Scientific American Content: Global
Novel Gene Therapy for Leukemia Clears FDA PanelThe experimental treatment will now face review by the agency -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
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4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart atomic cloud solves Heisenberg's observation problemScientists at the University of Copenhagen have developed a hands-on answer to a challenge linked to Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. The researchers used laser light to link caesium atoms and a vibrating membrane. The research, the first of its kind, points to sensors capable of measuring movement with unseen precision.
3h

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Gizmodo
Watch a 37,000-Pound Earth Mover Dance on Two Wheels GIF It’s amazing what kind of useless skills you can teach yourself while you’re bored at work. But twirling pens on your fingers or mastering Solitaire aren’t nearly as impressive as driving an 18-ton front-end loader on two wheels while making the gigantic machine twerk. This video comes from what looks like some kind of heavy machinery trade show. If you’ve ever been to an event like that, you
10min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micromotors are powered by bacteria, controlled by light(Phys.org)—When researchers deposit a drop of fluid containing thousands of free-swimming, genetically engineered E. coli onto an array of micromotors, within minutes the micromotors begin rotating. Some of the individual bacteria have swum head-first into one of the 15 microchambers etched on the outer edge of each micromotor, and with their flagella protruding outside the microchambers, together
10min
Futurity.org
These factors predict corporal punishment in U.S. schools The average education level in a school’s county and the number of Southern natives living there most influence US public schools to use corporal punishment, new research suggests. “Since research on school corporal punishment is so limited, our results are vital…” Sarah Font, a faculty member of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network and assistant professor of sociology at Penn State, found th
11min
Futurity.org
These wasps ‘recycle’ genes to make new venom Jewel wasps and their venom reveal new information about how genes change their function. A common view is that genes duplicate, with one of the copies picking up a new function while the other copy continues to function as before. The parasitic jewel wasps and their rapidly changing venom repertoires suggest otherwise, say researchers. What they’ve uncovered may be widespread in other species as
11min
Ars Technica
NASA finally admits it doesn’t have the funding to land humans on Mars Enlarge / NASA's chief of human spaceflight, Bill Gerstenmaier, speaks at the Humans to Mars summit in 2015. (credit: NASA) For the last five years or so, NASA has sold the public on a Journey to Mars , a grand voyage by which the agency will land humans on the red planet during the 2030s. With just budgetary increases for inflation, the agency said, it had the resources for humanity's next great
12min
The Atlantic
Lady Macbeth Is a Brilliant, Macabre Period Drama It’s best to know as little as possible about Lady Macbeth going in. It took me utterly by surprise—a costume drama unafraid of exploring the oppression and brutality at the heart of its genre, featuring a star turn from a largely unknown actress. Though filled with compassion for its heroine, the film is nonetheless deeply macabre, methodically building up to every menacing story twist and yet m
13min
Live Science
Space Images Reveal Speed of New Island's GrowthA new island in North Carolina popped up seemingly overnight.
16min
The Scientist RSS
Light Scattering Varies Among CoralsA new study reports which types of corals make the most of the sunlight they receive.
18min
The Scientist RSS
FDA Votes Yes on CAR T-Cell TherapyA Food and Drug Administration advisory panel unanimously calls for agency approval of the cell therapy for the treatment of resistant leukemia.
18min
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Wounded CoralCertain corals in the Gulf of Mexico were devastated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill's reverberating destruction.
18min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children conceived using donor sperm have similar health to general populationChildren conceived using donor sperm have similar health and well-being to the general population, according to a study published in Reproductive BioMedicine Online.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change could mean more weight restrictions and higher costs for airlinesAs air temperatures rise at constant pressure, the density of air declines and this makes it harder for an airplane to take off. Increased air temperatures due to climate change could therefore present a new challenge for the aviation industry. This is according to Ethan Coffel of Columbia University in the US, lead author of a study in Climatic Change Letters which is a section in Springer's jour
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting to the roots of Sahara mustard invasion in the American SouthwestOld World Sahara mustard is spreading rapidly through southwestern US deserts, smothering the native wildflowers that draw tourists to the region and disrupting the desert ecosystem. David Winkler is investigating whence the invasion originated and what enabled Sahara mustard to adapt so successfully, to gain insight into how to stop it. He will report his findings at the Ecological Society of Ame
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping invasive alien species of Union concernThe first ever Baseline Distribution of Invasive Alien Species of Union concern has been published by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. The 37 invasive alien species covered by this report have been prioritized as species that need to be addressed at the level of the EU territory.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New material resembling a metal nanosponge could reduce computer energy consumptionResearchers from the UAB, in collaboration with the ICN2, have developed a nanoporous material based on a copper and nickel alloy, with a structure similar to that of a sponge with pores measuring the size of a millionth of a millimeter, which allows handling and storing information using very little energy. These nanosponges could be the base of new magnetic memories for computers and mobile phon
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nickel is crucial for the Earth's magnetic fieldThe earth's hot core, consisting mainly of iron, is responsible for the 'dynamo effect,' which creates a magnetic field. But with iron alone, this effect cannot be explained. A team of researchers has shown that the theory of the geodynamo has to be revised. It is crucial for the dynamo effect that the earth's core contains up to 20 percent nickel -- a metal, which under extreme conditions behaves
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why a single nuke's impact shouldn't only be measured in megatonsNew calculations by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers show that even a limited nuclear strike could cause devastating climate change, resulting in widespread drought and famine that could cost a billion lives.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nagoya medical researchers propose new disease category of skin disordersNagoya University dermatologists define new category of skin diseases based on autoinflammation with a genetic root.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fungi can be used as biomonitors for assessing radioactivity in our environmentThe Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the UEx has carried out a study to quantify radioactive presence in fungi. According to the research, this quantification is made using transfer coefficients that compare the radioactive content in the receptor compartment (fungi) of the radioactive contamination, to that existing in the transmitter compartment (soil). From the study, we may conclude t
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover novel treatment target for pulmonary fibrosisScientists have demonstrated that a unique population of immune cells plays a key role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, and showed that targeting such cells could lead to new treatments for the disease. The findings have important implications for the development of future therapies, especially given that targeting such cells may lead to fewer adverse effects.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Material resembling a metal nanosponge could reduce computer energy consumption to minimumsResearchers from the UAB, in collaboration with the ICN2, have developed a nanoporous material based on a copper and nickel alloy, with a structure similar to that of a sponge with pores measuring the size of a millionth of a millimetre, which allows handling and storing information using very little energy. These nanosponges could be the base of new magnetic memories for computers and mobile phon
22min
Gizmodo
Has Jessica Jones Cast a Classic Daredevil Villain? Ant-Man and the Wasp might be on the lookout for another size-changing superhero. Woody Harrelson reassures people about Ron Howard’s vision for the Han Solo movie. Flash set pictures reveal a big costume change for Wally West and a deep DC cut. Plus, new footage from War for the Planet of the Apes . Behold, Spoilers! Ant-Man & The Wasp That Hashtag Show reports Marvel is looking to hire an “Afri
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optimizing hydrogen-powered passenger ferriesMaritime transportation has emerged as one solution to the traffic gridlock that plagues coastal cities. But with urban passenger ferries operating in sensitive environments and tourist areas, hydrogen fuel cell-powered passenger ferries offer a quiet, zero-emission alternative to conventional diesel vessels.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moon Express reveals plans for private exploration of the moon(Phys.org)—Private company Moon Express has announced via its website its plans for exploring the moon—plans that include sending three craft to the moon over the next three years. Officials with the company have also been speaking with the press regarding their ambitions.
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are Australia's native pigeons sitting ducks?Andrew Peters, Charles Sturt University
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why Japan's coastal zones might be disappearing due to climate changeClimate change can cause a range of effects on coastal environments, such as a decrease in sediment supply, changes in the intensity and frequency of extreme events, and changes in sea levels and wave climate. The estimation of changes due to climate change is a major issue for future coastal management decisions. Keiko Udo and Yuriko Takeda project beach losses in 77 coastal zones throughout Japa
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elderly yoginis have greater cortical thicknessScientists in Brazil have imaged elderly female yoga practitioners' brains and found they have greater cortical thickness in the left prefrontal cortex, in brain areas associated with cognitive functions like attention and memory. The results suggest that yoga could be a way to protect against cognitive decline in old age.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chillier winters, smaller beaksResearchers find that cold winters contributed to the evolution of beak size in Australasian songbirds.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Firearm-safety class rates in US little changed in 20 yearsInformation from nearly 4,000 US residents indicates that only 61 percent of all gun owners and 14 percent of non-owners who live with a firearm owner have received any formal gun training, percentages largely unchanged since 1994, according to a study from the University of Washington.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Registry identifies early onset of heart failure and lack of defibrillators in AsiaFor the first time this year a late breaking clinical trials session will be held at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology (APSC) Congress to highlight world-class research coming out of the region.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dignity Health St. Joseph's researchers discover indicator of lung transplant rejectionThe featured research unveils that monitoring of transcription factor Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 7A (ZBTB7A) can be an early predictor of chronic rejection after lung transplant.
42min
Science : NPR
No Offense, American Bees, But Your Sperm Isn't Cutting It U.S. bees are in trouble, and one of the major threats is a deadly parasite called varroa mite. So researchers are importing sperm from European bees resistant to mites to toughen up America's stock. (Image credit: Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University)
43min
Scientific American Content: Global
Fuzzy Fibers Could Help Rockets Take the HeatThe Velcro-like threads could help tomorrow’s spacecraft engines reach Mars or beyond -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
44min
Ars Technica
Asus ROG GX800VH review: A ludicrous liquid-cooled $6,000-plus laptop Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) The Asus ROG GX800VH, a liquid cooled monstrosity of a gaming laptop, is one of those things that, like 4K phones or the Apple Watch , is wholly unnecessary yet awfully desirable. Beneath its fully mechanical, RBG-lit keyboard is Intel's top-of-the-line mobile i7-7820HK processor, which is based on the same Kaby Lake architecture as the i7-7700K and is similarly over
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong to be sold at auctionMoon dust collected by Neil Armstrong during the first lunar landing is being sold at a New York auction.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tributes to wetter times on MarsA dried-out river valley with numerous tributaries is seen in this recent view of the Red Planet captured by ESA's Mars Express.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How selenium compounds might become catalystsChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have tested a new approach for activating chemical reactions based on the element selenium. They demonstrated that selenium can form bonds similar to those of hydrogen bonds, resulting in accelerated reactions. The exact mechanism is described by the team at the Chair of Organic Chemistry 1 in Bochum, including Prof Dr Stefan Huber and Patrick Wonner, in the jou
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests route to improving rechargeable lithium batteriesMost of today's lithium-ion batteries, which power everything from cars to phones, use a liquid as the electrolyte between two electrodes. Using a solid electrolyte instead could offer major advantages for both safety and energy storage capacity, but attempts to do this have faced unexpected challenges.
46min
NYT > Science
Whale Strikes and Kills Canadian Rescuer After He Helps Free ItAfter Joe Howlett helped untangle a whale from fishing lines off the coast of New Brunswick, it made a “big flip” and fatally injured him, an official said.
46min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Shark Bloopers | Shark Week #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Proof that even sharks have a bad day. Stream Full Episodes Now on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery htt
46min
New Scientist - News
Women with worse endometriosis pain have more fertility problemsAlthough around 10 per cent of women have endometriosis, little is known about the condition. Now severe pain has been linked to increased infertility
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Antarctic explorer and polar biologist discusses one of history's largest iceberg breaksUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham polar biologist and Antarctic explorer, Jim McClintock, Ph.D., provided advance insight into the Larsen C ice shelf break that occurred sometime between Monday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 12.
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's in the forecast and how do we know?Here's what the global temperature and rainfall conditions for the rest of this year are expected to be. The Earth Institute's International Research Institute for Climate and Society's (IRI) probabilistic outlooks for temperature and precipitation are updated monthly for six months into the future. The forecasts call for warmer than normal temperatures for portions of Africa, Australia, South Ame
52min
Gizmodo
How to Put Together the Perfect In-Car Setup for Your Phone Image: Google When you’re on the road, your phone can be the perfect companion—as long as you’ve got it set up right. Here we’ll explain everything you need to know about the hardware and the apps you can install to get a sweet and safe in-car system up and running, powered by your phone. You’ve got a ton of flexibility here too, so if you don’t agree with any of our recommendations then by all m
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic cousins team up in early quantum networking nodeLarge-scale quantum computers, which are an active pursuit of many university labs and tech giants, remain years away. But that hasn't stopped some scientists from thinking ahead, to a time when quantum computers might be linked together in a network or a single quantum computer might be split up across many interconnected nodes.
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seedlings face uphill battle with climate changeScientists found that certain species of trees will not rapidly advance uphill as global temperatures rise. In other words, subalpine forests will not follow the climate up the mountain. Using field experiments in the Rocky Mountains, scientists tested how two types of emerging tree seedlings responded to artificial warming and watering at three locations. They found that Engelmann spruce may not
58min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASTRO updates insurance coverage recommendations for proton therapyThe American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has issued an update to its recommendations for medical insurance coverage regarding the use of proton beam therapy to treat cancer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using self-assembly, scientists are coaxing nanoparticles into making new, customized materialsWhen you bring a box home from the furniture store, you don't expect the screws, slats, and other pieces to magically converge into a bed or table. Yet this self-assembly occurs every day in nature. Nothing tells atoms to link together; nothing tells DNA how to form. Living materials contain the very instructions and ability to become a larger whole.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using an electric charge to make tiny fluid droplets look like Saturn(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at Brown University has found that it is possible to induce a drop of fluid to emit smaller droplets in a way that resembles the planet Saturn with its rings. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Quentin Brosseau and Petia Vlahovska describe the path they took to discovering the interesting droplet formations and possible uses for them.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Should Artists Reveal How Much They Let Technology Make Creative Choices?How much should an artist reveal about letting technology make some choices? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
The neuroscience of inequality: does poverty show up in children's brains? There is increasing evidence that growing up poor diminishes the physical development of a child’s brain. A landmark US study is attempting to establish a causal link – and find new ways to help our poorest children With its bright colours, anthropomorphic animal motif and nautical-themed puzzle play mat, Dr Kimberly Noble ’s laboratory at Columbia University in New York looks like your typical d
1h
Popular Science
Bonobo ladies get to choose their mates and boy oh boy are they picky Animals Most males miss out. Bonobos get it on every which way—except with unattractive dudes. Read on.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to cryopreserve fish embryos and bring them back to life (video)Scientists report for the first time the ability to both deep freeze and reanimate zebrafish embryos. The method, appearing in the journal ACS Nano, could potentially be used to bank larger aquatic and other vertebrate oocytes and embryos, too, for a life in the future.
1h
Viden
GRAFIK: Vores transportmidler er mere automatiserede i dag, end man skulle troKlik rundt i grafikken og se hvor automatiserede biler, fly, skibe og toge rent faktisk er i dag.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU hauls Poland to top court over ancient forest loggingThe EU on Thursday took Poland to the bloc's top court over logging in the ancient Bialowieza forest, a UNESCO World Heritage site covering some of Europe's last primeval woodland.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flying cars and no more pilots in flight revolution: AirbusPilotless aircraft, flying electric vehicles and bespoke air cabins are the future of flight, Airbus said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
200 green activists killed in 2016, record toll: watchdogAt least 200 environmental campaigners and protectors—40 percent from indigenous tribes—were murdered around the world in 2016, the deadliest year on record, the watchdog organisation Global Witness said Thursday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cambodia bans overseas exports of coastal sandCambodia has outlawed sand exports from a coastal region where it has been primarily funnelled in huge quantities to Singapore, a move met with scepticism from activists who said previous bans on the destructive industry had failed to take root.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber cedes control in Russian market with Yandex tie-upUber is ceding control of the Russian market by agreeing to merge its ridesharing business in the country and five other ex-Soviet republics with Yandex, the Russian search-engine leader that also runs a popular taxi-booking app.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan flood death toll rises to 30The death toll from heavy rains and flooding in Japan's south has risen to 30, officials said Thursday, while rescue workers continued their efforts to find survivors.
1h
The Atlantic
Trump's Syria Ceasefire Is Doomed On Sunday, the new ceasefire in Syria negotiated between Russia, the United States, and Jordan, appeared to be holding. As is customary, President Donald Trump took to social media to praise the deal. “Now it is time to move forward in working constructively with Russia!” he tweeted. Other members of his administration are less sanguine. In a background briefing on July 7, a senior State Departme
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The Atlantic
What Dog Shootings Reveal About American Policing Last Saturday night, two children accidentally triggered a burglar alarm when returning to their Minneapolis house. Minutes later, a security company deactivated the alarm. Roughly 20 minutes after that, two Minneapolis police officers showed up; one of them chose to go around back and scale a backyard fence to look around. The police officer’s report relates what happened next this way: “Two lar
1h
The Atlantic
Tell Us: What’s the Best Jane Austen Adaptation? “The first rule of Fight Club is: One never mentions Fight Club. No corsets, no hat pins—and no crying.” That’s Lizzie Bennet, dictating to her fellow fighters the rules that govern an improbable collective: Jane Austen’s Fight Club . The club, portrayed in a viral YouTube video first posted in 2012, features a collection of Jane Austen’s most notable heroines (Lizzie, Fanny, Emma, Elinor, Marian
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The Atlantic
Disgraced Ex-FIFA Executive Chuck Blazer Dies Chuck Blazer, the former FIFA executive whose revelations about corruption in soccer’s governing body led to charges against 14 current or former officials, as well as the ouster of Sepp Blatter, the group’s longtime president, has died. He was 72. His death was announced Wednesday by his lawyers. He had been battling cancer. “We are truly saddened by the passing of our client and friend, Chuck B
1h
Gizmodo
In Japan, Nintendo Announces Production For The Smaller New Nintendo 3DS Has Ended [Image: Nintendo ] The official Japanese site for the smaller-sized New Nintendo 3DS clearly states that production of the handheld is over. The text in the little box reads 生産終了 (seisan shuuryou) or “production ended.” This does not only pertain to the pictured model. [Image: Nintendo ] If you click on the Line Up (ラインナップ) tab, it states すべて生産終了しました (subete seisan shuuryou shimashita) or “Produc
1h
Ars Technica
Ars Asks, part two: Electric IT bugbear boogaloo, cloud edition Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) Last time, we asked about the IT threats that keep you up at night, and you answered (and gave us a few nightmares ourselves). Though your reported IT fears varied over a pretty broad range, the things that concern Ars readers the most are unsecured or poorly secured mobile devices leaking company data—not surprising, considering how little control users and
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to cryopreserve fish embryos and bring them back to lifeScientists report for the first time the ability to both deep freeze and reanimate zebrafish embryos. The method, appearing in the journal ACS Nano, could potentially be used to bank larger aquatic and other vertebrate oocytes and embryos, too, for a life in the future.
1h
Wired
Soft Sensors Might Make Wearables Actually WearableSilver-plated fabric sensors could give wearables more of the stretchability and comfort of the best sweatpants.
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Wired
Explore Pingelap Island Through the Eyes of the ColorblindSurrounded by colors, all they see is gray.
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Wired
Hestan Cue Review: A High-Tech Burner and Pan Combo That Practically Cooks for YouThe Hestan Cue guides you through recipes step-by-step, setting your pan to exactly the right temperature.
1h
Science-Based Medicine
Australian review: Get homeopathy out of pharmaciesAn independent review of Australian pharmacy practice has recommended that homeopathic products be kept out of pharmacies.
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Futurity.org
Tweaked plants grow less but handle drought A group of proteins called WRKYs (pronounced ‘workies’) govern both stress response and growth in plants, report researchers. This makes the proteins of particular interest to plant breeders and crop growers eager for varieties that will withstand dry conditions. “They are important regulators for the balance of drought response and growth,” says Yanhai Yin, a professor of genetics, development,
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unraveling the molecular complexity of cellular machines and environmental processesStudying the mixtures formed by molecular machines within cells, or the mixtures found in a groundwater plume demands powerful instruments. Scientists are using one of the world's most powerful 21-Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (21T FTICR MS) to get answers. The instrument is at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy O
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Ingeniøren
Jordboerne kaster sig over billeder af Jupiters røde pletNasas Juno-mission lader hele vores verden lege med råfilerne og selv farvelægge billeder af stormen på solsystemets gasgigant. Du kan også lege med!
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Record number of environmental activists killed around the worldAt least 200 campaigners in 24 countries were killed in 2016, according to a new report from Global Witness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chillier winters, smaller beaksAlthough Charles Darwin lived and worked in the 19th century, modern evolutionary biologists are far from exhausting all avenues of inquiry regarding birds and evolution. For example, in the 1990s, researchers such as Russ Greenberg, ornithologist from the Smithsonian Institution in the United States, began to explore a new question concerning the relationship between climate and the evolution of
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The real reason you can't quit Facebook? Maybe it's because you can judge your friendsFacebook recently announced that it now has over 2 billion monthly users. This makes its "population" larger than that of China, the US, Mexico and Japan combined. Its popularity, and with it the influence it has in society, is beyond dispute. But for many the experience of actually using the site fluctuates somewhere between the addictive and the annoying. Our new research shows that the reason f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tackling disease in three dimensions—supercomputers help decode RNA structureA cure for cancer, HIV and other stubborn diseases has evaded the brightest minds for generations. But with supercomputers – computing systems that can calculate, analyze and visualize extremely large amounts of data – researchers are gaining a leg up in the fight for better treatments and cures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What biological clocks and geological rocks tell us about life in spaceOne of the first geological lessons we learn is that continents are constantly moving. The evidence of these plate tectonic movements is written in the rocks. But the rocks only tell us half of the story. The other half is contained in the evolutionary history of animals.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher studies cross-laminated timber as seismic retrofit toolSafer historic buildings and more jobs for the timber industry are the goals of a partnership between an Oregon State University structural engineering researcher and a newly formed nonprofit group in Corvallis, Oregon.
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Gizmodo
Your Favorite Affordable Bluetooth Speaker Is Back Under $30, Complete with a 24 Hour Battery Anker SoundCore , $27 Anker’s SoundCore blew away the competition to take the title of your favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker, and today, you can pick one up for $27 . That’s a couple bucks more than it was on Prime Day, but otherwise one of the best prices we’ve seen. In addition to solid sound quality and impressive Bluetooth range, the standout feature here is the SoundCore’s 24 hour batte
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Watermelon cultivar wards off soil-borne diseasesSome people love to eat a juicy, seedless watermelon for a tasty, refreshing snack during a hot, Florida summer day. University of Florida scientists have found a way to stave off potential diseases while retaining that flavor.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In space, this is the age of reusabilityBig plans are being made in space.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Bialowieza Forest: Poland sued over ancient woods loggingPolish logging in one of Europe's last remaining primeval forests is to go to the EU's top court.
2h
Wired
AI and ‘Enormous Data’ Could Make Tech Giants Like Google Harder to ToppleA new record-breaking research paper is a reminder that AI could make Google, Facebook, and Amazon more immune to competition.
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Wired
The Uber v. Waymo Court Showdown Looms. Here’s What You Need to KnowNew legal filings reveal new dirt.
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Wired
Remember When Martin Shkreli Bought That Single-Copy Wu-Tang Clan Album?An excerpt from the new book 'Once Upon a Time in Shaolin.'
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Wired
Giant Antarctic Icebergs and Crushing Existential DreadEven if climate change didn’t send Larsen C packing, the air and oceans on Earth are incontrovertibly warmer than they used to be. Could an event like this move a policy needle?
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Does Empathy and Warmth Make a Physician Seem More Competent?New research suggests that in many cases the answer is yes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Ars Technica
Wimbledon 2017: The tech behind the world’s top tennis tournament Sebastian Anthony The Championships at Wimbledon, which consumes some 28 tons of strawberries, 10,000 litres of cream, and 320,000 glasses of Pimm's per year, is notable for its seemingly unchecked luxuriant hedonism. While most companies, organisations, and institutions are looking to cut costs, Wimbledon has stuck to its mantra: Don't do things cheaper; do things better . Case in point: Wimbled
2h
Live Science
In Photos: Tomb Discoveries in the Land of 'Dead Fire'Here's a look at ancient stone tombs, some made of towering, flattened rocks, that have been discovered in a desert in Jordan that is so desolate an explorer once called it the land of "dead fire."
3h
Live Science
Hundreds of Stone Tombs Discovered in Land of 'Dead Fire'Hundreds of ancient stone tombs, some made with towering, flattened rocks, have been discovered in Jebel Qurma, a desert region in Jordan that is so desolate that one early explorer called it a land of "dead fire."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vitamin B7 monitoring device for food and clinical samples analysesDirect detection of vitamin B7 in real sample is possible using the developed immunosensor without the need of sample pre-treatment. The immunosensor not only leads to shorter analysis time but also is a user-friendly approach to the end user.
3h
NYT > Science
Feature: Arks of the ApocalypseAll around the world, scientists are building repositories of everything from seeds to ice to mammal milk — racing to preserve a natural order that is fast disappearing.
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The Atlantic
Cars 3: A Children’s Movie, and a Fable About Mentorship The Disney Pixar franchise Cars launched in 2006, telling the story of Lightning McQueen, a young rookie race car voiced by Owen Wilson who must learn that winning isn't everything. Even so, the franchise itself has done just that, making over $ 8 billion in merchandise alone. While Cars has long used its platform to teach its youngest audience members about the importance of nurturing personal r
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More driving on city streets, less on country roadsDespite a plethora of alternative transportation modes—buses, trains, bicycles—city dwellers are driving more miles than ever, say University of Michigan researchers.
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Live Science
Feline Purr-fection: What Makes a Cat Best of Breed?What are the traits that identify a domestic cat as the best of its breed?
3h
Live Science
Photos: Champion Cats are Show-Stopping StunnersMeet a few of the cats that took home top prizes for the Cat Fanciers Association show season of 2016 and 2017.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is 'ovarian tissue freezing' superior to egg freezing?Many women are turning to egg freezing to promote fertility, but what happens when it isn't an option because of special medical conditions? And, what option is there for women who want to preserve hormonal function, not just fertility? Ovarian tissue freezing can deliver these outcomes but has been considered experimental until now. According to a new study, nearly 4 out of 10 women who undergo t
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Behold Jupiter's Great Red SpotA Nasa probe returns the most detailed pictures ever of one of the Solar System's biggest storms.
3h
Ingeniøren
Mangel på grafikkort og SSD'er presser pc-priser op Det er blevet dyrere at bygge en pc i 2017, blandt andet fordi grafikkort bliver hamstret til at udvinde kryptovaluta. Det mærker både pc-producenterne og gaming-entusiaster. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/grafikkort-hamstring-kryptovalutaer-mangel-paa-ssder-presser-pc-priser-1078353 Emner Processorer Version2
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The end of sneakernet?Not everyone marvels at the speed of the internet.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manager attitudes on flexible work are changeable, researcher findsMany managers are skeptical about the idea of allowing flexible work arrangements for their employees. However, a new study shows that managers develop greater interest in supporting flexible work if they are strategically exposed to its value, and sociologist Stephen Sweet says his findings could give a boost to family-responsive employment practices.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists gain new understanding of quantum cooling processNew research at the U of A is helping physicists better understand optomechanical cooling, a process that is expected to find applications in quantum technology.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Robot meets its mastersSeen at ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands, BepiColombo has completed its final tests in launch configuration, the last time it will be stacked like this before being reassembled at the launch site next year to begin its mission to Mercury.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Desktop CubeSat testA standard satellite needs extensive test facilities to put it through its paces, but a laboratory desktop has been used to simulate this ESA CubeSat's post-deployment activation.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create first low-energy particle accelerator beam underground in the United StatesNuclear astrophysicists successfully created the first low-energy particle accelerator beam deep underground in the United States, bringing them one step closer to understanding how the elements of our universe are built.
3h
The Atlantic
The Troublemaker Many years ago, when his eldest son was still a boy, Donald Trump was interviewed by Barbara Walters, along with his family. Which child, she asked the real-estate mogul, did he consider the troublemaker in the family? Trump didn’t hesitate for a moment. “Don,” he shot back, according to the story Don himself—Donald Trump Jr., now a 39-year-old businessman—loves to tell. Don Jr. told me the story
3h
Science | The Guardian
Grenfell Tower fire survivor, 12, treated for cyanide poisoning Medical papers relating to Luana Gomes raise fears highly toxic hydrogen cyanide gas was released when insulation burned A survivor of the Grenfell Tower fire has been treated for cyanide poisoning, raising fears that the highly toxic gas hydrogen cyanide might have been released by the burning of insulation or plastics during the blaze. Luana Gomes, 12, was diagnosed with smoke inhalation injury
3h
Science | The Guardian
To hell with sympathetic sexism. ‘Busy mums’ don’t need your patronising help | Sian TownsonWe have learned to think critically about obviously biased statements – but against prejudice dressed up as kindness, we are more defenceless • Sian Townson is a lecturer in engineering Sometimes a rule is merely implied by its exceptions – that’s what the exception that proves the rule actually means. “No swimming outside the flags” tells you it’s OK to swim between the flags. “Closed Sundays” me
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chandra peers into a nurturing cloudIn the context of space, the term 'cloud' can mean something rather different from the fluffy white collections of water in the sky or a way to store data or process information. Giant molecular clouds are vast cosmic objects, composed primarily of hydrogen molecules and helium atoms, where new stars and planets are born. These clouds can contain more mass than a million suns, and stretch across h
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New evidence in support of the Planet Nine hypothesisLast year, astronomers announced the existence of an unknown planet in our solar system. However, this hypothesis was subsequently called into question as biases in the observational data were detected. Now, Spanish astronomers have used a novel technique to analyse the orbits of the so-called extreme trans-Neptunian objects and, once again, they report that there is something perturbing them—a pl
3h
Ingeniøren
Daimler mistænkes for sin egen dieselsskandale: Snød med udstødningen fra en million bilerTysk anklager mener, at Daimler benyttede nøjagtigt samme metode som Volkswagen og fik software til at skrue op for NOx-rensningen under test. I den virkelige verden er rensningen kun halvt så effektiv.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surging heat may limit aircraft takeoffs globallyRising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly, the study concludes.
4h
Wired
Thanks, Climate Change: Heat Waves Will Keep on Grounding PlanesForget about rain delays or missing flight crews. Climate change means the real problem for aviation will be heat waves.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Rising temps may mean fewer passengers on airplane flightsGlobal warming could force airplanes to carry a lighter load — and fewer passengers —on each flight.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surging heat may limit aircraft takeoffs globallyRising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly, the study concludes. The study, which is the first such global analysis, appears today i
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop imaging method for measuring glutathione in real timeScientists have developed a fluorescent probe -- they call it RealThiol -- that can measure real-time changes of glutathione concentration in living cells.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals interplay of an African bat, a parasite and a virusA lack of evidence that bats are key reservoirs of human disease has not prevented their vilification or efforts to exterminate bat colonies where threats are presumed to lurk. 'The fact is that they provide important ecosystem services...and we want them around,' says Tony Goldberg, a University of Wisconsin-Madison epidemiologist and virus hunter. 'But bats are also increasingly acknowledged as
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humansScientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technologyWhen it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice -- even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization -- the way that bones a
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK animal experiments fall by 5% - annual figuresHome Office annual figures show that animal experiments in the UK fell by 5% in 2016.
4h
The Atlantic
How Medicaid Cuts Could Exacerbate the Opioid Epidemic When Christie Green took her job three years ago as public-health director for the Cumberland Valley District in southeastern Kentucky, she had nearly two decades of experience in the state’s public-health system. But Green still wasn’t prepared for what she saw when her predecessor took her around this hardscrabble swathe of Appalachia centered on Clay County, which The New York Times once descr
4h
The Atlantic
Why Do Republicans Suddenly Hate College So Much? News flash: In the era of Trump, institutions—and especially those that are perceived as liberal—are unpopular, and opinions divide sharply along party lines, according to a new poll from the Pew Research Center . Alright, maybe that isn’t surprising. But there is one startling result in the survey: a sharp decline in conservative impressions of universities. Most of the results are about what on
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Smart atomsky løser Heisenbergs observationsproblemEt af fysikkens mest fundamentale principper, "Quantum Back Action", er blevet udfordret af forskere...
4h
Ars Technica
Uber driver, who says he was once paid under $2 per hour, advances labor lawsuit Enlarge (credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Images News) A federal judge in North Carolina ruled Wednesday in favor of an Uber driver who is suing the company, paving the way for a possible notable expansion of the lawsuit. In 2016, Michael Hood, an Uber driver, claimed in a proposed class-action lawsuit last year that he has been misclassified as an independent contractor rather than an employee, and
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals interplay of an African bat, a parasite and a virusIf there is anything scientists are certain of when it comes to bats and their supposed role in causing human disease, it is that they still have a lot to learn.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technologyWhen it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice - even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics.
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
De tidligste stadier af livet er måske enklere end hidtil antagetFire og en halv dag efter befrugtningen består det tidlige pattedyrembryon af ca. 100 celler....
5h
Science | The Guardian
Blue whale skeleton replaces dinosaur at Natural History Museum - timelapse video The Natural History Museum has replaced its much-loved dinosaur skeleton in the Hintze Hall, affectionately known as Dippy, with a huge blue whale skeleton. The whale was first displayed in 1939 in the museum and now proudly stands in the museum’s central space Watch the full clip on the Natural History Museum’s social media So long, Dippy: museum’s blue whale seeks to inspire love of living worl
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple unveils iCloud data centre in China as cyber laws tightenedApple has unveiled plans to build a data centre in China to store its local iCloud customers' personal details, marking the first such move by a foreign technology firm following the imposition of strict new cyber-security laws in the country.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetically enhanced, cord-blood derived immune cells strike B-cell cancersImmune cells with a general knack for recognizing and killing many types of infected or abnormal cells also can be engineered to hunt down cells with specific targets on them to treat cancer, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Leukemia.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
eSports league announces franchises for 'Overwatch' competitionA league being formed for local-based eSports—competitive video gaming as a spectator event—has awarded seven franchises aimed at fueling the fires of fans with city-based teams.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Daimler manipulated emissions in one million cars: reportGerman luxury automaker Daimler manipulated the engines of around one million diesel vehicles to make them appear less polluting, local media reported Thursday, raising echoes of competitor Volkswagen's 'dieselgate' scandal.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Re-creating old weapons for new discoveries of human historyMetin Eren wasn't satisfied just digging up ancient arrowheads to learn about the past. He wanted to use them for their intended purpose.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Juno spacecraft spots Jupiter's Great Red SpotImages of Jupiter's Great Red Spot reveal a tangle of dark, veinous clouds weaving their way through a massive crimson oval. The JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno mission snapped pics of the most iconic feature of the solar system's largest planetary inhabitant during its Monday (July 10) flyby. The images of the Great Red Spot were downlinked from the spacecraft's memory on Tuesday and placed on
6h
Ingeniøren
Niels Bohr-forskere løser 90 år gammelt kvantefysisk problemAtomsky inden i en mikrocelle og en avanceret vibrerende membran viser, hvordan man narrer Heisenbergs Ubestemthedsprincip.
6h
Ars Technica
Nintendo Switch finally has a streaming video app, and it works—kind of Enlarge / Rick and Morty on a Nintendo Switch?! It's thanks to Niconico, a Japan-only video streaming app that works on any Switch in the world. (credit: Sam Machkovech) For all of the things we like about the Nintendo Switch, its lack of serious app or multimedia support has become increasingly frustrating . Switch owners had to wait a full four months for the system's first true media-streaming
7h
Science | The Guardian
Tintagel excavations reveal refined tastes of medieval settlers English Heritage says people who lived on site of Cornish castle 1,000 years ago dined on oysters and imported fine tableware Early Cornish kings feasted on a diet of oysters, roast pork and fine wine, eating and drinking from bowls imported from Turkey and glass goblets from Spain, a new dig at Tintagel Castle has suggested. Continue reading...
7h
Science | The Guardian
Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong to be sold at auction Lunar dust plus some tiny Moon rocks are in a small bag and are expected to fetch $2 million to $4 million Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong during the first lunar landing is being sold at a New York auction. Related: Neil Armstrong obituary Continue reading...
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Timelapse of museum's new star attractionWhich creature is taking the place of Dippy the dinosaur?
7h
Science | The Guardian
10 of the best views, festivals and events for the US total solar eclipse Planning a trip in search of totality on 21 August in the US? Our guide provides advice on vantage points and events along the Oregon-to-South Carolina viewing corridor, plus tips on places to stay Total solar eclipses are often dismissed as merely a fleeting period of darkness in the day but they’re actually a short, spectacular view of the sun’s ice-white corona. As the moon completely blocks t
8h
Ingeniøren
Tekst-mining og strukturerede data skal nedsætte fejlbehandlinger på norske sygehuse Bedre data skal give grundlag for at finde årsags- og virkningsforhold på sygehuse. Det kan give svar på, om flere sygeplejesker og bedre bemanding faktisk resulterer i færre fejl. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/text-mining-strukturerede-data-skal-nedsaette-fejlbehandlinger-paa-norske-sygehuse-1077819 Version2
8h
The Atlantic
Clashes Continue Two Days After Victory Declared in Mosul Just two days after Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared “total victory” in Mosul, ISIS’s de facto capital in Iraq, fighting in the region continued between Iraqi forces and ISIS militants. The two sides exchanged gunfire throughout the day on Wednesday, killing a policeman and wounding at least two others, a security official reported . A day earlier, a U.S.-backed coalition that suppor
8h
Science | The Guardian
The great red spot of Jupiter as never seen before – in pictures Nasa’s Juno mission has captured stunning images of Jupiter’s great red spot in its first up-close flyby of the huge storm. The raw data has been released to the public, allowing for the never-before-seen images to be creatively brought to life • See the JunoCam website for more processed images Continue reading...
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links maternal obesity during pregnancy to behavioral problems in boysMaternal obesity and child neurodevelopmental problems have both increased in the US and scientists have suggested a possible link. A new study has found that the heavier mothers were when they entered pregnancy, the higher the risk of behavior problems for their sons. However, it did not show the same effects in girls. The results are reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ADHD medication tied to lower risk for alcohol, drug abuse in teens and adultsThe use of medication to treat attention deficient hyperactivity disorder is linked to significantly lower risk for substance use problems in adolescents and adults with ADHD, according to a study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry and led by Indiana University.
9h
Ingeniøren
Kræftfremkaldende og skadeligt for fostre: Regeringen kæmper for at beholde omstridt pesticidEU vil forbyde en ukrudtsgift, som danske landmænd bl.a. bruger i bygmarker. Men regeringen vil stemme nej til forbuddet. Midlet kan bruges sikkert i Danmark, lyder argumentet.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Blue whale takes centre-stage at Natural History MuseumMove over Dippy - Earth's biggest animal is now the star attraction at the Natural History Museum.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
If You Get Your Face Scanned the Next Time You Fly, Here’s What You Should KnowWe aren’t entirely sure what the government is doing with the images.
9h
cognitive science
An interesting video on moral dumbfounding, when we can't rationalize why we're disgusted by something submitted by /u/BuildMeAShip [link] [comments]
10h
Live Science
What Is Culture? | Definition of CultureCulture is the characteristics of a particular group of people, defined by everything from language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts
10h
Live Science
What is Diclofenac (Voltaren)?Diclofenac is often used to treat pain, tenderness, swelling and stillness resulting from various types of arthritis.
10h
The Atlantic
‘Bridgegate’ Mastermind Avoids Prison Sentence David Wildstein, a former ally and high school classmate of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, was sentenced to three years of probation on Wednesday for his involvement in a 2013 political scheme to shut down lanes on the George Washington Bridge, later dubbed “Bridgegate.” Wildstein pleaded guilty in May 2015 to one charge of conspiracy to commit fraud on federally funded property and one civi
11h
Science | The Guardian
Turning the climate crisis into a TV love child of Jerry Springer and Judge Judy | Planet Oz As a Trump appointee pushes for televised slanging match, a New York magazine cover story sparks a different debate – should we talk about how bad global warming could actually get? In the United States, people who refuse to accept even some of the basic tenets of climate science are calling for a heated debate. “Who better to do that than a group of scientists … getting together and having a rob
12h
Wired
Hyperloop One's First Real Test Is a Whooshing SuccessThe levitating test sled hit 70 mph in a near-vacuum in a tube.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's Juno Spacecraft Spots Jupiter's Great Red SpotImages of Jupiter's Great Red Spot reveal a tangle of dark, veinous clouds weaving their way through a massive crimson oval. The JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno mission snapped pics of the most iconic feature of the solar system's largest planetary inhabitant during its July 10 flyby.
13h
Science | The Guardian
Jupiter's great red spot: Juno probe captures closest images yet of huge storm Nasa releases raw data to public, enabling citizen scientists and experts to share their own processed versions of the images • The great red spot of Jupiter as never seen before – in pictures Nasa’s Juno mission has captured stunning images of Jupiter’s great red spot in its first up-close flyby of the huge storm. The images reveal not only the size of the tempest but also its extraordinary colo
13h
Science | The Guardian
Tall men at bigger risk of aggressive prostate cancer, study suggests UK scientists find chance of high-grade prostate cancer rises by 21% with every 10cm increment in height Tall men are at greater risk of contracting aggressive prostate cancer and of dying from the disease, the findings of a large study suggest. British scientists found that every 10cm increment in height increased the chance of developing high-grade prostate cancer by 21% and the risk of death f
13h
Futurity.org
AI can detect athlete’s concussions years later A new method uses artificial intelligence to accurately detect brain damage caused by concussions years after the trauma happened. “With 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions per year in the US alone, the prevalence of this injury is alarming…” While the short-term effects of head trauma can be devastating, the long-term effects can be equally hard for patients. The symptoms may linger years after the c
13h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Dash Wand Is Basically Free, and Finally Back In Stock For Prime Members Amazon’s new Dash Wand has Alexa built right in, and lets you order groceries and other household goods just by scanning a barcode or using your voice. The best part though? It’s basically free. The Dash Wand will set you back $20 upfront (not bad considering it’s a full-featured Alexa voice assistant), but once you register it, you’ll get a $20 credit in your Amazon account automatically. It’s b
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Gif and image written into the DNA of bacteriaImages and a short film are inserted into bacteria DNA and recovered with 90% accuracy.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts call for a ban on children rugby tacklingIn light of the British Lion's rugby success, Newcastle University experts warn steps need to be taken to ensure children's safety when they play the sport.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should we screen for cirrhosis?Should we screen high risk patients for cirrhosis -- long-term liver damage that can eventually lead to liver failure? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WHO decision to downgrade Tamiflu 'comes far too late' argues expertThe World Health Organization's decision to downgrade the influenza drug Tamiflu on its essential medicines list is better late than never, but still comes far too late, argues an expert in The BMJ today.
14h
Latest Headlines | Science News
CRISPR adds storing movies to its feats of molecular biologyVideo and images could be stored in living bacteria with a little help from the iconic gene editor, CRISPR.
14h
Live Science
Eat Better, Live Longer? Small Food Changes Make a DifferenceMaking even small changes in your diet really can help you live longer, a new study shows.
14h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: High-Stakes Hearing What We’re Following Comey’s Replacement: At his confirmation hearing today, Christopher Wray, President Trump’s nominee for FBI director, assured the Senate Judiciary Committee that he’d maintain his independence from the administration. Wray is a former federal prosecutor and served as the head of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. If confirmed, he’ll take on the FBI’s portion of the i
14h
Ars Technica
Climate scientists push back against catastrophic scenarios Enlarge / Sometimes, reality is alarming. (credit: Jim Nix ) One of the challenges of discussing climate change is that it really is that bad . Completely realistic projections of things like sea-level rise, loss of agricultural productivity, and so on can sometimes sound like a disaster movie. This is a bit of a problem in two ways. The first is that people naturally tend to dismiss possible fut
14h
Live Science
Humanity's Daily Steps Counted via Smartphone DataA new study analyzed anonymous smartphone data from more than 700,000 people in 111 countries to track step counts around the world.
14h
Gizmodo
The Microsoft Font That Has Scandalized Pakistan's First Family Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. (Photo: Getty) Back in April, the family of Pakistan’s scandal-plagued prime minister landed in the crosshairs of an investigation relating to the leaked Panama Papers . This week, the team handling the investigation concluded that documents signed by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s family were fraudulent due to the fact that they were purportedly from 2006 but
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: California looks to keep landmark climate policy aliveCalifornia Gov. Jerry Brown is racing to convince lawmakers to extend his state's signature program to confront climate change. The cap-and-trade program has been closely watched around the world as a market-based way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it expires in 2020.
14h
Gizmodo
The Root Wait, Did Floyd Mayweather Jr. The Root Wait, Did Floyd Mayweather Jr. Just Get Out-Mayweathered by Conor McGregor? | The Concourse Twitter Guy Wants You To Think He Was This Close To Bringing Down The Trump Regime | Jezebel Irene McGee Tells the True Story of The Real World: Seattle ’s ‘Slap Heard ‘Round the World’ | Fusion Leak Us Jeff Sessions’ Secret Speech to This Anti-LGBTQ Hate Group |
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Machine-learning techniques unlock benefit of weight loss for type 2 diabetes patientsLosing weight reduces the risk of long-term cardiovascular illness and mortality for the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes, but for a small subgroup, weight-loss intervention can lead to dramatically worse outcomes, according to new research published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Personal computer market continues to slumpWorldwide shipments of personal computers continued to slump in the recently ended quarter but showed signs of stabilizing, according to figures released Wednesday by market trackers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ISPs surprise net neutrality fans on protest dayAT&T has a surprise for tech firms and internet activists supporting net neutrality, the principle that bars internet service providers from playing favorites with websites and apps.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
French court annuls Google's $1.27 billion back tax billA French court annulled a 1.1 billion-euro ($1.27 billion) tax adjustment imposed on Google by France's tax authorities, saying Wednesday that the way the California firm operates in France allows it to be exempt from most taxes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Security lapse leaks data from millions of Verizon customersA security researcher says a lapse has exposed data from millions of Verizon customers, leaking names, addresses and personal identification numbers, or PINs.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nevada DMV nabs criminal with facial recognition technologyA man who fled federal custody more than 25 years ago couldn't escape new-age crime fighting, thanks to facial recognition technology.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of brain-like activity in immune system promises better disease treatmentsBrain-like activity has been discovered in the immune system, which promises better treatments for lymphoma, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency disorders, which collectively affect millions of people globally.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists simplify the incorporation of nitrogen into moleculesScientists generalize the synthesis of aminating agents to simplify the design and manufacture of drugs and other fine chemicals in which nitrogen atoms play key roles. Each of these agents contains an active electrophilic nitrogen atom to help chemists forge carbon-nitrogen bonds more easily than ever.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Function of cerebellar interneurons probed with new techniqueResearchers have developed a technique for selectively targeting and controlling the interneurons of the cerebellar molecular layer relying on a genetically engineered mouse model that exploits a unique gene encoding c-Kit to differentiate interneurons from other cell types. By using the c-kit mice in this study, the team was able to specifically access molecular layer interneurons and manipulate
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists replay movie encoded in DNAFor the first time, a primitive movie has been encoded in -- and then played back from -- DNA in living cells. Scientists say it's a major step toward a 'molecular recorder' that may someday make it possible to access an archive of the changing internal states of a developing cell by sequencing its genome. The ability to record such sequential events as a movie at the molecular level is key to thi
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Detecting long-term concussion in athletesLawyers representing both sides in concussion lawsuits against sports leagues may eventually have a new tool at their disposal: a diagnostic signature that uses artificial intelligence to detect brain trauma years after it has occurred.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes causes shift in oral microbiome that fosters periodontitis, Penn study findsPeople with diabetes are susceptible to periodontitis, a gum infection that can result in tooth loss. New research helps explain why: Diabetes triggers changes in the oral microbiome that enhance inflammation and the risk of bone loss
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Release of treated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing contaminates lakeHydraulic fracturing has enabled a domestic oil and gas boom in the US, but its rapid growth has raised questions about what to do with the billions of gallons of wastewater that result. Researchers now report that treating the wastewater and releasing it into surface waters has led to the contamination of a Pennsylvania watershed with radioactive material and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why you might trust a quantum computer with secrets, even over the internetResearchers have proposed a way you could use a quantum computer securely, even over the internet, explains a new report.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soccer boosts bone development in boysPlaying soccer can improve bone development in adolescent boys, new research shows. In a study comparing adolescent soccer players to swimmers, cyclists and a control group of boys not involved in regular sport, scientists found soccer led to significantly better bones after one year of training.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First aid kit in some living organisms helps fix DNA after lengthy sun exposureSunburn in living organisms is caused by ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun damaging the DNA in the cells. Many organisms, however, have an in-built mechanism for repairing the sun damage. In a study, researchers pinpoint the mechanism by which repair enzymes bind to the damaged site.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Granular media friction explained: Da Vinci would be proudThere is a very peculiar dynamics of granular matter, such as dry sand or grains of wheat. When these granular particles are left on a vibrating solid surface, they are not only subject to random vibrations, they are also under the spell of solid friction forces. In a new study published, researchers have extended our understanding of this problem.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microwaves reveal detailed structure of molecular motorMicrowaves have been used to unravel the exact structure of a tiny molecular motor. The nano-machine consists of just a single molecule, made up of 27 carbon and 20 hydrogen atoms (C27H20).
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum mechanics inside Earth's corePhysicists have discovered surprising properties of nickel. They could help unravel some mysteries about Earth's magnetic field, report the investigators.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First aid in the brain: When language suddenly failsAfter a stroke a person often suffers from language problems. In some cases certain linguistic abilities can be regained, whereas others are lost forever. Now scientists have found one possible explanation: The injury of some brain areas can be well compensated, whereas this is not the case with others. These findings could not just be relevant for therapy after a stroke but also prove the hierarc
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Einstein's theory of gravitation experienced a Renaissance after World War IIEinstein's 1915 theory of gravitation (General Relativity), is now considered one of the pillars of modern physics. It contributes to our understanding of cosmology and of fundamental interactions between particles. But that was not always the case. In a new article, historians of science and physicists share their views on the process, especially the 'Renaissance' of General Relativity, following
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Between extinction, survival of endangered populationsPopulations of endangered species reach a critical point and therefore, efforts to predict and prevent their extinction require a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms, report researchers. They investigated how environmental disturbance at random times could cause strong fluctuations in the number of individuals in biological populations. They found that environmental disorder can le
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New analysis of rare Argentinian rat unlocks origin of the largest mammalian genomeNew biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size. Researchers set out to study this particular species because its genome, or its complete set of DNA, is the largest of all mammals, and appears to have increased in size very rapidly.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shortcut method in drug developmentA new, small-scale method may become a smart shortcut for determining the 'bioavailability' of a pharmaceutical drug within cells, report scientists.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The one trillion ton iceberg: Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks throughA one trillion tonne iceberg -- one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice finally completed its path through the ice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution of a bacterial enzyme in green algaeA new jigsaw piece in the evolution of green algae has been identified by researchers who analyzed the hydrogen-producing enzyme of a phylogenetically old alga. Its properties were radically different from those of analogous enzymes in more recent algae, they report.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Babies born big more likely to become obese as children, study findsInfants born with a high birthweight are more likely to become obese as children, a new study suggests. By identifying at-risk infants early, doctors could work with parents to prevent weight gain and the health problems obesity brings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mulling over the aromas of wineA fine wine has an ideal balance of ingredients. Too much or too little of a component could mean the difference between a wine with a sweet and fruity aroma and one that smells like wet newspaper. To help wineries avoid off-aromas, a team reports a sensitive device for detecting a compound that can affect the beverage's fragrance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The wave nature of light in super-slow motionPhysicists have accomplished a quantum leap in light research. They have managed to capture the behavior of extremely short laser pulses during focusing by means of very high spatial and temporal resolution. The results are of fundamental relevance to understanding the interactions between light and matter and will make it possible to control electron movements and chemical reactions to an extent
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Creating music by thought aloneNeurologists have created a hands-free, thought-controlled musical instrument. They hope that this new instrument will help empower and rehabilitate patients with motor disabilities such as those from stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Data analysis in the kitchenResearchers suggest a new, data-driven hypothesis that may increase our understanding of which flavors work well together, and why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hormone replacement therapies help breast cancer grow, spreadWomen who take hormone replacement therapies have a higher incidence of breast cancer, research shows. Now, researchers have linked natural and synthetic progestins to the body's production of specialized cancer cells that act like stem cells in humans. Findings could help scientists target these rare cells that proliferate in breast cancers and metastasize elsewhere, and may help clinicians ident
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Planet Nine hypothesis supported by new evidenceLast year, the existence of an unknown planet in our Solar system was announced. However, this hypothesis was subsequently called into question as biases in the observational data were detected. Now astronomers have used a novel technique to analyze the orbits of the so-called extreme trans-Neptunian objects and, once again, they point out that there is something perturbing them: a planet located
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change to deplete some US water basins used for irrigationCertain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation, a new study by climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
After watching disturbing video, CPAP usage soarsMore than 20 million Americans are diagnosed with sleep apnea, yet more than half of those prescribed a CPAP mask to keep their airways open at night don't use it. So, researchers conducted a study where researchers recorded the patients sleeping without the CPAP mask and those who watched the video were more likely to wear it in the end.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer survivors get a taste for kefir after exerciseKefir may be a beneficial post-exercise beverage for cancer survivors. It means that cancer survivors can enjoy the nutritional support that milk provides without the potential for significant stomach upset, report researchers.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clinical trial looks at tramadol for opioid withdrawalA randomized clinical trial compared tramadol extended-release with clonidine and buprenorphine for the management of opioid withdrawal symptoms in patients with opioid use disorder in a residential research setting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No statistically significant risk of intellectual disability in children from mothers using antidepressantsIn a first-of its kind study, researchers found an elevated risk of intellectual disability (ID) in children born to mothers treated with antidepressants, but the risk was not statistically significant and is likely due to other factors, including parental age and the parents' psychiatric history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Botanists discover hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystemsHundreds of potentially new species of fungi have been discovered in the deep coral ecosystem in the 'Au'au channel off Maui, Hawai'i. These mesophotic coral ecosystems are generally found at depths between 130 - 500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumorsEarly phase research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors. The strategy involves using lipid polymer based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor initiating cells. The nanoparticle platform delivers molecules that can target the specific genetic makeup of a
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visual illusion could help you read smaller fontExposure to a common visual illusion may enhance your ability to read fine print, according to new research.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Signature analysis of single molecules using their noise signalsUnique noise signatures have been obtained from single molecules interacting with carbon nanotube-based electronic devices.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable robotsWearable technologies are exploding in popularity, but most of the electronic sensors that detect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer's natural movements and the accuracy of the data collected. Now a research team has created a highly sensitive soft sensor that leverages textiles in its construction, setting the stage for integr
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
House dust spurs growth of fat cells in lab testsPoor diet and a lack of physical activity are major contributors to the world's obesity epidemic, but researchers have also identified common environmental pollutants that could play a role. Now one team reports that small amounts of house dust containing many of these compounds can spur fat cells to accumulate more triglycerides, or fat, in a lab dish.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building a safer lithium-ion batteryLithium-ion batteries have become an indispensable power source for our proliferating gadgets. They have also, on occasion, been known to catch fire. To yield insight into what goes wrong when batteries fail and how to address the safety hazard, scientists report that they have found a potential way to track lithium ions as they travel in a battery.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Groundwater pumping drying up Great Plains streams, driving fish extinctionsGroundwater pumping from the the High Plains Aquifer has led to long segments of rivers drying up and the collapse of large-stream fishes.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Everyday chemicals linked to chronic disease in menChemicals found in everyday plastics materials are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men, according to researchers.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sinus disease symptoms improve 10 years after patients quit smokingPatients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who quit smoking will see their condition improve over a period of about 10 years, according to the results of a new study.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expecting the worst: People's perceived morality is biased towards negativityPeople who are believed to be immoral are unable to reverse individuals' perception of them, potentially resulting in difficulties in the workplace and barriers in accessing fair and equal treatment in the legal system, a new study reports.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Income directly affects children's outcomes, says new reportThere is a strong direct link between household income and children's outcomes, a new review of 61 studies shows.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female fish prefer averagely active loversIn evolution, a high sex drive does not always pay off. Female mosquitofish swim away from over-impetuous lovers because they leave them hardly any time to feed and also tend to injure their genitalia more often.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon displays quantum effectsCarbon atoms cannot only behave like particles but also like waves, new evidence shoes. This quantum-mechanical property is well-known for light particles such as electrons or hydrogen atoms. However, researchers have only rarely observed the wave-particle duality for heavy atoms, such as carbon.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Watching molecules 'breathe' in remarkable detailIn a milestone for studying a class of chemical reactions relevant to novel solar cells and memory storage devices, an international team of researchers used an X-ray laser to watch “molecular breathing” – waves of subtle in-and-out motions of atoms – in real time and unprecedented detail.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Automated security kiosk could alleviate travel, border woesAn automated screening kiosk could alleviate concerns about safety and wait time at U.S. airports and border crossings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unusual galaxy in distant universeMACS2129-1 is dead in the sense that it no longer produces stars. But what makes this galaxy particularly significant is the fact that, unlike many dead galaxies, which tend to be elliptical or oval-shaped, this galaxy is disk or spiral-shaped, like the Milky Way, and its stars rotate in a flattened disk, much like the Milky Way's stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Studying how bats hunt in flightFor the first time, researchers are studying how bats maneuver when they capture their prey in flight.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The fork in the road to DNA repairResearchers have uncovered a way in which our cells regulate the repair of broken DNA. Their results show a common molecule regulates multiple repair mechanisms and help shed light on how the cell maintains the integrity of the human genome when it is damaged.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nesting in cavities protects birds from predators, to a pointNesting in cavities provides birds with some protection from predators -- but it isn't foolproof. A new study explores how Poland's cavity-nesting marsh tits deal with predator attacks and finds that while tactics such as small entrances and solid walls do help, adaptations like this can only take the birds so far.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seaside sparrows caught between predators, rising seasSea-level rise is a problem for saltmarsh birds, but so is predation, and birds sometimes find themselves caught between two threats: They can nest lower in vegetation to avoid predators, putting them at risk of flooding, or move up to keep dry but risk getting eaten. A new study finds that pressure from predators increases flooding risk for seaside sparrow nests -- but that protecting them from p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Half of kids who needed epinephrine didn't get it before trip to the emergency roomEven kids who were prescribed an epinephrine auto injector didn't receive the life-saving medication when they needed it, new research has found.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research points to treatment breakthrough for virusesA protein that is activated by viruses, including influenza, rhinovirus (the common cold), dengue and HIV, has now been identified by researchers. Once activated, it suppresses the body's key antiviral reaction. This study also investigated a prototype drug to treat these debilitating viral diseases.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predictive model may help forecast migraine attacksA new model based on measuring stress from daily hassles may help forecast future migraine headache attacks in those who develop them frequently.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic liver inflammation linked to Western dietA new study reports that mice fed a Western diet, which is high in fat and sugar, resulted in hepatic inflammation, especially in males. Moreover, liver inflammation was most pronounced in Western diet-fed male mice that also lacked farnesoid x receptor (FXR), a bile acid receptor.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeting 'broken' metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory diseaseScientists have uncovered a way to 'program' immune cells to cause less damage to the body, by tapping into a 'broken' chemical pathway in inflammation.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
See-through heart tissue reveals hidden complexityA technique borrowed from neuroscience to see through brain tissue is helping scientists to see the fine structure of the heart.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Programs that teach emotional intelligence in schools have lasting impactSocial and emotional learning programs for youth not only immediately improve mental health, social skills, and learning outcomes but also continue to benefit children years later.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Engineered cell therapy for cancer gets thumbs up from FDA advisers Therapy shows promise in young patients with leukaemia, but safety risks abound. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22304
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A university in Oregon will use balloons to track eclipsePortland State University in Oregon will launch four high-altitude balloons equipped with GPS tracking systems and 360-degree video cameras during the upcoming solar eclipse.
15h
The Atlantic
Nigeria Suicide Bombings Kill At Least 17 At least 17 people were killed and 21 others wounded in a series of suicide bombings on Tuesday night in Borno state, Nigeria, the Borno police commissioner confirmed Wednesday. The bombings took place around 10 p.m. local time near the northeast city of Maiduguri and were orchestrated by four female suicide bombers. The Borno police commissioner, Damian Chukwu, told reporters that most of the de
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple to open data center in China with government tiesApple will open a data center in mainland China with ties to the country's government, raising concerns about the security of iCloud accounts that store personal information transferred from iPhones, iPads and Mac computers there.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No monkeying around: Court weighs if animal owns its selfiesA curious monkey with a toothy grin and a knack for pressing a camera button was back in the spotlight Wednesday as a federal appeals court heard arguments on whether an animal can hold a copyright to selfie photos.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds rainfall diminishing in a weakening Tropical Storm EugeneTropical Storm Eugene has been moving over cooler sea surface temperatures that have been sapping its strength. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, core satellite passed over Eugene and measured its decreasing rainfall rates.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team details foreshock activities leading up to Pawnee earthquakeA University of Oklahoma geophysics professor, Xiaowei Chen, details the foreshock activities leading up to the Pawnee earthquake, and highlights the complicated relationship between seismicity and wastewater injection rates in a research study published this week in Scientific Reports. The study details the precursory earthquake (foreshock) sequences that culminated in the September 3, 2016, 5.8
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking the mysteries of deepwater corals to restore the Gulf of MexicoCoral genetics could save the Gulf of Mexico - though it may take a few hundred years.
15h
Science : NPR
'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing The Immune System Clears Key Hurdle An advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration recommends the agency, for the first time, approve a new kind of treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to attack cancer cells. (Image credit: Eye of Science/Science Source)
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to grow a premium brand without killing its cachet? Outlet stores can helpManagers of premium brands face a perennial dilemma. How do you grow a premium brand without killing its soul - the unique brand cachet that attracts its core high price paying customers - even as you seek to expand sales to the masses by offering lower prices? In recent years, outlet stores located hours away from glitzy shopping districts, selling off-season and lower tier merchandise at a fract
15h
Live Science
Flea Market Find: World War II Enigma Machine Sells for $51,000A German Enigma machine found at a flea market in Bucharest, Romania, has sold for about $51,000 at auction.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study factors predicting school corporal punishmentThe number of Southern natives and the average education level in a county are the most influential factors on the odds of a U.S. public school using corporal punishment, according to new Penn State research.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds toxic mercury is accumulating in the Arctic tundraVast amounts of toxic mercury are accumulating in the Arctic tundra, threatening the health and well-being of people, wildlife and waterways, according to a UMass Lowell scientist investigating the source of the pollution.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early squirrel gets the real estate, study findsThose young squirrels now scampering around your neighbourhood were born in this year's earliest litters and are more likely to survive than squirrels born later and still curled up in their nests, according to a new University of Guelph study.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New biofuel technology significantly cuts production timeNew research from a professor of engineering at UBC's Okanagan Campus might hold the key to biofuels that are cheaper, safer and much faster to produce.
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: He’ll Go His Own Wray Today in 5 Lines During his Senate confirmation hearing for FBI director, Christopher Wray pledged that he’ll “never allow the FBI’s work to be driven by anything other than the facts, the law, and the impartial pursuit of justice.” Democratic Representative Brad Sherman introduced articles of impeachment against President Trump. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley said he plans to
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant charge reversal observed for the first timeCharged surfaces submerged in an electrolyte solution can sometimes become oppositely charged. This nonintuitive phenomenon, known as charge inversion, happens when excess counter ions adsorb, or adhere, to the surface. It can occur in a number of chemical and biological settings. In certain situations, theory predicts that a highly charged surface not only changes sign, but can become more highly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Online climate data benefits producersAre you a farmer who wants to keep better track of the climate conditions around you? There's an app for that.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rice scientists simplify the incorporation of nitrogen into moleculesA Rice University laboratory that specializes in synthesizing reagents and intermediate molecules for the design and manufacture of drugs and other fine chemicals has delivered on a promise to generalize the synthesis of electrophilic (electron-poor) aminating agents.
16h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Gets Its Close-UpNASA’s Juno spacecraft passed a few thousand miles above the gargantuan storm, revealing intricate patterns of swirling clouds.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cyber attacks can threaten public healthGordon and Landman have authored a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine that addresses the growing threat of attacks on information systems and the potential implications on public health.
16h
Popular Science
Meet KJ-600, the aircraft that could help China's navy rival America's From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The airborne early warning and control plane fills a gap in China's arsenal. China's carrier radar plane, the KJ-600, will be the aircraft to tie together Chinese naval aviation combat across all domains.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotic nanoparticles fight drug-resistant bacteriaAntibiotic resistance is a growing problem, especially among a type of bacteria that are classified as "Gram-negative." These bacteria have two cell membranes, making it more difficult for drugs to penetrate and kill the cells.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Grid Batteries Are Poised to Become Cheaper Than Natural-Gas Plants in MinnesotaA new report suggests the economics of large-scale batteries are reaching an important inflection point.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Slow earthquakes occur continuously in the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zoneSeismologists at the University of California, Riverside studying earthquakes in the seismically and volcanically active Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone have found that "slow earthquakes" are occurring continuously, and could encourage damaging earthquakes.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Trump Nominates DOE Science UndersecretaryThe President has nominated an investment banker for the role.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers illuminate the field of microscopy with nanoparticle 'buckyswitch'Visualizing biological cells under a microscope was just made clearer, thanks to research conducted by graduate student Yifei Jiang and principal investigator Jason McNeill of Clemson University's department of chemistry.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees formation of Tropical Storm Fernanda in Eastern Pacific OceanThe sixth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed near southwestern Mexico and quickly strengthened into Tropical Storm Fernanda. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the strengthening storm.
16h
Ars Technica
In NASA simulation, people tote hardy, allergy-inducing molds to Mars Enlarge / The inflatable lunar/Mars analog habitat, or ILMAH. (credit: Microbiome, 2017 ) For many Earthlings, our planet is teeming with airborne pollens, spores, and toxins that clog schnozes and turn windpipes wheezy. Sadly, jumping to space rocks may not help , a new NASA study suggests. In a 30-day simulation of living life on another planet, NASA researchers found that fungi followed artifi
16h
Wired
The Net Neutrality Fight Doesn't End With the Day of ActionThe Day of Action gave the fight for net neutrality its spotlight moment. But it shouldn't end here.
16h
Gizmodo
How Normal Guy Mark Zuckerberg Arranges All Those Candid Encounters With Real Americans In his new, obsessively documented mission to gather (and probably, in some way, monetize) the authenticity of Common People, Facebook’s putty-faced CEO is doing exactly what common people do: showing up to places uninvited, unannounced, and demanding absolute secrecy from strangers. As Amy Dudley, one of Zuckerberg’s handlers and a former aide to Tim Kaine and Joe Biden, explained to The Wall St
16h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Clever Humpbacks Move In for a Meal at Salmon HatcheriesResearchers documented for the first time that the large mammals learned to feed on juvenile salmon released from hatcheries in southeast Alaska.
16h
Live Science
Why ER Doctors Want to Banish the Term 'Dry Drowning'Some emergency-medicine doctors want to banish the phrase "dry drowning" because the term doesn't actually refer to any medically accepted conditions.
16h
Scientific American Content: Global
Lights, Cameras, CRISPR: Biologists Use Gene Editing to Store Movies in DNATechnique demonstrated in E. coli suggests way to record events -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Twitter Guy Wants You To Think He Was This Close To Bringing Down The Trump Regime Yesterday, Donald Trump Jr., in an attempt to undercut a New York Times story that was minutes away from being published , tweeted out images of an email thread in which he agreed to meet with a “Russian government lawyer” who promised to give him damaging information about Hillary Clinton. The emails were sent in June 2016, and the desire to share the information was described as “part of Russia
16h
Wired
FIGHT: The WIRED Guide to Net NeutralityOn the internet's day of action in support of net neutrality, a look at what's at stake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clemson researchers illuminate the field of microscopy with nanoparticle 'buckyswitch'Clemson University scientists develop a nanoparticle "switch" that fluoresces to sharpen the resolution of microscopic images that depict small cellular structures.
17h
Science : NPR
Statue Of Scopes Trial Lawyer Sparks Debate In Tennessee In 1925, the Scopes Trial sparked national debates about creationism and secularism, and put Dayton, Tenn., on the map. Now another debate is happening in Dayton about whether it's appropriate to memorialize the secular side with a statue.
17h
The Atlantic
House Democrat Escalates Call for Impeachment Despite efforts by Democratic leaders in Congress to quell talk of impeachment within party ranks, Democratic Representative Brad Sherman has formally introduced an article of impeachment against President Trump. The California Democrat’s political gambit is virtually guaranteed to go nowhere, but it signals that talk of impeachment isn’t going away, even if most Democrats in Congress view the is
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumor-targeting drug shows potential for treating bone cancer patientsThe treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic nanoparticles fight drug-resistant bacteriaResearchers from MIT and other institutions are hoping to use nanotechnology to develop more targeted treatments for drug-resistant bugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What do high school principals know about concussion?When it comes to helping high school student athletes recover from concussion, support is needed beyond the athletic field. It is also essential when they return to the classroom. A new study examining principals' perceptions about concussion will be released today and presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Jacksonville, Fla., July 14 to 16, 2017.
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Gizmodo
Secretive Company Says It Could Be 'Mining' the Moon by 2020 Image: Screen shot via collectSPACE /YouTube For years, private space company Moon Express has touted its grand ambitions of one day mining the moon for delicious resources that do not include cheese . After years of secrecy, today, the company stepped out of the shadows talk about just how it plans to achieve its lofty goals—apparently, it’s aiming to set up a lunar outpost on the Moon as early
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
How Apple’s Secretive Gym Is Shaping Its Activity-Tracking AlgorithmsThe fitness lab for the Apple Watch includes dozens of metabolic carts, a fleet of full-time nurses, and an infinity pool.
17h
The Atlantic
'There Is Nothing Libertarian About Attacking Bereaved Parents' There is so very little about the devastating moments after learning about our daughter’s murder that I remember clearly. Our brains have this amazing capacity for protecting us by limiting the amount of information that we can take in at one time. For nearly six months after the shooting, I asked myself and those around me daily, “Did this really happen?” That’s what I thought about on Monday wh
17h
Big Think
Was Shangdong Province Once Home to Near-Giants? Archeologisists unearth 5,000-year-old “giants” in Shandong Province. Read More
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Big Think
What Would Sex in Space Really Be Like? Sex is way different at zero-G. Read More
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Gizmodo
Do We Really Need an Obi-Wan Kenobi Standalone Movie? Ewan McGregor as Obi-Wan Kenobi. Image: Lucasfilm Fans have been talking about an Obi-Wan Kenobi movie for years. Meanwhile, Ewan McGregor has repeatedly said he’d like to return to the role. Now, if rumors are to be believed, Disney could soon announce it as the next Star Wars Story film, perhaps as early as this weekend, during the D23 Expo. But between Marvel’s comics and the Rebels TV show, d
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Female fish prefer averagely active loversIn evolution, a high sex drive does not always pay off. Female mosquitofish swim away from over-impetuous lovers because they leave them hardly any time to feed and also tend to injure their genitalia more often.
17h
Wired
Jupiter's Big Red Spot Finally Gets Its Closeup, Thanks to NASA's JunoNASA's Juno spacecraft made its first close pass by Jupiter's big red spot, and it's got the pictures to prove it.
17h
Ars Technica
Bay Area: Join us 7/19 to discuss technical troubles with drone warfare Enlarge / Former military technician Lisa Ling will talk to us about the problems of drone warfare at Ars Technica Live on 7/19. (credit: Lisa Ling ) Drone strikes and surveillance are a major component of modern warfare, but few people outside the military understand how these programs work. That's why former military technician Lisa Ling became a whistleblower after 14 years in the National Gua
17h
New Scientist - News
Battle lines are being drawn on the best way for babies to sleepPaediatricians say sharing a bed with your baby is dangerous, but anthropologists say it is natural and beneficial. Who's right?
17h
New Scientist - News
Real reform must follow ruling on flawed NHS-DeepMind data dealThe NHS has been censured for the way it shared patient data with DeepMind. Meaningful checks on big tech's healthcare ambitions must follow, says Hal Hodson
17h
New Scientist - News
Video stored in live bacterial genome using CRISPR gene editingCutting and pasting information into living DNA could theoretically safeguard complex records through a nuclear apocalypse
17h
New Scientist - News
Glove turns sign language into text for real-time translationThe 26 letters of American Sign Language have been coded so far, letting people who are deaf and do not write English communicate easily with anyone around them
17h
New Scientist - News
First close-ups of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot from Juno flybyThe closest-ever observations of our solar system’s biggest storm could tell us how deep into Jupiter it extends and how it has continued to rage for centuries
17h
New Scientist - News
Brexiteers must not risk UK’s nuclear future by leaving EuratomIf the UK leaves Europe’s nuclear regulator when it quits the EU, it risks disrupting nuclear fuel supplies and even cancer treatments, warns Alex Connor
17h
Wired
Day of Action: How Facebook, Google, and More Supported Net NeutralityOn a Day of Action in support of net neutrality, internet giants showed their supports a variety of ways.
17h
Popular Science
Moon Express ‘lunar outpost’ looks gorgeous, but don’t get too excited yet Space The company hopes to put robots on the moon’s South Pole by 2020 “Outpost” is a bit of a strong word, but here's what the company has in mind. Read on.
17h
NYT > Science
Who Needs Hard Drives? Scientists Store Film Clip in DNAIn a first, researchers converted a movie into a DNA sequence and inserted it into bacteria. They hope to someday use the technology to record cell behavior.
18h
Live Science
How Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf Birthed Such an Enormous BergThe calving of a massive iceberg from Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf progressed rapidly in recent months, growing from a crack that first appeared in 2010.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech review: Samsung QLED TV is picture perfectIt's time to make a confession about my television. I only have one TV in my house, and it's a 10-year-old, 42-inch Panasonic plasma set.
18h
Inside Science
BRIEF: How Sound May Save the Manatee BRIEF: How Sound May Save the Manatee Married research duo harnesses acoustical tools to protect manatees from fatal boat collisions. FloridaManatee_cropped.jpg Image credits: US Fish and Wildlife Service Creature Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 13:00 Olivia Trani, Contributor (Inside Science) -- The Florida manatee has no real predator save for one: boats. Watercraft strikes kill about 100 victims ea
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds toxic mercury is accumulating in the Arctic tundraVast amounts of toxic mercury are accumulating in the Arctic tundra, threatening the health and well-being of people, wildlife and waterways, according to a UMass Lowell scientist investigating the source of the pollution.
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