Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA is studying fungi to keep space travelers safe on new worldsHuman presence in closed habitats that may one day be used to explore other planets is associated with changes in the composition of the fungal community - the mycobiome - that grows on surfaces inside the habitat, according to a study published in the open access journal Microbiome.
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The Atlantic
Was Donald Trump Jr. Told the Kremlin Was Behind the Leak? Last week, Donald Trump Jr. wasn’t considered part of the sprawling Russia investigation that has consumed his father’s early presidency. Now he is firmly at its center. The New York Times reported over the weekend that the president’s eldest son met with a Russian lawyer who promised damaging information about Hillary Clinton. On Monday, the Times reported that Donald Jr. received an email befor
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Ingeniøren
Styrelse fjerner 3’s hastighedsgrænser for roamingMed det første indgreb for at sikre netneutralitet herhjemme har Energistyrelsen bedt 3 fjerne hastighedsbegrænsninger på internet i udlandet.
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Science-Based Medicine
What the Health: A Movie with an AgendaThe documentary "What the Health" espouses the fairy tale that all major diseases (heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and many others) can be prevented and cured by eliminating meat and dairy from the diet. It is a blatant polemic for veganism, biased and misleading, and is not a reliable source of scientific information.
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Science | The Guardian
Richard Dawkins and Carlo Rovelli on science and culture – books podcast Two of the world’s foremost scientists discuss how to bridge the divide between the arts and sciences Subscribe and review: iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter This week we’re talking science and culture, and how to bridge the divide between the two, with Richard Dawkins and Carlo Rovelli. Continue reading...
3min
Ingeniøren
Bunken vokser: Brugerne ønsker sig over 4.000 ændringer af Sundhedsplatformen I langt de fleste uger siden maj 2016 er der lukket færre ønsker fra brugerne til udvikling af Sundhedsplatformen, end der er kommet ind. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/oensker-brugerne-aendringer-sundhedsplatformen-hober-sig-nu-4000-aendringsforslag-1078132 Version2
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mesmerising video of a whale playing with dolphinsA whale appears to play with a pod of dolphins off the coast of Western Australia.
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Gizmodo
This $55 NETGEAR Nighthawk Is One Of The Best Router Deals We've Ever Seen Netgear Nighthawk R6700 If your home network has more holes than Swiss cheese, Netgear’s Nighthawk R6700 features beamforming, USB ports, and up to 1750 Mbps maximum throughput, meaning it’s more than enough router for most homes. You can save an additional $20 off the already-reduced Prime Day price of $75 by clipping the coupon, bringing it down to just $55.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accessing DNA in the cell's powerhouse to treat diseaseFor the first time, a synthetic compound has been made that can bind to DNA in the cells' energy powerhouses, suppressing a gene associated with nerve and muscle disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
JFK's back problems -- a new lookJFK promoted an image of himself as a young, healthy, strong-bodied man. But this image belies the truth: that Kennedy's life was plagued by illnesses and he required strong medication to perform his tasks as president. This paper sheds light on JFK's back problems and how they affected his life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify visual system changes that may signal Parkinson's diseaseChanges in the visual systems of newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients may provide important biomarkers for the early detection and monitoring of the disease, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insurance coverage for CT colonography increases likelihood of screeningPeople with insurance policies that cover CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening are almost 50 percent more likely to get screened than those whose policies don't cover the procedure, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preeclampsia: New study documents its enormous economic and health burdenRates of preeclampsia are rising rapidly, yet surprisingly there are few national estimates of the health and economic impact of preeclampsia on mothers and their infants. A new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (AJOG) provides sobering data on this topic by examining the short-term costs associated with the condition. Significantly increasing the chance of adverse health
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Gizmodo
Even the Drudge Report Has Finally Turned on Trump Screenshot: Drudge Report Conservative media juggernaut Matt Drudge has long been a defender of and even a reported advisor to Donald Trump. He’s never seen a negative story about our megalomaniac-in-chief that he couldn’t dismiss. But today, he was faced with a scandal that appears to be big trouble for the White House and all he could say was, “ THE EMAIL ,” typed below a photo of Saint Basil’s
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Gizmodo
John F. Kennedy Lived With More Pain Than We Realized Image: AP A re-evaluation of JFK’s health history and medical records paints a portrait a man who had to endure a surprising amount of physical discomfort throughout his short life. As president, he did his best to hide his misery from the public—no small miracle, given just how much pain he was forced to endure. On January 20, 1961, John F. Kennedy, at the age of 46, became the youngest presiden
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The Atlantic
16 Dead in Military Plane Crash in Mississippi Updated on July 11 at 12:12 a.m. ET At least 16 people have died in a military plane crash in Leflore County, Mississippi, the county’s emergency management director, Fred Randle, told CNN . The plane reportedly crashed in a soybean field at around 4 p.m. local time on Monday. According to Randle, there were no survivors. A local sheriff told The Clarion-Ledger that most of the passengers were ma
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New on MIT Technology Review
Obama’s Energy Secretary Addresses Trump’s Attacks on His LegacyMIT’s Ernest Moniz has taken on new roles preventing nuclear war, advocating for clean energy, and criticizing Trump’s policies.
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The Atlantic
Yemen's Cholera Epidemic Reaches New Heights More than 300,000 people in Yemen are believed to be infected with cholera, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) announced Monday, signaling a troubling milestone in the nation’s growing epidemic, which began in October. In the last ten weeks, cholera has claimed the lives of more than 1,600 people in Yemen, the ICRC said . On Sunday, the organization’s regional director for the Mi
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Gizmodo
Here's Your Prime Day $400 Alexa-Powered 55" 4K TV Elements 55" 4K TV Amazon Fire TV Edition , $400, image via Gizmodo $400 is a great price for a serviceable 55" 4K TV. $400 for a good 4K TV with Amazon’s Fire TV/Alexa built in is an impulse buy - the first time it’s dropped below its $650 MSRP. The first question I asked when I saw the “Amazon TV” at a press event a while back was whether it would be getting a discount for Prime Day. I’ve been
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Gizmodo
The Worst Deals from Amazon Prime Day [Updating] Image: Gizmodo Amazon has touted its “Prime Day” each year as a new kind of holiday, one in which the deals are virtually endless and anyone would be a sucker not to take advantage of them. But each year we learn that it’s mostly an opportunity for Amazon to offload the shit it couldn’t sell. We’ll be keeping you updated on all of the worst turds that Bezos and Co. hoped to polish this time aroun
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The Atlantic
The Three Stories of Donald Trump Jr. (So Far) Figures in politics get caught lying frequently, but seldom do they get caught so quickly, and with as much panache, as Donald Trump Jr. has been caught by The New York Times over the last three days. Twice now, the businessman has offered an account of a June 9 meeting at Trump Tower, only to see the paper quickly return with reporting that suggests his account was incomplete, inaccurate, or unt
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The Scientist RSS
Major CRISPR Patent-Holders Agree to Patent PoolThe Broad Institute and others sign on to participate in a platform designed to streamline the licensing process.
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Big Think
Australian Researchers Can Now Predict Who Will Become an Internet Troll Psychopathy and sadism play a prominent role among those who choose to take it up. Read More
5h
Ars Technica
Trump election commission stops collecting personal voter data—for now Enlarge (credit: kgroovy ) The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity made headlines on June 28 when it requested that states hand over registered voters' full names, political affiliations, addresses, dates of birth, criminal records, the last four digits of their Social Security numbers, and other personal identifying information. The government wants to make all of the data pub
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New Scientist - News
Meningitis B vaccines may fight the rise of super-gonorrhoeaAntibiotic-resistant gonorrhoea has spread worldwide. Now there’s hope that existing vaccines for meningitis could control gonorrhoea before it becomes unbeatable
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Gizmodo
The Best Prime Day Deals Prime Day is fast-paced and overwhelming, but we’re sorting through the deluge all day and night to find the deals that are worthy of your money and attention. We’ll add all of the deals we expect to last awhile below, but many Prime Day Lightning deals sell out within minutes, so be sure to follow us on Twitter for up-to-the-minute updates on the sales that just can’t wait. Top Tech Deals Amazon
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: All the best Amazon Prime Day deals going live right now Greetings, Arsians! The Dealmaster is here again to bring you the latest deals courtesy of our partners at TechBargains . This is a very special edition of the Dealmaster, because it's time for the third-annual Amazon Prime Day! 30 hours of non-stop deals on at everyone's favorite online retailer, provided you're subscribed to Amazon Prime. The deals start right now, and we'll be updating this po
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Gizmodo
Astronauts Are Going to Fill Outer Space With All Kinds of Weird Fungus One small step through the parking lot (Image: Blachowicz et al, Microbiome (2017)) Humans will make outer space dirty. NASA puts a lot of effort into keeping space clean. The Office of Planetary Protection , for example, exists to protect the Earth from potential life on other planets—but they also have to protect other planets from us. So it’s important to know exactly how we impact the environ
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Live Science
Clindamycin: Uses & Side EffectsClindamycin is a prescription antibiotic commonly used to treat acne, vaginal infections and certain bacterial infections.
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Live Science
Wolf Facts: Gray Wolves, Timber Wolves & Red WolvesWolves are large carnivores — the largest member of the dog, or Canid, family. Wolves are common to all parts of the Northern Hemisphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines fathers' experiences of child protection processNew research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) challenges assumptions that men in child protection cases do not stay involved in children's lives and always, or only, pose a risk of harm to their child -- fathers in this study were rarely 'absent.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbe study highlights Greenland ice sheet toxicityThe Greenland ice sheet is often seen as a pristine environment, but new research has revealed that may not be the case.A Danish-led study, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters, examined how microbes from the ice sheet have the potential to resist and degrade globally-emitted contaminants such as mercury, lead, PAH and PCB.
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The Atlantic
Militants Kill Seven Hindu Pilgrims in Kashmir Attack At least seven Hindu pilgrims were killed and 11 others wounded in a gun battle between militants and police forces in Anantnag, a district in Kashmir, on Monday evening. The attack marks the deadliest assault on Hindu pilgrims in the region since 2000, when 30 people were killed during the Amarnath Yatra, an annual religious pilgrimage to a cave shrine in the Himalayas. Monday’s victims were ret
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Live Science
'Brain Training' Games May Be No Better than Video Games, Study FindsBrain training games such as Lumosity may not boost people's overall thinking abilities, a new study suggests.
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Gizmodo
Prime Day Started Early: Get a Harmony Remote and Alexa-Compatible Harmony Hub For $60 Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $60 $60 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. The Hub allows you to use your iPhone, Android device, or even an Amazon Echo to control everything a Harmony remote can (which is basically any piece of home theater gear you can think of). So even when you inevitably lose the
7h
Live Science
Satellite Spots Bolivian Salt Plain from SpaceThe more than 3,861 square miles of the giant Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia provides salt to locals, lithium for the world's batteries and even technical help for satellite radar altimeters.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Galaxy Zoo: Citizen science trailblazer marks tenth birthdayGalaxy Zoo is one of the most successful citizen science projects ever conceived. We look back at what it's achieved over 10 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines fathers' experiences of child protection processNew research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) challenges assumptions that men in child protection cases do not stay involved in children's lives and always, or only, pose a risk of harm to their child—fathers in this study were rarely 'absent'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbe study highlights Greenland ice sheet toxicityThe Greenland ice sheet is often seen as a pristine environment, but new research has revealed that may not be the case.
8h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Reclaiming Mosul What We’re Following Mosul’s Liberation: After months of fighting by Iraqi troops and their allies against ISIS militants, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi officially declared victory in Mosul . It’s a significant blow to ISIS, which had controlled the city for three years, but it’s still only a step toward defeating the militant group. Meanwhile, Mosul is in ruins, and problems with corrupti
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Gizmodo
Trump’s Election Commission Plans to Abandon Insecure Voter Data Collection Methods Screenshot: Chrome Since the president’s Advisory Commission on Election Integrity requested voter rolls from state election officials—allegedly for the purpose of investigating Trump’s unproven claims about widespread voter fraud— 45 states and the District of Columbia have either partially or wholly declined to share their data, and security experts have raised concerns about whether the commis
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Big Think
Being Busy Is Killing Our Ability to Think Creatively Here's why you should try to fit less—not more—into each day. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-scale, collaborative effort could help ease global hearing lossA team of hearing experts at Duke University School of Medicine and the Duke Global Health Institute is calling for a comprehensive, worldwide initiative to combat hearing loss. The researchers suggest that the initiative could tap into resources at global health institutes and centers at universities, starting at Duke and hopefully including other such resources worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young people whose pregnant mothers smoked at heightened risk of antisocial behaviorTeens and young adults whose mothers smoked while pregnant with them may be at heightened risk of antisocial behavior, as assessed by their own reports and criminal record checks, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concussion important but badly neglected issue in Para sports, say expertsConcussion is an important but badly neglected issue in Para sports, and doctors, researchers, and leading sporting bodies need to start taking it seriously and take swift action, urge an international group of experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The fight against gonorrhea gets a potential new weapon: a vaccineA vaccine used in New Zealand to curb meningitis also appeared to drop gonorrhea infections, results that hint at a way to make a gonorrhea vaccine.
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Science | The Guardian
Meningitis vaccine may also cut risk of 'untreatable' gonorrhoea, study says Bacteria causing two different illnesses belong to the same family and share much of the same genetic code providing unexpected cross protection Hopes to fight untreatable strains of gonorrhoea have risen after it emerged that a new vaccine against meningitis unexpectedly reduced the risk of people getting the sexually transmitted infection. Some strains of gonorrhoea are resistant to all availab
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Popular Science
Everything you need to know about Amazon Prime week 2017 Gadgets You don't have to be a math geek to love this Prime Amazon's Prime Day is July 11. Here's what you outta know. Read on.
8h
The Atlantic
In Defense of 'The West' Updated on July 11 at 12:09 a.m. ET. In his speech last week in Warsaw, the president declared it “the fundamental question of our time … whether the West has the will to survive” the troubles that beset it from within and without. In this and other invocations of “the West,” some commentators, including Peter Beinart, detected a kind of esoteric code. “White nationalist supporters,” Beinart wrot
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The Atlantic
Are We as Doomed as That New York Magazine Article Says? No one knows how to talk about climate change right now. I don’t have an idea about where to begin, and I write about it professionally. On the one hand, the natural consequences of climate change seem increasingly severe and devastating. Just in the past two years, I’ve written about how global warming will probably cause more mega-droughts in Arizona and New Mexico; how dangerously sweltering s
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Ars Technica
Study: Lumosity boosts brain function as much as normal video games—by 0% Enlarge (credit: Lumosity ) Brain training may do little more than train healthy brains to be good at brain training, yet another study suggests. In the new controlled, randomized trial involving 128 healthy young adults, researchers found that playing Lumosity brain-training games for 30-minute sessions, five times a week for 10 weeks resulted in participants getting better at playing the games.
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NYT > Science
An Animal ReliquaryThe National Wildlife Property Repository in Colorado houses confiscated items, most of which are part of the global trade of endangered species.
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The Atlantic
The Two Ways Trump Associates Have Mischaracterized Their Russia Contacts On Monday, the American president’s son explained why he’d given two different accounts over the weekend of his encounter with a Russian lawyer during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. “No inconsistency in statements, meeting ended up being primarily about adoptions,” Donald Trump Jr. wrote on Twitter. “In response to further Q’s I simply provided more details.” Among those additional details:
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Too Close to the Son Today in 5 Lines Reuters reports that Donald Trump Jr. hired New York lawyer Alan Futerfas to represent him in the ongoing probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election. On Twitter, Trump Jr. said he’s “happy to work with” the Senate Intelligence Committee, after Republican Senator Susan Collins suggested he be interviewed about a meeting he had with a Russian lawyer during the 2016 presid
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New Scientist - News
Sunflowers work together to avoid overcrowding and soak up raysIn very dense fields, sunflowers self-organise into an alternating-tilt pattern that maximises exposure to sunlight
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New Scientist - News
Brain-training game fails test against regular computer gamesA study that pitted the Lumosity brain-training program against other computer games suggests it’s no better than them at improving your cognitive abilities
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Gizmodo
Deadspin A Brief History Of Rugby Teams Trying To Respond To The Haka | The Root Abused 5-Year-Old W Deadspin A Brief History Of Rugby Teams Trying To Respond To The Haka | The Root Abused 5-Year-Old Weighing 25 Pounds Found in Fla. Home. Stepfather Says ‘He Is Not My Responsibility. ... I Come From a Rich and White Family’ | Fusion There Are Only a Few Possibilities for the Future of News | Jezebel True Blood ’s Nelsan Ellis Was Going Through Alcohol Withdrawal When His Heart Failed |
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Live Science
US Military Seeks Neural Implants to Restore Hearing, SightCould a portable computer system one day interact directly with the human brain to improve how it processes sensory information?
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New on MIT Technology Review
Your Best Teammate Might Someday Be an AlgorithmA new program from Google seeks ways for AI systems to work more effectively with humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicare, Medicare Advantage physician rates nearly equalMedicare Advantage has similar prices as Medicare, but on some services or equipment, commercial insurers have an advantage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovations in primary care: Telehealth and patient-entered dataThese innovations were published in the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. Links go live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Call for the creation of chief primary care medical officer in hospitalsThis article appears in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Article link goes live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predictive model accurately diagnoses sinusitisThis article appears in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Link to article goes life at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Younger primary care physicians have greater turnoverThis article appears in the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. Link will go live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insured patients have limited access to behavioral health careThis article is published in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Article link will go live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deprescribing in primary care runs counter to medical cultureThis article appears in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Article link will go live at 5 p.m., ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chlamydia screening drops after change in cervical cancer screening guidelineThis article is published in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Links to articles will go live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who should treat patients with opioid use disorder?This point/counterpoint and editorial appear in the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. Links will go live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doctor cautions against denial of the opioid epidemicThis article appears in the July/August 2017 issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Buprenorphine: Being out of treatment increases risk of death nearly 30-foldThis article appears in the July/August 2017 edition of Annals of Family Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rural physicians report significant barriers in treating opioid use disorderThis item features an article published in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical expenditures rise in most categories except primary care physicians and home health careThis article was published in the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine research journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
July/August 2017 Annals of Family MedicineThis tip sheet features highlights from the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine research journal, including articles on health care reform, cancer screen and medical errors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drinking coffee reduces risk of death from all causes, study findsPeople who drink around three cups of coffee a day may live longer than non-coffee drinkers, a landmark study has found.
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The Scientist RSS
Sea Spiders Breathe with Their GutsThese ocean-dwelling arthropods move oxygen through a digestive system in their legs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cannibalism: A new way to stop the spread of diseaseCannibalism may be just what the doctor ordered, according to a new study that will be published in American Naturalist led by former LSU postdoctoral researcher and current University of California, San Diego, or UCSD, postdoctoral researcher Benjamin Van Allen, along with other individuals in Bret Elderd lab's at LSU and Volker Rudolf's lab at Rice University.
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Science | The Guardian
Coffee cuts risk of dying from stroke and heart disease, study suggests Coffee a day keeps the doctor away? Perhaps, but benefits may be down to lifestyles rather than the brew itself, researchers say People who drink coffee have a lower risk of dying from a host of causes, including heart disease, stroke and liver disease, research suggests – but experts say it’s unclear whether the health boost is down to the brew itself. The connection, revealed in two large studi
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NYT > Science
Photo Essay: A Mausoleum for Endangered SpeciesA warehouse in Colorado offers evidence of the immense demand for goods made from threatened and endangered animals.
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Gizmodo
Controversial Studies Suggest Coffee Drinkers Live Longer Image: Steve Snodgrass/ Flickr Coffee drinkers, rejoice. Two new studies are linking our favorite hot beverage to a decreased chance of being killed by heart disease, cancer, a stroke, and more. So, does this mean we can start drinking coffee with reckless abandon? We spoke to the experts to find out, and not surprisingly, the answer is complicated. People who drink coffee appear to live longer,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cannibalism: A new way to stop the spread of diseaseCannibalism may be just what the doctor ordered, according to a new study that will be published in American Naturalist led by former LSU postdoctoral researcher and current University of California, San Diego, or UCSD, postdoctoral researcher Benjamin Van Allen, along with other individuals in Bret Elderd lab's at LSU and Volker Rudolf's lab at Rice University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aphasia recovery via speech therapy related to structural plasticity of the ventral streamStrengthening the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) via speech therapy is associated with significant semantic error reductions in aphasic stroke patients, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in an article published online June 19, 2017 by Annals of Neurology. These findings suggest that speech recovery is related to the structural plasticity of the residual language net
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warmer Arctic harms crops in US, Canada: studyExceptionally warm years in the Arctic have provoked extra-cold winters and springs further to the south, decreasing crop yields across central Canada and the United States, researchers said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Let them be equal, but not too equal: studyHuman beings display a genuine aversion to income inequality, but this compassion is eclipsed by a competing desire not to upend the social pecking order, researchers said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lost in translation: To the untrained zebra finch ear, jazzy courtship songs fall flatZebra finches brought up without their fathers don't react to the singing of potential suitors in the same way that female birds usually do, hinting that the environment in which the birds are raised can have a determining effect on their behaviour.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single protein controls genetic network essential for sperm developmentScientists have found a single protein—Ptbp2—controls a network of over 200 genes central to how developing sperm move and communicate. The protein works by regulating how RNA is processed during each stage of sperm development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical trainees find meaning in written reflectionThis article appears in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Link goes live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicians' losses can contribute to burnoutThis article appears in the July/August 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. Link goes live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lost in translation: To the untrained zebra finch ear, jazzy courtship songs fall flatZebra finches brought up without their fathers don't react to the singing of potential suitors in the same way that female birds usually do.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single protein controls genetic network essential for sperm developmentScientists have found a single protein -- Ptbp2 -- controls a network of over 200 genes central to how developing sperm move and communicate. The protein works by regulating how RNA is processed during each stage of sperm development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Training/support have ongoing impact on delivery of alcohol interventionThis article appears in the July/August 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. Article link goes live at 5 p.m. ET, July 10.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bringing bacteria's defense into focusBy taking a series of near-atomic resolution snapshots, Cornell University and Harvard Medical School scientists have observed step-by-step how bacteria defend against foreign invaders such as bacteriophage, a virus that infects bacteria.
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Science : NPR
Trump's Budget Plan Proposes Cuts To Great Lakes Restoration Projects President Trump's 2018 budget plan eliminates millions for Great Lakes restoration. What does that mean for projects across the Great Lakes, including research on harmful algae and Asian carp prevention efforts? NPR looks at the most important programs in each lake that could be targeted.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Undersea robot reveals 'schools' of animals in deep scattering layersThroughout the world ocean, animals congregate at certain depths, forming layers that can be hundreds of meters thick and may extend horizontally for dozens or even hundreds of kilometers. Because these dense layers of animals reflect sound waves, they are sometimes called "sound-scattering layers" or "deep scattering layers" (though they can occur near the sea surface). A new paper in Limnology a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big fish in a small pond? Study says overqualified employees experience psychological strainFeel like you're a big fish in a small pond? If you're an employee who perceives you're overqualified for your position, chances are you're unsatisfied with your job, uncommitted to your organization and experience psychological strain, according to a study co-authored by a faculty member from Florida Atlantic University's College of Business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study describes method to save lives in chemical attacksA new study by Kiran Bhaganagar, associate professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, and her research group, Laboratory of Turbulence Sensing & Intelligence Systems, is taking a closer look at the damage caused by chemical attacks in Syria. The Syrian Civil War, ongoing since 2011, has seen hundreds of people killed through the use of chemical weapons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Out of the blue: Medieval fragments yield surprisesAnalyzing pigments in medieval illuminated manuscript pages at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is opening up some new areas of research bridging the arts and sciences.
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Ars Technica
Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age review: Reinforced for reexamination Enlarge / Hunts for named monsters are one of the only reliable ways to make gold. (credit: Square Enix ) Final Fantasy XII has always been a bit of an oddball within the long-running series. Its real-time combat smacks of an MMO, like FFXI and FFXIV , but it's still a single-player adventure centered around a core party of characters. Throw in a Gambit system that lets players "program" party be
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spontaneous system follows rules of equilibriumScientists have long known the ins and outs of equilibrium thermodynamics. Systems in equilibrium—a stable state of unchanging balance—are governed by a neat set of rules, making them predictable and easy to explore.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Culture and creativity help cities to thriveToday, the European Commission released the first ever edition of the 'Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor'.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ad hoc 'cache hierarchies' make chips much more efficientResearchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have designed a system that reallocates cache access on the fly, to create new 'cache hierarchies' tailored to the needs of particular programs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies new gene mutation associated with defective DNA repair and Fanconi anemiaFanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by hematologic symptoms and high cancer risk. Mutations in nearly 20 different genes have been identified in patients with Fanconi anemia. In a study published this week in the JCI, work from Detlev Schinder's group at the University of Wurzburg reveals a new Fanconi anemia gene, RFWD3, that is involved in complex DNA repair processes and may
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time heart attacks than whitesBlack adults, ages 45-64 years of age, are twice as likely to die during their initial cardiac event as white adults. However, the risk for nonfatal coronary heart disease is consistently lower among black men versus white men.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Just one night of poor sleep can boost Alzheimer’s proteinsDeep sleep may prevent the buildup of Alzheimer’s proteins.
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Popular Science
Sea spiders use their guts to pump oxygen through their freaky little bodies Animals Talk about having your heart in your stomach... Many of us think with our stomachs, but researchers on an Antarctic expedition have discovered a creature that uses its gut for a heart.
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Gizmodo
Save $5 On Any $15 Physical Book Purchase From Amazon. Yep, Any Book You Want. $5 off book purchases over $15 with code PRIMEBOOKS17 For the first time since the holiday shopping season, Amazon’s offering a sitewide discount on all physical books they sell; save $5 on any order of $15 or more with code PRIMEBOOKS17 . Just like previous, similar deals, this deal excludes Kindle titles and audiobooks, but if there are any commemorative coffee table-type books or collector’s e
10h
The Atlantic
Who Is Emin Agalarov? Emin Agalarov, the man identified as having arranged a meeting between Donald Trump Jr. and a Russian lawyer, is a Russian pop star and businessman who happens to be the son of a Russian billionaire with close ties to Vladimir Putin. “Music is creative and business can be creative,” Agalarov told the Chicago Tribune in an interview in May. “In music, you build something. You think of an idea, you
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology to manipulate cells could help treat Parkinson's, arthritis, other diseasesA groundbreaking advancement in materials from Northwestern University could potentially help patients requiring stem cell therapies for spinal cord injuries, stroke, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, arthritic joints or any other condition requiring tissue regeneration, according to a new study.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists invent new tool for the synthetic biologist's toolboxResearchers at the University of California San Diego have invented a new method for controlling gene expression across bacterial colonies. The method involves engineering dynamic DNA copy number changes in a synchronized fashion. The results were published in the July 10, 2017 online edition of Nature Genetics.
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Gizmodo
There Are Only a Few Possibilities for the Future of News It’s closed, get it: Getty The announcement that a large group of news media publishers are banding together in an attempt to bargain collectively with Facebook and Google over revenues is a big deal. And long overdue. But realistically, there are only a few ways that the future of the journalism industry can turn out. Newspapers have traditionally been very protective of their own independence,
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big fish in a small pond?Feel like you're a big fish in a small pond? If you're an employee who perceives you're overqualified for your position, chances are you're unsatisfied with your job, uncommitted to your organization and experience psychological strain, according to a study co-authored by a faculty member from Florida Atlantic University's College of Business.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing bacteria's defense into focusBy taking a series of near-atomic resolution snapshots, Cornell University and Harvard Medical School scientists have observed step-by-step how bacteria defend against foreign invaders such as bacteriophage, a virus that infects bacteria.
11h
Ars Technica
Wait, what? Trump proposed a joint “cyber security unit” with Russia Enlarge (credit: Mikhail Pochuyev/via Getty Images ) President Donald Trump proposed creating a so-called "cyber security unit" with Russia, then he decided against it after the idea was shot down by pretty much anybody who got word of it, including congressional members of his own GOP party. Trump, after meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday, said Sunday that they discussed bui
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Live Science
Amazon Prime Day: Best Health & Fitness DealsHere's our roundup of the best deals on health and fitness products for Amazon's prime day.
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Live Science
Some of Earth's 1st Big Animals Were Shape-ShiftersAmong the first nonmicroscopic life-forms on Earth were frondy things that changed depending on their environment.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fossil sheds light on bird evolution after asteroid strikeNewly-discovered fossil suggests birds evolved very rapidly after the dinosaurs went extinct.
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Live Science
Amazon Prime Day: Best Health & Fitness DealsHere's our roundup of the best deals on health and fitness products for Amazon's prime day.
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Live Science
Centuries of Tradition: Stunning Photos of Native American Hopi PotteryFor hundreds of years in the southwestern deserts of the United States, Native American potters have searched for the finest of clay soils and fashioned to create beautiful ceramic items.
11h
Big Think
Has America Lost the Revolutionary Spirit of Its Founders? Many people were upset when NPR tweeted out the Declaration of Independence. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell-based therapy for targeting skin-to-brain cancerInvestigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have a potential solution for how to kill tumor cells that have metastasized to the brain. The team has developed cancer-killing viruses that can deliver stem cells via the carotid artery, and applied them to metastatic tumors in the brain of clinically relevant mouse models.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not every sperm is sacred: Longer-lived sperm produce healthier offspringMales can produce hundreds of millions of sperm within a single ejaculate depending on the species. Does it matter then which sperm is actually fertilizing the egg? New research shows that selecting for longer-lived sperm results in offspring with better survival prospects early in life and higher quality as adults. The study by UEA, UK and Uppsala University, Sweden, could have major implications
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Green method developed for making artificial spider silkResearchers have designed a super stretchy, strong and sustainable material that mimics the qualities of spider silk, and is 'spun' from a material that is 98 percent water.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prelude to global extinctionIn the first such global evaluation, Stanford biologists found more than 30 percent of all vertebrates have declining populations. They call for curbs on the basic drivers of these losses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell advance brings bioengineered arteries closer to realityNew stem cell derivation techniques developed at the Morgridge Institute for Research and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have produced, for the first time, functional arterial cells at both the quality and scale to be relevant for disease modeling and clinical application.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decoding ants' coat of many odorsBiologists report a major advance in deciphering the molecular genetics underlying the ant's high-definition sense of smell, an ability that has allowed them to create the most complicated social organization on earth next to humans.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oxytocin improves social abilities in some kids with autism, Stanford study findsChildren with autism showed improved social behavior when treated with oxytocin, a hormone linked to social abilities, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Children with low oxytocin benefited most from the medication, the study found.
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Gizmodo
'Inventor of Email' Compares Trump's Immigration Policy to Science Image: YouTube Shiva Ayyadurai believes a lot of odd things. Most memorably Ayyadurai thinks of himself as the inventor of email , and to that end has sued publications— Techdirt and Gizmodo’s former parent company Gawker —which have claimed otherwise, despite a wide consensus that electronic mail was created by computing pioneer Ray Tomlinson . Ayyadurai also thinks he has a shot at a seat in th
11h
Ars Technica
Trump begins to dismantle Obama’s “startup visa” program Enlarge / US Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images ) The Trump administration has delayed the implementation of the "International Entrepreneur Rule," an Obama-era policy that would have allowed more foreigners to start businesses in the US. The administration intends to overturn the rule, which would have gone into effect next week. Official notice of the
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Popular Science
Antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is a huge problem, and it's only getting worse Health Clap your hands and say nah. Sexually transmitted infections can be scary, but talking about them is the only way to keep them from running rampant. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Faraday Future Halts Construction Of $1 Billion Factory In Nevada Amid Cash Crunch Photo: Faraday Future Ambitious but troubled startup automaker Faraday Future said today that it’s officially halting efforts to build a $1 billion factory in Nevada, as its billionaire financier Jia Yueting deals with significant money problems. The move comes just days after Faraday officials told Jalopnik that Jia’s financial woes will have “no impact” on Faraday’s day-to-day operation and goa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not every sperm is sacred: Longer-lived sperm produce healthier offspringMales produce hundreds of thousands to hundreds of millions of sperm within a single ejaculate depending on the species. Does it matter then which sperm is actually fertilising the egg?
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decoding ants' coat of many odorsIt's a waxy layer that covers their bodies and is the source of the complex aromas that ants use to communicate. These odorant blends act like biochemical uniforms, identifying individual ants by caste, colony and species. In so doing it helps regulate the ants' behavior, allowing them to navigate the sophisticated social systems that has made ants one of the most successful families of animals on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists say disappearance of species tells only part of the story of human impact on Earth's animalsNo bells tolled when the last Catarina pupfish on Earth died. Newspapers didn't carry the story when the Christmas Island pipistrelle vanished forever.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Green method developed for making artificial spider silkA team of architects and chemists from the University of Cambridge has designed super-stretchy and strong fibres which are almost entirely composed of water, and could be used to make textiles, sensors and other materials. The fibres, which resemble miniature bungee cords as they can absorb large amounts of energy, are sustainable, non-toxic and can be made at room temperature.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Out of the blue: Cornell X-ray finds unique fingerprint in Medieval manuscript inkAnalyzing pigments in medieval illuminated manuscript pages at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is opening up some new areas of research bridging the arts and sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More evidence shows natural plant compound may reduce mental effects of agingSalk scientists find benefits of antioxidant fisetin in mouse model of premature aging, Alzheimer's disease.
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Popular Science
Traction heroes: 4 tires for better grip in any season Gadgets Pick the right rubber to keep your ride glued to the road. Pick the right rubber to keep your ride glued to the road. Read on for a tire for every season.
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The Atlantic
It's a Mistake to Focus Just on Animal Extinctions Imagine if every animal and plant on the planet collapsed into a single population each, says ecologist Gerardo Ceballos . If lions disappeared except from one small corner of Kenya, the prey they keep in check would run amok everywhere else. If sparrows were no more except in one Dutch forest, the seeds that sparrows disperse would stay in place everywhere else. If honeybees became isolated to o
12h
New on MIT Technology Review
Kasparov Thinks Deeply about His Battle with a MachineA new book offers the chess master’s account of his famous match against Deep Blue—and some thoughts on the future of AI.
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Gizmodo
I Have Waited 20 Years for This Season of Game of Thrones This is not an exaggeration. These are not the whining words of a nerd who hated the year-plus wait between seasons six and seven of Game of Thrones . I have literally waited 20 years for Daenerys to get her Targaryen ass to Westeros and for the final battles of George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy to begin. I had a ritual every other week in 1997. My dad would pick me up from school, we’d get Tex-M
12h
Gizmodo
China Sealed Four Students in a Moon Lab to See If We'll Lose Our Shit in Space Source: AP On Sunday, four Chinese volunteers were sealed into a 1,720-square-foot lab where they are supposed to remain for the next six and a half months. The experiment is one of the latest steps in China’s plan to put astronauts on the moon by 2036 . The lab, known as Yuegong-1 or the Lunar Palace, has two plant cultivation areas and a living space, which contains four bed pods, a bathroom, a
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Updated meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of S-DAPT versus L-DAPT strategiesResearchers have evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of long duration dual anti-platelet therapy (L-DAPT) compared to short duration DAPT (S-DAPT) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. The current meta-analysis is the first to compare outcomes between S-DAPT and L-DAPT in a meta-analysis restricted to trials with patient follow-up of 24 months or longer. The research is detailed in
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12hIraqi Prime Minister Declares Victory in MosulIraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi officially declared Mosul retaken on Monday after ISIS seized the city three years ago. Abadi had traveled Sunday to Mosul to congratulate soldiers. In the background, gunfire could be heard as Iraqi forces continued to battle the militant group near the Tigris river.The Atlantic
The Atlantic
More and More States Are Outlawing Gay-Conversion Therapy Two years ago, in a testimony to the state of New Jersey, Benjamin Unger recounted how he was made to beat an effigy of his mother with a tennis racket. The action was part of a “treatment” meant to curb his attraction to men. According to Unger, a religious organization tasked with turning him straight told him that his close connection to his mother was the cause of his sexual orientation. He s
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Popular Science
Become a pro-level web developer with 28 hours of instruction for under $15 Sponsored Post Learn from top-rated instructor, Rob Percival, and build 14 project sites. Become a pro-level web developer with 28 hours of instruction for under $15. Learn from top-rated instructor, Rob Percival, and build 14 project sites. Read on.
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Gizmodo
DARPA Is Funding Brain-Computer Interfaces to Treat Blindness, Paralysis and Speech Disorders A undle of microwires developed by startup Paradromic to interface directly with the brain. Image: Paradromic These days, it seems you’re nobody if you’re not working on a way to merge machines with the human brain. Earlier this year, both Facebook and perpetual moonshot-enthusiast Elon Musk announced plans for brain-computer interfaces that could allow us to read the thoughts of others and impro
12h
Live Science
'True Blood' Actor Dead at 39: What Causes Heart Failure?Actor Nelsan Ellis, who starred on the HBO show "True Blood," has died of heart failure. But what causes this condition?
12h
Live Science
Amazon Prime Day: Best Deals for Science LoversHere are some of the deals we're watching for Amazon Prime Day, including science kits, kinetic sand and more.
12h
NYT > Science
Front Burner: Sustainability Is Focus of New Seafood InitiativeSmart Catch, created by a founder of Microsoft and backed by the James Beard Foundation, helps restaurants serve more sustainable fish.
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NYT > Science
Trending: Where and How to See the Total Eclipse This Summer in the U.S.On Aug. 21, the sun’s disappearance behind the moon will be visible from the Oregon coast to South Carolina. Here are eight places to see it.
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Gizmodo
The Best Features That Android and iOS Still Haven't Stolen From Each Other Image: Gizmodo A long time ago, in a smartphone scene much different from today’s, you could tell Android and iOS apart from a distance. Nowadays, it’s not quite as straightforward, given the number of features and ideas these two powerhouse mobile OSes have borrowed from each other over the years. There are still some crucial differences between them though. We won’t go too much into the history
12h
Big Think
Why Do We Eat Dessert For Breakfast? Breakfast is often cupcakes and cake with different names, like muffins and yogurt. That does not bode well for our waistlines. Read More
12h
The Atlantic
Will Is Flagrantly Silly, Glam-Rock Shakespeare The question, “What if William Shakespeare were actually really good looking?” has already been definitively answered by the Oscar-winning 1998 movie Shakespeare in Love. So Will , debuting on TNT Monday night, goes a few steps further. What if Shakespeare were actually really good looking and a secret Catholic spy and a prototypical glam-rock icon and suffering from PTSD sparked by watching his
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New UTSA study describes method to save lives in chemical attacksA new study by Kiran Bhaganagar, associate professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, and her research group, Laboratory of Turbulence Sensing & Intelligence Systems, is taking a closer look at the damage caused by chemical attacks in Syria. The Syrian Civil War, ongoing since 2011, has seen hundreds of people killed through the use of chemical weapons.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Undersea robot reveals 'schools' of animals in deep scattering layersThroughout the world ocean, animals congregate at certain depths. A new paper in Limnology and Oceanography shows that, rather than consisting of a random mixture of animals, these deep-scattering layers contain discrete groups of squids, fishes, and crustaceans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis: Hospital readmissions of all ages, insurance types identifies high risk groupsA first-of-its-kind study looks beyond Medicare readmission rates to determine causes of short-term readmissions of patients across the spectrum of age and insurance types. Researchers found while Medicare patients account for more than half of all readmissions, readmission rates of non-Medicare patients were still significant and costly. Psychiatric disease and substance abuse were the most commo
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving cardiac ICU outcomes through specialized 24/7 careAround-the-clock care from senior physicians helped reduce major complications in cardiac surgery patients as compared to receiving care from resident physicians, according to a new University of Alberta study. Researchers found that patients who received 24/7 intensivist physician care had a seven per cent lower risk of experiencing major complications and a nearly-four per cent lower chance of c
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC San Diego scientists invent new tool for the synthetic biologist's toolboxResearchers at the University of California San Diego have invented a new method for controlling gene expression across bacterial colonies. The method involves engineering dynamic DNA copy number changes in a synchronized fashion. The results were published in the July 10, 2017 online edition of Nature Genetics.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find significance of plaque burden using 3-D vascular ultrasoundIn a large population study that was the first of its kind, researchers found that an experimental technique known as 3-D vascular ultrasound (3DVUS) estimated the quantification of plaque burden (in cubic millimeters) as an important addition to conventional risk factor profile in addressing patient risk stratification.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Questionnaires can be a good predictor of survival rates in multiple sclerosisThe way in which patients with multiple sclerosis answer questionnaires could help to predict their survival rate from the disease, a study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Equity doesn't mean equal in heart health careRadical changes to our health care system that take into account the unique needs of women, including minority populations, are needed to ensure women are receiving the same high-quality care that men receive, according to a state of the art review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and written by members of the American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep, Alzheimer's link explainedResearch from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Radboud University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, and Stanford University shows that disrupting just one night of sleep in healthy, middle-aged adults causes an increase in a brain protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. Further, a week of poor sleep leads to an increase in another brain protein that has been linked to b
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Gizmodo
The Amazing Reason Deep Sea Corals Glow In the Dark Image: Wikimedia Lots of creatures glow in the ocean’s depths, where sunlight is slim to nil. But while most of these abyssal lightbulbs use their neon powers to hunt or avoid being hunted , deepwater corals may have beat everything else down there in terms of evolutionary creativity. New research indicates these corals glow in order to eat the meager sunlight, turning their tissues into grow cha
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Wired
Yes, It Matters That *Spider-Man: Homecoming* Just Made $117 MillionIt's not all about the money—it's about what this could mean for a more flexible Marvel Cinematic Universe.
12h
New Scientist - News
Quantum cheques could be a forgery-free way to move moneyUsing IBM’s cloud-based quantum computer, researchers have shown that it’s possible to create ultra-secure cheques with quantum technology
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Gizmodo
Make Your Own Cold Brew Concentrate With $10 Off OXO's Coffee Maker OXO Good Grips Cold Brew Coffee Maker , $40 It’s basically the seventh circle of hell outside right now, but you can keep cool with DIY cold brew from OXO’s popular brewer . Cold brew coffee is extremely concentrated, so you’ll need to water it down before you drink it, meaning a single carafe from this brewer can yield a dozen or more servings of coffee, with basically zero effort on your part.
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The Scientist RSS
How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic WaspsRibosome-inactivating proteins from symbiotic bacteria leave their hosts unharmed.
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Science | The Guardian
Poor quality sleep could increase Alzheimer's risk, research suggests Findings raise possibility repeated disruption of slow wave sleep could lead to a buildup of proteins linked to disease Prolonged periods of poor sleep increase levels of proteins involved in Alzheimer’s disease, research suggests, although quality, not quantity, of sleep is at the root of the issue. While previous research has revealed that bad sleep can increase levels of these proteins, known
12h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Will Cory Temple And Moonshine Be Ready For Their Comeback? | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c With a brand-new carburetor and another nitrous kit, Cory Temple and Moonshine are hoping to make a trip up the Small Tire List. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://w
13h
Ars Technica
Review: HP’s new Spectre x2 is a crazy value compared to the Surface Pro Readers, meet HP's new Spectre x2 convertible. (video link) Convertibles and detachables are ideal for people who need versatility but only want one device. Microsoft's Surface Pro ran on that idea and became a convenient multi-use product for many. However, the newest update to the Surface Pro left a lot to be desired, and other OEMs are jumping on this opportunity to out-Surface the Surface Pro
13h
Futurity.org
Tiny pockets of liquid make this polymer stiffer It’s possible to increase the stiffness, or “elastic modulus,” of a soft silicon-based polymer by infusing it with tiny pockets of liquid gallium, report researchers. These kinds of composites could be used in high-energy absorption materials and shock absorbers and in biomimetic structures like artificial intervertebral discs, scientists say. “What we’ve shown is that putting liquid inside a sol
13h
Ars Technica
Waymo v. Uber: Alphabet CEO Larry Page will be deposed Enlarge / Larry Page at an event in San Francisco in 2015. (credit: Photo by Kimberly White/Getty Images for Fortune) A US magistrate judge has ruled (PDF) that Uber lawyers can depose Alphabet CEO Larry Page, and perhaps Alphabet Chief Legal Officer David Drummond, in regard to Waymo's lawsuit alleging theft of trade secrets. Waymo, Google's self-driving car spinoff, sued Uber earlier this year
13h
Ars Technica
Over many objections, W3C approves DRM for HTML5 (credit: Bart Maguire ) A system for providing DRM protection to Web-based content is now an official recommendation from W3C. In 2013, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the industry body that oversees the development of Web standards, took the controversial decision to develop a system for integrating DRM into browsers. The Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) would offer a way for content produc
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Gizmodo
Today Is Your Last Day To Help Save 27 National Monuments The Milky Way rises over the ruins of an ancient, multi-story dwelling at Canyon of the Ancients, Colorado There’s so much happening in the circus that is 2017 American Politics that you’d be forgiven for missing something important. A Volkswagen full of clowns has caught fire in the center ring and a bear with a propellor beanie is eating her trainer in another, so it’s understandable that you d
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Well-known protein stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic cells, surprising scientistsA study published online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) demonstrated that a protein complex (Gbeta5-RGS) commonly known for halting cellular functions may actually stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic cells. This discovery offers insights into new treatment strategies for conditions where the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin, such as diabetes.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can patients record doctor's visits? What does the law say?What exactly are the laws governing patient recordings? In an article recently published in the Journal of American Medicine (JAMA), investigators on The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice's Open Recordings Project explain the often-confusing laws around recordings clinical visits.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Culture and creativity help cities to thriveThe 'Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor', developed by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) provides comparable data on how European cities perform across nine dimensions -- covering culture and creativity --- and underlines how their performance contributes to cities' social development and economic growth and job creation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain responds differently to food rewards in bulimia nervosaResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in how the brain responds to food rewards in individuals with a history of bulimia nervosa (BN), an eating disorder characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating followed by efforts of purging to avoid weight gain. The findings further define specific brain mechanisms involved in eating disorders
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Popular Science
Plants have a trick that drives very hungry caterpillars to cannibalism Animals Chemical defenses make friends look tastier than fronds. Plants can turn would-be predators against one another. Read on:…
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The Atlantic
Court Rules U.K.'s Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia Can Proceed The U.K. high court ruled Monday that the government can continue arms sales to Saudi Arabia, a deal that was challenged by humanitarian groups that say the weapons were being used illegally in the Yemeni civil war. The decision is likely to be a relief to the British government as Saudi Arabia is one the biggest importers of arms from the U.K., spending about $4 billion over the past two years o
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain training has no effect on decision-making or cognitive functionA recent study at the University of Pennsylvania found that, not only did commercial brain training with Lumosity™ have no effect on decision-making, it also had no effect on cognitive function beyond practice effects on the training tasks.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain training no better than video games at improving brain functionThe commercial brain-training program Lumosity has no effect on decision-making or brain activity in young adults, according to a randomized, controlled trial published in The Journal of Neuroscience.
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cognitive science
The Mozart Effect - Can Listening to Classical Music Increase Your Intelligence? (Video) submitted by /u/Smart_by_Design [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica
Breaking into the Buran graveyard: Aging Soviet vehicles still impress Exploring the Unbeaten Path The Soviet Union's Buran space shuttle program stands as one of the saddest episodes in aerospace history. After NASA began working on its space shuttle program in the early 1970s, the Soviet Union conceived of its own orbiter program, the eerily similar looking Buran shuttle. Ultimately, the vehicle made just one flight, an uncrewed mission in 1988. The Soviet Union's
13h
Gizmodo
The Neon Nintendo Switch Is Back In Stock On Amazon, If You Hurry Nintendo Switch , $300 Amazon’s had a few short-lived restockings of the gray Nintendo Switch, but if you were holding out for the Neon model , it’s in stock for Prime members right now, only the second time we’ve seen it there since initial preorders. Needless to say, we don’t expect it to last long at all. While you’re at it, the Switch Pro controller is $5 off. Don’t forget the games!
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spontaneous system follows rules of equilibriumDiscovery could be the beginning of a general framework of rules for seemingly unpredictable non-equilibrium systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malaria drug protects fetal mice from Zika virus, NIH-funded study findsHydroxychloroquine, a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat malaria and certain autoimmune diseases in pregnant women, appears to reduce transmission of Zika virus from pregnant mice to their fetuses, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dissolvable device could make closing surgical incisions a cinchLike many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including bowel perforations or a hernia at the incision site. Often, repairing these complications requires additional surgeries.
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Ars Technica
2,939 new Teslas were registered in Hong Kong in March—none in April Enlarge / Elon Musk (C), the co-founder of luxury all-electric US car maker Tesla, speaks at the StartmeupHK Venture Forum in Hong Kong on January 26, 2016. (credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images) According to The Wall Street Journal , Hong Kong’s transportation department registered 2,939 new Teslas in March and zero in April after a new-car tax exemption for electric vehicles (EVs) was ended
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Gizmodo
Netflix’s Castlevania Turns the Video Game Series Into a Bloody Great TV Show GIF Image: Netflix Castlevania became a classic video game franchise on the strength of labyrinthine level design, endearingly stilted dialogue, and bombastic aesthetics. The Netflix series based on the Konami property doesn’t use those elements in exactly the same way but finds its own path to being a great adaptation of the games’ whip-cracking, demon-killing lore. Born in the Wallachia region
14h
New Scientist - News
Climate change lets invaders beat Alpine plants in mountain raceRising temperatures and mountain roads are helping invasive weeds to overwhelm native Alpine flowers
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA gives eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Eugene 'eye exam'NASA satellites gave the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Eugene an "eye exam" as it studied the storm in infrared and visible light. NASA satellite imagery taken at different times showed Eugene's eye open and closed.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Being near colleagues helps cross-disciplinary research on papers and patentsWant to boost collaboration among researchers? Even in an age of easy virtual communication, physical proximity increases collaborative activity among academic scholars, according to a new study examining a decade's worth of MIT-based papers and patents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is teacher burnout contagious?Burnout among young teachers appears to be contagious, indicates a new study led by Michigan State University education scholars.
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Ars Technica
Albuquerque police refuse to say if they have stingrays, so ACLU sues Enlarge (credit: Rescuenav ) The American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico has sued the city of Albuquerque, seeking records by the city’s police department about its use of stingrays, also known as cell-site simulators. In May 2017, the ACLU of New Mexico filed a public records request to the Albuquerque Police Department (which has been under federal monitoring for years), seeking a slew of
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Gizmodo
Final Fantasy XIV Stormblood: The Kotaku Review I haven’t completed the final battle in the Final Fantasy XIV Stormblood expansions’ main story line. The titular quest has been sitting in the top left corner of my screen for a week, and I’ve been doing everything I can to ignore it. I don’t want it to end. Being a highly successful massively multiplayer online role-playing game, Final Fantasy XIV isn’t going to end any time soon. The story of
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Being near colleagues helps cross-disciplinary research on papers and patentsWant to boost collaboration among researchers? Even in an age of easy virtual communication, physical proximity increases collaborative activity among academic scholars, according to a new study examining a decade's worth of MIT-based papers and patents.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA gives eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Eugene 'eye exam'NASA satellites gave the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Eugene an 'eye exam' as it studied the storm in infrared and visible light. NASA satellite imagery taken at different times showed Eugene's eye open and closed.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Houston team one step closer to growing capillariesIn their work toward 3-D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is teacher burnout contagious?Burnout among young teachers appears to be contagious, indicates a new study led by Michigan State University education scholars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phase II Study: Radiotherapy dose increase to hypoxic NSCLC lesionsFluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a PET radiotracer that is widely used to diagnose hypoxia (insufficient oxygen supply to tissue), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with FMISO uptake are known to face a poor prognosis. A multicenter French Phase II study featured in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine investigated whether a selective radiotherapy dose increase
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Popular Science
Finding a sense of purpose probably won't fix your sleep problems Health Don't believe every study you see on Google News. If it’s already hard for you to fall asleep, maybe you can rest easy knowing that if you just had a sense of purpose in life you’d already be dreaming. But probably…
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The Atlantic
What Trump’s Cybersecurity Flip-Flop Reveals Donald Trump’s grand plan for a joint cybersecurity team with Russia ended even before it began. On Friday, after his unexpectedly long meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, both sides said they were going to work together on cybersecurity issues. “The two leaders … agreed to explore creating a framework around which the two countries can work together to better understand how to deal wi
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The Atlantic
Baseball’s Eyes Are on Aaron Judge The Major League Baseball season reaches its unofficial midpoint with Tuesday night’s All-Star game, and the story of the year, so far, is Aaron Judge. As the New York Yankees’ rookie right-fielder, Judge has produced jaw-slackening moments with such regularity that it’s hard to single one out, but a good example came on June 11, when the Yankees hosted the Baltimore Orioles in the Bronx. The gam
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The Atlantic
Why Hollywood Should Pay Attention to Dunkirk Over the last decade, Hollywood has tried to come up with new fixes for a fundamental problem: Fewer people are going to the movies , with actual ticket sales last year at their lowest since the 1920s. There are a lot of ways for studios, and theaters, to cover for that revenue loss—raising ticket prices, serving food to customers at their seats, offering more comfortable armchairs for a premium.
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Quanta Magazine
Subhash Khot, Playing Unique Games in Washington Square Park As a Princeton University graduate student in 2001, Subhash Khot was visiting his family in India and thinking about his research on the limits of computation when he came up with a good, if seemingly modest, idea . He was thinking about an analytic theorem that Johan Håstad , one of his mentors, had formulated (and Jean Bourgain had proved) and how it could be applied to the “hardness of approxi
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Viden
4 grunde til, at Apple bygger endnu et datacenter i DanmarkFra sikkerhed til fiberkabler. Nogle ting er bare bedre i smørhullet Danmark.
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Gizmodo
Car Crash Turns Utility Pole Into Fireball-Shooting Mortal Kombat Character GIF A driver in Ontario, Canada, recently discovered that crashing your minivan into a power pole can have bigger repercussions than just higher insurance premiums. Enraged at nearly getting toppled, the utility pole started spewing fire balls down the line like it was some kind of video game baddie. As the video below shows, the local police couldn’t do much but pace back and forth and wait for
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NYT > Science
Q&A: Putting the Compression in Compressed AirCreating compressed air relies on raising the pressure on the air while decreasing the volume of the container in which it is held.
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Futurity.org
Main asthma drug makes it worse for some people Researchers have uncovered the molecular mechanism underlying corticosteroid resistance in patients with severe asthma and found that the drug—the main treatment for asthma—may make the condition worse for these patients. “The current therapies are inadequate for a subset of patients with a severe form of asthma…” Asthma is a lifelong disorder characterized by airway inflammation that leads to wh
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Ars Technica
Seven years later, you can now run the Azure cloud on premises A block diagram that is supposed to clarify what Azure Stack does and is. (credit: Microsoft) After being announced in 2015 , Microsoft's Azure Stack—which offers a wide range of Azure services for on private, on-premises hardware—is now available. Azure Stack is positioned as a major part of Microsoft's hybrid cloud offering. It offers the same management tools, straightforward provisioning, and
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Ars Technica
Cocaine on training wheels? Snortable chocolate raises eyebrows, angers Schumer Enlarge (credit: https://www.legalleanstore.com/ ) Over the weekend, US Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer called upon the Food and Drug Administration to investigate the new “snortable” chocolate powder product, Coco Loko , made by Orlando-based company Legal Lean. The powder, released last month, contains cacao powder as well as ingredients often found in energy drinks , including taurine,
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford researchers observe unexpected flipper flapping in humpback whalesStanford researchers have found that humpback whales flap their foreflippers like penguins or sea lions. This unexpected observation helps explain whale maneuvering and could improve designs inspired by their movement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glioblastoma 'ecosystem' redefined for more effective immunotherapy trialsA research team detects gene expression patterns distinct from those of the surrounding immune cells, and characterizes the effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In fathering, peace-loving bonobos don't spread the loveBonobos have a reputation for being the peaceful, free-loving hippies of the primate world. But, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that despite friendly relations between the sexes, particular males have a surprisingly strong advantage over others when it comes to fathering offspring. For example, researchers found in one group that the most reproductively success
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea spiders move oxygen with pumping guts (not hearts)To keep blood and oxygen flowing throughout their bodies, most animals depend on a beating heart. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that sea spiders use a strange alternative: they move blood and oxygen throughout most of their bodies by pumping their guts. The sea spiders have an unusual gut in the first place, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's first demonstration of space quantum communication using a microsatelliteThe world's smallest and lightest quantum-communication transmitter has now been developed, report researchers who have succeeded in the demonstration of the first quantum- communication experiment from space, receiving information from the satellite in a single-photon regime in an optical ground station in Koganei city. This is a major step toward building a global long-haul and truly-secure sate
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Wired
Google's People + AI Research Initiative Sets Out to Solve Artificial StupidityInjecting more humanity into artificial intelligence could help society – and Google’s business.
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Popular Science
As the Arctic gets warmer, our winters get colder Environment And our plants take a hit. A warming Arctic may be causing colder North American winters. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four lions escape from S.Africa's Kruger ParkFour male lions escaped over the weekend fromm South Africa's famed Kruger National Park, officials said Monday, two months after five others slipped out.
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Gizmodo
Playstation's VR Gun Is a Deeply Satisfying New Way to Slaughter Aliens All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo I played a lot of make-believe as a child. I’d take my dad’s spare gun holster and draw guns made of air from it, or steal my sister’s cape, emblazoned with an S for her first name, and fly around like Superman. But you reach a point where making pew pew noises becomes gauche. So as an adult, if you want to play make believe without getting committed, you’ll need so
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Science | The Guardian
When very hungry caterpillars turn into cannibals Research shows that defensive chemicals emitted by plants cause armyworms to turn on each other Caterpillars turn into cannibals and eat each other when plants deploy defensive chemicals to make their foliage less appetising, research has revealed. While it was already known that caterpillars of many species munch on each other, and that plants have a range of defence mechanisms, it was not clear
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In the fast lane: Conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteriesCan you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New promise of cancer immunotherapy to treat rare lymphomaNew research demonstrates the promise of cancer immunotherapy against gray zone lymphoma, potentially paving the way for clinical trials utilizing this strategy in this and related conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medicaid enrollees satisfied with coverage, physician access, survey findsEnrollees in Medicaid have reported that they're largely satisfied with the health care they receive under the program, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to predict when electric cars and home batteries become cost effectiveThe future cost of energy storage technologies can now be predicted under different scenarios, thanks to a new tool created by researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research opens fresh view on volcanic plumbing systemsVolcanic eruptions such as Mount St. Helens' in 1980 show the explosiveness of magma moving through the Earth's crust. Now geologists are excited about what uplifted granite bodies such as Yosemite's El Capitan say about magma that freezes before it can erupt on the surface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers observe unexpected flipper flapping in humpback whalesWhen Jeremy Goldbogen, an assistant professor of biology at Stanford University, affixed recording devices to humpback whales, it was with the hope of learning more about how the animals move in their natural environment - deep underwater and far from human's ability to observe.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea spiders move oxygen with pumping guts (not hearts)To keep blood and oxygen flowing throughout their bodies, most animals depend on a beating heart. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that sea spiders use a strange alternative: they move blood and oxygen throughout most of their bodies by pumping their guts.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In fathering, peace-loving bonobos don't spread the loveBonobos have a reputation for being the peaceful, free-loving hippies of the primate world. But, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that despite friendly relations between the sexes, particular males have a surprisingly strong advantage over others when it comes to fathering offspring. For example, researchers found in one group that the most reproductively success
15h
The Atlantic
Sea Spiders Pump Blood With Their Guts, Not Their Hearts If sea spiders had a creation myth, it would go something like this. An inebriated deity stumbles home after a hard day’s creating, finds a bunch of leftover legs, glues them together, and zaps them to life before passing out and forgetting to add anything else. The resulting creature—all leg and little else—scuttles away to conquer the oceans. This is fiction, of course, but it’s only slightly m
15h
The Atlantic
The News Business Sinks Ever Closer to Rock Bottom A consortium of newspaper publishers are preparing to take the unusual step of begging the nation’s legislature for the right to collectively negotiate with Facebook and Google. (Generally, antitrust laws forbid this kind of collective bargaining because it reduces economic competition, except in specifically legislated cases such as labor unions.) It’s easy to see why publishers want to team up
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
World Leaders Voice Dissent against U.S. Climate StanceNations reaffirmed their commitment to the Paris accord at the Group of 20 summit, highlighting U.S. isolation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Last week in tech: Hello Tesla Model 3 and Doomfist, goodbye Jawbone Technology See what you missed last week when you were barbecuing. The Tesla 3 started rolling off the line, we got a new Overwatch character, and you may be able to brush your teeth in 10 seconds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists name new species of fish from the Orinoco region after singer EnyaScientists have named a new species of fish from the Orinoco River drainage after 'Orinoco Flow' singer-songwriter Enya.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oregon-led research opens fresh view on volcanic plumbing systemsVolcanic eruptions such as Mount St. Helens' in 1980 show the explosiveness of magma moving through the Earth's crust. Now geologists are excited about what uplifted granite bodies such as Yosemite's El Capitan say about magma that freezes before it can erupt on the surface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suzuki, Fiat Chrysler in Dutch emissions data probeDutch vehicle authorities said Monday that carmakers Suzuki and Fiat Chrysler were being referred to the public prosecutor for possibly misusing emissions software.
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Gizmodo
The Most Overlooked Rocky Planet Is Getting Two New Visitors Image: NASA Despite being closest to the sun, Mercury is the most ignored terrestrial planet in the solar system. It’s had to sit back and watch while Earth, Mars, and even Venus get all the attention. At night, if you listen closely, you can hear Mercury screaming into the dark void of space, begging for love. Thankfully, someone’s listening—the thirsty planet will be getting a pair of visitors
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Another Price Slash Suggests the Oculus Rift Is Dead in the WaterFacebook hopes that it can finally sell the thing if it undercuts its cheapest rival.
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Gizmodo
Which Companies Are Standing Up to Government Surveillance of Your Data? Photo: Getty Want to know which companies stand up for user privacy and which ones will hand out your data when the government asks for it? The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s seventh annual “ Who Has Your Back ” report is out today, ranking tech companies on their privacy practices. When scoring companies, EFF looks at their published policies about privacy and transparency to determine which a
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Amazon Gift Card Reload, Oculus Rift, Watch Sale, and More Prime Day kicks off tonight at 9PM ET, but there are a ton of great deals available right now to whet your appetite. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals $10 bonus with $100 Amazon Gift Card reload . First time reloaders only. Here’s a no-brainer deal to help you get ready for Prime Day. Just reload your Amazon gift card balance for the first time by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marshall School of Medicine team publishes longitudinal work on pneumoniaA Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine research team has published findings that show patients who recover from invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, on average, live 10 years less when measured against life expectancy tables for the state of West Virginia as well as two other techniques.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NEJM case reports show promise of cancer immunotherapy to treat rare lymphomaThree case reports published in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrate the promise of cancer immunotherapy against gray zone lymphoma, potentially paving the way for clinical trials utilizing this strategy in this and related conditions.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food scientists find cranberries may aid the gut microbiomeMany scientists are paying new attention to prebiotics, that is, molecules we eat but cannot digest, because some may promote the growth and health of beneficial microorganisms in our intestines, says nutritional microbiologist David Sela at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. In a new study, he and colleagues report the first evidence that certain beneficial gut bacteria are able to grow whe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospitals that spend more initially yield better outcomesHospitals that spend more on initial care following patient emergencies have better outcomes than hospitals that spend less at first and rely more on additional forms of long-term care, according to a new study co-authored by MIT economists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heart of an exploded star observed in 3-DSupernovas—the violent endings of the brief yet brilliant lives of massive stars—are among the most cataclysmic events in the cosmos. Though supernovas mark the death of stars, they also trigger the birth of new elements and the formation of new molecules.
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Viden
Sommerfænomen: Flyvemyrer er bevingede sædcellerDet er sæson for flyvemyrer. Når det rette højtryk melder sig, letter de i tusindvis for at parre sig og stifte nye myreboer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmic 'dust factory' reveals clues to how stars are bornA group of scientists led by researchers at Cardiff University have discovered a rich inventory of molecules at the centre of an exploded star for the very first time.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the fast lane—conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteriesCan you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University's College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy.
15h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Plants turn caterpillars into cannibals Chemical produced by tomato plants in response to pest attack can change insect behaviour. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22281
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New on MIT Technology Review
First Object Teleported from Earth to OrbitResearchers in China have teleported a photon from the ground to a satellite orbiting more than 500 kilometers above.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart of an exploded star observed in 3-DDeep inside the remains of an exploded star lies a twisted knot of newly minted molecules and dust. Using ALMA, astronomers mapped the location of these new molecules to create a high-resolution 3-D image of this 'dust factory,' providing new insights into the relationship between a young supernova remnant and its galaxy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hidden herpes virus may play key role in MS, other brain disordersThe ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 may play a critical role in impeding the brain's ability to repair itself in diseases like multiple sclerosis. The findings, which appear in the journal Scientific Reports, may help explain the differences in severity in symptoms that many people with the disease experience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Farm work may improve veterans' mental healthCare farming -- using working farms and agricultural landscapes to promote mental and physical health -- helped improve veterans' well-being in a recent study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kansas State University researchers help with landmark study of wild wheat ancestorAn international team of researchers, including Kansas State University scientists, has successfully deciphered all 10 billion letters in the genetic code of a wild ancestor of wheat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Age and obesity conspire to damage the tiny blood vessels that feed the heart, causing heart failureAge and obesity appear to create a perfect storm that can reduce blood flow through the tiny blood vessels that directly feed our heart muscle and put us at risk for heart failure, scientists report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey reveals widespread bias in astronomy and planetary scienceIn an online survey about their workplace experiences, 88 percent of academics, students, postdoctoral researchers and administrators in astronomy and planetary science reported hearing, experiencing or witnessing negative language or harassment relating to race, gender or other physical characteristics at work within the last five years. Of the 423 respondents, 39 percent reported having been ver
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH-funded team uses smartphone data in global study of physical activityUsing a larger dataset than for any previous human movement study, National Institutes of Health-funded researchers at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, have tracked physical activity by population for more than 100 countries. Their research follows on a recent estimate that more than 5 million people die each year from causes associated with inactivity.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the fast lane -- conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteriesCan you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University's College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's first demonstration of space quantum communication using a microsatelliteThe National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) developed the world's smallest and lightest quantum-communication transmitter (SOTA) onboard the microsatellite SOCRATES. We succeeded in the demonstration of the first quantum- communication experiment from space, receiving information from the satellite in a single-photon regime in an optical ground station in Koganei cit
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmic 'dust factory' reveals clues to how stars are bornA group of scientists led by researchers at Cardiff University have discovered a rich inventory of molecules at the center of an exploded star for the very first time.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to predict when electric cars and home batteries become cost effectiveThe future cost of energy storage technologies can now be predicted under different scenarios, thanks to a new tool created by Imperial researchers.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIO scientists link new cancer treatments to cardiovascular alterationsA study published in Nature Medicine by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) suggests that prolonged use of Plk1 inhibitors, which are currently in clinical trials with patients, can not only lead to hypertension issues but also to the rupturing of blood vessels and severe cardiovascular problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey finds Medicaid enrollees satisfied with coverage, physician accessEnrollees in Medicaid reported in a nationwide survey that they're largely satisfied with the health care they receive under the program, according to researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does baby-led approach to complementary feeding reduce overweight risk?A randomized clinical trial published by JAMA Pediatrics examined whether allowing infants to control their food intake by feeding themselves solid foods, instead of traditional spoon-feeding, would reduce the risk of overweight or impact other secondary outcomes up to age 2.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do Medicaid enrollees feel about their health care?A new research letter published by JAMA Internal Medicine found that Medicaid enrollees were generally satisfied with their coverage and most reported being able to get the care they needed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temple-led research team finds notable decrease in IVC filter usage after FDA advisoryDeep vein thrombosis is a medical condition in which blood clots develop in the deep veins of the body, often in the legs, thigh or pelvis. These clots can break loose and travel to the lungs and can cause a life-threatening condition called pulmonary embolism. An IVC filter is a small, basket-like device made of wire that's inserted into the inferior vena cava to capture the blood clots & prevent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford researchers find intriguing clues about obesity by counting steps via smartphonesA global study based on daily steps counted by smartphones discovers 'activity inequality.' It's similar to income inequality, except that the 'step-poor' are prone to obesity while the 'step-rich' tend toward fitness and health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big, shape-shifting animals from the dawn of timeMajor changes in the chemical composition of the world's oceans enabled the first large organisms -- possibly some of the earliest animals -- to exist and thrive more than half a billion years ago, marking the point when conditions on Earth changed and animals began to take over the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plants under attack can turn hungry caterpillars into cannibalsWhen does a (typically) vegetarian caterpillar become a cannibalistic caterpillar, even when there is still plenty of plant left to eat? When the tomato plant it's feeding on makes cannibalism the best option. 'It often starts with one caterpillar biting another one in the rear, which then oozes. And it goes downhill from there,' says University of Wisconsin-Madison integrated biology Professor Jo
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Futurity.org
How alcohol during pregnancy ups baby’s addiction risk New research suggests the reason fetal exposure to alcohol increases the risk of drug addiction later in life may be related to endocannibinoids, cannabis-like chemicals that the brain itself produces. “The end result is that the dopamine neurons in the brain become more sensitive…” “By understanding the role endocannibinoids play in increasing the brain’s susceptibility to addiction, we can star
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monarch butterfly parasitoids brough to light by citizen scienceScientists now know more than ever about the flies that attack monarch butterfly caterpillars, thanks to citizen science. Since 1999, volunteers participating in the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project have collected and raised more than 20,000 monarch eggs and caterpillars, and they've recorded incidents of those specimens being parasitized by fly larvae.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strengthening of West African Monsoon during Green Sahara period may have affected El Niño Southern OscillationAccounting for a vegetated and less dusty Sahara reduces the variability of El Niño during the Mid-Holocene to closer to that which is observed in several paleoclimate records.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oil spill impacts may perturb entire food websOil spills not only have a direct impact on species and habitats, but may also set off a cascade of perturbations that affect the entire food web, new research finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make 'squarest' ice crystals everA new record has been set for creating ice crystals that have a near-perfect cubic arrangement of water molecules -- a form of ice that may exist in the coldest high-altitude clouds but is extremely hard to make on Earth.
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Wired
US Farms Could Suffer as the Arctic Heats UpThe climate connection between the north and the midlatitudes might mean shorter growing seasons, frozen plants, and less water to go around.
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Wired
Tiny, Laser-Beaming Satellites Could Communicate With MarsRadio waves don't have the bandwidth to send enough data from Earth to Mars—but infrared lasers could.
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Gizmodo
Hundreds of Wildfires Are Barreling Through the Western US and Canada A firefighter sprays water as flames from a wildfire consume a residence near Oroville, California. (Image: AP/Noah Berger) Wildfires are tearing across regions in the western US and Canada, forcing over 15,000 residents to flee their homes. Hot, dry, and windy conditions are fueling the fires, many of which are expected to grow over the coming days. Discouragingly, wildfire season has only just
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maryland Zoo: Baby giraffe receives 2nd plasma transfusionMaryland Zoo officials say a struggling baby giraffe has had a second plasma transfusion and is continuing to receive around-the-clock intensive care.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil spill impacts may perturb entire food websOil spills not only have a direct impact on species and habitats, but may also set off a cascade of perturbations that affect the entire food web. These are the findings of new research published in an article in the special issue on Ocean Spills and Accidents in Springer's journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (AECT).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strengthening of West African Monsoon during Green Sahara period may have affected El Nino Southern OscillationAccounting for a vegetated and less dusty Sahara reduces the variability of El Niño during the Mid-Holocene to closer to that which is observed in several paleoclimate records. This is shown by researchers at the Department of Meteorology at Stockholm University in a recent study, published in Nature Communications.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Researchers Need Better Space DirtLax standards for lunar, Martian and asteroidal soil simulants are stymying planetary science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UNH researchers extend N.H. growing season for strawberriesResearchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State's strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New survey highlights gender, racial harassment in astronomy and planetary scienceWomen of color working in astronomy and planetary science report more gender and racial harassment than any other gender or racial group in the field, according to a new study revealing widespread harassment in these scientific disciplines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do you build a metal nanoparticle?Although scientists have for decades been able to synthesize nanoparticles in the lab, the process is mostly trial and error, and how the formation actually takes place is obscure. However, a study recently published in Nature Communications by chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering explains how metal nanoparticles form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing hopping hydrogens for high-efficiency OLEDsRenewed investigation of a molecule that was originally synthesized with the goal of creating a unique light-absorbing pigment has led to the establishment of a novel design strategy for efficient light-emitting molecules with applications in next-generation displays and lighting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make 'squarest' ice crystals everYou won't find ice cubes like this in your freezer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers revolutionize brain-computer interfaces using silicon electronicsToday, implanted electrode devices for stimulating the brain are extremely crude devices with only a handful of electrodes that are used to mitigate the effects of Parkinson's, epilepsy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. The number of patients with these devices is merely tens of thousands because of the extreme invasiveness of the implantation process and the large size of the implanted dev
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Newest Product Is Human Workers It Sends to Your House Photo: Getty Remember when Bill Clinton was president, and Amazon was just a website where you could buy books? Those were the halcyon days. Now, the world’s biggest store runs brick-and-mortar shops, builds affordable hardware, operates artificial intelligence, and soon, it will hire out humans to help you set up your gadgets . Why? Because if it’s possible to sell it, then Amazon wants to sell
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Gizmodo
Nightmarish Sea Spiders Pump Their Blood Using Their Guts Image: Timothy R. Dwyer (PolarTREC 2016), Courtesy of ARCUS Earth’s oceans are well-stocked with otherworldly inhabitants, but few of these critters are quite as strange as sea spiders, which look like something that would lurk in the crawlspace under Slender Man’s house. With their impossibly spindly legs, sea spiders—which aren’t even actual spiders—stride across the ocean floor with eerily slo
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Gizmodo
Plants Turn Caterpillars Into Cannibals to Save Themselves Image: Nick Harris /Flickr In the caterpillar-versus-plant fight, the winner might seem obvious. One side sits motionless in the sun, while the other feasts on it. But the tomato plant has a nefarious defense strategy. In some encounters with herbivores, it winds up relatively unscathed, while the caterpillars wind up eating each other. Researchers have long known that plants have myriad ways to
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Popular Science
How to find the best music, movie, and TV recommendations DIY Tailored just for your taste. These days, you can access more music, movies, and TV shows than you could ever hope to watch in one lifetime. Here's how to sort the best from the time-wasters.
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Ingeniøren
Kun få procent af københavnske overvågningskameraer registreret Sidste år indførtes en forsøgsordning med et register over overvågningskameraer, der skal hjælpe politiet i deres arbejde med at bekæmpe terror. Ordningen halter, erkender politiet og politikere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kun-faa-procent-koebenhavnske-overvaagningskameraer-registreret-1078161 Version2
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Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: StudyHerbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Re-created an Extinct VirusThe feat has triggered new warnings about controversial research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Touchscreen test reveals why some birds are quicker to explore than othersBirds such as parrots and crows have been using touchscreen technology as part of an international research study examining whether the ways in which animals respond to new things influences how eager they are to explore.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen science brings monarch butterfly parasitoids to lightThanks to citizen volunteers, scientists now know more than ever about the flies that attack monarch butterfly caterpillars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain's Iberia scraps pregnancy test after fineSpain's Iberia airline has decided to scrap a pregnancy test for new employees after it was fined 25,000 euros ($29,000) by a regional government for discrimination.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US newspaper group assails Google-Facebook online 'duopoly'The US newspaper industry on Monday warned of a "duopoly" in online news by Google and Facebook, and called for legislation that would relax antitrust rules allowing collective negotiations with the internet giants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spacecraft to fly over Jupiter's Great Red SpotAn unmanned NASA spacecraft is about to fly over a massive storm raging on Jupiter, in a long-awaited a journey that could shed new light on the forces driving the planet's Great Red Spot.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants under attack can turn hungry caterpillars into cannibalsWhen does a (typically) vegetarian caterpillar become a cannibalistic caterpillar, even when there is still plenty of plant left to eat?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big, shape-shifting animals from the dawn of timeWhy did life on Earth change from small to large when it did? Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have determined how some of the first large organisms, known as rangeomorphs, were able to grow up to two metres in height, by changing their body size and shape as they extracted nutrients from their surrounding environment.
16h
Ars Technica
Comcast, AT&T, WhatsApp all score low on new “Who Has Your Back?” list Enlarge (credit: Josh Hallett ) Only a handful of tech companies have earned the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s coveted five-star rating in its annual "Who Has Your Back?" scorecard , released on Monday. The top-rated companies for 2017 include Adobe, Credo Mobile, Dropbox, Lyft, Pinterest, Sonic, Uber, Wickr, and WordPress. Notable names among the lowest-rated companies include Comcast, AT&T,
16h
The Atlantic
Why Americans With Disabilities Fear Medicaid Cuts On a recent Thursday afternoon, 43 demonstrators were arrested outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office. They shouted “No cuts to Medicaid!” as Capitol Police lifted some from wheelchairs and removed them from the building. The activists were quick to point out that the vans used to transport them were wheelchair accessible, which they attributed to decades of similar direct act
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The Atlantic
An Ill-Advised Lawsuit Against Black Lives Matter Activists Last July, Gavin Long, a black, 29-year-old former Marine, ambushed police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, killing three officers and wounding three more before being killed. Now one of the wounded, who was rendered permanently disabled in the shooting, has filed a federal lawsuit against the Black Lives Matter movement and activists including DeRay Mckesson and Johnetta Elzie, whom he blames for inci
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The Atlantic
'Mosul Is Completely Destroyed' ERBIL—When Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi arrived in western Mosul to declare its liberation from the Islamic State, he was surrounded by mountains of rubble and shattered stone—all that remains of the majority of the once-great city. Rebuilding Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, will require many years, many billions of dollars, and deep coordination between government agencies and interna
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nature-inspired material uses liquid reinforcementMaterials scientists are looking to nature -- at the discs in human spines and the skin in ocean-diving fish, for example -- for clues about how to use liquid to increase the stiffness of flexible composites.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do you build a metal nanoparticle?Although scientists have for decades been able to synthesize nanoparticles in the lab, the process is mostly trial and error, and how the formation actually takes place is obscure. A new study explains how metal nanoparticles form.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Touchscreen test reveals why some birds are quicker to explore than othersBirds such as parrots and crows have been using touchscreen technology as part of an international research study examining whether the ways in which animals respond to new things influences how eager they are to explore.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On-site ecstasy pill-testing services may reduce user risks at concerts and ravesAt least some recreational users of illegal drugs may choose not to take them if tests show the pills are adulterated or fake, shows data collected over five years by volunteers who tested pills free of charge at music festivals and raves across the United States.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Sexism' in sexual assault research, but this time men are the targetSexism is alive and well, but this time men are the target. A new study debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn't as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn't result in similar emotional impacts, especially depression. Men make up about 38 percent of sexual assault and rape incidents reported, and those in the military are particularly vulnerable and le
16h
TEDTalks (video)
Lifesaving scientific tools made of paper | Manu PrakashInventor Manu Prakash turns everyday materials into powerful scientific devices, from paper microscopes to a clever new mosquito tracker. From the TED Fellows stage, he demos Paperfuge, a hand-powered centrifuge inspired by a spinning toy that costs 20 cents to make and can do the work of a $1,000 machine, no electricity required.
16h
Futurity.org
Titan’s tiny waves could make for a smooth landing Most waves on the liquid methane lakes of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, are only about 1 centimeter high, research shows. This indicates a serene environment that could be good news for future probes sent there. “There’s a lot of interest in one day sending probes to the lakes, and when that’s done, you want to have a safe landing, and you don’t want a lot of wind,” says Cyril Grima, a research a
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough in spintronicsIt's ultra-thin, electrically conducting at the edge and highly insulating within – and all that at room temperature. Physicists have developed a promising new material.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forensic Scientists Recover Human DNA from MosquitoesHuman blood extracted from mosquitoes remains viable for DNA analysis up to two days after feeding, new research shows.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-speed whole-brain imaging improves understanding of brain disease in animals and humansA high-speed serial-sectioning imaging system has been developed that captures high-resolution images of a whole mouse brain and furthers our understanding of brain diseases in rodents and primates.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sustainable amine production through hydrogenation of amides under mild conditionsA catalyst that effectively converts amides to amines at low temperature under low hydrogen pressure has been demonstrated by a team of researchers.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long term unemployed through the eyes of recruiters: less motivated, less talented and less trainableEmployers are reluctant to hire long-term unemployed, research shows: the longer the job candidates’ unemployment spell, the lower is their chance of a positive reaction.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Purpose in life by day linked to better sleep at nightHaving a purpose in life means you are more likely to sleep better at night with less sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, reports a new study. Cultivating a purpose in life could be drug-free strategy to improve sleep, scientists said. The study participants were older adults -- who tend to have more insomnia and sleep disturbances -- but researchers said the findings are likely applicable to t
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cognitive science
What’s going on in our minds when language shapes how we think? New research on how metaphors shape thought submitted by /u/rohendricks [link] [comments]
16h
The Atlantic
Why Do Corals Glow in the Dark? It’s one of the ocean’s most beautiful and striking mysteries: Why do corals fluoresce? In shallow waters, they glow a brilliant pink and purple. In deeper waters, corals turn red and green against a dim blue background. The view is most unforgettable at night with a flashlight and mask filter , when the fluorescent corals provide a “ psychedelic adventure .” Jörg Wiedenmann , a coral reef scient
16h
The Atlantic
The Disabled Fight for Health Care Recently, 43 disabled protesters were arrested outside of Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell's office, and the clips went viral on social media. Since then, activists have kept up the pressure on the Republican health bill with similar actions across the country. For this short documentary, The Atlantic traveled to the heart of the disability rights movement in the San Francisco Bay Area to l
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The Atlantic
Capitalism the Apple Way vs. Capitalism the Google Way While lots of attention is directed toward identifying the next great start-up, the defining tech-industry story of the last decade has been the rise of Apple and Google. In terms of wealth creation, there is no comparison. Eight years ago, neither one of them was even in the top 10 most valuable companies in the world, and their combined market value was less than $300 billion. Now, Apple and Al
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New survey highlights gender, racial harassment in astronomy and planetary scienceWomen of color working in astronomy and planetary science report more gender and racial harassment than any other gender or racial group in the field, according to a new study revealing widespread harassment in these scientific disciplines.
16h
Gizmodo
Classic Video Game Themes Sound Even Better Played Backwards GIF Video games like Super Mario Bros. and Tetris included some of the most catchy background music ever put on a cartridge. But would you recognize those same classic video game themes played backwards? An artist created an album featuring four memorable game themes performed in reverse, and we can’t stop listening to them. “ Sorb Oiram Repus ,” Stemage’s backwards version of the Super Mario Bro
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Let’s Talk About Diane von Furstenburg’s Friends | Deadspin We Are All Kyle Freeland’s Mom | Jezebel Let’s Talk About Diane von Furstenburg’s Friends | Deadspin We Are All Kyle Freeland’s Mom | The Root La. Cop, Wounded in Attack That Left 3 Officers Dead, Sues Black Lives Matter, DeRay Mckesson | Fusion GOP Senate Hopeful Airs Wild Ad Vowing to Shut Down the Government Over the Border Wall |
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Futurity.org
Algorithm beats experts at diagnosing heart rhythm A new algorithm can sift through hours of heart rhythm data generated by some wearable monitors to find sometimes life-threatening irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. The algorithm, which researchers explain in a paper on arXiv , performs better than trained cardiologists, and has the added benefit of being able to sort through data from remote locations where people don’t have routine acce
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Shells record West Antarctic glacier retreatThe remains of tiny marine organisms document the wind-driven, warm-water melting in West Antarctica.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BSACI guideline for the diagnosis and management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitisThe Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (BSACI) is to publish updated guidance on the diagnosis and management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNH researchers extend N.H. growing season for strawberriesResearchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State's strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Touchscreen test reveals why some birds are quicker to explore than othersBirds such as parrots and crows have been using touchscreen technology as part of an international research study examining whether the ways in which animals respond to new things influences how eager they are to explore.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do you build a metal nanoparticle?A study recently published in Nature Communications by chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering explains how metal nanoparticles form.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive intranasal method shows prevention of neurologic effect from metabolic diseaseResearchers have successfully used a noninvasive intranasal approach to deliver the gene for the enzyme that is deficient in the inherited lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS 1) to the brains of an MPS mouse model, and have demonstrated the presence of the therapeutic enzyme throughout the mouse brains.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make 'squarest' ice crystals everAn international team of scientists has set a new record for creating ice crystals that have a near-perfect cubic arrangement of water molecules -- a form of ice that may exist in the coldest high-altitude clouds but is extremely hard to make on Earth.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen science brings monarch butterfly parasitoids to lightThanks to citizen volunteers, scientists now know more than ever about the flies that attack monarch butterfly caterpillars. Since 1999, volunteers participating in the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project have collected and raised more than 20,000 monarch eggs and caterpillars, and they've recorded incidents of those specimens being parasitized by fly larvae. Findings from this long-running collabora
16h
Wired
'ARAMCO: Above the Oil Fields' Takes You Inside the Surreal, Saudi Suburbia Built by an Oil GiantAyesha Malike documents Dhahran Camp, home to employees of Aramco.
16h
Popular Science
Here's the high-speed racer Airbus just announced Aviation Building on the success of the X3 demonstrator, its Racer boasts a 248 mph cruise speed. Building on the success of the X3 demonstrator, its Racer boasts a 248 mph cruise speed. Read on.
16h
Gizmodo
Reload Your Amazon Gift Card Account With $100, Get $10 Free, Just In Time For Prime Day $10 bonus with $100 Amazon Gift Card reload . First time reloaders only. Here’s a no-brainer deal to help you get ready for Prime Day. Just reload your Amazon gift card balance for the first time by $100 or more , and get a bonus $10 added to your account. I think you’ll find plenty to spend it on starting tonight at 9PM ET. For all the fine print, click here .
16h
Ingeniøren
To spritnye vindmølleparker skal drive Apples datacentreIt-gigantens nye byggerier i Viborg og Aabenraa kommer til at køre på 100 procent vedvarende energi fra to nye vindmølleparker på land, lover Apple.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New hope for neuro-tumor patientsNew research could offer hope to the thousands of, mainly young, people affected by the hereditary condition Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2). In addition to NF2 disease there could be potential benefit for other cancers with the same mutations.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oil spill impacts in coastal wetlandThe Deepwater Horizon oil spill is still affecting wetland plants, a new study confirms. A paper explains how the presence of surface and buried crude oil under flooded and drained conditions affects the redox of wetland soils, an important control of wetland soil functions.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Malaria drug protects fetuses from Zika infectionZika virus infects the fetus by manipulating the body's normal barrier to infection, according to a new study of pregnant mice. Moreover, the study showed that a drug that interferes with this process protects the fetus from viral infection. That drug is already approved for use in pregnant women for other medical purposes.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biomarkers may lead to sports pitch-side test for brain injuryInflammatory biomarkers have now been identified which indicate whether the brain has suffered injury. The research team now hopes to use these new biomarkers to develop a test which can be used on the side of a sports pitch or by paramedics to detect brain injury at the scene of an incident.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stalagmites from Iranian cave foretell grim future for Middle East climateRelief from the current dry spell across the interior of the Middle East is unlikely within the next 10,000 years, results of a new study show, which include information during the last glacial and interglacial periods.
17h
Gizmodo
What Would Happen If We Blew Up the Moon? Image: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo/Lucasfilm The Moon is the Tango to Earth’s Cash, the Hall to our Oates, the Lennon to our McCartney before they hated each other. Simply put, our planet and the Moon are soul mates: except, of course, if something were to happen to one of them. Like, I don’t know, what if we just blew up the Moon? For this week’s Giz Asks , Gizmodo spoke to astronomers and planetary scien
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
U.S. to Fund Advanced Brain-Computer InterfacesHigh-bandwidth connections into the brain could treat blindness, paralysis, and speech disorders.
17h
Ars Technica
The augmented reality racing helmet is finally here (sort of) thanks to Acura Acura On Monday, Acura announced it's sort of making one of my dreams come true. As a way to launch the new 2018 TLX A-Spec, it's debuting an augmented reality helmet. Four "technology influencers"—Zachary Levi, Sam Gorski, Dom Esposito, and Maude Garrett (no, I've never heard of them either)—are going to compete against each other in a race that will be livestreamed on Facebook at 8pm EDT (1am U
17h
The Atlantic
One School's Quest for Personalized Public Education SAN DIEGO—To understand just how far Vista High School will go to keep kids interested in school, consider the case of 17-year-old Hernan Hernandez and his skateboard. Hernan, an avid skateboarder, was bored in gym class. So were his classmates. So, late this spring, Hernan approached Principal Anthony Barela with a potential solution: What about offering them a skateboarding course instead? “I’m
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The Atlantic
Tell Us: What Was Your Meet-Cute With Jane Austen? If you, like me, are a fan of Jane Austen’s novels, you must acknowledge the crucial importance of a good introduction. And I owe my enduring Austen addiction to my mom—who, with all the best parts of a Mrs. Bennet’s concern for her daughter’s well-being, introduced me to Ang Lee’s adaptation of Sense and Sensibility when I was still young enough to play make-believe as Marianne Dashwood. From th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Visualizing the Innards of Subatomic ParticlesWith a nod to the recently discovered Xi-cc++ particle, here’s a look at the quantum foam that lies within -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature-inspired material uses liquid reinforcementMaterials scientists at Rice University are looking to nature -- at the discs in human spines and the skin in ocean-diving fish, for example -- for clues about how to use liquid to increase the stiffness of flexible composites.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research looks into whether sea spray is losing its sparkleSea spray, which is produced in abundance across all the world's oceans, is one of the greatest sources of atmospheric aerosols -- tiny particles that not only scatter and absorb sunlight but also influence climate indirectly through their role in cloud formation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strengthening of West African Monsoon during Green Sahara period may have affected ENSOAccounting for a vegetated and less dusty Sahara reduces the variability of El Niño during the Mid-Holocene to closer to that which is observed in several paleoclimate records. This is shown by researchers at the Department of Meteorology at Stockholm University in a recent study, published in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harnessing hopping hydrogens for high-efficiency OLEDsResearchers at Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) have established a novel design strategy for efficient light-emitting molecules with applications in next-generation displays and lighting through renewed investigation of a molecule that slightly changes its chemical structure before and after emission.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lutein and zeaxanthin isomers benefits during high screen exposureAn exciting new peer reviewed publication based on ongoing research on macular carotenoids from the University of Georgia demonstrates that supplementation with lutein and zeaxanthin isomers can protect against a growing issue among the general population -- the undesirable effects of prolonged exposure to high-energy blue light emitted from digital screens of computers, tablets and smartphones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oil spill impacts may perturb entire food websOil spills not only have a direct impact on species and habitats, but may also set off a cascade of perturbations that affect the entire food web. These are the findings of new research published in an article in the special issue on Ocean Spills and Accidents in Springer's journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (AECT).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phosphorus rubberGoodyear's 1839 discovery of the vulcanization of natural rubber obtained from rubber trees marks the beginning of the modern rubber industry. A variety of synthetic rubber products were subsequently developed. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new, interesting variant: a phosphorus-containing rubber with a structure that corresponds to that of natural rubber.
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Gizmodo
Playing Darts off a 150-Foot Tower Is Even More Dangerous Than in a Bar GIF One of humanity’s worst decisions has to be the pairing of darts with bars full of drunk patrons making terrible decisions. Throwing tiny pointed spears when you can barely stand once seemed like a dangerous way to have fun, until the lads at How Ridiculous decided to play darts off a 150-foot-tall observation tower. From that height the darts hit the board with such force that they leave tin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why strength depends on more than musclePhysical strength might stem as much from exercising the nervous system as the muscles it controls. The findings could explain why those who lift heavier weights enjoy greater strength gains than low-load lifters despite similar growth in muscle mass.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disruptive technology for the treatment of hemophiliaIn patients with hemophilia A with inhibitors, a novel therapy called emicizumab decreases incidence of bleeding episodes by 87 percent, an international team of hematologists has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extreme coastal sea levels more likely to occur, new data, advanced modeling techniques suggestImproving projections for how much ocean levels may change in the future and what that means for coastal communities has vexed researchers studying sea level rise for years, but a new international study that incorporates extreme events may have just given researchers and coastal planners what they need. The study uses newly available data and advanced models to improve global predictions when it
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A novel practical test for the function of HDL, the carrier of 'good' cholesterolHigh-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is known as "good" cholesterol, because HDL particles removes excess cholesterol from arterial walls and transport them back to the liver. A research group has developed a practical test for the ability of HDL to accept cholesterol. This method could help to prevent and monitor cardiovascular disease, and it is simple enough to be used in everyday clini
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility conductedA new study conducted by an international team of lung cancer researchers, including Professor John Field from the University of Liverpool, have identified new genetic variants for lung cancer risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reduced mastication results in the impairment of memory and learning functionResearchers centered at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) delivered the influence of masticatory stimulus on brain function in order to establish the molecular basis of new treatments and preventive measures for memory/learning dysfunction.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nagoya forensic scientists recover human DNA from mosquitosNagoya University forensic scientists show that viable DNA samples can be taken from mosquito blood meal that has been digested for up to two days.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A novel practical test for the function of HDL, the carrier of 'good' cholesterolHigh-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is known as 'good' cholesterol, because HDL particles removes excess cholesterol from arterial walls and transport them back to the liver. A research group has developed a practical test for the ability of HDL to accept cholesterol. This method could help to prevent and monitor cardiovascular disease, and it is simple enough to be used in everyday clini
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough in spintronicsIt's ultra-thin, electrically conducting at the edge and highly insulating within -- and all that at room temperature: Physicists from the University of Würzburg have developed a promising new material.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-speed whole-brain imaging improves understanding of brain diseaseResearchers at Osaka University develop a high-speed serial-sectioning imaging system that captures high-resolution images of a whole mouse brain and furthers our understanding of brain diseases in rodents and primates.
17h
Futurity.org
Concrete can be a sponge for this kind of air pollution Concrete surfaces can remove sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, from the air, new research suggests. The findings could be a significant step toward the practice of using waste concrete to minimize air pollution. “Our findings open up the possibility that waste concrete coming from building demolitions can be used to adsorb these pollutants…” According to the World Health Organ
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Gizmodo
Basic Assumptions of Physics Might Require the Future to Influence the Past Image; Luca Biada /Flickr One of the most well-accepted physical theories makes no logical sense. Quantum mechanics, the theory that governs the smallest possible spaces, forces our human brains to accept some really wacky, uncomfortable realities. Maybe we live in a world where certain observations can force our universe to branch into multiple ones. Or maybe actions in the present influence thi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maxwell's demon extracts work from quantum measurement(Phys.org)—Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds 'sexism' in sexual assault research, but this time men are the targetSexism is alive and well in sexual assault research, but this time men are the target. A new study conducted by researchers at Florida Atlantic University and Sam Houston State University debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn't as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn't result in similar emotional impacts, especially when it comes to depression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forget defrosting your car at a glacial pace: New research speeds process up tenfoldResearchers at Virginia Tech have developed a novel way to defrost surfaces 10 times faster than normal.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds 'sexism' in sexual assault research, but this time men are the targetSexism is alive and well, but this time men are the target. A new study debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn't as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn't result in similar emotional impacts, especially depression. Men make up about 38 percent of sexual assault and rape incidents reported, and those in the military are particularly vulnerable and mo
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malaria drug protects fetuses from Zika infectionZika virus infects the fetus by manipulating the body's normal barrier to infection, according to a new study of pregnant mice by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Moreover, the study showed that a drug that interferes with this process protects the fetus from viral infection. That drug is already approved for use in pregnant women for other medical purposes.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Miami project presents data demonstrating therapeutic potential of SRK-015 in SCIThe Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and Scholar Rock present preclinical data demonstrating therapeutic potential of SRK-015 in spinal cord injury at 35th Annual National Neurotrauma Symposium.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Under stress, brains of bulimics respond differently to foodMagnetic resonance imaging scans suggest that the brains of women with bulimia nervosa react differently to images of food after stressful events than the brains of women without bulimia, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sustainable amine production through hydrogenation of amides under mild conditionsOsaka University group demonstrates a catalyst that effectively converts amides to amines at low temperature under low hydrogen pressure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood vessels are not designed to fight infectionOsaka University researchers show endothelial cells are vulnerable to bacterial infection because they lack certain immune machinery common in other cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detailed structure of the sweat gland revealedResearchers at Osaka University have characterized the structure of human sweat glands down to the single cell level; the findings clarify the functional components of these glands and their interactions with the vasculature and nervous system, and thus could lead to treatments for sweating disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New force measurement platform provides window to study cardiovascular diseaseVirginia Tech and University of Pittsburgh researchers have developed a method to study the role of biomechanical forces and their disruption in diseased pathologies using relevant platforms that provide a window to study disease manifestation and progression.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forget defrosting your car at a glacial pace: New research speeds process up tenfoldJonathan Boreyko turned on the defroster in his car one cold winter morning and waited for the ice on the windshield to melt. And kept waiting.
17h
Wired
Leica TL2 Touchscreen Camera: Specs, Price, and First ImpressionsThe new TL2 has touchscreen controls, Wi-Fi, and bonkers image quality. It's simple enough to use that it works like a (very expensive) point-and-shoot.
17h
Wired
Star Wars News: What Really Happened When BB-8 Met ReyA new animated short details the first encounter on Jakku between Rey and everyone's new favorite droid.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Going to extremes to predict natural disastersPredicting natural disasters remains one of the most challenging problems in simulation science because not only are they rare but also because only few of the millions of entries in datasets relate to extreme events. A systematic method for comparing the accuracy of different types of simulation models for such prediction problems has recently been developed by a working group at KAUST.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New class of insulating crystals hosts quantized electric multipole momentsResearchers have theoretically predicted a new class of insulating phases of matter in crystalline materials, pinpointed where they might be found in nature, and in the process generalized the fundamental quantum theory of Berry phases in solid state systems.
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Gizmodo
Han Solo Set Pictures Reveal Woody Harrelson's New Star Wars Character A familiar face will return for Arrow ’s sixth season. Ant-Man and the Wasp adds a classic SHIELD agent. David Mazouz teases the arrival of Batman on Gotham . Plus, new footage from the set of Aquaman , Supergirl recasts a villain, and the latest in the long saga of Daniel Craig’s James Bond future. Spoilers, ho! Han Solo TMZ has procured a bevy of images from the set of the film—what looks like
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Live Science
200,000-Year-Old 'Baby Tooth' Reveals Clues About Mysterious Human LineageDNA in a fossil from a young girl has revealed that a mysterious extinct human lineage occupied Asia longer than previously thought, allowing more potential interbreeding with Neanderthals.
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Viden
Ny billigere Tesla-elbil er rullet af samlebåndetTeslas grundlægger, Elon Musk, fik bilen med serienummer 1 i gave af bestyrelsesmedlem.
17h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Oculus ReparoFollowing an injury to a Drosophila pupal wing, macrophages swoop in, engulfing debris and aiding in the tissue regeneration process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France could close a third of nuclear reactors: ministerFrance's new environment minister said Monday nearly a third of the country's reactors could be shut under plans to scale back the amount of electricity produced from nuclear power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global demand for food products to slow, FAO saysGlobal demand for food and agriculture products is projected to slow "considerably" over the next decade, mainly due to weakening consumption in China, the UN food agency said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another bee in the beehive—Astronomers discover binary star in the NGC 2632 cluster(Phys.org)—Astronomers have detected a new low-mass eclipsing binary star in an open cluster named NGC 2632, better known as the Beehive Cluster (or Praesepe). The newly identified binary, designated PTFEB132.707+19.810, contains two late-type stars much smaller and less massive than the sun. The new findings were detailed June 28 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Going to extremes to predict natural disastersA systematic approach to selecting and configuring statistical models improves predictions of extreme events.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles coated with antibiotic eliminate drug-resistant bacteriaBrazilian researchers developed coating nanoparticles that are made of silver and silica with a layer of antibiotic. The silver and silica nanoparticles without ampicillin are highly toxic, but conventional ampicillin and ampicillin combined with silver were found to be equally safe. the same strategy could be used to combat other bacterial species that have developed resistance to antibiotics.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
"Positive Cities" Can Improve the Earth as Well as People's LivesUrban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful with energy, water, food and minerals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Should Talk Directly to the PublicOur work helps answer some of society's greatest challenges, but it's usually conveyed with technical language in journals most citizens never see -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Milkweed in suburbs and cities could restore monarchs Scientists say converting marginal cropland provides the best opportunity for adding milkweed to help restore the Eastern migratory monarch population. In addition, planting milkweed elsewhere, including protected areas, and urban and suburban locations, may be necessary. North American migratory monarch populations east of the Rocky Mountains declined by more than 80 percent over the last two de
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New Scientist - News
Spiders lure bees for dinner by making flowers look flashierCrab spiders that sit on flowers and reflect UV light could be attracting bees, making them easier prey
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Houston team one step closer to growing capillariesIn their work toward 3-D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature-inspired material uses liquid reinforcementMaterials scientists at Rice University are looking to nature—at the discs in human spines and the skin in ocean-diving fish, for example—for clues about designing materials with seemingly contradictory properties—flexibility and stiffness.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data analysis is really helping the Dutch national women's soccer teamThe European Football Championship for Women, in the Netherlands this summer, is the background of a large and innovative data research project. The Dutch football union is cooperating with Leiden University and Sportinnovator. The research is going to find links that have thus far remained unknown.
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Science | The Guardian
'I was hooked for life': science writers on the books that inspired them Brian Cox, Garry Kasparov, Gaia Vince and other stars of science writing pick the books that fired their imaginations Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers argue publicly on how well monkeys could talk if their brains were able(Phys.org)—A very public argument has erupted between researchers involved in attempting to understand why monkeys cannot speak—in the pages of respected journals. The argument traces its roots back several decades when a group led by Philip Lieberman conducted research on rhesus macaques to better understand why they cannot speak in a human-like manner. They concluded that the vocal abilities of
18h
Ingeniøren
Kommune betaler otte millioner for ulovlig bredbåndskontraktEfter en sag om ulovligt, offentligt tilskud til bredbånd i Ringkøbing-Skjern Kommune hænger kommunen på et erstatningskrav.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humansAnimals and plants are seemingly disappearing faster than at any time since the dinosaurs died out, 66m years ago. The death knell tolls for life on Earth. Rhinos will soon be gone unless we defend them, Mexico's final few Vaquita porpoises are drowning in fishing nets, and in America, Franklin trees survive only in parks and gardens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A fourth Denisovan fossil has been identified(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Russia, Germany, Canada and Italy studying a tooth found in Denisova cave back in 1984 has found that it belonged to a young Denisovan girl and that it was a baby tooth. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team also notes that DNA evidence suggests the girl lived approximately 20,000 years before other Denisovans
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
Mysterious Bear Dance ExplainedBrown bears paw the ground to leave one another smelly messages -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
On-site ecstasy pill-testing services may reduce user risks at concerts and ravesJohns Hopkins scientists report that data collected over five years by volunteers who tested pills free of charge at music festivals and raves across the United States suggest that at least some recreational users of illegal drugs may choose not to take them if tests show the pills are adulterated or fake.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How environmentalists can regroup for the Trump eraSince taking office, President Donald Trump has launched an all-out assault on regulations that protect the environment. In addition to retreating from the Paris climate accord, he wants to slash the Environmental Protection Agency's budget by more than 30 percent and he has issued executive orders instructing EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to roll back or bypass clean air and clean water rules.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers working with sports venues to make them 'greener,' sustainableEcosystem and bioproduct researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are working with professional sports franchises to make their venues "greener" and reduce the environmental impact of their events.
18h
Popular Science
How to find a new job on your smartphone DIY Career upgrades via mobile. If you're hunting for a new job then your smartphone can be an essential part of the journey—from apps to networking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cross-talk between stagnation points in flow and orientationWhat happens when you press two books horizontally against each other? The built-up pressure eventually will be released in an upward motion of the top pages and a downward motion of the bottom pages, like mountains that form from the earth's crust, but in two directions. However the question remains which way the center page goes. In theory, this is undecided, and soft matter physicists call this
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Ingeniøren
Aarhus Universitet og industrien sammen om patentfri legepladsAlle opdagelser inden ’Open Science’-forummet bliver frit tilgængeligt for alle. Det skal gavne både virksomheder og universitetet.
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Science | The Guardian
How do antidepressants actually work? | Dean Burnett A recent article by Deborah Orr regarding her experiences with antidepressants sparked a lot of debate as to their merits and drawbacks. The truth is, they’re not as simple or as understood as many might think Antidepressants; the go-to treatment for depression, or generalised anxiety . It’s incredible when you think about it, the fact that you can have a debilitating mood disorder , take a few p
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Science | The Guardian
Cache of Roman letters discovered at Hadrian's Wall Archaeologists excited about 25 tablets found at Vindolanda fort, site of 1992 discovery of hundreds of Roman documents A cache of 25 Roman letters has been found at Vindolanda , the fort below Hadrian’s Wall where the most famous documents from the Roman world were discovered in 1992, first-person accounts of cold feet, beer running short, and jolly birthday parties at the northernmost edge of t
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How a crop-destroying fungus mutated to infect wheatStudy details how wheat got a new pathogen called blast fungus.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SLAC's electron hub gets new 'metro map' for world's most powerful X-ray laserThe central hub for powerful electron beams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is getting a makeover to prepare for the installation of LCLS-II – a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser. LCLS-II will deliver the most powerful X-rays ever made in a lab, with beams that are 10,000 times brighter than
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The Scientist RSS
Scientists Concerned About Future of International CollaborationPolicies that limit researchers' travel could restrict scientific progress and partnerships.
19h
Big Think
Who Will Manage the New Human-Robot Workplace? Enter the Chief Robotics OfficerA new C is coming to the C-suite: The Chief Robotics Officer, or CRO. Do I hear laughter or detect an eye roll? Think again. The bots are coming. Business leaders, social observers and researchers are voicing concern that robots, powered by advances in artificial intelligence, are coming not ... Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique could lead to significantly higher power proton beams used to answer tough scientific questionsMany large-scale accelerators deliver short, powerful pulses of proton beams. Creating the beams involves accumulating multiple lower power beam pulses to produce a single high-power beam pulse. Today, the achievable proton beam powers are limited by the technology used to merge the incoming pulses into a final beam pulse. To resolve this limitation, scientists demonstrated a new technique, called
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What maths does—building a perfect metropolisOxford Mathematician Neave O'Clery works with mathematical models to describe the processes behind industrial diversification and economic growth. Here she discusses her work in Oxford and previously at Harvard to explain how network science can help us understand why some cities thrive and grow, and others decline, and how they can offer useful, practical tools for policy-makers looking for the f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in spintronicsIt's ultra-thin, electrically conducting at the edge and highly insulating within—and all that at room temperature: Physicists from the University of Würzburg have developed a promising new material.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The maths behind memes—why numbers could help us predict an internet sensationIn today's social media driven society an internet meme or online trend can explode in popularity overnight, remember the Ice Bucket challenge? But why do some online trends take the world by storm before disappearing just as quickly as they arrive?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forensic scientists recover human DNA from mosquitosNagoya University research team shows that human blood extracted from mosquitos remains viable for DNA analysis up to two days after feeding.
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Futurity.org
Nano light detector may mean smaller solar panels Scientists have created a nanoscale light detector that can convert light to energy, combining both a unique fabrication method and light-trapping structures. In today’s increasingly powerful electronics, tiny materials are a must as manufacturers seek to increase performance without adding bulk. Smaller is also better for optoelectronic devices—like camera sensors or solar cells—which collect li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable amine production through hydrogenation of amides under mild conditionsOsaka University group demonstrates a catalyst that effectively converts amides to amines at low temperature under low hydrogen pressure
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Gizmodo
Anker's Largest Battery Pack is Down To Its Smallest Price Anker PowerCore 26800 , $42 Anker’s PowerCore battery packs are your favorite portable chargers , and it’s not even close. And today only, the largest of those battery packs, the PowerCore 26800 is just $42. This model doesn’t have Quick Charge, but it can keep your phone juiced up to 7 times on one charge. Plus, its dual microUSB inputs allow it to recharge twice as fast as a regular battery pac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As the world embraces space, the 50-year-old Outer Space Treaty needs adaptationThe Outer Space Treaty (OST) is the framework multilateral treaty that establishes the principal rules regulating the exploration and use of outer space. Established in 1967, it celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating particles—but not just for the LHCThis week, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was in technical stop, but particles continued to circulate in the other accelerators. This is because the chain of four injectors that feed the LHC also supplies particles to myriad experiments across several experimental areas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study clears way to growing replacement body organsA discovery involving Monash University scientists promises to pave the way to producing replacement organs for damaged hearts, kidneys and bowels, using patients' own stem cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists name new species of fish from the Orinoco region after singer EnyaIn 1988, Irish singer and songwriter Enya released a lead single titled "Orinoco Flow" from her second studio album, which went on to become an international hit, earn a Grammy Award nomination, and help launch her wildly successful career.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A chemically functional phosphorus version of natural rubberGoodyear's 1839 discovery of the vulcanization of natural rubber obtained from rubber trees marks the beginning of the modern rubber industry. A variety of synthetic rubber products were subsequently developed. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new, interesting variant: a phosphorus-containing rubber with a structure that corresponds to that of natural rubber.
19h
Live Science
'Striking' Face of 4,500-Year-Old English Man RevealedThe face of a man who died in England around 4,500 years ago has been reconstructed, revealing a "striking" image that should help humans alive today feel a personal connection.
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Live Science
'Screen Time' Is About More Than Setting LimitsFor decades, parents have fretted over 'screen time,' limiting the hours their children spend looking at a screen. But as times change, so does media... and how parents should (or shouldn't) regulate it.
19h
New Scientist - News
Mike Pence says he touched NASA equipment on a dareThe US Vice President placed his hands on a piece of the Orion spacecraft while on a tour at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, despite a sign that forbade it
19h
Wired
As the Digital Divide Grows, an Untapped Solution LanguishesThe crazy history and secret deals that gobbled up internet-ready frequencies long ago set aside for education.
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Wired
The Pentagon Ponders the Threat of Synthetic BioweaponsAn imminent review from the National Academies of Sciences will address the risk of virulent organisms created by gene editing technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart technology needs smart usersWhat's the point of smart assistants and intelligent electricity meters if people don't use them correctly? In order to cope with the energy transition, we need a combination of digital technologies and smart user behaviour – and the social sciences can help.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple to invest $900mn in Danish data plantApple on Monday said it would invest nine billion Danish kroner ($920 million, 810 million euros) in a data centre in Denmark, its second in the country to run entirely on clean energy.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil, gas key to world energy for 'decades to come': Saudi Aramco bossOil and gas will remain central to the world's supply of energy for decades to come, despite a surge of interest in renewables, the chief executive of giant producer Saudi Aramco Amin Nasser said Monday.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Moonlighting Genes Evolve for a Venomous JobAn unexpected mechanism allows wasps to rapidly co-opt genes for new toxic functions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
The World's Five Military Empires Four countries around the world host both Russian and American military bases. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting short circuits by going back in timeIt took EPFL researchers only three minutes to detect and locate a short circuit triggered intentionally in the power grid serving Fribourg Canton. The researchers, using a computer and a single sensor, spotted it by "going back in time" to find the origin of the problem. Their highly promising method could make it easier to manage complicated power grids, especially those incorporating renewable
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secrets of superfluid helium exploredWhen Cornell physicists Robert Richardson, David Lee and Douglas Osheroff received the 1996 Nobel Prize for their discovery of the superfluid state of liquid helium, it was only the beginning. Now a new team of Cornell researchers, building on that work, have found new complexities in the phenomenon, with implications for the study of superconductivity and theoretical models of the origin of the u
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Economists find setting goals could improve student performanceBalancing the need to provide an affordable, accessible education with a commitment to transforming students' lives and preparing them for the future is an ongoing challenge in higher education. New research from economists at Purdue University's Krannert School of Management finds that task-based goal setting can help on both fronts as a low-cost and logistically simple approach to improving stud
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Improved Vaccination Rates Would Fall Victim to Senate Health CutsPublic health experts warn that more kids and families would go without shots -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proposed benefits of rising carbon dioxide are more likely driven by waterOne of the expected benefits from rising atmospheric carbon dioxide is that plants may use less water and avoid some of the damaging effects of drought. The basis for this effect is that plants close the pores called stomata on their leaves and less water is taken from the soil out through the plant and into the air. By taking in more carbon dioxide, plants can close their stomata earlier and this
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stress test—how scientists can measure how animals are feelingTo help determine how stress is affecting animals across Australia, researchers at Western Sydney University are utilising non-invasive methods to help farmers, zookeepers and pet owners ensure their animals are happy and healthy.
20h
Ingeniøren
Ny dansk forskning: Derfor virker jern superledendeNiels Bohr Institutet har fundet ud af, hvorfor metallet kan bruges i superledere, selv om det er magnetisk og i princippet ikke burde fungere som superleder.
20h
Ingeniøren
Nu er det store spørgsmål til Apple: Hvor skal energien komme fra?Endnu har hverken Apple, Facebook eller Google fortalt, hvor de vil købe den grønne strøm, som skal forsyne deres datacentre. Et kig til udlandet vil ikke nødvendigvis tilfredsstille kritikere. De frygter, at grønne datacentre vil gøre strømmen mere sort for resten af os.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers probe protein diversityProteins make up a wildly diverse class of molecule, with key roles in everything from catalyzing reactions to helping fight off infection to transporting oxygen through the body. Now, Harvard scientists are beginning to provide answers on drivers of that diversity.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waterbirds threatened by invasive carpThe presence of the carp, a freshwater invasive species spread worldwide, is alarmingly reducing the populations of diving ducks and waterbirds, according to a study published in the journal Biological Conservation by Alberto Maceda Veiga from the University of Barcelona and Raquel López and Andy J. Green from the Doñana Biological Station (EBD-CSIC).
20h
Gizmodo
That Viral Photo of Putin and Trump is Totally Fake GIF Have you seen this viral photo of Russian President Vladimir Putin? It shows the authoritarian leader in the middle of an intense discussion between other world leaders at the G-20. But it’s completely fake. And the fakery has even inspired a meme. Putin supporters have been circulating the image to make it look like the Russian president is in the middle of the action. But it’s bullshit. How
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate 'shape memory' effect in gold particlesResearchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and Germany have demonstrated for the first time the phenomena of shape memory and self-healing in gold microparticles. Achieved through defects-mediated diffusion in the particle, the discovery could one day lead to the development of micro- and nano-robots capable of self-repair; mechanically stable and damage-tolerant components and d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study indicates concrete construction waste can help rid the air of sulfur dioxide, a major pollutantNew research reveals that sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, is removed from the air by concrete surfaces. Stony Brook University researcher Alex Orlov, PhD, and colleagues discovered how concrete interacts and eliminates sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Their findings, published in the July edition of the Journal of Chemical Engineering, could be a significant step toward the practi
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disruptive technology for the treatment of hemophiliaAn international team of hematologists including Guy Young, MD, of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has found that in patients with hemophilia A with inhibitors, a novel therapy called emicizumab, decreases incidence of bleeding episodes by 87 percent. Results of this multicenter phase III study called HAVEN 1, will be presented at the International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis and publish
20h
New Scientist - News
Nice science, but don’t forget about the ethicsThe march of science is giving us new powers, but also creating new ethical dilemmas. We must trust in public engagement to try to seek consensus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pepsi-SAXS: New method of protein analysis that is 50 times faster than analoguesPepsi-SAXS is a new, highly efficient method for computation of X-ray scattering profiles, which are needed for solution-state protein molecule analysis. The method was created by scientists from the Université Grenoble Alpes and MIPT, led by Sergei Grudinin. The team tested their method, and the results were published by the International Union of Crystallography in its journal Acta Crystallograp
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscale forces measured in aortic smooth muscle cells tell story of diseaseResearchers from Virginia Tech and the University of Pittsburgh have collaborated to employ a novel nanoscale fibrous system that can measure the tiny forces exerted by and upon individual cells with extreme precision. The team hopes that this platform, which investigators call nanonet force microscopy (NFM), will provide new knowledge about smooth muscle cell biology that could have implications
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to rescue a moonwalker in needDuring a simulated space mission underwater last week, ESA tested an ingenious concept to bring astronauts safely back to base if they are incapacitated during lunar exploration.
20h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #8: Big Data er som en tsunami Big data Landbrug
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant enhancement of electromagnetic waves revealed within small dielectric particlesScientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, together with their Russian and foreign colleagues, have achieved the first direct measurements of giant electromagnetic fields emerging in dielectric particles with high refractive index at the scattering of electromagnetic waves. The researchers have presented their project results in Scientific Reports.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon microspheres for supercapacitorsAmong electrode materials for supercapacitors, carbon-based materials are most commonly used because they're commercially available and cheap, and they can be produced with a large specific surface area. Heteroatom doping, especially dual-doped carbon materials, have attracted much attention in the past few years, and have been regarded as one of the most efficient strategies to enhance the capaci
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record rain pounds Paris, shutters metro stationsA monsoon-like rainstorm dumped a record amount of rain on Paris, flooding streets, snarling traffic and briefly forcing the closure of metro stations, officials said Monday.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's 'oldest' hippo dies at Philippine zooBertha, believed to be the world's oldest hippopotamus, has died aged 65, the Manila zoo said Monday, having beaten the typical lifespan for the mostly herbivorous mammals by decades.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildfires rage in sweltering California forcing thousands to fleeWildfires roared Sunday across much of California, forcing thousands to evacuate homes as the most populous US state sweltered in record heat and flames menaced thousands of structures.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU: Coal-fired plants top polluters in EuropeThe European Union says coal-fired power plants are responsible for the most pollution on the continent, with Britain among the top polluters.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mt Gox CEO facing trial in Japan as bitcoin gains tractionThe head of the failed Japan-based bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox is due to appear in Tokyo District Court on Tuesday to face embezzlement charges.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers hope new biomarkers will lead to sports pitch-side test for brain injuryResearchers at the University of Birmingham have identified inflammatory biomarkers which indicate whether the brain has suffered injury. The team now hopes to use these new biomarkers to develop a test which can be used on the side of a sports pitch or by paramedics to detect brain injury at the scene of an incident.
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Science | The Guardian
Fight or flight? How our brain decides our response to danger | Daniel Glaser The neuroscience behind whether we run or stand our ground when faced with threat Londoners will always use humour as the ultimate response to terror attacks. Nowhere was this more apparent than with the Millwall supporter , knifed eight times after tackling the London Bridge terrorists, pictured recovering in hospital with a copy of Learn to Run . A gift from friends, the joke being he would hav
21h
Science : NPR
Pain Before Pleasure Makes The Pleasure Even Better, Study Finds A study from the University of Kentucky shows that doing something virtuous can make indulging later even more pleasurable.
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Science : NPR
Dads Respond Differently To Daughters Than To Sons, Study Finds Researchers from Emory University, using functional MRIs to measure fathers' brains, found that they had different biological reactions to their daughters' faces than to their sons'.
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Science : NPR
NASA Spacecraft Gets Up Close With Jupiter's Great Red Spot NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over the Great Red Spot, a swirling storm on Jupiter, on Monday. Scientists are hoping to gain a better understanding of the storm and why it persists. (Image credit: Karen Teramura with James O'Donoghue and Luke Moore/NASA)
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Science : NPR
Women With High-Risk Pregnancies Are More Likely To Develop Heart Disease Women who develop diabetes or high blood pressure during pregnancy, or whose babies are born prematurely, often are unaware of their own increased risk of heart disease later. So are their doctors. (Image credit: Anna Gorman/California Healthline)
21h
The Atlantic
If There Was No Collusion, It Wasn’t for Lack of Trying Since his presidential campaign was first alleged by critics to have colluded with the Russian government to undermine Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump has been consistent—and unusually so—in steadfastly denying it. Now it seems clear that if his denials are true, it isn’t because Trump’s advisers were unwilling to collude. And that confirmation comes, surprisingly, from Trump’s own son and namesake
22h

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