Scientific American Content: Global
Why the "You" in an Afterlife Wouldn't Really Be YouMemories, points of view and the self -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Ingeniøren
Opgør på vej med elektronik, der er designet til at bryde sammenElektronikprodukter skal leve længere og være lettere at reparere, siger Europaparlamentet, der vil såkaldt programmeret forældelse til livs.
6h
Viden
Apple vil bygge danske vindmølleparkerMed to datacentre får Apple behov for massiv mængde vindenergi. En dansk energipartner er på trapperne.
4h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lip-syncing Obama: New tools turn audio clips into realistic videoA new AI tool developed by University of Washington computer vision researchers can create realistic videos from audio files alone -- including speeches by President Obama.
2min
Futurity.org
More fatigue among cops on afternoon shift Police officers working afternoon shifts—which typically run from 4 pm to 2 am—are two times as likely to report feeling fatigue, a new study finds. “Officers who work the afternoon shift are more likely to be fatigued, which puts them at greater risk for accidents, errors, and stress,” says John Violanti, the study’s lead author and a research professor of epidemiology and environmental health i
8min
The Atlantic
How Mentorship Looks Different in the Sciences Every day, scientists pour their energy and effort into work that might prove to be life-changing, or a complete disappointment. It is a dynamic that can be difficult to sustain. And encouraging new scientists, even when the payoff of research might remain elusive for years, requires a specific type of guidance and encouragement. Allison Powell found that type of guidance in Russell Cruz, an immu
17min
The Atlantic
Did a Glowing Sea Creature Help Push the U.S. Into the Vietnam War? On a gray summer day in 1966, Todd Newberry was watching seabirds squabble above the kelp forests of California’s Monterey Bay, when a sailor struck up a conversation that changed his understanding of the Vietnam War. The stranger turned out to be a Navy sonar engineer assigned to the destroyer USS Turner Joy . Just two years prior, Turner Joy , along with USS Maddox , had reportedly been attacke
17min
The Atlantic
Donald Trump Jr.'s Email Exchange With Rob Goldstone On Tuesday, Donald Trump Jr. released copies of his emails with Rob Goldstone, a music publicist and acquaintance of Trump Jr., arranging a meeting with a “Russian attorney” to discuss potentially damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Below is a transcript of those emails, arranged in chronological order: On June 3, 2016 at 10:36 PM, Rob Goldstone wrote : Good morning Emin just called and a
17min
Gizmodo
The Deadliest-Looking Deals of Amazon Prime Day Photo: Amazon/Bethesda Softworks/Gizmodo Amazon would like you to believe its annual “Prime Day” extravaganza is all about the deals, but a true keyboard warrior knows that every day begins and ends with the same goal: total combat readiness. With that in mind, we’ve collected some of the baddest, brutal-est, and straight-up most lethal-looking Prime Day offers, suitable for veteran Liam Neesons
28min
The Atlantic
The G20 Is Obsolete The optics at the G20 summit in Hamburg were striking. On the one side, the United States. On the other, 18 nations and the European Union. While the dividing issue was climate change, for many, this symbolized something larger. In a video that instantly went viral, Chris Uhlmann of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation put it pithily: “The G20 had become the G19 plus one.” The United States ha
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Academic motivation suffers when economic mobility seems out of reachNew studies from Northwestern University show that high school and college students from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds are much less motivated to overcome academic hardships when they have doubts about the likelihood of people from their backgrounds achieving upward mobility.
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Big Muddy' Missouri river needs a planAs the Missouri River flows across the Great Plains to where it meets the Mississippi River at St. Louis, it accumulates such a large sediment load that it has earned the nickname 'Big Muddy.' A recent University of Illinois study looks at the history of the river, damages and changes from the 2011 flood, and its current post-flood condition. The study concludes that the river needs a comprehensiv
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key immunological mechanism for regulating intestinal flora discoveredResearchers at the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) have shown for the first time that immunoglobulin M, secreted by the human intestine, plays a key role in maintaining the diversity of intestinal flora by including and maintaining microorganisms that are beneficial to our health. These results have been published in the prestigious scientific journal Immunity.
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics taken late in pregnancy can increase risk for IBD in offspringA study by researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine shows that when mice that are genetically susceptible to developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were given antibiotics during late pregnancy and the early nursing period, their offspring were more likely to develop an inflammatory condition of the colon that resembles human IBD.
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye microbiome trains immune cells to fend off pathogensBugs in your eyes may be a good thing. Resident microbes living on the eye are essential for immune responses that protect the eye from infection, new research shows. The study, which appears in the journal Immunity on July 11, demonstrates the existence of a resident ocular microbiome that trains the developing immune system to fend off pathogens. The research was conducted at the National Eye In
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In rats that can't control glutamate, cocaine is less rewarding, staving off relapseRats missing a neuroreceptor that controls the release of the neurotransmitter glutamate are less amenable to the rewarding effects of cocaine, increasing their chance of kicking the habit once addicted, researchers from the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) find. Their work, appearing July 11 in Cell Reports, suggests that the receptor, which protects nerve cells from fatal inundation by
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye-dwelling bacteria help mice fight off invading pathogensThe surface of the eye is one of the most inhospitable environments for microbes in mammals because tears are loaded with anti-microbials. However, some microbes can live on this sparsely populated tissue and may play a key role in preventing eye infection. NIH researchers reporting in Immunity found that Corynebacterium mastitidis dwells on the eyes of laboratory mice, and that mice with Coryneba
37min
Popular Science
The LuminAid inflatable lantern Is the perfect light for outdoor adventures Sponsored Post Solar powered, long-lasting, waterproof, and incredibly versatile. The LuminAid inflatable lantern Is the perfect light for outdoor adventures. Read on.
38min
Gizmodo
Your Favorite Action Cam Is Just $60 Today, Plus 20% Off Its 4K Cousins Yi Camera , $60 | Yi 4K , $159 after 20% discount | Yi 4K+ , $272 after 20% discount Yi’s original action cam is a longtime reader favorite (as well as mine, for what it’s worth), and it’s all the way down to $60 today , which is insane for the image quality it captures. The upgraded 4K model is also down to $159 , after a 20% discount is applied at checkout for Prime members. And for the first t
40min
Ars Technica
Here’s your chance to buy brutal amputation tools used in the Revolutionary War Enlarge (credit: RR Auction ) For a quick break from the marvels of modern medicine, look no further than the gruesome tools used to hack people apart during the eighteenth century. Up for auction this week are two amputation kits used during the American Revolutionary War by Dr. John Warren, a Continental Army surgeon who co-founded Harvard Medical School in 1782. The kits sport clumsy, oddly cu
41min
Gizmodo
The Coolest-Looking Capsule Hotels Outside Japan [Image: Pengheng Space Capsules Hotel ] The first capsule hotel in the world opened in Osaka, Japan in 1979. Since then, capsule hotels have not only spread to across the country but around the world. Here are some of the coolest-looking ones that aren’t in Japan. The general concept of Japanese capsule hotels and their foreign counterparts is the same: these are cheap, functional places to sleep
46min
Wired
Tesla's Super-Battery Could Help Lift an Aircraft Carrier 1,500 FeetElon Musk wants to build a giant battery. What could he use it for? Lifting aircraft carriers, throwing baseballs, and melting ice come to mind...
52min
Popular Science
Yes, coffee drinkers seem to live longer. But don't get too excited. Health The question isn’t if, it’s how much. The science is pretty clear on coffee's health benefits, it's just not as impressive as you're hoping. Read on.
52min
The Atlantic
Donald Trump Jr.'s Reply to an Offer of Russian Government Aid: ‘I Love It’ Donald Trump Jr. was told a “Russian government lawyer” wanted to convey information to him that was damaging to Hillary Clinton, because the Russian government wished to aid the presidential campaign of Donald Trump Sr. “If it’s what you say I love it,” he responded, and met with her on June 9, 2016. That’s according to documents released by the president’s eldest son on Twitter on Tuesday . The
57min
Gizmodo
Your Eyeballs May Be Covered in Disease-Fighting Bacteria Image: Pete/Flickr Creative Commons If the eyes are windows to the soul, they’re open windows, potentially letting in all kinds of unwelcome bugs. To ensure that doesn’t happen, our tears are loaded with microbe-killing compounds and immune cells. In fact, our eyes are so inhospitable that it was long thought they were the only part of our bodies which lacked a symbiotic bacterial community. But
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prosthetic knee type may determine cost of care for amputeesIn a new study published in Prosthetics and Orthotics International, Mayo Clinic researchers describe the direct medical costs of falls in adults with a transfemoral amputation. In this type of amputation, the leg is amputated above the knee. This work "provides a comparison for policymakers when evaluating the value of more expensive ... technologies," say the authors.
58min
Scientific American Content: Global
Oxytocin Nasal Spray May Boost Social Skills in Children with AutismStudy suggests a biomarker for treatment with the “love hormone” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spiky ferrofluid thrusters can move satellitesBrandon Jackson, a doctoral candidate in mechanical engineering at Michigan Technological University, has created a new computational model of an electrospray thruster using ionic liquid ferrofluid—a promising technology for propelling small satellites through space. Specifically, Jackson looks at simulating the electrospray startup dynamics; in other words, what gives the ferrofluid its character
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Economic issues are key to predicting whether students will graduate college, study showsEconomic issues play a significant role in determining whether first-time students enrolling in a four-year college will complete their degree and graduate within six years, a new study from Oregon State University has found.
1h
Live Science
Hey, Star Wars Fans! Check Out These Amazon Prime Day DealsFor those who want the force to be with them, a ton of Star Wars-themed deals are being offered today, from a Yoda-shaped alarm clock to a Bantha costume for Fido.
1h
Gizmodo
Donald Trump Jr. Tweets Out Emails Showing He Sought to Collude With the Russian Government (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) Have you ever wondered what it would have looked like if President Nixon had a Twitter account during the Watergate scandal? Wonder no longer. In an effort to get ahead of a New York Times story that shows he sought incriminating information on Hillary Clinton from a Russian government-affiliated lawyer, Donald Trump Jr. tweeted out his emails with Rod Goldstone
1h
Ingeniøren
Efter NotPetya: Sådan bruger du netværket til at stoppe hackerne NotPetya-malwaren var i stand til at sprede sig via lokalnetværket mellem fuldt opdaterede Windows-maskiner. Men skaden kunne have været begrænset ved at bruge netværket i forsvaret mod hackerne. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/cisco-brug-netvaerket-at-stoppe-hackerne-1078142 Version2
1h
Ingeniøren
Forbud mod zinkmedicin: Ministerium frygter, at yderligere fem mio. grise skal have antibiotikaEU-Kommissionen har forbudt medicin med zink, som forhindrer smågrise i at få diarré. Notat fra Fødevareministeriet viser, at landmændene i stedet vil bruge antibiotika.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Economic issues are key to predicting whether students will graduate college, study showsEconomic issues play a significant role in determining whether first-time students enrolling in a four-year college will complete their degree and graduate within six years.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spiky ferrofluid thrusters can move satellitesOnce launched into low-Earth orbit, a small satellite needs propulsion. Electrospray uses spiky, needle-like jets of fluid to push spacecraft.
1h
Popular Science
To save endangered whales, look to the poop Animals Dung holds clues about noise pollution and lack of food. Whale poop is chock full of information. See for yourself.
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Gizmodo
Birds Wasted No Time Taking Over the World Once the Dinosaurs Croaked Artist’s impression of Tsidiiyazhi abini. (Image: Sean Murtha) The fossilized remains of a tiny bird that lived 62 million years ago suggests that birds burst out of the evolutionary gates once their dinosaur cousins were gone, rapidly diversifying into most of the lineages we see today. Within four million years of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event (K-Pg)—a mere blink of the eye in
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survey: 4 in 10 US adults have experienced online harassmentA new survey says a whopping 41 percent of U.S. adults have experienced online harassment, ranging from offensive name-calling to stalking and sexual harassment.
1h
The Atlantic
The Countless Computers Embedded in Nature There are many patterns of collective behavior in biology that are easy to see because they occur along the familiar dimensions of space and time. Think of the murmuration of starlings. Or army ants that span gaps on the forest floor by linking their own bodies into bridges. Loose groups of shoaling fish that snap into tight schools when a predator shows up. More From Our Partners How Heat Kills
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Aaron Judge Hits Everywhere | Jezebel Jennifer Garner Reportedly ‘Confronted’ Lindsay Shook Deadspin Aaron Judge Hits Everywhere | Jezebel Jennifer Garner Reportedly ‘Confronted’ Lindsay Shookus About Her Affair With Ben Affleck in 2015 | Fusion The White House Isn’t Denying Any Key Facts About Donald Trump Jr.’s Russia Fiasco | The Root Counterpoint: Oh, C’mon! Spider-Man: Homecoming (and Its Diversity) Were Just Great, Jason |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thinking thin brings new layering and thermal abilities to the semiconductor industryWhat would a simple technique to remove thin layers from otherwise thick, rigid semiconductor crystals mean for the semiconductor industry? This concept has been actively explored for years, as integrated circuits made on thin layers hold promise for developments including improved thermal characteristics, lightweight stackability and a high degree of flexibility compared to conventionally thick s
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulating splash at the microscopic levelSpray cooling is one of the most promising methods for cooling high heat flow electronics. Two-phase spray cooling, in particular, has been shown to cool heat fluxes that are orders of magnitude higher than traditional cooling methods like fans and heat sinks. The complex physics of two-phase spray cooling, in which droplets are atomized with a secondary pressurized gas phase, demands deeper under
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making telescopes that curve and twistA new tool for computational design allows users to turn any 3D shape into a collapsible telescoping structure. New mathematical methods developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University capture the complex and diverse properties of such structures, which are valuable for a variety of applications in 3D fabrication and robotics—particularly where mechanisms must be compact in size and easily
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better than Star Wars: Chemistry discovery yields 3-D table-top objects crafted from lightA scientist's dream of 3-D projections like those he saw years ago in a Star Wars movie has led to new technology for making animated 3-D table-top objects by structuring light.
1h
Futurity.org
Burnout may be contagious for newer teachers A new study indicates that burnout may be contagious among young teachers. The study found a significant link between burnout among early-career teachers and exposure to both a school-wide culture of burnout and burnout among the young teachers’ closest circle of colleagues. “We know that early career teachers are susceptible to burnout because of the significant demands placed on them.” Surprisi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coffee bubble phobia may be deep-seated aversion to parasitesSome people experience intense aversion and anxiety when they see clusters of roughly circular shapes, such as the bubbles in a cup of coffee or the holes in a sponge. Now psychologists have found that the condition -- known as trypophobia -- may be an exaggerated response linked to deep-seated anxiety about parasites and infectious disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinking thin brings new layering and thermal abilities to the semiconductor industryThe concept of a simple technique to remove thin layers from otherwise thick, rigid semiconductor crystals has been actively explored for years. In a significant advance, a research group from IBM successfully applied their new 'controlled spalling' layer transfer technique to gallium nitride (GaN) crystals, a prevalent semiconductor material, and created a pathway for producing many layers from a
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simulating splash at the microscopic levelSpray cooling is one of the most promising methods for cooling high heat flow electronics. Two-phase spray cooling, in particular, has been shown to cool heat fluxes orders of magnitude higher than traditional cooling methods but the complex physics of it demands deeper understanding. To tackle this, researchers investigated the basic physics of droplet impingement using a computational approach c
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Generous people live happier livesGenerosity makes people happier, even if they are only a little generous. People who act solely out of self-interest are less happy. Merely promising to be more generous is enough to trigger a change in our brains that makes us happier. This is what UZH neuroeconomists found in a recent study.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
USPSTF recommendation regarding behavioral counseling for cardiovascular disease preventionThe US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that primary care professionals individualize the decision to offer or refer adults without obesity who do not have high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol or blood sugar levels or diabetes to behavioral counseling to promote a healthful diet and physical activity. Existing evidence indicates a positive but small benefit of behavioral counseling f
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of osteoporosis drug with anti-inflammatory medication linked to lower risk of hip fractureAmong older patients using medium to high doses of the anti-inflammatory steroid prednisolone, treatment with the osteoporosis drug alendronate was associated with a significantly lower risk of hip fracture, according to a study published by JAMA.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study compares switching meds vs. an additional med for patients unresponsive to an antidepressantAmong patients unresponsive to an antidepressant medication, adding the antipsychotic aripiprazole modestly increased the likelihood of remission from depression compared to switching to the antidepressant bupropion, according to a study published by JAMA.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Should We Change Earth to Halt Warming? Studies show that if geoengineering works, it will be imperfect -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
New Scientist - News
Online harassment on the rise – but no one can agree what it isPeople in the US want more policing of online harassment, but the varying ways it affects different groups make it difficult to agree on a definition
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine vessels are unsuspecting hosts of invasive speciesInvasive ascidians—sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders—are nuisance organisms that present a global threat. They contribute to biodiversity loss, ecosystem degradation and impairment of ecosystem services around the world.
1h
Popular Science
Survive your commute with these 6 essential apps DIY Beat the daily grind. Your smartphone can be your helper or your escape during your commute—whether you need navigation aids or blissful distractions.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Microsoft’s Bid to Connect Rural America: Send Out Internet in between TV SignalsIt’s cheaper than many alternatives, but broadcasters aren’t thrilled at the prospect.
1h
TEDTalks (video)
How we can face the future without fear, together | Rabbi Lord Jonathan SacksIt's a fateful moment in history. We've seen divisive elections, divided societies and the growth of extremism -- all fueled by anxiety and uncertainty. "Is there something we can do, each of us, to be able to face the future without fear?" asks Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. In this electrifying talk, the spiritual leader gives us three specific ways we can move from the politics of "me" to the polit
1h
Gizmodo
The First Gonorrhea Vaccine May Be on The Horizon Image: Norman Jacobs/CDC/Public Domain Vaccines are one of the most important advances in the history of medicine. They’ve helped humankind more or less eliminate smallpox, and kicked measles out of the Americas with the exception of folks who’ve decided to believe a retracted, manipulated, widely-criticized study of twelve children . Vaccines are good. Gonorrhea, on the other hand, is bad. Sexua
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Gizmodo
Free Money Alert: Buy a $25 Amazon Gift Card, Get a $5 Credit $5 credit with $25 gift card purchase While supplies last, all Prime members can purchase a $25 Amazon.com gift card (either physical or digital) , and receive a $5 credit in their account within two days. To get the deal, just be sure to hit the “Click to Qualify” button on this page before you purchase your gift card. Unlike most of these kinds of deals, all Prime members are eligible, so be su
1h
Gizmodo
Microsoft's Plan to Beam Internet Over TV Frequencies Is So Crazy It Might Work Image: Wikipedia In the same hotel where Alexander Graham Bell once demoed coast-to-coast telephone calls, Microsoft will announce plans for a new white space internet service on Tuesday. This ludicrous technology sends broadband internet wirelessly over the unused channels of the television spectrum. It’s also ingenious. Understandably, you probably have some questions about this postmodern conc
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Scientific American Content: Global
Asimov's Laws Won't Stop Robots Harming Humans So We've Developed a Better SolutionInstead of laws to restrict robot behavior, robots should be empowered to pick the best solution for any given scenario -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Atlantic
Defending Liberal Democracy Is Not the Same as Defending 'the West' The most telling feature of Daniel Foster’s response to my article on Donald Trump’s Warsaw speech is that, while he dislikes my definition of “the West,” he never offers one of his own. I argued that, in the United States today, the best predictor of whether a country is considered “Western” is whether it is primarily white and primarily Christian. (With Protestant and Catholic countries conside
1h
The Atlantic
2017 Audubon Photography Awards The winners of the the eighth annual Audubon Photography Awards competition have just been announced. Photographers entered images in three categories: professional, amateur, and youth. More than 5,500 images depicting birdlife from 49 states and eight Canadian provinces, were judged. The National Audubon Society was once more kind enough to share some of this year’s winners and runners-up with u
1h
The Atlantic
The Technology That Will Make It Impossible for You to Believe What You See The president was seething. His problem was with the press, yes, but also with the technology they used. Electronic media had changed everything. People were glued to their screens. “I have never heard or seen such outrageous, vicious, distorted reporting,” he said in a news conference . The age of television news, Richard Nixon told reporters gathered that day in October 1973, was shaking the co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warm winter events in the Arctic are becoming more frequent, lasting longerArctic winter warming events - winter days when temperatures peak above minus 10 degrees Celsius - are a normal part of the Arctic climate over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, but new research finds they are becoming more frequent and lasting longer than they did three decades ago.
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Futurity.org
Want better beer? Use this protein A newly discovered protein could significantly improve the process of brewing beer, a new study suggests. In the study, researcher Jaswinder Singh and coauthors describe a new protein, TLP8 (Thaumatin—Like Protein), which manages the amount of β-glucan in barley grains, best known as the vital ingredient of beer. “We found that during grain germination, TLP8 binds to β-glucan and significantly lo
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Futurity.org
Whatever gets you out of bed can help you sleep Older adults who have a purpose in life are more likely to have fewer sleep disturbances such as sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome—and sleep better over a long period of time. “Helping people cultivate a purpose in life could be an effective drug-free strategy to improve sleep quality, particularly for a population that is facing more insomnia,” says Jason Ong, associate professor of neurolog
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better than Star Wars: Chemistry discovery yields 3-D table-top objects crafted from lightA scientist's childhood dream of 3-D projections like those he saw in a Star Wars movie has led to development of new technology for making animated 3-D table-top objects by structuring light, says chemist Alexander Lippert, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The technology uses photoswitch molecules to make an infinite number of volumetric 3-D light structures viewable from 360 degrees, which
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of using Droplet Digital PCR for measuring immunotherapy response highlighted in presentations at 2017 ASCO Annual MeetingResearchers presented evidence of clinical potential for how circulating tumor DNA, measured by ddPCR, could be used as a biomarker to identify pseudoprogression and measure early indicators of response in immuno-oncology therapies.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine vessels are unsuspecting hosts of invasive speciesA new Tel Aviv University study finds that ships play an unknowing but dominant role in introducing and dispersing tough-shelled non-indigenous organisms into new environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune system may keep body from neutralizing HIV-1 virusResearchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that a process protecting the body from autoimmune disease appears to prevent it from creating antibodies that can neutralize the HIV-1 virus, a finding that could possibly help lead to a vaccine that stimulates production of these antibodies.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making telescopes that curve and twistA new tool for computational design allows users to turn any 3-D shape into a collapsible telescoping structure. New mathematical methods developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University capture the complex and diverse properties of such structures, which are valuable for a variety of applications in 3-D fabrication and robotics -- particularly where mechanisms must be compact in size and ea
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NRL scientists find high prevalence of antibiotic resistance in KenyaAntibiotic resistance is one of the most significant global public health problems in many developing countries. NRL, working with researchers in the Republic of Kenya, discovered a high prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the East Africa nation due to over-use of antimicrobial agents.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Easter Island not victim of 'ecocide', analysis of remains showsAnalysis of remains found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely-held belief that the ancient civilization recklessly destroyed its environment, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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Gizmodo
Women of Color Face a Staggering Amount of Harassment in Astronomy Image: Flickr/ RStonejr The sciences are overwhelmingly hostile to women , and in astronomy, it’s doubly bad for women of color. New research published yesterday in T he Journal of Geophysical Research affirms what these women have been saying for years: As a result of persistent harassment by their male colleagues, many women of color feel unsafe at work, attending conferences, and conducting fi
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Popular Science
Greenland's ice sheet is full of toxins waiting to break free—and microbes that eat them Environment But they can't dine us away from disaster. As the ice sheets melt they’ll release trapped pollution, but microbes inside might break down the contaminants before they reenter the environment. Read on.
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The Atlantic
One Man's Plan to Make Sure Gene Editing Doesn't Go Haywire It’s summer, which means that it’s also tick season. Through their bites , these bloodsuckers pick up the bacteria that cause Lyme disease from white-footed mice and then spread those microbes to people. They do so with particular verve on the island of Nantucket, Mass., where almost 40 percent of people have suffered through the rashes, fevers, and pain of Lyme. For those beleaguered islanders,
2h
Ingeniøren
Danske sygehuse rammes af ransomware-angreb: Region sender 20.000 på kursus To gange er sygehuse i Region Syddanmark blevet ramt af ransomware inden for de sidste to måneder. I Region Midtjylland har 20.000 ansatte været på awareness-kursus. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danske-sygehuse-rammes-ransomware-angreb-region-sender-20000-paa-kursus-1078302 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new system to estimate the duration of a walk in the countrysideResearchers from the department of Physical Geography and Regional Geographical Analysis at the University of Seville have developed a new system to estimate the time that it takes to do a walk in the countryside. It is an algorithm that takes into account length and gradient as the main variables when establishing how long a walk takes. After applying their method on routes all across Spain, they
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA found heavy rainfall in Hurricane EugeneWhen Hurricane Eugene was nearing its peak, NASA analyzed the storm's heavy rainfall over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. That rainfall has lessened as Eugene has weakened to a tropical storm on July 11.
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Futurity.org
This herpes virus may keep brain from fixing myelin The ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 may play a critical role in impeding the brain’s ability to repair itself in diseases like multiple sclerosis. The findings, which appear in the journal Scientific Reports , may help explain the differences in severity in symptoms that many people with the disease experience. “While latent HHV-6—which can be found in cells throughout the brain—has been associate
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Scientific American Content: Global
Vaccine Shows Protection against Gonorrhea for First TimeThe shot was designed to protect against a strain of meningitis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment
First teleportation to low-Earth orbitChina teleports first object from the ground to satellite
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Inside Science
The 'Chickens From Hell' Were Probably Good Parents The 'Chickens From Hell' Were Probably Good Parents Analysis of dinosaur fossils showed that some parents warmed their eggs with body heat. Oviraptor_Senckenberg.jpg Oviraptor skeleton and eggs in the Senckenberg Museum in Frankfurt am Main Image credits: EvaK via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA-2.5 Creature Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 10:00 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science)
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The Atlantic
D.C.'s Misguided Attempt to Regulate Daycare In Washington, D.C., daycare for infants and children younger than preschool-age costs $23,000 per child on average , only $2,000 less than the countrywide average for out-of-state college tuition . D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, in her latest State of the District address, said high child-care costs are a major factor driving people out of the city. Prices upwards of $2,000 per month can be a tough p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA found heavy rainfall in Hurricane EugeneWhen Hurricane Eugene was nearing its peak, NASA analyzed the storm's heavy rainfall over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. That rainfall has lessened as Eugene has weakened to a tropical storm on July 11.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Faster diagnosis of inherited and lethal nerve disease could advance search for new treatmentsJohns Hopkins physicians report success in a small study of a modified skin biopsy that hastens the earlier diagnosis of an inherited and progressively fatal nerve disease and seems to offer a clearer view of the disorder's severity and progression. With a quicker and less invasive way to visualize the hallmark protein clumps of the rare but lethal disease -- familial transthyretin amyloidosis --
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental 'enhancer' drug may boost conventional therapies for deadly pediatric brain cancersLaboratory studies suggest that an experimental drug already in early clinical trials for a variety of adult cancers might enhance radiation and chemotherapy for two childhood brain cancers that currently are virtually always fatal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers describe novel reporter proteins for long term expression of therapeutic genesA new study showed that the expression levels of a novel secreted reporter protein delivered to an immunosuppressd large animal model could be detected for several months after infusion into the liver, demonstrating the potential to monitor the effectiveness of delivery and ongoing expression of a therapeutic gene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists bring back extinct horsepox virus in lab, raising important biosecurity questionsIn a laboratory in Alberta, Canada, a team of scientists recently pieced together overlapping segments of mail order DNA to form a synthetic version of an extinct virus.
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The Atlantic
Will Trump Start a Trade War? On Monday, The New York Times uncovered the first clear evidence that top Trump campaign officials knowingly colluded with an agent of the Russian government to defeat Hillary Clinton. The Times reported that Donald Trump Jr., aware of the Russian effort to aid his father’s campaign, arranged a meeting in which Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya promised to dish dirt on Clinto
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Live Science
Beer and Birthdays: Personal Roman Letters Unearthed Near Hadrian's WallA cache of ink-written letters unearthed near an ancient Roman fort is revealing insights about life in a frontier post of the Roman Empire.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research uncovers the secrets of photosynthesis that could help develop computer technologyScientists at the University of Sheffield have published new research illuminating how energy is transferred in molecules - something that could influence new molecular technologies for the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strength of bacterial adhesion does not depend on size of contact areaA team of physicists and biologists working at Saarland University has developed a method with which they can measure the contact area between a bacterium and the surface it is 'sitting' on. Interestingly, and perhaps counterintuitively, a large contact area does not necessarily mean a large adhesive force. It turns out that specific features of the bacteria, which result in local differences in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New production method for 2-D materials could lead to smarter devicesA world-first non-destructive quality control method from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has enabled Oxford Instruments to commercialise wafer-scale fabrication technology for 2-D material MoS2.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers establish key mechanism controlling cell divisionResearchers at the Francis Crick and Gurdon Institutes have pinpointed the mechanism that activates a key point in embryonic development. This could help scientists develop new treatments for diseases where the cell cycle is disrupted, such as cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech trouble? Some schools are training students to helpWhen Crane Middle School decided to turn over minor IT repairs and troubleshooting duties to students, even the program coordinator was skeptical.
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Wired
Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 Review: Leave Your Friends in the DustThis bike's Turbo mode turns a steep hill into a Mary Poppins joyride.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warm winter events in the Arctic are becoming more frequent, lasting longerA new study analyzing winter air temperatures over the Arctic Ocean from 1893 to 2017 shows that since 1980, an additional six Arctic winter warming events are occurring each winter at the North Pole and these events are lasting about 12 hours longer, on average.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Method determines cell age more accurately, could help elderly patientsResearchers are reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IU, Regenstrief study: Early home health worker visit lowers risk of hospital readmissionA visit by a home health worker, such as a nurse or physical therapist, within a week of an older adult's discharge from a skilled nursing facility appears to lower the risk of hospital readmission within 30 days by nearly half according to a new Indiana University Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warm winter events in Arctic becoming more frequent, lasting longerArctic winter warming events -- winter days where temperatures peak above 14 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 10 degrees Celsius) -- are a normal part of the climate over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. But new research by an international team that includes NASA scientists finds these events are becoming more frequent and lasting longer than they did three decades ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulse rate monitoring before a C-section can improve maternal healthDoctors often prescribe preventative drugs to women who are to receive spinal blocks while giving birth via a Caesarean section. Such preventative treatment against hypotension, however, can have side-effects. In a study in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Augusto Navarro of the Miguel Servet University Hospital in Spain and collaborators investigate how clinicians can use aspe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment rapidly reverses the effect of blood thinner dabigatranA new treatment rapidly removes the oral blood thinner dabigatran (PRADAXA®) from circulation within minutes, allowing life-saving clots to form normally.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the ClassroomWhat do you think they’ll actually use it for? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Tobacco Gets More Screen Time in Blockbuster Movies, Study ShowsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raises concerns about smoking’s influence on youths. The movie industry defends its ratings system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remotely controlling electronic devices with hand gesturesMoving things with a wave of the hand: thanks to Empa technology this dream could soon become real. A sensor made of piezo-resistive fibers integrated in a wristband measures wrist movements and converts them into electrical signals. This can be used to steer drones or other electronic devices without a remote control.
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Ars Technica
Plants turn their tormentors into cannibals Enlarge / This leaf makes me want to eat you. (credit: Brian Connolly ) Plants are a lot less passive than their reputation makes them out to be. They foster helpful microbes, have internal systems of communication, and can even share information with their neighboring plants. When they're being eaten, their alarm signals call in predator species that consume whatever's eating them. Now, a new pa
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Scientific American Content: Global
Plants Turn Caterpillars into CannibalsChemical produced by tomato plants in response to pest attack can change insect behavior -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
All the Hard Drive Space You Could Possibly Want Is On Sale For Prime Day Seagate Prime Day Sale Whether you’re looking for a massive external hard drive for your desk, a portable hard drive you can slip in a bag, or an internal drive to upgrade your PC, Amazon’s Seagate Prime Day sale has what you need . Highlights include a 2TB portable drive for $60 , a 6TB drive with USB ports for $130 , and a wireless 3TB NAS for $97 , but head over to Amazon to see the full selec
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Ingeniøren
Laser-pen kan blænde Lidar-teknologien i selvkørende bilerKoreansk forskning viser, at man let kan slå bilerne ud af kurs ved at forvirre bilens sensorer - med risiko for fatale følger.
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Futurity.org
‘Virus cam’ can catch germs in the act A team of researchers has developed a microscope powerful enough to see a virus in the act of infecting a cell. The team’s new 3D “virus cam” can spy on tiny viral germs as they wriggle around in real time. In a video caught by the microscope, you can watch as a lentivirus bounces and jitters through an area a little wider that a human hair. The team used their 3D virus cam to spy on this small l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new system to estimate the duration of a walk in the countrysideResearchers from the University of Seville have developed a new system to estimate the time that it takes to do a walk in the countryside. It is an algorithm that takes into account length and gradient as the main variables when establishing how long a walk takes. After applying their method on routes all across Spain, they are convinced that their formula provides a better approximation of the ti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UF Health researchers find genetic factors that cause muscle weakness, wasting disorderFor years, the underlying process that causes a debilitating muscle disorder in infants and young children has been largely unknown. Now, a group that includes University of Florida Health genetics researchers has identified the fundamental mechanism that causes congenital myotonic dystrophy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Easter Island not victim of 'ecocide', analysis of remains showsAnalysis of remains found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely-held belief that the ancient civilization recklessly destroyed its environment, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ECDC report: 10-fold increase of hepatitis E cases in the EU/EEA between 2005 and 2015The incidence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been steadily increasing across the countries of the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) with 21 081 cases reported in the EU/EEA over the last decade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women and men may have different bipolar disorder biomarkersMen and women react differently to compounds associated with immune system response to bipolar disorder, according to an international team of medical researchers. The findings suggest that bipolar disorder could one day be diagnosed by measuring biological changes in the body, and that treatments could be tailored differently for men and women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warmer Arctic linked to weaker vegetation growth in North AmericaAn international team of researchers led by Jong-Seong Kug at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) has shown that the warmer Arctic has triggered cooler winters and springs in North America, which has in turn weakened vegetation growth and lowered carbon uptake capacity in its ecosystems. This achievement has been published in the world-renowned Nature Geoscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria on surfaces -- strength of adhesion does not depend on size of contact areaScientists at Saarland University have developed a method with which they can measure the contact area between a bacterium and the surface it is 'sitting' on. Interestingly a large contact area does not necessarily mean a large adhesive force. It turns out that specific features of the bacteria are the main reasons for the observed differences. These results can be used to optimize antibacterial m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of premature babies has implications for future treatmentStudy of premature babies has implications for future treatmentResearch carried out by the University of Kent with doctors on the neonatal unit at the William Harvey Hospital and Brunel University have provided further insight into the biology of premature birth, with findings that may have implications for treating premature babies.
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Viden
Meningitis-vaccine beskytter måske mod gonoréForskere på New Zealand er optimistiske efter studie viser, at meningitisvaccinerede i mindre grad blev smittet med sexsygdommen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Universal basic income could work in Southeast Asia—but only if it goes to womenThe universal basic income debate has been raging for some years, with politicians and people hotly divided over the notion of their government paying every citizen a set amount of money on a regular basis, without requiring work to be completed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
St. Columba's cell on Iona uncovered by archaeologistsArchaeologists from the University of Glasgow have uncovered conclusive evidence that a wooden hut traditionally associated with St Columba at the monastery on the island of Iona does indeed date to his lifetime in the late sixth century AD.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Caterpillars key to urban blue tits' low breedingMany animal species suffer reduced reproductive success in urban habitats, despite wide-spread supplementation of breeding and feeding opportunities. In some years, the breeding success of city birds is devastatingly low.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher decodes the secret language of ring-tailed lemursWhy do lemurs go "hmm?" It's not because they don't know the words, but the answer may provide important clues about how ancient human ancestors may have socialized with each other. In research published in Ethology, U of T Mississauga primatologist Laura Bolt recounts how vocalizations by Madagascar's ring-tailed lemurs may aid in protecting them from predators and bolster social cohesion within
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Precipitation extremes in dry regions of China found closely related to SSTPrecipitation extremes are of general interest due to their profound impacts on the society, economy, human safety, and the natural environment. Precipitation extremes exhibit high spatiotemporal variation in terms of both their frequency and intensity relative to the mean precipitation, so it is always difficult to detect extreme events and their underlying related mechanisms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dolphins follow the trawlersNew research has shown that dolphins offshore of Western Australia's Pilbara coast are following fishing trawlers to feed on injured or discarded fish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From solid to liquid and back againYou can easily walk across the sand on a beach. But step into a ball pit, and chances are you'll fall right through.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spaceborne data for monitoring mosquitos in the name of public healthIt's a simple tactic in mosquito combat—find out where the little bloodsuckers are headed and cut them off at the pass. An online system is using NASA data to do just that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaning up toxic sites shouldn't clear out the neighborsSan Francisco has embarked on a project to transform its industrial southeast waterfront into a bike-friendly destination called the Blue Greenway. When completed, the Blue Greenway will be a 13-mile network of parks, bike lanes and trails along the southeastern edge of the city.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Many schools now urge kids to bring their own screensGot your own laptop or tablet? Bring it to class, many schools now say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
British Asian students more likely to receive negative media coverageMedia outlets continue to differentiate between British East Asian students and East Asian students in the UK education system, portraying the former in a negative, undesirable light, a new study in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crystals help volcanoes cope with pressureUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks researchers have discovered that volcanoes have a unique way of dealing with pressure—through crystals.
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Popular Science
The most worthwhile deals this Amazon Prime Day Gadgets A continually updated list of all the Amazon Prime Day deals we like. All the Amazon Prime Day deals we like—continually updated, in one place. Read on.
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Live Science
Meet the Beetles: Stunning Museum Specimens from LondonApproximately 10 million beetle specimens make up the Coleoptera collection at the Natural History Museum in London.
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The Atlantic
When Will Trump Visit the U.K.? Donald Trump’s visit to the U.K. has been postponed to next year, the BBC reports , citing growing opposition to Prime Minister Theresa May’s invitation to the U.S. president to visit her country. The BBC reported the U.K. and U.S. governments “are believed to be looking at options for the visit.” May invited Trump to the U.K., on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II, when she became one of the first wor
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Gizmodo
Does the Setting for Wonder Woman 2 Mean a Character Is Making an Unlikely Return? Ciarán Hinds talks playing Steppenwolf in Justice League . Ridley Scott says he’s got plans to re-introduce Ripley in the future Alien movies. A spooky figure returns for American Horror Story ’s next season. Plus, set footage from Luke Cage , and how Star Trek: Discovery is sticking to Trek canon. To me, my Spoilers! Wonder Woman 2 Both Screen Rant and The Wrap report they’ve learned Wonder Woma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New algorithms extract biological structure from limited dataUnderstanding the 3D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses is crucial in biology and medicine. With recent advances in X-ray technology, scientists can now collect diffraction images from individual particles, ultimately allowing researchers to visualize molecules at room temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Greek theaters used moveable stages more than 2,000 years agoAn investigation by an architectural researcher from Kumamoto University, Japan has revealed the high possibility that a wooden stage existed in the theater of the ancient Greek City of Messene during the Greek Classical period (ca. 369 BC). The evolution from the rustic, open theaters of ancient Greece to the magnificent theaters of the Roman times clearly demonstrates the passion that the people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Give and take—credentials could aid panhandlingNew York Mayor Bill de Blasio recently said on a radio show that he would like to ban panhandling but wouldn't try because the courts wouldn't allow it. Many panhandlers "are not particularly in need and just are finding a way to get some easy money and that does frustrate me," he said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human pose estimation for care robots using deep learningExpectations for care robots are growing against the backdrop of declining birthrates, an aging population, and a lack of care staff. As an example, for care at nursing homes and other such facilities, it is anticipated that robots will check the condition of the residents while patrolling the facility. When evaluating a person's condition, while an initial estimation of the pose (standing, sittin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Future materials are becoming 'topological'Researchers from CIC nanoGUNE, Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley experimentally developed the so-called 'Quantum Spin Hall' effect in a 2-D material. Materials that display this phenomenon are called 'topological insulators.' But since they were theoretically predicted in 2005, only a handful of two-dimensional ones have been found in nature and none of them offer any
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
British Asian students more likely to receive negative media coverageMedia outlets continue to differentiate between British East Asian students and East Asian students in the UK education system, portraying the former in a negative, undesirable light, a new study in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caregiving needs increase as older adults approach the end of lifeDying adults in the United States have 2.5 people assisting them, on average, according to a new study. Yet those caring for adults at the end-of-life, especially spouses, are likely to report that they have no one assisting them and no time for themselves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Barrier to autoimmune disease may open door to HIV, study suggestsResearchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered that a process that protects the body from autoimmune disease also prevents the immune system from generating antibodies that can neutralize the HIV-1 virus. The findings, which will be published July 11 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, might be considered by scientists trying to develop a vaccine that can stimu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA astronomers track the birth of a 'super-earth''Synthetic observations' simulating nascent planetary systems could help explain a puzzle -- how planets form -- that has vexed astronomers for a long time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crystals help volcanoes cope with pressureUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks researchers have discovered that volcanoes have a unique way of dealing with pressure -- through crystals. According to a new study published in the Journal of Geology, if enough crystals can develop in rising magma, then a network of microscopic crystals can lessen the internal pressure of rising magma and reduce the explosiveness of eruptions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla adding service centers as Model 3 goes on saleElectric car maker Tesla is expanding its service operations and hiring more than 1,000 technicians to meet expected demand for its new Model 3 sedan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover evolutionary origin of redox regulation in plantsDuring the development of higher life forms over the course of millions of years, there have always been significant and comparatively sudden leaps in development. As a consequence, living organisms developed new skills and conquered additional habitats. In this process they adopted these abilities partly from their predecessor organisms: For example the plastids of the plants, the place where pho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants use calcium to convey internal warning of attacking aphidsScientists at the John Innes Centre have discovered how plants send internal warning signals in response to attack by aphids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers track the birth of a 'super-Earth'A new model giving rise to young planetary systems offers a fresh solution to a puzzle that has vexed astronomers ever since new detection technologies and planet-hunting missions such as NASA's Kepler space telescope have revealed thousands of planets orbiting other stars: While the majority of these exoplanets fall into a category called super-Earths—bodies with a mass somewhere between Earth an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The ref and the fighter—two sides of plant defenseA year ago, the Howe lab developed a plant that upended a common misconception that plants can defend or grow, but not both. Theirs could.
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Futurity.org
Culture shapes our answer to ‘big frog, small pond’ question Whether someone would rather be a “big frog in a small pond” or a “small frog in a big pond” may depend on their cultural upbringing, new research suggests. In a series of studies, researchers asked more than 600 adults from the United States and China about their preferences regarding education and work. Would they prefer to be a star student in a top 100 school or a mediocre student in a more p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animal emotions stare us in the face—are our pets happy?Scientists are starting to be able to accurately read animal facial expressions and understand what they communicate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vineyard biosecurity project looks to next stage after trialFinding a balance between maximizing the biosecurity benefit and the ease of use for vignerons will play a key role in determining the future of software to help keep pests and diseases out of vineyards.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists can now locate oxygen in the structure of catalysts with a precision of one-trillionth of a meterA major new application of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR technology at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has led to the ability to examine the chemical structure of catalysts with a spatial resolution of less than a picometer, or one-trillionth of a meter. That capability enables scientists to better understand, and design more effective catalysts for the production of fuels and h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Contaminants in food: Identifying and assessing risks as early as possibleDioxins, mineral oils, perfluorinated substances - people do not only obtain important nutrients with their food. They also ingest undesirable substances which can affect health when taken up in certain quantities. The recently published special issue 'Contaminants in Foods' gives an overview of the assessment strategies of possible health risks and explains what properties and hazard potential th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient Greek theaters used moveable stages more than 2,000 years agoTheater has been loved by many people since classical times. Along with its popularity, stage theater construction evolved greatly between the ancient Greek and Roman periods. In this research, a Japanese architectural researcher has clarified the development process for some of the stage equipment that was used in the theaters of Messene, an ancient Greek city.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNU report focuses on ties between financial sector and modern slaveryA UN University report released today finds that the financial sector has a number of underutilized tools at its disposal to disrupt funds generated by human trafficking and modern slavery. The report identifies concrete measures to break the ties between the financial sector and modern slavery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NC pre-K earns high marks for its first 15 years"The NC Pre-K Program has enhanced children's language development, communication skills, cognitive development, and social and emotional development," says FPG senior research scientist Ellen Peisner-Feinberg, who has led annual evaluations of the program since its inception as 'More at Four' in 2001. "Not only does the program benefit children while they attend it, but its positive effects persi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cells control nuclear size becomes clearerOver a century since scientists first observed that cells and their nucleus grow at a constant ratio, we are now closer to finding out how.This study was carried out by Assistant Professor Kazunori Kume of Hiroshima University and supervised by Nobel Laureate Sir Paul Nurse.It discovered that hoarding of genetic materials (mRNA) and proteins by the nucleus causes it to bulk up and is enabled by th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 1 diabetes risk linked to intestinal virusesA new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that viruses in the intestines may affect a person's chance of developing Type 1 diabetes. Children whose gut viral communities are less diverse are more likely to generate self-destructive antibodies that can lead to Type 1 diabetes. Further, children who carried a specific virus belonging to the Circoviridae famil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Berkeley lab algorithms extract biological structure from limited dataA new Berkeley Lab algorithmic framework called multi-tiered iterative phasing (M-TIP) utilizes advanced mathematical techniques to determine 3-D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses from very sparse sets of noisy, single-particle data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precipitation extremes in dry regions of China found closely related to SSTScientists investigated the connections between the precipitation extremes during 1953-2002 in the dry and wet regions of China and the sea surface temperature and found that in the dry region of China, the extreme precipitation is closely related to the sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human pose estimation for care robots using deep learningA research group led by Professor Jun Miura at Toyohashi University of Technology, has developed a method to estimate various poses using deep learning with depth data alone. Although it requires a large volume of data, the group has realized a technology which efficiently generates data using computer graphics and motion capture technologies. This data is freely available, and expected to contrib
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Structural insights into the modulation of synaptic adhesion by MDGA for synaptogenesisA KAIST research team reported the 3-D structure of MDGA1/Neuroligin-2 complex and mechanistic insights into how MDGAs negatively modulate synapse development governed by Neurexins/Neuroligins trans-synaptic adhesion complex.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why Some Mice Seem to Make Bad Parents A single gene is linked to nest building in mice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Most Insurance Won't Cover the Expensive Electronics in Your Checked Bags Photo by Masakazu Matsumoto . With an electronics ban in place for most flights coming from the Middle East and North Africa, and the threat of a laptop ban hanging over our heads , there’s a good chance you’ll have to check your expensive electronics with your luggage on an upcoming flight. Too bad there’s nothing you can do to cover loss or damage. Whether you’re forced to check your laptop or
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Ars Technica
The Gearhead podcast: Was the iPhone a revolution or just slick marketing? Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) 10 years of iPhone . Who'd have thunk it? From humble beginnings as a way to one-up Microsoft's tablet business, the iPhone has had a lasting impacting on the mobile and computer industries, turning us into mindless swiping and tapping zombies along the way. Your browser does not support the audio element. Click here to listen Gearhead , episode 2: iPhone turns
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use-inspired basic research—external report recommends targeted adjustmentsThe Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) commissioned an external evaluation of its funding category "use-inspired basic research" last year. Based on the evaluators' recommendations, it has now decided to introduce targeted changes in its processes.
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Futurity.org
Watch: Nobody knew humpbacks flap their flippers Scientists have observed humpback whales flapping their foreflippers like penguins or sea lions do—something never seen before in whales. When they attached recording devices to humpback whales, they were hoping to learn more about the animals move deep underwater. “Whales power their swimming by using their muscular tails,” says Paolo Segre, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University. “How
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The Atlantic
Is the ISIS Leader Al-Baghdadi Dead? Updated at 8:52 a.m. ET The Syrian Observatory of Human Rights says Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the ISIS leader, is dead. Confirmed information for the #SOHR about the death Abu Bakr #Baghdadi , the “Amir of the #IslamicState organization” pic.twitter.com/JivM08RJWI — #المرصدالسوري #SOHR (@syriahr) July 11, 2017 The group did not cite a source, though Agence France-Press reported that the claim was bas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of ancient bird discovered in New Mexico(Phys.org)—A new species of ancient bird has been discovered by a trio of researchers working in the New Mexico desert—its fossilized remains were found in the Nacimiento Formation in the San Juan Basin. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Daniel Ksepka with the Bruce Museum, Thomas Stidham with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Thomas Williamson with the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How we're using ancient DNA to solve the mystery of the missing last great auk skinsOn a small island off the coast of Iceland, 173 years ago, a sequence of tragic events took place that would lead to the loss of an iconic bird: the great auk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert calls for global effort to combat threat of rising sea levelsA University of Southampton academic has called for a concerted global effort to combat the threat posed by sea level changes, ahead of a major international conference next week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists transmit data via Earth-to-space quantum entanglement(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers in China have advanced the distance that entangled particles can be used to send information, including encryption keys. In their papers, both uploaded to the arXiv preprint sever, the two groups outline their work and suggest their achievement represents an essential step toward the development of a global-scale quantum internet.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sustainable Cities Put Waste to WorkTransforming costly wastes into valuable resources can make cities highly efficient -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Bees, Flowers, and Pollen ShowersBumblebees (Bombus impatiens) can amass pollen by 'buzzing'-or oscillating-against a flower, creating a gentle flurry of grains.
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The Scientist RSS
Qatar Blockade Evinces Vulnerability of Helium SupplyScientific users had braced for another helium shortage, but many have turned to new technologies to reduce their needs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insect 'anti-antiaphrodisiac' tells males when females are ready to mateResearchers have identified a pheromone released by female insects after mating that tells males exactly when they are ready to mate again.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alien ice on EarthA flash of green laser followed by pulses of X-rays, and mere nanoseconds later an extraterrestrial form of ice has formed. The miniature crystal reveals how water solidifies under high pressures, like those expected in icy comets, moons and planets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does the European public understand the impacts of climate change on the ocean?A new in-depth study of the European public's awareness of the impacts of climate change on the ocean shows that although many are relatively well informed, an alarming number remain either uninformed or misinformed. Many believe that Arctic sea-ice is already completely lost during the summer and that sea temperatures have already risen by more than 2°C. Climate science needs to be effectively co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depression affects the brains of males and females differentlyDepressed adolescents were exposed to happy or sad words and their brains imaged. Researchers in the UK found that depression has different effects on the brain activity of male and female patients in certain brain regions. The findings suggest that adolescent girls and boys may experience depression differently and that sex-specific treatments might be beneficial for adolescents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A time capsule containing 118 trillion cubic feet of gas is buried in northern AustraliaTwo to three kilometres beneath the surface of Australia's Northern Territory sits buried energy. The layered rock formations known as the Velkerri Shale were recently estimated to contain over 118 trillion cubic feet of gas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using sensors and social networks to make slopes saferThe peace and quiet that envelope a lone hiker on a leaf-riddled trail or a rock climber perched on the top of a cliff seem a world away from the noise of a social media feed. But Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE) alumnus Jim Christian SM '14 had an idea to tap into the superabundance of social-media data to benefit athletes and outdoor adventurers. He, along with MIT Sloan School of Ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seagrass meadows—critical habitats for juvenile fish and dugongs in the Johor islandsScientists at University of Malaya, Malaysia, have found that the seagrass meadows in Johor harbor three times more juvenile fish than coral reefs. They also found that the dugong herds there prefer certain types of meadows over others.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shading and lighting retrofits slash energy use in New York 'Living Lab' office demonstrationBy using advanced lighting and automated shades, scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found that occupants on one floor of a high-rise office building in New York City were able to reduce lighting energy usage by nearly 80 percent in some areas.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthetic ferrimagnet nanowires make more efficient memory devicesRacetrack memory is a potential next-generation solution for our digital storage devices. However, current experiments using single-layer ferromagnetic nanowires are less efficient than expected. New research published in Scientific Reports shows that replacing them with a double-layered synthetic ferrimagnet nanowire reduces electric current requirements by a factor of ten, and power requirements
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New Scientist - News
Melting ice may be making mountains collapse in GreenlandThe collapse of the mountain which triggered a tsunami that destroyed an Arctic village last month may have been caused by climate change – and more may follow
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cells control nuclear size becomes clearer – could lead to greater understanding of cancer and aging processOver a century since scientists first observed that cells and their nuclei grow at a constant ratio to each other, researchers are now closer to finding out how.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insect 'anti-antiaphrodisiac' tells males when females are ready to mateResearchers have identified a pheromone released by female insects after mating that tells males exactly when they are ready to mate again.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft announces rural broadband initiativeMicrosoft is announcing a project to bring broadband internet access to rural parts of the United States.
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Futurity.org
Ants wear smells like a uniform The waxy layer that covers the bodies of ants is the source of complex smells that they use to communicate, new research suggests. “If you’re an ant, you view others by their smell and others view you by your smell…” These odorant blends act like biochemical uniforms, identifying individual ants by caste, colony, and species. In so doing it helps regulate the ants’ behavior, allowing them to navi
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasitizing wasps offer hope against devastating lily beetleMany gardeners across New York state have given up on growing lilies, thanks to the lily leaf beetle, which has devastated the plants in many areas statewide, across the Northeast and in Canada.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does the European public understand the impacts of climate change on the ocean?The oceans are our lifeline and the lungs of our planet producing 70% of the oxygen we breathe. They regulate our climate and provide us with food, new medicines, and energy. However, the ocean - and therefore the future of humanity - is threatened by climate change. But how much does the public really understand the impacts of climate change and what can be done to facilitate better communication
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alien ice on Earth: Scientists discover how dense, extraterrestrial ice can form in just billionths of a secondStanford researchers have for the first time captured the freezing of water, molecule-by-molecule, into a strange, dense form called ice VII ("ice seven"), found naturally in otherworldly environments, such as when icy planetary bodies collide.
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Wired
These Lithuanians Are the Perfect Picture of PatriotismPhotographer Mattia Vacca documented volunteers and draftees training at Lithuanian military camps.
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The Atlantic
How to Survive Running Across the Grand Canyon There’s a book called Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon . The cover depicts a human skeleton lying at the canyon rim, not subtly. It’s not so much a safety manual as a collection of terrifying stories—it promises “gripping accounts of all known fatal mishaps” in the canyon. The author at the edge of the North Rim the evening before the run (Sarah Yager / The Atlantic) Most of them involve
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The Atlantic
Tell Us: What’s Your Favorite Jane Austen Line? I learned Jane Austen’s lines like a second language when I was growing up. My quip-quoting, BBC box-set owning, Austen-loving parents began immersing me in her literary world before I was old enough to comprehend all its nuances and ironic undertones. By the time I picked up Pride and Prejudice to read it myself when I was in middle school, the characters and scenes felt as familiar as memories
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The Atlantic
Russia Threatens to Expel 30 U.S. Diplomats Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says his government is considering “specific measures” against the U.S. over its refusal to hand over two compounds seized last year by the Obama administration. It is “simply shameful for such a great country as the United States, a champion of international law, to leave the situation in such a state of suspended animation,” Lavrov
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why mosquitoes should not be eliminatedA Purdue researcher and a team of scientists working on a new insecticide argue that mosquitoes should not simply be made extinct due to their role in various ecosystems.
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The Atlantic
How Can Iraq Rebuild? On Sunday, Haider al-Abadi, the prime minister of Iraq, visited Mosul to herald the success of his army’s nine-month struggle to recapture the city from the Islamic State. In a speech on state television the next day, he declared “ the end and the failure and the collapse of the terrorist state of falsehood and terrorism which [ISIS] announced from Mosul.” Even as pockets of militants continue to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of hip hop lyrics shows that 'pro-social' messages are popular with fansTraditional music companies have yet to realize the full financial and cultural potential of hip hop and rap, a UCLA-led study suggests. When it comes to the type of artists that get signed, recorded and heavily promoted, the big record labels often overlook what researchers call "pro-social" themes.
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Live Science
I Know Your Next Move: Game Reveals How the Brain StrategizesIn a new study, brain scans taken during a strategy game reveal how people strategize about what they think their opponent will do.
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Live Science
Amazon Prime Day: The Best Science Kit DealsFrom gross and slimy to gleaming, these science kits are sure to be fun and educational for your kids.
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Gizmodo
Here Are Your Stupid-Cheap Prime Day TV Deals TCL 32" 720 Roku TV , $125 | 40" 1080p , $215 32" and 720p aren’t ideal specs for your main TV, but this Roku-enabled TCL set would be perfect for a bedroom, kid’s room, or office, and it’s only $125 right now for Prime members . For $90 more, upgrade to 1080p and 43" . Want 4K? Here’s a 55" Sony for $500 . In the market for a higher end set? You can find the rest of Amazon’s Prime Day TV deals h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boosting the breeding of New Zealand's endangered birdsNew Victoria University research suggests hormones found in New Zealand's native plants are helping endangered native birds to breed successfully.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Determining the parameters for transmission electron microscopyWhile the phones in our pockets may be perfect for taking photos of our pets, taking good images of catalysts and other materials is far more complex, especially when you bring in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The STEM imaging method is a way to observe catalysts while they're working, or under catalytic conditions. The challenge is that background scattering from reaction gase
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Jane Goodall on her extraordinary life with chimpanzeesIn an inspiring video interview, world-renowned primatologist Jane Goodall tells Dean of UNSW Science Emma Johnston that the resilience of nature and the indomitable human spirit give her hope for the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colored rice may brighten the menu for diabetics in the futureA healthy diet includes foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, oils, and whole grains, which contain important nutrients our bodies need. These foods also contain bioactive compounds with potential to promote human health.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Y-type starsBrown dwarf stars are failed stars. Their masses are so small, less than about eighty Jupiter-masses, that they lack the ability to heat up their interiors to the roughly ten million kelvin temperatures required for normal hydrogen burning (hydrogen burning fuels the Sun, whose surface temperature is about 5700 kelvin).
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Gizmodo
Fox News is 'Just Asking Questions' About the Safety of Vaccines Fox News, the president’s favorite TV channel, is just asking questions. But not about anything important. Last night, most people were talking about the explosive revelations that Donald Trump Jr. sought to collude with a Russian lawyer to get dirt on Hillary Clinton . But Tucker Carlson thought that it might be a perfect time to discuss a different topic: The safety of vaccines. Vaccines don’t
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Science | The Guardian
Painful progress: how evolution muddled human breastfeeding Breastfeeding our babies may be ‘natural’ but it’s not always viable, and many women lack support. In fact, the process is far trickier for humans than other species – and it’s all because of our oversized brains… Have you recently had a baby? Here’s a step-by-step guide for how to go about your new role as a mother. 1. Do what you think is best for you and your baby. 2. Get told you are wrong. C
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Live Science
Why Does the Holy Communion Wafer Need Gluten?The purity of bread matters to the Catholic Church.
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Live Science
Can You Open a Plane Door Midflight? If You Can Lift ElephantsWhat would it take to open a plane's exit door at cruising altitude?
5h
Wired
The Who's Who of Net Neutrality's 'Day of Action'Where tech's leading companies stand on net neutrality's 'Day of Action'
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Wired
The Professional American Flag Football League Is Reshaping the Future of the GameThis isn't the flag football of your childhood. It's football with high-tech equipment and a social media presence, designed for the short attention span of the modern viewer.
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Wired
Science Guy Bill Nye Teaches You to Tie Your ShoesA shoelace knot is a metaphor for the scientific approach to problem-solving.
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Wired
It's Time to Make Code More Tinker-FriendlyThe web needs a simple on ramp to encourage curious coders.
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Wired
Audi's Self-Driving 2018 A8 Sedan Solves the Human Handoff ProblemAudi’s engineers and psychologists have spent years teaching the car to drive safely on the highway, but their real focus was on the human-machine interface that enables the tricky handoff.
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The Atlantic
Burning Fossil Fuels Almost Ended All Life on Earth “Who you with ?” “I’m a science journalist,” I said, jolted from my reverie on the shoulder of I-68 in Maryland, where a crowd of geologists had gathered on a field trip to poke at some rocks revealed by the highway department’s dynamite. The rocks, slate gray and studded with pebbles from a punishing ice age, spoke to a mysterious global die-off at the end of the Devonian period, hundreds of mil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NanoRacks CEO discusses trends in commercial space hardwareFounded in 2009, the Houston, Texas-based company NanoRacks LLC provides commercial hardware and services onboard the International Space Station (ISS) for government and commercial customers. To date, the firm has sent more than 550 payloads from over 30 countries to ISS, creating trends in commercial hardware in space. In an interview with Astrowatch.net, Jeffrey Manber, the founder and CEO of N
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thai seafood giant commits to major fishing reformsThai Union, one of the world's largest seafood conglomerates, said Tuesday it will overhaul its fishing practices to protect against labour abuses and unsustainable trawling, a move hailed by Greenpeace as "huge progress".
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NYT > Science
Endangered Rhinos Flee From Indian Floods Into Poachers’ HandsSevere flooding since June in Assam State has left scores of animals in Kaziranga National Park in danger, a government official said.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Physicists Go Deep in Search of Dark MatterA laboratory buried nearly a mile beneath South Dakota is at the forefront of a global push for subterranean science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Uyuni salt flat, BoliviaThis image shows part of Bolivia's Salar de Uyuni – the largest salt flat in the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles take a bite out of infectionsAntibiotic-resistant bacteria that colonize surfaces and medical equipment are causing alarming annual rises in the number of patients becoming infected in hospitals and clinics. A KAUST team is working to reduce these numbers with a smart polymer that changes color and activates natural antimicrobial enzymes when bacterial contamination is detected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Your phone to ID you by the way you swipeFingerprint scanners are all the rage, yet new research shows that this is just the beginning of biometric identification.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's first demonstration of space quantum communication using a microsatelliteNICT developed the world's smallest and lightest quantum communication transmitter (SOTA) onboard the microsatellite SOCRATES. We succeeded in the demonstration of the first quantum communication experiment from space, receiving information from the satellite in a single-photon regime in an optical ground station in Koganei city. SOTA weighs 6 kg and its size is 17.8 cm length, 11.4 cm width and 2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles coated with antibiotic eliminate drug-resistant bacteriaA new strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been described by Brazilian researchers in Scientific Reports, an online journal owned by Springer Nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ATLAS experiment takes its first glimpse of the Higgs boson in its favourite decayPreviously, the Higgs boson has been observed decaying to photons, tau-leptons, and W and Z bosons. However, these impressive achievements represent only 30 percent of Higgs boson decays. The Higgs boson's favoured decay to a pair of b-quarks (H→bb) was predicted to happen around 58 percent of the time, thus driving the short lifetime of the Higgs boson, and thus remained elusive. Observing this d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three European firms join in robot ship projectThree European companies are to work on a pioneering project to build a fully-automated supply ship, the French member of the scheme announced on Tuesday.
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Science : NPR
Web Comic: The Scientist Who Escaped Aleppo It was a harrowing journey. Nedal Said made a new life in Germany — and found what he'd always been looking for. (Image credit: Erik Nelson Rodriguez for NPR)
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The Atlantic
Bernie Sanders's Pitch to Trump Voters MORGANTOWN, W.Va.—When Bernie Sanders spoke at a rally on Sunday afternoon to stop the Republican effort to dismantle Obamacare, he didn’t wait long to bring up President Trump. “I am more than aware that Donald Trump did very well in the state of West Virginia, I got that,” the Vermont senator told a crowd inside a hotel ballroom. “Donald Trump told the people that he was going to be a champion
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Science | The Guardian
Coffee 'cuts risk of dying from heart disease' – video Research has found that drinking three or more cups of coffee a day can cut the risk of dying early by between 8% and 18%. Scientists suggest drinking coffee lowers the risk of dying from a host of causes, including heart disease, stroke and liver disease. However, experts say it is unclear whether the health boost is down to the brew itself. Coffee cuts risk of dying from stroke and heart diseas
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fusion energy pushed back beyond 2050We will have to wait until the second half of the century for fusion reactors to start generating electricity, experts have announced.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
First vaccine shows gonorrhoea protectionThe World Health Organization sees developing a vaccine as vital in stopping "super-gonorrhoea".
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Viden
Rumsvamp kan angribe svækkede astronauterAstronauters svækkede immunforsvar kan gøre svamp i væggene på rumbaser til et yderst ubehageligt bekendtskab.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Kill the myth of the miracle machine Unchallenged assumptions about how science works threaten its support and decrease its ability to contribute to society, says Daniel Sarewitz. Nature 547 139 doi: 10.1038/547139a
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NYT > Science
The Salty Pink Pools of the YucatánStep out into the salty waters on the northern tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, where small organisms turn the water pink.
7h
New Scientist - News
It’s time we all burst our carbon bubblesDistant financial elites aren't the only ones with investments in the fossil fuel industry – most people with a private pension or savings account do too
7h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens landbrug? Humlebier bestøver og sprøjter markerneCanadisk biotek-startup summer af begejstring over de foreløbige resultater med smarte bikuber, hvor humlebierne læsser nektar af og tanker miljøvenlige bekæmpelsesmidler.
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The Atlantic
Will France's State of Emergency Become Permanent? Last Thursday, France’s parliament voted to extend the country’s national state of emergency for the sixth time, leaving in place what has been its longest uninterrupted state of emergency since the Algerian War of the 1960s. In a parliamentary address last Monday, French President Emmanuel Macron pledged to “restore the liberties of the French” by lifting the order and replacing it with a new, m
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Science : NPR
With Caviar, Clay, and Turkey Feathers, Saving Lake Sturgeon From Extinction Lake sturgeon have been around since the dinosaurs, and they can live as long as humans, or longer. Overfishing and pollution has decimated populations, but biologists are learning to help them breed.
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Science : NPR
Reading, Writing And Fracking? What The Oil Industry Teaches Oklahoma Students Oklahoma's oil industry is spending millions on science lessons for public schools. But environmentalists say omitting climate change leaves students unprepared. (Image credit: Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma)
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Ingeniøren
Amerikansk militærfly styrter ned og dræber mindst 16Et af de mest udbredte, militære transportfly i verden er styrtet ned på en sojamark i Mississippi uden chancer for at finde overlevende.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong quake off New Zealand but no damageA 6.6-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of New Zealand Tuesday, officials said, with minor shaking in the South Island but no damage reported.
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Viden
Kunstig intelligens kan hjælpe med at opdage hjerteproblemerDet er blot et af de seneste eksempler på, hvordan kunstig intelligens kan understøtte lægerne.
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The Atlantic
When the Nation's Capital Came Together for the MLB All-Star Game On Tuesday, Bryce Harper will lead a clan of Washington Nationals in this year’s All-Star Game in Miami. Not many fans are still around to remember it, but 80 years ago this month, Washingtonians got to witness Joe DiMaggio, Lou Gehrig, Dizzy Dean, and other future Hall-of-Famers at Griffith Stadium, as the city pretty much shut down to host the fifth All-Star Game in history. The star power was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cannibal cells may limit cancer growthNew research led by scientists at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge reveals a link between cell cannibalism and cancer biology. Cell cannibalism occurs when one cell surrounds, kills and digests another. This latest research reveals that cannibalism can be triggered by cell division; when one cell divides to form two. Since uncontrolled cell division is a key hallmark of cancer, this suggests that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Collagen controlling the thickness and juvenile state of skinType XVII collagen (COL17) is found to regulate the proliferation of epidermal cells and therefore the thickness of juvenile and aged skin, suggesting COL17 can potentially be used for future anti-aging strategies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lawmakers announce plan to extend California cap and tradeGov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders released a plan Monday to extend through 2030 California's cap-and-trade program, a key piece of the state's quest to fight climate change by drastically reducing emissions from greenhouse gases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mt Gox CEO on trial in Japan as bitcoin gains tractionA Tokyo court began hearings Tuesday into charges that the head of the failed Japan-based bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox accessed its computer system and inflated his account by $1 million.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accessing DNA in the cell's powerhouse to treat diseaseFor the first time, a synthetic compound has been made that can bind to DNA in the cells' energy powerhouses, suppressing a gene associated with nerve and muscle disease.
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Ingeniøren
Sådan søger du nyt job i arbejdstiden Hvordan søger man bedst muligt nyt job, mens du har et fast arbejde? Jobfinder kommer med råd til at skyde jobjagten i gang på en diskret måde, mens du er i arbejde. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/kan-du-soege-job-arbejdstiden-8807 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo
Your Favorite Speaker, Portable Projector, Robotic Vacuum, and the Rest of Anker's Prime Day Deals Anker makes basically all of our readers’ favorite charging and affordable audio gear , and their Prime Day deals don’t disappoint. The reader-favorite Anker SoundCore is a highlight at $25 (with code PRIMEAN9), one of the best prices we’ve seen. This thing sounds terrific for its size, and most importantly, will run for 24 hours on a charge, and that’s a conservative estimate in my experience .
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