New Scientist - News
US ranked worst healthcare system, while the NHS is the bestAn analysis of 11 wealthy nations, including Australia and Canada, has found that the US healthcare system is the worst, particularly for fair and easy access
12h
Ingeniøren
Premierminister: Australsk lov står over matematikkens loveAustralien vil have Facebook og Google til at hjælpe med adgang til krypteret indhold – også selv om det er umuligt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/premierminister-vil-have-adgang-krypteret-indhold-australsk-lov-staar-matematikkens-lov Version2
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Færre ansøgere, men flere vil læse sundhedsvidenskab og naturvidenskabDet samlede antal ansøgere til en bacheloruddannelse på Københavns Universitet er...
10h

LATEST

Science : NPR
NOAA Halts Whale Disentanglement Efforts After Rescuer DiesBoat captain Joe Howlett died on Monday after freeing a right whale that was tangled fishing gear in Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence. (Image credit: International Fund for Animal Welfare/AP)
2min
Gizmodo
Slo-Mo Footage of a Model Rocket Engine Eviscerating a Fish Tank Is Ridiculously SatisfyingGIF GIF: YouTube Drop a lit match in water, and it will immediately be extinguished. But model rocket engines, made mostly of potassium nitrate, sulphur, and charcoal, will burn all the way through even when completely submerged. As this high-speed footage reveals, to test a rocket engine’s apathy to H2O, you’ll want to find something stronger than a glass fish tank for your experiment. YouTube’s
3min
Ars Technica
Juicero to cut staff, drop price of its juice bag presser below $200Enlarge (credit: Juicero) According to a letter to employees sent today, Juicero CEO Jeff Dunn allegedly called for a “strategic shift” at the company that would involve cutting 25 percent of staff and dropping the price of the press to under $200. Juicero found itself in the Silicon Valley limelight in April, when Bloomberg reporters got ahold of one of the company’s high-end presses and found t
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change: Biodiversity rescues biodiversity in a warmer worldClimate change leads to loss of biodiversity worldwide. However, ecosystems with a higher biodiversity in the first place might be less affected a new study in Science Advances reports. An international research team found that when they experimentally warmed meadows, the diversity of nematode worms living in the soil went down in monocultures, whereas the opposite was true for meadows with many d
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fluorine grants white graphene new powersFluorination of hexagonal boron nitride, a common insulator, turns it into a magnetic semiconductor. That may make the heat-resistant material suitable for electronics and sensors in extreme environments.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hamburg researchers develop new transistor conceptTransistors, as used in billions on every computer chip, are nowadays based on semiconductor-type materials, usually silicon. As the demands for computer chips in laptops, tablets and smartphones continue to rise, new possibilities are being sought out to fabricate them inexpensively, energy-saving and flexibly. The group led by Dr. Christian Klinke has now succeeded in producing transistors based
22min
Gizmodo
Scientists Push Back Against Booming Genetic Pseudoscience MarketImage: Soccer Genomics The premise behind Yes or No Genomics is simple: Genetic disease is typically caused by a variation in at least one of the many thousands of genes in the human genome, so knowing whether your DNA code contains variants could suggest whether your health is at risk. And for just $199, the scientists at Yes or No Genomics can use special technology to determine that. Except Ye
27min
Live Science
Divers Find 8 More Wrecks at Sunken-Ship Hotspot in GreeceEight sunken ships have been found around Fourni, a cluster of Greek islands that's a hotspot for wrecks, a team of underwater archaeologists announced.
28min
Live Science
In Photos: 8 New Shipwrecks Discovered in GreeceA cluster of Greek islands called Fourni is a hotspot for shipwrecks, the oldest of which date back as early as the sixth century B.C.
28min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Giant mud balls roamed the early solar systemThe first asteroids may have been great balls of mud, which would solve some puzzling features of meteorites.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mica provides clue to how water transports mineralsIn a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of ru
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new transistor conceptTransistors, as used in billions on every computer chip, are nowadays based on semiconductor-type materials, usually silicon. As the demands for computer chips in laptops, tablets and smartphones continue to rise, new possibilities are being sought out to fabricate them inexpensively, energy-saving and flexibly.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fluorine grants white graphene new powers: Researchers turn common insulator into a magnetic semiconductorA little fluorine turns an insulating ceramic known as white graphene into a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties. Rice University scientists said that could make the unique material suitable for electronics in extreme environments.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change: Biodiversity rescues biodiversity in a warmer worldClimate change leads to loss of biodiversity worldwide. However, ecosystems with a higher biodiversity in the first place might be less affected a new study in Science Advances reports. An international research team found that when they experimentally warmed meadows, the diversity of nematode worms living in the soil went down in monocultures, whereas the opposite was true for meadows with many d
45min
Gizmodo
Turn Any Desk Into a Standing Desk For $169Halter Preassembled Sit-Stand Desk Riser , $169 with code O7UYCDBY So you want to try a standing desk , but you’re not ready to commit to it for eight hours a day...what do you do? You buy this monitor riser for $148 with code O7UYCDBY, or nearly $100 off. This riser arrives fully assembled, and just sits on top of your existing desk. Put your monitor(s) on the top shelf, your keyboard and mouse
45min
Popular Science
Ravens are so smart it’s actually kind of disconcerting, new study findsAnimals Unlike so many of us, they actually plan for the future. A flock of ravens ravaging a carcass may technically be called an unkindness, but the real unkindness is using that term for an objectively awesome animal.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia launches 73 satellites into orbitAn imaging satellite and 72 micro-satellites were launched into orbit Friday from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Russian space agency Roscosmos and research centre Glavcosmos announced.
51min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
This Expectant Family Has Quarantined Themselves Against The Zika OutbreakOn July 29, 2016, Florida became the first U.S. state to see a locally transmitted Zika case. For families like the Fuhrmans, it means a nightmare scenario could become reality. Full special streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/mosquito/ Learn more: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mosquito Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http
51min
The Atlantic
The Trump-Macron Handshake: A Play in Four ActsThe president of the United States and the president of France have weaponized an ancient gesture invented to signal the absence of weapons. They have double-handedly ruined the handshake. On Friday, they made it official, in an excruciating conclusion to a long-running saga. I. The Test of Wills This story begins with what the French president, Emmanuel Macron, has described as a “moment of trut
52min
Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on biodiversity: the lightness of the whale | EditorialExperts warn that Earth’s sixth mass extinction has begun – and humans are to blame. Can Hope help us to confront biological annihilation? A single blue whale, even with a skeleton of 4.5 tonnes, weighs imperceptibly in the world’s scales when biological annihilation is set on the other side. Yet perhaps the “new” 126-year-old star of the entrance hall of Natural History Museum in London may play
54min
New Scientist - News
Never-before-seen photos of leopard cub being raised by a lionShould the leopard cub survive its unusual upbringing, would it behave more like a lion or a leopard?
57min
New Scientist - News
The best way to detect aliens may be by finding their footprintsThe first sign of aliens might not be microbes or radio signals but fossilised imprints or excrement left on the solid surfaces of Mars or Titan
57min
Ars Technica
First insider build of Windows Server arrives with new virtualization featuresEnlarge / Server administrator kaiju hates user password reset requests. (credit: Bandai Namco Entertainment America (CC) ) Back in May , Microsoft announced that Windows Server would be joining the Windows Insider Program. Late last night, the first preview release of Windows Server was published. The biggest areas of improvement in the new build are around virtualization and containers. The pre
1h
The Atlantic
The Military Is Altering the Limits of Human PerformanceImagine a group of volunteers, their chests rigged with biophysical sensors, preparing for a mission in a military office building outfitted with cameras and microphones to capture everything they do. “We want to set up a living laboratory where we can actually pervasively sense people, continuously, for a long period of time. The goal is to do our best to quantify the person, the environment, an
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Gizmodo
The 15 Best Food Descriptions in A Song of Ice and FireAll Images: HBO Based on the approximately four hundred hours of Next Food Network Star that I have seen, I gather that it’s hard to properly describe food to someone who can’t actually taste it. This apparently isn’t a problem for George R.R. Martin, who inserts long and varied food descriptions everywhere in A Song of Ice and Fire . These are the best ones. Fair warning, some of these things mi
1h
Ars Technica
Ajit Pai not concerned about number of pro-net neutrality commentsEnlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaks during the National Association of Broadcasters conference in Las Vegas on April 25, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Ethan Miller ) One day after a large protest of his plan to gut net neutrality rules, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai was asked if the number of pro-net neutrality comments submitted to the FCC might cause a change in course.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silicon Valley reeling in wake of sexual harassment stormIt started with a few women speaking up, reporting a suggestive text message, an invitation to a hotel room, an unwanted touch under a table.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big-data analysis points toward new drug discovery methodA computational method has been created to systematically probe massive amounts of open-access data to discover new ways to use drugs, including some that have already been approved for other uses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to cryopreserve fish embryos, bring them back to lifeScientists report for the first time the ability to both deep freeze and reanimate zebrafish embryos. The method could potentially be used to bank larger aquatic and other vertebrate oocytes and embryos, too, for a life in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
After 'freezing' in fear, what part of the brain helps make fish swim again?The brain is the body's mission control center, sending messages to the other organs about how to respond to various external and internal stimuli. Located in the forebrain, the habenular region is one such message-conducting system. Two new papers explain how the habenulae develop and their unsuspected role in recovering from fear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting to the roots of Sahara mustard invasion in the American SouthwestOld World Sahara mustard is spreading rapidly through southwestern US deserts, smothering the native wildflowers that draw tourists to the region and disrupting the desert ecosystem. A new study is investigating when the invasion originated and what enabled Sahara mustard to adapt so successfully, to gain insight into how to stop it.
1h
Live Science
Netflix Film 'Chasing Coral' Warns of Grim Future for Imperiled ReefsClimate change's devastating impact on coral reefs is on display in the new Netflix film "Chasing Coral."
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
GM moth trial gets a green light from USDAGM diamondback moths will take wing in New York field trial.
1h
Wired
Did Trump's Data Team Help Russian Hackers? Facebook Might Have the AnswerThe congressional investigation turns its attention to the digital team that helped Trump win.
1h
The Atlantic
More People Are Now Exempt From Trump's Travel BanUpdated at 2:20 p.m. ET The U.S. Supreme Court is on something of a summer vacation. But the ongoing legal battle over President Trump’s travel ban is taking no time off. A federal district court in Hawaii ruled Thursday night that a category of travelers previously blocked by the directive can now enter the United States: the grandparents and other close family members of U.S. residents coming f
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
3-D-Printed Artificial Heart Beats Like the Real Thing But Isn’t Much Use YetIt pumps blood using ventricles like those of a real heart, but it begins to degrade after just 3,000 beats.
1h
Gizmodo
'Pence Can Eat My Asshole': America's Letters to Trump's Election Fraud PanelSource: whitehouse.gov Earlier this year, the White House requested written comments from US voters about the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity, led by Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. And now the American public has spoken, saying (among other things), “you are evil. pray there is no hell.” On Thursday, the Trump administration released 112 pages o
1h
Live Science
Should We Fear the Rise of Intelligent Robots?A scientist who spends his days developing artificial intelligence systems, reveals what about AI keeps him up at night.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor thyroid function may affect dialysis patients' quality of life and daily livingIn hemodialysis patients, hypothyroidism was linked with impairments across multiple areas of health-related quality of life, including lower energy and greater fatigue, poorer physical function, and greater pain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long working hours increases the risk of developing atrial fibrillationPeople who work long hours have an increased risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation, according to a study of nearly 85,500 men and women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
FOXI3 gene is involved in dental cusp formationHairless dog breeds differ from other dogs not only by lacking a coat, but also in the number and nature of their teeth. Scientists studied the skulls and teeth of pedigreed hairless dogs from the collection of the Phyletisches Museum of the University of Jena. Thus, they furthered our understanding of the involvement of the FOXI3 gene in the development of teeth - not only in hairless dogs, but p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cretaceous Tanaidaceans took care of their offspring more than 105 million years agoThe first evidence of parental care in Tanaidaceans has been found by scientists, dating back to more than 105 million years, according to a new study. These new findings are based on the study of three small crustaceans from different species of the Cretaceous -- Alavatanais carabe, Alavatanais margulisae and Daenerytanais maieuticus -- preserved in amber pieces from the sites in Peñacerrada (Ála
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria never swim aloneMany animal species display flocking behavior, but the fact that microorganisms do is not as well known. Researchers have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Side effects not a major problem for new class of breast cancer drugsA ground-breaking new class of oral drugs for treating breast cancer, known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, are generally well-tolerated, with a manageable toxicity profile for most patients. This is the conclusion of a comprehensive review of toxicities and drug interactions related to this class of drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MMA fighters, boxers may have signs of long-term brain injury in bloodBoxers and mixed martial arts fighters may have markers of long-term brain injury in their blood, according to a study.
1h
Wired
Amazon Echo Tips and TricksHow to get the most out of your Amazon Echo Dot.
1h
Live Science
Hwasong-14 Missile Test: Can North Korea's Rockets Reach the US?Are North Korean rockets capable of reaching American shores?
1h
The Atlantic
Seven Are Dead in Separate Attacks in EgyptTwo separate attacks in Egypt on Friday have killed seven people, including five policemen at a checkpoint in the Sinai Peninsula, and two tourists at a popular resort on the Red Sea. In the attack on officers, the suspects escaped and no group has claimed responsibility. One man was arrested in the resort attack, and investigators are still questioning him. In the Sinai Peninsula attack, gunmen
1h
The Atlantic
What’s Broken—and What’s Still Working—in American PoliticsI tried my best, through the first half of this year, to avoid getting caught up in the political emergencies of each day, so as to write about some longer-term developments that I know are more encouraging than current national-level trauma, and that I believe are at least as significant. My wife Deb and I physically absented ourselves from the capital, as described here , which provided some me
1h
New Scientist - News
AI coach will train hopeless chatbots to pass the Turing testA neural network trained to rate how human-like an AI is could turn Alexa and Siri into much more convincing conversation partners
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Here's an ugly truth about attractivenessThe attractiveness of a romantic partner can influence a person's desire to diet and seek a slim body, though that motivation contrasts sharply between men and women, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disease-busting 'recycling bins' in our cells now better understoodScientists have made an important step in understanding how cells keep themselves clean and healthy -- a finding that may have implications for combating neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How neurons sense our everyday lifeA molecular mechanism has been discovered that enables neuronal connections to change through experience, thus fueling learning and memory formation. The findings have the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies for neurological and psychiatric disorders.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies new target to preserve nerve functionScientists have identified an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the degeneration of axons, the threadlike portions of a nerve cell that transmit signals within the nervous system. Axon loss occurs in all neurodegenerative diseases, so this discovery could open new pathways to treating or preventing a wide array of brain diseases.
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Gizmodo
Hagfish Slime Is WonderfulImage: Oregon State Police Sadly, a flatbed truck dumping 7,500 lbs of live hagfish onto a highway in Oregon will not be the weirdest story of 2017. It will not even be close . Still, the situation warrants some kind of scientific explanation, since it’s not every day that the mucus of a living fossil destroys a Prius. WKRG reports that yesterday, local authorities in Lincoln County, Oregon were
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AT&T could create media division after Time Warner merger: reportTelecoms giant AT&T is likely to create a separate media division upon completion of its planned merger with Time Warner, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong friendships among women in the workplace reduce conflict, according to new studyAccording to a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science, when employers foster an office environment that supports positive, social relationships between women coworkers, especially in primarily male dominated organizations, they are less likely to experience conflict among women employees.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble spots a barred lynx spiralDiscovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. As this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows, NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core.
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NYT > Science
Slime Eel Crash Leaves an Oregon Road Covered in OozeMore than 7,000 pounds of hagfish, also known as slime eels, coated a section of Highway 101 with a gel described as “Spider-Man’s webbing crossed with a jellyfish.”
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The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘Memo’ by W. G. SebaldW. G. Sebald was born in Germany just a year before the end of World War II, and grew up in the conflict’s long shadow. In his prose, he explored the landscapes of postwar Europe—the ruined cities, the lethal machinery of the Holocaust, the vast collections of records—and the themes of memory, loss, and decay that they embodied. Though he wrote them decades after moving to England to work as a un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering the connection between negative stiffness and magnetic domain wallsNature doesn't like having interfaces—this is why bubbles like to be round, and the surface of a pond settles to flat as long as it's not disturbed. These trends minimize the total amount of interface (or surface) that is present. As an exception to this behavior, certain materials are known to have a property, called negative stiffness, where the interface prefers to become distorted, or wavy, ev
2h
Popular Science
Master python programming for thousands of dollars offSponsored Post Build your own apps, program devices, analyze the markets, and more. Master python programming for thousands of dollars off. Build your own apps, program devices, analyze the markets, and more. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feinstein Institute identifies potential cause for lupusResearch profiles how a particular protein could cause immune system to attack healthy cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Walking like ants gives spiders a chanceTo avoid being eaten, some jumping spiders pretend to be ants.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble spots a barred Lynx spiralDiscovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. As this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows, NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New limits to functional portion of human genome reportedAn evolutionary biologist at the University of Houston has published new calculations that indicate no more than 25 percent of the human genome is functional. That is in stark contrast to suggestions by scientists with the ENCODE project that as much as 80 percent of the genome is functional.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strong friendships among women in the workplace reduce conflict, according to new studyAccording to a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science, when employers foster an office environment that supports positive, social relationships between women coworkers, especially in primarily male dominated organizations, they are less likely to experience conflict among women employees.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers make improbable discoveryScientists had long believed that the waters of the Central and Northeast Pacific Ocean were inhospitable to certain species of deep-sea corals, but a marine biologist's discovery of an odd chain of reefs suggests there are mysteries about the development and durability of coral colonies yet to be uncovered.
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Science | The Guardian
'Tired of medals': new letters reveal how Alfred Russel Wallace shunned Darwin's fameFrom declining royal honour to refusing to sit for a portrait, correspondences show co-discoverer of evolutionary theory avoiding publicity Darwin’s name is eternally linked to one of the most momentous scientific breakthroughs of all time, while his co-discoverer, Alfred Russel Wallace , who first coined the phrase “origin of species”, has been largely forgotten. Now a newly revealed archive of
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Ars Technica
Ravens ignore a treat in favor of a useful tool for the futureEnlarge (credit: flickr user: NH53 ) If humans, chimps, gorillas, and orangutans can all do something, but monkeys can’t, that tells a certain evolutionary story: it suggests that the ability emerged sometime after the apes split off from the monkeys on our evolutionary tree . But if a bird comes along with that ability, it throws the whole story off course. Corvids—a family of birds that include
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lung benefits of caffeine therapy in preemies persists into mid-childhoodPremature babies treated with caffeine have better lung function in mid-childhood than preemies not treated with caffeine, according to a randomized controlled trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Complex gas motion in the centre of the milky wayOur solar system is located in the outer regions of the Milky Way, a disk-shaped galaxy with an approximate diameter of 100,000 light years. From Earth, its appearance can only be observed indirectly, by measuring positions and movements of stars and gas clouds. In addition to luminous stars, a substantial portion of the visible matter in our Milky Way is interstellar gas. Gas clouds in the so-cal
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny cellular antennae key to fat formation in muscleLike it or not, as we age, our muscle cells are slowly exchanged, one by one, for fat cells. This process quickens when we injure a muscle, and an extreme form of this process is also seen in muscle-wasting diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Now, scientists have shown that cellular antennae called cilia, found on fat-forming cells interspersed in muscle, play a key role in this mu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How social rank can trigger vulnerability to stressRank in social hierarchies has been identified by researchers as a major determining factor for vulnerability to chronic stress. They also show that energy metabolism in the brain is a predictive biomarker for social status as well as stress vulnerability and resilience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many parents in the dark about concussions, research showsDespite the large volume of information about sports related concussions on the Internet, many parents and guardians of young athletes have a limited understanding of concussions, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
National strategy to reduce opioid epidemic, an urgent public health priorityYears of sustained and coordinated efforts will be required to contain and reverse the harmful societal effects of the prescription and illicit opioid epidemics, which are intertwined and getting worse, says a new report.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ohio county fair hogs to be destroyed after swine flu foundState officials have ordered the slaughter of nearly 300 hogs at a county fair in Ohio after at least two animals tested positive for swine flu.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New limits to functional portion of human genome reportedAn evolutionary biologist at the University of Houston has published new calculations that indicate no more than 25 percent of the human genome is functional. That is in stark contrast to suggestions by scientists with the ENCODE project that as much as 80 percent of the genome is functional.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create first laboratory generation of astrophysical shock wavesThroughout the universe, supersonic shock waves propel cosmic rays and supernova particles to velocities near the speed of light. The most high-energy of these astrophysical shocks occur too far outside the solar system to be studied in detail and have long puzzled astrophysicists. Shocks closer to Earth can be detected by spacecraft, but they fly by too quickly to probe a wave's formation.
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The Atlantic
The Trump Family's Explanations Are Straining Credulity to Its Breaking PointAs an American statesman once said, “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice—can’t get fooled again.” The Trump family has little love lost with the Bush family, but the president, his son, and their aides and legal team would do well to heed the 43rd president’s mangled maxim, as they continue to offer an increasingly implausible story to the public about a meeting involving a Russian lawyer,
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The Atlantic
If My Friend Smokes Sometimes, Should the Cigarettes Have Filters?The standard answer from a doctor is simply never have a single cigarette. Never bring your phone to bed, never have unprotected sex, never sit for eight hours at a time. Never is the directive for a lot of things that a lot of people will do more times than never. This is a new reader-question-and-answer column that focuses on social determinants of health, and how we assess risk and make decisi
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Gizmodo
Heartwarming Photos Show a Lion Nursing an Orphaned Leopard CubPhoto Courtesy of Joop Van Der Linde / Ndutu Safari Lodge / KopeLion Earlier this week, a remarkable scene played out at Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Conservation Area. An orphaned leopard cub, desperate for a meal, approached a lioness who happened to be lactating. It’s a rare—and extremely precious—example of cross-species nursing in the wild. A guest staying at the Ngorongoro Conservation Area snappe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citrix pivoting from growth mode to profit-taking in CEO change, analysts saySoftware company Citrix Systems promoted its chief financial officer to CEO on Monday, and for good reason, analysts say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prime Day broke records, Amazon saysAmazon.com said its third Prime Day, held Tuesday, broke records and was the biggest day of sales in the company's history.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immunosuppression underlies resistance to anti-angiogenic therapyA Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified a novel mechanism behind resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors -- drugs that fight cancer by suppressing the formation of new blood vessels.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create first laboratory generation of astrophysical shock wavesFeature describes first laboratory generation of an astrophysical shock wave.
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Gizmodo
The Greatest Spider-Women of All Time, RankedImage: Still via Youtube Last week, we brought you the definitive ranking of the most superior Spider-Men in Marvel’s comic books—but let’s be honest: who runs the Spider-world? Spider-Girls. In the years since Peter Parker first donned the Spider-mantle, leagues of legendary women have taken on Spider-heroics of their own, and now its their turn to be ranked. A lot of the same rules apply as our
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How statins could be more effective in treatment of ovarian cancerStatins may be used as a potentially effective treatment against ovarian cancer, suggests evidence from a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer cells force normal cells to mimic viruses to help tumors spread, resist treatmentIn a study that could explain why some breast cancers are more aggressive than others, researchers say they now understand how cancer cells force normal cells to act like viruses – allowing tumors to grow, resist treatment, and spread. The virus mimic is detected in the blood of cancer patients, particularly in cases of an aggressive type known as triple-negative breast cancer. Researchers say cra
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence helps build brain atlas of fly behaviorScientists have created comprehensive brain maps linking different groups of neurons to specific behaviors, using a machine-learning program that annotated more than 225 days of videos of flies -- a feat that would have taken humans some 3,800 years.
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Popular Science
A new view of twisted proteins could help scientists understand Alzheimer'sHealth A critical molecule in the neurodegenerative disease has finally been mapped. A recent study reveals the full molecular structure of tau filaments, thought to cause Alzheimer's disease. It could unlock the secret of neurodegenerative .
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Live Science
7,500 Pounds of 'Eels' Cover Oregon Road with Slime (Here's Why)A highway in Oregon was recently closed when a crate filled with slime eels overturned on the highway, releasing tons of gooey slime. But what exactly are those creatures, and why do they produce the slime?
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Futurity.org
Current testing may not catch low iron in teen girlsYoung women should get blood tests for iron deficiency within a few years of starting their periods, new research suggests. The researchers used data from more than 6,000 women 12 to 49 years old who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 2003 and 2010. As part of the survey, female participants had blood testing for iron deficiency as well as hemoglobi
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New Scientist - News
Rats can tell when they’ve forgotten something, just like usEver walked into a room then realised you can't remember why you're there? Like people, rats know what they know, and can tell when their memory has failed them
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest study of malaria gene function reveals many potential drug targetsThe malaria parasite's success is owed to stripping down its genome to the bare essential genes, scientists have found. In the first ever large-scale study of malaria gene function, scientists analyzed more than half of the genes in the parasite's genome and found that two thirds of these genes were essential for survival -- the largest proportion of essential genes found in any organism studied t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New material resembling a metal nanosponge could reduce computer energy consumptionA nanoporous material has been developed based on a copper and nickel alloy, with a structure similar to that of a sponge with pores measuring the size of a millionth of a millimeter, which allows handling and storing information using very little energy. These nanosponges could be the base of new magnetic memories for computers and mobile phones with greater energy efficiency than those currently
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New route to improving rechargeable lithium batteries?In a study that suggests a route to improving rechargeable lithium batteries, researchers report that smooth surfaces may prevent harmful deposits from working their way into a solid electrolyte.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using a microRNA to shift the makeup of glioblastoma subtypesA specific microRNA, miR-128, was examined by scientists to help identify glioblastoma subtypes and to determine if altering the microRNA's presence in glioblastoma cells could change the tumor's subtype.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why a single nuke's impact shouldn't only be measured in megatonsA single nuclear warhead could cause devastating climate change, resulting in widespread drought and famine that could cost a billion lives, warn researchers.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Surge Protectors, Coffee Pods, Sport-Brella, and MoreBelkin surge protectors , Amazon’s K-Cup sample box , and a CyberPower UPS lead off Friday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals CyberPower 1000VA/600W UPS , $75 Today only, Amazon is offering up this 600 watt/1000-volt CyberPower UPS for just $75 , or about $30 less than its usual price. Advertisement If you use a desktop computer, this
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two UK police forces team up to launch drone unitTwo British police forces have combined efforts to create what they say is the nation's first police unit dedicated to using drones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars mission astronauts rehearse water landings off TexasNASA astronauts training for a possible mission to Mars have been practicing water maneuvers in a mock-up Orion space capsule in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA gives Hurricane Fernanda a close-upHurricane Fernanda is moving through the deep tropics and there's nothing in its way to prevent it from becoming a major hurricane. NASA's Terra satellite took a closer look at the strengthening storm.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher makes deep-sea coral reefs discovery in depths of the North-PacificScientists have long believed that the waters of the Central and Northeast Pacific Ocean were inhospitable to deep-sea scleractinian coral, but a Florida State University professor's discovery of an odd chain of reefs suggests there are mysteries about the development and durability of coral colonies yet to be uncovered.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
What an Artificial Intelligence Researcher Fears About AI“Being a scientist doesn’t absolve me of my humanity” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Water bears will survive the end of the world as we know itWater bears have a till-death-do-us-part pact with the sun, study suggests.
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Ars Technica
More on Oculus’ plans for a “spectrum” of standalone VR headsetsEnlarge / Just as there are no wires visible in this promotional shot, soon there will be no wires on a future Oculus standalone headset. Yesterday, a report from Bloomberg revealed that Oculus is planning to release a $200 wireless standalone VR headset. Today, we have additional details on Oculus' overall VR hardware plans. Ars Technica has confirmed that Oculus is exploring multiple different
3h
Live Science
Charlie Gard Controversy: Why a Baby's Head Size MattersIn a recent court hearing, the parents of Charlie Gard were at odds with their son's hospital over a seemly straightforward fact: The size of their baby's head.
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The Atlantic
The Projection PresidentIn Paris on Thursday, Donald Trump said , “A lot of people don’t know” that “France is America’s first and oldest ally.” That may be true. But commentators noted that when Trump uses the “a lot of people don’t know” formulation, it’s usually a sign that he didn’t know himself. It’s called projection. And Trump does it with remarkable frequency. You may have noticed that over the last few days, Tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spark Therapeutics announces publication in The Lancet of pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial data for investigational voretigene neparvovecSpark Therapeutics, a fully integrated gene therapy company dedicated to challenging the inevitability of genetic disease, today announced The Lancet, a highly ranked peer-reviewed journal, has published Phase 3 clinical trial data of voretigene neparvovec, an investigational, potential one-time gene therapy candidate for the treatment of patients with vision loss due to confirmed biallelic RPE65-
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseasesA fast and practical molecular-scale imaging technique has been developed that could let scientists view never-before-seen dynamics of biological processes involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decision-making rules least susceptible to manipulation, according to scienceComputer modelling has been used to demonstrate the varying manipulability of decision-making procedures and to identify those least susceptible to manipulation.
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Futurity.org
Just 1 night of bad sleep boosts amyloid beta in brainDisrupting just one night of sleep in healthy, middle-aged adults causes an increase in amyloid beta, a brain protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a small study suggests. And a week of tossing and turning leads to an increase in another brain protein, tau, which research has linked to brain damage in Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases. “We showed that poor sleep is associated wit
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Gizmodo
Maybe Dockless Bikesharing Was a Bad IdeaOn Wednesday Singapore-based bikesharing startup oBike dropped off 400 autolocking, smartphone-connected bicycles onto the sidewalks of London. Two days later, and, uh, things aren’t going so hot. As Trusted Reviews editor Michael Passingham tweeted this morning, one London city district has already hit several of Obike’s bikes with big yellow warning tags for causing “unnecessary obstruction.” I
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Gizmodo
Don't Blink or You'll Miss the World's Fastest Drone Flying Faster Than a Sports CarGIF Watching first-person footage of racing drones makes it seem like the tiny craft fly somewhere close to the speed of light. In reality, due to the limits of their human pilots, they top at around 80 miles per hour. That’s incredibly fast, but the Drone Racing League managed to double that with a new world record speed of 163.5 miles per hour. To ensure its races are decided by the skills of t
3h
Wired
Musicals (Yes, *Musicals*) Are About to Shake Up PodcastingOne podcasting company is betting it can keep listeners hooked with its musical offering '36 Questions.'
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Wired
Want a Robot That Can Really Feel? Give It WhiskersWhiskers are all the rage in nature, so why not give them to robots?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moms who breastfeed may have reduced risk of MSMothers who breastfeed for a total of at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with those who don’t breastfeed at all or do so for up to four months, according to a study.
3h
TEDTalks (video)
Why our screens make us less happy | Adam AlterWhat are our screens and devices doing to us? Psychologist Adam Alter has spent the last five years studying how much time screens steal from us and how they're getting away with it. He shares why all those hours you spend staring at your smartphone, tablet or computer might be making you miserable -- and what you can do about it.
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: Teleportation, encoding film into DNA and Jupiter's great red spotScientists hit a new milestone this week when they successfully exploited the properties of quantum entanglement – particles generated simultaneously existing in a single, shared quantum state – to teleport photons 300 miles into space from Earth . The implications of this are huge. While Star Trek-like teleportation of humans exists in realms of fiction only, achieving space-scale quantum entang
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify potentially safer substitutes for BPAResearchers at Baylor College of Medicine have identified a group of potential substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) that lack the adverse effects typically associated with BPA.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decline in financing could undermine malaria effortsGlobal malaria elimination funding is declining at a time when it remains crucial to eliminating the disease worldwide, according to a study published in the open access Malaria Journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prior dengue infection does not increase Zika disease severityA study involving 65 people who live in and around São José do Rio Preto (São Paulo State, Brazil), where dengue is endemic and there was a particularly rapid outbreak of Zika during the 2016 epidemic, show that prior dengue infection in human beings infected by Zika does not necessarily lead to a worse illness.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased sample size in 2015 surveyThe National Science Foundation's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics has more than doubled the sample size of its 2015 Survey of Doctorate Recipients in order to examine employment characteristics for specific fields of degree for the first time.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Verily Robot Will Raise 20 Million Sterile Mosquitoes for Release in CaliforniaThe company, an arm of Alphabet, is using mosquitoes infected with a sterilizing bacteria to fight dengue and Zika.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survey reports employment characteristics for more than 200 fields of studyThe National Science Foundation's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics has more than doubled the sample size of its 2015 Survey of Doctorate Recipients in order to examine employment characteristics for specific fields of degree for the first time.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Watch the World’s Fastest Drone Drag-Race into the Record BooksTechnically, it lays claim to the “fastest ground speed by a battery-powered remote-controlled quadcopter.”
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Gizmodo
This Squishy Artificial Heart is AmazingGIF Researchers in Europe have created a soft artificial heart that mimics the real thing. It’s still not ready for prime time, but the approach, in which the developers used silicone and 3D-printing, could revolutionize the way patients with heart disease are treated. Patients with severe cardiovascular problems are typically hooked up to blood pumps while they wait for a donor organ or for thei
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find first genomic biomarkers in extracellular vesicles in veterinary patientsResearchers at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University have discovered important biomarkers in extracellular vesicles in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease and congestive heart failure. This is the first biomarker discovery based on extracellular vesicles in a veterinary disease. The genomic material (microRNA, or miRNA) were isolated in small extracellular vesicles calle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Pilanesberg, South AfricaThe circular structure dominating this Sentinel-2 image is Pilanesberg, the result of geological activity over more than a billion years. Once a massive volcanic complex towering over 7000 m tall, millions of years of erosion have shaped the landscape to what it is today: concentric rings of hills rising from the surrounding plain, with a diameter of some 25 km.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shh! Proven security for your secretsResearchers show the security of their cipher based on chaos theory. The research highlights that their Vector Stream Cipher is not only secure, but structurally simple and low on memory usage compared with existing technology, making it useful for high-density data transmission applications such as in 5G mobile networks and 4K television broadcasts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research uses satellites to predict end of volcanic eruptionsInfrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end, researchers recently discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When life gives you lemons, make bioplasticsAn environmentally friendly method to produce BPA-free polycarbonate from limonene and carbon dioxide has been developed by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chinese lakes less polluted after sanitation clean-upPollution levels in many Chinese lakes have declined somewhat from high levels in the past decade, helped by billion-dollar investments in urban sewers and waste water treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists gain new understanding of quantum cooling processNew limits in optomechanical cooling have now been defined to better help understand the quantum state, report scientists.
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Futurity.org
App predicts heart risk after liver transplantResearchers have created an app—available online and for smartphones—that can determine the one-year risk of liver transplant patients dying or facing hospitalizations due to heart complications. Liver transplant surgery is among the highest-risk cardiac surgery. “Knowing the patient’s risk is critical to help prevent the frequent cardiac complications that accompany liver transplant surgery and
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA gives Hurricane Fernanda a close-upHurricane Fernanda is moving through the deep tropics and there's nothing in its way to prevent it from becoming a major hurricane. NASA's Terra satellite took a closer look at the strengthening storm.
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Gizmodo
French Army Performs Daft Punk Medley, Trump Does Not Look PleasedImage: YouTube / The Guardian At a Bastille Day event on Friday, the French army marching band did something unusual and amazing : they played electronic music unplugged. And not just any electronic music, either. The horns and drums and woodwinds performed a stunning medley of Daft Punk’s greatest hits. Donald Trump apparently did not enjoy it. Do you know who looks like he loved the celebration
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Live Science
Ready, Aim, Blast! NASA Engineer Creates World's Largest Super SoakerIf you're going to challenge someone to a water gun fight this summer, it's best you don't take up arms against Mark Rober, a former NASA engineer who has created the world's largest Super Soaker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research uses satellites to predict end of volcanic eruptionsResearchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) recently discovered that infrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover one of the brightest galaxies knownThanks to an amplified image produced by a gravitational lens, and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS a team of scientists from the Polytechnic University of Cartagena and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias have discovered one of the brightest galaxies known from the epoch when the universe had 20 percent of its present age.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mountain forests don't need humans – but we need themForests in the mountain regions of our planet are fragile ecosystems, suffering from the impact of climate change. However, to survive in the long-term, these ecosystems do not need human intervention. It is rather the humans in the mountain regions who depend on healthy forests and the protection they provide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New scales for the new kilogramThe Planck scale works according to the principle of electromagnetic force compensation: A weight force on one side of the scale is balanced by an electromagnetic force on the other side. This means that weights (so-called mass standards) will no longer be needed. This could be the beginning of the development of a completely new generation of scales that are suitable for industry.
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Gizmodo
What Do Teens Think About When They Think About HIV?Teens today have never known a world where HIV was a certain death sentence. They missed the “plague years” of AIDS—the confusion, the pop-cultural discussions, the general feeling of hopelessness regarding the disease. This is sometimes referred to as “historical privilege.” It means that through no fault of their own, teens could be unaware of the enormity of the epidemic—the havoc it wreaked,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smartphone app could reveal how urban spaces affect our health and wellbeingA new smartphone app designed to show how urban environments affect people's health and wellbeing has been launched this week (14 July 2017).
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The Atlantic
Trump’s Wile E. Coyote Approach to Border SecurityThe president of the United States wants a see-through wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, in part because he’s worried about people getting hit in the head by any bags of drugs that might be hurled over the divide. “As horrible as it sounds, when they throw the large sacks of drugs over, and if you have people on the other side of the wall, you don’t see them—they hit you on the head with 60 pounds
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The Atlantic
Mosul Rivalries and Pyongyang Assassins: The Week in Global-Affairs WritingHow (Not) To Kill Kim Jong Un Adam Rawnsley | Foreign Policy “But long before Pyongyang began lighting off ballistic missiles and churning out nuclear warheads, the Kim dynasty has been facing down assassination threats, both real and imagined. From the days of Japanese colonialism in the 1930s through the turbulent end of communist regimes in the 1990s, many have tried (and failed) to kill a Kim
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Live Science
Computerized Fabric Could Transform Any Piece of Clothing Into a Fitness TrackerThe flexible fabric, developed by Harvard researchers, might also one day assist with movement, acting as a soft exoskeleton for wearers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researcher makes deep-sea coral reefs discovery in depths of the North-PacificFSU researcher discovers improbable coral reefs in the hostile waters of the North Pacific.
4h
Ingeniøren
Teleselskab afviser at have sænket roaming-hastighedDet var en fejl, at teleselskabet 3 fortalte Energistyrelsen, at de benyttede trafikstyring ulovligt. Det gør de ikke, slår selskabet nu fast. Energistyrelsen ændrer derfor sin rapport.
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Viden
Ny forskning: Ældres korte søvn er et levn fra en farefuld fortidResultatet er interessant, fordi det belyser, hvordan vores hjerne er indrettet til overlevelse, siger dansk forsker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chipped teeth suggests Homo naledi had a unique dietThere was a lot of excitement when scientists reported the discovery of an entirely new hominin species, Homo naledi, in 2015. Since then, we are gradually learning more about them. For example, earlier this year, researchers found that they lived sometime between 335,000 and 236,000 years ago.
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Gizmodo
Your New Private Beach Cabana Is Just $43 TodaySport-Brella XL , $43 Bar none, Sport-Brella is the ultimate beach umbrella , and Amazon’s discounting the blue XL model for just $43 today , the best price we’ve seen in months. Unlike a regular umbrella, Sport-Brella leans backwards and attaches to the sand with stakes, creating a kind of semi-private cocoon with enough space for a couple of chairs and a cooler. Best of all, it sets up in about
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The Warriors Said No To Paul George For Klay Thompson | Jezebel A Very Dramatic First PhotoDeadspin The Warriors Said No To Paul George For Klay Thompson | Jezebel A Very Dramatic First Photo of Beyonce’s Twins, Who Are One Month Old Today | Fusion The GOP’s Revised Healthcare Bill Is Already on Life Support After Less Than 24 Hours | The Grapevine White Beauty Blogger Creates ‘Chocolate Challenge’ ... Because People Are Idiots |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How protein interactions drive cellular deathResearchers use a simplified model of a protein network to explain how apoptosis is regulated, whose malfunction is linked to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The last survivors on EarthThe world's most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the sun dies, according to a new study.
4h
The Atlantic
When Companies Get Hacked, Should They Be Allowed to Hack Back?There is an old debate (at least, counting in internet years) that tends to crop up after major cybersecurity breaches such as the widespread WannaCry ransomware attack in May . In the aftermath of such incidents, some decry the sorry state of cybersecurity and insist that if only tech firms, with their wealth of resources and technical expertise, were allowed to go after the perpetrators of thes
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 7/8–7/14Beer yoga in Australia, utter destruction in Mosul, Iraq, the Shearing of the Beasts and Running of the Bulls in Spain, wildfires in California, Formula One Grand Prix of Austria, Stage 11 of the Tour de France, and much more.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
NIH Fetal Research Plan Blocked in House Panel's Draft BillThe prohibition would be a symbolic win -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Wired
The Model 3's Success Depends Upon Tesla Building More Than a Decent CarTesla has to ramp up the infrastructure to support its new model.
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Wired
Buying Guide: All The Gear You Need For Trail RunningHere's everything you need to rouse yourself from that pavement-pounding stupor.
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New Scientist - News
Hailing e-Volvos as imminent saviours of the planet is nonsenseHigh praise was heaped on Volvo when it said it would stop making cars powered only by petrol or diesel. This is no revolution, says Olive Heffernan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FOXI3 gene is involved in dental cusp formationHairless dog breeds differ from other dogs not only by lacking a coat, but also in the number and nature of their teeth. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena studied the skulls and teeth of pedigreed hairless dogs from the collection of the Phyletisches Museum of the University of Jena. Thus, they furthered our
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gene therapy treatment routes for motor neurone disease uncovered in new studyScientists investigating the genetic causes and altered functioning of nerve cells in motor neurone disease (MND) have discovered a new mechanism that could lead to fresh treatment approaches for one of the most common forms of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
COPD: Changes in the lungs, changes in the microbiomeChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can result in structural changes within the lungs over time. Scientists have now been able to show that these changes not only affect the organ itself, but also the bacteria that live in the lung.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not all muscle building supplements are equalPopular muscle building supplements, known as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are ineffective when taken in isolation, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synchrotron light used to show human domestication of seeds from 2000 BCFor the first time, scientists have documented the rate of evolution of seed coat thinning, a major marker of crop domestication, from archaeological remains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determinationScientists have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of the nanowire can be influenced by excitation of the quantum dot with a laser.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is a healthy environment a human right? Testing the idea in AppalachiaDo we have a fundamental right to breathe clean air, drink clean water and eat safe food? The idea of environmental human rights is receiving growing attention worldwide, driven by our global ecological crisis. But the United States has lagged behind in codifying these rights into laws and in successfully furthering them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria never swim aloneMany animal species display flocking behaviour, but the fact that microorganisms do is not as well known. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cretaceous tanaidaceans took care of their offspring more than 105 million years agoA scientific team has found the first evidence of parental care in Tanaidaceans, dating back to more than 105 million years, according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports, from Nature group. These new findings are based on the study of three small crustaceans from different species of the Cretaceous –Alavatanais carabe, Alavatanais margulisae and Daenerytanais maieuticus- pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How protein interactions drive cellular deathResearchers at the Universities of Tübingen and Konstanz, the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the Max Planck Institute of Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, and the German Cancer Research Centers have worked together to gain new insights into a protein network which regulates the programmed break down of cells, also known as apoptosis. These Bcl-2 proteins are difficult to investigate as they exchange bet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diesel is now better than gas, study saysModern diesel cars emit less pollution generally than cars that run on gasoline, says a new six-nation study published today in Scientific Reports whose groundwork was laid in part by an American chemist now working at Université de Montréal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combatting stereotypes about Appalachian dialectsDuring the 2016 presidential election, broad support for Donald Trump came from most communities in Appalachia, where he received 63 percent of the vote. A great deal of national attention was directed to the people of this region, which spans from southern New York to Mississippi and Alabama.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The current heat spell is needed for the monsoonWill this week's high temperatures make it into the record book? Can we top 122 F? We don't know yet, but as we move through this extreme heat spell, one thing is for certain, the unpredictability of the weather means records will continue to fall, says Randy Cerveny, an ASU President's professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning.
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Futurity.org
Program makes robots better listenersResearchers have created a system that may make robots better at following spoken instructions from people, regardless of how abstract or specific those instructions may be. The research is a step toward robots that are able to more seamlessly communicate with human collaborators. “The issue we’re addressing is language grounding, which means having a robot take natural language commands and gene
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eavesdropping on the ocean's mighty microorganismsThe microscopic organisms that make up ocean ecosystems are invisible to the naked eye, yet they are responsible for producing half the oxygen we breathe, and for sustaining all the world's fisheries. Now, nearing the end of our three-week cruise of the North Pacific off Hawaii, we are working to understand how these tiny bacteria connect and communicate with one another.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unabated climate change would reverse the development gains in Asia: ReportUnabated climate change would bring devastating consequences to countries in Asia and the Pacific, which could severely affect their future growth, reverse current development gains, and degrade quality of life, according to a report produced by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discovered one of the brightest galaxies knownThanks to an amplified image produced by a gravitational lens, and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS a team of scientists from the Polytechnic University of Cartagena and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias have discovered one of the brightest galaxies known from the epoch when the universe had 20 percent of its present age.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not all muscle building supplements are equalPopular muscle building supplements, known as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are ineffective when taken in isolation, according to new research from the University of Stirling.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny songbird won't be silencedOn a quiet, 30-acre property near West Palm Beach, Fla., 19 Florida grasshopper sparrows are starting to sing.
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Futurity.org
This, not diet, may cause GI trouble in kids with autismDiet is not a contributing factor to the significant gastrointestinal issues common among children with autism spectrum disorder, research finds. “Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for those with autism to experience constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal pain, and other gastrointestinal issues,” says Brad Ferguson, postdoctoral research fellow in the radiology department at the Univers
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New alternative to whey protein in calf milk replacersWe see a lot of whey protein on the supermarket shelves these days. The high-protein, low-carb diet trend has been highly profitable for cheese makers and whey processors, who once used the cheese byproduct as fertilizer or in animal feed. With more whey going to the human market, animal feed manufacturers are looking for alternative protein sources that maintain animal health while saving costs.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Complex gas motion in the center of the Milky WayHow does the gas in the centre of the Milky Way behave? Researchers from Heidelberg University, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Oxford, recently investigated the motion of gas clouds in a comprehensive computer simulation. The new model finally makes it possible to conclusively explain this complex gas motion. Astrophysicists Dr Mattia C. Sormani (Heidelberg) and Matthew Ri
5h
The Atlantic
The Problem With Helicopter CollegesAs a coda to yesterday’s article on Harvard University, where a committee is trying to ban undergraduates from joining social clubs, readers may be interested in a dissent offered by Steven Pinker, the influential psychology professor, who declared that the recommendation of his colleagues is “at odds with the ideals of a university.” If you’re catching up, the Harvard committee argued that “allo
5h
Ars Technica
Scrap dealer finds Apollo-era NASA computers in dead engineer’s basementNASA A pair of Apollo-era NASA computers and hundreds of mysterious tape reels have been discovered in a deceased engineer’s basement in Pittsburgh, according to a NASA Office of the Inspector General (OIG) report released in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. Most of the tapes are unmarked, but the majority of the rest appear to be instrumentation reels for Pioneer 10 and P
5h
Live Science
Facts About TardigradesTardigrades, often called water bears or moss piglets, are near-microscopic animals that are almost indestructible and can even survive in outer space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clever crows can plan for the future like humans doHumans aren't as unique as we used to think. Not, at least when it comes to making plans for the future. Scientists originally thought humans were the only animals that made plans but, over the past decade, studies on non-human primates and the crow family have challenged this perspective.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer chip technology repurposed for making reflective nanostructuresA team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-sensitive measurement of nanoscale deformationNanoscale deformations could impact the high-precision experiments, such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Americans more likely to vote in times of uncertaintyDuring times of economic and political uncertainty, Americans are more likely to vote, according to a new book by two Rice University political scientists. The researchers also found that when there's less uncertainty, many Americans stay home on Election Day.
5h
Gizmodo
How to Back Up All of Your Online Accounts OfflineImage: Google Big fans of the cloud as we are, there’s no doubt relying solely on keeping your stuff stored remotely is a risky strategy. Accounts get hacked. Companies fold. And if you don’t have backups of your most precious Snapchats and Gmails , then they can disappear in a puff of data center smoke. Here’s how to make sure you’ve got local copies of everything. Facebook Image: Screenshot You
5h
Ingeniøren
Brokollaps: Stålstillads rykkede sig, da beton blev hældt ud over brodækket12 bygningsarbejdere blev såret i går, da et brobyggeri over en jernbane styrtede sammen, just efter at et tog var passeret under broen.
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Futurity.org
Spring-loaded stairs spare knees and anklesResearchers have built energy-recycling stairs that store a user’s energy during descent and return energy to the user during ascent, making the trip up easier. The spring-loaded stairs compress when someone comes down the stairs, saving energy otherwise dissipated through impact and braking forces at the ankle by 26 percent. When going up, the stairs give people a boost by releasing the stored e
5h
Gizmodo
Shooting With Sony's Killer A9 Almost Feels Like CheatingPhotos: Brent Rose/Gizmodo If you’ve ever wondered how a photographer managed to capture the exact moment of an incredible end zone reception or the instant a bird takes flight, the answer, in part, is that the photographer’s camera also captured the garbage moments directly before and after that golden frame, with a very expensive camera rattling off photos at tommy gun speeds. For these profess
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theory of modularity limiting disturbance effects found to be sound using springtails(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Spain, Switzerland and Canada has used common springtails to prove the soundness of a theory that suggests that modularity limits disturbance effects in networks. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their experiments and what they observed. Marta Sales-Pardo with Universitat Rovira i Virgili offers a Perspective piece on the wo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
COPD -- changes in the lungs, changes in the microbiomeChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can result in structural changes within the lungs over time. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show that these changes not only affect the organ itself, but also the bacteria that live in the lung. The results have been published in PLOS ONE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gene therapy treatment routes for motor neurone disease uncovered in new studyScientists investigating the genetic causes and altered functioning of nerve cells in motor neurone disease (MND) have discovered a new mechanism that could lead to fresh treatment approaches for one of the most common forms of the disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Peptide complex formed in the brain is responsible for Alzheimer's diseaseMembers of the Faculty of Fundamental Medicine at the Lomonosov Moscow State University have determined the structure of a peptide complex, formed in the brain at the early stages of Alzheimer's disease progression. The research results will contribute to the rational design of compounds, capable to block disease progress.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria never swim aloneMany animal species display flocking behavior, but the fact that microorganisms do is not as well known. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How protein interactions drive cellular deathResearchers use a simplified model of a protein network to explain how apoptosis is regulated, whose malfunction is linked to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gene mutation associated with Fanconi anemiaFanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by high cancer risk. Researchers of the University of Würzburg now have revealed a new Fanconi anemia gene that is involved in complex DNA repair processes and may also play a relevant role in cancer prevention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shh! Proven security for your secretsResearchers show the security of their cipher based on chaos theory.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When life gives you lemons, make bioplastics!Chemists at ICIQ in Tarragona developed an environmentally friendly method to produce BPA-free polycarbonate from limonene and CO2.
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cognitive science
The Brain, Part 2 -- the secret life of neurons & how they make the brain computesubmitted by /u/benbrum [link] [comments]
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Wired
Apple’s Privacy Pledge Complicates Its Push Into Artificial IntelligenceA puny iPhone is no match for a cloud server.
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The Atlantic
What's Actually Wrong With the U.S. Health SystemOn the heels of the Senate’s latest attempt at replacing the Affordable Care Act, the Commonwealth Fund has released its latest evaluation of what, exactly, ails the U.S. health-care system. Once again , the think tank found the U.S. medical system performed the worst among 11 similar countries, all while spending more. The United States fared especially badly on measures of affordability, access
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Gizmodo
George R. R. Martin Reveals the Morbid State of One Returning Game of Thrones CharacterImage: HBO Another series of R.L. Stine classics is coming to the big screen. Witness the fantastic-looking cast of Black Panther . Arrow ’s newest Black Canary finally suits up. The Flash could be casting one very weird DC hero. Plus, tons of pictures from Blade Runner 2049 , Justice League , Tomb Raider , It , and more. Spoilers, assemble! Fear Street THR reports that 20th Century Fox has hired
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Dana Foundation
Subscribe to Dana Foundation E-newsletterIf you haven’t already, subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter! The July issue will be out next week.
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Scientific American Content: Global
In Case You Missed ItTop news from around the world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fermented red clover extract stops menopausal hot flushes and symptomsIt cannot be said that red clover alone reduces menopause symptoms, but a recently published Danish study finds that fermented red clover extract effectively prevents hot flushes, hormonal swings and bone loss. Bucking the trend of usual research tradition the study has delivered a strong seal of approval to an innovative Danish red clover producer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researchers discover an ugly truth about attractivenessNew research from Florida State University finds the attractiveness of a romantic partner can influence a person's desire to diet and seek a slim body, though that motivation contrasts sharply between men and women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ecological underpinnings of rural povertyA first-of-its-kind effort to examine the ecological drivers of rural poverty combines economic, ecological and epidemiological models. The lessons learned could inform interventions to lift people out of poverty.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Singapore scientists pave way for better juvenile arthritis diagnosis & treatment outcome predictionThey discovered a previously unknown group of regulatory T cells linked to the disease and DNA features that affect patients' response to treatment.Findings pave the way for improved juvenile arthritis diagnosis and prediction of treatment outcomes, and are also relevant for adult rheumatoid arthritis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research uses satellites to predict end of volcanic eruptionsResearchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa recently discovered that infrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end.
5h
Gizmodo
What You Can Actually Do to Fight Climate Change, According to ScienceImage: Dennis Yang/Flickr Creative Commons There’s no doubt that if we’re going to stop or even slow down climate change, we have to get our collective shit together. But collective action starts with individual choices, and for all the data-driven decision makers out there, the path forward just got a bit more lucid. A new study in Environmental Research Letters has determined exactly which life
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: You, My Green-Eyed HermitIn a delightful turn of events near the South African West Coast, scientists stumble upon a new hermit crab species with distinctively green eyes.
5h
Viden
NASA trækker i nødbremsen: Budgettet rækker ikke til MarsDen amerikanske rumorganisation fattes penge til den dyre Mars-mission, der var planlagt til 2030'erne.
5h
Live Science
Mount Vesuvius Is on Fire (Not Like That, Though)Smoke is rising from Mount Vesuvius.
5h
Wired
The AlphaBay Takedown Sends Dark Web Markets ReelingBut law enforcement's raid on AlphaBay won't end the darknet's vibrant drug trade.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find first genomic biomarkers in extracellular vesicles in veterinary patientsResearchers at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University have discovered important biomarkers in extracellular vesicles in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease and congestive heart failure. This is the first biomarker discovery based on extracellular vesicles in a veterinary disease. These findings could provide important insight into the molecular basis, diagnosis and therap
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Live Science
See the New Trillion-Ton Antarctic Iceberg in Image from SpaceA new view from space shows Antarctica's newest bouncing baby iceberg. And it's huge.
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Gizmodo
Actually, Cannibalism Can Be GoodImage: Youtube (Screenshot) Sometimes, we humans let our dumb values prevent us from taking biological realities seriously. Take pooping, for example: People have decided pooping is gross, even though it’s a thing that most of us do literally every day. Now, some scientists think that even cannibalism is worth another hard look. Cannibalism naturally occurs in lots of species of insects, fish, an
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Futurity.org
Forests on mountains store more carbonDue to a range of factors, mountain forests store more carbon than forests on flat land or low slopes, new research indicates. Trees are one of Earth’s most important carbon reservoirs, absorbing carbon dioxide—a greenhouse gas—from the atmosphere as part of their process of respiration. Yet, in mountain landscapes, trees aren’t lone agents at storing carbon. There is more going on; factors such
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Scientific American Content: Global
Hunt for Flight MH370 Takes Searchers into Uncharted TerritoryThe hunt for the missing flight MH370 plane maps a largely unexplored part of the Indian Ocean's seafloor -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
There's An Amazing New Drug For Multiple Sclerosis. Should I Try It?The innovative drug Ocrevus looks as if it could be a game-changer for people with MS. But it's very, very expensive. And as with any new medication, the long-term safety risks are unknown. (Image credit: Katherine Streeter for NPR)
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
European Commission urges logging ban in ancient Białowieża ForestEurope's highest court will rule on Poland's policy that encourages tree-felling in biodiversity hotspot. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22309
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The Atlantic
Bluegrass and Brain Rest: This Week’s Top 7 Education StoriesGirls’ Opportunities to Play the Sports They Love Jane Meredith Adams | EdSource Lacrosse came to Avonna Usher, a 16-year-old junior at Granite Bay High School northeast of Sacramento, the way sports come to many young athletes—at school. The pure pleasure of hurling a 40-yard pass has driven her to attack her learning disability, improve her grades and win a verbal commitment to play lacrosse fo
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The Atlantic
To the Bone: The Trouble With Anorexia on FilmTo the Bone , which arrives on Netflix Friday, is a mostly unremarkable film about anorexia, in that it follows the model of virtually all existing films about the subject. Ellen (Lily Collins), a young white woman from a privileged but dysfunctional family, is anorexic. In the narrative arc of the movie, she’s admitted to a treatment center, where a charismatic doctor (Keanu Reeves) essentially
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The Atlantic
Send Us Your Best Jane Austen MemesIf Jane Austen were alive today, I like to think she’d be pretty at home on the internet. That eminently judgy narrator of hers would delight in quipping and snarking her way through Twitter and Tumblr—not to mention the fact that so many of the dynamics she observed in Regency-era England continue, even 200 years later, to be just a little too real. As one Tumblr user puts it: https://jillianajo
6h
Wired
Verily's Mosquito Factory Accelerates the Fight Against ZikaThe next release of sterile mosquitoes from MosquitoMate gets an assist from robotic sorters from the Google spin-off.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use new techniques to pinpoint evolution in fungiAuthors from Yale and Michigan State University collaborated on a National Science Foundation study of five types of fungi that has illuminated a successful new strategy for pinpointing genes responsible for the evolution of certain biological processes.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who learns foreign language better—introverts or extraverts?Extravert Chinese students learning English as a second language are likely to perform better in speaking and reading, but less proficient in listening than their introvert counterparts, according to a study published in Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (JSSH).
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Science-Based Medicine
Placentophagy and the Risk of Invasive Neonatal GBS DiseaseA young infant has suffered an invasive and potentially deadly bacterial infection...twice! Now the CDC is warning that maternal placentophagy may have played a role.
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Ars Technica
Ars is hiring—if you’re an experienced product reviewer, we want you!Enlarge / Artist's impression of how busy this person will be once hired. (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) Ars Technica is seeking an experienced writer and reviewer to join our Reviews Team. The world of technology products is vast, and the ideal candidate will have a broad interest in technology goodies that stretches from flagship products to the lesser wonders that we nonetheless can’t li
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Ars Technica
The state of Mac gamingEnlarge / Could this really be a keyboard and mouse for modern gaming? Well... (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Gaming on the Mac is terrible, right? That has been the consensus among gamers for a decade-plus—Ars even declared Mac gaming dead all the way back in 2007. But in reality, the situation has gotten better. And after Apple dedicated an unprecedented amount of attention to Mac gaming at WWDC 2
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Futurity.org
51% of opioid prescriptions go to people with mood disordersOf all opioid prescriptions in the United States each year, fifty-one percent go to adults with mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, new research suggests. “Despite representing only 16 percent of the adult population, adults with mental health disorders receive more than half of all opioid prescriptions distributed each year in the United States,” says Matthew Davis, lead author of the
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Popular Science
Grandma's insomnia might be a product of evolutionScience She's actually looking out for you. A new study suggests that older people have more restless sleep because we evolved to serve as nighttime "sentinels" in mixed-age groups. Read on.
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Ingeniøren
Enig opposition: Regeringen sætter landbruget over forbud mod farligt pesticidSamtlige partier i rød blok vender sig mod regeringen, som vil modarbejde et EU-forbud mod et omstridt pesticid, der er kræftfremkaldende og skader fostre.
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Ingeniøren
Hedebølger udvider luften, så fly får svært ved at letteKlimaet slår så at sige igen mod en af de helt store CO2-syndere, luftfarten. Global opvarmning kan få vidtrækkende konsekvenser for flyenes evne til at lette, viser amerikansk forskning.
6h
New Scientist - News
What is chemsex and why is the UK government worried about it?The UK government wants to address chemsex, which usually involves drugs like miaow miaow or GHB. Clare Wilson explains the health concerns around the trend
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New Scientist - News
Laws of mathematics don’t apply here, says Australian PMInspired by the UK’s Investigatory Powers Act, Malcolm Turnbull has proposed a new cybersecurity law to circumvent encryption – and he won’t be beaten by maths
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Ars Technica
A diesel emissions test you can’t game? We try it outBosch provided flights to Frankfurt and three nights' accommodation for this trip to the Bosch Mobility Experience. Jonathan Gitlin BOXBERG, Germany—Diesel is a dirty word in the auto industry these days. The fuel was once viewed— particularly in Europe —as a potential savior, since diesel engines offer much better fuel economy and emit much less CO 2 per mile than engines that run on gasoline. B
7h
Live Science
8-Legged Extremophile Freaks Will Outlive Humanity (& Maybe the Sun)The eight-legged micro-animal called a tardigrade could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun, a new study suggests — long after humans are history.
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Live Science
Half of Kids Don't Get Epinephrine Until They Get to the ERWhen a person has a severe allergic reaction, an injection of epinephrine is absolutely essential, and the sooner, the better.
7h
Live Science
World's Brightest Laser Could Pave Way for Lower-Radiation X-RaysThe world's brightest laser can "transform" visible light into X-rays, making the shape and color of objects appear different, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Step by step, we're tackling gender equity in Australian astronomyThe number of women at the most senior levels in the Australian astronomical community remains low despite many positive steps in supporting gender equity. Women make up only 17% of positions at full or associate professor level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers offer new explanation for why protein fibers formAlzheimer's disease results from a dysfunctional stacking of protein molecules that form long fibers inside brain cells. Similar stacking occurs in sickle-cell anemia and mad cow disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Jupiter's Great Red Spot (enhanced color)This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LISA Pathfinder—bake, rattle and rollThe final days of the LISA Pathfinder mission are some of the busiest, as controllers make final tests and get ready to switch off the gravitational pioneer next Tuesday.
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Science | The Guardian
'Truly unique': lioness adopts and nurses leopard cubNo wild cat has ever been observed nursing a cub from another species – the event may be the result of the Tanzanian lioness having lost her own litter A lioness has been spotted nursing a tiny leopard cub in Tanzania, the first time a wild cat is known to have adopted a cub from another species. The five-year old lioness, called Nosikitok is closely monitored by conservationists in the Ngorongor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Symbiotic ciliates and bacteria have a common ancestorCiliates, just like humans, are colonized by a vast diversity of bacteria. Some ciliates and their bacterial symbionts have become friends for life, as researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen demonstrated by comparing a group of these single-celled ciliates and their bacterial partners from the Caribbean and the Mediterranean Seas. The bacteria provide their cil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Vesuvius on fireWith Italy suffering high temperatures and drought, wildfires have broken out including blazes that are ravaging the slopes of Mount Vesuvius near Naples. Using images taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite on 12 July 2017, the animation combines different sensor bands to highlight the numerous separate fires around this iconic volcano and the smoke billowing over the surrounding area.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scholars examine ecological underpinnings of rural povertyDeep in landlocked Africa, a miracle is unfolding. Less than a generation after a genocidal civil war left it in ruins, Rwanda is defying poverty traps that ensnare many other natural resource-dependent developing countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explore electronic properties of liquid electrolytes for energy technologiesLiquid electrolytes are essential components in a variety of emerging energy technologies, including batteries, supercapacitors and solar-to-fuel devices.
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Wired
This Is How *Game of Thrones* Ends in Total MatriarchyWith the Stark sisters, the Mother of Dragons, and a few others, we could see an era of total female rule in Westeros.
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Wired
Lenovo X1 Yoga Gen 2 Review: This Bendy 2-in-1 laptop gets an upgradeWe review Lenovo's hybrid 2-in-1 laptop, the second generation of the X1 Yoga.
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Wired
Google’s Academic Influence Campaign: It's ComplicatedSeveral academics named in a database of Google funding recipients say they’ve never received money from the company.
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New Scientist - News
150-year-old zombie plants revived after excavating ghost pondsPlant species from ghost ponds that were buried alive when agricultural land expanded can survive for hundreds of years
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Gizmodo
Never Run Out of Power Outlets With Today's Amazon Gold BoxBelkin Gold Box Death, taxes, and never having enough power outlets. I can’t help you with the first two, but today’s Belkin Gold Box deal on Amazon can ease the pain of the third. Choose from three popular surge protectors, from a travel-friendly miniature model , to a larger one with pivoting outlets that accommodate oversized plugs. More Deals
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Scientific American Content: Global
London's Deadly Grenfell Tower Fire: Building Material Now Leading SuspectTower’s “skin” was filled with flammable core though fire-retardant versions were available; many more structures at risk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
End Times for the American Republic?The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mental Illness Is Common, but Long-Lasting Mental Illness Is RareNew research suggests that nearly everyone will develop a psychological disorder at some point in their lives—but for most, it’s temporary -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Copper in Ötzi the Iceman’s ax came from surprisingly far awayCopper for the ancient Iceman’s blade traveled about 500 kilometers to his northern Italian home region.
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New Scientist - News
Polar bear attacks on people set to rise as climate changesDwindling sea ice is driving hungry bears on to land and towards human settlements
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New Scientist - News
Hundreds charged in huge opioid and healthcare fraud crackdownCharges have been brought against 412 people in the US for healthcare fraud, including a doctor who allegedly gave out 12,000 illegal prescriptions for opioids
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thailand to check monks' bad habits with 'smart ID cards'Thailand's Buddhist monks could soon be issued "smart ID cards" flagging any drug or criminal records, in the latest move by the junta to restore the tarnished image of the men in orange robes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Fake News Goes Viral--Here's the MathModels similar to those used to track disease show what happens when too much information hits social media networks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers describe one of the most massive large-scale structures in the universeA team of astronomers from the Inter University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics (IUCAA), and Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), both in Pune, India, and members of two other Indian universities, have identified a previously unknown, extremely large supercluster of galaxies located in the direction of constellation Pisces. This is one of the largest known structures in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new search for extrasolar planets from the Arecibo ObservatoryThe National Science Foundation's Arecibo Observatory and the Planetary Habitability Laboratory of the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo joined the Red Dots project in the search for new planets around our nearest stars. This new collaboration will simultaneously observe in both the optical and radio spectrum Barnard's Star, a popular star in science fiction literature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost CO sensor developed using nanoscale honeycomb structuresResearchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have developed a highly sensitive, low-cost nanosensor that can quickly detect minute changes in carbon monoxide (CO) levels, with potential applications in environmental pollution monitoring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heat-loving quantum oscillationsThe rapidly developing science and technology of graphene and atomically-thin materials has taken another step forward with new research from The University of Manchester.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mississippi mud may hold hope for Louisiana coastMany studies say capturing Mississippi River sand through diversions is key to rebuilding Louisiana's vanishing coast. But a new study in the open-access journal Earth Surface Dynamics of an old levee breach, or crevasse, along Bayou Lafourche indicates that mud, the most plentiful sediment type carried by the river, may be the most powerful tool in building land.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computational imaging on the electric gridResearchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the University of Toronto have developed a technology for producing a new understanding of the nighttime landscape—from the office level to the entire city—based on the flicker of electric lights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlling heat and particle currents in nanodevices by quantum observationResearchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations.
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cognitive science
Philosophy Discord chat for quality conversation - We just launched our reading group where we read and discuss a philosophy paper every week.submitted by /u/Bostrom-VS-Clark [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science
The Secret of the Sun’s Magnetic CyclesStep inside a simulation of the interior of the sun as its magnetic field reverses, a process that creates solar storms that can interrupt power grids and satellite communications on Earth.
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Wired
Video: Watch the Dreamy History—and Lurid Future—of Film ColorFrom simple film-painting to digital post-production techniques, we've long been searching for the perfect hue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrafast motions and fleeting geometries in proton hydrationBasic processes in chemistry and biology involve protons in a water environment. Water structures accommodating protons and their motions have so far remained elusive. Applying ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, researchers have mapped fluctuating proton transfer motions and provided direct evidence that protons in liquid water are predominantly shared by two water molecules. Femtosecond proton e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In rare sight, lioness nurses leopard cub in TanzaniaNewly released photographs from a Tanzanian wildlife area show an incredibly rare sight: a leopard cub suckling on a lion believed to have given birth to a litter last month.
8h
Ingeniøren
Forskere fjernstyrer levende cyborg-guldsmedEn guldsmed med indopererede lysledere og manipulerede gener kan fjernstyres gennem en rygsæk med elektronisk udstyr, hævder forskere.
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Ingeniøren
Masser af varme tilbud til it-specialister i stort set alle brancherFra forsvaret og efterretningstjenesten til fremtidens tandlæge-løsning. Fra SKAT over energi- og finanssektoren, uddannelse, elektronik-, transport-, detailhandel- og konsulentbranchen. Alle ønsker softwareudviklere og it-specialister. Find dit næste job her. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/masser-varme-tilbud-it-specialister-stort-set-alle-brancher-9122 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decision-making rules least susceptible to manipulation, according to scienceHSE researchers have used computer modeling to demonstrate the varying manipulability of decision-making procedures and to identify those least susceptible to manipulation. Their findings are published in the paper "Manipulability of Majority Relation-based Collective Decision Rules."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of frictionIn physics, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise—and not only on the macroscopic scale, as in mechanical engineering, but also on the microscopic scale, in areas such as biology and nanotechnology. It is quite difficult to study friction at the atom scale where non-linear effects prevail.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shedding light on galaxy rotation secretsThe dichotomy concerns the so-called angular momentum (per unit mass) that in physics is a measure of size and rotation velocity. Spiral galaxies are found to be strongly rotating, with an angular momentum higher by a factor of about five than ellipticals. What is the origin of such a difference? An international research team investigated the issue in a study just published in the Astrophysical J
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Gizmodo
Elon Musk Launches Mystery Website, X.com(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Elon Musk just announced the launch of a new website, x.com. The billionaire founder of Tesla and SpaceX made the announcement on Twitter at 1:21am Pacific time this morning. But so far there isn’t much to look at. The website is just a single letter X . Musk formerly owned x.com when he was a co-founder at PayPal (that’s how he made his fortune) but lost the domain when th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fungi can be used as biomonitors for assessing radioactivity in our environmentRadioactive contamination is the unwanted presence of radioactive substances in the environment. The environment is contaminated by naturally occurring and anthropogenic radionuclides, unstable isotopes of an element that releases radiation as it decomposes and becomes more stable These radionuclides can be transferred throughout the food chain until reaching humans, comprising a potential health
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia foils trade in vulnerable slow lorisesIndonesian authorities have detained an alleged wildlife trafficker and seized nine protected slow lorises and a wreathed hornbill, an official said Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synchrotron light used to show human domestication of seeds from 2000 BCScientists from UCL have used the UK's synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, to document for the first time the rate of evolution of seed coat thinning, a major marker of crop domestication, from archaeological remains.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determinationScientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of the nanowire can be influenced by excitatio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tardigrades: The last survivors on EarthThe world's most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the Sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determinationScientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of the nanowire can be influenced by excitatio
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synchrotron light used to show human domestication of seeds from 2000 BCScientists from UCL have used the UK's synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, to document for the first time the rate of evolution of seed coat thinning, a major marker of crop domestication, from archaeological remains.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The last survivors on EarthThe world's most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.
9h
The Atlantic
What Would It Take to Completely Sterilize the Earth?The odds of finding life on another planet hinge on the answers to two big questions. First, how often does life arise? Second, once it does arise, how likely is it to persist without being completely wiped out? The first question is extremely difficult, especially since we have exactly one example of a life-spawning planet. But the second question is easier to answer—at least for Earth—and a tri
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The Atlantic
Pat Robertson Gives Trump a Pass on RussiaPat Robertson has been a Cold War Don Quixote for years. He’s been tilting at Russian windmills from atop his nightly perch at the 700 Club for the better part of three decades, as I spent years watching his show with my grandmother and great-grandmother. In between reports on zany plots to drop Bibles on North Korea with balloons, warnings about “ AIDS handshake rings ,” and a healthy weekly dos
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The Atlantic
Are Juvenile Life Sentences Here to Stay?It’s been more than seven years since the U.S. Supreme Court began to chip away at life-without-parole sentences for juvenile offenders, and lower courts are still wrestling with how to apply the justices’ logic to the American criminal-justice system. Life sentences are an American institution. According to a recent Sentencing Project report , more than 200,000 people are serving either life in
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Science | The Guardian
Tardigrades: Earth’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic cataclysmMicroscopic creatures reassure scientists complete eradication of life on the planet is extremely unlikely Whether it is a supernova or an asteroid impact, should a cosmic calamity strike, it seems there will be at least one form of life left: a tubby, microscopic animal with the appearance of a crumpled hoover bag. The creatures, known as tardigrades, are staggeringly hardy animals, a millimetre
9h
Gizmodo
Scientists Say Tardigrades Will Be the Last Animals On EarthA scanning electron microscope image of the incredible tardigrade. (Credit: Tanaka S, Sagara H, Kunieda) Microscopic tardigrades, also known as “water bears,” are the toughest animals on the planet, capable of withstanding intense radiation, extreme temperatures, and even the vacuum of space. In a fascinating new study, researchers have shown that tardigrades are poised to survive literally anyth
9h
Science : NPR
Beam Me Up, Scotty ... Sort Of. Chinese Scientists 'Teleport' Photon To SpaceChinese scientists have announced they pulled off a successful teleportation of a photon from Earth to space. But what does that really mean? (Image credit: Jin Liwang/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images)
9h
The Atlantic
The ‘Worst Deal Ever’ That Actually Wasn’tToday, the Iran nuclear deal turns two years old. In its critics’ eyes, it has already failed. President Donald Trump and many of his supporters complain that it has not changed Iran’s regional behavior, pointing to Tehran’s continued support for regional proxies and ongoing ballistic missile tests as proof. Other critics, including Senators Tom Cotton, Ted Cruz, David Perdue, and Marco Rubio, wh
9h
Ingeniøren
Sikkerhedsekspert advarer: SMS'er er for usikre til to-faktor-autentifikationDet er tid til at overveje at droppe sms'en som ekstra sikkerhedsled. Det er nemlig alt for nemt at fuske sig til et nyt simkort. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/smser-usikre-to-faktor-autentifikation-nemt-at-faa-nyt-sim-kort-1078363 Emner It-sikkerhed Mobil Version2
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Portland cleans dirty river, invites residents to take a dipPortland is well-known as a tree-hugging, outdoorsy city, but the river that powers through its downtown has never been part of that green reputation.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia to compel chat apps to hand over encrypted messagesSocial media giants like Facebook and WhatsApp will be compelled to share encrypted messages of suspected terrorists and other criminals with Australian police under new laws unveiled Friday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ADB warns climate change 'disastrous' for AsiaA business-as-usual approach to climate change will be "disastrous" for Asia, undoing much of the phenomenal economic growth that has helped it make vast inroads against poverty, the Asian Development Bank said in a report released Friday.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Chemsex drugs and former legal highs targeted by Home OfficeExperts praise return to harm-reduction in strategy aimed at cutting illicit drug use and improving dependence recovery rates Drugs charities and critics have welcomed a shift away from an “abstinence-only” approach to drug treatment and a return to an emphasis on harm-reduction and recovery in the government’s revised drugs strategy. The 2017 drug strategy, published on Friday by the Home Office
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds our Sun is like other stars, resolving mysteryOur Sun is much like other stars, and not an anomaly because of its magnetic poles that flip every 11 years, scientists said Thursday.
11h
Ingeniøren
Solen er - når alt kommer til alt - bare en ordinær stjerneForskere har i årevis diskuteret, om der er noget ekstraordinært over centrum i vores solsystem. Det er der ikke …
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain heatwave breaks records and kills oneSpain baked in a record-breaking heatwave on Thursday which was blamed for the death of a road crew worker and is suspected of leaving another man in critical condition.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's Infosys eyes artificial intelligence profitsIndian IT giant Infosys said Friday that artificial intelligence was key to future profits as it bids to satisfy clients' demands for innovative new technologies.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cook Islands creates huge Pacific Ocean reserveThe Cook Islands has created one of the world's largest marine sanctuaries, protecting a vast swathe of the Pacific Ocean more than three times the size of France.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explainer: Bitcoin's possible financial panicAnyone holding the digital currency bitcoin could soon face some unsettling problems—up to and including financial losses, whipsawing prices and delays in processing payments.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Tv-stationen al-Mayadeen giver venstreorienterede arabere stemmeI frustration over al-Jazeeras dækning af det arabiske forår og det folkelige oprør...
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research as Art Awards 2017: Fifteen extraordinary images shed light on the beauty and diversity of researchFifteen stunning images, and the fascinating stories behind them—such as how a barn owl's pellets reveal which animals it has eaten, how data can save lives, and how Barbie breaks free—have today been revealed as the winners of the 2017 Research as Art awards.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered Cuban crocodiles released into the wildExperts from WCS's Global Conservation Programs and WCS's Bronx Zoo assisted Cuban conservationists in the recent release of 10 Cuban crocodiles (Crocodylus rhombifer) into Cuba's Zapata Swamp as part of an ongoing recovery strategy for this Critically Endangered species.
11h
The Scientist RSS
UK Researchers Used Fewer Animals Last YearExperiments involving animals dropped by more than 200,000, or 5 percent, in 2016.
13h
Ingeniøren
Danske Spil: Lotto på Android? Så skal du slå sikkerhedsfunktion fraFor at installere Danske Spils Lotto-app på Android, skal brugeren tillade installation fra 'ukendte kilder'. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danske-spil-lotto-paa-android-saa-skal-du-slaa-sikkerhedsfunktion-igen-1078364 Version2
13h
Gizmodo
Here's What Disney's Pirates Ride Looks Like Without the Wench AuctionGIF Earlier this month, Walt Disney Imagineering announced it was giving the Pirates of the Caribbean ride a much-needed update, removing the Mercado’s Wench Auction showing pirates buying women as wives. Disneyland Paris is the first park to get the update, and here’s a peek at the new look. DLP Welcome has released a look inside the new Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland Paris. The Wen
13h
The Atlantic
Iraq Investigates Videos of Troops Killing Mosul DetaineesFollowing the release of videos on social media that appear to show Iraqi troops killing and beating detained ISIS militants in Mosul, the Iraqi government said they were investigating the footage. A spokesman for Iraq’s defense ministry, Mohammed al-Khudhari, told the Associated Press on Thursday that troops were given “very clear instructions and guidance” to turn over suspected militants, who
13h
Science | The Guardian
Long working days can cause heart problems, study saysChances of developing irregular heartbeat – atrial fibrillation – spikes up considerably with working more than 55 hours a week, research shows A long hours office culture can affect more than just your social life – long days at work can be bad for your heart as well, according to a major study. It’s been established that too many hours in the office can increase the risk of a stroke . Now it se
14h
Science | The Guardian
Retiring cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin visits London – archive, 14 July 196114 July 1961: Prime minister Harold Macmillan attended a reception for the man hailed ‘Columbus of the space age’ There must have been moments yesterday when Major Gagarin could have wished himself back in the solitude of space. Especially last night at a reception at the Hyde Park Hotel arranged by the Great Britain-USSR Association. It was attended unexpectedly by Mr Macmillan – who had earlier
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Karamba Is Writing Software to Keep Your Connected Car from Getting HackedIn Israeli’s cybersecurity-focused tech scene, cars are becoming a hot area.
14h
Gizmodo
Watch a Woman Destroy $200,000 Worth of Art While Taking a SelfieScreengrab: YouTube /Party Pooper Taking selfies with art is an entire photographic subgenre unto itself. So, when an exhibition is touted as “series of wondrous, over-the-top sets for the perfect selfie,” why wouldn’t you pull out your camera and a snap a pic for the ‘gram? This is why. The video below was taken at a group show at The 14th Factory in Los Angeles. Around the ten second mark, you
15h
Ingeniøren
To danske landmølleparker kan umuligt dække forbruget i Apples nye datacentreApple har bebudet, at selskabet vil producere sin egen grønne strøm til sine to datacentre i Viborg og ved Aabenraa. Men de to landmølleparker, som selskabet planlægger, kan ifølge prognoserne ikke dække forbruget, hvis de skal stå i Danmark.
15h
Live Science
American Culture: Traditions and Customs of the United StatesNearly every region of the world has influenced the customs and traditions of the United States.
15h
Live Science
What is Metformin?Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of type II diabetes.
15h
Gizmodo
Here, Watch a Slithering Mass of Slime Eels Get Bulldozed Off an Oregon HighwayScreencapture via @DepoeBayFire on Twitter. In what was surely the most thrilling day in the history of the Oregon Department of Transportation, a flatbed truck spilled 7500 pounds of slime eels onto US 101 , the Oregonian reports. Eel truck driver Salvatore J. Tragale, who had been delivering the hagfish (“slime eels”) to be shipped to Korea for consumption, lost control of the flatbed when he c
15h
Gizmodo
'The Biggest Marketplace on the Dark Web' Gets Busted by AuthoritiesPhoto: Getty On July 4th, AlphaBay Market went down and scared the hell out of users. One of, if not the most popular destination for illicit goods on the dark net, the site took over Silk Road’s throne after its founder was arrested. According to a new report, AlphaBay has suffered the same fate and international authorities have shut it down. It’s common for dark net markets to suddenly shut do
16h
The Atlantic
Gunman Who Killed Boris Nemtsov Receives 20-Year Prison SentenceZaur Dadayev, the gunman who fatally shot Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov in February 2015, was sentenced to 20 years in prison by a Moscow military court on Thursday following his conviction in late June. Prosecutors originally asked for Dadayev, a former member of an elite security battalion in Chechnya, to receive life in prison. On Thursday, Dadayev’s four accomplices were sentenced t
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Factory contamination of medical device likely source of M. chimaera infection in patients in multiple countriesThe first full report using whole genome sequencing has identified contaminated heater-cooler units produced by LivaNova in a factory in Germany as the likely source of Mycobacterium chimaera infection in 21 open-heart surgery patients in Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK, and a further 12 in the USA and Australia, according to a study.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Should we screen for cirrhosis?Should we screen high risk patients for cirrhosis -- long-term liver damage that can eventually lead to liver failure? Experts debate the issue in a new article.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
WHO decision to downgrade Tamiflu 'comes far too late' argues expertThe World Health Organization's decision to downgrade the influenza drug Tamiflu on its essential medicines list is better late than never, but still comes far too late, argues an expert in a new article.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slow earthquakes occur continuously in the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zoneSeismologists studying earthquakes in the seismically and volcanically active Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone have found that 'slow earthquakes' are occurring continuously, and could encourage damaging earthquakes. Slow earthquakes are quiet, can be as large as magnitude 7, and last days to years. Taking place mainly at the boundary between tectonic plates, they happen so slowly that people don't
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart atomic cloud solves Heisenberg's observation problemA 'hands-on' answer has been developed to a challenge intricately linked to a very fundamental principle in physics: Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. The researchers used laser light to link caesium atoms and a vibrating membrane. The research, the first of its kind, points to sensors capable of measuring movement with unseen precision.
17h
The Atlantic
Trump's Lawyer Apologizes for a Profane TiradeThe lead attorney on President Trump’s legal team for the Russia investigation says he will apologize to the recipient of several profane and threatening emails published on Thursday by ProPublica . “Mr. Kasowitz, who is tied up with client matters, said he intends to apologize to the writer of the email referenced in today’s ProPublica story,” Kasowitz’s spokesman Mike Sitrick said in a statemen
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The farmer helping to cut cow fartsHow reducing the methane from cows is helping to fight climate change
18h
Gizmodo
Trump Says He's Fighting Russia by Approving Pipelines, 'I'm a Tremendous Fracker'Photo: Getty On Wednesday, during an off the record chat aboard Air Force One, Trump used his revival of the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines as an example of how he’s not Putin’s puppet. In what seems likely to be a new method of handling/editing Trump’s public remarks, the White House released excerpts from the transcript of the conversation on Thursday. The subject of the US and Trump’s
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low doses of radiation could harm cardiovascular health, study suggestsIonizing radiation, such as X-rays, has a harmful effect on the cardiovascular system even at doses equivalent to recurrent CT imaging, a new study published in the International Journal of Radiation Biology suggests.
18h
New Scientist - News
Use waste rather than crops for biofuels, says UK reportLiquid biofuels can help reduce carbon emissions, but the focus should be on making them from wastes such as cooking oil, says major review
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Butterfly numbers facing 'vital' period - Sir David AttenboroughBroadcaster Sir David Attenborough says species have suffered "significant declines" recently.
18h
cognitive science
Artificial General Intelligence: Why Aren’t We There Yet? (Gary Marcus)submitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]
19h
NYT > Science
Keith Conners, Psychologist Who Set Standard for Diagnosing A.D.H.D., Dies at 84After devising a scale for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Dr. Conners later expressed dismay over how loosely the label was being applied.
19h
Science | The Guardian
The cynical and dishonest denial of climate change has to end: it's time for leadership | Gerry HuestonAbsence of climate and energy policy has left Australia lagging dangerously behind, missing out on investment and facing major electricity disruptions. Gerry Hueston is chairperson of the Climate Council and former BP president Australia has enough renewable energy to power the country 500 times over. With South Australia a step closer to unveiling the largest lithium ion battery storage facility
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long working hours increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillationPeople who work long hours have an increased risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation, according to a study of nearly 85,500 men and women published in the European Heart Journal.
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Revisions and DecisionsWhat We’re Following Next Steps on Health Care: Senate Republican leaders released the revised version of their bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. The new draft includes changes meant to appease both moderates and conservatives, including fewer tax cuts, more funding to help low-income people, and a tentative provision that would allow insurance companies to sell plans that don’t conform to
19h
Live Science
Link to the Past: Evidence of Humanity's Oldest Ropes Unearthed"Perfect forms" carved in ivory reveal humanity's oldest set of ropes, research suggests.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Waste products, not crops, key to boosting UK biofuelsThe UK should focus on making fuel from chip fat, whiskey dregs and forest waste and not from crops like wheat
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Gannet bonanza on Yorkshire cliffsA gannet bonanza is confirmed on the towering cliffs of Yorkshire by research from the RSPB.
19h
Ars Technica
Not for the first time, Microsoft’s fonts have caught out forgersPrime Minister Nawaz Sharif. (credit: Z A Balti/Public domain ) I was confused for a few moments today, after one of my colleagues asked me if I'd heard about "fontgate." "Fontgate?" I queried. "Pakistan either loves or hates Calibri," I was unhelpfully informed. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments
19h
The Atlantic
Bombers Strike in Cameroon, Killing 14At least 14 people were killed and around 30 wounded in Waza, a small town in Cameroon near the Nigerian border, on Wednesday evening after two female suicide bombers targeted a crowded area filled with restaurants and kiosks. A local official told Agence France-Presse that the town has since been “sealed off,” barring anyone from entering or leaving. The official said those wounded were in “quit
19h
Wired
Donald Trump, Border Walls, and Flying Bags of HeroinNope, sorry, a see-through border wall doesn't protect against tossed heroin.
19h
Ars Technica
Intriguing experiment reveals a fundamental conflict in human cultureEnlarge / Hey remember this movie from the 1980s about rank-reversal aversion? (credit: Paramount Pictures ) It's well known among economists that most people don't like income disparities, especially when they're on the lower rungs of the economic ladder. This is reflected in polls and scientific studies, but also just everyday common sense. Yet many of our societies suffer from a widening gap b
19h
Gizmodo
Cover Your Entire Work Space in Mouse Pad For $8PECHAM XL Mouse Pad , $8 with code EFX3JXJL $8 is cheaper than a lot of standard sized mouse pads, but today, that gets you a massive 2.5' x 1' model that can accommodate your keyboard as well . So luxurious! Just be sure to use promo code EFX3JXJL at checkout to save a couple bucks.
20h
Gizmodo
Former Aides Indicted for Leaking Nude Images Stolen From CongresswomanPhoto: Getty A former Congressional staffer has been indicted on charges of cyberstalking after allegedly distributing nude pictures and videos of a member of the US House of Representatives and her husband, the Justice Department announced on Thursday. Juan McCullum worked as a legislative assistant to Delegate Stacey Plaskett, a non-voting Democratic delegate for the Virgin Islands. According t
20h
The Atlantic
Why the Senate Health-Care Bill Might Never Get a Final VoteWith the release of their latest draft on Thursday, Senate Republican leaders have spent more than two-and-a-half months writing an overhaul of the nation’s health-care system behind closed doors. It now may die before ever seeing an up-or-down vote. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s revised bill to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act drew swift opposition from two Republican sen
20h
Ars Technica
AlphaBay taken down by law enforcement across 3 countries, WSJ saysEnlarge / A bitcoin token stands in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) AlphaBay, one of the largest Tor-hidden drug websites that sprang up in the wake of Silk Road, has been shuttered for good after a series of law enforcement raids and arrests. The site mysteriously went dark earlier this month. Some users
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A hit love song for toadsResearchers in Australia say they now know exactly what makes horny cane toads boogie. And the toad tune could help sound the death knell for the pests.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of frictionA model system has been presented by researchers that allows the investigation of atomic-scale friction effects and friction dynamics that are similar to those taking place, for instance, in proteins, DNA strands and other deformable nanocontacts. This model system consists of laser-cooled ions, which arrange themselves in so-called Coulomb crystals.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Babies with hearing loss form better vocabulary with early interventionBabies with hearing loss who are diagnosed by three months and receive interventions by six months have broader vocabularies than those treated later, a new study found. It also found that nearly half don't meet early intervention guidelines.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel bacterial physiology identified in the creation of biofilmsA team of researchers studied the biofilm construction capabilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), a bacterium responsible for sinusitis, pneumonia, exacerbations of cystic fibrosis and COPD, bronchitis and ear infections.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mountaintop coal mining causes Appalachian rivers to run 'consistently saltier'Over time, alkaline salts and other contaminants from the coal residue and crushed rocks in valley fills leach into nearby streams and rivers, degrading water quality and causing dramatic increases in salinity that are harmful to downstream ecosystems.
20h
Live Science
How Much Pee Is in Swimming Pools?Before you take a dip, know this: There is definitely pee in the swimming pool. But, it's probably not that much.
20h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Happens When Mother Nature Pits Her Toughest Predators Against Each Other? Shark-Croc Showdown!#SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Sharks and crocodiles go head-to-head in an epic showdown down under. Premieres Sunday, July 23 at 9p on Discovery. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https
20h
Science : NPR
Ravens Surprise Scientists By Showing They Can PlanAs recently as 10 years ago, humans were thought to be the only species with the ability to plan. Turns out ravens can, too, on a par with great apes. (Image credit: Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
20h
Gizmodo
Fusion Behold What a Union Gets You | The Root The Black Person’s Guide to Game of Thrones | JezebelFusion Behold What a Union Gets You | The Root The Black Person’s Guide to Game of Thrones | Jezebel Don’t Fall for the Tender Trap | Deadspin KatyPerrysBootyHole And Wetbutt23 Broke The Jose Quintana Trade |
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US Social Security funds run out in 17 years: TreasuryThe US government retirement program for the elderly will be exhausted starting in 17 years unless policies are changed, the US Treasury said Thursday.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parts of Wisconsin, Illinois recover from floodingFlooding in the Midwest closed roadways and knocked out power to thousands, including a suburban Chicago hospital that was forced to close, but residents in the Wisconsin city of Burlington appeared upbeat even as portions of streets remained submerged by water Thursday.
20h
The Atlantic
The 'America First' President Heads to FranceIn a visit laden with ceremony, President Trump, standing alongside French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris, took the opportunity to remind everyone about the historic nature of the U.S.-French alliance. “France is America’s first and oldest ally—a lot of people don’t know that,” Trump said Thursday at a joint news conference. “Ever since General Lafayette joined the American fight for independ
20h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Notre DonToday in 5 Lines Senate Republicans unveiled a revised version of their health-care bill, which includes more money to fight the opioid epidemic, as well as more funds to keep costs lower for consumers. At least two Republican senators, Susan Collins of Maine and Rand Paul of Kentucky, said they still won’t support the bill. During a joint press conference with French President Emmanuel Macron in
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
50-year-old flu virus model revamped, revealing pandemic prediction possibilitiesThe scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a new discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn't so perfect after all. The finding could give scientists the opportunity to better predict pandemics and find new ways to disrupt the flu virus.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On the way to a biological alternativeA bacterial enzyme enables reactions opens up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes, explain scientists in a new report.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New data network for Huntington's disease researchThe first data network for research into Huntington's disease has been created by an international team, now freely available to all scientists in this field.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Machine learning technique offers insight into plasma behaviorA new paper describes the application of machine learning to avoiding plasma disruptions, which will be crucial to ensuring the longevity of future large tokamaks, say researchers.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ga-ga, goo-goo, why a baby likes youBy the age of one, infants already prefer speakers of their native tongue, but do not necessarily view speakers of an unfamiliar language negatively, according to new research. The findings suggest that, while positivity toward familiar groups may be innate, dislike for unfamiliar groups appears to be a learned behavior.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly discovered elovanoids called a 'transformative new concept of biology'A new class of mediators, or biochemical triggers, has been discovered that researchers have named elovanoids (ELVs). This discovery provides the first evidence of the existence of elovanoids and of their significant role in protecting and sustaining retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cell survival.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers overcome suppression of immune response against bacterial pathogensResearchers were able to positively influence the immune response in severe viral and bacterial co-infection. Using a human lung tissue model, they were able to show that the immune mechanisms triggered by viral pathogens prevent the tissue from mounting an effective response against a simultaneously occurring bacterial infection.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Squirrels have long memory for problem solvingSquirrels can remember problem-solving techniques for long periods and can apply them to new situations, researchers have discovered.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research makes robots better at following spoken instructionsA new software system helps robots to more effectively act on instructions from people, who by nature give commands that range from simple and straightforward to those that are more complex and imply a myriad of subtasks.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient plankton-like microfossils span two continentsLarge, robust, lens-shaped microfossils from the approximately 3.4 billion-year-old Kromberg Formation of the Kaapvaal Craton in eastern South Africa are not only among the oldest elaborate microorganisms known, but are also related to other intricate microfossils of the same age found in the Pilbara Craton of Australia, according to an international team of scientists.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in miceDaily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study, report investigators.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synapses in the brain mirror the structure of the visual worldNew research has discovered why our brain might be so good at perceiving edges and contours. Neurons that respond to different parts of elongated edges are connected and thus exchange information. This can make it easier for the brain to identify contours of objects, report scientists.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Miniature human hearts created from rat heartsA miniature human heart created by introducing human cells into the matrix of a whole rat heart may make it easier to confirm basic science findings and test potential new heart drugs for safety and efficacy, according to a preliminary study.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Scientists Create See-Through HeartsA new tissue-clearing technique reveals blood vessel networks and collagen scaffolds of dog and human cardiac tissue.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Lawmakers Propose Increasing NIH BudgetA House bill would also bar funding for research with fetal tissues.
21h
The Atlantic
Trump's Incredible Shrinking Border WallDonald Trump has repeatedly pledged to seal off the U.S.-Mexico border. But on Thursday, the president told reporters that he only intends to cover “anywhere from 700 to 900 miles.” “It’s a 2,000 mile border, but you don’t need 2,000 miles of wall because you have a lot of natural barriers. You have mountains. You have some rivers that are violent and vicious. You have some areas that are so far
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stand Up To Cancer, St. Baldrick's Foundation hail green light for CAR T cell therapySU2C and St. Baldrick's welcomed ODAC's recommendation for FDA approval of the new CAR T therapy for a deadly form of leukemia, an approach whose development has also been supported by their Pediatric Dream Team investigating why some patients with B-cell ALL relapse after receiving the CD19 CAR T cell therapy, and developing standardized management of cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a potentiall
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor thyroid function may affect dialysis patients' quality of life and daily livingIn hemodialysis patients, hypothyroidism was linked with impairments across multiple areas of health-related quality of life, including lower energy and greater fatigue, poorer physical function, and greater pain.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shedding light on Galaxies' rotation secretsSpiral galaxies are found to be strongly rotating, with an angular momentum higher by a factor of about 5 than ellipticals. In a new study, the researchers have traced back the dichotomy in the angular momentum of spiral and elliptical galaxies to their different formation history. In particular, the low angular momentum of ellipticals is mainly originated by nature in the central regions during t
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Testing a soft artificial heartA silicone heart has been developed that beats almost like a human heart. Researchers have now tested how well it works.
21h
Gizmodo
Teardown Confirms Samsung's Refurbished Note 7 Has a Smaller, Less Explode-y BatteryImage: iFixit Samsung’s refurbished Galaxy Note 7, aka the Note Fan Edition , was announced last month. But instead of excitement, everyone had one question in mind: Will it also explode? Upon the announcement, it wasn’t clear what parts on the Note FE would be new and which would be old. The main concern was the potential reuse of old batteries which caused a series of phones to spontaneously co
21h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US lawmakers seek $1.1-billion boost for the NIHLegislation introduced in the House of Representatives also rejects a White House plan to cut 'indirect cost' payments to research institutions. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22307
21h
Science | The Guardian
Evermore: ravens can plan for the future, scientists saySwedish experiment shows the notoriously brilliant bird has capacity to think ahead, an ability previously documented only in humans and great apes Scientists from Sweden say ravens are able to think about the future, showing a general planning ability previously documented only in people and great apes. Researchers Can Kabadayi and Mathias Osvath, of Lund University, tested five captive ravens i
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Server outage at Brazil foreign ministry after rogue emailsTwo employees of the Brazilian Foreign Ministry say the agency briefly suffered an unspecified computer outage after a flurry of suspicious emails.
21h
The Atlantic
Tucker Carlson Is Doing Something ExtraordinaryOver the last two nights, something fascinating has broken out on the Tucker Carlson show: A genuine, and exceedingly bitter, debate between conservatives on foreign policy. On Tuesday , Carlson told retired Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Peters he thought the U.S. should team up with Russia to defeat ISIS. Peters responded that, “You sound like Charles Lindbergh in 1938.” Carlson called that comment “
21h
Ars Technica
Biometrics catches violent fugitive 25 years on the runHere at Ars, we often speak of facial-recognition technology as some Orwellian surveillance method that will one day be deployed by governments or other actors to chronicle our every move—perhaps for nefarious purposes. We reported Wednesday that the Department of Homeland Security is pushing a plan that would require all Americans to submit to a facial-recognition scan when flying out of the cou
21h
Science : NPR
If It Walks Like An Ant, You Probably Wouldn't Eat It — Or So These Spiders HopeA scientist discovers how some spiders go undercover as a less delicious species to evade predators. (Image credit: Ian Boyd/Flickr)
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Science : NPR
Scientists Discover Sneaky Spider That Fools PredatorsIt's a dog eat dog world out there in nature. One way not to get eaten is to look like something else that's not tasty. Now scientists have discovered a spider that fools predators by not only looking like a nasty ant, but actually walking like one.
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Live Science
How Scientists Stored a Movie Inside DNAResearchers have encoded the data to make a short video into the DNA molecules of bacteria.
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Ars Technica
Oculus’ next step? A $200, untracked wireless headset for next year [Updated]Enlarge / Oculus' Santa Cruz prototype, shown off at Oculus Connect last year, gives some idea of what a standalone wireless headset from the company could look like. (credit: Oculus ) [ Update: An Oculus representative provided Ars with the following statement: “We don't have a product to unveil at this time; however, we can confirm that we're making several significant technology investments in
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Science | The Guardian
Moon Express in race against timeCommercial space company says it is still on track to land on the moon and bag Google’s $20m prize before the end of 2017 M oon Express , a private company founded in California in 2010, is living up to its name. This week in Washington DC, its chief executive, Bob Richards , said it was still on course to launch its lander by the end of the year. To do this means sticking to a tight schedule. Mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change deepens threat to Pacific island wildlifeLand mammals and reptiles in the Pacific islands facing extinction due to habitat loss, hunting and other threats could be decimated by climate change, a study published Thursday said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vaccines protect fetuses from Zika infection, mouse study showsZika virus can cause severe brain damage in people infected before birth. A new study in mice shows that females vaccinated before pregnancy and infected with Zika virus while pregnant bear pups who show no trace of the virus. The findings offer the first evidence that an effective vaccine administered prior to pregnancy can protect vulnerable fetuses from Zika infection and resulting injury.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ravens can plan ahead, similar to humans and great apesDespite previous research that indicates such behaviors are unique to humans and great apes, a new study shows that ravens, too, can plan ahead for different types of events , and further, that they are willing to forgo an immediate reward in order to gain a better one in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yes, the sun is an ordinary, solar-type star after allThe Sun is a solar-type star, a new study claims -- resolving an ongoing controversy about whether the star at the center of our Solar System exhibits the same cyclic behavior as other nearby, solar-type stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bitcoin study shows value of exclusive access for early adoptersDelaying access for the tech-savvy can stifle spread of new products, experiment with students shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nickel is crucial for Earth's magnetic fieldEarth's hot core, consisting mainly of iron, is responsible for the 'dynamo effect,' which creates a magnetic field. But with iron alone, this effect cannot be explained. A team of researchers has shown that the theory of the geodynamo has to be revised. It is crucial for the dynamo effect that the earth's core contains up to 20 percent nickel -- a metal, which under extreme conditions behaves qui
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The Scientist RSS
Update: Iranian Researcher Detained at US AirportThe cancer scientist and his family have been sent home, and an official claims that his detention was not triggered by the Trump travel ban.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insect attack! US West is battling crop-killing swarmsFarmers in the U.S. West face a creepy scourge every eight years or so: Swarms of ravenous insects that can decimate crops and cause slippery, bug-slick car crashes as they march across highways and roads.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Windows Phone 8 fades out as Microsoft mulls mobile strategyMicrosoft has ended support for its Windows 8 smartphones, as the US tech giant focuses on other segments, amid ongoing speculation about its strategy for mobile.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mountaintop coal mining causes Appalachian rivers to run 'consistently saltier'Mountaintop-removal coal mining causes many streams and rivers in Appalachia to run consistently saltier for up to 80 percent of the year, a new study by researchers at the University of Wyoming and Duke University finds.
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Ars Technica
Meet Audi’s new tech flagship: The 2018 A8 sedanAudi provided flights to Barcelona and two nights' accommodation for this trip. Jonathan Gitlin BARCELONA, Spain—In one of the most elaborate new-car reveals the industry has seen, Audi has revealed its new technology flagship to the world. The big three German luxury brands (Audi, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz) are locked in a constant battle of oneupmanship when it comes to these four-wheeled standard
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MMA fighters, boxers may have signs of long-term brain injury in bloodBoxers and mixed martial arts fighters may have markers of long-term brain injury in their blood, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Jacksonville, Fla., July 14 to 16, 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water makes the proton shakeBasic processes in chemistry and biology involve protons in a water environment. Water structures accommodating protons and their motions have so far remained elusive. Applying ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, researchers map fluctuating proton transfer motions and provide direct evidence that protons in liquid water are predominantly shared by two water molecules. Femtosecond proton elongation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human evolution in the sea at BiokoDid some of our human features evolve while our ancestors were living in water? The aquatic ape theory has been disregarded by paleoanthropologists, but it deserves another chance, suggests experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood test for early detection of pancreatic cancer headed to clinicA newly identified biomarker panel could pave the way to earlier detection and better treatment for pancreatic cancer. Currently over 53,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer -- the fourth leading cause of cancer death -- every year. The blood biomarkers correctly detected pancreatic cancer in blood samples from patients at different stages of their disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ADHD medication tied to lower risk for alcohol, drug abuse in teens and adultsThe use of medication to treat attention deficient hyperactivity disorder is linked to significantly lower risk for substance use problems in adolescents and adults with ADHD, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mississippi mud may hold hope for Louisiana coastMud, the most plentiful sediment type carried by the Mississippi River, may be the most powerful tool in building land to keep up sea level rise, suggests new research.
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The Atlantic
Why Bogus News Stories Are So Hard to StopThe July 4 week was a quiet one in Washington, but the news business abhors a vacuum. Into the void sprung a perfect viral story: Female reporters were being tossed from the Speaker’s Lobby at the U.S. Capitol for being insufficiently dressy. The specific topic at hand was bare shoulders, and in an entertaining touch, one reporter ripped pages from her reporting notebook and tried to pass them of
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New Scientist - News
Ravens can plan for future as well as 4-year-old children canThe smart birds seem to have evolved this flexible cognitive ability independently from hominids as the two lineages diverged about 320 million years ago
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New Scientist - News
A type of bacteria might speed up the growth of colon cancerMore than 70 per cent of colon tumours may contain Streptococcus gallolyticus gallolyticus, a bacterium that accelerates tumour growth when fed to mice
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Gizmodo
Animals Are Teenagers, TooIllustration by Sam Woolley Animals, they’re just like us: they breathe, they eat, they like rubbing their genitals on things, they look cool in sunglasses, they die. But sometimes before that, they go through a period of adolescence that has a few things in common with what we associate with human adolescence. Aside from the sexual activity and procreative capability that puberty brings, some ta
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Gizmodo
Save $5 On OxyLED's Newest, Brightest T-02 Stick-Anywhere Light [Exclusive]OxyLED T-02U Plus , $23 with code KINJA2UP The newest member of OxyLED’s popular T-02 stick-anywhere light family is the T-02U Plus , which features the same footprint at the T-02 Plus, while packing in a remarkable 64 LED bulbs compared to the original’s 36. That makes it perfect for a closet or wardrobe where you get ready in the morning, but it would also work well under your kitchen cabinets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toxic mercury is accumulating in the Arctic tundra, Study findsVast amounts of toxic mercury are accumulating in the Arctic tundra, threatening the health and well-being of people, wildlife and waterways, according to a scientist investigating the source of the pollution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher use of health care services throughout adult life linked with traumatic childhoodsRegardless of socio-economic class or other demographics, people who have adverse childhood experiences use more health and medical services through their lifetime, new research confirms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is a biological driver behind the need for self-fulfillment?As human beings, what drives us to higher levels of existence? Once we have satisfied the basics - food, shelter, a mate, children - then what? For many it's the idea of self-actualization, or realizing our full potential. But what does self-actualization look like? How do we know when we are doing it? Researchers recently published a new series of studies on what people think it means to be self-
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Factors predicting school corporal punishmentThe number of Southern natives and the average education level in a county are the most influential factors on the odds of a US public school using corporal punishment, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spread of breast cancer reduced by targeting acid metaboliteIt's a metabolite found in essentially all our cells that, like so many things, cancer overexpresses. Now scientists have shown that when they inhibit 20-HETE, it reduces both the size of a breast cancer tumor and its ability to spread to the lungs.
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Gizmodo
What Would It Take to Kill Daenerys' Dragons?GIF Image: HBO When Daenerys hatched three dragons from what seemed to be petrified eggs during the finale of Game of Thrones ’ first season, the balance of power between the contenders for the Iron Throne began to shift. Thanks to her ever-growing, ever-more powerful “children,” Daenerys has transformed from one of the show’s underdogs to arguably its most powerful political player. Which raises
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer cells force normal cells to mimic viruses to help tumors spread, resist treatmentIn a study that could explain why some breast cancers are more aggressive than others, researchers say they now understand how cancer cells force normal cells to act like viruses - allowing tumors to grow, resist treatment, and spread. The virus mimic is detected in the blood of cancer patients, particularly in cases of an aggressive type known as triple-negative breast cancer. Penn researchers sa
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Science : NPR
How Storytelling Can Improve The Care Of People With Alzheimer'sA former journalist is making sure caregivers know patients' life stories. (Image credit: Family photo, courtesy of Jay Newton-Small)
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Wired
Election Security Is a Surprisingly Controversial IssueOne would think that keeping elections safe would be an issue everyone backed. It's not that simple.
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Wired
2017 Emmy Nominations: 'The Handmaid's Tale' Just Made Hulu a Prestige TV PlayerThe streaming service's breakout show nabbed an impressive 13 Emmy nods.
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Gizmodo
Did an FDA Panel Really Just Approve the First Gene Therapy Treatment?NIH This week marked a major milestone in medicine: On Wednesday, a Food and Drug Administration panel unanimously recommended the approval of the first CAR-T therapy, a pioneering new cancer drug from Novartis that genetically engineers a patient’s own white blood cells to recognize and attack the cancer cells invading their body. The headlines were emphatic. “First gene therapy—‘a true living d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mountaintop coal mining causes Appalachian rivers to run 'consistently saltier'Over time, alkaline salts and other contaminants from the coal residue and crushed rocks in valley fills leach into nearby streams and rivers, degrading water quality and causing dramatic increases in salinity that are harmful to downstream ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in miceDaily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study at The Ohio State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using a microRNA to shift the makeup of glioblastoma subtypesIn a new study published in Cell Reports, BWH researchers examined a specific microRNA, miR-128, to help identify glioblastoma subtypes and to determine if altering the microRNA's presence in glioblastoma cells could change the tumor's subtype.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
RNA molecules live short livesA new method to measure the half-life of RNA molecules has now been created by researchers. Their study revealed that commonly used methods provide distorted results and that RNA molecules live an average of only two minutes, ten times shorter than previously assumed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early squirrel gets the real estate, study findsThose young squirrels now scampering around your neighborhood were born in this year's earliest litters and are more likely to survive than squirrels born later and still curled up in their nests, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Foreshock activities leading up to Pawnee earthquakeA geophysics professor details the foreshock activities leading up to the Pawnee earthquake, and highlights the complicated relationship between seismicity and wastewater injection rates in a research study. The study details the precursory earthquake (foreshock) sequences that culminated in the September 3, 2016, 5.8 magnitude earthquake near Pawnee, Okla., which ruptured along the previously unm
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists stumble across new method of making antibioticsCancer researchers may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA.
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New Scientist - News
Swiss bank becomes first to offer bitcoin to its richest clientsAsset managers at Falcon Private Bank can now buy and store bitcoins for its investors. But is this missing the point of decentralised currencies?
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Gizmodo
Tourist Ignores Danger Signs And Gets Blown To Death By Jet EngineA view of a landing jet at the airport. Photo Credit: Princess Juliana International Airport Tourists flock to Princess Juliana International Airport on the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten to catch a glimpse of jets nearly skimming the beach on their ultra-low takeoffs and landings. Numerous signs warn the tourists not to get too close, lest they get blown to their deaths by the landing jet’s ai
23h
Live Science
What the Heck? Odd, Slimy Sea Creature Defies ExplanationA beachgoer recently came across a bizarre sight on the California shore: a decaying white, black and purple blob covered with sand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists expect 'significant' algae bloom on Lake ErieA "significant" harmful algae bloom is expected to form in western Lake Erie this summer, though it probably won't be as large as some previous formations that posed health risks and hampered tourism, scientists said Thursday.
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Ars Technica
Uber accepts minority role, merges with Russian ride-sharing companyEnlarge / An Uber car (back) and a Yandex.Taxi car drive on a street in Moscow. (credit: VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images ) Uber is merging its business in Russia with Yandex, a dominant player in the Internet business in that nation and Eastern Europe. The move is an unusual one for Uber, a company that doesn't have a reputation for backing down against competitors. Still, Uber has become embroil
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Futurity.org
Why this flashy butterfly has red and yellow wingsPainted Jezebel butterflies use the distinctive red and yellow colors on their wings as warning signals to predators, report researchers. Red is a new and potentially more effective color to members of this lineage of butterflies. The painted Jezebel is a common butterfly found in urban and forested landscapes throughout the Asia-Pacific region, known for its bright yellow and red wing colors. Wh
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Gizmodo
These Bears Eat as Much Junk Food as You Do(Image: Bess Sadler /Flickr) Bears, they’re just like us. And I’m not referring to a subset of hairy humans, but to some furry critters in Wisconsin whose diets contain a staggering amount of junk food. Seriously! There’s a reason for their sugary diet. This population of bears in Wisconsin lives by the law—hunters can feed them bait for up to six months out of the year. Bait, which includes junk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What 'Thrones' fans already know: Ravens can see aheadMore than 170 years after Edgar Allan Poe's fictional raven croaked, "Nevermore," scientists are reporting that real-life ravens think about the future.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Juno Delivers Stunning New Views of Great Red SpotScientists and the public are dazzled by images from the spacecraft’s close encounter with Jupiter’s largest—and the solar system’s most famous—storm -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Everything's Negotiable Except Cutting MedicaidThe new draft of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Better Care Reconciliation Act released today has significant additions that have seemingly responded both to the demands of his own Republican conference and to public outcry. As my colleague Russell Berman notes , perhaps the most significant change—or the most significant potential change—over the previous version of the BCRA is the add
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The Atlantic
Can a Sideways Elevator Help Designers Build Taller Skyscrapers?Half the world’s population already lives in cities, and that number is expected to jump to 70 percent by the end of the century. To accommodate the new urban dwellers, cities will have to build higher—and that will mean doubling down on ways to transport residents from the ground up into the sky. The medieval town of Rottweil, in rural South Germany, may seem like an odd place to contemplate the
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team studies mechanism of H. influenzae biofilm formationA research study identifying novel bacterial physiology in the creation of biofilms by Nationwide Children's Hospital scientists has been published in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
23h
Wired
Russia Could Easily Spread Fake News Without Team Trump's HelpYou don't need to be a campaign insider to narrowly target American voters with disinformation online.
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Ars Technica

Physical activity inequality can explain obesity differences Enlarge (credit: Rajarshi MITRA - flickr ) On average, people in the US take around the same number of steps daily as people in Mexico—about 4,700. But the US has a much higher obesity rate than Mexico—27.7 percent compared to 18.1 percent. Why? The immediate and obvious answer is food culture, and that probably does play an important role. But a paper in Nature this week suggests something else
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Popular Science

Baby squirrels are less likely to die if they’re born early Animals If you’re an adorable red squirrel pup, it’s best to have a birthday in March. The early bird gets the worm, and the early squirrel gets the ... home. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental Zika virus vaccines restrict in utero virus transmission in miceTwo experimental vaccines can restrict Zika virus transmission from pregnant mice to their fetuses and can prevent Zika virus-induced placental damage and fetal demise, according to new findings published in Cell. Scientists from NIAID; Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB); and other partners conducted the research. They tested a live-att
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Gizmodo

Quantum Mechanics Could Shake Up Our Understanding of Earth’s Magnetic Field Image: NASA Goddard /Flickr Earth’s magnetic field does way more than guide our compasses and cause occasional worry . It’s part of the reason there’s life at all on this planet—it protects us from harmful solar radiation that might otherwise blow our ozone layer away. But there’s still a lot about the magnetic field scientists don’t understand . Most importantly, they’re having trouble figuring
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Ars Technica

Trent Reznor’s cold call led to an awesome game-filled Nine Inch Nails video Enlarge / If you want dark NIN lyrics in your Polybius , you'll have to beg game creator Jeff Minter for the customized build he sent to Trent Reznor. (credit: Llamasoft/Nine Inch Nails) Industrial and synth-rock music fans got good news on Thursday when Nine Inch Nails announced its next EP, titled ADD VIOLENCE , coming in only eight days. What's more, fans got a hint of the EP with a catchy sin
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Science : NPR

Afghan Girls Robotics Team Allowed To Enter U.S. For Competition President Trump intervened to find a way to permit the girls entry after their applications for visas were twice rejected. For the budding scientists, the path to compete has been a long one. (Image credit: Hoshang Hashimi/AFP/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

The First Alexa Skills to Enable on Your New Amazon Echo Image via Amazon So, you bought an Amazon Echo during Prime Day, but you’re not sure what to do with it other than ask it silly questions, set timers, and roll a dice. Before you return it, know there’s a whole bunch else you can do with that smart speaker. The Echo currently has more than 3,000 skills , according to Amazon. But since writing a guide for all its talents would probably be longer t
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The Atlantic

Do Unto Other Harvard Students At Harvard University, a faculty panel empowered to study undergraduate social organizations like fraternities, sororities, and “final clubs” has issued a controversial new recommendation : that denying official recognition to these groups is not enough—they should be gradually but totally eliminated from campus life. Their original transgression was discriminating on the basis of gender. But eve
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The Atlantic

Does the Burqa Have a Future in Europe? The burqa’s legal standing in Europe was dealt another blow this week after the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled that Belgium’s ban on face veils is lawful under convention rules and “necessary in a democratic society.” The Strasbourg-based court’s unanimous ruling Tuesday determined that the 2011 Belgian law, which prohibits people from wearing clothing that partly or completely cover
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The Atlantic

Can a Bernie Sanders Ally Win the Maryland Governor's Mansion? Ben Jealous is betting that a progressive Democrat can unseat blue state Maryland’s Republican governor Larry Hogan, despite the fact that Hogan remains exceedingly popular. “Already, we are seeing signs, early signs, that we will be successful, [and] not just in the primary, in unifying Democrats, and pulling folks together,” Jealous said in an interview on Thursday at a civic center in Silver S
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Futurity.org

Emergency ‘NaloxBox’ could let public prevent overdoses Placing a new kind of emergency medicine kit called a “NaloxBox” that contains anti-overdose medication in public places could allow bystanders to prevent drug overdoses, the creators say. On the night of Saturday, June 3, just six days before Amos House installed six “NaloxBoxes”—wall-mounted kits with doses of the opioid overdose reversing medicine naloxone—a resident nearly died of an overdose
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Latest Headlines | Science News

These bacteria may egg on colon cancerStreptococcus gallolyticus may goad colon cancer growth.
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Gizmodo

Should We Be Worried About Ron Howard Directing the Han Solo Movie? Han Solo makes his concerns known. Image: Lucasfilm. Guten tag, my... uh... gang, I guess? Please enjoy a bit of “Postal Apocalypse” calm before the storm of San Diego Comic-Con! This week: Disney’s Star Wars problem, whether Secret Empire will come to the MCU, and how to show someone you love something that’s become problematic over time. Also, I, uh, write a Transformers movie. A Solo Low Tim M
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Science | The Guardian

Dementia and Alzheimer’s main cause of death for women, says Public Health England Female life expectancy is now 83 years but many women will spend a quarter of their lives in ill-health, finds report Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the biggest cause of death among women, according to a government report on the state of the nation’s health. Related: Don’t dread old age. I’m 94, and I won’t spend my last years in fear of the Tories | Harry Leslie Smith Continue reading...
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ravens pass tests of planning ahead in unnatural tasksClever birds may have evolved their own broad powers of apelike thinking about the future.
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Gizmodo

Man Stuck Inside ATM Rescued After Slipping Customers Terrifying Notes Image: Screen Shot via KZTV Under capitalism, money imprisons us all, but for one man in Corpus Christi, Texas, this arrangement transcended mere metaphor recently. On Wednesday afternoon, the contractor (whose name has not been released) was fixing a lock in a room connected to a Bank of America ATM when, suddenly, he trapped himself in. Having left his phone in the car, he was unable to call fo
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NeuWrite San Diego

How I Spent My Summer VacationWhat’s one part beach, four parts science, and too much fun? If you answered “Brain Camp,” you nailed it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIT Bitcoin study shows value of exclusive access for early adoptersDelaying access for the tech-savvy can stifle spread of new products, experiment with MIT students shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water makes the proton shakeBasic processes in chemistry and biology involve protons in a water environment. Water structures accommodating protons and their motions have so far remained elusive. Applying ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, Dahms et al. map fluctuating proton transfer motions and provide direct evidence that protons in liquid water are predominantly shared by two water molecules. Femtosecond proton elongatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could calcium hold the key to fighting a dangerous hospital infection?It lurks in hospitals and nursing homes, preying upon patients already weak from disease or advanced age. It kills nearly 30,000 Americans a year, and sickens half a million more. But new research shows that Clostridium difficile bacteria can't do all this without enough of a humble nutrient: calcium. And that new knowledge may lead to better treatment for the most vulnerable patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early adopters prefer earliest accessWidespread adoption of a new technology often relies on a small subpopulation of people who take the lead, but what happens if those natural early adopters can't adopt early, or, choose not to?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A neural switch for becoming alpha maleResearchers have identified a neural circuit in the brains of mice that plays a role in social dominance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yes, the sun is an ordinary, solar-type star after allThe Sun is a solar-type star, a new study claims -- resolving an ongoing controversy about whether the star at the center of our Solar System exhibits the same cyclic behavior as other nearby, solar-type stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop technique to control and measure electron spin voltageInformation technologies of the future will likely use electron spin -- rather than electron charge -- to carry information. But first, scientists need to better understand how to control spin and learn to build the spin equivalent of electronic components and tools. Now, Harvard researchers have developed a technique to control and measure spin voltage, known as spin chemical potential. The techn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ravens can plan ahead, similar to humans and great apesDespite previous research that indicates such behaviors are unique to humans and great apes, a new study shows that ravens, too, can plan ahead for different types of events , and further, that they are willing to forgo an immediate reward in order to gain a better one in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feedback from thousands of designs could transform protein engineeringA large-scale study to test the actual stability of computationally designed proteins shows a way to take some of the guesswork out of protein engineering. Previously, scientists tested only a few tens of proteins, due to prohibitive costs of DNA. This new approach, which incorporates advances in DNA synthesis technology, efficiently checks thousands of mini-protein designs. The hope is that in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacterium actively drives colorectal cancer tumor cell growthA subspecies of the bacterium Streptococcus gallolyticus appears to actively promote the development of colorectal cancer, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study tracks leishmaniasis in dogs, wild animals and sand flies in BrazilResearchers have surveyed the environmentally protected area in Campinas, Southeastern Brazil, which has undergone several changes by human action, especially the implementation of condominiums, and revealed that more than one percent of dogs, as well as some opossums and insect species in the area carry the parasite responsible for the most dangerous form of leishmaniasis. The results of their st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nearly half of women who use social media say they have been sexually victimizedA total of 261 women aged 13-72 took part in an anonymous online survey about their online experiences, with 46 per cent reporting sexual victimization. The most frequent experience was being asked to share sexual images of themselves, followed by receiving unsolicited sexual images and requests to talk about sex.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to grow a premium brand without killing its cachet? Outlet stores can helpThe conventional wisdom is that relying on revenues from outlet stores can destroy a brand's cachet over time. But according to a new study, outlet stores may actually help improve the brand's cachet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metal-free MRI contrast agent could be safer for some patientsA metal-free MRI contrast agent has been developed that could be safer for certain patients. The compound contains organic molecules called nitroxides instead of metal and may be used to generate more informative MRI scans of tumors.
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The Atlantic

Ravens Can Plan for the Future When you’re a scientist who studies birds as inquisitive and intelligent as ravens, doing experiments is easy. “If they find the task interesting enough, they all line up, and almost fight over who gets to take part in the study,” says Mathias Osvath from Lund University, who keeps 16 of the birds on his farm. As we talk on the phone, I can hear them cawing in the background. For years, Osvath ha
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists discover brain's neural switch for becoming an alpha male Timid mice turn bold after their ‘alpha’ circuit is stimulated as results show ‘winner effect’ lingers on and mechanism may be similar in humans Brash, brawny and keen to impose their will on anyone who enters their sphere of existence: the alpha male in action is unmistakable. Now scientists claim to have pinpointed the biological root of domineering behaviour. New research has located a brain c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin study shows value of exclusive access for early adoptersGiving early adopters the first access to new technologies can help diffuse those technologies among the masses. A notable example is Google's rollout of Gmail: In 2004, about 1,000 select users were given exclusive access and told to invite others. This campaign was so successful that at one point before the email service went mainstream Gmail invites were selling for more than $150 on eBay.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop technique to control and measure electron spin voltageInformation technologies of the future will likely use electron spin—rather than electron charge—to carry information. But first, scientists need to better understand how to control spin and learn to build the spin equivalent of electronic components, from spin transistors, to spin gates and circuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feedback from thousands of designs could transform protein engineeringThe stage is set for a new era of data-driven protein molecular engineering as advances in DNA synthesis technology merge with improvements in computational design of new proteins.
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Gizmodo

More Evidence That Ravens Are Ridiculously Intelligent Birds Image: Frank Vassen/Wikimedia New research shows that ravens can plan ahead for different types of events, and even resist the urge to take an immediate reward in favor of getting a better one in the future. These capacities are often considered the exclusive domain of humans and great apes, so their presence in birds comes as a surprise. The study , published today in Science , shows that ravens
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Brain activity helps build an alpha maleIn mice, nerve cells in the prefrontal cortex influence whether an individual is dominant or submissive.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Pinpointing the Brain's Motivation SwitchResearchers identify neurons important for the drive to win in mice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nevermore, or Tomorrow? Ravens Can Plan AheadLike great apes, the canny corvids seem capable of delaying gratification -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Virginia utility agrees to install two offshore wind turbines for study Enlarge / An image of an offshore wind turbine, from Dong Energy. (credit: Dong Energy) This week, Virginia utility Dominion announced that it would partner with Danish firm Dong Energy to build two offshore wind turbines as test cases for a commercial-sized installation. Currently, the US only has one 30MW commercial offshore wind farm off Block Island in Rhode Island. Renewable energy proponent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bakaletz Lab biofilm work published in Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesThe laboratory of Lauren Bakaletz, PhD, director, Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and vice president of basic sciences, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's, studied the biofilm construction capabilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), a bacterium responsible for sinusitis, pneumonia, exacerbations of cystic fibrosis and COPD, bronchitis and ear infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite sees Tropical Storm Fernanda heading westTropical Storm Fernanda continues to strengthen as it moves west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an infrared image of the storm on July 13 as it was nearing hurricane strength.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Will This Deckhand Survive This String? | Deadliest Catch #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Something's up with this string: Wizard deck hand Roger Schlosstein keeps getting snake bit by the block. Is it a coincidence or just bad luck? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite sees Tropical Storm Fernanda heading westTropical Storm Fernanda continues to strengthen as it moves west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an infrared image of the storm on July 13 as it was nearing hurricane strength.
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A microglia type associated with AD
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Late to the party
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Bulking up algae for biofuels
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Growing nanosheets off nanowires
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Bumble bees create a buzz
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History of winning remodels thalamo-PFC circuit to reinforce social dominance Mental strength and history of winning play an important role in the determination of social dominance. However, the neural circuits mediating these intrinsic and extrinsic factors have remained unclear. Working in mice, we identified a dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) neural population showing "effort"-related firing during moment-to-moment competition in the dominance tube test. Activation
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Global analysis of protein folding using massively parallel design, synthesis, and testing Proteins fold into unique native structures stabilized by thousands of weak interactions that collectively overcome the entropic cost of folding. Although these forces are "encoded" in the thousands of known protein structures, "decoding" them is challenging because of the complexity of natural proteins that have evolved for function, not stability. We combined computational protein design, next-
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Snap deconvolution: An informatics approach to high-throughput discovery of catalytic reactions We present an approach to multidimensional high-throughput discovery of catalytic coupling reactions that integrates molecular design with automated analysis and interpretation of mass spectral data. We simultaneously assessed the reactivity of three pools of compounds that shared the same functional groups (halides, boronic acids, alkenes, and alkynes, among other groups) but carried inactive su
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High-temperature quantum oscillations caused by recurring Bloch states in graphene superlattices Cyclotron motion of charge carriers in metals and semiconductors leads to Landau quantization and magneto-oscillatory behavior in their properties. Cryogenic temperatures are usually required to observe these oscillations. We show that graphene superlattices support a different type of quantum oscillation that does not rely on Landau quantization. The oscillations are extremely robust and persist
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Reconciling solar and stellar magnetic cycles with nonlinear dynamo simulations The magnetic fields of solar-type stars are observed to cycle over decadal periods—11 years in the case of the Sun. The fields originate in the turbulent convective layers of stars and have a complex dependency upon stellar rotation rate. We have performed a set of turbulent global simulations that exhibit magnetic cycles varying systematically with stellar rotation and luminosity. We find that t
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Tuning quantum nonlocal effects in graphene plasmonics The response of electron systems to electrodynamic fields that change rapidly in space is endowed by unique features, including an exquisite spatial nonlocality. This can reveal much about the materials’ electronic structure that is invisible in standard probes that use gradually varying fields. Here, we use graphene plasmons, propagating at extremely slow velocities close to the electron Fermi v
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All-oxide-based synthetic antiferromagnets exhibiting layer-resolved magnetization reversal Synthesizing antiferromagnets with correlated oxides has been challenging, owing partly to the markedly degraded ferromagnetism of the magnetic layer at nanoscale thicknesses. Here we report on the engineering of an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling (AF-IEC) between ultrathin but ferromagnetic La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 3 layers across an insulating CaRu 1/2 Ti 1/2 O 3 spacer. The layer-resol
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Control and local measurement of the spin chemical potential in a magnetic insulator The spin chemical potential characterizes the tendency of spins to diffuse. Probing this quantity could provide insight into materials such as magnetic insulators and spin liquids and aid optimization of spintronic devices. Here we introduce single-spin magnetometry as a generic platform for nonperturbative, nanoscale characterization of spin chemical potentials. We experimentally realize this pl
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Science current issue

Effects of network modularity on the spread of perturbation impact in experimental metapopulations Networks with a modular structure are expected to have a lower risk of global failure. However, this theoretical result has remained untested until now. We used an experimental microarthropod metapopulation to test the effect of modularity on the response to perturbation. We perturbed one local population and measured the spread of the impact of this perturbation, both within and between modules.
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Ravens parallel great apes in flexible planning for tool-use and bartering The ability to flexibly plan for events outside of the current sensory scope is at the core of being human and is crucial to our everyday lives and society. Studies on apes have shaped a belief that this ability evolved within the hominid lineage. Corvids, however, have shown evidence of planning their food hoarding, although this has been suggested to reflect a specific caching adaptation rather
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Science current issue

Mouse models of acute and chronic hepacivirus infection An estimated 71 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of small-animal models has impeded studies of antiviral immune mechanisms. Here we show that an HCV-related hepacivirus discovered in Norway rats can establish high-titer hepatotropic infections in laboratory mice with immunological features resembling those seen in human viral hepatitis. Whereas immune-c
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Guanine glycation repair by DJ-1/Park7 and its bacterial homologs DNA damage induced by reactive carbonyls (mainly methylglyoxal and glyoxal), called DNA glycation, is quantitatively as important as oxidative damage. DNA glycation is associated with increased mutation frequency, DNA strand breaks, and cytotoxicity. However, in contrast to guanine oxidation repair, how glycated DNA is repaired remains undetermined. Here, we found that the parkinsonism-associated
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Germ line-inherited H3K27me3 restricts enhancer function during maternal-to-zygotic transition Gametes carry parental genetic material to the next generation. Stress-induced epigenetic changes in the germ line can be inherited and can have a profound impact on offspring development. However, the molecular mechanisms and consequences of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance are poorly understood. We found that Drosophila oocytes transmit the repressive histone mark H3K27me3 to their offs
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New Products
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Academia needs to confront sexism
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Comment on "Molecular and neural basis of contagious itch behavior in mice" Yu et al . (Reports, 10 March 2017, p. 1072 ) state that contagious itch occurs in mice based on imitative scratching in normal mice observing excessive scratching in genetically modified demonstrator mice. However, despite employing multiple behavioral analysis approaches, we were unable to extend these findings to normal mice observing the well-established histamine model of acute itch in demon
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Response to Comment on "Molecular and neural basis of contagious itch behavior in mice" Liljencrantz et al . report the failure of observing contagious itch behavior using mice injected with histamine as the demonstrators. Analysis of their results shows that the histamine model is limited by inadequate frequency and duration of scratching bouts required for contagious itch test. To streamline the contagious itch test, the screen paradigm is highly recommended.
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Can we beat influenza?
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News at a glance
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Labmade smallpox is possible, study shows
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Trump's science shop is small and waiting for leadership
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CubeSat networks hasten shift to commercial weather data
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A trans-Atlantic transparency gap on animal experiments
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A push for low-carbon fuels pays off in California
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Surviving the cure
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A raven's memories are for the future
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The importance of being modular
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Immunology taught by rats
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Of sizzling steaks and DNA repair
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Plasmonic imaging is gaining momentum
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How do miniproteins fold?
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When early adopters don't adopt
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The Sun spotters
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The elegant law that governs us all
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Publish openly but responsibly
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Publish openly but responsibly--Response
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Indigenous peoples: Conservation paradox
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Outbreak
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Driving improvements in emerging disease surveillance through locally relevant capacity strengthening Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) threaten the health of people, animals, and crops globally, but our ability to predict their occurrence is limited. Current public health capacity and ability to detect and respond to EIDs is typically weakest in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many known drivers of EID emergence also converge in LMICs. Strengthening capacity for surveillance of disea
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Science current issue

Opportunities and challenges in modeling emerging infectious diseases The term "pathogen emergence" encompasses everything from previously unidentified viruses entering the human population to established pathogens invading new populations and the evolution of drug resistance. Mathematical models of emergent pathogens allow forecasts of case numbers, investigation of transmission mechanisms, and evaluation of control options. Yet, there are numerous limitations and
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Science current issue

Improving vaccine trials in infectious disease emergencies Unprecedented global effort is under way to facilitate the testing of countermeasures in infectious disease emergencies. Better understanding of the various options for trial design is needed in advance of outbreaks, as is preliminary global agreement on the most suitable designs for the various scenarios. What would enhance the speed, validity, and ethics of clinical studies of such countermeasu
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Science current issue

When an emerging disease becomes endemic Epidemics, such as HIV in the early 1980s and Ebola in 2014, inspire decisive government investment and action, and individual and societal concern, sometimes bordering on panic. By contrast, endemic diseases, such as HIV in 2017 and tuberculosis, struggle to maintain the same attention. For many, the paradox is that endemic disease, in its totality, continues to impose a far higher public health
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Is the Sun a solar-type star?
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Diamonds to the rescue
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The brain circuits of a winner
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Amyloid impairs synaptic trafficking
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Making a plan
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New York City rats provide a gift to virologists
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A triple search for coupling reactions
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Intergenerational transcription taming
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Divided, they conquer
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Modularity limits disturbance effects
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Making an oxide-layered antiferromagnet
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Exploring structure space to understand stability
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Heat-loving quantum oscillations
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Plasmons probe the quantum response
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Distinct neural patterns for two languages
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Not-so-sweet DNA damage repaired
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Curbing culprits of chronic rejection
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Meteorites formed in two reservoirs
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Mechanisms for maintaining mental maps
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Popular Science

Why CAR T-cell immunotherapy is such a big deal for cancer treatment Health The FDA will likely approve the gene-altering therapy. The FDA just recommended a brand new type of cancer treatment for approval: One that employs the body’s immune system to fight cancer. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Secure Chat App Wickr Thinks It’s Solved the Encrypted Conference Calls Problem Photo: AP Remember when encrypting stuff was really hard? It kinda drives me crazy to think about how much time I wasted trying to set up encrypted OTR chat on Adium a few years ago, and now we can just download Signal or WhatsApp or Messenger and bam! Our chats are encrypted, just like that. We can even have an encrypted group chat. We’re so cyber-spoiled these days. But calling is still a diffe
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Gizmodo

14 Recent Scifi Films That Didn't Need Big Budgets To Be Amazing MIchael Shannon in Take Shelter. Image: Sony Pictures Classics Low-budget scifi movies may have had their heyday during Roger Corman’s rise to B-movie greatness in the 1950s, but they’re still going strong today—proving that you don’t necessarily need lavish special effects to tell a really great story. Here are our favorites from the past few decades. 14. Another Earth (2011) Director Mike Cahil
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Gizmodo

Here's the Best Price We've Ever Seen On a 4TB External Drive Seagate Backup Plus 4TB , $90 This particular external hard drive requires a power cord, so it’ll have to live on your desk or on top of your game console , but as long as that doesn’t bother you, $90 is the best price we’ve ever seen on a 4TB drive .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antibody against carcinogenic substance decipheredSummertime is barbecue time. However, when fat reacts with glowing coal, a substance chemists call benzopyrene is created. It is a widespread environmental toxin that can cause cancer in humans. Since buildings were heated with coal and wood for decades, dispersed by chimney smoke, it is now also found in soil and groundwater. A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from the Technical University of Munich
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How selenium compounds might become catalystsA new approach for activating chemical reactions based on the element selenium has been tested by scientists. They demonstrated that selenium can form bonds similar to those of hydrogen bonds, resulting in accelerated reactions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children conceived using donor sperm have similar health and well-being to general populationChildren conceived using donor sperm have similar health and well-being to the general population, according to a new study.
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Ars Technica

Nintendo ceases production of the New Nintendo 3DS in Japan [Updated] You won't be able to buy this in Japan anymore, now that Nintendo has stopped production. [ Update: Nintendo of Europe has confirmed to Gamestop that the New Nintendo 3DS is also being discontinued in that region. Meanwhile, a Nintendo of America representative told Polygon "this announcement does not affect Nintendo of America territories, as the model in question was only sold in limited quanti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimizing hydrogen-powered passenger ferries focus of Sandia Labs studyMaritime transportation has emerged as one solution to the traffic gridlock that plagues coastal cities. But with urban passenger ferries operating in sensitive environments and tourist areas, hydrogen fuel cell-powered passenger ferries offer a quiet, zero-emission alternative to conventional diesel vessels.
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Gizmodo

Frank Darabont's Furious Emails to His Walking Dead Coworkers: 'Fuck You All' A scene from the farmhouse in season 2. Image: AMC The Walking Dead’ s original showrunner Frank Darabont continues to paint a bizarre (and vulgar) picture about the first two seasons of the show, as his $280-million legal fight against AMC has unveiled thousands of documents and emails from his time on set. In short, he was pissed . “YOU NEED TO PAY ATTENTION TO THE MOTHERFUCKING SCRIPT!” A few
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Laser Sensor on an iPhone Would Make a Lot of SenseThe feature could help Apple’s push to develop compelling augmented-reality applications.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Living Another Day, Thanks to Grandparents Who Couldn’t SleepAge-related changes in sleep patterns may have helped early humans survive by ensuring at least one person was always alert to nighttime threats.
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NYT > Science

Climate-Altering Gases Spiked in 2016, Federal Scientists ReportThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration attributed the increase in part to the El Niño weather pattern. Its report makes no mention of human contributions.
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Zika Vaccines Protect Mouse FetusesThe first-of-its-kind study follows on the heels of ethicists' urging vaccine developers to conduct clinical trials in pregnant women.
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The Atlantic

A Shake-Up for the 2017 Emmy Nominations A sweeping year of Peak TV dominated the Emmy nominations Thursday morning, with new series like The Crown , The Handmaid’s Tale , Stranger Things , Westworld , and This Is Us entering a drama field now dominated by shows on streaming networks. The comedy field remained more stable, with old favorites like Veep and Modern Family leading the pack, but overall the industry awards reflected the ongo
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Ars Technica

SpaceX goes there—seeks government funds for deep space Enlarge / The view of a landed Falcon 9 first stage booster in June, 2017, in Florida. (credit: SpaceX) During the last decade, NASA has invested billions of dollars into programs with private companies to carry cargo and, eventually, astronauts to the International Space Station. These commercial services were powered by new kinds of contracts for the agency, because they offered a "fixed price"
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Popular Science

Trampolines are more dangerous than you think Health And no, the padding and nets don’t really help. They're basically giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. So are you surprised?
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New Scientist - News

Robotic landers could start mining the moon as early as 2020Moon Express has just unveiled plans for three lunar expeditions. The firm aims to mine moon rocks to sell on Earth, and vague laws mean it probably can
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The Atlantic

Major League Baseball's Educational Safety Net Monday night’s Home Run Derby proved to be a short contest for Charlie Blackmon. Despite swatting an impressive 14 bombs in a heart-pounding first round of the jovial tournament, the Colorado Rockies’ bearded leadoff hitter was eliminated early by Cody Bellinger of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Blackmon’s 20 home runs and .319 average at the All Star break suggest he has a promising future in baseball
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Gizmodo

New Deep Sea Hermit Crabs Have Super Weird Homes Image: Jannes Landschoff Most hermit crabs live their lives in an endless episode of House Hunters, switching from one shell to the next. A newly discovered species of hermit crab, however, chooses to live in an unusual abode that’s actually also alive. Together, the home and its crustacean tenant live in a symbiotic relationships that appears to be infinitely less stressful than any show on HGTV
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Gizmodo

Can Facebook Fix VR’s Most Frustrating Problems in One Fell Swoop? Image: Oculus Virtual reality is cool and all, but it won’t really become mainstream until a) it’s affordable and b) it doesn’t require a $1,000+ gaming PC. But it seems Facebook is attempting yet again to make VR a thing. Facebook is creating a new Oculus VR headset that’s not only untethered, but also cheap, according to Bloomberg. The new headset, codenamed “Pacific,” is expected to be announc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers revolutionize vital conservation tool with use of gold nanotechnology and lasersIn a new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) provide the first-ever reproducible evidence for the successful cryopreservation of zebrafish embryos.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer may metastasize without lymph node involvementResearch by several leading scientists including Rakesh Jain, Ph.D., Director of the Edwin L. Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and supported in part by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, has provided the first evidence that the century old model for cancer metastasis -- where cancer spreads from primary tumor, to nearby lymph nodes, and then to ot
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Newly discovered elovanoids called a 'transformative new concept of biology'Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans, has discovered a new class of mediators, or biochemical triggers that he named elovanoids (ELVs). This discovery provides the first evidence of the existence of elovanoids and of their significant role in protecting and sustaining retinal pigment epithelial (R
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibody against carcinogenic substance decipheredWhen fat reacts with glowing coal at a barbecue, the substance benzopyrene is created, an environmental toxin that can cause cancer. Since buildings were heated with coal and wood for decades, dispersed by chimney smoke, it is still in soil and groundwater. A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from Technical University of Munich has deciphered the binding mechanism of an antibody to benzopyrene -- this
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Close-Up of Jupiter's Great Red SpotNew photos were just released from Juno’s most recent flyover of the enormous storm raging on Jupiter. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Laser turns water into alien ice in nanoseconds For the first time, researchers have observed and captured the freezing of water into a type of extraterrestrial ice called ice VII (“ice seven”), usually found in environments like icy planetary collisions. In addition to helping scientists better understand those remote worlds, the findings could reveal how water and other substances undergo transitions from liquids to solids. Learning to manip
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zika vaccine protects fetus against infection and birth defectsImmunizing female mice with a Zika vaccine can protect their developing fetus from infection and birth defects during pregnancy, according to new research from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The findings are now available in Cell.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Major Science Report Lays Out a Plan to Tamp Down Opioid CrisisThe National Academies report includes recommendations for federal agencies, states and medical personnel -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Brilliant Staircase Design Stores Extra Energy to Make It Easier to Climb Later GIF Do you deliberately avoid visiting friends who live in multi-story buildings without an elevator? No one would fault you—having to climb even just a single flight of stairs is like being forced to workout against your will. But thanks to engineers at Georgia Tech and Emory University , stairs might one day do all the hard work for you. In a paper published today in the journal PLOS ONE , that
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Popular Science

Stay powered wherever you go with this waterproof solar charger Sponsored Post Power any two mobile devices and save 72 percent off MSRP. Stay powered wherever you go with this waterproof solar charger. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthesizing the human genome from scratchFor the past 15 years, synthetic biologists have been figuring out how to synthesize an organism's complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. They've tackled the genomes of microbes, but now one large consortium has its sights set on the human genome.
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Behavior Circuits Mapped in Whole Fruit Fly BrainUsing machine learning, researchers have created extensive maps of the neuronal circuits associated with social and locomotion behaviors in the fruit fly.
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Gizmodo

RIP USB: These Are Ports and Connectors to Care About in 2017 Image credit: Aaron Yoo/ Flickr We hate to break it to you, but the traditional USB ports you’ve used to connect your cameras, controllers, and other gizmos for the past 20 years aren’t long for this world. The whole squad’s getting replaced by a few great alternatives, though they each come with their own pros and cons. If you’re thinking of upgrading your devices this year, here are the ports y
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Ars Technica

A Comcast billing nightmare affects woman caring for her sick father You can check out any time you'd like, but you can never... well, you know the song. (credit: Aurich Lawson) Amie Stepanovich‏ has been shuttling back and forth between Washington, DC, and Ohio, where her father is " very sick and currently in the hospital and unable to speak for himself," she wrote in a series of tweets yesterday. Stepanovich has power of attorney for her father and wants to red
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ga-ga, goo-goo, why a baby likes youBy the age of one, infants already prefer speakers of their native tongue, but do not necessarily view speakers of an unfamiliar language negatively, according to new UBC research. The findings suggest that, while positivity toward familiar groups may be innate, dislike for unfamiliar groups appears to be a learned behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report presents national strategy to reduce opioid epidemicYears of sustained and coordinated efforts will be required to contain and reverse the harmful societal effects of the prescription and illicit opioid epidemics, which are intertwined and getting worse, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny cellular antennae key to fat formation in muscleLike it or not, as we age, our muscle cells are slowly exchanged, one by one, for fat cells. This process quickens when we injure a muscle, and an extreme form of this process is also seen in muscle-wasting diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Now, scientists at UC San Francisco have shown that cellular antennae called cilia, found on fat-forming cells interspersed in muscle, play a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How social rank can trigger vulnerability to stressEPFL scientists have identified rank in social hierarchies as a major determining factor for vulnerability to chronic stress. They also show that energy metabolism in the brain is a predictive biomarker for social status as well as stress vulnerability and resilience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How neurons sense our everyday lifeResearchers from King's College London have discovered a molecular mechanism that enables neuronal connections to change through experience, thus fueling learning and memory formation. The findings are published in the journal Neuron and have the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies for neurological and psychiatric disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest study of malaria gene function reveals many potential drug targetsThe malaria parasite's success is owed to stripping down its genome to the bare essential genes, scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found. In the first ever large-scale study of malaria gene function, scientists analyzed more than half of the genes in the parasite's genome and found that two thirds of these genes were essential for survival -- the larges
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Time to rise and shineThe copepod species Calanus finmarchicus schedules its day using a genetic clock that works independently of external stimuli. The clock shapes the copepod's metabolic rhythms and daily vertical migration. This in turn have an enormous influence on the entire food web in the North Atlantic, where Calanus finmarchicus is a central plankton species. Wherever the high-calorie copepod is, determines w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After 'freezing' in fear, what part of the brain helps make fish swim again?The brain is the body's mission control center, sending messages to the other organs about how to respond to various external and internal stimuli. Located in the forebrain, the habenular region is one such message-conducting system. Two new papers explain how the habenulae develop and their unsuspected role in recovering from fear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers investigate possible link between carnitine deficiency and autismAt Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Arthur Beaudet has been following clinical and genetic clues in patients with autism spectrum disorder and experimental results in animal models that have led him to propose that the lack of carnitine, a nutrient needed for the normal development and workings of the brain, the liver, the heart and other muscles, might be involved in triggering mild forms of autis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light on disease-busting 'recycling bins' in our cellsScientists have made an important step in understanding how cells keep themselves clean and healthy -- a finding that may have implications for combating neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.
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Vaccines protect fetuses from Zika infection, mouse study showsZika virus can cause severe brain damage in people infected before birth. A new study in mice shows that females vaccinated before pregnancy and infected with Zika virus while pregnant bear pups who show no trace of the virus. The findings offer the first evidence that an effective vaccine administered prior to pregnancy can protect vulnerable fetuses from Zika infection and resulting injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence helps build brain atlas of fly behaviorScientists at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus created comprehensive brain maps linking different groups of neurons to specific behaviors, using a machine-learning program that annotated more than 225 days of videos of flies -- a feat that would have taken humans some 3,800 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping behavior in the fruit fly brainOne of the primary missions of neuroscience is to make connections between particular neurons in the brain and specific behaviors. Now a team of researchers has used computer-vision and machine-learning techniques in fruit flies to create behavior anatomy maps that will help us understand how specific brain circuits generate Drosophila aggression, wing extension, or grooming. The data are being pu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

All roads lead to 5GIn the ever-changing context of communication networks, all roads converge towards the promise of 5G: higher data bandwidth, greater speed and lower latency. International scientists are competing to be the first to develop technical solutions that seek to unite and balance the set of existing technologies with those yet to come, and thus bring us closer to the ideal of seamless communications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetically enhanced, cord-blood derived immune cells strike B-cell cancersImmune cells with a general knack for recognizing and killing many types of infected or abnormal cells also can be engineered to hunt down cells with specific targets on them to treat cancer, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breathing in a new gene therapy to treat pulmonary hypertensionA novel airway-delivered gene therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension (PH), a form of high blood pressure in blood vessels in the lungs that is linked to heart failure, has been advanced by new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adapters enable better communication between machinesPlug and play is a technology that allows users to connect devices such as printers or USB memory sticks to a computer and directly use them without installing any software. This technology is now also available for industrial applications: Engineers developed an adapter that makes it much easier to interconnect parts of a production facility and align them with each other.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effective protection against hip fracture during cortisone treatmentThere is effective protection against hip fracture for the many elderly people whose skeleton is declining in strength, as a side effect of cortisone treatment. If patients receive the osteoporosis medication alendronate, it reduces the risk of hip fracture by 65 percent, as a study reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming could result in losses for the European wine industrySlight increases in temperature in Mediterranean regions from global warming could potentially result in labor, productivity and economic losses for the European wine industry, an article suggests.
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The Atlantic

What's Inside Mitch McConnell's Latest Health-Care Proposal Updated on July 13 at 2:50 p.m. ET The revised Senate health-care bill that Republican leaders released on Thursday morning seemingly has something for everyone—but perhaps not enough for anyone. Seeking to quell a revolt from more than one-fifth of his conference, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agreed to forego two significant tax cuts for the wealthy and instead pour hundreds of billions of do
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The Atlantic

The Dark Side of That Personality Quiz You Just Took I am the Danube River. My spirit is sparkling and swift. I yearn for new experiences and deep connections with people. I’m adaptable, but to a fault; I rarely see danger ahead. I’m capable of infidelity without much remorse. I’m also great at ceramics. So says Meet Yourself As You Really Are , the oldest, longest, and WTF-est personality quiz I’ve taken. Published in 1936, Meet Yourself is a 336-
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The Atlantic

The Case for Kid Rock Kid Rock claims he is running for United States Senate. While I am skeptical— OK, go ahead and get those jokes out. I’ll wait. Are you good now? Those name jokes are not as funny or original as you think. —anyway, while I am skeptical that we see a Senator Rock, or even a nominee Rock, in the near future, it’s also not entirely crazy to think that a run for office by Robert James Richtie could be
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Popular Science

Sexy sounds lure invasive cane toads into traps Animals Let’s not get it on. Killing me softly with his song. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New suit can enhance athletes' performance with dataWhen it comes to professional athletics, every little bit counts, and for centuries, athletes have been doing everything they can to get ahead. From legal means like hiring the best trainers and purchasing the best equipment, to less legal means like pharmaceutical enhancement, athletic advantages come in all forms. But thanks to CMU-SV Professor Pei Zhang, the modern athlete now has access to the
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Ars Technica

Samba puts out new security update to address exploit that fueled WannaCry Enlarge (credit: kelly sweeney ) On Wednesday, the Samba Team released new security updates to fix a vulnerability in "all versions of Samba from 4.0.0 onward using embedded Heimdal Kerberos," according to an announcement from the United States-Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT). The update comes in response to an invasive piece of malware that virally spread ransomware known as "WannaCr
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Quanta Magazine

Missing Mutations Suggest a Reason for Sex For a species whose numbers show no signs of collapsing, humans have a shockingly high mutation rate. Each of us is born with about 70 new genetic errors that our parents did not have. That’s much more than a slime mold, say, or a bacterium. Mutations are likely to decrease an organism’s fitness, and an avalanche like this every generation could be deadly to our species. The fact that we haven’t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient plankton-like microfossils span two continentsLarge, robust, lens-shaped microfossils from the approximately 3.4 billion-year-old Kromberg Formation of the Kaapvaal Craton in eastern South Africa are not only among the oldest elaborate microorganisms known, but are also related to other intricate microfossils of the same age found in the Pilbara Craton of Australia, according to an international team of scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning technique offers insight into plasma behaviorMachine learning, which lets researchers determine if two processes are causally linked without revealing how, could help stabilize the plasma within doughnut-shaped fusion devices known as tokamaks. Such learning can facilitate the avoidance of disruptions—off-normal events in tokamak plasmas that can lead to very fast loss of the stored thermal and magnetic energies and threaten the integrity of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic clocks in zooplankton species regulate what is likely the largest daily movement of biomass worldwideThe copepod species Calanus finmarchicus schedules its day using a genetic clock that works independently of external stimuli. The clock shapes the copepod's metabolic rhythms and daily vertical migration. This, in turn, has an enormous influence on the entire food web in the North Atlantic, where Calanus finmarchicus is a central plankton species. Wherever the high-calorie copepod is found determ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study sheds light on disease-busting 'recycling bins' in our cellsScientists have made an important step in understanding how cells keep themselves clean and healthy - a finding that may have implications for combating neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How social rank can trigger vulnerability to stressStress is a major risk factor for a range of psychopathologies. However, stress does not affect everyone equally: in the face of sustained adversity, some people develop depression symptoms while others adapt and remain resilient. Identifying risk factors and biomarkers for vulnerability to developing stress-induced depression in order to identify individual susceptibility before stress exposure h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Largest study of malaria gene function reveals many potential drug targetsThe malaria parasite's success is owed to the stripping down of its genome to the bare essential genes, scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found. In the first ever large-scale study of malaria gene function, scientists analysed more than half of the genes in the parasite's genome and found that two thirds of these genes were essential for survival—the la
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Live Science

See Juno Probe's Amazing Up-Close Views of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (Photos)On Monday night (July 10), NASA's Juno spacecraft zoomed just 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Great Red Spot's cloud tops — closer than any probe had gotten before. The images Juno took that night have now come down to Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study by UTA professor shows many parents in the dark about concussionsDespite the large volume of information about sports related concussions on the Internet, many parents and guardians of young athletes have a limited understanding of concussions, according to a study co-authored by a faculty member of UTA's College of Nursing and Health Innovation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient plankton-like microfossils span 2 continentsLarge, robust, lens-shaped microfossils from the approximately 3.4 billion-year-old Kromberg Formation of the Kaapvaal Craton in eastern South Africa are not only among the oldest elaborate microorganisms known, but are also related to other intricate microfossils of the same age found in the Pilbara Craton of Australia, according to an international team of scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Side effects not a major problem for new class of breast cancer drugsA ground-breaking new class of oral drugs for treating breast cancer, known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, are generally well-tolerated, with a manageable toxicity profile for most patients.
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Live Science

NASA Images Show Gradual Separation of Massive New Antarctic IcebergMultiple NASA satellites have captured images of the dramatic and long-awaited birth of one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, which broke off an Antarctic ice shelf this week.
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Ars Technica

Google’s new “Backup and Sync” app lets you back up your desktop to Drive On the Web, Google Drive is mostly used as a competitor to Microsoft Office. You get apps for word processing, spreadsheets, and slides. On a desktop computer, the Drive app takes on a different form—it's a Dropbox competitor, syncing your files to the cloud from a special folder. This week, Google announced the Drive desktop app is changing; it's not even called "Drive" anymore. Now this app is
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The Atlantic

The 'What About Ukraine?' Defense of Trump Jr.'s Russia Meeting Before welcoming Donald Trump Jr. onto his show on Tuesday, Sean Hannity boiled down his defense of the president’s son to one word: Ukraine. In obsessing over whether Trump’s campaign colluded with Russian officials to interfere in the 2016 presidential election—and most recently whether it was ethical and legal for Trump Jr. to meet with a Russian lawyer in the hope of obtaining damaging inform
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Ars Technica

Two judges smack down notorious patent holder “Shipping and Transit” in one week Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) Shipping and Transit LLC, a company that claims to have patented both the tracking of vehicles and the packages they deliver, has been hit with an order (PDF) to pay $36,317.50 in attorney's fees. US Magistrate Judge Dave Lee Brannon, who published the order yesterday, is the second federal judge to hit Shipping and Transit with fees in less than a week. It could be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotic nanoparticles fight drug-resistant bacteriaResearchers are hoping to use nanotechnology to develop more targeted treatments for drug-resistant bugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor-targeting drug shows potential for treating bone cancer patientsThe treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A new study found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experts call for a ban on children rugby tacklingIn light of the British Lion's rugby success, experts warn steps need to be taken to ensure children's safety when they play the sport.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Anker SoundCore, Google Wifi, Dyson Vacuum, and More Your favorite Bluetooth speaker , a popular Dyson vacuum , and Pandemic lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundCore , $27 Anker’s SoundCore blew away the competition to take the title of your favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker, and today, you can pick one up for $27 . That’s a couple buck
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning technique offers insight into plasma behaviorA paper by graduate student Matthew Parsons describes the application of machine learning to avoiding plasma disruptions, which will be crucial to ensuring the longevity of future large tokamaks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research makes robots better at following spoken instructionsA new software system helps robots to more effectively act on instructions from people, who by nature give commands that range from simple and straightforward to those that are more complex and imply a myriad of subtasks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Babies with hearing loss form better vocabulary with early interventionA new study published in Pediatrics found that babies with hearing loss who are diagnosed by three months and receive interventions by six months have broader vocabularies than those treated later. It also found that nearly half don't meet early intervention guidelines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can sexual risk and behaviors among women help explain HIV disparities by race/ethnicity?Researchers examined the sexual behaviors of a nationally representative group of US women that can prevent against or increase risk for HIV infection and reported the differences in behaviors such as condom use and concurrent sex partners and the changes in these behaviors over 7 years for white, black, and Latina women ages 18-44 in a study published in Journal of Women's Health.
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Ars Technica

Ex-mentor testifies, airs Shkreli’s bad, gross, romantically confusing conduct Enlarge / Martin Shkreli leaves a federal court in New York. (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) In 2009, at an apartment cocktail party in New York’s East Village, Steven Richardson met one Martin Shkreli; soon after, Richardson invested $400,000 in Shkreli’s buzzing MSMB hedge funds. Though federal prosecutors allege that Shkreli went on to defraud investors of those funds, including Richardson, the t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chillier Winters, Smaller BeaksAlthough Charles Darwin lived and worked in the 19th century, modern evolutionary biologists are far from exhausting all avenues of inquiry regarding birds and evolution. For example, in the 1990s, researchers began to explore a new question concerning the relationship between climate and the evolution of beak size.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop imaging method for measuring glutathione in real timeScientists have developed a fluorescent probe -- they call it RealThiol -- that can measure real-time changes of glutathione concentration in living cells.
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New Scientist - News

Experiences or stuff, what’s the best buy for a happiness boost?A decade of research that says buying experiences makes you happier than gaining possessions is being questioned. Is stuff king again, wonders James Wallman
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The Atlantic

What Is Dodd-Frank and Why Does Trump Want to Repeal It? Trump campaigned on deregulating Wall Street, saying that regulations are “killing our country and our jobs.” He wants to repeal Dodd-Frank, the 2010 law that tried to reign in the banks after the financial crisis. What exactly does Dodd-Frank do? And is the president right that it threatens the American economy?
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Gizmodo

Airbnb Host Who Made Racist, Pro-Trump Comments Ordered to Take Asian-American Studies Class Source: YouTube An Airbnb host near Big Bear, California, who cancelled reservations last-minute and blamed the user’s ethnicity, must now take an Asian American studies course and pay $5,000. “I wouldn’t rent it to u if u were the last person on earth,” “One word says it all. Asian,” and “It’s why we have trump... I will not allow this country to be told what to do by foreigners” were some of th
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
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Ars Technica

Mario Kart becomes the first Nintendo property to come to VR It's been nearly a year-and-a-half since Nintendo first said it was "looking into" virtual reality , though we have yet to see any concrete signs of that "look" outside of a vague patent application . Thus, it came down to Nintendo partner Namco Bandai to give the world its first official taste of what a popular Nintendo franchise would look like on a modern virtual reality headset (no, the Virtu
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NYT > Science

Newsbook: 3 Books Take a Deeper Look at the Opioid EpidemicTwo books help explain the opiate abuse crisis and how we may resolve it, while a novel shows the havoc addiction can wreak.
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Ingeniøren

Stillads kollapset under svensk vejbro - 16 tilskadekomneStilladset til en ny bro over en svensk jernbane er styrtet sammen. Det ligner umiddelbart en gentagelse af to ulykker med danske motorvejsbroer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Interplay of an African Bat, a Parasite and a Virus, study revealsA lack of evidence that bats are key reservoirs of human disease has not prevented their vilification or efforts to exterminate bat colonies where threats are presumed to lurk. To better understand the dynamics of bats and potential threats to human health, researchers explored the relationship of an African forest bat, a novel virus and a parasite.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant charge reversal observed for the first timeCharged surfaces submerged in electrolyte solutions can sometimes become oppositely charged. This nonintuitive phenomenon happens when excess counter ions adsorb to the surface. In certain situations, theory predicts a highly charged surface not only changes sign, but can become more highly charged than the original surface. This is known as giant charge reversal, but remains controversial and has
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Field of microscopy with nanoparticle 'buckyswitch'Visualizing biological cells under a microscope was just made clearer, thanks to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anti-CRIPSR protein reduces off-target cutting during genome editingHinting at a new approach to regulating gene editing in mammalian cells, a new study reports that an inhibitor protein from a Listeria bacteriophage can block the Cas9 component of CRISPR-Cas9 from interacting with DNA.
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Scientific American Content: Global

5 Things to Know about the Trillion-Ton IcebergAn iceberg the size of Delaware is now on the move -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Jeff Sessions Claimed He Never Met Foreign Officials on a Key Security Form In response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, the Justice Department released Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s SF-86 security-clearance form Thursday that shows he denied having any contact with foreign governments or their representatives “in the past seven (7) years.” Sessions’s spokesman told CNN in May that certain meetings weren’t supposed to be listed. “In filling out the SF-86 form,
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Wired

Netflix's 'Castlevania' Is the Future of Videogame AdaptationsThe anime version of the Dracula-killing, dungeon-crawling game franchise looks like a success—so we'll probably be seeing more like it.
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Live Science

Ancient House of the Dead Unearthed Near StonehengeA nearly 6,000-year-old long barrow, or house of the dead, has been unearthed in the same region that houses Stonehenge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More to life than the habitable zoneTwo separate teams of scientists have identified major challenges for the development of life in what has recently become one of the most famous exoplanet systems, TRAPPIST-1.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Squirrels have long memory for problem solvingSquirrels can remember problem-solving techniques for long periods and can apply them to new situations, researchers have discovered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests route to improving rechargeable lithium batteriesIn a study that suggests a route to improving rechargeable lithium batteries, MIT researchers report that smooth surfaces may prevent harmful deposits from working their way into a solid electrolyte.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Squirrels have long memory for problem solvingSquirrels can remember problem-solving techniques for long periods and can apply them to new situations, researchers have discovered.
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Popular Science

Tesla is building the world’s biggest battery. Here’s how it will work. Technology Get amped to learn about lithium-ion energy storage! By the end of the year, the state of South Australia will be home to the world’s biggest battery, if Elon Musk and Tesla make good on an ambitious commitment. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Radiohead Secretly Hid an Old App in the Anniversary Edition of OK Computer GIF Image: YouTube / Radiohead “Old” is a very relative term when talking about computer history. By the looks of it, however, Radiohead hid a computer program on the tape that comes with the 20th anniversary edition of OK Computer , and making it work feels like time travel. That’s because you’ll need an ‘80s-era, 8-bit British computer, the ZX Spectrum, to run it. Well, that’s being a little bi
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Gizmodo

Komodo Dragon Blood Could Save Your Life One Day Image: The American Chemical Society Many animals are good at healing us emotionally, like capybaras and tiny kittens in tiny hats. Regrettably though, if we got really sick, no amount of golden retriever puppies could do anything to help us. Komodo dragons, on the other hand, might not be “adorable” in the traditional sense, but they could save us from untimely death. Komodos are the largest liz
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Live Science

Tiny Bird Fossil Solves Big Mystery About Life After DinosaursA teeny-tiny fossilized bird skeleton is helping researchers understand the explosive rate at which birds diversified after the dinosaur age, new research shows.
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TEDTalks (video)

What rivers can tell us about the earth's history | Liz HajekRivers are one of nature's most powerful forces -- they bulldoze mountains and carve up the earth, and their courses are constantly moving. Understanding how they form and how they'll change is important for those that call their banks and deltas home. In this visual-packed talk, geoscientist Liz Hajek shows us how rocks deposited by ancient rivers can be used as a time machine to study the histor
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Futurity.org

Gel could let cracked screens ‘heal’ themselves Researchers have created a 3D-printed, gel-like “ink” that that could let cracked screens and scratches in paint repair themselves, much as living tissue does. The toothpaste-like 3D-printed gel heals itself when exposed to the right stimulus, like humidity. (Credit: U. Melbourne) If successfully developed, the polymer-based substance could have endless applications, from protecting mobile device
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Gizmodo

Musk’s Hyperloop Has Nothing on This Quantum Levitation Race Track GIF He might have billions of dollars, a company that promises to revolutionize space travel , and an upgraded full head of hair , but Elon Musk’s Hyperloop will never be as cool as this superconducting quantum levitation Möbius strip race track created by students at Ithaca College’s Low Temperature Physics Lab. Möbius strips, as we all learned in science class, turn both sides of a strip of pap
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Futurity.org

New sour beer could be good for your gut The specialty sour beer incorporates the probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L26 , which was first isolated from human intestines and has the ability to neutralize toxins and viruses, as well as regulate the immune system. “The health benefits of probiotics are well known,” says Chan Mei Zhi Alcine, a student in the Food Science and Technology Programme in the National University of Singapor
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Yes, The NFL Is Still Making Assloads Of Money | Fusion Man Accused of Tormenting Muslim Co Deadspin Yes, The NFL Is Still Making Assloads Of Money | Fusion Man Accused of Tormenting Muslim Couple For 20 Blocks Cries After Being Charged With a Hate Crime | The Grapevine Yes, Conor McGregor Is a Racist | Jezebel Hey, Remember When Donald Trump Jr. Proposed to His Wife As a Jewelry Ad? |
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Ars Technica

AMD Threadripper—16 cores and 32 threads for $999–arrives in August Enlarge / AMD's Ryzen die. Threadripper has two of these in a multi-chip module. Epyc has four of them. (credit: AMD) AMD today announced the pricing and (approximate) availability for Threadripper, its high-end desktop platform that was first unveiled in May . The top-end part will be the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X: a 16 core, 32 thread chip with a base clock of 3.4GHz and a boost clock of 4.0GHz
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's TCS profits fall by 6 percentIndia's largest IT services firm Tata Consultancy Services reported a nearly 6 percent fall in quarterly earnings Thursday owing to a strengthening rupee, the company said.
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Ars Technica

Comcast says net neutrality supporters “create hysteria” Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | SweetBabeeJay) Broadband providers made it clear this week: they wholeheartedly support net neutrality... but they want to overturn those pesky net neutrality rules and replace them with something that isn't so strict. In fact, the way to truly protect net neutrality is to keep the Internet free of regulations, Internet provider CenturyLink wrote . "Keep the Intern
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal obesity during pregnancy may be linked to behavioral problems in boysMaternal obesity and child neurodevelopmental problems have both increased in the US and scientists have suggested a possible link. A new study has found that the heavier mothers were when they entered pregnancy, the higher the risk of behavior problems for their sons. However, it did not show the same effects in girls.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technologyWhen it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice -- even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics. Researchers have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization -- the way that bones and teeth form.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humansA herpes virus has been detected in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is 'ovarian tissue freezing' superior to egg freezing?Many women are turning to egg freezing to promote fertility, but what happens when it isn't an option because of special medical conditions? And, what option is there for women who want to preserve hormonal function, not just fertility? Ovarian tissue freezing can deliver these outcomes but has been considered experimental until now. According to a new study, nearly 4 out of 10 women who undergo t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surging heat may limit aircraft takeoffs globallyRising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly, the study concludes.
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The Atlantic

The Awful Decline of the New York City Subway System Okay, what the hell happened to the New York subway? It wasn’t so long ago that New Yorkers could smugly look to cities like Boston ( Aww, what a darling toy train! ) and Washington ( Six whole lines? Adorable! ) and appreciate the scope and reliability of their underground transit system. But between fare hikes, overcrowding, frequent breakdowns, mechanical failures, signal gaps, janky cars, and
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The Atlantic

The U.S. Is a Good Place for Bad People to Stash Their Money When Viktor Bout—the arms dealer extraordinaire who inspired the 2005 Nicolas Cage movie Lord of War—sought to set up anonymous shell companies, according to a Senate panel , he turned to, of all places, the U.S. So too, court documents indicate , did former Ukrainian Prime Minister Pavlo Lazarenko, a man who has landed on Transparency International’s list of the 10 most corrupt officials. Per a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A hit love song for toadsJames Cook University researchers in Australia say they now know exactly what makes horny cane toads boogie. And the toad tune could help sound the death knell for the pests.
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Gizmodo

Make Vacuuming Less Awful With The Cordless Dyson V6 For $184 Dyson V6 Motorhead , $184 Dyson dominated the nominations in our favorite vacuum Co-Op, and you can pick up a Dyson V6 Motorhead from Amazon’s Gold Box for $184. You’d be hard pressed to find any Dyson vacuum for under $200, let alone a battery-powered one, so I’d take advantage of this deal before they’re all cleaned out. More Deals
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Omics technologies for analysis of precious rare biosamplesOmics technologies such as proteomics have far-reaching applications in diagnostics and clinical medicine, ecology, integrative biology research and beyond.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A hit love song for toadsJames Cook University researchers in Australia say they now know exactly what makes horny cane toads boogie. And the toad tune could help sound the death knell for the pests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseasesResearchers have developed a fast and practical molecular-scale imaging technique that could let scientists view never-before-seen dynamics of biological processes involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis.
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The Atlantic

The Schools Transforming Immigrant Education Katherine Zelaya sits in the front of her math class, leading her table of classmates in a word problem that’s asking them to determine the median and mean for a set of numbers. “¿ Por qué ?” she chimes in, asking Maria Alejandra to tell her why she came to a certain conclusion. “Jesús, termínalo ,” the 19-year-old says a little later, encouraging the classmate on her left to finish his work. The
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The Atlantic

Remembering Liu Xiaobo Liu Xiaobo, the Nobel Prize-winning Chinese dissident who defied the Communist Party by calling for the end of one-party rule, has died. He was 61. The cause, Chinese officials said, was terminal liver cancer. Liu, who had been serving an 11-year prison sentence for subversive activities, was transferred to a hospital in northeastern China last month. Liu, a university professor who protected stu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA infrared image shows Eugene now a remnantFormer Hurricane Eugene has now weakened to a remnant low pressure area. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that only a small area of convection remains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On the way to a biological alternativeThe research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase. Now the group is introducing the first three-dimensional structural analysis of the enzyme variant that contains vanadium. Within the scope of preparing his doctoral thesis, Daniel Sippel succeeded in producing and crystallizing vanadium nit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Hope' the whale replaces 'Dippy' as London museum's skeleton star"Hope" the blue whale takes over from "Dippy" the dinosaur as the centrepiece of the revamped atrium of London's Natural History Museum on Thursday despite a spirited campaign to keep the much-loved attraction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Villagers in Niger 'massacre' 27 hipposAt least 27 hippos have been slaughtered in a touristy zone in western Niger by villagers who blame them for destroying crops and harming livestock, local authorities said on Thursday.
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Wired

Uber's New Tool Lets Its Staff Know *Less* About YouThe controversial ride-sharing service is making a push for "differential privacy," a method that masks users' individual data.
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Wired

Let's Do Some Physics and Learn About the Momentum Principle and the Work Energy PrincipleBoth deal with forces acting on an object, which often leads students to think they are similar. In a way, they are.
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Popular Science

China just deployed to its first overseas base From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal A logistics hub for the Middle East and North Africa. This week, China sent a task force to man up its first foreign military base, in the strategically located country of Djibouti.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

50-year-old flu virus model revamped, revealing pandemic prediction possibilitiesThe scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine team's discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn't so perfect after all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui shows adaptation and resilience not 'ecocide'Research by an international team, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the fate of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseasesResearchers have developed a fast and practical molecular-scale imaging technique that could let scientists view never-before-seen dynamics of biological processes involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis.
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Gizmodo

Uber Unveils New Privacy Tool That Protects Individual User Data Photo: Getty You might think of Uber as a ride-hailing company or a lawsuit-ridden self-driving car developer, but at its core, Uber is a big data company. It has to constantly crunch location coordinates, traffic data, payment information, and tax rates—and putting all that data in Uber’s hands sometimes makes users nervous . But now Uber is debuting a differential privacy tool that it will use
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New data network for Huntington's disease researchAn international team has created the first data network for research into Huntington's disease, freely available to all scientists in this field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers overcome suppression of immune response against bacterial pathogensResearchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to positively influence the immune response in severe viral and bacterial co-infection. Using a human lung tissue model, they were able to show that the immune mechanisms triggered by viral pathogens prevent the tissue from mounting an effective response against a simultaneously occurring bacterial infection. Results from this study h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA infrared image shows Eugene now a remnantFormer Hurricane Eugene has now weakened to a remnant low pressure area. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that only a small area of convection remains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On the way to a biological alternativeA bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why a single nuke's impact shouldn't only be measured in megatonsAs the notion of nuclear hostilities leaps from its old, Cold War perch into modern debate, new calculations by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers show that even a limited nuclear strike could have disastrous global consequences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping invasive alien species of Union concernThe first ever Baseline Distribution of Invasive Alien Species of Union concern has been published by the JRC. The 37 invasive alien species covered by this report have been prioritised as species that need to be addressed at the level of the EU territory.
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The Atlantic

The U.K.'s Bill to Withdraw From the EU The U.K. government introduced Thursday an EU withdrawal bill that aims to convert the bloc’s law into British law, but already some of what has been left out of the measure has prompted angry criticism from opposition parties. The aim of the measure is to ensure that the EU’s rules, which the U.K., as a member of the bloc, must follow, continue to apply after Brexit goes into effect in about two
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Gizmodo

Rich Person Phone Brand Goes Kerplunk Image: Vertu Vertu, the company that sells $50,000 smartphones, is shutting down its UK manufacturing operations. But everyone saw it coming. The liquidation will result in the loss of some 200 jobs, according to The Telegraph . Employees had already expressed fear of losing their jobs, since the company was reportedly skipping out on paying its bills and employee wages . Recent troubles at Vertu
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Gizmodo

Rising Temperatures Could Make Air Travel Even Worse A Boeing 737 takes off from Mau Hau Airport. (Image: Riyad Filza/Wikimedia) Last month, as a record-breaking heat wave swept through the southwest United States , dozens of flights were canceled when the blisteringly hot conditions made it hard for jets to take off . New research suggests this wasn’t a one-off event, and that global warming could make it increasingly difficult for planes around t
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Ingeniøren

Immunterapi mod kræft tæt på amerikansk godkendelseBørn og unge med en særlig form for leukæmi, der ellers ikke kan behandles, vil sandsynligvis få tilbudt en meget lovende genterapibehandling.
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Viden

NASA er tættere på Jupiters røde plet end nogensinde førRumsonden Juno har taget smukke nye billeder af et Solsystemet mest ekstreme fænomener.
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Futurity.org

Watch: Soft artificial heart beats like the real thing The first entirely soft artificial heart mimics its natural model as closely as possible. A well-functioning artificial heart is a real necessity: about 26 million people worldwide suffer from heart failure and there is a shortage of donor hearts. Artificial blood pumps help to bridge the waiting time until a patient receives a donor heart or their own heart recovers. But the blood pumps in curre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Getting to the roots of Sahara mustard invasion in the American SouthwestIn 2015, a rural community in southeastern California approached Daniel Winkler and his doctoral advisor, Travis Huxman, for help with an invader that was hurting their local economy. An Old World annual plant called Sahara mustard (Brassica tournefortii) was spreading rapidly through the deserts of the southwestern U.S., carpeting the local Anza-Borrego Desert in spring, and smothering the native
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decision-making rules least susceptible to manipulation, according to scienceHSE researchers have used computer modelling to demonstrate the varying manipulability of decision-making procedures and to identify those least susceptible to manipulation. Their findings are published in the paper 'Manipulability of Majority Relation-based Collective Decision Rules.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

50-year-old flu virus model revamped, revealing pandemic prediction possibilitiesThe scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine team's discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn't so perfect after all. The finding could give scientists the opportunity to better predict pandemics and find new ways to disrupt the flu virus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Testing a soft artificial heartETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart. In collaboration with colleagues from the Product Development Group Zurich, they have tested how well it works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shedding light on galaxies' rotation secretsSpiral galaxies are found to be strongly rotating, with an angular momentum higher by a factor of about 5 than ellipticals. In a study just published in the Astrophysical Journal, the researchers have traced back the dichotomy in the angular momentum of spiral and elliptical galaxies to their different formation history. In particular, the low angular momentum of ellipticals is mainly originated b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How selenium compounds might become catalystsChemists at Ruhr-Universitat Bochum have tested a new approach for activating chemical reactions based on the element selenium. They demonstrated that selenium can form bonds similar to those of hydrogen bonds, resulting in accelerated reactions. The exact mechanism is described by the team at the Chair of Organic Chemistry 1 in Bochum, including Prof Dr Stefan Huber and Patrick Wonner, in the jou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of frictionScientists from the QUEST Institute at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have presented a model system which allows the investigation of atomic-scale friction effects and friction dynamics that are similar to those taking place, e.g., in proteins, DNA strands and other deformable nanocontacts. This model system consists of laser-cooled ions, which arrange themselves in so-called Coul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui shows adaptation and resilience not 'ecocide'Research by an international team, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the fate of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island).
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