Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The most effective individual steps to tackle climate change aren't being discussedGovernments and schools are not communicating the most effective ways for individuals to reduce their carbon footprints, according to new research.
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Gizmodo
Andy Serkis Reading President Trump's Tweets as Gollum is a Bit Too Perfect GIF Andy Serkis, the actor who played Gollum in the Lord of the Rings series, was on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert last night. And Colbert, a huge LOTR nerd, had Serkis read President Trump’s tweets on air. It’s honestly just too perfect . Hearing Serkis say “the fake news media has never been so wrong” in the voice of Gollum is pretty disturbing. Let’s just hope it doesn’t start a World War
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Giant iceberg splits from AntarcticA block of ice a quarter the size of Wales calves from the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula.
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Does the Antarctic Ice Shelf Break Really Mean?A glaciologist explains that any link to climate change is far from straightforward -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4min
NYT > Science
Following the Eyes for a Clue to AutismResearchers studied where toddlers focused their eyes when watching a video in order to find the genetic underpinnings of brain development and autism.
9min
The Atlantic
The Closest-Ever Shot of the Great Red Spot Two days ago, Juno, a pinwheel-shaped spacecraft, zoomed over Jupiter, coming within just 5,600 miles of its best-known feature, the Great Red Spot. The spacecraft’s camera stared at the oval-shaped storm as it soared above, capturing a few images of its orangey-red coils. The photo shoot lasted nine minutes. Juno travels at tens of thousands of miles per hour, and it doesn’t slow down. The space
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Diet not connected to GI problems in children with autismMany children with autism spectrum disorder experience significant gastrointestinal issues, but the cause of these symptoms is unknown. Professionals in the medical community have suggested a potential link between diet and gastrointestinal issues related to autism. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that diet is not a contributing factor in these indivi
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Giant charge reversal observed for the first timeCharged surfaces submerged in electrolyte solutions can sometimes become oppositely charged. This nonintuitive phenomenon happens when excess counter ions adsorb to the surface. In certain situations, theory predicts a highly charged surface not only changes sign, but can become more highly charged than the original surface. This is known as giant charge reversal, but remains controversial and has
14min
Wired
There's A Reason Women in Tech Are Finally Speaking OutSilicon Valley is flush with jobs and women in tech are talking openly about harassment. That's no coincidence.
21min
Ars Technica
Global Web standard for integrating DRM into browsers hits a snag Enlarge (credit: BoingBoing ) Days ago, Ars reported on a controversial decision by the industry trade group that oversees the global development of Web standards. The decision by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to back a standard for implementing digital rights management (DRM) for Web-based content is now under appeal, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced Wednesday. Cory Doctorow, t
23min
Scientific American Content: Global
Fire Ants Build "Eiffel Tower" StructuresWhen fire ants build a structure, they avoid getting crushed by their fellow ants by following a simple set of rules to distribute the load evenly. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23min
Science | The Guardian
Deadly flaws in the US ‘cash for blood’ system | LettersConcerns about the quality of blood products from the United States were raised nearly half a century ago, writes Martyn Berry The “bad blood” tragedy could so easily have been avoided ( May orders inquiry into contaminated blood scandal , 12 July). Professor Richard Titmuss’s book The Gift Relationship , published in 1970, showed clearly in a comparison of the American system (donors paid for blo
30min
The Atlantic
How to Know Who Will Let Trump Get Away With Anything We now know, in part, how the Trump-Russia scandal ends. As McKay Coppins and Rosie Gray pointed out on Tuesday, the revelation that Donald Trump Jr. enthusiastically requested dirt on Hillary Clinton despite knowing it was coming from the Russian government has radically changed the argument being deployed by Trump’s defenders. Until this week, it was: “There is no collusion with the Russian gov
32min
The Atlantic
War for the Planet of the Apes Is an Epic Slog It is necessary to note, from the start, that War for the Planet of the Apes is perhaps misleadingly titled. The third film in this retelling of one of Hollywood’s strangest franchises is not about a grand battle between man and super-ape, a showdown that began brewing in 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes and exploded into all-out conflict in 2014’s Dawn of the Planet of the Apes . Instead, t
32min
Ars Technica
Six major US airports now scan Americans’ faces when they leave country Enlarge (credit: John Lamb / The Image Bank / Getty Images ) The Department of Homeland Security has been pushing a plan that if enacted would require all Americans submit to a facial-recognition scan when departing the country. This step would be a way to expand a 2004 biometric-tracking law meant to target foreigners. According to the Associated Press, which first reported the plan on Wednesday
32min
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NASA sees formation of Tropical Storm Fernanda in Eastern Pacific OceanThe sixth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed near southwestern Mexico and quickly strengthened into Tropical Storm Fernanda. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the strengthening storm.
35min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Tricks to mute quantum noise aid hunt for gravitational waves Physicists find ways to make LIGO and other gravitational-wave detectors even more sensitive. Nature 547 148 doi: 10.1038/547148a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to grow a premium brand without killing its cachet? Outlet stores can helpThe conventional wisdom is that relying on revenues from outlet stores can destroy a brand's cachet over time. But according to a forthcoming study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, a leading scholarly marketing journal, outlet stores may actually help improve the brand's cachet.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RNA molecules live short livesA research group at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has developed a new method to measure the half-life of RNA molecules. The study revealed that commonly used methods provide distorted results and that RNA molecules live an average of only two minutes, ten times shorter than previously assumed. The results have now been published in the journal "Science Advances".
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-CRISPR proteins decrease off-target side effects of CRISPR-Cas9Viruses developed a weapon to thwart the Cas9 protein, which is the scissors that bacteria use to obliterate viruses. A new UC Berkeley and UCSF study shows that these anti-CRISPR proteins can reduce off-target gene editing that can cause side effects. Structural studies show that anti-CRISPRs mimic DNA, binding to the active site of Cas9 and never letting go. Future CRISPR therapies may routinely
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-CRIPSR protein reduces off-target cutting during genome editingHinting at a new approach to regulating gene editing in mammalian cells, a study by Jiyung Shin, Jennifer Doudna and colleagues reports that an inhibitor protein from a Listeria bacteriophage can block the Cas9 component of CRISPR-Cas9 from interacting with DNA.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finally, a noninvasive measure to identify dangerous blood vessel plaquesA new method of analyzing images from routine heart scans can, for the first time, reliably and noninvasively measure blood vessel inflammation -- which may help doctors deploy preventative interventions for the patients most at-risk patients for cardiovascular disease.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test for early detection of pancreatic cancer headed to clinicA newly identified biomarker panel could pave the way to earlier detection and better treatment for pancreatic cancer. Currently over 53,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer -- the fourth leading cause of cancer death -- every year. The blood biomarkers correctly detected pancreatic cancer in blood samples from patients at different stages of their disease.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals the hidden ways math helps us in everyday lifeA psychological intervention implemented to help students cope and learn more in a tough statistics course did more than just help them in the class, a new study found. It also helped them demonstrate better financial literacy and make better health-related decisions during the semester they took the course.
56min
Gizmodo
Zappos' First Sale In Years Is Here, And It's Huge Zappos Sale Zappos is basically a one-stop shoe destination already, but right now, they’re having an actual sale, something they haven’t done in years. Grab discounted shoes from Cole Haan, Brooks, Nike, Stuart Weitzman, Frye, and more for men and women. And, if you’re part of their rewards program, get 3x the points on the over 40,000 items on sale.
57min
Wired
Forget the Echo. The Dot Is the Most Important Alexa DeviceThe Echo Dot remains the best-selling Alexa device since its debut. So why aren't more companies copying it?
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Viden
Computer skaber kunstig udgave af Barack ObamaMed kunstig intelligens og 17 timers video, kan man nu lave en overbevisende imitation af et menneske der taler.
1h
Popular Science
Researchers used CRISPR to encode a movie into DNA Science Genome GIFs. Using the gene editing technique CRISPR, the researchers encoded a series of images and a short video in the form of a GIF into the DNA of E. Coli . Read on.
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Science | The Guardian
New way of reading scans can predict heart attack risk, research finds Researchers says colour of fat surrounding a heart’s arteries can predict risk, meaning expensive drugs can be given to those most likely to benefit Heart attacks may soon be easier to predict thanks to a method of reading routine heart scans that can pinpoint those most at risk, research suggests. Every year, roughly 750,000 Americans have a heart attack and around half die from it, often before
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The Scientist RSS
Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target EffectsAcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MPFI scientists probe function of cerebellar interneurons with new techniqueResearchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience developed a technique for selectively targeting and controlling the interneurons of the cerebellar molecular layer relying on a genetically engineered mouse model that exploits a unique gene encoding c-Kit to differentiate interneurons from other cell types. By using the c-kit mice in this study, the team was able to specifically acc
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slow earthquakes occur continuously in the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zoneSeismologists at the University of California, Riverside studying earthquakes in the seismically and volcanically active Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone have found that 'slow earthquakes' are occurring continuously, and could encourage damaging earthquakes. Slow earthquakes are quiet, can be as large as magnitude 7, and last days to years. Taking place mainly at the boundary between tectonic plate
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Live Science
Alexander Hamilton's 'The Grange': His Last Home Before the DuelLike other well-to-do New Yorkers in the late 1700s, Alexander Hamilton and his family moved to Harlem Heights in Upper Manhattan, a rural area with cool breezes that also provided an escape from the yellow fever threat in Lower Manhattan.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
In The Face Of Adversity, The Brown Brothers Are Resolved To Hold Down Browntown #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Feasting on fresh-caught crab, Noah and Matt raise a crab leg to the future, and whatever it may hold for the Brown family. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Fa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anti-CRISPR proteins decrease off-target side effects of CRISPR-Cas9CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing is based on a tactic bacteria developed to protect themselves from viruses.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost smart glove wirelessly translates the American Sign Language alphabet into textA glove fitted with wearable electronics can translate the American Sign Language alphabet and then wirelessly transmit the text for display on electronic devices—all for less than $100, according to a study published July 12, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy O'Connor and Darren Lipomi from University of California, San Diego, US, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
RNA molecules live short livesA research group at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has developed a new method to measure the half-life of RNA molecules. The study revealed that commonly used methods provide distorted results and that RNA molecules live an average of only two minutes, ten times shorter than previously assumed. The results have now been published in the journal Science Advances.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals the hidden ways math helps us in everyday lifeA psychological intervention implemented to help students cope and learn more in a tough statistics course did more than just help them in the class, a new study found.
1h
NYT > Science
Moon Express Sets Its Sights on Deliveries to the Moon and BeyondThe Florida start-up is not just aiming to win $20 million in the Google Lunar X Prize competition. It plans to be a payload delivery company.
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NYT > Science
Study of How We Look at Faces May Offer Insight Into AutismThe research suggests that genetics underlie how children seek out formative social experiences like making eye contact or observing facial expressions.
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Ars Technica
FDA abruptly drops request for more drug data after maker’s CEO meets Trump Enlarge / WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 31: US President Donald Trump meets with representatives from PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, in the White House. (credit: Getty | Pool ) In a rare and surprising reversal, the Food and Drug Administration gave Amicus Therapeutics Inc. the greenlight Tuesday to submit its rare-disease drug, Galafold, for an accelerated review pro
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Lights, camera, CRISPR: Biologists use gene editing to store movies in DNA Technique demonstrated in E. coli suggests ways to record key events in a cell's life. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22288
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The Atlantic
Brazil's Lula Found Guilty Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET Former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was sentenced Wednesday to 9 ½ years in prison for his role in a massive corruption scandal, marking a remarkable turnaround for a political figure who less than two decades ago was being hailed as the architect of modern Brazil. Judge Sergio Moro of the 13th Federal Court in Curitiba sentenced Lula, as he is known, for
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Quanta Magazine
Cell Atlases Reveal Biology’s Frontiers Nir Hacohen, an immunologist and geneticist at the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, knew that biology had a problem. He wanted to understand the human immune response’s role in cancer and other diseases. But to do that, he first had to address a more fundamental issue: The definition of the immune cell types themselves seemed insufficient, incom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers study factors predicting school corporal punishmentThe number of Southern natives and the average education level in a county are the most influential factors on the odds of a US public school using corporal punishment, according to new Penn State research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher use of health care services throughout adult life linked with traumatic childhoodsA research paper in the Journal of Health Service Research & Policy provides, for the first time, the statistical evidence showing that, regardless of socio-economic class or other demographics, people who have adverse childhood experiences use more health and medical services through their lifetime.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Splitting the atomThe government is about to set out its position on membership of Europe's nuclear regulator after Brexit.
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Futurity.org
Body feedback could make assisted walking easier Researchers are using feedback from the human body to develop designs for exoskeletons and prosthetic limbs. The work, called human-in-the-loop optimization, lessens the amount of energy needed for walking with exoskeleton assistance or prosthetic limbs. “…the biggest challenge has remained the human element…” “Existing exoskeleton devices, despite their potential, have not improved walking perfo
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Gizmodo
The Most Amazing (and Hard to Get) Toys and Collectibles at San Diego Comic-Con 2017 There’s just one week left till San Diego Comic-Con returns to blast us in the face with awesome pop culture spectacle, cosplay, and fantastic, expensive goodies. Here’s the very best toys and collectibles at this year’s show that we can’t wait to line up forever for (or, more likely, pay even more for on eBay afterwards). Revolution Comic Crossover Preview Mega-Set (Hasbro, $100) Toymakers often
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here are Juno’s first close-ups of Jupiter’s Great Red SpotThe Juno spacecraft swooped just 9,000 kilometers above Jupiter’s Great Red Spot on July 10. Here are the first pictures.
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Live Science
Vatican Frescoes Found to Contain 2 Female Figures Painted by RaphaelA room in the Vatican apartments contains two old paintings that deserve a fresh look.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice scientists simplify the incorporation of nitrogen into moleculesRice University scientists generalize the synthesis of aminating agents to simplify the design and manufacture of drugs and other fine chemicals in which nitrogen atoms play key roles. Each of these agents contains an active electrophilic nitrogen atom to help chemists forge carbon-nitrogen bonds more easily than ever.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is a biological driver behind the need for self-fulfillment?As human beings, what drives us to higher levels of existence? Once we have satisfied the basics - food, shelter, a mate, children - then what? For many it's the idea of self-actualization, or realizing our full potential. But what does self-actualization look like? How do we know when we are doing it? Arizona State University researchers recently published a new series of studies on what people t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds rainfall diminishing in a weakening Tropical Storm EugeneTropical Storm Eugene has been moving over cooler sea surface temperatures that have been sapping its strength. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, core satellite passed over Eugene and measured its decreasing rainfall rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early squirrel gets the real estate, U of G study findsThose young squirrels now scampering around your neighborhood were born in this year's earliest litters and are more likely to survive than squirrels born later and still curled up in their nests, according to a new University of Guelph study. That's because squirrels with early birth dates are first out of the nest and therefore more likely to find vacant spots to store their food for the winter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Massive iceberg breaks off from AntarcticaAn iceberg about the size of the state of Delaware split off from Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf sometime between July 10 and July 12, 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online climate data benefits producersA group from the USDA Agricultural Research Station (ARS) has introduced a web-based application to help farmers. It allows users to access important historical information about the past climate in their area. This could allow them to better plan for the current year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detecting long-term concussion in athletesLawyers representing both sides in concussion lawsuits against sports leagues may eventually have a new tool at their disposal: a diagnostic signature that uses artificial intelligence to detect brain trauma years after it has occurred.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart atomic cloud solves Heisenberg's observation problemQuantum physics: Scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute by University of Copenhagen have been instrumental in developing a 'hands-on' answer to a challenge intricately linked to a very fundamental principle in physics: Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. The NBI-researchers used laser light to link caesium atoms and a vibrating membrane. The research, the first of its kind, points to sensors capab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists replay movie encoded in DNAFor the first time, a primitive movie has been encoded in -- and then played back from -- DNA in living cells. Scientists say it's a major step toward a 'molecular recorder' that may someday make it possible to access an archive of the changing internal states of a developing cell by sequencing its genome. The ability to record such sequential events as a movie at the molecular level is key to thi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of brain-like activity in immune system promises better disease treatmentsThe Australian National University (ANU) has led the discovery of brain-like activity in the immune system that promises better treatments for lymphoma, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency disorders, which collectively affect millions of people globally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking cells out to the movies with new CRISPR technologyIn a new study published in Nature, the same team shows in foundational proof-of-principle experiments that a new CRISPR system, as a first-of-its-kind approach, is able to encode information as complex as a digitized image of a human hand, reminiscent of some of the first paintings drawn on cave walls by early humans, and a sequence of one of the first motion pictures made ever, that of a gallopi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How children look at mom's face is guided by genetics and disrupted in autismResearchers have found striking evidence for the role of genetics in shaping a fundamental feature of human behavior: how children pay attention to the world -- what they look at, and what they don't -- is strongly influenced by genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synapses in the brain mirror the structure of the visual worldThe research team of Professor Sonja Hofer at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered why our brain might be so good at perceiving edges and contours. Neurons that respond to different parts of elongated edges are connected and thus exchange information. This can make it easier for the brain to identify contours of objects. The results of the study are now published in the journal Natu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children's visual engagement is heritable and altered in autismHow children visually engage with others in social situations is a heritable behavior that is altered in children with autism, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study appears in the latest issue of Nature. Autism spectrum disorder affects how a person acts, communicates and learns. In the United States, approximately 1 out of 68 children has the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In autism, genes drive eye gaze abnormalitiesUsing eye-tracking technology, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta have found compelling evidence that genetics plays a major role in how children look at the world and whether they have a preference for gazing at people's eyes and faces or at objects. The discovery adds new detail to understanding the causes of au
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Do you live in the world's laziest country?Scientists use smartphones to track and rank activity levels around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Serving pizzas made by robotsNot long after the pizzeria Zume opened for business last year, its kitchen staff noticed a problem with some of its pizzas: they had holes in them.
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New Scientist - News
Hairs use chemical signals to tell each other when to growHair follicles all over the body use the same chemical language to coordinate their growth, a finding that may lead to treatments for hair loss and baldness
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Ars Technica
Miscreants have been pillaging credit cards from Trump Hotels’ booking system Enlarge / Trump Chicago was one of the hotels targeted. (credit: Don Sniegowski ) If you stayed at one of 14 Trump hotel properties between July 2016 and March 2017, there’s a chance your credit card data and other personal information may have been pilfered. (We have posted the full list of new hacks here .) According to a Tuesday statement posted on the Trump Hotels website, a booking service c
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Microsoft Thinks AI Will Fill Your Blind Spots, Not Take Over Your JobThe company is looking to improve the way AI and humans get along, but it says we should think differently about how we ask machines to explain themselves.
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Wired
Scientists Upload a Galloping Horse GIF Into Bacteria With CrisprDNA could be a robust storage system for data, but never before have researchers stored information in a live organism.
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Viden
Facebook lancerer reklamer i populær beskedtjenesteMessenger-appen er ikke længere reklamefri zone.
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Ars Technica
70 mph and 5.3 seconds of magnetic levitation: Hyperloop One hits a milestone Enlarge / The test track looks a lot like the one SpaceX built for a recent competition , although this one is wider and shorter than SpaceX's. (credit: Hyperloop One) Hyperloop One claims that its prototype ultra-fast train has completed a first full systems test in a vacuum, reaching a speed of 70 mph. The sled was able to magnetically levitate on the track for 5.3 seconds and “reached nearly 2
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Big Think
Scientists Teleport a Photon to Space for the First Time Ever Chinese scientists accomplish the feat of teleporting a photon to a satellite hundreds of miles above Earth. Read More
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Popular Science
An iceberg the size of Delaware just broke off of Antarctica From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News “We are seeing a microcosm of the future.” In a sign of things to come, Antarctica just shed an iceberg the size of Delaware. Read on.
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Popular Science
Check out the closest ever view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot Space Looking into a massive storm. Here are the first pictures from NASA’s flyby of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. Take a look.
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The Atlantic
Scientists Can Use CRISPR to Store Images and Movies in Bacteria In 1872, Eadweard Muybridge captured a series of photos of a running horse. His images settled a debate about whether the animal ever lifted all four feet off the ground at once—it did. They also formed the basis of one of the first motion pictures . And now, Seth Shipman, from Harvard Medical School, has immortalized the running horse in a new and very different medium: the genomes of bacteria.
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Gizmodo
Vizio's Tolerance for LeEco's Bullshit Has Come to an End Photo: AP By many accounts , LeEco was set to be the next major player in the US tech market. But its bank accounts indicate that this won’t be the case. Everything is going south for the Chinese startup and in the latest blow, Vizio is suing the company for $60 million. Vizio claims that LeEco executives misrepresented its finances in a failed acquisition deal. LeEco had its hands in everything.
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Science | The Guardian
Scientists pioneer a new revolution in biology by embedding film on DNA Transfer of Muybridg’e galloping horse images on to a bacterial genome opens possibility of using living cells to record what happens inside them His groundbreaking photos showed life in motion, from cantering bison to leapfrogging boys, and settled an argument that had long divided trainers and riders: do all four hooves of a racehorse ever leave the floor at once? Now, more than a century later
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OU team details foreshock activities leading up to Pawnee earthquakeA University of Oklahoma geophysics professor, Xiaowei Chen, details the foreshock activities leading up to the Pawnee earthquake, and highlights the complicated relationship between seismicity and wastewater injection rates in a research study published this week in Scientific Reports. The study details the precursory earthquake (foreshock) sequences that culminated in the September 3, 2016, 5.8
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal-free MRI contrast agent could be safer for some patientsResearchers from MIT and the University of Nebraska have developed a metal-free MRI contrast agent that could be safer for certain patients. The compound contains organic molecules called nitroxides instead of metal and may be used to generate more informative MRI scans of tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by ironThis week from AGU: Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by iron, new technique could help scientists track nitrous oxide sources, and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes causes shift in oral microbiome that fosters periodontitis, Penn study findsPeople with diabetes are susceptible to periodontitis, a gum infection that can result in tooth loss. New research led by Dana Graves of the University of Pennsylvania helps explain why: Diabetes triggers changes in the oral microbiome that enhance inflammation and the risk of bone loss
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New biofuel technology significantly cuts production timeNew research from a professor of engineering at UBC's Okanagan Campus might hold the key to biofuels that are cheaper, safer and much faster to produce.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking cells out to the movies with new CRISPR technologyResearchers are developing ways to harness DNA, the blueprint of biological life, as a synthetic raw material to store large amounts of digital information outside of living cells, using expensive machinery. But, what if they could coerce living cells, like large populations of bacteria, into using their own genomes as a biological hard drive that can be used to record information and then be tapp
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Gizmodo
Scientists Code an Animated GIF Into DNA Image: Seth Shipman What’s a strand of DNA but data? We often think of its units, the As, Cs, Ts, and Gs, as letters of the words in an instruction manual. But what if, instead, we think of them as biological computer bits, storing the smallest unit of information? What stops scientists from harnessing the power of those units, using the latest biological technology to treat DNA like a writable d
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New on MIT Technology Review
Scientists Used CRISPR to Put a GIF Inside Living DNAHarvard researchers embedded images in the genomes of bacteria to test the limits of DNA storage.
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The Scientist RSS
Smallpox Kerfuffle Reveals Biosecurity ProblemsA review of a 2014 incident in which mystery vials of smallpox were found at the NIH reveals security weaknesses, but also concludes the response was appropriate.
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Gizmodo
Insanely Accurate Lip Synching Tech Could Turn Fake News Videos Into a Real Problem GIF GIF: University of Washington / Gizmodo Imagine the worst case scenario. Dubious filmmakers use artificially intelligent computers to feed raw audio into a simulated version of Barack Obama. The audio is actually Obama’s voice, and the face really is his face. But the lip movements? Totally fake. The filmmakers publish the video on the internet, and it’s virtually impossible to see that it’s
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Science : NPR
Took The Wrong Medicine By Mistake? Study Finds Such Errors Are On The Rise A study analyzing data from poison control centers finds that the rate of serious medication errors outside health care settings doubled between 2000 and 2012. (Image credit: Gillian Blease/Getty Images)
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New Scientist - News
Swinging birds play with rhythm like jazz musiciansAt least a handful of species of birds swing as they sing, playing with the timing in their songs in a similar way to jazz performers
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The Atlantic
Why Are There So Many More Species on Land When the Sea Is Bigger? Half a billion years ago on Earth, after the Cambrian explosion had created an astonishing array of new species, there was still no life on land. No complex life anyway. No plants, no animals, certainly nothing that even compared to the great diversity of life in the sea, which teemed with trilobites, crustaceans, bristly worms, and soft squid-like creatures. Most major animals groups that exist
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Gizmodo
Our Best Look Yet at Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is Finally Here Image Courtesy of NASA/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major Praise Cthulhu! NASA’s Juno spacecraft has just delivered the most incredible images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot—and that’s a really high bar to clear. The spacecraft has spent the last year beaming back some of the most mind-blowing images of the gas giant. But today’s batch marks a historic moment for the orbiter, which got closer to the Great Red Sp
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Ars Technica
How Facebook, Google, Netflix, and others supported net neutrality today EFF Today is the "Internet-wide Day of Action to Save Net Neutrality" organized by advocacy groups, and many websites changed their home pages or displayed their support for net neutrality in some way. Many of them directed visitors to forms for submitting comments to the Federal Communications Commission about its plan to reverse net neutrality rules that outlaw blocking, throttling, and paid pr
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Science | The Guardian
Beam me up, Scotty! Scientists teleport photons 300 miles into space Star Trek tech is still way off but successful test of quantum entanglement at Earth-space distance boosts hope for building an unhackable quantum internet Chinese scientists have teleported an object from Earth to a satellite orbiting 300 miles away in space, in a demonstration that has echoes of science fiction. The feat sets a new record for quantum teleportation, an eerie phenomenon in which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyperloop startup moves closer to near-supersonic railUS startup Hyperloop One on Wednesday announced the first successful full-systems test of its near-supersonic rail transit system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graduate research fellow investigates how fungi and fire enable pine savanna ecosystem to thriveFor most humans, fire symbolizes destruction and death. Yet nature often adapts to fire and can wield it as a creative force. For example, in the pine savannas of the southeastern U.S., fire acts as a chrysalis from which grasslands and forests spread new stems and unfurl fresh leaves.
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Popular Science
Anyone can become a certified project manager with this 3-course bundle Sponsored Post Pass the globally-recognized CAPM exam via 20 hours of instruction. Anyone can become a certified project manager with this 3-course bundle. Pass the globally-recognized CAPM exam via 20 hours of instruction. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV hijacks surface molecule to invade cellResearchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a key step in the process that HIV uses to inject its genetic material into cells. Working with cultures of cells and tissues, the researchers prevented the invasion process by chemically blocking this step, preventing HIV genetic material from entering cells. The findings could lead to the eventual development of new drugs to preven
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Gizmodo
I Tried the Most Futuristic Car Dashboard You Can Buy All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo We all know we’re supposed to ignore our smartphones while driving. Yet somehow it’s OK to take our eyes off the road to glance at some kind of GPS unit? Navdy is one of the first GPS device s that claims to be safer for drivers by putting the map and other info front and center so your eyes stay on the road—it’s also one of the most comprehensive in-car navig
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Audio-Technica, Household Sample Box, and More An Audio-Technica Gold Box , $15 household sample box with $15 credit, Cowin noise-cancelling headphones , and more lead today’s best lifestyle deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Audio-Technica Gold Box When it comes to full-sized headphones, wired options still reign supreme, and Audio-Technica took the throw for the second time your favorit
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Ars Technica
Juno has sent back some of its first raw images of the Great Red Spot NASA / SwRI / MSSS On Monday, the Juno spacecraft made its eighth close flyby of the planet Jupiter, and this time the spacecraft flew over the Great Red Spot that has captured the public's attention since its discovery in the 17th century. Why is it so big? So red? And why has this storm lasted for centuries? Juno reached perijove on Monday at 9:55pm ET, and at the time, the spacecraft was just
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Ars Technica
Radiohead releases a surprise ZX Spectrum program for OK Computer anniversary What's that little cassette packed into this expensive Radiohead set? Let's use a ZX Spectrum emulator to find out. Radiohead has never shied away from arty and elaborate "special edition" versions of its albums, which normally ship to fans with unique artwork and limited vinyl. But Tuesday's collector's item release of the OK Computer 20th anniversary edition, priced at a whopping $130/£100, shi
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Big Think
A New Battery-Free Phone Grabs Power from the Air Around It Researchers develop a working, battery-free cellphone. Read More
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The Atlantic
The Hidden Message in the Architecture of Steven Universe Is there an architect who would turn down the chance to build a floating stadium? Or a spire on the moon? What sort of abode would you build for magical creatures who don’t need to eat, sleep, or go to the bathroom? That’s what the background designers for Steven Universe ask themselves when constructing the show’s environments. Currently in its fifth season on Cartoon Network, the series revolve
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Live Science
Eco-Friendly Technique Spins Super-Strong Artificial Spider SilkCambridge researchers have developed a non-toxic method for producing ultra-thin — and very strong — fiber for use in traditional clothing, medical devices, and even shrapnel-resistant military apparel.
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Gizmodo
This Fluid Artist's Messy Painting Style Is So Wonderfully Soothing to Watch GIF Like Jackson Pollock, Piet Mondrian, and other abstract artists before her, Crystal Ma creates colorful masterpieces that are as much about the creative process as they are about the finished product. As you watch Ma pour rainbow after flowing rainbow onto a canvas, it becomes hard to care what the final result even looks like. You have to assume that Ma spent countless hours staring at the f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greece: Heatwave closes Acropolis, ancient sitesGreek authorities closed the ancient Acropolis in Athens to visitors for several hours Wednesday along with other popular archaeological sites around the country due to a heatwave.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook Is Adding Live VR Broadcasts to Your News FeedIf you’re one of the few people with access to an Oculus Rift headset, you can now broadcast live from VR as an avatar on Facebook.
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Gizmodo
A Complete Guide to the Religions of Game of Thrones All Image and Stills: HBO Game of Thrones is an incredibly dense show, filled with hundreds of characters, families, legends, and everything else under the realm’s sun. With all the information fans have had to absorb over the years, it’s easy for some things to fall on the wayside. That includes the show’s plethora of religions. As season 7 promises a major power shift in Westeros, here’s a guid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HIV hijacks surface molecule to invade cellResearchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a key step in the process that HIV uses to inject its genetic material into cells. Working with cultures of cells and tissues, the researchers prevented the invasion process by chemically blocking this step, preventing HIV genetic material from entering cells. The findings could lead to the eventual development of new drugs to preven
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Gizmodo
German Enigma Machine Found at Flea Market Fetches $51,000 at Auction The Enigma 1 that sold at auction. (Image: Artmark) A professor of cryptology has auctioned off a rare and fully-functional Enigma machine used by the Nazis to encrypt messages during the Second World War. Incredibly, the collector found the machine at a flea market in Bucharest—which suggests Romania may house other machines still waiting to be discovered. As reported in Deutsche Welle , the unn
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The Atlantic
Trump's Campaign Succeeded by Breaking All the Rules—and It’s Catching Up to Him Now Donald Trump’s campaign for president seemed to vacillate between, to borrow Hunter S. Thompson’s dichotomy, being too weird to live and too rare to die. All the smartest analysts were convinced that it was definitely too weird to live. Stocked with amateurs, retreads, and minor-league washouts suddenly promoted for a cup of coffee , and overseen by a candidate with a penchant for enormous gaffes
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The Atlantic
What Exactly Are 'Kremlin Ties'? On its surface, the Donald Trump Jr. affair seems as bizarre as its cast of characters. A Russian corporate lawyer who Trump Jr. believed possessed Russian government kompromat —compromising information—on the Clinton campaign. A Russian-Azerbaijani pop star, Emin Agalarov , whose publicist made the connection with Trump Jr., and who himself is the son of the so-called “ Trump of Russia ,” billio
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Ars Technica
Bootleg NES Classics flood market to fill demand that Nintendo won’t Enlarge / A slightly misaligned logo is the main difference that distinguishes this bootleg system from the real thing. (credit: NeoGAF ) Video games have a long history of counterfeit cartridges trying to pass themselves off as legitimate. But while there are plenty of obvious knock-off video game hardware floating out there, it's pretty rare to see a game console that tries to exactly mimic the
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Ars Technica
A truly enormous iceberg just broke loose from Antarctica Enlarge / The rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf, as seen in November 2016. (credit: John Sonntag/NASA ) Concluding a months-long deathwatch, one of the largest icebergs ever seen finally separated from Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf sometime in the last couple days. The 5,800-square-kilometer iceberg contains over a trillion tons of ice. For years, researchers have been keeping an eye on a growing
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NYT > Science
How Big Is the Iceberg? That Depends on Where You LiveThe size of Brunei. Twice the volume of Lake Erie. News media around the world used a wide variety of geographic references to describe one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.
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Wired
Introducing Mighty, the iPod Shuffle for SpotifyThe $85 device, called Mighty, syncs with your Spotify playlists so you can jam out without going online.
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Live Science
No, That's Not Amelia Earhart in That History Channel PhotoIt's not her.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Code @ TACC robotics camp delivers on self-driving carsOn a hot and breezy June day in Austin, parents, friends, brothers and sisters navigated through main campus at The University of Texas at Austin and helped carry luggage for the new arrivals to their dorm rooms. Thirty-four high school students from mostly low-income Title I schools in Central Texas, some from as far away as Houston, said good-bye to their families.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Face scans for Americans flying abroad stir privacy issuesIf the Trump administration gets its way, all U.S. citizens flying abroad will have to submit to face scans at airport security.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bloomberg outlines plan to quantify US climate effortsBillionaire philanthropist Michael Bloomberg and the governor of California announced Wednesday a plan to quantify efforts by US states, cities and businesses to drive down greenhouse gas emissions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumorsEarly phase Northwestern Medicine research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.
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Gizmodo
Cops Bust Alleged Masterminds Behind Big-Ass Canadian Coin Heist Photo: AP Most people have heard that the American penny costs more to manufacture than it’s worth, but Canada really has us beat. In 2007, the country unveiled an enormous, 220-pound gold coin with a face value of 1 million Canadian dollars and a metal value of around 5 million of the same (or about $3.8 million American). Then, somebody stole it . On Wednesday, German police arrested two people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paleontologists solve pterosaur pelvis puzzleFollowing a discovery in 2015 in Alberta's Dinosaur Provincial Park, Greg Funston puzzled for two years over a mysterious bone trying to identify the species of animal—as well as the part of the body—the bone belonged to.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's SDO watches a sunspot turn toward EarthAn active region on the sun—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—has rotated into view on the sun and seems to be growing rather quickly in this video captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between July 5-11, 2017.
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The Atlantic
Qatar Crisis: No End in Sight Saudi Arabia and three other Arab countries that have imposed a blockade on Qatar say the terrorism-financing agreement signed between the U.S. and Qatar on Tuesday “is not enough,” as the impasse among the countries shows no signs of abating after more than one month. “It must be stressed that this step is not enough and the four countries will closely watch how serious the Qatari authorities ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's SDO watches a sunspot turn toward EarthA new sunspot group has rotated into view and seems to be growing rather quickly in this video captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between July 5-11, 2017.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paleontologists solve pterosaur pelvis puzzleFollowing a discovery in 2015 in Alberta's Dinosaur Provincial Park, Greg Funston puzzled for two years over a mysterious bone trying to identify the species of the animal -- as well as the part of the body -- the bone belonged to.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The number of illustrations in storybooks influences children's word learningNew research shows that the number of illustrations presented in a storybook can influence preschool children's ability to learn words from shared reading.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watch 3-D movies at home, sans glassesWhile 3-D movies continue to be popular in theaters, they haven't made the leap to our homes just yet -- and the reason rests largely on the ridge of your nose.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The wiser brain: Insights from healthy eldersThe archetype of old wise elders distinguished for their wisdom and sound judgement continues to inspire dreams of reaching a bright and enlightened old age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spread of breast cancer reduced by targeting acid metaboliteIt's a metabolite found in essentially all our cells that, like so many things, cancer overexpresses. Now scientists have shown that when they inhibit 20-HETE, it reduces both the size of a breast cancer tumor and its ability to spread to the lungs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visual illusion could help you read smaller fontExposure to a common visual illusion may enhance your ability to read fine print, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explores antidepressant medication use during pregnancyA study published by JAMA Psychiatry reports no evidence of an association between intellectual disability in children and mothers who took antidepressant medication during pregnancy when other mitigating factors, such as parental age and underlying psychiatric disorder, were considered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical trial looks at tramadol for opioid withdrawalA randomized clinical trial published by JAMA Psychiatry compared tramadol extended-release with clonidine and buprenorphine for the management of opioid withdrawal symptoms in patients with opioid use disorder in a residential research setting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No statistically significant risk of ID in children from mothers using antidepressantsIn a first-of its kind study, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found an elevated risk of intellectual disability (ID) in children born to mothers treated with antidepressants, but the risk was not statistically significant and is likely due to other factors, including parental age and the parents' psychiatric history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineering professor proposes bold concept for solving great barrier reef bleachingA green, low-cost solution for the coral bleaching crisis -- one of the unfortunate consequences of global warming -- is proposed by a University of Arizona engineering professor known for developing innovations for solving infrastructure renewal challenges.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scores of U.S. Communities Face Frequent Flooding in 18 YearsMore than 90 locales, mostly in rural Louisiana and Maryland, already face chronic inundation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The wave nature of light in super-slow motionPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU) have accomplished a quantum leap in light research. They have managed to capture the behaviour of extremely short laser pulses during focusing by means of very high spatial and temporal resolution. The results are of fundamental relevance to understanding the interactions between ligh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthesizing the human genome from scratchFor the past 15 years, synthetic biologists have been figuring out how to synthesize an organism's complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. They've tackled the genomes of microbes, but now one large consortium has its sights set on the human genome. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores Genome Project-write
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mulling over the aromas of wineA fine wine has an ideal balance of ingredients. Too much or too little of a component could mean the difference between a wine with a sweet and fruity aroma and one that smells like wet newspaper. To help wineries avoid off-aromas, a team reports in ACS Sensors a sensitive device for detecting a compound that can affect the beverage's fragrance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adapters enable better communication between machinesPlug and play is a technology that allows users to connect devices such as printers or USB memory sticks to a computer and directly use them without installing any software. This technology is now also available for industrial applications: Engineers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed an adapter that makes it much easier to interconnect parts of a production facility and align th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon to build fulfillment center employing 1,500 near Orlando airportAmazon announced Monday it will expand its internet retailing empire by building a massive fulfillment center south of Orlando International Airport.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Delaware-sized iceberg breaks off Antarctic ice shelfAn iceberg about the size of Delaware splintered from the Larsen C ice shelf in one of the largest calving events ever recorded.
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New Scientist - News
Breast implants can lessen gunshot injuries by slowing bulletsIt has been claimed that breast implants can offer some protection from gunshot wounds. A study led by a plastic surgeon suggests there’s some truth to this idea
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Wired
NASA's Safeguard Tech Stops Trespassing Drones Without Touching ThemSafeguard uses algorithms to track a drone’s movement relative to the geofences, and stops it before it goes too far.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data analysis in the kitchen: Modeling flavor networks to predict tasty ingredient combinationsWhat's on the menu tonight? How about some roast beef with strawberry-, beer- and garlic sauce? Or perhaps something lighter based on tomatoes, apricots and whiskey gum? Gourmet chefs and foodies alike love to experiment in the kitchen and come up with new flavor combinations, and recent research is taking the science of combining ingredients to a whole new—computable—level. New research published
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Popular Science
Brain training apps don't seem to do much of anything Health But figuring out whether or not they work is almost as tough as creating them. The brain training app Luminosity might not be any better than video games, according to a recent study.
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NYT > Science
Era of ‘Biological Annihilation’ Is Underway, Scientists WarnA new paper describes the threatened mass extinction of thousands of animal species around the globe. The authors say that human activities are in large part to blame.
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Ars Technica
Lithium/graphene “foil” makes for a great battery electrode Enlarge / Some lithium metal. Note the surface has already reacted with something. (credit: Wikimedia Commons ) Lithium ion batteries, as the name implies, work by shuffling lithium atoms between a battery's two electrodes. So, increasing a battery's capacity is largely about finding ways to put more lithium into those electrodes. These efforts, however, have run into significant problems. If lit
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Futurity.org
Watch: Fire ants climb each other to build moving tower Fire ants use their bodies to build tower-like structures —all without a plan, a leader, or coordinated effort, new research suggests. Each ant, researchers say, wanders around aimlessly, adhering to a certain set of rules, until it unknowingly participates in the construction of a tower several inches tall. “If you watched ants for 30 seconds, you could have no idea that something miraculous wou
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TEDTalks (video)
Why journalists have an obligation to challenge power | Jorge RamosYou can kick Jorge Ramos out of your press conference (as Donald Trump infamously did in 2015), but you can never silence him. A reporter for more than 30 years, Ramos believes that a journalist's responsibility is to question and challenge those in power. In this compelling talk -- which earned him a standing ovation midway through -- Ramos explains why, in certain circumstances, he believes jour
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumorsEarly phase research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors. The strategy involves using lipid polymer based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor initiating cells. The nanoparticle platform delivers molecules that can target the specific genetic makeup of a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer survivors get a taste for kefir after exerciseKefir may be a beneficial post-exercise beverage for cancer survivors. It means that cancer survivors can enjoy the nutritional support that milk provides without the potential for significant stomach upset, report researchers in the Journal of Dairy Science®.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone replacement therapies help breast cancer grow and spreadResearch has indicated that women who take hormone replacement therapies have a higher incidence of breast cancer. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have linked natural and synthetic progestins to the body's production of specialized cancer cells that act like stem cells in humans. Findings could help scientists target these rare cells that proliferate in breast cancers and metastasiz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Data analysis in the kitchenResearchers suggest a new, data-driven hypothesis that may increase our understanding of which flavors work well together, and why.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Truth about China’s Cash-for-Publication PolicyThe first study of payments to Chinese scientists for publishing in high-impact journals has serious implications for the future of research
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Scientific American Content: Global
This Cell Phone Needs No BatteryAn experimental cell phone works by absorbing and reflecting radio waves—meaning it's incredibly energy efficient and needs no battery. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How migrating birds 'run a marathon,' burning muscles and organs in long flightsMigrating birds complete long non-stop flights of many hours for songbirds and days for some shorebirds to reach breeding or wintering grounds. During such flights a bird's metabolic rate is very high, fueled by stored fat, but also by burning the protein in muscles and organs in a process that is not well understood, says eco-physiologist Alexander Gerson at the University of Massachusetts Amhers
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Gizmodo
Grab a $15 Sample Box Of Household Items You Probably Need Anyway And Get $15 Back Household Essentials Sample Box , $15 with $15 credit Sample boxes like these, the ones full of things you probably need around your house rather than sample sized beauty products or protein powder (no offense), are great. For $15, you get 15 samples of stuff like paper towels, laundry detergent, hand sanitizer , and more, plus $15 back to spend on buying select household items .
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Poverty Affects the BrainAn unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does a candidate's religion matter to voters?Religion is sometimes used as shorthand to define a political candidate's views—"evangelical" and "antiabortion" may be considered interchangeable. But a new analysis by political scientists at the University of Houston suggests party labels are far more powerful predictors of how voters perceive candidates.
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Gizmodo
Incredible Slo-Mo Footage Reveals Hummingbirds Are Truly Nature's Fighter Jets GIF Most birds get all the lift they need to fly with the downward stroke of their wings—meaning there’s no upward force being produced as they raise them back up. Hummingbirds, on the other hand, produce lift with both their upward and downward wing strokes, creating air vortices that the tiny birds use to fly with incredible maneuverability . For a recent article delving into the science of wha
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Science | The Guardian
So long, Dippy: museum's blue whale seeks to inspire love of living world Natural History Museum in London signals urgency of wildlife crisis by replacing dinosaur centrepiece with species alive today In the hot summer of 1976, when Richard Sabin was 10, he went on a trip with his Birmingham primary school to the Natural History Museum in London. Blown away by the scale of what he was seeing, the wide-eyed schoolboy was told by an attendant that if he wanted to see som
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution of a bacterial enzyme in green algaeA new jigsaw piece in the evolution of green algae has been identified by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with colleagues from Max Planck Institute in Mülheim an der Ruhr. They analysed the hydrogen-producing enzyme of a phylogenetically old alga. Its properties were radically different from those of analogous enzymes in more recent algae. The team headed by Vera Engelbrecht and Pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effective protection against hip fracture during cortisone treatmentThere is effective protection against hip fracture for the many elderly people whose skeleton is declining in strength, as a side effect of cortisone treatment. If patients receive the osteoporosis medication alendronate, it reduces the risk of hip fracture by 65 percent, as a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: After watching disturbing video, CPAP usage soarsMore than 20 million Americans are diagnosed with sleep apnea, yet more than half of those prescribed a CPAP mask to keep their airways open at night don't use it. So, National Jewish Health conducted a study where researchers recorded the patients sleeping without the CPAP mask and those who watched the video were more likely to wear it in the end.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change to deplete some US water basins used for irrigationA new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence in support of the Planet Nine hypothesisLast year, the existence of an unknown planet in our Solar system was announced. However, this hypothesis was subsequently called into question as biases in the observational data were detected. Now Spanish astronomers have used a novel technique to analyze the orbits of the so-called extreme trans-Neptunian objects and, once again, they point out that there is something perturbing them: a planet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthesizing the human genome from scratchFor the past 15 years, synthetic biologists have been figuring out how to synthesize an organism's complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. They've tackled the genomes of microbes, but now one large consortium has its sights set on the human genome. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores Genome Project-write
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Creating music by thought aloneNeurologists have created a hands-free, thought-controlled musical instrument, which they've recently described in a report in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Researchers hope that this new instrument will help empower and rehabilitate patients with motor disabilities such as those from stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The wave nature of light in super-slow motionPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU) have accomplished a quantum leap in light research. They have managed to capture the behavior of extremely short laser pulses during focusing by means of very high spatial and temporal resolution. The results are of fundamental relevance to understanding the interactions between light
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mulling over the aromas of wineA fine wine has an ideal balance of ingredients. Too much or too little of a component could mean the difference between a wine with a sweet and fruity aroma and one that smells like wet newspaper. To help wineries avoid off-aromas, a team reports in ACS Sensors a sensitive device for detecting a compound that can affect the beverage's fragrance.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The one trillion tonne iceberg -A one trillion tonne iceberg -- one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice, monitored by the Swansea University-led MIDAS project, finally completed its path through the ice.
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Science : NPR
Massive Iceberg Breaks Free In Antarctica Scientists say the iceberg is one of the largest seen by satellites. But the full implications of its separation off remain to be seen. (Image credit: John Sonntag/NASA)
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Gizmodo
The Root Black Teenager ‘Mistaken’ for Larger, Bald Black Man Says that Calif. The Root Black Teenager ‘Mistaken’ for Larger, Bald Black Man Says that Calif. Police Drew Gun at Her, Punched Her in the Mouth | Jezebel It Was a Marble Table, Not Cocaine | Deadspin Calvin Johnson Says He Retired Because The Lions Weren’t Going Anywhere | Fusion America’s Worst Congressman Has a Disgusting Plan to Pay for Trump’s Border Wall |
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Futurity.org
Childhood stress can yield valuable skills Children who grow up in high-stress environments may be at higher risk for learning or behavioral trouble, but new research suggests that their skills warrant more attention. Stress-adapted youth may possess traits—such as heightened vigilance, attention shifting, and empathic accuracy—that traditional learning and testing situations don’t tap into. These skills may actually allow at-risk childre
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Ars Technica
Private company plans to bring Moon rocks back to Earth in three years Moon Express After several years of secrecy, a company called Moon Express revealed the scope of its ambitions on Wednesday. And they are considerable. The privately held company released plans for a single, modular spacecraft that can be combined to form successively larger and more capable vehicles. Ultimately the company plans to establish a lunar outpost in 2020 and set up commercial operatio
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Panda diplomats, smuggled relics and a nuclear-weapons treaty The week in science: 7–13 July 2017. Nature 547 142 doi: 10.1038/547142a
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The Atlantic
Jill Tarter, Feminist Cosmic Icon The first scholarly paper on the search for extraterrestrial life was published in Nature in 1959, and ended like this: “The probability of success is difficult to estimate, but if we never search the chance of success is zero.” Jill Tarter has spent more than 40 years working on that search. Tarter is an astronomer and co-founder of the SETI Institute in California, and, among many other things,
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The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: Sandwich Sociology
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The Atlantic
An American Racial Slur Crosses the Atlantic A British lawmaker was suspended Monday after a recording emerged of her using a racial slur during a Brexit discussion at a public event. In her remarks, which were first reported by the Huffington Post , Anne Marie Morris, the ruling Conservative Party’s chief whip, told attendees at an event focusing on the U.K.’s financial sector that the prospect of leaving the European Union without a deal
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Big data: what can the internet tell us about who we really are? – Science Weekly podcastIn an age where Google sees trillions of searches a year, what can our usage of it reveal? How accurate are these ‘big data’ representations? And how might this all be used for the greater good?
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Science | The Guardian
Big data: what can the internet tell us about who we really are? – Science Weekly podcast In an age where Google sees trillions of searches a year, what can our usage of it reveal? How accurate are these ‘big data’ representations? And how might this all be used for the greater good? Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Pokemon Go, the iPhone 7, and Donald Trump. These were 2016’s most searched for t
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New Scientist - News
Nations of the world agree to ban nuclear weapons – now what?Most of the world’s countries have agreed a treaty to ban nuclear weapons, but with the nuclear powers boycotting it, will it make a difference?
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Gizmodo
Why Is Greenland's Ice Sheet Covered in Industrial Waste-Chowing Bacteria? Image: NASA The Greenland ice sheet is vast, majestic, pristine....and peppered with bacteria that seem equipped to survive in industrial waste, according to a new study. Which really makes you question the whole the pristine bit, now, doesn’t it? In fact, scientists know that industrial contaminants, including heavy metals, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), have been accumulating
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What to know about the net neutrality 'day of action' internet protestRight now, you may have a shaky idea of what net neutrality is, but on July 12, a massive online protest plans to make you painfully aware.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US bans Kaspersky software amid concerns over Russia tiesThe US government has moved to block federal agencies from buying software from Russia-based Kaspersky Labs, amid concerns about the company's links to intelligence services in Moscow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intensive fishing finds no more Asian carp beyond barrierTwo weeks of intensive fishing in and around a Chicago waterway failed to produce any proof that more Asian carp have made it past electronic barriers intended to keep the invasive species out of Lake Michigan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Babies born big more likely to become obese as children, study findsInfants born with a high birthweight are more likely to become obese as children, a new study suggests. By identifying at-risk infants early, doctors could work with parents to prevent weight gain and the health problems obesity brings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does a candidate's religion matter to voters?Religion is sometimes used as shorthand to define a political candidate's views -- 'evangelical' and 'antiabortion' may be considered interchangeable. But a new analysis by political scientists at the University of Houston suggests party labels are far more powerful predictors of how voters perceive candidates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low oxygen in Chesapeake BayThe BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
€3 billion in funding and 31,000 funded projectsDFG presents 2016 Annual Report /-- 'Best knowledge-driven research -- supported by broad political and public trust' -- Annual meeting in Halle concluded.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution of a bacterial enzyme in green algaeA new jigsaw piece in the evolution of green algae has been identified by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with colleagues from Max Planck Institute in Mülheim an der Ruhr. They analyzed the hydrogen-producing enzyme of a phylogenetically old alga. Its properties were radically different from those of analogous enzymes in more recent algae. The team outlines their results in the jou
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shortcut method in drug developmentA research group at Uppsala University presents in PNAS a new, small-scale method that may become a smart shortcut for determining the 'bioavailability' of a pharmaceutical drug within cells. 'Finding out how a therapeutic drug affects the body means having to consider many different factors that can influence the cells' internal environment. Our method may be a way of substantially facilitating t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research raises antibiotic questionsA James Cook University scientist has warned about the side effects of overusing topical antibiotics, including concerns they're contributing to global antibiotic resistance.
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Science | The Guardian
Doctor Who and the Key to Deep Time | Susannah Lydon Time-travel would be a useful tool for palaeontologists, but Doctor Who has already explained some of the fossil record for us Every palaeontologist wants a time machine. The tantalising, scrappy bits of biology that survive in the fossil record are a tiny fraction of what I could find out from a quick field trip to the Cretaceous. I’ve got my list prepared of the first four or five trips I’ll ma
5h
New Scientist - News
Why your favourite websites are protesting over the net’s futureA campaign on 12 July opposes repeal of US net neutrality laws that ensure all web traffic is treated equally, but to succeed it must spark a wider discussion
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Ingeniøren
Tech-virksomheder går sammen i protest for at bevare netneutralitet En stribe internetgiganter danner fælles front i protest mod amerikanske planer om at tilbagerulle regler, der skal sikre netneutralitet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tech-virksomheder-gaar-sammen-protest-at-bevare-netneutralitet-1078341 Version2 Forside relaterede artikler Begrænsede data og fri streaming: Fire danske teleselskaber brød netneutraliteten
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google, Facebook join online protest of net neutrality rollbackHow many online activists does it take to save Silicon Valley's favorite Obama-era regulation?
5h
Wired
Master & Dynamic MA770 Review: This Concrete Speaker Really RocksThe MA770 is a 35-pound speaker made of concrete (yes, cement and crushed rocks) that is equal parts art and audio.
5h
The Atlantic
Privatization Is Changing America's Relationship With Its Physical Stuff Last month, paddlers in New York state floated their kayaks and canoes in the Erie Canal to celebrate the waterway’s 200th birthday. Workers first dug their shovels into the ground to start the construction of the ditch in 1817. Eight years later, over 300 miles opened for business, making it one of America’s first big gifts to itself. There was no apparent connection between the anniversary and
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Gizmodo
How Much TV Is President Trump Watching This Week? Photo: Getty Donald Trump is having a complicated week. His son released a bunch of emails that appear to show collusion with the Russian government. He got sued by a bunch of people he blocked on Twitter. Even the Drudge Report turned on him . How’s the president handling all this? Definitely not by watching a bunch of TV. Nope. Absolutely not. Why would you even suggest that? Being the Presiden
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Granular media friction explained: Da Vinci would be proudNew York | Heidelberg, 12 July 2017 Leonardo Da Vinci had already noticed it. There is a very peculiar dynamics of granular matter, such as dry sand or grains of wheat. When these granular particles are left on a vibrating solid surface, they are not only subject to random vibrations, they are also under the spell of solid friction forces, like the force a dry floor would exert on a brick in conta
5h
Live Science
Photos: Alexander Hamilton Lived Here Until the Infamous DuelAlexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, owned only one home during his entire life: the Hamilton Grange.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Trillion-Ton Iceberg Breaks Off AntarcticaThe massive ice chunk is one of the largest ever recorded, and scientists had been monitoring it for months -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explain mechanism behind process that can increase efficiency of organic solar cellsIn view of climate change and the needs of the energy reform, it has become particularly important to significantly increase the efficiency of organic solar cells. In a process known as 'singlet fission', one photon simultaneously excites two electrons. If this effect can be exploited, it may well be possible to dramatically increase the power generated by solar cells. Physicists and chemists at F
5h
Futurity.org
New video puts old words in Obama’s mouth Researchers have developed new algorithms that can turn audio clips into a realistic, lip-synced video of the person speaking those words. The team successfully generated highly-realistic video of former president Barack Obama talking about terrorism, fatherhood, job creation, and other topics using audio clips of those speeches and existing weekly video addresses that were originally on a differ
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New series of papers call for a global recovery treatment consensus for stoke patientsThe absolute number of people who have a stroke every year; stroke survivors, related deaths, and the overall global burden of stroke is increasing. Neurorehabilitation clinicians and researchers have long been aware of the limited evidence for stroke recovery and rehabilitation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expecting the worst: People's perceived morality is biased towards negativityPeople who are believed to be immoral are unable to reverse individuals' perception of them, potentially resulting in difficulties in the workplace and barriers in accessing fair and equal treatment in the legal system, a new study in PLOS One reports.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematical modeling could help with personalized cancer careA new study from the University of Southern California could pave the way for improving personalized lung cancer care and treatment. The research used mathematical modelling to examine if there was a link between the molecular and anatomical properties of lung cancer metastases, and whether this has an influence on how they spread through the body.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbon displays quantum effectsChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found evidence that carbon atoms cannot only behave like particles but also like waves. This quantum-mechanical property is well-known for light particles such as electrons or hydrogen atoms. However, researchers have only rarely observed the wave-particle duality for heavy atoms, such as carbon.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First aid kit in some living organisms helps fix DNA after lengthy sun exposureSunburn in living organisms is caused by ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun damaging the DNA in the cells. Many organisms, however, have an in-built mechanism for repairing the sun damage. This is possible thanks to an enzyme called DNA photolyase, which is so specialised that cryptochrome, a structurally similar molecule, is unable to do the same job. By comparing both types of molecule, physici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Einstein's theory of gravitation experienced a Renaissance after World War IIEinstein's 1915 theory of gravitation, also known as General Relativity, is now considered one of the pillars of modern physics. It contributes to our understanding of cosmology and of fundamental interactions between particles. But that was not always the case. Between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, General Relativity underwent a period of stagnation, during which the theory was mostly consider
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New analysis of rare Argentinian rat unlocks origin of the largest mammalian genomeNew biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifetime simulation of biological populations reveals dramatic population fluctuations before extinctionPopulations of endangered species reach a critical point in their life where they either survive or evolve towards extinction. Therefore, efforts to predict and even prevent the extinction of biological species require a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In a new study published in The European Physical Journal B, Hatem Barghathi and colleagues from Missouri University of Scienc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microwaves reveal detailed structure of molecular motorA team of scientists has used microwaves to unravel the exact structure of a tiny molecular motor. The nano-machine consists of just a single molecule, made up of 27 carbon and 20 hydrogen atoms (C27H20). Like a macroscopic motor it has a stator and a rotor, connected by an axle. The analysis reveals just how the individual parts of the motor are constructed and arranged with respect to each other
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Groundwater pumping drying up Great Plains streams, driving fish extinctionsFarmers in the Great Plains of Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas and the panhandle of Texas produce about one-sixth of the world's grain, and water for these crops comes from the High Plains Aquifer—often known as the Ogallala Aquifer—the single greatest source of groundwater in North America. A team of researchers, including Colorado State University Professor Kurt Fausch and Jeff Falke, a CSU alumnus a
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To attract more students to STEM, highlight communal aspects of STEM careersThe idea of scientists working long hours in lab by themselves is a common concept for Americans, but this idea of a "lone scientist" is not universal. Examining students in the United States, India, and China, social psychologists show not only a cultural divide in how STEM careers are viewed, but that these views can be changed to encourage more interest in STEM fields.
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The Atlantic
China's First Overseas Military Base Chinese troops are headed to Djibouti to set up the country’s first foreign military base in order to carry out its “international obligations,” the state-run Xinhua news agency reported Wednesday. Geng Shuang, the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman, said the base will, in the words of Xinhua, “better serve Chinese troops when they escort ships in the Gulf of Aden and the waters off the Somali co
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Between extinction and survival of endangered populationsPopulations of endangered species reach a critical point and therefore, efforts to predict and prevent their extinction require a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In a new study published in EPJ B, Hatem Barghathi has investigated how environmental disturbance at random times could cause strong fluctuations in the number of individuals in biological populations. They found that
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Einstein's theory of gravitation experienced a Renaissance after World War IIEinstein's 1915 theory of gravitation (General Relativity), is now considered one of the pillars of modern physics. It contributes to our understanding of cosmology and of fundamental interactions between particles. But that was not always the case. In a special issue of EPJ H just published, historians of science and physicists share their views on the process, especially the 'Renaissance' of Gen
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making two out of oneIn view of climate change it has become important to significantly increase the efficiency of organic solar cells. In a process known as 'singlet fission', one photon simultaneously excites two electrons. If this effect can be exploited, it may well be possible to increase the power generated by solar cells. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg collaborating in an inter
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First aid in the brain: When language suddenly failsAfter a stroke a person often suffers from language problems. In some cases certain linguistic abilities can be regained, whereas others are lost forever. Now scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brains Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig have found one possible explanation: The injury of some brain areas can be well compensated, whereas this is not the case with others. These
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum mechanics inside Earth's corePhysicists from the University of Würzburg have discovered surprising properties of nickel. They could help unravel some mysteries about Earth's magnetic field.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Granular media friction explained: Da Vinci would be proudThere is a very peculiar dynamics of granular matter, such as dry sand or grains of wheat. When these granular particles are left on a vibrating solid surface, they are not only subject to random vibrations, they are also under the spell of solid friction forces. In a study published in EPJ E, Prasenjit Das from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, India, and colleagues extended our understanding of t
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First aid kit in some living organisms helps fix DNA after lengthy sun exposureSunburn in living organisms is caused by ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun damaging the DNA in the cells. Many organisms, however, have an in-built mechanism for repairing the sun damage. In a study published in EPJ D, Katrine Aalbæk Jepsen from the University of Southern Denmark, in Odense, and her colleague Ilia Solov'yov pinpoint the mechanism by which repair enzymes bind to the damaged site.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New analysis of rare Argentinian rat unlocks origin of the largest mammalian genomeNew biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size.Researchers from McMaster University set out to study this particular species because its genome, or its complete set of DNA, is the largest of all mammals, and appears to have increased in size very rapidly.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microwaves reveal detailed structure of molecular motorA team of scientists has used microwaves to unravel the exact structure of a tiny molecular motor. The nano-machine consists of just a single molecule, made up of 27 carbon and 20 hydrogen atoms (C27H20). The team led by DESY Leading Scientist Melanie Schnell reports the results in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Behind Green Eyes: New Species of deep-water hermit crab finds itself unusual shelters'Green-eyed hermit crab' is the common name for a new species recently discovered off the West Coast of South Africa. Apart from its magnetic stare, however, there is a number of characteristic morphological traits and an unusual home preference that all make the crustacean unique.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big-data analysis points toward new drug discovery methodA research team led by scientists at UC San Francisco has developed a computational method to systematically probe massive amounts of open-access data to discover new ways to use drugs, including some that have already been approved for other uses.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why you might trust a quantum computer with secrets—even over the internetHere's the scenario: you have sensitive data and a problem that only a quantum computer can solve. You have no quantum devices yourself. You could buy time on a quantum computer, but you don't want to give away your secrets. What can you do?
5h
Gizmodo
This New Interactive Documentary on Viruses Is Spellbinding Image: Screenshot Golf balls, some buildings, and even a few works of religious art imitate viruses. Not in a bad way, but in their beauty. If you don’t believe me, just take a half hour or so to explore University of Edinburgh Computational Biology Ph.D. student Hamish Todd’s new interactive documentary . You’ll realize that human design and viruses have a lot more in common than you’d think. “I
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cognitive science
Lark or night owl? Blame your ancestors submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Popular Science
Entrepreneurs are turning trash into food, drink, and clean energy From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Bread-powered beer and other delights. A number of startups—mostly breweries—are “upcycling” food waste to make new products. One brewery is turning discarded bread into beer. Another is using leftover grains…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oxygen vacancy supported memoryA non-volatile memory keeping its digital information without power and working at the same time at the ultrahigh speed of today's dynamic random access memory (DRAM) – that is the dream of materials scientists of TU Darmstadt.
5h
Gizmodo
How Exactly Do You Get Rich Off the Hot New Cryptocurrency? Image: Getty With the meteoric rise in popularity of Ethereum , cryptocurrencies and blockchains are back in the news again. Graphics card prices have soared with the promise that those who have the computers and know-how to do some serious mining can take home huge sums in a Bitcoin-like gold rush to snatch up as much virtual currency as possible. But how easy is it to make your fortune in crypt
5h
Gizmodo
Your Favorite Headphones (And More) Are Discounted Thanks To This Audio-Technica Gold Box Audio-Technica Gold Box When it comes to full-sized headphones, wired options still reign supreme, and Audio-Technica took the throw for the second time your favorites . Now you an get both models for less during this one-day sale . The sale has the ATH-M50X and M40X at their lowest prices, plus condenser mics and turntables. But these prices will *record scratch* disappear by the end of the day.
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cognitive science
Why the "You" in an Afterlife Wouldn't Really Be You submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal-free MRI contrast agent could be safer for some patientsTo enhance the visibility of organs as they are scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients are usually injected with a compound known as a contrast agent before going into the scanner. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents are based on the metal gadolinium; however, these metal compounds can be harmful for young children or people with kidney problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Politicians jeopardise the safety of whistleblowers with bad technologyThe Western Australian Liberal Party has created a website, www.wawhistleblowers.com, encouraging whistleblowers to report on WA public officers, government ministers and members of parliament.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cellular thermometer discoveredScientists from Freie Universität Berlin have identified a mechanism that allows cells to adapt their gene expression program to very small changes in temperature. "Like a thermometer, these changes in gene expression follow the temperature in linear form and thus enable gradual adaptation to the given temperature," explains Prof. Dr. Florian Heyd from Freie Universität, who led the study. This ce
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum mechanics inside Earth's coreWithout a magnetic field life on Earth would be rather uncomfortable: Cosmic particles would pass through our atmosphere in large quantities and damage the cells of all living beings. Technical systems would malfunction frequently and electronic components could be destroyed completely in some cases.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon displays quantum effectsChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found evidence that carbon atoms cannot only behave like particles but also like waves. This quantum-mechanical property is well-known for light particles such as electrons or hydrogen atoms. However, researchers have only rarely observed the wave-particle duality for heavy atoms, such as carbon. The team led by Prof Dr Wolfram Sander and Tim Schleif from t
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female fish prefer averagely active loversIn evolution, a high sex drive does not always pay off. Female mosquitofish swim away from over-impetuous lovers because they leave them hardly any time to feed and also tend to injure their genitalia more often.
5h
The Atlantic
Why Donald Trump's Russia Denials Can No Longer Be Believed The most important question that Donald Trump was ever asked in a press conference is suddenly easy to identify: “Can you say whether you are aware that anyone who advised your campaign had contacts with Russia during the course of the election?” President Trump’s answer last spring was dubious. He replied that aside from Mike Flynn (who ostensibly resigned as national-security adviser for mislea
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Football boosts bone development in boysPlaying football can improve bone development in adolescent boys, new research shows.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multi-antioxidant nanoparticles to treat sepsisFrom the energy sector to biology, ceria-zirconia nanoparticles remove free radicals and improve survival in animal models.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WikiLeaks gave Trump edge in campaign race, Twitter study findsViral tweets relating to Hillary Clinton's WikiLeaks scandal played a part in her failure to win the US presidential election, according to computer-led analysis of social media.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insufficient levels of Vitamin D in pregnancy detrimental to child developmentVitamin D deficiency in expectant mothers during pregnancy has a negative effect on the social development and motor skills of pre-school age children, a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition reports.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach to leukaemia can help improve successful treatmentNew University of Liverpool research, presented at an international conference, confirms that a novel approach to the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) can safely increase treatment success and reduce negative side effects.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behind Green Eyes: New Species of deep-water hermit crab finds itself unusual sheltersThe Green-eyed hermit crab is a new species recently discovered off the West Coast of South Africa. Apart from its magnetic stare, however, there is a number of characteristic morphological traits and an unusual home preference that all make the crustacean unique. Formally named after the University of Cape Town alumnus Dr Lara Atkinson -- the very first to notice the unusual hermit crab, the new
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why you might trust a quantum computer with secrets -- even over the internetWriting in Physical Review X on 11 July, researchers in Singapore and Australia propose a way you could use a quantum computer securely, even over the internet.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Everyday chemicals linked to chronic disease in menChemicals found in everyday plastics materials are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men, according to Australian researchers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soft and stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable robotsWearable technologies are exploding in popularity, but most of the electronic sensors that detect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer's natural movements and the accuracy of the data collected. Now, a team of researchers at the Wyss Institute and SEAS at Harvard University has created a highly sensitive soft sensor that leverage
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big-data analysis points toward new drug discovery methodA research team led by scientists at UC San Francisco has developed a computational method to systematically probe massive amounts of open-access data to discover new ways to use drugs, including some that have already been approved for other uses.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To attract more students to STEM, highlight communal aspects of STEM careersNew research highlights the importance of showing students the communal aspects of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) careers in order to attract more students to STEM classes and careers. The research is published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Signature analysis of single molecules using their noise signalsJapanese researchers obtain unique noise signatures from single molecules interacting with carbon nanotube-based electronic devices.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
WikiLeaks gave Trump edge in campaign, tweets showCriticism of Hillary Clinton over documents posted by WikiLeaks played a key role in her failed US presidential campaign, analysis of social media suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sentinel satellite captures birth of behemoth icebergOver the last few months, a chunk of Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf has been hanging on precariously as a deep crack cut across the ice. Witnessed by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, a lump of ice more than twice the size of Luxembourg has now broken off, spawning one of the largest icebergs on record and changing the outline of the Antarctic Peninsula forever.
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Futurity.org
New method can tell how old your cells really are A new system can consider a wide array of cellular and molecular factors in one comprehensive study to determine the functional age of cells. The system could eventually help clinicians evaluate and recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve other treatments, including skin graft matching and predicting prospects for wound healing. These researchers’ results show
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cognitive science
A paper in JPSP looks at vocational interests--a different set of traits from the typical personality traits used--and finds that these traits in high school predict a lot about success later in life. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to CareThe big companies developing them show no interest in fixing the problem.
6h
New Scientist - News
Backstreet fried chicken shops must stop using killer trans fatCheap fast food in deprived pockets of the UK has slipped through the net in the war on harmful trans fats. Time to dish up a solution, says Anthony Warner
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New Scientist - News
Uninhabitable Earth? In fact, it’s really hard to fry the planetA controversial article says we’re heading for the worst-case warming scenarios. But while we can’t rule out extreme warming, it’s not our most likely future
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Wired
Google Photo Books Review: Reasonable Price, Excellent QualityLike so few things in life, Google's printed photo book service works exactly as advertised.
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Wired
The Saga of Lena Dunham's Dog Lamby, the Walking Internet ReceiptYou know how social media posts feel like transient thoughts when you make them? Turns out they stick around.
6h
Ingeniøren
Galileo på Frederiksberg: Nøjagtighed på 3 cmGPS-pedanterne fra EU, Rusland og Kina bliver nu brugt til at gøre dansk vejarbejde 40 pct. hurtigere.
6h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Tesla Model 3 - elbilen vi har ventet på?Knap så stor, knap så hurtig og knap så sofistikeret som model S - men til halv pris (35.000 USD). Første eksemplar af Teslas billigmodel, Model 3, er netop kørt af samlebåndet på fabrikken i Fremont, Californien. Den længe ventede og meget hypede bil er dermed omsider på vej ud til de knap 400.0...
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Viden
Dansk robotteknologi stormer frem - her er 10 fede eksemplerDanske robotter gør hverdagen lettere - se hvordan.
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Gizmodo
She-Venom May Join Sony's Spider-Man Movie Universe Image: Marvel/Disney The Transformers spinoff finds its star, a banner contains the first look of the Wasp in Ant-Man and the Wasp , and Westworld adds a character who is visiting the park at the worst possible time. Spoilers ahead! Godzilla: King of the Monsters Elizabeth Ludlow has joined the cast in an undisclosed role. [ Deadline ] Bumblebee While no details have been given, Jorge Lendeborg J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HIRMES—a new high-resolution mid-infrared spectrometer for SOFIANASA is developing a new instrument to expand the boundaries of astronomy research. A team of scientists and technologists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing the High-Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectrometer (HIRMES)—an innovative instrument that will enable new scientific investigations and important contributions to our understanding of the cosmos. HIRMES' commissioning is an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'hot Jupiter' with short orbital period discovered(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a new "hot Jupiter" exoplanet with a short orbital period of just three and a half days. The newly detected giant planet, designated KELT-20b, circles a rapidly rotating star known as HD 185603 (or KELT-20). The finding was presented in a paper published July 5 on arXiv.org.
6h
Live Science
Trillion-Ton Iceberg Breaks Off AntarcticaOne of the largest icebergs ever recorded, packing about a trillion tons of ice or enough to fill up two Lake Eries, has just split off from Antarctica, in a much anticipated, though not celebrated, calving event.
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Futurity.org
Can games actually boost your brain? Not really Sites like Lumosity not only have no effect on decision-making, but also have no effect on cognitive function beyond practice effects on the games themselves, research shows. Researchers wanted to find an intervention that could reduce the likelihood that people would engage in unhealthy behaviors such as smoking or overeating and looked at whether, through the claimed beneficial effect on cognit
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spider walks like an ant and raises front legs to mimic ant antenna(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers at Cornell University has found that a certain species of spider raises its front legs periodically to mimic the look of antennae on ants. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group reports that the spider also walks in a zig-zap pattern similar to ants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots debate future of humans at Hong Kong tech showIt was a spooky sight: two lifelike disembodied robot torsos discussing the pros and cons of humans in front of a nervously tittering audience in Hong Kong Wednesday.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The fork in the road to DNA repairJapanese researchers from Osaka University have uncovered a way in which our cells regulate the repair of broken DNA. Their results, published in the journal 'Cell Reports,' show a common molecule regulates multiple repair mechanisms and help shed light on how the cell maintains the integrity of the human genome when it is damaged.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Botanists discover hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystemsBotanists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa have discovered hundreds of potentially new species of fungi in the deep coral ecosystem in the 'Au'au channel off Maui, Hawai'i. These mesophotic coral ecosystems are generally found at depths between 130 - 500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Groundwater pumping drying up Great Plains streams, driving fish extinctionsGroundwater pumping from the the High Plains Aquifer has led to long segments of rivers drying up and the collapse of large-stream fishes.
6h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Psychedelic SymbiosisThanks to the bioluminescent bacteria inhabiting its light organ, the vividly colored southern bobtail squid (Euprymna tasmanica) can glow in the dark.
6h
Gizmodo
Antarctica Just Plopped a One Trillion Ton Iceberg Into the Ocean (Update) Image: Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission/ESA As expected, an iceberg half the size of Jamaica has finally cut itself loose from Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf. Dubbed A68, the 2,240 square mile (5,800 square km) chunk of ice one of the biggest ever recorded—but what happens now, both to the iceberg and the ice shelf, is anyone’s guess. The calving event was confirmed by NASA’s Aqua MODIS satellite i
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Scientific American Content: Global
Acreage of Pristine Landscapes Declined Significantly So Far This CenturyLogging, agriculture, mining and fires recently have eliminated a larger chunk of vast expanses of forests or naturally treeless ecosystems than you might think -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Hard Look in the Climate MirrorOne scientist looks at her own carbon emissions—and makes some major lifestyle changes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan baby panda healthy after 30 daysA baby panda in Japan has survived its crucial first 30 days, zoo officials said Wednesday, as fresh video showed the cub at one month old.
6h
Popular Science
Here's how you can actually help stop climate change Environment It takes more than turning off the lights, but it's all doable. A new study says that the best ways to lower personal carbon emissions might not be what you think. Read on.
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Gizmodo
A Pair of Planet-Like Objects Is Romantically Hurtling Through the Void Together Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Harvard-Smithsonian CfA What is love, if not braving the tempest of existence by someone’s side? Recently, astronomers at the University of Hawaii found a couple of “planetary mass objects” doing just this—waltzing through the final frontier, locked in each other’s embrace. Oddly enough, the star-crossed lovers don’t actually orbit a star at all—just each other. Using inst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trillion-tonne iceberg breaks off AntarcticaAn iceberg the size of Delaware, one of the largest on record, was set adrift after snapping off a West Antarctic ice shelf that is now at increased risk of collapse, scientists said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global warming could result in losses for the European wine industrySlight increases in temperature in Mediterranean regions from global warming could potentially result in labor, productivity and economic losses for the European wine industry, an article in the journal Temperature suggests.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We make fake poo in a laboratory – to improve sanitation in BangladeshAcross the world, almost three billion people do not have the luxury of a flushing toilet. Instead they rely on static sanitation systems, like pit latrines to deal with their waste. As these are not often connected to a sewer, they require manual emptying and disposal.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancestors of Stonehenge people could be buried inside uncovered 'house of the dead'A 'House of the Dead' has been discovered in Wiltshire dating back 5,000 years by University of Reading archaeologists and students, and could contain the ancestors of those who lived around Stonehenge and Avebury.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy storage paired with solar more cost effective in Minnesota todayAs federal policy on renewable energy is being rolled back, a new UMN-led report finds that when environmental benefits are considered combined energy storage and solar arrays can be a more cost-effective alternative in Minnesota – implementable today – to natural gas peaking plants, which are fired up only to meet peak demand.
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Futurity.org
More than 30% of vertebrates are in decline Two vertebrate species go extinct every year on average, but few people notice, perhaps because the rate seems relatively slow—not a clear and present threat to the natural systems we depend on. But that view overlooks trends of extreme decline in animal populations, which tell a more dire story with cascading consequences, according to a new study that provides the first global evaluation of the
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The Atlantic
'Nobody Asked Me for Any Kind of Loyalty Oath' Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET Christopher Wray did not explicitly mention President Trump’s abrupt ouster of former FBI Director James Comey during his opening remarks before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. But the president’s pick to replace Comey declared his independence in emphatic terms. “If I am given the honor of leading this agency, I will never allow the FBI’s work to be driven b
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising sea temperatures will hit fisheries and communities in poor countries the hardestDespite having some of the world's smallest carbon footprints, small island developing states and the world's least-developed countries will be among the places most vulnerable to climate change's impacts on marine life, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Model suggests fear of crime is contagious(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at University College London has found evidence suggesting that fear of crime is contagious. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, Rafael Prieto Curiel and Steven Bishop describe the model they built, how it works and what it showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does greed help a forager survive?In a world of sometimes scarce resources, greed, the trait that encourages resource accumulation, would seem to be an evolutionary advantage. But, new research reveals that while greed may appear to be a good strategy, it isn't often the best one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists see molecules 'breathe' in remarkable detailIn a milestone for studying a class of chemical reactions relevant to novel solar cells and memory storage devices, an international team of researchers working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to watch "molecular breathing" – waves of subtle in-and-out motions of atoms – in real time and unprecedented detail.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VENu makes it possible to watch a neutrino hunter at workWhat happens when tiny, invisible particles called neutrinos are sent hurtling through a tank of liquid argon? For most of the neutrinos, not much. They'll pass through the argon unscathed. But other neutrinos will collide with argon molecules, leaving behind tracks—proof they were there.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Driverless Cars Will Transform CitiesA moving web of sensor-laden vehicles and smart intersections will transform how we get around town -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Efficient and intelligent: Drones get to grips with planning the delivery of goodsWhen goods are needed urgently, for instance, in rural areas poorly served by transport infrastructure, or in large, heavily congested cities, they could be delivered by drones. In 2013, Amazon was one of the first to declare the intention to work towards the automated delivery of goods by small autonomous helicopters. A multi-disciplinary research team at the Alpen-Adria-Universität assembled by
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harmless elements can replace toxic lead in electronicsMost smartphones and other electrical or electronic products contain small amounts of lead, which doesn't sound like a big problem on its own. But when there are many billions of such products, either in daily use or gone astray, the total sums up to very large amounts of lead – which is a toxic heavy metal.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique noise signatures from single molecules interacting with carbon nanotube-based electronic devicesNoise is low-frequency random fluctuation that occurs in many systems, including electronics, environments, and organisms. Noise can obscure signals, so it is often removed from electronics and radio transmissions. The origin of noise in nanoscale electronics is currently of much interest, and devices that operate using noise have been proposed. Materials with a high surface-to-volume ratio are at
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The fork in the road to DNA repairJapanese researchers from Osaka University have uncovered a way in which our cells regulate the repair of broken DNA. Their results, published in the journal Cell Reports show a common molecule regulates multiple repair mechanisms and help shed light on how the cell maintains the integrity of the human genome when it is damaged.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global warming could result in losses for the European wine industrySlight increases in temperature in Mediterranean regions from global warming could potentially result in labor, productivity and economic losses for the European wine industry, an article in the journal Temperature suggests.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sinus disease symptoms improve 10 years after patients quit smokingPatients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who quit smoking will see their condition improve over a period of about 10 years, according to the results of a new study led by the Sinus Center at Mass. Eye and Ear.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
House dust spurs growth of fat cells in lab testsPoor diet and a lack of physical activity are major contributors to the world's obesity epidemic, but researchers have also identified common environmental pollutants that could play a role. Now one team reports in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that small amounts of house dust containing many of these compounds can spur fat cells to accumulate more triglycerides, or fat, in a lab
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building a safer lithium-ion batteryLithium-ion batteries have become an indispensable power source for our proliferating gadgets. They have also, on occasion, been known to catch fire. To yield insight into what goes wrong when batteries fail and how to address the safety hazard, scientists report in the journal ACS Sensors that they have found a potential way to track lithium ions as they travel in a battery.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Release of treated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing contaminates lakeHydraulic fracturing has enabled a domestic oil and gas boom in the US, but its rapid growth has raised questions about what to do with the billions of gallons of wastewater that result. Researchers now report that treating the wastewater and releasing it into surface waters has led to the contamination of a Pennsylvania watershed with radioactive material and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The s
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The electricity sector in Australia needs to cut carbon by 45% by 2030Our new ClimateWorks Australia report, released today, shows that the electricity sector needs to deliver a much greater cut than the 28% emissions reduction modelled in the Finkel Review if Australia is to meet its overall climate target for 2030.
7h
Science-Based Medicine
Brain Wave PseudoscienceiSynchrony has put together a plausible-sounding bit of bafflegab to justify what it sells. The reality of neurology is against their claims.
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The Atlantic
Tell Us: Who’s Your Favorite Jane Austen Character? C. E. Brock / Hugh Thomson / Katie Martin / The Atlantic Just before she began writing Emma , Jane Austen called the novel’s young protagonist “a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like.” Emma Woodhouse is privileged, self-involved, often frivolous, and sometimes even (unintentionally) cruel. In her overconfident attempts at matchmaking, she repeatedly misinterprets signals and muddles rela
7h
Wired
Scientists Inject Ferrets' Brains With Rabies to Study ... Vision?A modified rabies virus lets scientists control how ferrets respond to simple visual patterns. There's a point, promise.
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Wired
The DIY Aviation Buffs Who Build Gyrocopters From Gaming Joysticks and Spare PartsXiaoxiao Xu dreams of flying. So do the DIY aviators who fill her delightful new photo book.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We're close to banning nuclear weapons—killer robots must be nextOn Friday, 122 countries voted in favour of the "Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons".
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Futurity.org
How low-income moms approach TV for their kids Low-income moms report good experiences in managing their child’s media use—challenging negative assumptions about low-income mothers and screen time management. The moms in the study also viewed TV as a positive parenting tool when watching parent-approved, educational programming with their child. In the study, 296 low-income moms were asked about beliefs and rules regarding their 4-to-8-year-o
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building a safer lithium-ion batteryLithium-ion batteries have become an indispensable power source for our proliferating gadgets. They have also, on occasion, been known to catch fire. To yield insight into what goes wrong when batteries fail and how to address the safety hazard, scientists report in the journal ACS Sensors that they have found a potential way to track lithium ions as they travel in a battery.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Release of treated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing contaminates lakeHydraulic fracturing has enabled a domestic oil and gas boom in the U.S., but its rapid growth has raised questions about what to do with the billions of gallons of wastewater that result. Researchers now report that treating the wastewater and releasing it into surface waters has led to the contamination of a Pennsylvania watershed with radioactive material and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The
7h
Gizmodo
It's Back: Get These Noise-Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones For Just $38 Cowin E-7 Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones , $38 with code 42YFK63R You don’t need to sell a kidney to afford noise-cancelling Bluetooth headphones; these 4 star-rated Cowin E-7s are just $38 right now , or $32 off with promo code 42YFK63R. They might not have the brand recognition of Sony or Bose, but these headphones pack in 30 hours of battery life, the ability to use them in wired mode i
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Gizmodo
A KFC Branded Smartphone Is Coming To China [Image: KFC] Because there’s nothing that reminds people of fried chicken more than a slick new smartphone. (And yes, this is real.) To celebrate 30 years of KFC in China, Huawei is releasing a Kentucky Fried Chicken phone. According to Tech Sina and NetEase , it will be available with 16GB or 32GB of memory. [Image: KFC ] The phone is preloaded with a KFC delivery app and, as Ad Age explains, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Treating fungal cornea infection with synthetic moleculesA*STAR researchers have created synthetic molecules to treat fungal keratitis – an infection of the cornea that causes visual disability. The new molecules are a first step toward developing effective drugs to combat this widespread disease.
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New Scientist - News
A massive iceberg just broke off Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelfA 5,800-square-kilometre iceberg weighing more than a trillion tonnes is one of the largest known, and will change the face of Antarctica forever
7h
NYT > Science
Ants Can Build an Eiffel Tower (Sort Of)New research shows how ants band together to survive floods. Find out why these tiny creatures are surprisingly good architects when they all work together.
7h
Viden
Afbrækket kæmpe-isbjerg fungerede som prop for gletsjer-isIsbjerget er dobbelt så stort som Fyn og holdt gigantiske mængder af is tilbage. Den blokerede indlandsis alene kan måske forøge vandstanden globalt med op til 10 centimeter.
7h
Viden
Er du jubeloptimist eller dommedagsprofet?Automatisering kan opfattes på mange måder. Find ud af hvordan du og andre anskuer emnet i slideren herover.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystems discovered by botanistsResearchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Department of Botany have discovered hundreds of potentially new species of fungi in the deep coral ecosystem in the 'Au'au channel off Maui. Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) are generally found at depths between 130 to 500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species. The mysteries of these reefs are only recently be
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solution of DNA and gold nanorods capable of six fundamental logic operationsBy adding strands of DNA to a solution containing gold nanorods, A*STAR researchers have created a remarkably simple system that can 'compute' basic logic operations like OR and NOT in response to specific molecular inputs. This has potential applications in rapid and complex diagnostic systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular scaffold for modifying fluorescent compounds used in biological imagingRadiation in the near-infrared region is invisible, but can deeply penetrate living tissue without damaging it. Dye molecules that produce near-infrared light consequently have valuable applications in medical diagnostics, and A*STAR researchers have developed a synthetic approach that can quickly identify ways to fine-tune their emission properties.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightweight module that can pick up and move objects could lead to faster and more accurate automationA module for rapid, accurate and versatile positioning of semiconductor chips has been developed by Singaporean researchers. It features a novel electromechanical actuator that can move objects both linearly and rotationally.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA closes Chamber A door to commence Webb telescope testingThough the Webb telescope will be enveloped in darkness, the engineers testing the telescope will be far from blind. "There are many thermal sensors that monitor temperatures of the telescope and the support equipment," said Gary Matthews, an integration and testing engineer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who is testing the Webb telescope while it is at Johnson. "Spe
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Database holds Earth's 2,000 year climate historyClimate scientists will be able to more accurately study Earth's temperature changes, thanks to a global database compiled with the help of a Victoria University of Wellington and GNS Science researcher.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change to deplete some U.S. water basins, reduce irrigated crop yieldsA new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smallest-ever star discovered by astronomersThe smallest star yet measured has been discovered by a team of astronomers led by the University of Cambridge. With a size just a sliver larger than that of Saturn, the gravitational pull at its stellar surface is about 300 times stronger than what humans feel on Earth.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting heart events after liver transplantThe first app and score to determine the one-year risk of a liver transplant patient dying or being hospitalized for a heart attack or other cardiovascular complication has been developed. The new risk score app may guide preventive treatment and who gets a donor organ. One-third of transplant patients will have serious cardiac complication within first year of transplant. The current method of ri
7h
Popular Science
These birds are trapped between predators and rising sea levels Animals Between the devil and the deep blue sea. Which is worse: getting eaten, or drowning? Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal skyrmion physics driven by magnons in confined geometriesThe magnetic skyrmion is a current hot topic in condensed matter physics, as it is a promising candidate as information carrier for building novel memory and logic computing devices. Reporting in the New Journal of Physics, a Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (CUHKSZ) research group and their collaborators reveal the dynamics of skyrmions driven by magnons in confined geometries. They find
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Science | The Guardian
Can the first nation to Mars claim the planet for itself? The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts If a country – Russia, say – managed to send cosmonauts to Mars, would they be able to claim the planet for Russia? Are there rules governing territorial claims in space? Stephen Hughes, Birmingham Continue reading...
8h
Wired
Hey, Tech: You’d Do Well to Stop Ignoring Smaller CitiesOpinion: The tech industry can benefit from bringing beta-testing outside Silicon Valley.
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Wired
Your Guide to Russia’s Infrastructure Hacking TeamsWhich of Russia's hacking groups is targeting American energy utilities?
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Wired
Could 'Stranger Things' Have Given Us These IRL 1984 Oddities?Zuul, the Gatekeeper of Gozer? That's one Sumerian demigod who's definitely going to find his way to Hawkins National Laboratory.
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Wired
Looks Like Google Bought Favorable Research to Lobby WithTwo new reports contend that Google financed hundreds of papers that could help further its policy and regulatory goals.
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Wired
Day of Action: Sen. Ron Wyden on What’s at Stake in the Battle for Net NeutralitySenator Ron Wyden on The Day of Action and the Fight For Net Neutrality Against the FCC
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Do the oceans need new rules?Why are scientists are worried about the open seas?
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Swansea tidal lagoon review head Charles Hendry 'hopeful'It is six months since an independent review backed a planned £1.3bn tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay.
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Live Science
Diatoms Have Sex, and Ammonium Is a Turn-OnDiatoms, long thought to reproduce asexually, do engage in sexual reproduction, with ammonium acting as an aphrodisiac.
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The Atlantic
Everyday Sexism in a 'Post-Feminist' World For the past two decades, “girl power” has become a popular way of describing the success of girls in American culture. Widespread reports of “alpha girls”—girls who can do it all, find popularity, escape gender stereotypes, excel in school and walk away with the Homecoming Queen prize—have, according to all kinds of media reports, pioneered a gender takeover. In 2007, The Nation reported that gi
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Ant colonies flow like fluid to build tall towers Insects' structural secrets offer model for designing swarm robots. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22290
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Teeny-weeny star vies for title of smallest knownA Saturn-sized star is one of the smallest yet discovered.
8h
Gizmodo
This Photo of the Trump Sons Is Totally Fake GIF Have you seen this photo of Donald Trump’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric? It made me do a double-take recently. But it’s not real. The photo has been altered to make the Trump brothers look like cartoon characters. Or something like that. Given the recent news stories about Donald Trump Jr.’s attempt to collude with the Russian government, the eldest Trump son has been in the news a lot the past f
8h
Ars Technica
If FCC gets its way, we’ll lose a lot more than net neutrality Enlarge / Net neutrality supporters rally for Title II reclassification of broadband in front of the White House in November 2014. (credit: Stephen Melkisethian ) The Republican-led Federal Communications Commission is preparing to overturn the two-year-old decision that invoked the FCC's Title II authority in order to impose net neutrality rules. It's possible the FCC could replace today's net n
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Scientific American Content: Global
Are Colors Innate or Learned?Babies’ perception of hues sheds light on the culture versus biology question -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Wired
Video Games Are Being Transformed By This Autistic CharacterVideo games like Overwatch are becoming unexpected sites for destigmatizing autism spectrum disorders.
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Wired
A Blueprint for Coexistence with Artificial IntelligenceThere's no getting around the fact that artificial intelligence will upend our world—but human empathy can't be coded.
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Wired
When Companies Get Serious About Diversity and Sexual Harassment, They Call HerY-Vonne Hutchinson helps tech firms master inclusion—and she says the Valley's wave of mea culpas over sexual harassment is just step one.
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Ars Technica
Ars Technica supports net neutrality Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) You may have noticed that Ars looks a bit different today. We're standing in solidarity with the Internet's " Day of Action ," in which thousands of companies and websites are protesting plans by the US Federal Communications Commission to dismantle Obama-era net neutrality rules. We hope it doesn't happen—and that the FCC doesn't give corporate America even
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New Scientist - News
Transformer robots can be printed on demand in just 13 minutesA reconfigurable robot made only from wire and motors can be printed to suit your needs. When the job is done, simply recycle it into a new robot
8h
The Atlantic
What Melissa Harris-Perry Learned From Maya Angelou About Mentorship As a professor at Wake Forest University and an editor at large at Elle , Melissa Harris-Perry is constantly on the lookout for new students to mentor. When she teaches a class, she gravitates towards those who aren’t afraid to challenge her. She knows these students will be the ones most willing to relax around her—to go out for a drink, debate about Kendrick Lamar, or let loose on the dance flo
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Wired
The Internet Ripoff You’re Not ProtestingNet neutrality is crucial, and today's protests are hugely important. But we're really getting screwed on the 'middle mile.'
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Ingeniøren
Efter vandprøve-fejl: Miljøstyrelsen kontrollerer laboratorierAnalysemetoden til opgørelse af fosfor og kvælstof i vandprøver fra hele Danmark var forkert i 15 måneder. Nu vil Miljøstyrelsen undersøge, om fejlen kan være endnu mere omfattende.
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Viden
Teenagere prøver gammel tech: Skal finde vej med KRAKHver dag bruger vi automatiseret teknologi, men hvis man aldrig har oplevet andet, kan den virke absurd, hvordan man gjorde i gamle dage.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sweating the Small Stuff: CubeSats Swarm Earth OrbitA boom in nanosatellites could revolutionize space science and industry, but also dramatically increase the hazards of space junk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Earth Faces 'Biological Annihilation' as Animal Populations Decline DramaticallyA human-caused mass extinction is underway, threatening the foundations of civilization, researchers argue in a study of the planet's declining biodiversity.
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Gizmodo
US Tests Alaskan Missile Defense System Following North Korea ICBM Launch GIF GIF made from video of the THAAD missile defense system test launched yesterday from Alaska to hit a target sent from north of Hawaii (US Missile Defense Agency) The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) has released video of a test conducted yesterday using a dummy missile that was launched north of Hawaii. The missile was obliterated by another missile shot from Alaska by the THAAD defense system
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Live Science
2 Whale Shark Sightings in Maryland: Are These Colossal Fish Dangerous?Two separate sightings of majestic whale sharks have occurred in the past few weeks near Ocean City, Maryland.
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Live Science
Fire Ants Build Sinking 'Eiffel Towers' from Their Own BodiesFire ants can build miniature look-alikes of the Eiffel Tower from their own bodies, and the insects perpetually rebuild the structures to save them from collapsing, a new study finds.
9h
Ingeniøren
Gigantisk isflage ved Antarktis har revet sig løsSatellitbilleder viser, at kæmpegletsjeren ’Larsen C’ har mistet en 175 km lang og 5800 km2 stor isflage.
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Viden
Isbjerg på en billion ton brækket af ved AntarktisEn sektion på 5800 kvadratkilometer er brækket helt af, siger forskere på Swansea Universitet.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How poverty affects the brain An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development. Nature 547 150 doi: 10.1038/547150a
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The Atlantic
The Weird Scientific Illustrations That Shaped Pop Culture In a time when you can explore all corners of the globe on your laptop, and find much of the information you’ll ever need on your phone, romantic notions of discovery are hurting, to say the least. Not so during the heyday of the New York Zoological Society’s Department of Tropical Research (DTR). From 1916 to 1964, this quirky, intrepid bunch of men and women, led by the famed American scientist
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Science | The Guardian
Doomsday narratives about climate change don't work. But here's what does | Victoria Herrmann Feeling hopeless about a situation is cognitively associated with inaction . Instead of being defeatist, look to climate change heroes who are leading the way The title of David Wallace-Wells’ recent essay in New York magazine is catchy, if not uncomfortable. “The Uninhabitable Earth: Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreck – sooner than you think.” The art
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Science | The Guardian
Vast iceberg splits from Antarctic ice shelf – video explainer A giant section of the Larsen C ice shelf in the Antarctic peninsula has broken off, unleashing a 5,000 sq km iceberg – about a quarter of the size of Wales One of largest icebergs ever recorded breaks off Antarctic ice shelf Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren
Rumsonde kigger for første gang dybt ind i Jupiters røde pletNasa håber i de kommende dage at blive meget klogere på den hemmelighedsfulde storm, som gennem flere hundrede år har hersket på gasplaneten.
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Viden
Fra dampmaskine til robot: Automatiseringens historie på ti minutterI mere end 2000 år har vi opfundet maskiner til at gøre arbejdet for os. Se hvordan teknologien har udviklet sig.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing world drought threat to EU rice and cotton intensifies research effortsA Europe-wide research effort is ramping up efforts to understand the risk to EU food supplies from climate change, after a report revealed that common staples are under threat from water scarcity and drought in the developing world.
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Science | The Guardian
Iceberg twice size of Luxembourg breaks off Antarctic ice shelf Satellite data confirms ‘calving’ of trillion-tonne, 5,800 sq km iceberg from the Larsen C ice shelf, dramatically altering the landscape A giant iceberg twice the size of Luxembourg has broken off an ice shelf on the Antarctic peninsula and is now adrift in the Weddell Sea. Reported to be “ hanging by a thread ” last month, the trillion-tonne iceberg was found to have split off from the Larsen C
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common strength 'genes' identified for first timeCommon genetic factors that influence muscle strength in humans have been identified for the first time in a study led by researchers from the University of Cambridge and published today in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
See-through heart tissue reveals hidden complexityA technique borrowed from neuroscience to see through brain tissue is helping scientists to see the fine structure of the heart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeting 'broken' metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory diseaseScientists have uncovered a way to 'program' immune cells to cause less damage to the body, by tapping into a 'broken' chemical pathway in inflammation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research points to treatment breakthrough for virusesResearchers identified a protein that is activated by viruses, including influenza, rhinovirus (the common cold), dengue and HIV. Once activated, it suppresses the body's key antiviral reaction. The study also investigated a prototype drug to treat these debilitating viral diseases.
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Viden
VIDEOBOT: Få svar på alle dine robotspørgsmålRobotten svarer på dine spørgsmål om robotter og automatisering.
10h
Science : NPR
Video: Japan Created Easy-To-Swallow Foods To Prevent Senior Choking Deaths In NPR's Elise Tries series, correspondent Elise Hu tries out different experiences in East Asia. In rapidly aging Japan, an edible innovation is helping seniors enjoy meals without fear of choking. (Image credit: Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR)
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Ingeniøren
Regeringen ignorerer flertal: Vil ikke straffe myndigheder for datasjusk Selvom et Folketings-flertal ønsker, at offentlige myndigheder skal kunne straffes med bøder ved brud på den kommende persondataforordning, så går regeringen en anden vej. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/regeringen-ignorerer-flertal-vil-ikke-straffe-myndigheder-datasjusk-1078317 Version2
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
White House’s dwindling science office leaves major research programmes in limbo Pared-back staff struggles to continue cybersecurity, climate-change and science-education efforts without direction from the Trump administration. Nature 547 145 doi: 10.1038/547145a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
World's largest hoard of carbon dates goes global Scientists hope pooled records could answer major archaeological questions and map human migration patterns. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22287
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Female astronomers of colour face daunting discrimination Two-fifths report feeling unsafe at work, and 18% have concerns about attending conferences. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22291
10h
The Atlantic
There's Nothing Bipartisan About Medicaid Cuts With Republican senators’ Affordable Care Act replacement, the Better Care Reconciliation Act drawing as little as 12 percent approval nationwide—and even majorities of Republicans disapproving of their assault on Medicaid—it is understandable that the plan’s defenders would be looking far and wide for political cover. But arguing that the approach is “borrowed from a nearly identical 1995 propos
11h
The Atlantic
Growing Cheaper Embryos for IVF Inside the Vagina As the number of U.S. babies born as a result of fertility treatment tops 1 million —an all-time high—clinics are under pressure to keep up to date with pricey lab equipment that can create, develop, and test embryos. But some fertility doctors have started to offer a new low-tech device that enables a woman to incubate them in her own body. The catch: She grows them inside her vagina. A doctor p
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Ars Technica
FBI didn’t need warrant for stingray in attempted murder case, DOJ says Enlarge (credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images News ) OAKLAND, Calif.—Weeks before a key hearing, federal prosecutors have submitted their formal opposition to an attempted murder suspect’s recent efforts to suppress evidence found through the warrantless use of an FBI cell-site simulator, better known as a stingray. The Tuesday filing reiterates the government’s position in the case known as Un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ads heading for Messenger home screens globallyFacebook on Tuesday said that advertisements will begin popping up on Messenger home screens globally after promising tests with users in Australia and Thailand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia scales back controversial China-run mine siteAustralia has bought back most of a contentious mining licence issued for a huge Chinese-run coal mine near prime agricultural land, officials said Wednesday, but farmers are still not happy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proposed California climate deal takes aim at toxic airA plan to extend California's signature climate initiative for another decade looks beyond cutting greenhouse gas emissions and takes aim at toxic air in the polluted neighborhoods around refineries and factories.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
George the wombat turns one, warms hearts againAn orphan baby wombat who warmed the hearts of the world in a viral Facebook video viewed 40 million times has turned one, with his latest exploits also proving a huge hit.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using treated graywater for irrigation is better for arid environmentsReusing graywater in dry areas may require treatment for more efficient irrigation in arid, sandy soils, according to a new study published in Chemosphere by researchers at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research. Graywater includes any wastewater generated in households or office buildings except from the toilet.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides evidence for naturality of high-purity stevia leaf extract sweetenersNew research published in the International Journal of Food Science and Technology found steviol glycosides are not altered during the extraction and purification process to make high-purity stevia extract. The study, published on June 19, 2017, was conducted at the University of Bonn in Germany, and provides further evidence for the naturality of stevia, a zero-calorie, plant-based sweetener.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Restless development: bad sleep may be evolutionary survival tool, study finds Research into sleep patterns of Tanzanian hunter-gatherers sheds new light on phenomenon often attributed to smartphones and modern-day lifestyles Poor sleep is often regarded as a modern affliction linked to our sedentary lifestyles , electric lighting and smartphones on the bedside table. However, new research suggests that fitful sleep could be an ancient survival mechanism designed to guard a
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The Atlantic
Donald Trump Jr. to Sean Hannity: 'I Can't Help What Someone Sends Me' In his first televised comments since revealing his meeting with a Russian lawyer based on the suspicion that she held damaging information about Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump Jr. downplayed the incident, telling Fox News’s Sean Hannity that the meeting was nothing more than “a wasted 20 minutes.” “There was nothing to tell,” the president’s eldest son told Hannity. “I wouldn’t have even remember
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Science | The Guardian
Butterfly signals a pause, for reflection Wenlock Edge: Shropshire It’s easy to see how the comma butterfly got its English name, but devilishly hard to work out where the French one came from I crept up on the butterfly as its wings flexed, pumping like delicate bellows, as it took in salts from dried dog urine. For a moment I thought it might be a fritillary – the upper sides of the wings were a rich orangey-brown with complex dark mar
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Programs that teach emotional intelligence in schools have lasting impactSocial and emotional learning programs for youth not only immediately improve mental health, social skills, and learning outcomes but also continue to benefit children years later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using treated graywater for irrigation is better for arid environments'This condition, called 'graywater-induced hydrophobicity,' is likely temporary and disappears quickly following rainwater or freshwater irrigation events,' says Prof. Gross. 'However, it is a more significant concern in arid lands with negligible rainfall as compared with wetter regions.'
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chronic liver inflammation linked to Western dietA new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports that mice fed a Western diet, which is high in fat and sugar, resulted in hepatic inflammation, especially in males. Moreover, liver inflammation was most pronounced in Western diet-fed male mice that also lacked farnesoid x receptor (FXR), a bile acid receptor.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predictive model may help forecast migraine attacksA new model based on measuring stress from daily hassles may help forecast future migraine headache attacks in those who develop them frequently.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Half of kids who needed epinephrine didn't get it before trip to the emergency roomA new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology showed that even kids who were prescribed an epinephrine auto injector didn't receive the life-saving medication when they needed it.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seaside sparrows caught between predators and rising seasSea-level rise is a problem for saltmarsh birds, but so is predation, and birds sometimes find themselves caught between two threats: They can nest lower in vegetation to avoid predators, putting them at risk of flooding, or move up to keep dry but risk getting eaten. A new study finds that pressure from predators increases flooding risk for seaside sparrow nests -- but that protecting them from p
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nesting in cavities protects birds from predators -- to a pointNesting in cavities provides birds with some protection from predators -- but it isn't foolproof. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how Poland's cavity-nesting marsh tits deal with predator attacks and finds that while tactics such as small entrances and solid walls do help, adaptations like this can only take the birds so far.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Trump Talk Aside, Auto Manufacturing and Automation Are Booming in MexicoA visit to the country’s Bajío region finds a thriving car ecosystem.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seaside sparrows caught between predators and rising seasSea-level rise may be a big problem for saltmarsh birds, but so is predation, and birds sometimes find themselves caught between a rock and a hard place: They can place their nests lower in the vegetation to avoid predators, putting them at greater risk of flooding, or move them up to keep them dry but risk getting eaten. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that greater
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nesting in cavities protects birds from predators—to a pointNesting in cavities provides birds with some protection from predators—but it isn't foolproof. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how Poland's cavity-nesting Marsh Tits deal with predator attacks and finds that while tactics such as small entrances and solid walls do help, adaptations like this can only take the birds so far.
15h
Ingeniøren
Begrænsede data og fri streaming: Fire danske teleselskaber brød netneutralitetenFri facebook, fri streaming og begrænset mobildata på computeren er i skudlinjen, når Energistyrelsen gør status på adgangen til det åbne internet i Danmark.
16h
The Atlantic
Syrian Rebels Shoot Down Assad Warplane Near Cease-Fire Zone Two Syrian rebel groups shot down a warplane in southern Syria on Tuesday, the groups announced in a joint statement. The shooting took place over territory belonging to the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and came dangerously close to a cease-fire zone brokered last week by the U.S. and Russia. The ceasefire, which went into effect on Sunday, applies to the Daraa, Quneitra, and Sw
16h
NYT > Science
U.S. Cities, States and Businesses Pledge to Measure EmissionsThe coalition, led by Gov. Jerry Brown of California and Michael Bloomberg, a former mayor of New York, said it will work with experts to try to meet the targets of the Paris climate deal.
17h
Gizmodo
One Does Not Simply Pay Full Price For the Lord of the Rings or Hobbit Extended Trilogies The Lord of the Rings: The Extended Motion Picture Trilogy , $26 | Hobbit Trilogy Extended , $38 There are quite a few permutations of the Lord of the Rings films out there on Blu-ray, but the extended editions are the ones you want, and the extended trilogy pack is down to $26 on Amazon for Prime Day, complete with all three extended films totaling 11 hours, plus 26 hours of special features to
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Undersea National Monument Could Be Left High and DryScott Kraus, vice-president and senior science advisor at the Anderson-Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium in Boston, talks about the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
New Scientist - News
Large carnivores have lost more than 90 per cent of their rangeThe hunting grounds of lions, tigers and the red and Ethiopian wolves have shrunk dramatically in the past 500 years, but a few species aren't doing as badly
18h
New Scientist - News
Whales sneak into shallow water to eat salmon from hatcheriesHumpbacks have been spotted feeding on baby salmon bred for release into the wild to restock fisheries for the first time, competing with fishermen
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New Scientist - News
Ants build living towers that flow to fight endless collapseThe rules that guide fire ants to make tall towers with their own bodies could be applied to miniature search-and-rescue robots
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New Scientist - News
Spider waves its front legs like antennae to mimic warlike antsThis sneaky jumping spider performs antics to fool predators in what is an unusual example of mimicry through behaviour, rather than appearance
18h
New Scientist - News
Sleeping less in old age may be an adaption to surviving in wildThe ‘poorly-sleeping grandparent’ hypothesis backed with new evidence from Tanzania’s Hadza people, links our sleep patterns to having night sentinels
18h
Gizmodo
Hackers Stole Trump Hotel Guests’ Credit Card Details, Again Less than a year after Trump Hotels settled with the victims of a security breach, the luxury chain reports that guests at 14 Trump properties have had their payment card information stolen. “We recently learned of an incident involving unauthorized access to guest information associated with certain hotel reservations,” a letter on the Trump company’s website read on Tuesday. The breach occurred
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Make new rules' to save the oceansNew rules are urgently needed to protect the open seas, scientists warn.
19h
Live Science
Scabies: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentScabies is a skin condition caused by a microscopic mite. Symptoms include itching and red bumps or blisters.
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Live Science
Atorvastatin (Generic Lipitor): Uses, Dosage & Side EffectsAtorvastatin is a prescription medicine used to treat high cholesterol. It is sold under the brand name Lipitor.
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Live Science
Camels: Facts, Types & PicturesCamels are mammals with long legs, a big-lipped snout and a humped back. There are two types of camels: dromedary camels, which have one hump, and Bactrian camels, which have two humps.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Can a robot help solve the Atlantic's lionfish problem?The invasive lionfish poses a number of threats in the Atlantic Ocean – can it be stopped by a robot?
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Lark or night owl? Blame your ancestorsOur ancestors could be to blame for the wide variety of human sleeping habits, from larks to night owls.
19h
Wired
Trump Is Being Sued for His Twitter Blocking HabitsThe Knight First Amendment Institute has sent a letter to President Trump, arguing that blocking Americans on Twitter violates their First Amendment rights.
19h
Inside Science
Why Seemingly Scary Cities Might Be Safer Than You Think Why Seemingly Scary Cities Might Be Safer Than You Think Mathematical model shows how fear of crime can spread even when risk is low. CrimeModel_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: ESB Professional via Shutterstock Culture Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 19:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Do you see your neighborhood as safe, or riddled with thieves and cutthroats? Either way, there's a good
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Live-in grandparents helped human ancestors get a safer night's sleepA sound night's sleep grows more elusive as people get older. But what some call insomnia may actually be an age-old survival mechanism, researchers report. A study of modern hunter-gatherers in Tanzania finds that, for people who live in groups, differences in sleep patterns commonly associated with age help ensure that at least one person is awake at all times.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The most effective individual steps to tackle climate change aren't being discussedGovernments and schools are not communicating the most effective ways for individuals to reduce their carbon footprints, according to new research.Published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters, the study from Lund University, found that the incremental changes advocated by governments may represent a missed opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions beneath the levels needed to
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ants build sinking Eiffel Towers when trying to escapeFire ants use their bodies to construct Eiffel Tower-looking structures when they run into a tall obstruction while looking for food or escaping to new areas. A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology suggests that they build these structures without a leader or coordinated effort. The towers constantly sink and have to be rebuilt.
19h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Whales feast when hatcheries release salmonWhales: “They’re 40 feet long and they’re feeding on fish that are the size of my finger.”
20h
The Atlantic
What the Heck Is a Russian 'Crown Prosecutor'? Updated on July 12 at 9:26 a.m. ET. In emails he released on Tuesday by Donald Trump Jr., the president’s eldest son and former campaign surrogate, Rob Goldstone, a former British tabloid journalist, told Trump Jr. that “the Crown prosecutor of Russia met with … Aras [Agalarov] this morning and in their meeting offered to provide some official documents and information that would incriminate Hill
20h
The Atlantic
U.S. Shoots Down Target in THAAD Anti-Missile Test The U.S. military conducted a successful test of its Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile system on Tuesday by shooting down a simulated intermediate-range ballistic missile over the Pacific Ocean. The test signals an improvement in the defense system, which before Tuesday had only intercepted shorter-range missiles. While the simulation was planned for months, it comes amid a grow
20h
Gizmodo
Behold the Tiniest Star Ever Discovered The small star (artist’s depiction shown in reddish orange) is about the size of Jupiter, and slightly smaller than the ultracool dwarf Trappist-1 (shown in grey). (Image: A Boetticher et al., 2017) Astronomers at the University of Cambridge have discovered a star that’s barely bigger than Saturn, making it the smallest stellar object known to science. The title of this new Astronomy & Physics st
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Gizmodo
Scientists Discover the Secret Behind Incredible Ant Towers GIF Credit: D. Hu et al., 2017 Ants, through their Borg-like powers, are capable of performing complex cooperative feats that make solitary insects look useless. In an extraordinary example of this collective behavior, researchers have shown how fire ants, when confronted by a barrier, swarm together to create towers with their bodies, allowing the lucky few at the tip of the structure to escape.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ants build sinking Eiffel Towers when trying to escapeIf you want to see the Eiffel Tower, you don't have to go to Paris. Just look down at your feet —but watch your step.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Live-in grandparents helped human ancestors get a safer night's sleepA sound night's sleep grows more elusive as people get older. But what some call insomnia may actually be an age-old survival mechanism, researchers report.
20h
Big Think
Is Bullying A Public Health Issue? Lise Feldman Barrett says emotional harm is worse for your health than physical harm. The legal system needs to catch up to the science. Read More
20h
Big Think
80 People Form an Incredible Human Chain to Save a Family from Drowning A human chain of 80 people rescues a drowning family in Florida, illustrating the dangers of rip currents. Read More
20h
Ars Technica
News industry decries Facebook’s “digital duopoly,” wants government help (credit: NS Newsflash / flickr ) The News Media Alliance, a trade group representing almost 2,000 news organizations, has asked US Congress for an exemption to antitrust law so that it can "negotiate collectively" with Google and Facebook. The Alliance, formerly known as the Newspaper Association of America, complains that the two dominant Internet companies form a " de facto duopoly that is vacu
20h
NYT > Science
New Mascot for the Hamptons: Mary Lee, the Great White SharkShe weighs about 4,000 pounds and has a considerable following on Twitter. And she is certainly not the only one of her kind in the waters off the Northeast Coast.
20h
NYT > Science
Pursuits: When Dinosaurs Roamed North DakotaThe lonely landscape of the North Dakota Badlands has allowed nature to preserve one of the state’s greatest intrigues: its prehistoric residents.
20h
Science : NPR
Macron Got A Lot Wrong About Africa ... But Made One Good Point In answering a reporter's question, the French president characterized Africa as a continent of failing states with high birth rates. Viviane Rutabingwa shares her perspective. (Image credit: Michele Tantussi/Getty Images)
20h
Popular Science
August Smart Lock review: An easy way to smarten up a dumb deadbolt Gadgets Teach your old door hardware some new tricks. The second generation August Smart Lock adds Apple HomeKit, and is still easy and reliable. Read on.
21h
Gizmodo
Adequate Man Who Has The Best Hair In Sports? Adequate Man Who Has The Best Hair In Sports? | Fusion It Cannot Be This Difficult to Cast Aladdin You Disney Punks | The Root We Fact-Checked Umar Johnson’s Hotep Tantrum With Roland Martin Because Someone Had To | The Slot Donald Trump Jr. Releases Incredibly Incriminating Emails For Some Reason, I Don’t Know, What the Hell |
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Ars Technica
Did you hear the one about a monkey suing a photographer for infringement? Enlarge (credit: David Slater / Naruto ) On Wednesday, a federal appeals court will embark on a legal safari of sorts: animal rights activists, representing an Indonesian monkey named Naruto, are set to argue to the San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals that their monkey client should be recognized as the lawful owner of property. The property at issue are a few infamous and viral s
21h
Live Science
Summer Health Quiz: Test Your Knowledge of This Season's HazardsThe balmy days of summer provide plenty of opportunity for adventure, but the season also brings with it a number of health woes, from sunburns to insect bites.
21h
NeuWrite West
Brain transplants - are they possible? “ Theoretically speaking if the brain stops aging and growing at a certain point would it be possible to transplant the brain to a younger body and it continue to operate normally as it did in the previous body? ” — Nolan Andreson Hi Nolan, Thank you for the question! I love it! First off, the brain is plastic which means it can learn and unlearn through creating new synapses and breaking down ex
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Don Jr.'s Email Evidence What We’re Following Damaging Details: President Trump’s eldest son tweeted out a chain of messages that document how he agreed to meet with a “Russian government attorney” after being told she had information about Hillary Clinton that would help his father win the election. “If it’s what you say I love it,” he responded at the time. (Read the full exchange here .) The emails vindicate not only
21h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
We'll Investigate One Of The Ocean's Trickiest Riddles When We Return to the Isle of Jaws #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 The team returns to document an abundance of male sharks and figure out their strange behavior. Premieres Monday, July 24 9p on Discovery. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebo
21h
Gizmodo
What the Fuck Is Julian Assange Doing? Photo: Getty Attempting to figure out what’s going on in Julian Assange’s head is a daily struggle. After moving into the Ecuadorean embassy in London seven years ago to avoid extradition to Sweden on since-dropped sexual assault allegations, the 46-year-old has remained holed up there with Twitter as his main means of communication. From the embassy’s confines, he’s kept himself busy leaking a s
21h
Gizmodo
Study: The Internet Is Still Full of Assholes Image: AP/Gizmodo A nationally-representative study on online harassment released by Pew Research today confirms what most of us already know: the internet is absolutely chock full of abusive shitheads. The study leads with an alarming figure: 40 percent of internet users have been the target of abusive behavior online. That number climbs to 67 percent for young people between the ages of 18 and
21h
The Atlantic
The Everybody-Does-It Defense of Collusion As evidence continues to mount suggesting the Trump campaign worked with Russia to influence the 2016 election, the president’s allies have shifted to a new defense. As former House Speaker Newt Gingrich put it: “You could argue it’s dumb, but it’s not illegal.” For months, the White House has fervently denied allegations of collusion, with President Trump routinely dismissing Russia stories in t
21h
Gizmodo
Contact Is More Than a Movie About Science vs. Religion Jodie Foster stars in Robert Zemeckis’ Contact, which opened 20 years ago today. All Images: Warner Bros. When Contact first opened, 20 years ago today, I thought it was a masterpiece. For a soon-to-be high school senior, Robert Zemeckis’ adaptation of Carl Sagan’s novel was the perfect Hollywood mix of thought-provoking ideas and spectacle. It wasn’t until years later I realized how divided fell
21h
The Scientist RSS
Meningitis Vaccine May Protect Against GonorrheaIndividuals who received a meningitis B vaccine were less likely to have contracted the sexually transmitted infection than their unvaccinated counterparts.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream SamplingModeling gives insight to the critical role of streamflow conditions when assessing the concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Iranian Researcher Detained at US AirportThe cancer scientist is being held, with his wife and three small children, at Logan International Airport in Boston.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
New Report Suggests a Way to Make the Gig Economy More FairThe findings of a study commissioned by the U.K. government are a good first step for gig workers everywhere.
21h
Live Science
How John F. Kennedy's Back Pain Affected His Life and DeathFor the first time, researchers have pieced together a detailed story of John F. Kennedy's back pain.
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: From Russia, ‘I Love It’ Today in 5 Lines Donald Trump Jr. released copies of his emails with Rob Goldstone, a music publicist and acquaintance, in which they arranged a meeting with a “Russian government lawyer,” who had potentially damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Democrats and Republicans in Congress expressed alarm over the email exchanges. In a statement, President Trump said his son is a “high-quality pe
21h
The Atlantic
Did Donald Trump Jr. Break the Law? Updated at 8:29 p.m. ET With the disclosure of a June 2016 email in which he welcomed direct assistance from the Russian government to help his father’s campaign, Donald Trump Jr. leapt Tuesday from the frying pan of political danger into the fire of potential legal peril. The president’s eldest son became a central figure in questions about interference in last year’s election after The New York
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital management practices may put women at risk for C-sections during childbirthThe way certain hospital labor and delivery units are managed may put healthy women at greater risk for cesarean deliveries and hemorrhage, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers and colleagues.
21h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Very Hungry Caterpillars That Turned to CannibalismWith no food other than tomato plants that had been induced to use chemical defenses, scientists found that caterpillars ate each other.
21h
Blog » Languages » English
Analog vs Digital The battle begins July 13th at 11am ET and runs for 24 hours. In our current world, we use analog and digital signals all the time. A classic example is the round faced clock you watched when you were waiting for your class period to end (analog) vs the clock on your mobile phone (digital). But what exactly relegates these signals to one category or the other? It turns out, the answer is pretty s
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Big cash boost for UK satellite sectorThe UK government formally announces a more-than-£100m investment in new satellite and rocket test facilities.
22h
Wired
In Donald Trump Jr.'s Emails, Intent Matters More than IntelThe conservative defense of Donald Trump Jr. misses the point.
22h
Gizmodo
Scientists 'Teleport' a Particle Hundreds of Miles—But What Does That Mean? Image: Timm Weitkamp /Wikimedia Commons Humanity is advancing rapidly towards a place where the news sounds an awful lot like science fiction. In fact, yesterday, Chinese scientists reported that they “teleported” a photon over hundreds of miles using a “quantum satellite.” But this isn’t Star Trek. It’s the real world. Which happens to mean it’s a lot less exciting than Star Trek-style teleporta
22h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Running Unprecedented Philips Hue Deals For Prime Day Philips Hue Third Generation Starter Kit , $140 for Prime members If you own an Alexa device or bought one today , one of the best things you can do next is upgrade to Philips Hue, allowing you to control your lights with your voice. The third generation starter kit is down to $140 for Prime Day, the best deal ever on a non-refurb. Individual bulbs are also on sale for $10 off .
22h
Live Science
Medication Mistakes Getting More Americans SickThe number of Americans getting sick from making medication mistakes at home is rising.
22h
The Atlantic
What a Protestant Parade Reveals About Theresa May's New Partners Northern Ireland’s Twelfth of July parades will be watched with unusual care from London this year. Celebrating the central national holiday of Northern Ireland’s Protestants, the parades—known for their long history of provoking communal violence—typically pass unnoticed in the rest of the United Kingdom. But this year, Prime Minister Theresa May is reliant on the largest Northern Irish Protesta
22h
Gizmodo
Pirate Keeps Taking Over British Radio Station to Play Masturbation Anthem Photo Source: Pixabay Over the weekend, a banjo jauntily strummed on the airwaves of Mansfield 103.2, a local radio station in England. As the singer of the tune broke out into a chorus about his love of masturbation, the calls flooded in. It was the eighth time the station’s airwaves had been hijacked by someone who just loves “The Winker’s Song.” And no one knows who’s responsible. For those wh
22h
Popular Science
What the heck is 'ice VII,' and why are scientists using lasers to make it? Science No, it's not a superweapon. There are actually 17 different forms of crystalline ice—and some of them come from space. Read on:…
22h
Big Think
71% of All Global Emissions Come From Just 100 Companies The new Carbon Majors Report 2017 puts all the greenhouse-gas puzzle pieces together in one eye-popping report. Read More
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Gizmodo
AT&T Takes a Break From Decade-Long Effort to Dismantle Net Neutrality to Express Its Support for Net Neutrality Photo: Getty In a remarkable display of bullshit, AT&T announced today that it’s joining tomorrow’s net neutrality protest—a “ Day of Action ” when a collection of tech companies will throw their weight behind an effort to block Trump’s FCC from rewriting the 2015 rules that protect net neutrality and the future of the open internet. Major tech firms like Amazon and Google have signed on to parti
22h
Latest Headlines | Science News
The most distant star ever spotted is 9 billion light-years awayA bright blue star sends its light from two-thirds of the way across the universe, thanks to a chance alignment with a galaxy cluster.
22h
Wired
Rob Goldstone, the Trump Family, and Russia: A TimelineAs details around Donald Trump Jr.'s meeting with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya become clearer, a look at the man who brokered it, and his ties to the Trumps.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden stars may make planets appear smallerIn the search for planets similar to our own, an important point of comparison is the planet's density. A low density tells scientists a planet is more likely to be gaseous like Jupiter, and a high density is associated with rocky planets like Earth. But a new study suggests some are less dense than previously thought because of a second, hidden star in their systems.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon rivals offer deals during online giant's Prime DayAmazon's competitors are offering their own deals during the online giant's Prime Day promotion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US need for four polar icebreakers 'critical,' warns reportThe rapid pace of global warming and ice melting at the poles have underscored the "critical" need for the United States to build four new polar icebreaker ships, US officials said Tuesday.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
App turns Mexican women's phones into panic buttonsThe Mexican city of Juarez has been dubbed "the capital of murdered women": since the 1990s, hundreds of women have been raped, killed and dumped in the desert, or simply disappeared without a trace.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts: Scrapped electric-car plant may mean industry woesAn electric car maker deserted its plan to construct a $1 billion manufacturing plant in southern Nevada in a move experts say could spell trouble for the company and the broader niche electric automobile industry.
22h
Ars Technica
Google Pixel 2 leak shows slimmer bezels, huge camera lens, squeezable sides Enlarge (credit: Android Police ) Assuming Google is working on a yearly cadence, we're about three months out from a release of the second Google Pixel. That means we're getting into proper leak territory, and, as usual, Android Police is giving us our first look at Google's latest flagship. Today, the site posted a render that it says is "an accurate representation" of the new Pixel design. And
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
PAINS-killer: Study finds serious issues with popular drug screening toolA widely used screening tool deployed in the early phases of drug discovery to weed out undesirable compounds is wrong so often it can't be trusted on its own, according to scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough tool predicts properties of theoretical materialsScientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University have created the first general-purpose method for using machine learning to predict the properties of new metals, ceramics and other crystalline materials and to find new uses for existing materials, a discovery that could save countless hours wasted in the trial-and-error process of creating new and better materials
22h
The Scientist RSS
Cell Cannibalism as Cancer DefenseA new study suggests that the mysterious process by which one cell consumes another may be triggered by cell division, potentially helping to fight tumor growth.
22h
Ars Technica
Kaspersky under scrutiny after Bloomberg story claims close links to FSB Enlarge / Kaspersky Lab CEO and Chairman Eugene Kaspersky speaks at a conference in Russia on July 10, 2017. (credit: Anton NovoderezhkinTASS via Getty Images ) Shortly after Bloomberg Businessweek published an explosive story under the headline: "Kaspersky Lab Has Been Working With Russian Intelligence," the security firm released a lengthy statement noting that the company does not have "inappr
22h
Wired
The Problem With Fitness Studies Based on Activity AppsUsing smartphones to study public health requires reliable data—and researchers, even at well-connected universities like Stanford, still have a hard time getting their hands on the truly good stuff.
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Science | The Guardian
Atmospheric sound channels – good for sleuths but not UFOs US army efforts in 1947 to put ‘wiretapping’ balloons in the mesosphere led to flying saucer tales but ultimately to scientists finding natural channels of communication Seventy years ago a rancher near Roswell, New Mexico, found some peculiar wreckage of silver foil and sticks. An official US army statement claimed it was a “flying disc”, leading to headlines that an alien flying saucer had been
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preclinical results support entinostat's role in targeting the tumor microenvironmentSyndax Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ('Syndax,' the 'Company' or 'we') (Nasdaq:SNDX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing entinostat and SNDX-6352 in multiple cancer indications, in collaboration with The Wistar Institute and Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, today announced the publication of a preclinical report demonstrating that entinostat, Syndax's oral, Class-
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PTSD may be physical and not only psychologicalThe part of the brain that helps control emotion may be larger in people who develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after brain injury compared to those with a brain injury without PTSD, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Jacksonville, Fla., July 14 to 16, 2017.
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The Atlantic
The Revival of John Quincy Adams July 11 is the 250th anniversary of the birth of John Quincy Adams. We are experiencing something of an Adams revival, with several new biographies, new editions of his astoundingly revealing and eloquent diary , and a renewed willingness to see this one-term president turned antislavery congressman—rather than his ally-turned-rival Andrew Jackson—as the custodian of what is most redemptive, and
22h
Live Science
Awesome 'Star Wars' Lego Sets On Sale for Prime DayThe Amazon Prime Day force is strong with these Lego "Star Wars" sets.
22h
Gizmodo
The Highest Capacity MicroSD Card Is Down To Its Lowest Price SanDisk 256GB MicroSD Card , $105 SanDisk’s 256GB microSD card is currently the highest capacity card that you can buy, and at $105 for Prime members, it’s never been cheaper. That’ll hold a lot of Nintendo Switch games. Now, I might not buy this card unless I was planning on using all of the space, since you can get a 128GB card for $36 , or 200GB for $81 right now, but that’s the price you pay
23h
Ars Technica
AT&T joins net neutrality protest—despite suing to block neutrality rules Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | ljhimages ) AT&T says it is joining a big protest to save net neutrality—even though the company previously sued the US Federal Communications Commission in a failed attempt to get the commission's rules thrown out. "Tomorrow, AT&T will join the 'Day of Action' for preserving and advancing an open Internet," AT&T Senior Executive VP Bob Quinn wrote in a blog post t
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough tool predicts properties of theoretical materialsUNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy used data on approximately 60,000 unique materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Inorganic Crystal Structure Database to create a new methodology they call Properties Labeled Materials Fragments.
23h
The Atlantic
The Apocalyptic Appeal of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds My first attempt at joining the carnage of PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds—a smash-hit new video game that pits 100 users against each other in a spare, bloody deathmatch—was as surreal as you might imagine. Like every other online player, I parachuted onto a gigantic island, unarmed, ready to search for weapons and gear with which to exterminate my 99 competitors. I immediately came across a one-r
23h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump Jr.'s Emails Vindicate the Intelligence Community Line by ugly line, Donald J. Trump Jr.’s emails with British-born former tabloid reporter and Russian intermediary Rob Goldstone are now plastered on The New York Times website. They reveal an astounding set of communications. Goldstone promises incriminating information about Hillary Clinton that could be used in the campaign—with the Kremlin’s backing. Junior’s response should have been to spee
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PAINS-killer: UNC study finds serious issues with popular drug screening toolA widely used screening tool deployed in the early phases of drug discovery to weed out undesirable compounds is wrong so often it can't be trusted on its own, according to scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI study sheds light on regulation of hair growth across the entire bodyTo paraphrase the classic poem, no hair is an island entire of itself. Instead, University of California, Irvine scientists have discovered that all hairs can communicate with each other and grow in coordination across the entire body. This is regulated by a single molecular mechanism that adjusts by skin region to ensure efficient hair growth - so no bald patches form - and enable distinct hair d
23h
Gizmodo
The World's Biggest Super Soaker Is Powerful Enough to Shatter Windows GIF Last summer, Mark Rober built the world’s largest Nerf dart gun , capable of blasting foam at 40 mph. Sure, that made it slightly more dangerous than the toy it was based on, but it doesn’t even come close to Rober’s latest bonkers creation: a giant Super Soaker that fires water at 243 mph . At seven feet long, Rober’s super-sized Super Soaker officially holds the Guinness World Record, but y
23h
The Scientist RSS
Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: StudyScientists describe the number of vertebrate species experiencing population declines as 'biological annihilation.'
23h
Blog » Languages » English
Mystic FAQ: Common Problems and Solutions Hello Mystics! We’re hope you’re enjoying working with MSTY to build our latest dataset. As you may have already realized, MSTY is not perfect, and there are a few special “quirks” that cells in this dataset regularly have. Some of these issues you’ve probably encountered in Eyewire before, and some are brand new! So without further ado, let’s go through some common problems in MSTY cells and lea
23h
Blog » Languages » English
Mystic Trainings are here! Calling all Mystics! The time you’ve been waiting patiently for is finally here! We’ll be doing two Mystic trainings to get you up to speed with all the new fun-filled features you’ve received with your Mystic powers. The first training will be on Thursday, July 13th (that’s this Thursday!) at 11 AM ET . We suggest you come to this training, as we will be releasing new Mystic cells to players on
23h
The Atlantic
What If It's All True? For months, rumors, innuendos, and allegations about collusion between the Trump campaign, the Trump administration, and the Russian government swirled around Washington, sometimes in great gushing floods, other times in lazy rivulets. Time and again, Donald Trump and his allies denied it. They said there was no contact before the election. They said that any meetings that were held were routine,
23h
Big Think
This Turns Tragedy into an Opportunity for Personal Growth 75% of all people will live through a traumatic event. 35-37% will experience PTG. Read More
23h
Live Science
Dazzling Auroras Dance on the Southern Horizon in Astronaut's PhotoThe southern lights appear to dance on the horizon off the southern coast of Australia in a stunning new photo taken by an astronaut aboard the International Space Station.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distant galaxies 'lift the veil' on the end of the cosmic dark agesAstronomers studying the distant Universe have found that small star-forming galaxies were abundant when the Universe was only 800 million years old, a few percent of its present age. The results suggest that the earliest galaxies, which illuminated and ionized the Universe, formed at even earlier times.
23h
Quanta Magazine
Marjorie Rice’s Secret Pentagons In 1975, a San Diego homemaker named Marjorie Rice came across a column in Scientific American about tiling, a problem that has fascinated mathematicians since ancient Greek times. The problem, as Martin Gardner explained in the column, asks which shapes “tile” the plane, locking together with copies of themselves in endless patterns called tessellations. Gardner reported that the classification
23h
Live Science
Mysterious Sea Creatures Surface in 'Big Pacific'Author Rebecca Tansley told Live Science how the photos and stories of the book "Big Pacific" came together.
23h
Live Science
In Photos: The Stunning Sea Life 'Stars' of 'Big Pacific'The photo book “Big Pacific,” companion to the five-part PBS series, showcases the stunning marine life living in the Pacific Ocean, and highlights the conservation challenges they face.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter users file suit, saying Trump block is unconstitutionalA group of Twitter users blocked by President Donald Trump filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday claiming the White House is violating the constitution by keeping them out of a "public forum."
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Live Science
Brewing Up a Longer Life: Drink Coffee, Studies SuggestPeople who drink coffee live longer, new studies find.
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Live Science
Superdense Extraterrestrial Ice Formed in a (Laser) FlashIn a new experiment, researchers have created a super-dense version of ice found deep within icy moons and colliding comets, and watched it form in nanoseconds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch project tests floating cities to seek more spaceDutch researchers unveiled Tuesday a model of what could become within two decades a floating mega-island to be used as a creative solution for accommodating housing, ports, farms or parks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA probe successfully peers into Jupiter's Great Red SpotA NASA spacecraft, Juno, has successfully peered into the giant storm raging on Jupiter, known as the Great Red Spot, and its first pictures should be out in days, the US space agency said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat parent Snap slides below IPO priceShares of Snapchat parent Snap Inc. plunged Tuesday, slipping below the price at the time of its stock offering, after a pessimistic outlook from a Wall Street analyst on the popular messaging service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists upgrade database tracking global temperatures across millenniaA consortium of international scientists led by a climate expert from USC have upgraded an open-source global database tracking the Earth's temperatures since 1 A.D. that further confirms that the Earth is warming at a rate unprecedented in recent geologic history.
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Gizmodo
Fry Your Next Thanksgiving Turkey For Just $71 Butterball Oil-Free Fryer and Roaster , $71 Contrary to what you might have heard , you don’t have to risk burning down your house to fry a turkey this Thanksgiving. With the right equipment, like this $71 Butterball Oil-Free Fryer . Even better, it doubles as a smoker.
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Gizmodo
Bring Your Underwear Drawer Up to Code With This ExOfficio Prime Day Discount 25% off ExOfficio Underwear I’m biased, since I’m wearing them right now, but this is the best deal of Prime Day: 25% off ExOfficio men’s underwear . Our readers have bought tens of thousands of pairs of the boxer briefs , but this deal is also eligible on briefs and boxers.
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Futurity.org
Obesity spikes where people walk a lot or very little Countries with the largest activity disparities between people who walk a lot and people who walk very little have much higher levels of obesity, new research suggests. In countries with little obesity, people mostly walk a similar amount per day, the researchers found. Considering that an estimated 5.3 million people die from causes associated with physical inactivity every year, these researche
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Blog » Languages » English
Mystic Completed Cells List Mystics, masters of the zfish universe! Find here a list of the cells you’ve completed. This blog will be updated weekly with the latest cells with shoutouts to the players who mapped them. If you’re a Scythe who’s ready for your next challenge, you can request a promotion to Mystic class here . If you are a Mystic, check below to find your name and review the accuracy of any cells you’ve worked
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid tapering may improve outcomes for chronic pain sufferersBelow please find summaries of new articles that will be published in the next issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The summaries are not intended to substitute for the full articles as a source of information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists upgrade database tracking global temperatures across millenniaA new version of an international climate database first released in 2013 includes more records that further confirm the disturbing rise in the Earth's temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk-reducing mastectomy questioned for BRCA mutation carriers with prior ovarian cancerFor the subset of women with BRCA mutations who have already had ovarian cancer, risk-reducing mastectomy might not be worth the price tag. New research from the Duke Cancer Institute finds that for many women in this unique group, prophylactic mastectomy does not produce a substantial survival gain compared to breast cancer screening and is not cost-effective.
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Popular Science
Amazon's delivery drone hive patent is an urban planning nightmare Aviation This clever concept is subprime logistics. Amazon drone towers don't match with the economics of warehousing…
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Viden
Forskere slår alarm: Klodens dyr udryddes i hobetalHvis kloden skal overleve, skal vi gøre noget nu, siger bl.a. WWF - Verdensnaturfonden.
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Gizmodo
The Planet of the Apes Prequels May Not Be Over Yet Caesar and his team go hunting in War for the Planet of the Apes. Image: Fox War for the Planet of the Apes is being positioned as the end of a trilogy of Planet of the Apes prequels leading into the 1968 original. This is especially true because director Matt Reeves has already committed to another franchise. But, that doesn’t mean he thinks the story is over. “In our minds the story’s not over,
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Live Science
Climate Cities: Can Urban America Save Paris Agreement?U.S. cities committed to the Paris climate accord after President Trump announced the country's exit. But how much can urban areas do?
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Gizmodo
This Prime Day Shoe Sale Is Truly Massive Prime Day Shoe Sale Amazon’s Prime Day shoe sale includes just about anything that could be considered athletic or outdoor footwear. Save big on running shoes, hiking boots and sandals, boating shoes, weightlifting shoes, and a lot more. Adidas, New Balance, Skechers, Saucony, and others are represented here, so you’re certain to find a style you like .
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Limitations and challenges of using Raman spectroscopy to detect the abiotic plant stress response [Biological Sciences]Altangerel et al. (1) suggest that Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect the early abiotic stress response in plants through the measurement of anthocyanins and carotenoids in plant tissues. However, we believe there are some problems that need to be considered. First, there is insufficient evidence that Raman spectroscopy...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Dong and Zhao: Plant stress via Raman spectroscopy [Biological Sciences]Dong and Zhao (1) attempt to provide perspective on our use of Raman spectroscopy in plant stress studies (2). Unfortunately, their experimental criticism is incorrect and their technical suggestions won’t work. The following points support these strong statements. Dong and Zhao claim that Raman spectroscopy is limited by its “poor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protect coastal wetlands in China to save endangered migratory birds [Biological Sciences]Evaluating the significance of protected areas for biodiversity and ecosystem services is important for nature conservation. In a recent issue of PNAS, Xu et al. (1) present valuable information on provision of biodiversity and ecosystem services by China’s nature reserves. They conclude that reserves serve bird populations moderately well. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Yang et al.: Coastal wetlands are not well represented by protected areas for endangered birds [Biological Sciences]We thank Yang et al. (1) for their perspective. We are aware of the importance of coastal wetland protection for endangered migratory birds. Our paper in PNAS (2) focuses on the general representation of protected areas for endangered species (e.g., endangered birds) and ecosystem services. Thus, we did not emphasize...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intrinsic map dynamics exploration for uncharted effective free-energy landscapes [Applied Mathematics]We describe and implement a computer-assisted approach for accelerating the exploration of uncharted effective free-energy surfaces (FESs). More generally, the aim is the extraction of coarse-grained, macroscopic information from stochastic or atomistic simulations, such as molecular dynamics (MD). The approach functionally links the MD simulator with nonlinear manifold learning techniques....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3 is ferroelectric [Applied Physical Sciences]Halide perovskite (HaP) semiconductors are revolutionizing photovoltaic (PV) solar energy conversion by showing remarkable performance of solar cells made with HaPs, especially tetragonal methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3). In particular, the low voltage loss of these cells implies a remarkably low recombination rate of photogenerated carriers. It was suggested that low...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Triplet-triplet energy transfer in artificial and natural photosynthetic antennas [Chemistry]In photosynthetic organisms, protection against photooxidative stress due to singlet oxygen is provided by carotenoid molecules, which quench chlorophyll triplet species before they can sensitize singlet oxygen formation. In anoxygenic photosynthetic organisms, in which exposure to oxygen is low, chlorophyll-to-carotenoid triplet–triplet energy transfer (T-TET) is slow, in the tens of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics [Engineering]Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Grc3 programs the essential endoribonuclease Las1 for specific RNA cleavage [Biochemistry]Las1 is a recently discovered endoribonuclease that collaborates with Grc3–Rat1–Rai1 to process precursor ribosomal RNA (rRNA), yet its mechanism of action remains unknown. Disruption of the mammalian Las1 gene has been linked to congenital lethal motor neuron disease and X-linked intellectual disability disorders, thus highlighting the necessity to understand Las1...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
TraR directly regulates transcription initiation by mimicking the combined effects of the global regulators DksA and ppGpp [Biochemistry]The Escherichia coli F element-encoded protein TraR is a distant homolog of the chromosome-encoded transcription factor DksA. Here we address the mechanism by which TraR acts as a global regulator, inhibiting some promoters and activating others. We show that TraR regulates transcription directly in vitro by binding to the secondary...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of human nSMase2 reveals an interdomain allosteric activation mechanism for ceramide generation [Biochemistry]Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2, product of the SMPD3 gene) is a key enzyme for ceramide generation that is involved in regulating cellular stress responses and exosome-mediated intercellular communication. nSMase2 is activated by diverse stimuli, including the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine binds to an integral-membrane N-terminal domain (NTD); however, how the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nucleotide-dependent farnesyl switch orchestrates polymerization and membrane binding of human guanylate-binding protein 1 [Biochemistry]Dynamin-like proteins (DLPs) mediate various membrane fusion and fission processes within the cell, which often require the polymerization of DLPs. An IFN-inducible family of DLPs, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), is involved in antimicrobial and antiviral responses within the cell. Human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1), the founding member of GBPs, is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Vascular disease-causing mutation, smooth muscle {alpha}-actin R258C, dominantly suppresses functions of {alpha}-actin in human patient fibroblasts [Cell Biology]The most common genetic alterations for familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) are missense mutations in vascular smooth muscle (SM) α-actin encoded by ACTA2. We focus here on ACTA2–R258C, a recurrent mutation associated with early onset of TAAD and occlusive moyamoya-like cerebrovascular disease. Recent biochemical results with SM α-actin–R258C...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Muscarinic receptor regulates extracellular signal regulated kinase by two modes of arrestin binding [Cell Biology]Binding of agonists to G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) activates heterotrimeric G proteins and downstream signaling. Agonist-bound GPCRs are then phosphorylated by protein kinases and bound by arrestin to trigger desensitization and endocytosis. Arrestin plays another important signaling function. It recruits and regulates activity of an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. How
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Notch1 maintains dormancy of olfactory horizontal basal cells, a reserve neural stem cell [Developmental Biology]The remarkable capacity of the adult olfactory epithelium (OE) to regenerate fully both neurosensory and nonneuronal cell types after severe epithelial injury depends on life-long persistence of two stem cell populations: the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), which are quiescent and held in reserve, and mitotically active globose basal cells. It...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The doublesex-related Dmrta2 safeguards neural progenitor maintenance involving transcriptional regulation of Hes1 [Developmental Biology]The mechanisms that determine whether a neural progenitor cell (NPC) reenters the cell cycle or exits and differentiates are pivotal for generating cells in the correct numbers and diverse types, and thus dictate proper brain development. Combining gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches in an embryonic stem cell-derived cortical differentiation model, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antagonistic BMP-cWNT signaling in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis reveals insight into the evolution of mesoderm [Evolution]Gastrulation was arguably the key evolutionary innovation that enabled metazoan diversification, leading to the formation of distinct germ layers and specialized tissues. Differential gene expression specifying cell fate is governed by the inputs of intracellular and/or extracellular signals. Beta-catenin/Tcf and the TGF-beta bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) provide critical molecular signaling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Disentangling the effects of selection and loss bias on gene dynamics [Evolution]We combine mathematical modeling of genome evolution with comparative analysis of prokaryotic genomes to estimate the relative contributions of selection and intrinsic loss bias to the evolution of different functional classes of genes and mobile genetic elements (MGE). An exact solution for the dynamics of gene family size was obtained...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quantitative proteomics identify Tenascin-C as a promoter of lung cancer progression and contributor to a signature prognostic of patient survival [Genetics]The extracellular microenvironment is an integral component of normal and diseased tissues that is poorly understood owing to its complexity. To investigate the contribution of the microenvironment to lung fibrosis and adenocarcinoma progression, two pathologies characterized by excessive stromal expansion, we used mouse models to characterize the extracellular matrix (ECM)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intact piRNA pathway prevents L1 mobilization in male meiosis [Genetics]The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is essential for retrotransposon silencing. In piRNA-deficient mice, L1-overexpressing male germ cells exhibit excessive DNA damage and meiotic defects. It remains unknown whether L1 expression simply highlights piRNA deficiency or actually drives the germ-cell demise. Specifically, the sheer abundance of genomic L1 copies prevents reliable...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transmembrane features governing Fc receptor CD16A assembly with CD16A signaling adaptor molecules [Immunology and Inflammation]Many activating immunoreceptors associate with signaling adaptor molecules like FcεR1γ or CD247. FcεR1γ and CD247 share high sequence homology and form disulphide-linked homodimers that contain a pair of acidic aspartic acid residues in their transmembrane (TM) domains that mediate assembly, via interaction with an arginine residue at a similar register...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Targeting cancer cell integrins using gold nanorods in photothermal therapy inhibits migration through affecting cytoskeletal proteins [Medical Sciences]Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, but the current clinical treatments are not effective. Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were discovered to inhibit cancer cell migration and prevent metastasis. Rationally designed AuNPs could greatly benefit their antimigration property, but the molecular mechanisms need to be explored. Cytoskeletons are cell structural...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IGF2BP1 overexpression causes fetal-like hemoglobin expression patterns in cultured human adult erythroblasts [Medical Sciences]Here we investigated in primary human erythroid tissues a downstream element of the heterochronic let-7 miRNA pathway, the insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 1 (IGF2BP1), for its potential to affect the hemoglobin profiles in human erythroblasts. Comparison of adult bone marrow to fetal liver lysates demonstrated developmental silencing in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiparity improves outcomes after cerebral ischemia in female mice despite features of increased metabovascular risk [Neuroscience]Females show a varying degree of ischemic sensitivity throughout their lifespan, which is not fully explained by hormonal or genetic factors. Epidemiological data suggest that sex-specific life experiences such as pregnancy increase stroke risk. This work evaluated the role of parity on stroke outcome. Age-matched virgin (i.e., nulliparous) and multiparous...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neural mechanism for hypothalamic-mediated autonomic responses to light during migraine [Neuroscience]Migraineurs avoid light because it intensifies their headache. However, this is not the only reason for their aversion to light. Studying migraineurs and control subjects, we found that lights triggered more changes in autonomic functions and negative emotions during, rather than in the absence of, migraine or in control subjects,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Simulating tactile signals from the whole hand with millisecond precision [Neuroscience]When we grasp and manipulate an object, populations of tactile nerve fibers become activated and convey information about the shape, size, and texture of the object and its motion across the skin. The response properties of tactile fibers have been extensively characterized in single-unit recordings, yielding important insights into how...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protein homeostasis of a metastable subproteome associated with Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. A hallmark of this disease is the presence of aberrant deposits containing by the Aβ peptide (amyloid plaques) and the tau protein (neurofibrillary tangles) in the brains of affected individuals. Increasing evidence suggests that the formation of these deposits is closely...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Arabidopsis ABCG34 contributes to defense against necrotrophic pathogens by mediating the secretion of camalexin [Plant Biology]Plant pathogens cause huge yield losses. Plant defense often depends on toxic secondary metabolites that inhibit pathogen growth. Because most secondary metabolites are also toxic to the plant, specific transporters are needed to deliver them to the pathogens. To identify the transporters that function in plant defense, we screened Arabidopsis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphosite charge rather than shootward localization determines OCTOPUS activity in root protophloem [Plant Biology]Polar cellular localization of proteins is often associated with their function and activity. In plants, relatively few polar-localized factors have been described. Among them, the plasma membrane-associated Arabidopsis proteins OCTOPUS (OPS) and BREVIS RADIX (BRX) display shootward and rootward polar localization, respectively, in developing root protophloem cells. Both ops and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Constrained sampling experiments reveal principles of detection in natural scenes [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]A fundamental everyday visual task is to detect target objects within a background scene. Using relatively simple stimuli, vision science has identified several major factors that affect detection thresholds, including the luminance of the background, the contrast of the background, the spatial similarity of the background to the target, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells [Systems Biology]The actin cytoskeleton is an essential intracellular filamentous structure that underpins cellular transport and cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. However, the system-level properties of actin-based cellular trafficking remain tenuous, largely due to the inability to quantify key features of the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we developed an automated image-based, network-driven framework...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanochemical feedback underlies coexistence of qualitatively distinct cell polarity patterns within diverse cell populations [Systems Biology]Cell polarization and directional cell migration can display random, persistent, and oscillatory dynamic patterns. However, it is not clear whether these polarity patterns can be explained by the same underlying regulatory mechanism. Here, we show that random, persistent, and oscillatory migration accompanied by polarization can simultaneously occur in populations of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Group augmentation, collective action, and territorial boundary patrols by male chimpanzees [Anthropology]How can collective action evolve when individuals benefit from cooperation regardless of whether they pay its participation costs? According to one influential perspective, collective action problems are common, especially when groups are large, but may be solved when individuals who have more to gain from the collective good or can...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chimpanzee super strength and human skeletal muscle evolution [Anthropology]Since at least the 1920s, it has been reported that common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) differ from humans in being capable of exceptional feats of “super strength,” both in the wild and in captive environments. A mix of anecdotal and more controlled studies provides some support for this view; however, a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Experimental evolution reveals an effective avenue to release catabolite repression via mutations in XylR [Applied Biological Sciences]Microbial production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides promising biorenewable alternatives to the conventional petroleum-based products. However, heterogeneous sugar composition of lignocellulosic biomass hinders efficient microbial conversion due to carbon catabolite repression. The most abundant sugar monomers in lignocellulosic biomass materials are glucose and xylose
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CIDE domains form functionally important higher-order assemblies for DNA fragmentation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE) domains, initially identified in apoptotic nucleases, form a family with diverse functions ranging from cell death to lipid homeostasis. Here we show that the CIDE domains of Drosophila and human apoptotic nucleases Drep2, Drep4, and DFF40 all form head-to-tail helical filaments. Opposing positively and negatively...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cryo-EM structure of the DNA-PK holoenzyme [Biophysics and Computational Biology]DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a large protein complex central to the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathway. It comprises the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the heterodimer of DNA-binding proteins Ku70 and Ku80. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of human DNA-PKcs at 4.4-Å resolution and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nonredox thiolation in tRNA occurring via sulfur activation by a [4Fe-4S] cluster [Chemistry]Sulfur is present in several nucleosides within tRNAs. In particular, thiolation of the universally conserved methyl-uridine at position 54 stabilizes tRNAs from thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea and is required for growth at high temperature. The simple nonredox substitution of the C2-uridine carbonyl oxygen by sulfur is catalyzed by tRNA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Aridity and hominin environments [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Aridification is often considered a major driver of long-term ecological change and hominin evolution in eastern Africa during the Plio-Pleistocene; however, this hypothesis remains inadequately tested owing to difficulties in reconstructing terrestrial paleoclimate. We present a revised aridity index for quantifying water deficit (WD) in terrestrial environments using tooth enamel...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Varying and unchanging whiteness on the wings of dusk-active and shade-inhabiting Carystoides escalantei butterflies [Evolution]Whiteness, although frequently apparent on the wings, legs, antennae, or bodies of many species of moths and butterflies, along with other colors and shades, has often escaped our attention. Here, we investigate the nanostructure and microstructure of white spots on the wings of Carystoides escalantei, a dusk-active and shade-inhabiting Costa...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolution of nonspectral rhodopsin function at high altitudes [Evolution]High-altitude environments present a range of biochemical and physiological challenges for organisms through decreases in oxygen, pressure, and temperature relative to lowland habitats. Protein-level adaptations to hypoxic high-altitude conditions have been identified in multiple terrestrial endotherms; however, comparable adaptations in aquatic ectotherms, such as fishes, have not been as extensi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insect outbreak shifts the direction of selection from fast to slow growth rates in the long-lived conifer Pinus ponderosa [Evolution]Long generation times limit species’ rapid evolution to changing environments. Trees provide critical global ecosystem services, but are under increasing risk of mortality because of climate change-mediated disturbances, such as insect outbreaks. The extent to which disturbance changes the dynamics and strength of selection is unknown, but has important implications...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolution of immune chemoreceptors into sensors of the outside world [Evolution]Changes in gene expression patterns represent an essential source of evolutionary innovation. A striking case of neofunctionalization is the acquisition of neuronal specificity by immune formyl peptide receptors (Fprs). In mammals, Fprs are expressed by immune cells, where they detect pathogenic and inflammatory chemical cues. In rodents, these receptors are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nonenzymatic gluconeogenesis-like formation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in ice [Evolution]The evolutionary origins of metabolism, in particular the emergence of the sugar phosphates that constitute glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the RNA and DNA backbone, are largely unknown. In cells, a major source of glucose and the large sugar phosphates is gluconeogenesis. This ancient anabolic pathway (re-)builds carbon bonds...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA-PK facilitates piggyBac transposition by promoting paired-end complex formation [Genetics]The involvement of host factors is critical to our understanding of underlying mechanisms of transposition and the applications of transposon-based technologies. Modified piggyBac (PB) is one of the most potent transposon systems in mammals. However, varying transposition efficiencies of PB among different cell lines have restricted its application. We discovered...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA methylation markers for diagnosis and prognosis of common cancers [Medical Sciences]The ability to identify a specific cancer using minimally invasive biopsy holds great promise for improving the diagnosis, treatment selection, and prediction of prognosis in cancer. Using whole-genome methylation data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and machine learning methods, we evaluated the utility of DNA methylation for differentiating tumor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Small mitochondrial Arf (smArf) protein corrects p53-independent developmental defects of Arf tumor suppressor-deficient mice [Medical Sciences]The mouse p19Arf (human p14ARF) tumor suppressor protein, encoded in part from an alternative reading frame of the Ink4a (Cdkn2a) gene, inhibits the Mdm2 E3 ubiquitin ligase to activate p53. Arf is not expressed in most normal tissues of young mice but is induced by high thresholds of aberrant hyperproliferative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exploiting the synthetic lethality between terminal respiratory oxidases to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and clear host infection [Microbiology]The recent discovery of small molecules targeting the cytochrome bc1:aa3 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis triggered interest in the terminal respiratory oxidases for antituberculosis drug development. The mycobacterial cytochrome bc1:aa3 consists of a menaquinone:cytochrome c reductase (bc1) and a cytochrome aa3-type oxidase. The clinical-stage drug candidate Q203 interferes with the function of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Simulation of Deepwater Horizon oil plume reveals substrate specialization within a complex community of hydrocarbon degraders [Microbiology]The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident released an estimated 4.1 million barrels of oil and 1010 mol of natural gas into the Gulf of Mexico, forming deep-sea plumes of dispersed oil droplets and dissolved gases that were largely degraded by bacteria. During the course of this 3-mo disaster a series of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Glutamate transporter GLAST controls synaptic wrapping by Bergmann glia and ensures proper wiring of Purkinje cells [Neuroscience]Astrocytes regulate synaptic transmission through controlling neurotransmitter concentrations around synapses. Little is known, however, about their roles in neural circuit development. Here we report that Bergmann glia (BG), specialized cerebellar astrocytes that thoroughly enwrap Purkinje cells (PCs), are essential for synaptic organization in PCs through the action of the l-glutamate/l-aspartat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Local auxin production underlies a spatially restricted neighbor-detection response in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Competition for light triggers numerous developmental adaptations known as the “shade-avoidance syndrome” (SAS). Important molecular events underlying specific SAS responses have been identified. However, in natural environments light is often heterogeneous, and it is currently unknown how shading affecting part of a plant leads to local responses. To study this...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neighbor detection at the leaf tip adaptively regulates upward leaf movement through spatial auxin dynamics [Plant Biology]Vegetation stands have a heterogeneous distribution of light quality, including the red/far-red light ratio (R/FR) that informs plants about proximity of neighbors. Adequate responses to changes in R/FR are important for competitive success. How the detection and response to R/FR are spatially linked and how this spatial coordination between detection...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pathogen exploitation of an abscisic acid- and jasmonate-inducible MAPK phosphatase and its interception by Arabidopsis immunity [Plant Biology]Phytopathogens promote virulence by, for example, exploiting signaling pathways mediated by phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonate (JA). Some plants can counteract pathogen virulence by invoking a potent form of immunity called effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Here, we report that ABA and JA mediate inactivation of the immune-associated MAP...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chimpanzees return favors at a personal cost [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Humans regularly provide others with resources at a personal cost to themselves. Chimpanzees engage in some cooperative behaviors in the wild as well, but their motivational underpinnings are unclear. In three experiments, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) always chose between an option delivering food both to themselves and a partner and one...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Emotion shapes the diffusion of moralized content in social networks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Political debate concerning moralized issues is increasingly common in online social networks. However, moral psychology has yet to incorporate the study of social networks to investigate processes by which some moral ideas spread more rapidly or broadly than others. Here, we show that the expression of moral emotion is key...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Poor caregiver mental health predicts mortality of patients with neurodegenerative disease [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases cause profound declines in functioning; thus, many patients require caregivers for assistance with daily living. Patients differ greatly in how long they live after disease onset, with the nature and severity of the disease playing an important role. Caregiving can also be extremely stressful, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Free will beliefs predict attitudes toward unethical behavior and criminal punishment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Do free will beliefs influence moral judgments? Answers to this question from theoretical and empirical perspectives are controversial. This study attempted to replicate past research and offer theoretical insights by analyzing World Values Survey data from residents of 46 countries (n = 65,111 persons). Corroborating experimental findings, free will beliefs...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Groundwater declines are linked to changes in Great Plains stream fish assemblages [Sustainability Science]Groundwater pumping for agriculture is a major driver causing declines of global freshwater ecosystems, yet the ecological consequences for stream fish assemblages are rarely quantified. We combined retrospective (1950–2010) and prospective (2011–2060) modeling approaches within a multiscale framework to predict change in Great Plains stream fish assemblages associated with groundwater...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Rodesney et al., Mechanosensing of shear by Pseudomonas aeruginosa leads to increased levels of the cyclic-di-GMP signal initiating biofilm development [Corrections]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Mechanosensing of shear by Pseudomonas aeruginosa leads to increased levels of the cyclic-di-GMP signal initiating biofilm development,” by Christopher A. Rodesney, Brian Roman, Numa Dhamani, Benjamin J. Cooley, Ahmed Touhami, and Vernita D. Gordon, which appeared in issue 23, June 6, 2017, of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Mao et al., Disruption of quercetin metabolism by fungicide affects energy production in honey bees (Apis mellifera) [SI Corrections]AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for “Disruption of quercetin metabolism by fungicide affects energy production in honey bees (Apis mellifera),” by Wenfu Mao, Mary A. Schuler, and May R. Berenbaum, which appeared in issue 10, March 7, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:2538–2543; first published February 13,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Conos et al., Active MLKL triggers the NLRP3 inflammasome in a cell-intrinsic manner [SI Corrections]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction to Supporting Information for “Active MLKL triggers the NLRP3 inflammasome in a cell-intrinsic manner,” by Stephanie A. Conos, Kaiwen W. Chen, Dominic De Nardo, Hideki Hara, Lachlan Whitehead, Gabriel Núñez, Seth L. Masters, James M. Murphy, Kate Schroder, David L. Vaux, Kate E. Lawlor, Lisa M....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Collective action and quid pro quo among chimpanzees Chimpanzees engage in reciprocal cooperation. Chimpanzees are remarkably social primates, grooming reciprocally, fighting in groups, and sharing the spoils of hunts. Yet whether chimpanzees engage in collective action and reciprocal cooperation when doing so exacts a toll remains unclear. Kevin Langergraber et...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Karel Svoboda [QnAs]When Karel Svoboda describes his decades-long efforts to visualize the brain with ever-greater precision, the unmistakable impression is that of a man driven by an insatiable urge to expand the frontiers of technology in the service of science. Since the mid-1990s, when he and his colleagues developed transformative imaging techniques...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Rodolphe Barrangou [QnAs]The past decade in biological research might well be christened the age of CRISPR, a once-curious feature of bacterial genomes that spawned a handy tool for editing genes. Using CRISPR-based tools, researchers are making leaps in basic clinical research, and biotechnology companies are racing to launch trials of gene therapies...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Raymond J. Deshaies [Profile]Protein homeostasis is crucial to the health of living cells, and dysregulated protein homeostasis can trigger diseases, including cancer. Biochemical cell biologist Raymond Deshaies has devoted his distinguished career to the analysis of protein homeostasis and the development of therapeutic approaches to counter diseases that result when homeostasis goes awry....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Xiang-Jin Meng [Profile]Trained in both human medical and veterinary sciences, Xiang-Jin Meng has made numerous contributions to the field of comparative viral pathogenesis. His achievements concerning emerging, reemerging, and zoonotic viral diseases include the discovery of swine and avian hepatitis E viruses (HEV) and the invention of a commercial vaccine against porcine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Getting a charge out of hybrid perovskites [Applied Physical Sciences]Until now, metal–organic hybrid perovskites (MOHPs) have been known mainly for their remarkable electronic (1–3) and optical properties, generating immense interest worldwide and offering the potential to realize the goal of highly efficient and inexpensive solar power conversion (1, 4, 5) as well as a wide variety of other optoelectronic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tracking LINE1 retrotransposition in the germline [Genetics]Nearly half of the mammalian genome is occupied by repetitive transposon elements, including long-interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs), short-interspersed nuclear elements, and long terminal repeat retrotransposons. The ability of these transposable elements to propagate and insert randomly throughout the genome plays an important role in genome evolution (1). However, as transposon-mediated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Economics and computer science of a radio spectrum reallocation [Economic Sciences]The recent “incentive auction” of the US Federal Communications Commission was the first auction to reallocate radio frequencies between two different kinds of uses: from broadcast television to wireless Internet access. The design challenge was not just to choose market rules to govern a fixed set of potential trades but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
News Feature: Special agents offer modeling upgrade [Applied Mathematics]After playing a key role in the fight against Ebola, agent-based models are poised to help decision-makers tackle other disease outbreaks, economic turbulence, and more. When news of West Africa’s Ebola outbreak first appeared in the spring of 2014, “the world wasn’t paying a lot of attention,” says Bryan Lewis....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Optimal multivalent targeting of membranes with many distinct receptors [Applied Physical Sciences]Cells can often be recognized by the concentrations of receptors expressed on their surface. For better (targeted drug treatment) or worse (targeted infection by pathogens), it is clearly important to be able to target cells selectively. A good targeting strategy would result in strong binding to cells with the desired...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Confined in-fiber solidification and structural control of silicon and silicon-germanium microparticles [Applied Physical Sciences]Crystallization of microdroplets of molten alloys could, in principle, present a number of possible morphological outcomes, depending on the symmetry of the propagating solidification front and its velocity, such as axial or spherically symmetric species segregation. However, because of thermal or constitutional supercooling, resulting droplets often only display dendritic morphologies....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Photoacoustic trace detection of gases at the parts-per-quadrillion level with a moving optical grating [Applied Physical Sciences]The amplitude of the photoacoustic effect for an optical source moving at the sound speed in a one-dimensional geometry increases linearly in time without bound in the linear acoustic regime. Here, use of this principle is described for trace detection of gases, using two frequency-shifted beams from a CO2 laser...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-speed acoustic communication by multiplexing orbital angular momentum [Applied Physical Sciences]Long-range acoustic communication is crucial to underwater applications such as collection of scientific data from benthic stations, ocean geology, and remote control of off-shore industrial activities. However, the transmission rate of acoustic communication is always limited by the narrow-frequency bandwidth of the acoustic waves because of the large attenuation for...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Traces of surfactants can severely limit the drag reduction of superhydrophobic surfaces [Applied Physical Sciences]Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have the potential to achieve large drag reduction for internal and external flow applications. However, experiments have shown inconsistent results, with many studies reporting significantly reduced performance. Recently, it has been proposed that surfactants, ubiquitous in flow applications, could be responsible by creating adverse Marangoni stresses. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CRISPR-Cas9 conformational activation as elucidated from enhanced molecular simulations [Biochemistry]CRISPR-Cas9 has become a facile genome editing technology, yet the structural and mechanistic features underlying its function are unclear. Here, we perform extensive molecular simulations in an enhanced sampling regime, using a Gaussian-accelerated molecular dynamics (GaMD) methodology, which probes displacements over hundreds of microseconds to milliseconds, to reveal the conformational...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstruction from limited single-particle diffraction data via simultaneous determination of state, orientation, intensity, and phase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Free-electron lasers now have the ability to collect X-ray diffraction patterns from individual molecules; however, each sample is delivered at unknown orientation and may be in one of several conformational states, each with a different molecular structure. Hit rates are often low, typically around 0.1%, limiting the number of useful...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA cytoskeleton for stabilizing artificial cells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cell-sized liposomes and droplets coated with lipid layers have been used as platforms for understanding live cells, constructing artificial cells, and implementing functional biomedical tools such as biosensing platforms and drug delivery systems. However, these systems are very fragile, which results from the absence of cytoskeletons in these systems. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Theory of long binding events in single-molecule-controlled rotation experiments on F1-ATPase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The theory of elastic group transfer for the binding and release rate constants for nucleotides in F1-ATPase as a function of the rotor angle is further extended in several respects. (i) A method is described for predicting the experimentally observed lifetime distribution of long binding events in the controlled rotation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spatially resolved multicolor CsPbX3 nanowire heterojunctions via anion exchange [Chemistry]Halide perovskites are promising semiconductor materials for solution-processed optoelectronic devices. Their strong ionic bonding nature results in highly dynamic crystal lattices, inherently allowing rapid ion exchange at the solid–vapor and solid–liquid interface. Here, we show that the anion-exchange chemistry can be precisely controlled in single-crystalline halide perovskite nanomaterials wh
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detergent-induced self-assembly and controllable photosensitizer activity of diester phenylene ethynylenes [Chemistry]Photodynamic therapy, in which malignant tissue is killed by targeted light exposure following administration of a photosensitizer, can be a valuable treatment modality but currently relies on passive transport and local irradiation to avoid off-target oxidation. We present a system of excited-state control for truly local delivery of singlet oxygen....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Demotivating incentives and motivation crowding out in charitable giving [Economic Sciences]Research has shown that extrinsic incentives can crowd out intrinsic motivation in many contexts. Despite this, many nonprofits offer conditional thank-you gifts, such as mugs or tote bags, in exchange for donations. In collaboration with a nonprofit, this study implements a direct mail field experiment and demonstrates that thank-you gifts...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Microfluidic guillotine for single-cell wound repair studies [Engineering]Wound repair is a key feature distinguishing living from nonliving matter. Single cells are increasingly recognized to be capable of healing wounds. The lack of reproducible, high-throughput wounding methods has hindered single-cell wound repair studies. This work describes a microfluidic guillotine for bisecting single Stentor coeruleus cells in a continuous-flow...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Force generation by groups of migrating bacteria [Microbiology]From colony formation in bacteria to wound healing and embryonic development in multicellular organisms, groups of living cells must often move collectively. Although considerable study has probed the biophysical mechanisms of how eukaryotic cells generate forces during migration, little such study has been devoted to bacteria, in particular with regard...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Local thermal energy as a structural indicator in glasses [Physics]Identifying heterogeneous structures in glasses—such as localized soft spots—and understanding structure–dynamics relations in these systems remain major scientific challenges. Here, we derive an exact expression for the local thermal energy of interacting particles (the mean local potential energy change caused by thermal fluctuations) in glassy systems by a systematic low-temperature...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Zero-field magnetic response functions in Landau levels [Physics]We present a fresh perspective on the Landau level quantization rule; that is, by successively including zero-field magnetic response functions at zero temperature, such as zero-field magnetization and susceptibility, the Onsager’s rule can be corrected order by order. Such a perspective is further reinterpreted as a quantization of the semiclassical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early phonology revealed by international adoptees' birth language retention [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Until at least 6 mo of age, infants show good discrimination for familiar phonetic contrasts (i.e., those heard in the environmental language) and contrasts that are unfamiliar. Adult-like discrimination (significantly worse for nonnative than for native contrasts) appears only later, by 9–10 mo. This has been interpreted as indicating that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure-based control of complex networks with nonlinear dynamics [Systems Biology]What can we learn about controlling a system solely from its underlying network structure? Here we adapt a recently developed framework for control of networks governed by a broad class of nonlinear dynamics that includes the major dynamic models of biological, technological, and social processes. This feedback-based framework provides realizable...
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Scientific American Content: Global
Tactile Traffic Maps Could Help Blind Pedestrians NavigateThe technology is currently being tested at a busy intersection in New York City -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How dragon blood could save your life (video)Chemists have found potential drugs and other really useful compounds in some truly bizarre places in nature. From a natural immune defense in the blood of komodo dragons, to a sponge armed with resilience to bacterial infection, to a 400-million-year-old medical workhorse, check out the latest Reactions video to find out how these exotic creatures just might save your life someday: https://youtu.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neural stem cells steered by electric fields in rat brainElectric fields can be used to guide neural stem cells transplanted into the brain towards a specific location. The research, published July 11 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, opens possibilities for effectively guiding stem cells to repair brain damage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intervention associated with reduced disrespect and abuse during childbirth in TanzaniaAn intervention aimed at community and healthcare facility stakeholders was associated with a reduction in the prevalence of disrespect and abuse seen during childbirth in Tanzania, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Stephanie Kujawski from Columbia University, USA, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High burden of traumatic brain injuries in the EU and ChinaTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health threat contributing to mortality and morbidity around the world, according to two studies published in PLOS Medicine that quantify the burden of TBI on the populations of Europe and China, respectively.
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The Atlantic
Tillerson Calls Qatar's Position in Dispute With Arab States 'Very Reasonable' U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met Tuesday with Qatari officials as he continued his tour of the region in an attempt to help defuse the monthlong rift between Qatar and its Arab neighbors. “I think Qatar has been quite clear in its positions, and I think those have been very reasonable,” Tillerson said Tuesday. On Monday, Tillerson and Mark Sedwill, the British national-security adviser,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: How dragon blood could save your lifeChemists have found potential drugs and other really useful compounds in some truly bizarre places in nature.
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Ars Technica
Microsoft wants all of rural America to get high-speed broadband Enlarge / Illustration of a white spaces network. (credit: Microsoft ) Microsoft wants to connect two million rural Americans to high-speed wireless broadband by 2022, and it will get started with 12 pilot projects over the next year. The company is also offering free access to its intellectual property to help the rest of rural America get connected. Microsoft isn't planning to become an Interne
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Gizmodo
Now That Spider-Man's a Part of Marvel's Cinematic Universe, He Needs His Own Team Marvel Over the weekend, Spider-Man: Homecoming became Sony’s second-largest opening ever, pulling in an impressive $117 million and being on track to ultimately make $300 million at the domestic box office alone. With that financial win in its pocket, Sony finally has to feel confident again about Spidey’s cinematic future. But as much as audiences have responded positively to Tom Holland’s perf
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Squeezing innovation out of the NASA Twins study: Pipetting and cell isolation in spaceJust like early explorers, NASA Twins Study investigators are venturing into new territory. Conducting human omics research on twin astronauts as part of the One Year Mission that took place aboard the International Space Station is one such venture. As technology evolves so does the research. NASA is evaluating more efficient and innovative research techniques to prepare for the journey to Mars.
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Wired
On Prime Day, These Are the Humans Making Amazon Work Like MagicEach brown Amazon package passes through many hands before landing at your door.
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NYT > Science
U.K. Orders New Inquiry Into Contaminated-Blood ScandalPrevious inquests into the tragedy, which killed at least 2,400 people, have left critical questions unanswered.
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NYT > Science
Postolowo Journal: In Poland, a Battle for the Fate of Europe’s Last Ancient ForestEnvironmentalists are fighting to prevent logging in Bialowieza forest, a Unesco world heritage site, but the Polish government has dismissed their concerns.
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Gizmodo
Logitech's Tricked Out MX Master Mouse Is Down to $60 for Prime Day The successor to one of the most popular mice ever made is within a few cents of its lowest price ever , while supplies last. The Logitech MX Master Mouse comes with all the accoutrements you’d expect form a high end mouse—namely a rechargeable battery, adjustable DPI, and a dark field laser that works on glass—and a few that you wouldn’t, like a side thumb wheel for horizontal navigation and ges
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Gizmodo
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets Is Undeniably Gorgeous, But Not Much Else Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) in Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets. All Images: STX It’s rare that a modern scifi movie shows you something you’ve truly never seen before, but that happens a lot in Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets. There’s innovative action, wondrous landscapes, creepy aliens, awesome weapons and technology, all of which
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Squeezing innovation out of the NASA Twins study: Pipetting and cell isolation in spaceNASA is evaluating more efficient research techniques to prepare for the journey to Mars. Innovative thinking could improve the way biological samples are processed and transported from space back to research labs on Earth for future studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even droplets sometimes take the stairsSometimes, liquid drops don't drop. Instead, they climb. Using computer simulations, researchers have now shown how to induce droplets to climb stairs all by themselves. This stair-climbing behavior could be useful in everything from water treatment and new lab-on-a-chip microfluidic devices, to biochemical processing and medical diagnostic tools. The researchers describe their findings this week
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The Atlantic
But His Emails! Nothing like a presidential scandal to turn something utterly mundane into a national obsession. But here we are, once again, talking about emails. The emails. Oh, the emails! During the 2016 presidential campaign, email became a symbol of Hillary Clinton’s alleged corruption. Clinton’s aides wiped about 33,000 emails from a private server she used during her time as secretary of state, and Donal
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Ars Technica
Two energy powerhouses join together to make big, grid-tied batteries Enlarge / An aerial view of the new batteries on SDG&E's grid. (credit: SDG&E ) Two large energy companies, Siemens and AES Corporation, are joining together to start a new company aimed exclusively at building utility-grade batteries. The company, called Fluence , will market these large lithium-ion storage systems to utilities and energy providers around the world. The news follows reports from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even droplets sometimes take the stairsSometimes, liquid drops don't drop. Instead, they climb. Using computer simulations, researchers have now shown how to induce droplets to climb stairs all by themselves.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Here's Why Mosquitoes Are So Good At Transmitting Diseases When a mosquito bites a human carrying a virus, the mosquito becomes infected and its saliva now carries the virus. When it bites its next victim, the virus spreads to the next person. Full special streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/mosquito/ Learn more: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mosquito Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Faceboo
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Gizmodo
Free Speech Fans Sue Donald Trump for Blocking Them on Twitter Photo: Getty Suing people isn’t easy. Suing the President of the United States of America, however, is huge pain in the ass. But that hasn’t stopped a group of Twitter users from filing suit against Donald Trump . These free speech advocates were all blocked by Trump after tweeting things he didn’t like. Now they’re claiming this violated their First Amendment rights. It might not be as crazy as
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Live Science
The 'Chickens From Hell' Were Probably Good ParentsAnalysis of dinosaur fossils showed that some parents warmed their eggs with body heat.
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Gizmodo
What You Need to Know About the Net Neutrality 'Day of Action' [Updated] GIF GIF Source: Fight for the Future Why aren’t the images loading? Why is Orange is the New Black buffering? What is going on? On Wednesday, your web browsing experience may feel a whole lot different. Some of your favorite websites may appear to be broken and a lot of people will be talking about net neutrality. Here’s a rundown of what this “ Day of Action ” is all about. What Is Net Neutralit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
News laser design offers more inexpensive multi-color outputFrom checkout counters at supermarkets to light shows at concerts, lasers are everywhere, and they're a much more efficient light source than incandescent bulbs. But they're not cheap to produce.
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The Atlantic
Where Donald Trump Jr. Is Still Loved Donald Trump Jr.’s bombshell disclosure of emails arranging a meeting with a Russian lawyer during the campaign has intensified scrutiny of Russian efforts to aid his father during the 2016 election. But the incident also calls attention to Trump Jr.’s position within Trump world as a bridge to the fringe elements of Trump’s support, and someone in the inner circle who is plugged into alternative
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Ars Technica
Twitter users blocked by Trump sue, claim @realDonaldTrump is public forum Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images) A handful of Twitter users, backed by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, sued President Donald Trump on Tuesday, claiming their constitutional rights are being violated because the president has blocked them from his @realDonaldTrump handle. The suit claims that Trump's Twitter feed is a public forum and an official voice of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging reveals how well PTSD patients will respond to psychotherapy, researchers findA pair of studies led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine demonstrates that scientists can predict, with a high degree of accuracy, which patients with post-traumatic stress disorder will respond to a method of psychotherapy often used to treat the condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at UIC identify master molecule behind corneal inflammationResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified an enzyme present in the cornea that becomes dramatically upregulated and triggers inflammation during and even after a herpes virus infection has cleared.
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Quanta Magazine
Pentagon Tiling Proof Solves Century-Old Math Problem One of the oldest problems in geometry asks which shapes tile the plane, locking together with copies of themselves to cover a flat area in an endless pattern called a tessellation. M.C. Escher’s drawings of tessellating lizards and other creatures illustrate that an unlimited variety of shapes can do this. The inventorying reduces to a finite, though still formidable, task when mathematicians co
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Big Think
The Surprising Truth About Couples Who Drink Together A new study suggests that older couples may help their marriages by drinking together. Read More
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Big Think
AI Can See America's Wealth Inequality From Space Just by looking at satellite images, AI can predict your income bracket, and tell us what wealth and poverty look like from space. Read More
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Ars Technica
Intel launches its new precious metal Xeon platform Enlarge / That weird tab at the bottom is the Omni-Path Fabric interconnect. (credit: Intel) NEW YORK—At a trendy entrepreneurial workspace in Brooklyn, Intel formally launched a new range of Xeon processors powered by its new Skylake-SP core . The new processors offer more cores and more performance than their predecessors, with a new mesh-based design to enable greater scaling within their mult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
News laser design offers more inexpensive multi-color outputA new Northwestern University study has engineered a more cost-effective laser design that outputs multi-color lasing and offers a step forward in chip-based lasers and miniaturization. The findings could allow encrypted, encoded, redundant and faster information flow in optical fibers, as well as multi-color medical imaging of diseased tissue in real time.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Audi’s New A8 May Drive Itself, But Owners Should Proceed with CautionEven with laser sensors and safety measures in place, the car will still be susceptible to unpredictable events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's major 'mass extinction' eventsMost scientists agree that a "mass extinction" event is underway with the Earth's wildlife disappearing at an alarming rate, mainly due to human activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab makes changes in wake of botched nuclear shipmentsLos Alamos National Laboratory is making changes in the wake of last month's improper shipment of radioactive material to two other research facilities in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Ancient Brews' reveals tasty history of alcohol"Ancient Brews: Rediscovered & Re-created" (W.W. Norton & Co.), by Patrick E. McGovern
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Academic motivation suffers when economic mobility seems out of reachNew studies from Northwestern University show that high school and college students from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds are much less motivated to overcome academic hardships when they have doubts about the likelihood of people from their backgrounds achieving upward mobility.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers to develop new gene-editing method for the study of arthropodsA grant from the National Science Foundation will enable a Penn State-led team of entomologists to develop and disseminate a technology they say could bring gene-editing capabilities within reach of everyday scientists, regardless of the arthropod species they study.
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The Atlantic
‘These Emails Are Very Explosive’ Updated on July 11, 2017 at 5:28 p.m. As public attention over Russian involvement in the 2016 United States presidential election increasingly focuses on President Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., Republicans and Democrats in Congress are expressing alarm. Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday that a chain of email correspondence released by Trump Jr. earlier in the day mark “the
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The Atlantic
How to Know If the Republican Health-Care Bill Is Dead Updated on July 11 at 2:54 p.m. ET Senate Republican leaders have a new plan to pass the health-care bill their members scuttled late last month: They’ll unveil a revised bill this Thursday, receive an updated analysis from the Congressional Budget Office on Monday, and then rush the proposal across the floor before its critics have a chance to defeat it. “We’re going to do health care next week,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Big Muddy' Missouri river needs a planAs the Missouri River flows across the Great Plains to where it meets the Mississippi River at St. Louis, it accumulates such a large sediment load that it has earned the nickname "Big Muddy." A recent University of Illinois study looks at the history of the river, damages and changes from the 2011 flood, and its current post-flood condition. The study concludes that the river needs a comprehensiv
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