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Science : NPR
Maryam Mirzakhani, Prize-Winning Mathematician, Dies At 40 Maryam Mirzakhani was the first woman to win the prestigious Fields Medal. She worked at Stanford University, which confirmed her death Saturday. (Image credit: Stanford University)
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Maryam Mirzakhani, first woman to win mathematics' Fields medal, dies at 40 Stanford professor, who battled breast cancer, died on Saturday Prestigious Fields medal is considered mathematics’ equivalent of the Nobel Maryam Mirzakhani, a Stanford University professor who was the first and only woman to win the prestigious Fields medal in mathematics , has died. She was 40. Related: Maryam Mirzakhani: 'The more I spent time on maths, the more excited I got' Continue readin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Source of cell-specific change in Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers have identified altered expression of a gene called ANK1, which only recently has been associated with memory robbing Alzheimer's disease, in specific cells in the brain. Following sequencing of each of these cell types, the scientists found that altered ANK1 expression originates in microglia, a type of immune cell found in the brain and central nervous system.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teen girls at higher risk OK with emergency department offering pregnancy prevention infoAdolescent girls receiving a wide range of medical care in the Emergency Department (ED) are receptive to receiving information about preventing pregnancy.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Females with autism show greater difficulty with day-to-day tasks than male counterpartsWomen and girls with autism may face greater challenges with real world planning, organization and other daily living skills, according to a new study.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping robots learn to see in 3-DWhile it's relatively straightforward for robots to 'see' objects with cameras and other sensors, interpreting what they see, from a single glimpse, is difficult. New technology enables robots to spot a new object and recognize what it is, whether it is right side up or upside down, without examining it from multiple angles. It can also fill in the blind spots in its field of vision and 'imagine'
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Endangered Cuban crocodiles come homeConservationists have released 10 Cuban crocodiles (Crocodylus rhombifer) into Cuba’s Zapata Swamp as part of an ongoing recovery strategy for this Critically Endangered species.
23h
Live Science
Chinese Scientists Just Set the Record for the Farthest Quantum TeleportationChinese scientists have just shattered a record in teleportation. They sent the quantum state of a photon from the ground in Tibet to a satellite in orbit, 870 miles (1,400 kilometers) above the Earth's surface.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Security mistakes prompt changes to Georgia election systemGeorgia's top elections official says his office will take over managing the state's elections technology after a major security lapse at the center that has done the work for 15 years.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking leishmaniasis in dogs, wild animals and sand flies in BrazilResearchers have surveyed the environmentally protected area in Campinas, Southeastern Brazil, which has undergone several changes by human action, especially the implementation of condominiums, and revealed that more than one percent of dogs, as well as some opossums and insect species in the area carry the parasite responsible for the most dangerous form of leishmaniasis.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterium actively drives colorectal cancer tumor cell growthA subspecies of the bacterium Streptococcus gallolyticus appears to actively promote the development of colorectal cancer, according to new research.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping behavior in the fruit fly brainOne of the primary missions of neuroscience is to make connections between particular neurons in the brain and specific behaviors. Now a team of researchers has used computer-vision and machine-learning techniques in fruit flies to create behavior anatomy maps that will help us understand how specific brain circuits generate Drosophila aggression, wing extension, or grooming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could calcium hold the key to fighting a dangerous hospital infection?It lurks in hospitals and nursing homes, preying upon patients already weak from disease or advanced age. It kills nearly 30,000 Americans a year, and sickens half a million more. But new research shows that Clostridium difficile bacteria can't do all this without enough of a humble nutrient: calcium. And that new knowledge may lead to better treatment for the most vulnerable patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic clocks in zooplankton species regulate what is likely the largest daily movement of biomass worldwideThe copepod species Calanus finmarchicus schedules its day using a genetic clock that works independently of external stimuli. The clock shapes the copepod's metabolic rhythms and daily vertical migration. This in turn have an enormous influence on the entire food web in the North Atlantic, where Calanus finmarchicus is a central plankton species. Wherever the high-calorie copepod is, determines w
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Room With a Few Today in 5 Lines Rinat Akhmetshin, a Russian-American lobbyist, said he attended the June 2016 meeting with Donald Trump Jr. Yahoo News reports that Jamie Gorelick, a lawyer representing Jared Kushner in the Russia probe, will hand over her responsibilities to Abbe Lowell, another criminal-defense lawyer. Ty Cobb, a veteran criminal defense lawyer, will reportedly join the White House legal team
23h
Wired
Photo of the Week: Firefighters Save a Flag From California's Raging WildfiresAs the blaze careened towards a neighborhood in Oroville, four firefighters jumped into action.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To infinity and beyond? US lawmakers advance 'Space Corps' plansUS lawmakers on Friday advanced a defense bill that includes a provision to establish a new branch of the military—dubbed "Space Corps"—that would focus on space operations.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA analyzes US midwest heavy rainfall, severe stormsHeavy rain resulted in significant flooding in the U.S. Midwest over the week of July 7 to 14, 2017. Using satellite data, NASA estimated the amount of rain that fell over those areas and used satellite data to create 3-D imagery of severe storms.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helping robots learn to see in 3-DAutonomous robots can inspect nuclear power plants, clean up oil spills in the ocean, accompany fighter planes into combat and explore the surface of Mars.
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Gizmodo
I Can't Believe We Have to Tell You Not to Snort Chocolate Snorting chocolate to get high lives alongside “ Beezing ,” butt chugging , and blumpkins as things that everyone talks about but few people take seriously. Despite being around for a while , chocolate snorting has once again resurfaced in the news, thanks to a company called “Legal Lean” selling “Coko Loko,” a product that promises to simultaneously deliver “euphoric energy,” “calm focus,” and a
23h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Unlocking Mysteries in the Sun’s 11-Year CycleTwo studies focused on the sun’s maximum and minimum periods of activity, yielding new findings about its internal processes and external corona.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Elderly yoginis have greater cortical thicknessScientists in Brazil have imaged elderly female yoga practitioners' brains and found they have greater cortical thickness in the left prefrontal cortex, in brain areas associated with cognitive functions like attention and memory. The results suggest that yoga could be a way to protect against cognitive decline in old age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why Japan's coastal zones might be disappearing due to climate changeClimate change can cause a range of effects on coastal environments, such as a decrease in sediment supply, changes in the intensity and frequency of extreme events, and changes in sea levels and wave climate. The estimation of changes due to climate change is a major issue for future coastal management decisions.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fungi can be used as biomonitors for assessing radioactivity in our environmentThe Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the UEx has carried out a study to quantify radioactive presence in fungi. According to the research, this quantification is made using transfer coefficients that compare the radioactive content in the receptor compartment (fungi) of the radioactive contamination, to that existing in the transmitter compartment (soil). From the study, we may conclude t
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New disease category of skin disorders proposedDermatologists define a new category of skin diseases based on autoinflammation with a genetic root.
23h
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 17. Five rad and random things I found this week. The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 17.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic’s Week in Culture Don’t Miss All the Brown Girls on TV — Mallika Rao profiles HBO’s latest web-series acquisition, which takes place in a queer, multiracial, multiethnic arts landscape in Chicago. Cinebook Film Science Fiction’s Under-Appreciated Feminist Icon — Gabrielle Bellot celebrates one of the genre’s first protagonists to own her own womanhood. Why Hollywood Should Pay Attention to Dunkirk — David Sims con
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Gizmodo
These Artists Use Oil, Paint, and Soap to Create Tiny Alien Galaxies GIF GIF: Vimeo Scientists trying to unlock the secrets of our universe’s origin need to look no further than the photography studio of Thomas Blanchard and Oilhack. By mixing nothing more than paints, oil, and soap, the artists manage to create colorful miniature universes full of strange, tiny alien worlds. Their latest video, Emerald , makes you wonder if NASA should be sending incredibly tiny
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
White House Selects Leadership for National Space Council Scott Pace, the director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, will be the Council’s executive secretary -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Live Science
People Could Make Smallpox from Scratch in a Lab, Scientists WarnScientists have re-created a relative of the smallpox virus in a lab, from scratch.
23h
The Scientist RSS
First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENUUsing the mutagenic chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, researchers confirm the role of a gene in a piglet deformity and identify potential models for human diseases.
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Gizmodo
Honolulu May Soon Ban Texting While Crossing the Street Like a Dumbass Photo: Mike Wilson/Unsplash You already know that texting and driving is against the law, but for a few years now cities across the US have considered making texting while crossing the street illegal. Honolulu is one of those cities. Honolulu’s City Council passed a bill Wednesday that makes it illegal for pedestrians to use their phones while they’re crossing the street. If they are caught, they
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Popular Science
DJI Spark drone review: A powerful little flying machine for the average person Gadgets This mini drone brings advanced features in a small package. DJI has entered the entry-level, consumer drone market with the Spark. Here's what it has to offer.
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Gizmodo
‘Limited’ Nuclear Strikes Could Still Wreak Climate Havoc Image: National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Photo Library/Wikimedia Commons With the Cold War a fading memory, some nuclear powers have adopted strategies allowing for limited nuclear strikes. But a disturbing new study shows that even small batches of nukes can have disastrous environmental consequences on a global scale. In the 1980s, experts warned of a nuclear winter—a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
15 awesome 'Google Home' tricksWhether you already own one or have thought about it, you probably know Google Home ($129) is one of those popular voice-activated personal assistants for the home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA analyzes US midwest heavy rainfall, severe stormsHeavy rain resulted in significant flooding in the U.S. Midwest over the week of July 7 to 14, 2017. Using satellite data, NASA estimated the amount of rain that fell over those areas and used satellite data to create 3-D imagery of severe storms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teen girls at higher risk OK with emergency department offering pregnancy prevention infoAdolescent girls receiving a wide range of medical care in the Emergency Department (ED) are receptive to receiving information about preventing pregnancy, according to the results of a cross-sectional survey published online July 11 in The Journal of Pediatrics.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Will We Ever Stop the Robocallers?Americans are “mad as hell” about telephone spam, says the FCC chairman—but they may have to get used to it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helping robots learn to see in 3-DWhile it's relatively straightforward for robots to 'see' objects with cameras and other sensors, interpreting what they see, from a single glimpse, is difficult. New technology enables robots to spot a new object and recognize what it is, whether it is right side up or upside down, without examining it from multiple angles. It can also fill in the blind spots in its field of vision and 'imagine'
1d
Live Science
Wild Lioness Nurses Leopard Cub in 'Unprecedented' SightingLions and leopards normally don't get along, but one wild lioness — recently spotted nursing a leopard cub in Tanzania's Ngorongoro Conservation Area — apparently didn't get that memo.
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The Scientist RSS
Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial DiscoveryResearchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.
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Gizmodo
Here's the First Discount We've Seen On Philips Hue White Bulbs 2-Pack Philips Hue White , $25 after 15% Prime discount If you like the idea of Philips Hue’s automation features , but don’t particularly care about exotic and colorful lighting concepts, Prime members can get a pair of plain white Hue bulbs for $25 today , about $5 less than usual. Just remember that you’ll need a Hue Bridge to control them. Note : You won’t see the 15% Prime discount until che
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New Scientist - News
Asteroids may have been giant mudballs in the early solar systemAsteroids could have started life as sludgy balls of mud instead of tough rocks, which may explain how rocky planets came to be
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Live Science
Photos: In Wildlife First, Lioness Nurses Leopard CubIn an unexpected first, wildlife experts have identified a lioness nursing a leopard cub.
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Popular Science
Here's how we were able to see that giant chunk of ice break off of Antarctica Science A golden age of Earth observation. A peek into the satellites that let us track the progression of Larsen C from an ice shelf to an iceberg. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU-TGen led study identifies source of cell-specific change in Alzheimer's diseaseASU and TGen researchers have identified altered expression of a gene called ANK1, which only recently has been associated with memory robbing Alzheimer's disease, in specific cells in the brain. Following sequencing of each of these cell types, the ASU-TGen led team found that altered ANK1 expression originates in microglia, a type of immune cell found in the brain and central nervous system, acc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Planets like earth may have had muddy originsScientists have long held the belief that planets – including Earth – were built from rocky asteroids, but new research challenges that view.
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Wired
Gadget Lab Podcast: On Vacation With My AIThis week, the hosts explore the somewhat useful, frequently frustrating world of travel apps.
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The Atlantic
How Will the Game of Thrones Be Won? Game of Thrones is, inarguably, the king of the TV water-cooler. There’s no other show around that maintains total command of the zeitgeist and dominates the pop-culture conversation every week like Thrones does each season. In the fractured world of Peak TV, the HBO fantasy epic is still a show you have to watch live rather than wait to binge, such is the ubiquity of spoilers. And yet, as the se
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Popular Science
Tardigrades could probably survive the otherwise complete annihilation of life on Earth Animals Water bear don't care. Water bear don't care. Meet our planet's future overlords.
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Blog » Languages » English
Analog vs Digital: Results The people have spoken and the digital age is here to stay! Thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mica provides clue to how water transports mineralsIn order to understand various environmental processes and learn to better address the effects of pollution, scientists have been interested in tracking the movement of elements through the environment, particularly at interfaces between water and minerals.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: The best Amazon Prime Day deals that are still alive Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , the Dealmaster is back with a big bag of deals for your weekend consideration. We're in post-Amazon Prime Day mode, so here's the best of what's still live. There's a $399 Oculus Rift VR Bundle, $10 Amazon Credit on Gift Card Reloads, and 40 percent off Audible. Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post throu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links restless legs syndrome to poor sleep quality, impaired function in pregnancyA new study of pregnant women shows that restless legs syndrome (RLS) is common and is strongly associated with poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, and poor daytime function, which are frequent complaints during pregnancy.
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New Scientist - News
Galaxy supercluster is one of the biggest things in the universeThe Saraswati supercluster of 400 galaxies could help us understand the physics governing the whole universe
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The Atlantic
The Cruz Plan Would Splinter Health Insurance Markets It’s way down there, at the bottom of the new bill , in brackets. The largest addition to the new draft of the Republican Better Care Reconciliation Act, released by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Thursday, is stashed away at the end of a 172-page series of amendments, Social Security Act references, and bits of tax code. The brackets around it indicate it’s not even fully part of the dra
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Ars Technica
US border agents: We won’t search data “located solely on remote servers” Enlarge / International air travelers are processed by US Customs and Border Protection agents upon arrival to Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on December 10, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. (credit: David McNew/Getty Images) In a new letter, Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) has answered some questions posed months ago by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) about the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep-sea coral reefs discovery in depths of the North-PacificScientists had long believed that the waters of the Central and Northeast Pacific Ocean were inhospitable to certain species of deep-sea corals, but a marine biologist's discovery of an odd chain of reefs suggests there are mysteries about the development and durability of coral colonies yet to be uncovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decline in financing could undermine malaria effortsGlobal malaria elimination funding is declining at a time when it remains crucial to eliminating the disease worldwide, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potentially safer substitutes for BPA identifiedA group of potential substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) have been identified that lack the adverse effects typically associated with BPA, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First laboratory generation of astrophysical shock waves createdThe first laboratory generation of an astrophysical shock wave has been reported by scientists. To produce the wave, scientists used a laser to create a high-energy plasma -- a form of matter composed of atoms and charged atomic particles -- that expanded into a pre-existing magnetized plasma. The interaction created, within a few billionths of a second, a magnetized shock wave that expanded at a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immunosuppression underlies resistance to anti-angiogenic therapyA novel mechanism behind resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors has now been identified -- drugs that fight cancer by suppressing the formation of new blood vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Walking like ants gives spiders a chanceTo avoid being eaten, some jumping spiders pretend to be ants, a new study has found. Protective mimicry is a remarkable example of adaptive evolution: Moths can be colored like butterflies and grasshoppers may look like tiger beetles. While most mimicry studies focus on traits like color and shape, the researchers in this work used multiple high-speed cameras and behavioral experiments to pinpoin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study identifies new target to preserve nerve functionAn enzyme that plays a crucial role in the degeneration of axons, the threadlike portions of a nerve cell that transmit signals within the nervous system, has now been identified by researchers. Axon loss occurs in all neurodegenerative diseases, so this discovery could open new pathways to treating or preventing a wide array of brain diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mica provides clue to how water transports mineralsChemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium - a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Females with autism show greater difficulty with day-to-day tasks than male counterpartsWomen and girls with autism may face greater challenges with real world planning, organization and other daily living skills, according to a study published in the journal Autism Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advance furthers stem cells for use in drug discovery, cell therapyUsing an automated screening test that they devised, William Murphy, a professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues Eric Nguyen and William Daly have invented an all-chemical replacement for the confusing, even dangerous materials, now used to grow stem cells.
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The Scientist RSS
Streptococcus Gallolyticus Spurs Colorectal Tumor Growth in MiceThe bacteria also promoted the growth of human colon cancer cells in a dish.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First genomic biomarkers in extracellular vesicles in veterinary patientsImportant biomarkers have been found in extracellular vesicles in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease and congestive heart failure. This is the first biomarker discovery based on extracellular vesicles in a veterinary disease. These findings could provide important insight into the molecular basis, diagnosis and therapies for myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs, as well as mitral valve p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One of the brightest galaxies ever discoveredThanks to an amplified image produced by a gravitational lens, and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, a team of scientists has discovered one of the brightest galaxies known from the epoch when the universe had 20 percent of its present age.
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