entering adulthood. Grant Pollard / AP Music The Familiar Novelty of Haim’s New Album — Spen
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The Atlantic
Trump and Putin's Rashomon Summit Updated July 7 at 4 p.m. Pundits eager to analyze the outcome of Friday’s first face-to-face meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin don’t have much to go on. (Bold prediction: That won’t slow them down.) In the absence of material information, many analysts rushed to read meaning into the length of the meeting in Hamburg, which was scheduled for just 30 m
14h
Gizmodo
Your Muscles Will Thank You For This TriggerPoint Foam Roller, Now Just $23 TriggerPoint GRID Foam Roller , $23 TriggerPoint’s GRID foam rollers are the most popular on the market, and Amazon just discounted the 13" extra firm model to $23 . That’s within about a buck of an all-time low, so limber up your buying muscles, and go get it.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New class of insulating crystals hosts quantized electric multipole momentsResearchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Princeton University have theoretically predicted a new class of insulating phases of matter in crystalline materials, pinpointed where they might be found in nature, and in the process generalized the fundamental quantum theory of Berry phases in solid state systems.
14h
Inside Science
How to ‘Film’ Firing Neurons How to ‘Film’ Firing Neurons Flash-and-freeze technique creates flipbook-like images of brain cells in action. FiringNeuron_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Andrii Vodolazhskyi via Shutterstock Technology Friday, July 7, 2017 - 12:15 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- On June 15, 1878, in front of a crowd of reporters, British photographer Eadweard Muybridge deployed an elaborate apparatus
14h
Ars Technica
Possibly most intense Star Wars v. Star Trek argument ever ends in arrest Enlarge / Zachary Quinto (left) as Commander Spock and Chris Pine (right) as Captain James T. Kirk in the 2013 movie, "Star Trek: Into Darkness." (credit: CBS via Getty Images) An Oklahoma City man was arrested last Saturday after police responded to a domestic disturbance in the force (or perhaps a rip in space-time): two roommates were arguing over whether Star Wars or Star Trek was the better
15h
Ars Technica
Where are all the Nintendo Switch game ports? Enlarge With retailers continuing to sell out of Nintendo Switch hardware pretty much the moment it comes into stock and Nintendo promising shipments of 10 million consoles by the end of the fiscal year , you'd think third-party publishers would be falling all over themselves to port existing and upcoming games and franchises over to Nintendo's hit system. For the most part, you'd be wrong (so fa
15h
Gizmodo
The Anteater's Tongue Is an Evolutionary Masterpiece This is such a good animal!! (Image: Malene Thyssen /Wikimedia Commons) Anteaters are very good animals. They somehow pull off the whole “slurp up ants with their sticky, noodly, bendy straw tongues” so confidently you forget how weird that is. And scientists agree that, yes, anteater tongues are weird. But they’re also understudied. A team of Brazilian researchers are therefore spending their ti
15h
Popular Science
Personalized vaccines could help the immune system fight cancer Health But there’s still a long way to go. Two recent studies have made headway on developing a personalized human cancer vaccine. Read on.
15h
Gizmodo
How to Exit an Airplane Like You're Not an Idiot Photo: Flickr THE SITUATION: You’re on a plane and the plane has landed. NOW: Let me explain to you what NOT to do—and what to do instead. THE WRONG THING TO DO To be clear this is what you should NOT do—although many do (do it). So you’re on the plane and the plane has landed and the plane has taxied to the gate. It’s time to get off now. Let’s say you’re ten rows back from the front. Or 15, or
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
FDA Approves First Sickle Cell Drug in 20 YearsApproximately 100,000 people in the U.S. have the disorder -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Ars Technica
Creationist sues national parks, now gets to take rocks from Grand Canyon Enlarge (credit: Scott K. Johnson) “Alternative facts” aren’t new. Young-Earth creationist groups like Answers in Genesis believe the Earth is no more than 6,000 years old despite actual mountains of evidence to the contrary, and they've been playing the “alternative facts” card for years. In lieu of conceding incontrovertible geological evidence, they sidestep it by saying, “Well, we just look a
15h
Popular Science
Five map and compass skills every outdoorsman should master DIY How to master the art of finding your way home. These tools can still lead you to the object of your heart’s desire—be that a lake teeming with brook trout or buried treasure. Read on.
15h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: In a Lost Baby Tooth, Scientists Find Ancient Denisovan DNAThe molar is from what researchers say is only the fourth individual member of the elusive species of ancient human cousins.
15h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Massive database of 182,000 leaves is helping predict plants' family trees The technique could be used on everything from flowers to cells to examine the factors that influence the shapes of plant parts. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22230
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Gizmodo
The Black Death May Have Had a Surprising Effect on the Environment Image: er madx/ Flickr Creative Commons From 1347 to 1351 , a nightmare disease ravaged Europe, afflicting victims with putrid black boils, fevers, vomiting, and in short order, death. Daily life ground to a halt as the Black Death spread along medieval trade routes, claiming an estimated 20 million lives with ruthless efficiency. Now, a team of researchers is asserting that the plague had an une
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diatoms have sex after all, and ammonium puts them in the moodNew research shows a species of diatom, a single-celled algae, thought to be asexual does reproduce sexually, and scientists learned it's a common compound -- ammonium -- that puts the ubiquitous organism in the mood.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Tesla Will Build the World’s Biggest Lithium-ion BatteryAnd, like a pizza delivery, the buyer even gets an “if it’s late, it’s free” guarantee.
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Wired
You, Too, Can Analyze North Korea's Missile Capabilities--With Physics and VideoLet's take a closer look at the video North Korea released to determine that missile's acceleration.
15h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How Do You Know Visibility's Bad On The Bering Sea? Birds Start Flying Into Your Boat. #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c How is Captain Keith supposed to direct the Wizard through this storm when even the birds can't see? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Step aboard the fishin
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Gizmodo
Bat Rays Are Sentient Ravioli of the Sea Image: Monterey Bay Aquarium The superorder Batoidea, commonly known as “rays,” is full of stingy cuties. The bat ray ( Myliobatis californica) is especially adorable, and tragically underrated. This week on Animals Are Good, we’re highlighting these happy little sea flaps and their unusual eating habits. As their scientific name suggests, bat rays live along the waters of the west coast of the U
15h
New Scientist - News
People are hacking antidepressant doses to avoid withdrawalA patient-led movement is helping people taking psychiatric medicines to hack their dosing regimens, but regulatory agencies advise against self-medication
15h
Wired
These Days It Makes More Sense for Batman to Be a Villain'Batman: White Knight' flips the roles of the Joker and the Caped Crusader—and offers up a comics series primed for the 21st century.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bacteria Might Share the Blame for EczemaIn patients with severe eczema, Staphylococcus aureus strains dominated the skin microbe population—suggesting that certain types of bacteria could worsen eczema flares. Christopher Intagliata... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
This magnetic space putty will make hours disappear Sponsored Post Feel the stress fade away while satisfying your curiosity. This magnetic space putty will make hours disappear. Feel the stress fade away while satisfying your curiosity.
15h
Ars Technica
Waymo drops most of its patent case against Uber Enlarge / Pieces of Uber's earlier lidar system, codenamed "Spider," are arrayed in a courtroom in San Francisco. (credit: Waymo v. Uber court documents) Waymo has narrowed the claims in its lawsuit against Uber over self-driving car technology. Alphabet's self-driving car company dropped most of its patent claims in an effort to streamline a planned October trial. Uber was sued in February, when
15h
The Atlantic
The Strange, High-Pressure Work of Presidential Interpreters Ahead of President Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin Friday, some of the White House’s critics lamented the lack of experience among the Americans in the meeting. The group included was extremely small—just six people, including Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, and interpreters. Ivo Daalder, the U.S. ambassador to NATO under Barack Obam
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Genetically Engineered Moths Coming to a Cabbage Patch Near YouOpen-air tests of self-destructing moths mark a new frontier for GMOs.
15h
Live Science
Calm Seas on Titan: Saturn Moon's Waves Less Than 1 Inch HighThe liquid-hydrocarbon lakes on Titan are incredibly calm, suggesting that future missions to the huge Saturn moon could enjoy a smooth ride to the surface.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why does prenatal alcohol exposure increase the likelihood of addiction?One of the many negative consequences when fetuses are exposed to alcohol in the womb is an increased risk for drug addiction later in life. Neuroscientists in the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions are discovering why.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospitalized older adults may need more help selecting skilled nursing facilitiesWe don't have much information about how people select skilled nursing facilities or what information they're given to make informed choices. So a team of researchers recently studied how hospitalized older adults make decisions about choosing a facility, who helps them decide, what they think about the process, and what they consider as they make decisions.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dendritic cells 'divide and conquer' to elude viral infection while promoting immunityTwo subsets of dendritic cells work together to activate T cells against a virus: one dies and produces the viral antigens that the other then sweeps up and presents to the T cells.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Powerful new photodetector can enable optoelectronics advancesIn a nanoscale photodetector that combines a unique fabrication method and light-trapping structures, a team of engineers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University at Buffalo has overcome obstacles to increasing performance in optoelectronic devices -- like camera sensors or solar cells -- without adding bulk.
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Gizmodo
Ötzi the Iceman’s Axe Came From Surprisingly Far Away Reconstruction of Ötzi. (Image: University of Padova) Ötzi the Iceman—our favorite Copper Age corpsicle—is the gift that keeps on giving. A recent analysis of the metal found in the Neolithic hunter’s copper axe suggests a point of origin in Southern Tuscany, which is far from where Ötzi’s frozen body was found. This suggests a long-distance trade route might have existed between central Italy an
16h
New Scientist - News
Invisibility cloak makes solar panels work more efficientlyA new material that hides the metal grid on top of solar panels make them 9 per cent more efficient in lab tests
16h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 7/1–7/7 The pagan Ivana Kupala night celebrated in Ukraine, a crash in the Tour de France, the Wife-Carrying World Championship in Finland, G20 meetings and protests in Germany, a brawl in Venezuela’s National Assembly, flooding in Japan, the start of the San Fermin festival in Spain, and much more.
16h
The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘America’ by Alicia Ostriker In honor of this week’s Fourth of July celebrations, here are the first few lines from Alicia Ostriker’s “ America ,” from our July/August 2012 issue: Do you remember our earnestness our sincerity In first grade when we learned to sing America The Beautiful along with the Star-Spangled Banner And say the Pledge of Allegiance to America We put our hands over our first-grade hearts We felt proud to
16h
Live Science
Kinect Scans of T. Rex Skull Shed Light on Mysterious HolesMotion-sensing tech used by gamers — the Kinect — helped scientists conduct serious research, when they used it to scan and 3D-model the skull of a T. rex.
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Gizmodo
The Greatest Spider-Men of All Time, Ranked Spider-Man is one of the world’s most beloved superheroes. So beloved, in fact, that far more people than just Peter Parker or even Peter’s clones have taken on the Spider-Mantle. In celebration of Spider-Man: Homecoming ’s release, here are the many Spider-Men of the multiverse, judged and ranked for your pleasure. Note: We’re ranking Spider- Men rather than Spider- People , so you won’t find th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visitors get first look at Pittsburgh Zoo's baby elephantShe doesn't have a name yet, but visitors to the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium can now get a look at a female elephant calf born a month prematurely.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Fossil tooth pushes back record of mysterious Neandertal relativeA Denisovan child’s fossil tooth dates to at least 100,000 years ago, researchers say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study showsFor patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia -- high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia -- low blood sugar), says new research published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Powerful new photodetector can enable optoelectronics advancesIn today's increasingly powerful electronics, tiny materials are a must as manufacturers seek to increase performance without adding bulk.
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Popular Science
All good sunglasses have these five things Gadgets Lens layers, like an onion. Lens layers, like an onion. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Doubt And Drama Still Haunt An Old, Seemingly Impossible Atari World Record [Updated] The current world record for the Atari 2600 racing game Dragster is 5.51 seconds. Thirty-five years after it was set, nobody has beaten or even tied it on official leaderboards. One speedrunner who has examined the game’s inner workings believes that world record to be impossible, but the game’s creator thinks it’s legitimate. For now, the Dragster record is one of the great unsolved mysteries of
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The Atlantic
Why Geologists Think Glacial Mountains Look Like Sheep Two dozen mountains drape themselves diagonally across the middle of Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island in Maine. The peaks start near Bar Harbor in the northeast, tumble down across Jordan Pond, Somes Sound, and Echo Lake, and end with Mansell and Bernard Mountains in the southwest. Every one of these mountains, like the state of Maine, all of New England, and much of the continent of N
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New Scientist - News
Boy finds ‘extinct’ frog in Ecuador and helps revive speciesA citizen science prize of $1000 got one family looking for a once-common amphibian. Their rediscovery of it has led to tadpoles hatching in captivity
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Gizmodo
This One-Day Sale From Amazon Is Truly Marvelous Marvel Gold Box Start your weekend with a pretty super deal. Amazon is marking down a ridiculous amount of Marvel stuff , from tees and toys, to dog beds and Blu-rays. It’s basically a comic book lover’s dream, except with less Stan Lee. But you’d better take advantage of this today , because it’ll disappear quicker than you can say “SNIKT”.
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Gizmodo
I Gave Mattel My Email Address to Keep My Child Safe. They Used It to Send Me Spam. Image by Angelica Alzona Once I became a parent, I noticed for the first time that the products I was buying came with pre-addressed postcards. These postcards ask you to send in your contact information, so you can be informed if the product you bought is later deemed unsafe and recalled, so you don’t, for example, get killed by a whipped cream canister . Maybe all products come with these postc
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Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on vaccinations: a matter of public health | EditorialResisting childhood vaccinations for bad reasons should not be tolerated. We must not play with people’s lives It takes a long time for social movements to show up in conventional politics. The personal becomes political only with a time lag of decades. The increased toleration and the respect for the individual and the marginalised that appeared in western societies in the 60s and 70s did not mak
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The Atlantic
Trump's Meeting With Putin Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin met Friday for the first time in the U.S. leader’s young presidency, an encounter that was marked by differing accounts of the issues discussed, some common ground, and areas of disagreement. The meeting, which was held in Hamburg, Germany, on the sidelines of the G20 summit, was scheduled to last 35 minutes, but went on for more than two ho
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer vision techniques shed light on urban changeFour years ago, researchers at MIT's Media Lab developed a computer vision system that can analyze street-level photos taken in urban neighborhoods in order to gauge how safe the neighborhoods would appear to human observers. Now, in an attempt to identify factors that predict urban change, the MIT team and colleagues at Harvard University have used the system to quantify the physical improvement
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Ars Technica
Super-litigious patent holder ordered to pay defendant’s legal fees Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) Shipping and Transit, LLC is a company that has spent more than a decade filing patent lawsuits against big businesses, public transport systems, and one-man software companies. Now for the first time, the organization has been ordered to pay the legal fees of one of the companies it sued. A federal judge has ordered (PDF) Shipping and Transit—formerly known as Arri
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New Scientist - News
After 80 years, will forensics solve the Amelia Earhart mystery?Sniffer dogs have been hunting Earhart's DNA on an island, while a rival search hails an archived image as proof the riddle is over. Is it, asks Paul Marks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An easier prescriptionType I diabetes patients typically inject insulin several times a day, a painful process that reduces quality-of-life. Injectable medications are also associated with noncompliance, which can result in long-term complications for patients with chronic disease and dramatic increases in healthcare costs.
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Wired
Don't Let the Alt-Right Fool You: Journalism Isn't DoxingDoxing long predates CNN's recent story about the Redditor behind a Trump tweet—but it doesn't include it. Here's why.
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The Atlantic
The Familiar Novelty of Haim's New Album Talking about the band Haim often quickly becomes an exercise in naming older bands they remind people of. So, to get this out of the way: Haim’s new album, Something to Tell You , draws from Fleetwood Mac, Wilson Phillips, Talking Heads, Shania Twain, TLC, Fleetwood Mac, AC/DC, Bruce Springsteen, Prince, Heart, George Michael, Fleetwood Mac, and many others. Did I mention Fleetwood Mac? Especial
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Big Think
Why Believing in Free Will Is More Important Than Knowing We Have It At some point in life, you've probably asked yourself how in-control of your own actions you are. Could you have stopped yourself from eating that extra morsel? In other words, do you have free will? Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons aim at improving integrity in dissimilar metal weldsWhen welders fuse together metals, they don't always use metals with similar compositions. Often, dissimilar welding is required to create the most formidable structure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Borneo's orangutans in 'alarming' decline: studyThe orangutan population on the island of Borneo has shrunk by a quarter in the last decade, researchers said Friday, urging a rethink of strategies to protect the critically-endangered great ape.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rivers do not have same rights as humans: India's top courtIndia's sacred Ganges and Yamuna rivers cannot be considered "living entities", the country's top court ruled Friday, suspending an earlier order that granted them the same legal rights as humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees weakening of Tropical Depression 4NASA satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Depression 4 appears to be losing its punch, and the National Hurricane Center expects the storm to weaken.
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The Atlantic
When Potential Mentors Are Mostly White and Male Stacy Blake-Beard was 29 years old when she was starting out as a professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education. Not only was she the youngest faculty member, but she was also younger than most of her students. One day, one of her doctoral students came into her office to discuss a research project. “[The student] looked over at me and asked, ‘How old are you, anyway?’” Blake-Bea
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New on MIT Technology Review
Hackers Have Been Targeting U.S. NukesThis could be the warm-up act for something larger.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google's 'moonshot' factory spins off geothermal unitGoogle parent Alphabet is spinning off a little-known unit working on geothermal power called Dandelion, which will begin offering residential energy services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strange silk: Why rappelling spiders don't spin out of controlThe last time you watched a spider drop from the ceiling on a line of silk, it likely descended gracefully on its dragline instead of spiraling uncontrollably, because spider silk has an unusual ability to resist twisting forces.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees weakening of Tropical Depression 4NASA satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Depression 4 appears to be losing its punch, and the National Hurricane Center expects the storm to weaken.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop tumor-targeting MRI contrast based on human proteinA team led by Gang Han, PhD, has designed a human protein-based, tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast that can be easily cleared by the body. The discovery holds promise for clinical application, including early stage tumor detection because of the enhanced MRI contrast, according to Dr. Han, associate professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology at University of Massach
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Popular Science
Facebook can't solve its hate speech problem with automation Technology How can the company engineer civil discourse for 2 billion people? Facebook transparency into speech reveals a thorny problem. Read on.
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The Scientist RSS
Untreatable Gonorrhea Rising GloballyFifty countries report strains of the bacteria that are resistant to last-resort antibiotics.
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cognitive science
Scientists enhanced or reduced mouse memorization skills by modulating specific synchronized brain waves during deep sleep. This is the first study to show that manipulating sleep spindle oscillations at the right timing affects memory. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica
Nintendo could have supported Super FX long before the SNES Classic "It's the difference between looking at a picture and being there." (credit: Stone Age Gamer ) Since launching the Virtual Console in 2006 , Nintendo has officially re-released dozens of Super NES games for play on modern consoles. As that emulated library has grown, though, many have noted an important gap: Nintendo hasn't re-released any SNES games that made use of the 3D-focused Super FX chip
18h
Gizmodo
Mars Might Not Be The Potato Utopia We Hoped Image: 20th Century Fox In Andy Weir’s novel-turned-Matt-Damon-movie The Martian , the protagonist endures the harsh terrain of Mars by using his own shit to grow potatoes. The idea isn’t that outlandish—over the last few years, a NASA-backed project has been attempting to simulate Martian potato farming by growing taters in the Peruvian desert. While early results were promising, new research su
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Gizmodo
Waymo Just Dropped Nearly All of Its Patent Claims Against Uber Photo: AP Waymo and Uber have reached an agreement in their ongoing legal fight—Waymo will drop the majority of its patent infringement claims and Uber will promise not to resume development of its defunct, allegedly infringing lidar device, Spider. The patent claims have been a bit of a distraction in Waymo’s lawsuit against Uber, which also accuses the ride-hailing company of stealing trade sec
18h
cognitive science
New research by scientists at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in the UK and Indiana University School of Medicine gives the most detailed view yet of tau protein structures found in Alzheimer’s disease. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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cognitive science
Poor sleep may be a sign that people who are otherwise healthy may be more at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life than people who do not have sleep problems submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR
Who Gets To Fish For Red Snapper In The Gulf? It's All Politics The fish were nearly wiped out from the Gulf 20 or 30 years ago, so the catch is closely regulated. A Trump administration deal to extend the recreational season has prompted cheers – and concerns. (Image credit: Debbie Elliott/NPR)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Newfound particle relies on its charm(s)First-of-its-kind subatomic particle is composed of two charm quarks and an up quark.
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Gizmodo
This Photographer's Shots of Real Buildings Look Just Like Optical Illusions The Diagonal - New York City, NY - Photo courtesy Nikola Olic Serbian photographer Nikola Olic lives and works in Dallas, Texas, but he also travels the world with a keen eye that’s always looking for unusual angles on buildings and other structures. The result is a collection of architectural photographs that look more like impossible optical illusions. Olic’s abstract shots make the world seem
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Quanta Magazine
Why Are There Two Sexes? Sex is one of the greatest mysteries in biology. Why on earth do most large complex animals have two sexes? Asexual reproduction can efficiently produce twice as many offspring as sexual reproduction without the complications of finding and courting a mate. There must be major benefits to having two sexes, but if so, why shouldn’t three sexes be even better? Isaac Asimov explored this complicated
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New Scientist - News
Even toddlers expect bullies to get more than their fair shareFor the first time, there’s evidence that even 17-month-old infants expect socially dominant people to be treated differently in life, and to get more things
18h
Ars Technica
Cable TV companies can charge higher prices thanks to new court ruling Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KLH49) The cable TV industry has won a big victory against rate regulation via a court decision that will make it harder for cities and towns to impose price controls on pay-TV service. Today's ruling from the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld a June 2015 decision by the Federal Communications Commission that helped cable companies avo
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Gizmodo
Brutal Drone Footage Shows a Pod of Orcas Attacking a Minke Whale GIF As apex predators, orcas can prey on whichever marine animal they choose—large or small. During a recent expedition off the coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula, scientists captured rare footage of orcas attacking a 40-foot-long minke whale. Fair warning, people—this footage is graphic and disturbing. They’re called “killer whales” for a reason, and this clip is a potent reminder as to how these
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Popular Science
Your anti-virus software is not enough Technology As cyber-security gets more complicated, you should be taking more steps to protect yourself. Straightforward measures will protect your computer. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMMS researcher, colleagues develop tumor-targeting MRI contrast based on human proteinA team led by Gang Han, PhD, has designed a human protein-based, tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast that can be easily cleared by the body. The discovery holds promise for clinical application.
18h
Ars Technica
After bet between billionaires, South Australia buys 129MWh Tesla battery Enlarge (credit: Tesla) South Australia has suffered significant blackouts in recent months due to storms and heat. Now, the Australian state is looking for ways to fortify the grid, and it’s apparently turning to Tesla to provide some grid-tied storage. In a press release , Tesla wrote that it was chosen “through a competitive bidding process" to build a 100 MW/129 MWh battery system, which will
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Scientific American Content: Global
Pence Calls for "New Era of Space Exploration" at NASAThe Vice President spoke of a return to the Moon and human missions to Mars, but offered few further details -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Falsehood at the Core of Trump's Warsaw Speech Sunday was “trivialize violence against the media” day for President Trump. Thursday was “fly to Warsaw and champion Western values day.” As presidential speeches go, Trump’s address in Warsaw was fair. Ish. If you forget who is speaking and what that person has been saying and doing since Inauguration Day—since the opening of his campaign in 2015—and really through his career. But if you remembe
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The Atlantic
The Story of Jay-Z Until 4:44 , Jay-Z’s albums could be understood as an indictment of the immorality of capitalism by a man luxuriating in its fruits. Jay-Z argued that there was something revolutionary in this, in a black man born in the projects proving himself a better entrepreneur than white men born into plenty, as if to suggest the infinite human potential destroyed by the circumstances he escaped. He was ri
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Big Think
Welcome to Snorting Chocolate People are snorting chocolate in Europe and now in America. Read More
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Nest Thermostat, Marvel Sale, Anker SoundBuds, and More Amazon’s one-day Marvel sale , $50 off a Nest thermostat , and Anker’s fitness-friendly SoundBuds lead off Friday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundBuds Tag , $24 with code PRIME231 Anker’s original SoundBuds are your favorite affordable wireless earbuds , but the newer SoundBuds Tag just got their bigge
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The Atlantic
U.S. Fears Dispute Over Qatar Will Intensify U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will fly Monday to Kuwait in an attempt to resolve the impasse over Qatar’s dispute with its Arab neighbors. The proposed visit comes just days after the expiration of a deadline Saudi Arabia and its allies set for Qatar to meet 13 demands, including severing links with the Muslim Brotherhood and shutting Al Jazeera, the Qatari-owned, Arabic-language TV stati
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Gizmodo
Jeremy Renner Managed to Break Both Arms During Avengers: Infinity War Image: The Avengers, Marvel/Disney In an unfortunate instance of a fake superhero getting really hurt, Jeremy Renner fractured both arms while doing a stunt for Infinity War . Renner told the story of how he fractured his right elbow and left wrist at Karlovy Vary Film Festival (via Variety ). For someone with two arms in braces, he seems pretty determined to keep working, saying that the injurie
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Futurity.org
Weak spot in TB bacteria could mean new drugs Researchers have discovered a key metabolic mechanism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria, which could lead to new drugs for treating tuberculosis. Mtb, which currently infects nearly 1.5 billion people worldwide and causes more than 1 million deaths each year, requires host lipids—cholesterol and fatty acids—to maintain infection. This is considered a defining characteristic of this pat
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Wired
With 'Spider-Man: Homecoming,' Hollywood's Dude Director Problem ContinuesMarvel's latest summer blockbuster is a reminder of an unfortunate trend—but it's not just a big-budget issue.
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The Atlantic
The Paris Agreement: Already Forgotten? REYKJAVÍK, Iceland—When President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris Agreement on climate change, it seemed like the entire world rushed to condemn him. Emmanuel Macron, the president of France, immediately made a live broadcast. “He is making a mistake for the future of his country and his people, and a mistake for the future of the planet,” he said. Bishop Marcelo Sánchez So
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Futurity.org
This cell phone doesn’t need any batteries Instead of batteries, a new cellphone harvests the few microwatts of power it needs from a different source: ambient radio signals or light. Researchers were also able to make Skype calls using the battery-free phone, demonstrating that the prototype—made of commercial, off-the-shelf components—can receive and transmit speech and communicate with a base station. “We’ve built what we believe is th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Toxic Compounds May Sterilize Martian SoilMicrobes could be killed off by perchlorates exposed to ultraviolet radiation on the planet’s surface -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Battery Explodes at Turkish Airport After Passenger Throws Power Bank During Security Spat Screengrab: Doğan News Agency Throwing things out of anger is never a smart move, but it can also lead to more serious consequences. Especially when you’re at an airport and what you’re hurling at the ground is an explosion-prone lithium battery. This week, a man traveling to the UK caused a scene at Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, when he furiously threw his mobile power bank, which are ban
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Gizmodo
Fusion Trump Was Tweeting About Hillary Clinton Nonsense Before His Meeting With Putin | The Root Ph Fusion Trump Was Tweeting About Hillary Clinton Nonsense Before His Meeting With Putin | The Root Philando Castile, the War on Drugs and the Lynching of Black Humanity | Deadspin Andre Roberson, Bad Tipper, Roasted By Teammates | Jezebel Ben Affleck’s New Girlfriend’s Name Is Shookus |
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Latest Headlines | Science News
China’s quantum satellite adds two new tricks to its repertoireSatellite performs quantum teleportation and securely transmits encryption keys.
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: Toxic Mars, mission to Mercury and string theory Remember Matt Damon growing potatoes from his own waste in Ridley Scott’s spectacular man-on-Mars space epic The Martian? Of course you do. Damon’s botanist astronaut Mark Watney devises an ingenious way of surviving four years till his only chance of being rescued when another mission flies by Mars. So he grows spuds and lives to tell the tale – in the film, that is. In reality, Mr Watney wouldn
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Futurity.org
Friends beat family for aging well Among older adults, friendships are actually a stronger predictor of health and happiness than relationships with family members, research shows. In a pair of studies involving nearly 280,000 people, William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University, also found that friendships become increasingly important to one’s happiness and health across the lifespan. “If a frie
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Scientific American Content: Global
CO2 Benefits the "Rats and Cockroaches" of Marine WorldOcean acidification may be driving a cascade of changes that drains marine biodiversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strange silk: Why rappelling spiders don't spin out of controlOn this week's Applied Physics Letters, researchers show that unlike human hair, metal wires or synthetic fibers, spider silk partially yields when twisted. This property quickly dissipates the energy that would otherwise send an excited spider spinning on the end of its silk. A greater understanding of how spider silk resists spinning could lead to biomimetic fibers that mimic these properties fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cornell discovery holds potential for treating tuberculosisA recent discovery by Cornell University researchers could lead to a new, effective treatment for persistent tuberculosis infections.
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Science : NPR
Georgia OB-GYN Will Lead Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, who leads the Georgia Department of Public Health, has been appointed CDC director. She'll take over as the Trump administration seeks big cuts to the CDC's budget. (Image credit: Branden Camp/AP)
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Science : NPR
Something New For Baby To Chew On: Rocket Science And Quantum Physics Chris Ferrie's board books introduce subjects like rocket science, quantum physics and general relativity to toddlers and babies. What can parents do to make the concepts resonate? (Image credit: Courtesy of Amber Faust)
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New Scientist - News
Titan’s conditions could be just right to power US-sized colonySaturn’s largest moon may be able to provide enough wind, solar or tidal power to make human life there a possibility – if we can build the tech to exploit it
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Ars Technica
Sorry Veep, America already leads the world in space by a large margin Enlarge / Vice President Mike Pence speaks at Kennedy Space Center on Thursday. (credit: NASA) If President Donald Trump has had one consistent message about space exploration both during his campaign and presidency, it's that America is doing badly in space. About a year ago during a campaign stop in Daytona Beach, Florida, Trump said , "Look what's happened with our whole history of space and l
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Inside Science
The Fragile Ground Beneath 66 Million Barrels of Oil Earth Wastewater from oil drilling is triggering earthquakes, and no one can predict where they will strike or how hard they will shake. 07/07/2017 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/fragile-ground-beneath-66-million-barrels-oil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble's hidden galaxyIC 342 is a challenging cosmic target. Although it is bright, the galaxy sits near the equator of the Milky Way's galactic disk, where the sky is thick with glowing cosmic gas, bright stars, and dark, obscuring dust.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zero gravity: Graphene for space applicationsResearchers and students in the Graphene Flagship are preparing for two exciting experiments in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the viability of graphene for space applications. Both experiments will launch between 6-17th November 2017, testing graphene in zero-gravity conditions to determine its potential in space applications including light propulsion and thermal mana
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Gizmodo
This AR-Equipped Laser Tag Game Is Light on the AR, But Heavy on the Fun Images: Skyrocket The pitch was Pokemon Go meets Call of Duty . I couldn’t quite fathom how that would turn into a cool as hell game, but it involved augmented reality, a key feature of Pokemon Go , and laser tag, and those are both very fun things. Then I sat down with the team from Skyrocket and got to actually hold one of the guns from its new Recoil laser tag system. “It’s AR adjacent” the PR
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Why planetary scientists want better fake space dirt Artificial soils that mimic the surfaces of the Moon, Mars and asteroids are hard to make — and often miss the mark. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22228
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Trump administration chooses Georgia physician to lead US public-health agency Brenda Fitzgerald will be the next director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22235
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Ingeniøren
Den er god nok: Samkørselsbaner afhjælper verdens værste trafikkaosRejsetiden er nogle steder næsten fordoblet, efter Indonesiens hovedstad droppede omstridte samkørselsbaner. Det viser en MIT-undersøgelse fra verdens mest trafikerede by.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble's hidden galaxyAlthough IC 342 is bright, the galaxy sits near the equator of the Milky Way's disk, thick with glowing cosmic gas, bright stars, and dust.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How universities are fostering innovation and entrepreneurshipTechnology and Innovation 19.1 zeroes in on innovation and entrepreneurship, with a special focus on what universities are currently doing to foster growth in those areas both for their success and the success of the communities and regions to which they are connected. Novel educational programs, innovation-driving business accelerators, and ingenious makerspaces that allow users to manufacture th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New data, advanced modeling techniques suggest extreme coastal sea levels more likely to occurImproving projections for how much ocean levels may change in the future and what that means for coastal communities has vexed researchers studying sea level rise for years, but a new international study that incorporates extreme events may have just given researchers and coastal planners what they need. The study, published today in Nature Communications uses newly available data and advanced mod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking medications as prescribed important to control health care costsAt a time when health care costs are scrutinized more closely than ever, a new study demonstrates the importance of taking medications as prescribed to control costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Giant enhancement of electromagnetic waves revealed within small dielectric particlesScientists have done for the first time direct measurements of giant electromagnetic fields, emerging in dielectric particles with the high refractive index at the scattering of electromagnetic waves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insulin release is controlled by the amount of Epac2A at the secretory vesiclesSpecialized beta cells in the pancreas release the hormone insulin to control our blood glucose levels, and failure of this mechanism is central to the development of type-2 diabetes. How much and when insulin is released depends on a complex system of messenger molecules and proteins that is not well understood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pepsi-SAXS: New method of protein analysis that is 50 times faster than analoguesOne of the techniques used to study proteins is the analysis of X-rays scattered from them. Pepsi-SAXS stands for 'polynomial expansions of protein structures and interactions' and 'small-angle X-ray scattering.'It has been shown that Pepsi-SAXS is five to 50 times faster than the previously used methods. At the same time, the accuracy is on a par with them."
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Dell’s Black Friday in July includes a DJI Mavic Pro plus $200 gift card for $999 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with a new list of deals to share. Dell is having its Black Friday in July sale, featuring savings on laptops, monitors, drones, and more. Of note is a steal on one of DJI's newest drones: now you can get a DJI Mavic Pro plus a $200 Dell gift card for $999. The Mavic Pro originally costs $999, so you essentially get the $20
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NYT > Science
Cholera Spreads as War and Poverty Batter YemenAbout 1,600 people have died because of a cholera outbreak in Yemen, where the bacterial infection has spread to 21 of the country’s 22 provinces.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald Named New CDC DirectorThe incoming chief was a two-time Republican candidate for Congress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: G20 Check-In
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Gizmodo
Experts Sound the Alarm as Drug Resistant Gonorrhea Goes Global Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteria responsible for gonorrhea. (Image: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) Describing it as a “serious situation,” the World Health Organization has issued a grim warning about the dramatic rise of antibiotic resistant gonorrhea around the world. The agency is now calling for the quick development of drugs to treat the sexually transmitted
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Gizmodo
If You Want Your Five Bucks Back, The FAA Is Refunding Drone Registrations Source: Getty Good news for drone hobbyists who were noble enough to register their aircrafts but could really use $5 right about now: The US Federal Aviation Administration is refunding registration fees and removing names from its registration database. The FAA first started requiring drone owners to register small aerial vehicles on December 21, 2015. The registrations cost a small fee and las
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Futurity.org
Program keeps more men from repeat domestic violence A three-year study comparing domestic violence offenders who completed a new pilot program with those who completed a traditional program found that around 50 percent fewer participants reoffended and were arrested in the year after taking the new program. Amie Zarling, a clinical psychologist and an assistant professor of human development and family studies at Iowa State University, worked with
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Wired
The Petya Plague Exposes the Threat of Evil Software UpdatesSecurity firm Kaspersky says the ransomware was the third attack in the last year that hijacked innocent updates to spread malware.
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Wired
'The Lifesaving Machines' Peeks Inside the Beeping, Whirring Machines That Save LivesStriking images of incubators and ventilators outside of the hospital.
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Gizmodo
Fly Trapped in a 3D Printed Block Is a 21st Century Fossil Image: Richard Johnston Millions of years ago, unlucky animals settled in the sticky resin of trees, only to be trapped and preserved until we humans found them. Fossils of the distant future, however, will probably be a whole lot weirder than bugs in tree sap. An engineer 3D-printing this honeycomb structure was surprised to find a bug had trapped itself in the print, like an insect in amber. Fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nurse-led intervention helps carers' manage medication and cancer painA study funded by Marie Curie and Dimbleby Cancer Care published today shows the potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New epigenomic strategies in the clinical management of cancer of unknown primaryThe invention of the EPICUP epigenetic test and its impact in the clinical management of Cancer of Unknown Primary is discussed in Dr.Esteller's latest review.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Iron secrets behind superconductors unlockedDue to magnetism iron should -- theoretically -- be a poor superconductor. Nevertheless certain ironbased materials possess fine superconducting properties. Why? Because the five unbound electrons found in iron -- as a result of individual modes of operation, it turns out -- facilitate superconductivity. This new, long sought-for explanation - appearing in this weeks issue of Science - is the resu
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Futurity.org
Greater risk of death with these heartburn drugs A new study shows that long-time use of heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of death. Past studies have linked PPIs to several health problems, including serious kidney damage, bone fractures, and dementia. Millions of US residents take proton pump inhibitors to treat heartburn, ulcers, and other gastrointestinal problems. The drugs also are availabl
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Gizmodo
iOS 11 Has a Secret Feature That Lets You Stomp Around Cities Like Godzilla GIF With the introduction of iOS 11 and a development tool called ARKit, Apple is betting that augmented reality could be the next revolutionary feature for smartphones. At the very least, it’s facilitated a secret feature that lets iPhone users pretend they’re giant monsters stomping through a tiny city. The feature was discovered by developer Felix Lapalme who stumbled across it in the iOS 11 b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extreme low-oxygen eddies in the Atlantic produce greenhouse gasesOxygen in the seawater is not only vital to most marine organisms, its concentrations also affect the chemistry of the ocean and that of the atmosphere above. In oceanic regions with very little oxygen, for example, large amounts of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, also called laughing gas, are produced via biogeochemical processes and can then be released to the atmosphere.
20h
Live Science
How Much Should We Spend on Miracle Drugs? (Op-Ed)Specialty prescription drugs are responsible for countless medical miracles, but their high price tag is the main reason health care costs are out of control.
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Gizmodo
Slapping a Fancy Name on Nokia's New Smartphone Cameras Won't Make Them Good Image: Getty Nokia’s smartphones have long been known for having great cameras. Classic devices like the N95 (2007), 808 PureView (2012), or Lumia 1020 (2013) all had industry-leading camera tech on board. But will Nokia’s upcoming Android smartphones be just as great now that HMD Global is manufacturing them? This week, HMD Global announced a partnership with Zeiss Camera that “aims to set new i
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extreme low-oxygen eddies in the Atlantic produce greenhouse gasesIn 2014, an international research team led by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean' and the GEOMAR Kiel was able to investigate in detail eddies in the Atlantic Ocean which were characterized by extremely low oxygen concentrations. The interdisciplinary analysis of the data and samples has revealed processes which were not previously known to occur in the Atlantic. This also includes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fasting blood sugar and fasting insulin identified as new biomarkers for weight lossPersonalized diet approach could lead to greater weight loss and maintenance success.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts urge action to cut child deaths from deadly lung virusVaccines to combat a virus that can lead to fatal lung infections are urgently needed to help prevent child deaths worldwide, research suggests. Experts report that more than 115,000 children under five are dying each year from complications associated with the infection, called Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Around three million are admitted to hospital each year with the virus, which causes
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obstructing the 'inner eye'Hypnosis can help people stop smoking, sleep better and even undergo dental treatment without pain. But what exactly is hypnosis and what precisely happens in the brain of a hypnotised person? These questions are currently being studied by psychologists at the Universities Jena and Trier in Germany. The aim is to find comprehensive scientific answers to the questions, and the researchers have pres
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sucking up spilt oilSpilt crude oil has repeatedly polluted and even destroyed marine ecosystems. An effective measure would be to remove spilt oil slicks by absorption into a separable solid phase. As Indian scientists now report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, congelation of the oil to a rigid gel within impregnated cellulose and scooping the particles out is possible.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Ii Hamina cemetery reveals adaptation to the environmentThe medieval cemetery in Ii Hamina in northern Finland on the Iijoki river was originally discovered by accident. A recent study examined the isotope compositions of the teeth of the dead. It turned out that the population in the small village survived throughout the 15th and 16th centuries despite the Little Ice Age.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Childhood obesity major link to hip diseasesNew research from the University of Liverpool, published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, shows a strong link between childhood obesity and hip diseases in childhood.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops golden bananas high in pro-vitamin AThe decade-long research, led by Distinguished Professor James Dale, involved extensive laboratory tests at QUT as well as field trials in north Queensland.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flexible and cost-effective fabrication of nature inspired structural colorsThroughout nature, colors generally arise from two sources: pigment colors and structural colors. For application purposes, pigments or dyes that absorb light are considered to be the traditional method to color materials due to their ease of usage. Despite their strengths, there are negative aspects to pigment colors such as potential for environmental damage during the manufacturing process and
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Untreatable Gonorrhea on the Rise WorldwideNonprofit group helps marshal trial of a new antibiotic in an attempt to beat back resistant infections -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Growing plants in vinegar could help them survive drought Science Even crops like rice and wheat might be grown in imperfect conditions. A study by Japanese scientists shows that external application of acetate, found in vinegar, helps plants grow in drought conditions.
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Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: It-projektleder hos Forsvaret eller Business Intelligence konsulent for IDA? På ugens liste søger både Forsvaret, SKAT, Bloom ApS, VP SECURITIES A/S dygtige it-folk. Se listen her https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-it-projektleder-hos-forsvaret-eller-business-intelligence-konsulent-ida-8989 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Viden
Tesla vil bygge verdens største batteri i AustralienEfter udfordring på Twitter får australsk delstat nu verdens største batterianlæg, der skal lagre vindmøllestrøm.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Well-being in later life: The mind plays an important roleWell-being in later life is largely dependent on psychosocial factors. Physical impairments tend to play a secondary role, as scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered. The results of their recent study are published in BMC Geriatrics.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthesis of internal gem-diborylalkanes by copper-catalyzed double hydroborationGeminal organometallic reagents have attracted considerable attention due to their unique activity. Among them, gem-diboryl compounds are particularly valuable due to their stability, no-toxicity, and usability for a variety of transformations
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drinking alcohol while pregnant could have transgenerational effectsSoon-to-be mothers have heard the warning - don't drink while pregnant. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued numerous statements about the dangers of alcohol consumption during pregnancy, as it can lead to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) in newborns.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recruiting manganese to upgrade carbon dioxideOIST researchers developed simple catalysts based on Earth-abundant manganese to use carbon dioxide for energy storage or turn it into useful chemicals for the industry.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NYU researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetesUtilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flexible and cost-effective fabrication of nature inspired structural colorsA team of Korean researchers led by Geunbae Lim, a professor at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) has successfully developed a new and cost-effective method for obtaining biomimetic structural colors with the ability to finely tune the completed structures. This achievement has been published in the world-renowned ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
QUT develops golden bananas high in pro-vitamin AQUT has produced Ugandan bananas high in pro-vitamin A.Cooking bananas are the staple food in rural UgandaWorldwide 650 000 - 750 000 children die from vitamin A deficiency.Ugandan farmers will be growing pro-vitamin A rich bananas in 2021.A humanitarian project backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon microspheres for supercapacitorsA facile two-step synthetic strategy was proposed to synthesize nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon microsphere (NSCM). Outstanding electrochemical performance was obtained when the materials were used as electrodes for supercapacitor.
21h
The Atlantic
Economy Added 222,000 Jobs; Unemployment Rate Is at 4.4 Percent The U.S. economy added 222,000 jobs in June, the Labor Department said Friday, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 4.4 percent. Economists surveyed by Reuters had expected the addition of 179,000 jobs. The jobless rate was a slight increase over last month’s 4.3 percent rate, a 15-year low. The average hourly wage grew 2.5 percent from last year, slightly less than expected, but the r
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The Atlantic
Tour de Pharmacy's Insane, Riotous Ride Tour de Pharmacy , a new mockumentary by Andy Samberg and Murray Miller, starts as it means to go on: with Orlando Bloom, in lycra and sporting two-tone facial hair, hurtling down a mountain having a drug-induced heart attack while his penis dangles woefully to the side. The 38-minute special, a good-natured play on reverent sports docs like ESPN’s 30 for 30 series, is absurd. It takes the thorny
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New Scientist - News
Neural network poetry is so bad we think it’s written by humansA machine learning algorithm trained on thousands of lines of English poetry can now mimic different poetic styles - but its verse doesn’t quite ring true
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Gizmodo
Can an Algorithm Diagnose Heart Disease Better Than a Person? Image: AP Images On Thursday, researchers at Stanford University introduced the latest thing in AI diagnostics: an algorithm that can sift through hours of heart rhythm data gathered by wearable monitors to determine whether a patient has an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia. The algorithm, the researchers say, is not only as good as a cardiologist at correctly diagnosing a condition, but often
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Gizmodo
The Nintendo Switch Is Back In Stock On Amazon, If You Hurry Nintendo Switch , $300 for Prime Members PSA: Nintendo Switch is in stock on Amazon for Prime members, for the next few seconds anyway. Go fast! Don’t forget the games!
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New Scientist - News
Smartphone components work beautifully at nearly absolute zeroA team working on electronics for a space-based camera has tested ordinary transistors at ultra-low temperatures, and they passed with flying colours
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Wired
Volta V Wooden Gaming PC Review: It Looks and Plays Like a MasterpieceMuch has been said about how good the Volta V looks on your desk. Less however has been written about how well it actually works.
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Gizmodo
More Avengers: Infinity War Set Pictures Tease Yet Another Villain It’s already time to start talking about Spider-Man: Homecoming 2 's villains. Once Upon a Time bulks out its new cast in the wake of several key departures. The next big DC/CW crossover event wants to up the emotional stakes. Plus, new Kingsman: The Golden Circle footage, and rumors of another comic adaptation coming to Netflix. Spoilers now! Avengers: Infinity War Set pics have surfaced of Paul
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Kindle Is King–Why Would I Buy This Other E-reader? All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo I’ve got a struggle y’all. I’ve been using the new Kobo Aura H2O off and on for the last few weeks, switching between reading on it with reading on my overpriced but super damn slick Amazon Kindle Oasis . The two aren’t entirely comparable: The Oasis costs $290 and the Kobo goes for $180. But the big difference between the two has nothing to do with price, or even h
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feel the heat, one touch a timeA research team from the University of Washington and Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology has developed a technique combining atomic force microscopy and finite element simulation to measure local thermal conductivity with nanometer resolution, posed to substantially advance thermoelectric materials characterization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes in brain regions may explain why some prefer order and certaintyWhy do some people prefer stable, predictable lives while others prefer frequent changes? Why do some people make rational decisions and others, impulsive and reckless ones? UCLA behavioral neuroscientists have identified changes in two brain regions that may hold answers to these questions.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Readers Respond to the February and March 2017 IssuesLetters to the editor from the February and March 2017 issues of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Smelling our food may make us gain weight Our sense of smell is key to the enjoyment of food, so it may be no surprise that obese mice in a recent study who lost their sense of smell also lost weight. What’s surprising, however, is that these slimmed-down but smell-deficient mice ate the same amount of fatty food as mice that retained their sense of smell and ballooned to twice their normal weight. Further, super smeller mice—those with
21h
Live Science
Sandbox Sickness: Diarrhea-Causing Bacteria Found in PlaygroundsWhat's lurking in the playground sandbox? According to a new small study from Spain, the answer may confirm a parent's worst fears: dangerous germs.
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cognitive science
A new paper in JPSP suggests that keeping secrets is bad for you--not because of the stress of hiding information, but because you keep thinking about the secret. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippine police arrest rare sea turtle poachersPhilippine police said Friday they had seized 70 dead hawksbill marine turtles, a critically endangered species illegally trafficked for its prized shell, and arrested two suspects.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Delayed GratificationEighty years ago, a Neanderthal femur dating back more than 120,000 years was recovered from a Southwestern Germany cave. Now, the ancient bone reveals new clues about the bedfellows of human ancestors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new approach to emissions trading in a post-Paris climateDespite the US withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, other countries, including New Zealand, remain committed to cutting their greenhouse gas emissions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscale motion sends light into overdriveAMOLF researchers have developed nanoscale strings whose motion can be converted to light signals with unprecedented strength. This could allow for extremely precise sensors and comes with an important side effect. "Analogous to a guitar amplifier in overdrive producing distorted sound waves, our strong motion-to-light conversion leads to distorted light signals," says group leader Ewold Verhagen.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Peering beneath the Surface of Ancient ManuscriptsTo save on parchment, monks would overwrite older documents to create new ones—but a new tool can reveal what lies beneath -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
New Scientist - News
Frogs may have evolved the first kneecaps on EarthThe discovery that frogs have cushy kneecaps pushes back the evolution of this feature, and hints at why they don’t incur as much injury as humans do when jumping
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can spiders really count?A recent issue of Interface Focus examined the idea of convergent minds, which pertains to how distantly related species can think about problem solving in very similar ways. The special issue is a multi-disciplinary investigation into the evolution of cognition and its various forms. One of the papers, a research article called 'Representation of different exact numbers of prey by a spider-eating
22h
Ingeniøren
Tesla skal bygge verdens største batteripark i Australien - på 100 dageElon Musk lovede i marts den australske delstat Sydaustralien, at han kan bygge en 100 MWh-batteripark på 100 dage – ellers er det gratis. Nu har delstaten takket 'ja' til tilbuddet.
22h
Ingeniøren
Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste søgte ulovligt i rådata i 2016 Forsvarets Efterretningstjenestes indhenter ved såkaldte Signal Intelligence meget store informationsmængder. Det sker bare ikke altid i overensstemmelse med loven, viser et tilsyn. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/forsvarets-efterretningstjeneste-soegte-ulovligt-raadata-2016-1078164 Version2
22h
Popular Science
How to get the most out of Google Play Music DIY Nine ways to upgrade your listening experience. Google's music player app is available on the web, Android, and iOS. These tricks will help you optimize your listening experience.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin's central appeal could also be its biggest weaknessBitcoin reached a huge new peak in value in June 2017, when one unit of the virtual currency was worth US$2,851 (£2,208), up from around US$600 just a year earlier. More than 10m people worldwide are now thought to own bitcoin and more than 100,000 merchants accept it for goods (not counting all those using it to sell drugs and other illegal items on the black market).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons point the way to optimised crash-tolerant automotivesPress-hardened boron steel is an ultra high-strength steel used across a variety of industries, with a particularly important application in the automotive industry. A large proportion of car manufacturers use boron steel for structural components and anti-intrusion systems in automobiles, as it provides high strength and weight-saving potential, allowing for stronger yet lighter cars, with increa
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New Scientist - News
Tesla to build world’s largest lithium ion battery in AustraliaThe 100 megawatt battery will store excess energy generated by a wind farm when electricity demands are low, then feed it back into the grid during peak hours
22h
Gizmodo
Avoid Crossing Any Lines With the Ghost Paper Notebook, Now $5 Off [Exclusive] Ghost Paper Notebook , $20 with code KINJA444 Even (or perhaps, especially) in the age of laptops and tablets, many people prefer the tactile experience of jotting down notes with an actual pen and paper, and the most tactile experience of all comes from the Ghost Paper Notebook . Rather than simply printing lines on the sheet to keep your letters straight, Ghost Paper’s lines are very slightly e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines increasing likelihood of extreme sea levelsScientists at the University of Southampton are warning that future coastal impact studies must take account of extreme sea levels – a phenomenon expected to occur more frequently as rising waters combine with high tides and storm surges to potentially devastating effect.
22h
Wired
Your Phone Is Your Most Vulnerable Gadget. Protect It NowIf there’s ever been a gadget worth protecting, it’s the rectangle in your pocket.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helically twisted photonic crystal fibresPhotonic crystal fibres (PCF) are strands of glass, not much thicker than a human hair, with a lattice of hollow channels running along the fibre. If they are continuously twisted in their production, they resemble a multi-helix. Twisted PCFs show some amazing features, from circular birefringence to conservation of the angular momentum. The biggest surprise, however, is the robust light guidance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Counting calories in spaceRockets and spacecraft may get us to Mars, but food must nourish us on the journey. Now researchers are using the International Space Station to look at how much food will be needed on a spacecraft heading to the Moon, Mars or beyond. By tracking the energy used by astronauts, we can count the number of calories humans will need for long flights.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Hermaphrodite wildflower has its own battle of the sexesA new example of sexual conflict shows up in a plant with a troublesome pollinator.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence-based system warns when a gun appears in a videoScientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have designed a computer system based on new artificial intelligence techniques that automatically detects in real time when a subject in a video draws a gun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CO2-neutral hydrogen from biomassWithout fossil fuels, there can be no blast furnace process – but hydrogen could play a more important role in the future. An environmentally friendly process is being developed at TU Wien by which biomass can be used to produce a hydrogen-rich gas that can then be employed in various ways in the iron and steel industry. TU Wien and voestalpine now aim to conduct further joint research on the subj
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most graduates will never pay off their student loansNew finding show that more than 70% of students who left university last year are never expected to finish repaying their loans. The report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) shows that many of these graduates – the first cohort to pay the higher £9,000 fees – will be making repayments for 30 years. This means that a large number of graduates will be paying back their loans well into their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Majorana highway on a chipThe first experimental evidence of a Majorana fermion in Delft 2012 led to a wave of scientific enthusiasm: control such particles are a holy grail in quantum science and technology. Quantum chips based on Majorana fermions promise error-protected quantum computations. However, the fabrication of Majorana devices is an extremely challenging task.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emojis and the jealous heartNearly 70 percent of Americans use some form of social media, according to a Pew Research Center survey. There is little doubt it affects our daily lives—but how?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Juveniles transferred to adult courts receive more time for their crimesFlorida transfers juvenile offenders to adult court at a higher rate than any other state in the nation, and a new Florida State University study has found that those transferred are much less likely to be sentenced to incarceration than adults. However, those juveniles who are sent to jail or prison are given longer incarceration sentences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New biosynthetic pathway unique to pathogenic microorganismsScientists have discovered a unique biosynthetic pathway for D-Glutamate, an important cell wall component in pathogenic bacteria, which could lead to the development of medicines and agricultural chemicals.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Says Why We Can't Look at the Sun It is 93 million miles away but can still do a lot of damage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recruiting manganese to upgrade carbon dioxideOIST researchers developed simple catalysts based on Earth-abundant manganese to use carbon dioxide for energy storage or turn it into useful chemicals for the industry.
23h
Gizmodo
First Handshake Between Trump and Putin Is Posted by Angela Merkel on Facebook GIF Video of the first ever handshake between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, which was posted to Facebook (Bundesregierung/Facebook) President Donald Trump and Russian president Valdimir Putin aren’t scheduled for a sit-down meeting until 9:30am Eastern this morning at the G-20 summit. But we have the first video from their meeting thanks to Facebook and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Tools l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CERN Data Centre passes the 200-petabyte milestoneOn 29 June 2017, the CERN DC passed the milestone of 200 petabytes of data permanently archived in its tape libraries. Where do these data come from? Particles collide in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detectors approximately 1 billion times per second, generating about one petabyte of collision data per second. However, such quantities of data are impossible for current computing systems to reco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Roman teaching methods help modern school children learn mathsSchoolchildren from across the region have been learning different ways to engage with maths, as part of a series of ancient Roman classroom days held at the University of Reading.
23h
The Atlantic
A College Student Who Seeks to Learn Rather Than to Teach Last year, the social psychologist Jonathan Haidt argued that recent conflicts at institutions of higher education are rooted in conflicting assessments of their telos , or core purpose. Is it to seek truth or to advance social justice? Those missions aren’t always at odds. But in Haidt’s view, they are presently coming into conflict often enough that the status quo is unmanageable. “Universities
23h
Live Science
'Charming' Heavy Particle Discovered at World's Largest Atom SmasherThe world's largest atom smasher, the large hadron collider, has uncovered a long-predicted type of heavy particle, known as the Xi-cc, which is made up of two charm quarks.
23h
Wired
Why the Tesla Model S Couldn't Ace That Small Overlap Front Crash TestThe Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's small overlap front crash test is a tricky one to master.
23h
Wired
The Guerrilla Journalists Defying ISIS One Video at a TimeA new documentary by Acadamy Award nominated director Matt Heineman goes inside the struggle to shed light on the horrors of ISIS's rule in Raqqa, Syria.
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Wired
The World May Be Headed for a Fragmented ‘Splinternet’In Germany, Canada, Austria, and elsewhere in the world, tech companies are being ordered to remove online content globally. Here's why that's troubling.
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Wired
Two Giants of AI Team Up to Head Off the Robot ApocalypseThe brains behind Google's DeepMind and Elon Musk's OpenAI are studying the ways AIs learn. The goal: to keep machines from going rogue.
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Wired
"Element" Makes It Official: Kendrick Lamar's Genius Isn't Just Verbal, It's Visual TooOver the past few years, the LA rapper and his collaborator have forged a stunning body of work—and revitalized music videos.
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Wired
'Spiderman: Homecoming' Gives Us a Reason to Study the Physics of Spider-Man's WebsPondering the role of Hooke's law and Young's modulus as we break down a scene in 'Spider-Man: Homecoming.'
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Gizmodo
Experts Cast Doubt on That New Photo Alleged to Show Amelia Earhart The world is fascinated with a newly discovered photo that claims to show Amelia Earhart being held by the Japanese in 1937. That’s supposed to be her in the photo above with her back to the camera. The only problem is that experts at the US National Archives aren’t so sure about key assertions made in some of this week’s sensationalistic headlines. The History Channel plans to air its documentar
23h
Live Science
Electrified Droplets Create Mini Saturn PlanetsBy electrifying tiny drops of fluid, scientists have created miniature versions of the ringed planet Saturn.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Juno will fly a mere 9,000 km above Jupiter’s Great Red SpotJuno is about to get up close and personal with Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.
23h
Science-Based Medicine
Chiropractic and Spinal Manipulation Red Flags: A Comprehensive ReviewMany people visit chiropractors’ offices seeking relief from back pain. Appropriate use of spinal manipulation provided by a chiropractor can be helpful in treating mechanical-type back pain, but there are good reasons to avoid chiropractic manipulation based on correction of “vertebral subluxations,” and there are red flags to look for before undergoing any kind of manipulative treatment for neck
23h
Ars Technica
Spider-Man Homecoming review: Having a blast with Peter Parker’s day off Enlarge / Trouble brews high, high in the sky. If only we had a hero nearby who could quickly scale buildings. (credit: Marvel Studios ) How many Spider-Man film reboots do we really need? That's not a hypothetical question. The comic series often hinges on "boy-becomes-man" plot devices, so you don't want someone portraying Peter Parker who reaches 90210 levels of aging out. But the Menudo metho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A big repeating molecule may be what defines lifeAs NASA inches closer to launching new missions to the solar system's outer moons in search of life, scientists are renewing their focus on developing a set of universal characteristics of life that can be measured.
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Science | The Guardian
Is the big business of scientific publishing bad for science? – podcast It is an industry like no other, with profit margins to rival Google – and it was created by one of Britain’s most notorious tycoons: Robert Maxwell • Read the text version here Subscribe via Audioboom , iTunes , Soundcloud , Mixcloud , Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Continue reading...
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Scientific American Content: Global
Night Owl? Scientists Identify a Gene That May Be Keeping People Up at NightA mutation found in some individuals who suffer from delayed sleep phase disorder could be interfering with their circadian clocks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows millennials view support, access to information as key to staying with an employerConventional wisdom says the era of the long-term company employee is over and that members of the millennial generation job hop.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The economic consequences of the arms race—military spending is harmful for growthIs military spending good for economic growth? According to some studies, the answer is affirmative. Military spending boosts business confidence, particularly in conflicting countries, which facilitates physical investment and economic growth. Others find that government spending on military hardware lowers macroeconomic growth as it crowds out social expenditures and investment in economically p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon nanotubes mimic biologyProteins in lipid membranes are one of the fundamental building blocks of biological functionality. Lawrence Livermore researchers have figured out how to mimic their role using carbon nanotube porins.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Stephen Hawking's daughter Lucy: 'You could ask my dad any question'Lucy Hawking describes her famous scientist father being asked - what happens if you fall into a black hole?
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Merkel’s climate mission at the G20Germany is battling to stop the US undermining a united front on climate change at the G20 summit.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
LHC Physicists Unveil a Charming New Particle The discovery could offer fresh insight into how fundamental forces bind together subatomic particles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Carved in Stone: The Ancient City of Petra (Photos)Sculpted into cliffs thousands of years ago, the massive stone city of Petra endures as a monument to what was once a thriving civilization in Jordan's distant past.
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Live Science
Christopher Columbus to Thailand's Kings: 11 Curious Stories About EclipsesSolar and lunar eclipses have sometimes played quite a remarkable role in human history. From foretelling evil omens to inspiring early works of science fiction, here are 11 of the most curious stories about eclipses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
See our seasons change from spaceWith the Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite fully fledged and its data freely available, the task of monitoring and understanding our changing planet has been made that much easier. Seeing the effect spring has on our plant life is just one of its many uses.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An organogelator-cellulose composite material for practical and eco-friendly marine oil-spill recoverySpilt crude oil has repeatedly polluted and even destroyed marine ecosystems. An effective measure would be to remove spilt oil slicks by absorption into a separable solid phase. As Indian scientists now report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, congelation of the oil to a rigid gel within impregnated cellulose and scooping the particles out is possible.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality opens doors to Edinburgh's historic pastFor the first time, visitors to Edinburgh will be able to explore the streets, marketplaces and churches as they may have been in the 16th century thanks to academics at the University of St Andrews. The virtual reality app, released this Friday, will add a new dimension for visitors, especially for those visiting the Fringe Festival over the summer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists devise new approach to manipulate silicon 'qubits'During their research for a new paper on quantum computing, HongWen Jiang, a UCLA professor of physics, and Joshua Schoenfield, a graduate student in his lab, ran into a recurring problem: They were so excited about the progress they were making that when they logged in from home to their UCLA desktop—which allows only one user at a time—the two scientists repeatedly knocked each other off of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eyewitness recollection easily distorted by the views of othersIt is human nature to give added credence to the views of family and friends. But this could lead to inaccurate eyewitness statements in court cases and therefore potential miscarriages of justice, argues a University of Huddersfield lecturer, who is calling on police and the courts to take this factor into account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fern fossil data clarifies origination and extinction of speciesThroughout the history of life, new groups of species have flourished at the expense of earlier ones and global biodiversity has varied dramatically over geologic time. A new study led by the University of Turku, Finland, shows that completely different factors regulate the rise and fall of species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Falling sea level caused volcanos to overflowThroughout the last 800,000 years, Antarctic temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have showed a similar evolution. However, they were different during the transition to the last ice age—approximately 80,000 years ago, temperature declined while the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere remained relatively stable. An international research team led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two significant warming intervals in southern China since 1850Regular meteorological observations in most of China only started in the 1950s, so it is therefore necessary to reconstruct regional temperature series from high-resolution temperature proxies to compensate for the deficiency.
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Ingeniøren
250 tons laks døde under mystiske omstændigheder på pilotfarm i Hvide SandeEt unikt anlæg til at opdrætte laks under kontrollerede former på land har mistet en fjerdedel af sin årsproduktion uden at kende årsagen. Det sker, netop som de norske investorer står over for gigantinvestering i USA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SMAD4 loss is associated with cetuximab resistance and induction of MAPK/JNK activation in HNCThe researchers identified that SMAD4 loss results in cetuximab resistance in vitro and poor survival in HPV-negative HNSCC patients and in vivo models. Using OncoFinder (an innovative bioinformatic tool currently rebranded as iPANDA), they revealed a signature of pro-survival and anti-apoptotic pathways specifically dysregulated in SMAD4-low HNSCCs and indicate JNK and MAPK activation as potentia
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