EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issuesArtificial sweeteners may be associated with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, according to a new study published in CMAJ.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory offer clues about sun's coronal irradiance(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Aberystwyth University in the U.K. has used data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to learn more about how the sun's corona behaves over differing stages of its 11-year cycle. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Huw Morgan and Youra Taroyan describe attributes of the sun they observed over time and what they discovered about
1h
Ingeniøren
Danske raps smøres i bi-dræbende pesticid, som EU vil forbydeFor tredje år i træk kan danske landmænd i år så vinterraps med frø, der er bejdset med de neonikotinoider, som EU ellers vil stramme forbuddet imod, fordi de er skyld i bidød. Biavlerne protesterer.
10h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Epigenetics between the generationsMax Planck researchers prove that we inherit more than just genes.
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Happiness can affect physical healthA new review indicates that subjective well-being -- factors such as life satisfaction and enjoyment of life -- can influence physical health.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studying argon gas trapped in two-dimensional array of tiny 'cages'For the first time, scientists have trapped a noble gas in a two-dimensional porous structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable detailed studies of individual gas atoms in confinement -- research that could inform the design of new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at IRB Barcelona discover a crucial gene involved in the development of the placentaThe study also solidifies an important role for both TLK1 and TLK2 in genome stability.A massive genomics study of people with intellectual disabilities performed in the Netherlands points to patient mutations in the TLK2 gene.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New device detects tumor cells in bloodResearchers at the URV's Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry-led by the ICREA researcher, Ramon Álvarez Puebla, and the professor of Applied Physics, Francesc Díaz, and the Department of Clinical Oncology of the HM Torrelodones University Hospital, have patented a portable device that can detect tumor cells in blood. The device counts the number of tumor cells in a blood sample and is a
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New test paves way for potential treatments to target Alzheimer's and other conditionsA simple methodology for capturing proteins implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions has been developed by researchers at the University of Bradford and University of Dundee.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Fanconi anemia-causing gene identifiedResearchers from the group led by UAB Chair Professor Dr. Jordi Surrallés at the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the CIBER of Rare Diseases participated in a study which has led to the identification of a new gene involved in Fanconi anemia, a rare genetic disease.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is this Gulf of Mexico tubeworm the longest living animal in the world?Large tubeworms living in the cold depths of the Gulf of Mexico may be among the longest living animals in the world. This is revealed in a study in Springer's journal The Science of Nature. According to lead author Alanna Durkin of Temple University in the US, members of the tubeworm species Escarpia laminata live around 100 to 200 years, while the longevity of some even stretches to the three ce
0min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The earliest stages of life might be simpler than we thoughtIn the very earliest stages of life, mammalian cells multiply and form the embryo. New research from the University of Copenhagen suggests that this process might be much simpler than we thought. The development of the embryo can be cut down to the cell's ability to count their neighbouring cells.
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop a novel type of optical fiber that preserves the properties of lightThe fiber samples obtained by researchers have demonstrated great results, indicating good prospects for further development of such technological solutions. They will find use not only in laser systems but also in optical fiber sensors, where the change of polarization characteristics is known in advance, since they are determined by external environmental factors, such as temperature, pressure,
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world overNew research that looked into people's kissing bias could have wider implications for cognitive and neuroscience.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome therapy could lead to new treatment for life-threatening blood disordersBy introducing a beneficial natural mutation into blood cells using the gene-editing technique CRISPR, a UNSW Sydney-led team of scientists has been able to switch on production of foetal haemoglobin - an advance that could eventually lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria found in Alzheimer's brainsResearchers in the UK have used DNA sequencing to examine bacteria in post-mortem brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Their findings suggest increased bacterial populations and different proportions of specific bacteria in Alzheimer's, compared with healthy brains. The findings may support evidence that bacterial infection and inflammation in the brain could contribute to Alzheimer's di
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climatic stability resulted in the evolution of more bird speciesMore species of birds have accumulated in genera inhabiting climatically stable areas. This is shown by a new study from Umeå University, published in Ecology Letters.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds that lymph node removal isn't necessary for all melanoma patientsMany patients with melanoma need a sentinel-lymph-node biopsy to determine if cancer cells have spread there, but a positive finding doesn't mean all the lymph nodes in the area must be removed, according to new international study.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Record-breaking marine heatwave powered by climate change cooks Tasmania's fisheriesClimate change has warmed the waters east of Tasmania at four times the speed of the global average. But the heatwave of the southern summer of 2015/2016 was something exceptional, damaging fisheries and bringing new species to the island. It's a sign of things to come, say the researchers examining these events.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The earliest stages of life might be simpler than we thoughtIn the very earliest stages of life, mammalian cells multiply and form the embryo. New research from the University of Copenhagen suggests that this process might be much simpler than we thought. The development of the embryo can be cut down to the cell's ability to count their neighbouring cells.
15min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humanity's 'sustainability' is no excuse for abandoning planet Earth"Spreading out into space will completely change the future of humanity," says Stephen Hawking. It "may be the only thing that saves us from ourselves. I am convinced that humans need to leave Earth".
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team reveals the whole genome sequences of rare red batA recent study, affiliated with the Korean Genomics Industrialization and Commercialization Center (KOGIC) at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented the first whole genome sequence and analyses of the Myotis rufoniger, one of the most well-known and iconic protected wild animals in South Korea, known as the golden bat.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST reveals the whole genome sequences of rare red batSouth Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has presented, for the first time, the whole genome sequence and analyses of the Myotis rufoniger.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIC scientists find the key to improved cancer immunotherapyResearchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III have investigated how different subtypes of essential immune-response cells called CD8+ T lymphocytes cooperate to mount a stronger anti-tumor response. The results show that generation of an optimal immune response to cancer requires cooperation between two types of memory T cell -- one circulating in the blood and
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study of brain circuits finds key links to symptoms of depressionScientists have linked specific wiring in the brain to distinct behavioral symptoms of depression. In a study published in Cell, researchers at UC San Diego found brain circuits tied to feelings of despair and helplessness and were able to alleviate and even reverse such symptoms in mice studies. Two populations of neurons were identified in the brain's ventral pallidum region (part of the basal g
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Screening those at risk of psychosis may help prevent violence, reduce stigmaA new study of young persons at clinical high-risk of developing psychosis has identified measures of violence potential that may be useful in predicting both the increased risk of future violent behavior and the actual development of psychosis.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser lightKAUST researchers predict that synchronized emissions from new on-chip lasers can produce artificial neural networks at low cost.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New target could soothe the itch of inflammatory skin conditionsExisting medicines could offer a new way to treat inflammatory skin conditions, researchers at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and the Royal Melbourne Hospital have revealed.The research team discovered skin inflammation relies on a protein called RIPK1, and could be prevented by depleting this protein. The finding offers hope that drugs targeting RIPK1, which are currently in clinical
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is America's digital leadership on the wane?American leadership in technology innovation and economic competitiveness is at risk if U.S. policymakers don't take crucial steps to protect the country's digital future. The country that gave the world the internet and the very concept of the disruptive startup could find its role in the global innovation economy slipping from reigning incumbent to a disrupted has-been.
38min
Futurity.org
Immune response to bipolar differs in men vs. women New research shows that men and women react differently to compounds tied to the body’s immune response to bipolar disorder. The findings suggest that bipolar disorder could one day be diagnosed by measuring biological changes in the body, and that treatments could be tailored differently for men and women. Bipolar disorder is a recurring mood condition that will affect about 1 to 4 percent of pe
40min
Science | The Guardian
Could our approach to chemical weapons help reduce the threat of acid attacks? UK expertise in preventing the misuse of chemical weapons should be applied to tackling the alarming rise in acid violence On 13 July, five acid attacks occurred across north London in the space of ninety minutes, causing “life-changing” injuries in at least one case, with others severely injured. Two of the alleged attackers have been arrested, yet little is known about them. This follows severa
41min
Science | The Guardian
Getting to the bottom of the Higgs boson As the Large Hadron Collider at CERN continues probing the high-energy frontier of physics, a new feature of its greatest discovery so far has come into view In high-energy particle collisions we study the smallest known constituents of matter. According to our best knowledge of physics, these constituents have mass only because of the way they interact with a unique quantity which permeates all
41min
Gizmodo
New Blade Runner 2049 Trailer Shows More of the Dirty, Desperate Future Image: WB We just got a bunch of new footage from the hotly anticipated sequel to Ridley Scott’s dystopian scifi classic, courtesy of a brand new trailer. And Harrison Ford’s Deckard says something so potentially huge you’ll be reeling. Previous glimpses have shown that Ryan Gosling’s Officer K has been tasked with finding Deckard, and this new teaser hints at why. Ever since the first Blade Runn
44min
New Scientist - News
The cosmic dance of three dead stars could break relativityDo we have the first hints that Einstein is about to be proven wrong? A stellar system discovered in 2012 looks like the ideal experiment to tell us
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Somalia's internet returns after 3-week outage caused outcrySomalia's internet has returned after an outage of more than three weeks cost the Horn of Africa nation about $10 million a day, authorities said Monday.
44min
The Scientist RSS
Salk Faces Gender Discrimination LawsuitsTwo high-ranking female scientists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, claim the center is run by a team of 'good old boys.'
45min
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Skinning the CatThis stack of polarized light micrographs depicts a vibrant ensemble of tissues, hair follicles, and vessels within a slice of cat skin.
45min
Gizmodo
Mark Ruffalo Gives the Odds for a Standalone Hulk Movie Image: Marvel Sigourney Weaver says there are good reasons for doing so many Avatar sequels, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom has finished filming, and a look at Once Upon a Time ’s brand new Cinderella. Spoilers ahead! The Incredible Hulk Speaking with Variety , Mark Ruffalo confirmed a solo Hulk film featuring his version of the character “will never happen”. I want to just make one thing perfect
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists name new species of dinosaur after Canadian iconScientists from the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and the Philip J Currie Dinosaur Museum have identified and named a new species of dinosaur in honour of renowned Canadian palaeontologist Dr. Philip J. Currie. Albertavenator curriei, meaning "Currie's Alberta hunter". It stalked Alberta, Canada, about 71 million years ago in what is now the famous Red Deer River Valley. The find recognizes Currie fo
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combining genomics with farmers' traditional knowledge to improve wheat productionThe key to produce better crops to meet the needs of the growing world's population may lie in combining the traditional knowledge of subsistence farmers of the Ethiopian highlands with plant genomics. Researchers in Italy and Ethiopia conducted research that demonstrates that the indigenous knowledge of traditional farmers, passed on from one generation to the next since hundreds of years, can be
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do human beings speak so many languages?The thatched roof held back the sun's rays, but it could not keep the tropical heat at bay. As everyone at the research workshop headed outside for a break, small groups splintered off to gather in the shade of coconut trees and enjoy a breeze. I wandered from group to group, joining in the discussions. Each time, I noticed that the language of the conversation would change from an indigenous lang
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers measure detailed chemical abundances of 158 stars in a nearby dwarf galaxy(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has performed detailed measurements of the chemical composition of 158 red giant stars in the nearby Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. The study, presented in a paper published July 11 on arXiv.org, is so far the largest and most chemically extensive high-resolution survey of this galaxy.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny particles increase in air with ethanol-to-gasoline switchThe concentration of ultrafine particles less than 50 nanometers in diameter rose by one-third in the air of São Paulo, Brazil, when higher ethanol prices induced drivers to switch from ethanol to gasoline, according to a new study by a Northwestern University chemist, a National University of Singapore economist and two University of São Paulo physicists.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dialogue or activism? Which works best in a divided society?We live in a world of divisions – between black and white, police and citizens, Republicans and Democrats. As the heated rhetoric between opposing sides grows louder, often the response from those seeking peace is, "If only we could just sit down and talk."
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clinical tests show that biosensors could pave the way for a personalized antibiotherapy in the futurePersonalized drug therapy adjusting the dose, dosage intervals, and the duration of treatment to fit individual patients' needs is increasingly important. Frequently, medications are dosed in such a way that each patient receives the same standardized amount of a drug. Thus, clinical conditions such as overall state of health, metabolism, or other physical factors are often not sufficiently consid
55min
Wired
Big Pharma Buys Into Crowdsourcing for Drug DiscoveryThe Structural Genomics Consortium encourages pharma companies and academics to put all their cards on the table in the interest of speeding up drug research.
56min
Gizmodo
We Don't Deserve Capybaras In a world seemingly intent on destroying itself, the humble capybara is a wholesome good. The oversized friendship guinea pig is a reminder of what humanity could achieve if we stopped yelling at each other on the internet. That’s why this week on Animals Are Good, we’re celebrating the world’s largest—and chillest—rodent, the capybara. Capybaras ( Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris ) live in social grou
56min
Scientific American Content: Global
Brain Activity during Sleep Can Predict When Someone Is DreamingStudying the dreaming brain offers a window on consciousness -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Futurity.org
When 1 depression med doesn’t work, add another? Millions of patients suffering from major depression get little relief from the first drug they take. A new study of 1,522 patients at 35 US Veterans Health Administration medical centers shows these patients benefit more from adding an antidepressant treatment than from switching to another one. “We found that among three strategies evaluated in this study evidence of the greatest symptom benefi
1h
Ars Technica
Ataribox retro mini-console plays current and classic games Atari, in the hope of emulating the success of Nintendo's Mini NES and Mini SNES , has unveiled the Ataribox—a modern console inspired by the legendary Atari 2600, which was first released in 1977. While technical details on the Ataribox are slim, Atari—or at least, the company that now goes by the Atari name after the original Atari went bankrupt in 2013—has revealed that the console will come i
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climatic stability resulted in the evolution of more bird speciesMore species of birds have accumulated in genera inhabiting climatically stable areas. This is shown by a new study from Umeå University.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly described algae species toughens up corals to endure warming oceansGlobal climate change has increased water temperatures in the world's oceans, often causing mass coral bleaching and mortality, which harms not only corals, but also the vast ecosystems they support. Using innovative methods, researchers at Penn State University have identified a new species of stress-tolerant Symbiodinium, a genus of algae that occurs mutualistically with corals in a partnership
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Running light around a tetrahedronThanks to an innovative ring laser design, geophysicists at LMU can now measure and monitor Earth's rotation with unprecedented accuracy. The new instrument in Fürstenfeldbruck will be formally inaugurated this week.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantifying the crossover from surface to bulk properties in important spintronic materialsThe expanding field of spintronics promises a new generation of devices by taking advantage of the spin degree of freedom of the electron in addition to its charge to create new functionalities not possible with conventional electronics. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect (2007 Nobel Prize in Physics) is a paradigmatic example of a spintronics application. As the interface between the magnet
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plasmon-powered devices for medicine, security, solar cellsA Rice University professor's method to "upconvert" light could make solar cells more efficient and disease-targeting nanoparticles more effective.
1h
Ars Technica
George A Romero, master of the zombie horror, dies aged 77 Enlarge (credit: Getty Images/Laura Lezza/Contributor) OBITUARY—Legendary filmmaker George A Romero, creator of the genre-defining horror Night of the Living Dead , has died at the age of 77. Romero passed away in his sleep on Sunday after a "brief but aggressive battle" with lung cancer, according to producing partner Peter Grunwald. Filmed on a meagre budget of $120,000, Romero's Night of the L
1h
Futurity.org
Astronomers tackle mystery of super-Earth birth The birth of super-Earths, rather than larger planets, can explain some features of the protoplanetary disks that produce new planets, new simulations suggest. While the majority of exoplanets fall into a category called super-Earths—bodies with a mass somewhere between Earth and Neptune—most of the features observed in nascent planetary systems were thought to require much more massive planets,
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research finds immigrants more trusting of native-born AmericansFirst-generation immigrants in the United States are as trusting of native-born American citizens as those native-born are of each other in their interactions, according to research by Georgia State University economist and his colleague. However, these new immigrants do not show the same levels of trust among other immigrants.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser lightA reinvented, low-cost laser source that stores light energy inside nanoscale disks could underpin the development of optically powered neurocomputers, reveals a simulation study led by KAUST researchers.
1h
The Atlantic
Your First Encounters With Austen I’ll admit to tearing up, the way you do for the end of a really good novel, as I read through the scores of reader responses we received to our callout for Jane Austen introduction stories . I’m not sure what came over me. Maybe it was the charm of all those far-flung fans connected through one author’s work—or maybe just the swoony effects of watching people fall in love with a book, almost a h
1h
The Atlantic
The Power of Inclusive Sex Education The night the cable channel Freeform aired an LGBTQ sex-education-themed episode of its teen drama The Fosters earlier this spring, Madison Russell spent the evening in front of her television with tears rolling down her face. A high-school junior, Russell has identified as a lesbian since age 11, but when she took a school-mandated sex education class at her Hiram, Georgia, high school, she coul
1h
The Atlantic
Who Hacked Qatar's News Sites? The foreign minister of the United Arab Emirates denied Monday a report in The Washington Post that said the Emirates was behind the posting of false stories on Qatari news websites that sparked the regional fallout between four Saudi-led Arab countries and Qatar. Anwar Gargash, the Emirates foreign minister, told the BBC the Post report was “untrue.” In a statement posted on Twitter, Yousef al-O
1h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Ingeniør med flyteknisk baggrund eller projektmedarbejder til Cityringen Selv i sommerferien er der tryk på jobmarkedet. Se dine karrieremuligheder hos bl.a. Forsvaret, HOFOR og Widex. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-ingenioer-med-flyteknisk-baggrund-eller-projektmedarbejder-cityringen-9154 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Probing physics beyond the Standard Model with the ATLAS ExperimentAlthough the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations in 2012 completed the Standard Model, many mysteries remain unexplained. For instance, why is the mass of the Higgs boson so much lighter than expected, and why is gravity so weak?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model projects an increase in dust storms in the U.S.Could the storms that once engulfed the Great Plains in clouds of black dust in the 1930's once again wreak havoc in the U.S.? A new statistical model developed by researchers at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts that climate change will amplify dust activity in parts of the U.S. in the latter half of the 21st century, which may lead to th
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Refined DNA tool tracks native and invasive fishRather than conduct an aquatic roll call with nets to know which fish reside in a particular body of water, scientists can now use DNA fragments suspended in water to catalog invasive or native species.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
External structures can stymie policies designed to improve education for minority studentsEducation policy is of topmost interest to Jurée Capers, an assistant professor of public management and policy in the Andrew Young School. Her research puts a different spin on the subject, though, by examining the structures inside and outside educational institutions that impact underrepresented populations.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Do Probiotics Really Work?Although certain bacteria help treat some gut disorders, they have no known benefits for healthy people -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hypersonic flight test goes like a rocketCommercialised flight faster than five times the speed of sound has been brought one step closer, thanks to a successful experimental flight featuring University of Queensland knowhow.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biosensors light up cellular signaling processesResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have converted a naturally occurring fluorescent protein from corals into a biosensor that can be used to monitor the cellular thioredoxin (Trx) system, which is a promising target for cancer therapy.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The blockchain could have better security than the banksThere are ways to improve the online ledger blockchain by taking some security notes from banks. If people could use both two-step verification and spending limits on the blockchain, this would reduce any economic loss from cyber attacks and in turn encourage more users.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune system found to control eye tissue renewal in zebrafishResearchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report evidence that zebrafishes' natural ability to regenerate their eyes' retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes' immune systems. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combining genomics with farmers' traditional knowledge to improve wheat productionProducing better crops to meet the needs of the growing world's population may lie in combining the traditional knowledge of subsistence farmers with plant genomics. Researchers in Italy and Ethiopia demonstrated that the indigenous knowledge of traditional farmers, passed on from one generation to generation, can be measured in a quantitative way and used with advanced genomic and statistical met
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world overIf you lean in for a kiss on the left you may be in the minority. A new study from an international team of psychologists and neuroscientists suggest that humans are hardwired to favour leaning to the right while kissing romantic partners, which may have wider implications for neuroscience and cognitive sciences.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The great galactic recessionA simulated universe created by Swinburne University of Technology and The University of Melbourne has revealed galaxies emerging in the first billion years after the Big Bang were experiencing a recession.
1h
Gizmodo
Lay Your Head on Shredded Memory Foam With This One-Day Sale Shredded Memory Foam Pillow , $44-$48 You spend 1/3 of your life in contact with a pillow, so it had better be a good one. This bed pillow is stuffed with chunks of shredded memory foam, and it can be yours under $50 during this Amazon Gold Box sale . The queen-sized will run you $44, and the king-sized is priced at $48. Don’t sleep on this deal. More Deals
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tasmania's fisheries cooked by record-breaking marine heatwaveHuman-induced climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heat wave off Tasmania's east coast that lasted 251 days and had an area of impact seven times the size of the island, a new study shows.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mature cells revert to stem cells to boost tissue regeneration and repair in mouse intestinesResearchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School have identified a previously unknown mechanism that plays an important role in the regeneration of the inner intestinal lining. Their findings provide new insights on how this tissue, which undergoes change on a daily basis, maintains itself.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher discusses the future of the electric utilityFrancis O'Sullivan, director of research for the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), recently led discussions about the future of the electric grid and clean energy technologies with leaders in industry, government, and academia at MITEI's Associate Member Symposium. In the wake of the symposium, O'Sullivan reflects on several of its main themes: current trends in the industry, changes in customer beha
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-high-contrast digital sensingVirtually any modern information-capture device—such as a camera, audio recorder, or telephone—has an analog-to-digital converter in it, a circuit that converts the fluctuating voltages of analog signals into strings of ones and zeroes.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Introducing JUICE—the Jupiter Icy Moons ExplorerIt may still be five years away from launch, and over a decade before our Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer reaches the gas giant and its icy moons, but preparations are well under way. This new artist's impression depicts the final spacecraft design, the construction of which is being overseen by Airbus Defence and Space.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snip, snip, cure—correcting defects in the genetic blueprintGene editing using 'molecular scissors' that snip out and replace faulty DNA could provide an almost unimaginable future for some patients: a complete cure. Cambridge researchers are working towards making the technology cheap and safe, as well as examining the ethical and legal issues surrounding one of the most exciting medical advances of recent times.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Newquay is go!World Land Speed record holder Andy Green looks forward to the first, low-speed runs of the Bloodhound supersonic car.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian scientists develop technology for production of transparent aluminumSpecialists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and multi-institutional collaborators have developed a technology to produce compacts from aluminum oxynitride (ALON). They've published their results in IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New horizons unveils new maps of Pluto, Charon on flyby anniversaryOn July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flight through the Pluto system – providing the first close-up images of Pluto and its moons and collecting other data that has transformed our understanding of these mysterious worlds on the solar system's outer frontier.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Flyover of Pluto's majestic mountains and icy plainsIn July 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sent home the first close-up pictures of Pluto and its moons – amazing imagery that inspired many to wonder what a flight over the distant worlds' icy terrain might be like.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Monday, 8 A.M.: Time to Have a BabyBirths peak on weekdays during daytime work hours -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Microbes Encourage Altruism?If gut bacteria can sway their hosts to be selfless, it could answer a riddle that goes back to Darwin -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study lengths of restroom queuesTwo queueing theorists of Ghent University investigated why queues at restrooms are invariably longer for ladies than for men. Time and time again. What are the main causes for this disparity? And how can it be overcome? Moving to unisex toilets, it appears from this study, may reduce waiting times for women from over 6 minutes to less than a minute and a half. Already a symbol for transgender equ
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new ligand extends the half-life of peptides from minutes to daysEPFL scientists have developed a ligand molecule that connects peptide drugs to blood-serum albumin and keeps them from being cleared out by the kidneys too soon. The ligand is easy to synthesize and can extend the half-life of therapeutic peptides from minutes to several days.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traffic pollution prevents children's brains from reaching their full potentialTraffic pollution in cities can stall children's brain development and stop them from reaching their full potential, according to a Spanish study that measured air pollution in 300 classrooms.
2h
Ingeniøren
Undersøgelse: Gentest af raske mennesker er ofte meningsløstAmerikansk forskning tyder på, at det ofte ikke giver nogen mening at undersøge ellers sunde menneskers gener. Hver femte har en mutation, der ofte er uden betydning.
2h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Selling 12-Month Xbox Live Gold Memberships For $25, For Some Reason Xbox Live Gold 12 Months , $25 This is almost certainly a mistake of some kind, but Amazon’s currently selling 12-month digital Xbox Live Gold subscriptions for just $25 . Get them while you can! h/t Antonio
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists peek inside the mind of Maxwell’s demonScientists probe information retained by Maxwell’s demon.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Small Reactors Could Kick-Start the Stalled Nuclear SectorNuScale is on track to build the first commercial small modular reactors in the United States.
2h
Wired
How Climate Change Denial Threatens National SecurityLast week, military officials described how climate change would escalate instability across the globe and make it harder for the US military to conduct its operations.
2h
Wired
Viceland Keeps Growing—But In What Direction?The young network's flagship shows are back for a second season. Is there room for them in today's fragmented media landscape?
2h
Wired
Ted Cruz Asks Space Capitalists How to Make Orbit Great AgainLast Thursday, a bunch of space capitalists met with a bunch of senators to talk policy.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
What Would It Take to Get an Effective Alzheimer's Drug?Clinical trial failures kick off a search for new approaches -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Lawbreaking Particles May Point to a Previously Unknown Force in the UniverseScientists aren’t yet certain that electrons and their relatives are violating the Standard Model of particle physics, but the evidence is mounting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Remember When Fox News Posted Tucker Carlson's Home Phone Number Online? Photo: Producer Lawrence O’Donnell, moderator Tucker Carlson and Governor Mike Huckabee of Arkansas at a panel discussion August 31, 2004 in New York City (Photo by Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images) These days, the folks at Fox News are outraged by even the possibility of someone getting doxxed . But they didn’t have such high standards back in the early 2000s. In fact, back in 2003, the network poste
3h
Live Science
'Stalker' Velociraptor Relative Sported Feathers, Serrated TeethAbout 71 million years ago, a feathered dinosaur that was too big to fly rambled through parts of North America, likely using its serrated teeth to gobble down meat and veggies, a new study finds.
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Live Science
Possible Human Remains Recovered from Sunken WWII BomberDivers completed a recovery mission to the wreck of the Tulsamerican, an American bomber that crashed off the coast of Croatia in 1944.
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Live Science
What If Earth Was 50% Bigger?If Earth were to grow, gravity would mean humans couldn't venture into space on rockets, one scientist says.
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Live Science
It Takes Guts: The Yucky Way Sea Spiders Get Oxygen to Their LegsIt would take a lot of energy for a heart to pump blood through all those long legs.
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Live Science
Electric Avenue: Energy-Harvesting Tiles Line London 'Smart Street'Interactive tiles recently installed in a London lane transformed it into an energy-harvesting "smart street."
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens may be missing vaccines because parents aren't aware they need oneParents may be up to speed on what vaccines their children need for kindergarten, but may be less sure during high school years, a new national poll suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Breivik terrorist attacks in Norway led to mental illness in DenmarkA new study shows that the number of Danes diagnosed with trauma -- and stressor-related disorders (such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) increased substantially following the terrorist attacks carried out by Anders Breivik in Oslo and on the nearby island of Utøya in Norway in the summer of 2011. The study also suggests that the intense media coverage of the attack is likely to be partly
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists name new species of dinosaur after Canadian iconA new species of troodontid theropod dinosaur identified, Albertavenator curriei, named after renowned Canadian palaeontologist Dr. Philip J. Currie.Palaeontologists initially thought that the bones of Albertavenator belonged to its close relative Troodon, which lived around 76-million-years-ago.This new species of troodontid in the Late Cretaceous of North America indicates that small dinosaur di
3h
New Scientist - News
AI doctors should improve healthcare, but not at any costAlgorithms can already outperform specialists at disease diagnosis, but we must come up with a clear framework for what data they are allowed to use
3h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #9: Er Kina det nye Silicon Valley?
3h
Ingeniøren
Bemandet Mars-mission i fare: Pengene rækker ikkeNasa indrømmer nu, at agenturets ambitiøse budget for en bemandet Mars-mission ikke holder.
4h
NYT > Science
Where Else Does the U.S. Have an Infrastructure Problem? AntarcticaThe United States has had the most ambitious research program in Antarctica for 50 years. But its infrastructure is old, and the new price tags are high.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers prove the security of the Vector Stream CipherHow do we know if the electronic keys we use in our devices are really secure? While it is possible to rigorously test the strength of a cipher—a kind of digital data lock—there are rarely any definitive proofs of unbreakability. Ciphers are highly complex, and while they may ward off certain attacks, they might be vulnerable to others.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When life gives you lemons, make bioplasticsFrom your phone case to airplane windows, polycarbonates are everywhere. Several million tons of polycarbonate are produced every year around the world. However, worries about the dangers of this material are increasing because of the toxicity of its precursors, especially bisphenol-A, a potential carcinogen.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny particles increase in air with ethanol-to-gasoline switchThe concentration of ultrafine particles less than 50 nanometers in diameter rose by one-third in the air of São Paulo, Brazil, when higher ethanol prices induced drivers to switch from ethanol to gasoline, according to a new study by a Northwestern University chemist, a National University of Singapore economist and two University of São Paulo physicists. The research team also found when drivers
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model projects an increase in dust storms in the USA new statistical model developed by researchers at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts that climate change will amplify dust activity in parts of the U.S. in the latter half of the 21st century, which may lead to the increased frequency of spectacular dust storms that have far-reaching impacts on public health and infrastructure.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new ligand extends the half-life of peptide drugs from minutes to daysEPFL scientists have developed a ligand molecule that connects peptide drugs to blood-serum albumin and keeps them from being cleared out by the kidneys too soon. The ligand is easy to synthesize and can extend the half-life of therapeutic peptides from minutes to several days.
4h
The Atlantic
Are Socialists Physically Weak? A couple weeks ago, a study bubbled up through the muck of the The Red Pill subreddit: “ Physically Weak Men More Likely to be Socialists (Unless They’re Poor) ,” the Redditor posted, next to a tag that says “Science” and, for good measure, a picture of an atom. “Lifting doesn’t just make you stronger and fitter, it also makes you less of a cuck,” the Redditor proclaimed, using a term coined by t
4h
The Atlantic
Who Gets to Own Iraq’s Religious Heritage? The revelation that Hobby Lobby bought thousands of ancient artifacts smuggled out of Iraq provoked astonishment and anger. The craft-supply chain has agreed to pay a $3 million settlement and forfeit the cuneiform tablets and clay bullae to the U.S. government. But the story doesn’t end there. “The government will post a notice online giving the artifacts’ owners 60 days to submit claims,” The N
5h
The Atlantic
The 'Blackwater 2.0' Plan for Afghanistan Here’s a crazy idea floating around Washington these days, outlandish even by today’s outlandish standards: The United States should hire a mercenary army to “fix” Afghanistan, a country where we’ve been at war since 2001, spending billions along the way. The big idea here is that they could extricate U.S. soldiers from this quagmire, and somehow solve it. Not surprisingly, the private-military i
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Daily crosswords linked to sharper brain in later lifeThe more regularly people report doing word puzzles such as crosswords, the better their brain function in later life, a large-scale and robust online trial has found. Experts at the University of Exeter Medical School and Kings College London analyzed data from more than 17,000 healthy people aged 50 and over, submitted in an online trial.
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Science | The Guardian
Hearing loss could pose greater risk of potential dementia in later life – study Auditory issues could be an early sign of future risk of memory and thinking problems but more research is required to unpick the link, researchers say People who experience hearing loss could be at greater risk of memory and thinking problems later in life than those without auditory issues, research suggests. The study focused on people who were at risk of Alzheimer’s disease, revealing that th
5h
The Atlantic
How VA Reform Turned into a Fight Over Privatization In 2014, the Department of Veterans Affairs was mired in a scandal . An inspector general’s report had found “systemic” manipulation by government officials to hide lengthy and growing wait times at its medical centers. Veterans were waiting months for appointments, and dozens may have died because they could not get treated in time. Spurred to action, Congress created a program aimed at temporar
5h
Live Science
Artificial Sweeteners Have Little or No Benefit to Health, Researchers ConcludeFor people who are overweight, or have high blood pressure or diabetes, the benefits of artificial sweeteners are modest to nil.
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny professor i hvordan fødevare-mikroberne påvirker vores sundhedMikrobiolog Dennis Sandris Nielsen fra Institut for Fødevarevidenskab ved Københavns Universitet...
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to create independent military cyber commandAfter months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California lawmakers to decide fate of landmark climate lawCalifornia lawmakers are nearing a high-stakes decision that will decide the fate of a climate initiative that Gov. Jerry Brown holds up as a model to be replicated around the world to confront rising global temperatures.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK not ready for Brexit's impact on food, report warnsThe UK is unprepared for the most complex ever change to its food system, which will be required before Brexit, according to a new briefing paper published by SPRU, the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex.
6h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Sådan skal Facebooks kæmpedroner udbrede internettetEn sværm af store, svævende droner i stratosfæren, der kommunikerer indbyrdes ved hjælp af laser og udbreder internettet til jordens øde områder – lyder det som science fiction? Det kan snart blive virkelighed i følge Mark Zuckerberg og Facebook.
6h
Science-Based Medicine
Does chemotherapy cause cancer to spread?Earlier this month, a study was published in Science Translational Medicine that showed how chemotherapy before surgery can stimulate breast cancer invasiveness and invasion under certain circumstances. Not surprisingly, alternative cancer cure mavens everywhere are spinning the study as "proof" that chemotherapy has no benefit and causes only harm (and so you should by their nostrums instead). Un
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Breivik-terrorangrebet gjorde danskerne psykisk sygeTerrorangreb påvirker vores psykiske helbred – også selvom det foregår i andre...
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Are you smarter than an architect? A puzzle that tests 3D thinking Hi guzzlers, Today’s puzzle was sent in by a reader who remembers it from his days as an architecture student. Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren
Høflighed gør danske virksomheder sårbare for analoge hackere Hacking som foregår væk fra skærmen og fysisk ude på virksomhederne ved 'tailgating' og 'dumpster diving' foregår mere, end de fleste tror, mener dansk etisk hacker. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dansk-etisk-hacker-analog-hacking-nemt-1078088 Emner It-sikkerhed Version2
8h
The Scientist RSS
Twists and TurnsNew starring roles for nucleic acids
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The Scientist RSS
Notable Science QuotesThe NIH budget, the nature of science, paternal age, and more
8h
The Scientist RSS
The Evolutionary Roots of InstinctDid behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?
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The Scientist RSS
Mysterious Brain Waves May Connect REM Sleep with Visual ExperiencesNew methods could propel investigation of neural 'PGO' wave patterns that may underlie critical aspects of visual experience, dreaming, and even psychosis.
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The Scientist RSS
Nine Decades of Environmental Change Resurrected From Swedish SeasScientists bring marine plankton back to life to study past climate change
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The Scientist RSS
Recreating Fish Migration Written Through Environmental GenomicsScientists examine floating traces of DNA left by fish to better understand New York's aquatic life.
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The Scientist RSS
Microbiota ManipulationsTwo research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.
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The Scientist RSS
Epigenetic Inheritance in NematodesThe memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.
8h
The Scientist RSS
The Unlikely Relationship Between a Brittle Star and a Sea PansyThe presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Uncover Previously Unknown Immune Cell SubtypesUsing single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Oceans AmbassadorJane Lubchenco has embraced many roles: marine ecologist, science communicator, federal agency administrator, and sustainable fishing advocate.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Emily Balskus pins down the chemistry and metabolism of human microbiomesAt Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.
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The Scientist RSS
The Mechanobiology GarageNew tools for investigating how physical forces affect cells
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The Scientist RSS
Identifying Predatory PublishersHow to tell reputable journals from fishy ones
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The Scientist RSS
Bacteriophages to the RescuePhage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990Activists demanded greater access to and involvement in clinical research for AIDS treatments-and their protests were heard.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Book Excerpt from Natural DefenseIn Chapter 3, 'The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,' author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.
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The Scientist RSS
Microbe MavenMeet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans at Harvard University
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The Scientist RSS
DNA OrigamiWill complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsule to deliver drugs to cancer cells?
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The Scientist RSS
Lubcheco on ConservationFormer NOAA administrator and zoologist Jane Lunchenco discusses the importance of science in the face of climate change.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Building Nanoscale Structures with DNAThe versatility of geometric shapes made using the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.
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The Scientist RSS
Grass RoutesResearchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.
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The Scientist RSS
Uncovering Functions of Circular RNAsRecent research has revealed many surprises about circular RNAs, from findings that they are translated in vivo to links between their expression and disease.
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The Scientist RSS
DNA ConstructionResearchers have devised multiple ways to build nanoscale structures from the nucleic acid.
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The Scientist RSS
Making the RoundsCircular RNA biogenesis occurs when RNA fragments are bent into closed loops of one or more exons and/or introns.
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The Scientist RSS
Messing with the MicrobiomeTwo new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria.
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The Scientist RSS
Worms Epigenetic MemoriesWhen kept at warmer temperatures for five generations, C. elegans showed evidence of 'remembering' that experience for up to 14 generations.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Endocannabinoids in the GrooveThe system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canada should continue with separate medical stream after cannabis is legalized for recreational useAfter cannabis is legalized, Canada should continue with a separate medical cannabis stream to keep patients safe, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
9h
Live Science
What Are Carbohydrates?Carbohydrates — one of the basic food groups — are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products. They are important to a healthy life.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Will wildcat lynx be reintroduced to the UK?The wildcat could be reintroduced into the UK for the first time in 1,300 years.
9h
Wired
IBM Z's 'Pervasive Encryption' Wants to Stop Data Breaches in Their TracksThe new IBM Z mainframe uses "pervasive encryption" to stop data breaches in their tracks.
9h
The Atlantic
Game of Thrones Gears Up for the Wars Still to Come Every week for the seventh season of Game of Thrones , David Sims, Spencer Kornhaber, and Lenika Cruz will discuss new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we'll be posting our thoughts in installments. David Sims: It’s finally back. After 12 long months of waiting, 12 months of rumor, speculation, and fierce fan arguments, Game of T
10h
Gizmodo
Let's Talk About Tonight's Long-Awaited Return of Game of Thrones After more than a year, Game of Thrones has made its very welcome return. It was a reasonably quiet episode, by which I mean at least 50 people were still murdered, but we need to breakdown what the premiere has promised is yet to come. The cracks in Jon and Sansa’s relationship have already begun to show. Bran finally returns to the south of the Wall. Cersei is about to make an alliance that is
11h
Wired
Remembering George A. Romero, Master of the UndeadThe writer-director all but invented the modern movie zombie, but he was also a clear-eyed satirist of humanity's darkest urges.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
9/11 survivors may be at increased risk of heart and lung disease years laterPeople who were exposed to the dust cloud or sustained physical injuries during the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 may be at increased long-term risk of asthma, other respiratory diseases and heart attack, according to a study published in the open access journal Injury Epidemiology.
13h
The Neurocritic
Role of the Vestibular System in the Construction of Self How do we construct a unified self-identity as a thinking and feeling person inhabiting a body, separate and unique from other entities? A “self” with the capacity for autobiographical memory and complex thought? Traditionally, the field of cognitive science has been concerned with explaining the mind in isolation from the body. The growing field of embodied cognition , on the other hand, seeks t
14h
Futurity.org
Rotating keyboard lets you ‘type’ on your watch Researchers have designed a rotating keyboard, called COMPASS, that lets users “type” text into smartwatches without a touchscreen interface. Entering text on smartwatches is currently quite difficult, especially on those without a virtual keyboard. The COMPASS smartwatch keyboard. (Credit: Stony Brook U.) COMPASS is a text entry method that is based in the bezel of the watch, allowing the user t
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A prescription of activities shown to improve health and well-beingGyms, walking groups, gardening, cooking clubs and volunteering have all been shown to work in improving the health and well-being reported by a group of people with long-term conditions. Key to the success was a 'Link Worker' who helped participants select their activity and supported them throughout the program.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK not ready for Brexit's impact on food, report warnsThe UK is unprepared for the most complex ever change to its food system, which will be required before Brexit, according to a new briefing paper published by SPRU, the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medicationNegative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially life-saving drugs, according to research published today.
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Futurity.org
DNA test finds invasive fish without nets Scientists can now use DNA fragments suspended in water—called environmental DNA—to detect and catalog invasive or native fish species. “We’ve sharpened the environmental DNA (eDNA) tool, so that if a river or a lake has threatened, endangered or invasive species, we can ascertain genetic detail of the species there,” says senior author David Lodge, the director of the Atkinson Center for a Susta
14h
Science | The Guardian
Let's twist again: the secrets of kissing angles revealed Humans hard-wired to favour leaning to the right while locking lips with romantic partners, an international study has found Humans are hard-wired to favour leaning to the right while kissing romantic partners, an international study by psychologists and neuroscientists has found. The research, by the universities of Dhaka, Bath and Bath Spa, found that kiss recipients have a tendency to match th
14h
Science | The Guardian
Government offers £2m for scientific research into counter-terrorism Security minister Ben Wallace set to launch competition seeking ideas on how ‘to keep people safe in crowds’ The government is to make up to £2m available to fund research into technology and behavioural science projects that could identify possible terrorists in crowds. Ministers hope the competition will generate techniques to improve the surveillance and detection of potential terrorist threat
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Futurity.org
Existing drug could keep Zika from infecting fetus Researchers have uncovered how the Zika virus infects fetuses through the body’s barrier to infection. They show that an existing malaria drug can protect the fetus from infection by blocking this process. The drug is also already approved for use in pregnant women for other medical purposes. Devastating consequences of Zika virus infection are suffered in the womb, where the virus can cause brai
15h
Gizmodo
RIP George Romero, the Man Behind the Modern Zombie Image: Marco Ugarte/AP. George Romero, the legendary filmmaker who changed the horror world forever with Night of the Living Dead and its sequels, has died of lung cancer at the age of 77. Romero will be forever remembered for his iconic contribution to horror, not just through his birth of the zombie genre as we know it today in 1968's Night of the Living Dead and its litany of sequels all the w
16h
cognitive science
The Anchoring Effect: How The Mind Is Biased By First Impressions submitted by /u/mmellowww [link] [comments]
16h
NYT > Science
Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: ‘Why,’ About the Science of CuriosityIn his new book, Mario Livio delves into the fields of psychology and neuroscience, and speaks with people who have extreme curiosity.
16h
Gizmodo
In Wake of Grenfell Tower, Government Warns Removing Dangerous Cladding Is Just Making Things Worse Photo: Getty At least 80 people died in the catastrophic fire at Grenfell Tower in June. There were many questions after the blaze was extinguished, and it was discovered that among numerous safety hazards , a particularly combustible form of cladding was used on the facade of the building in order to cut costs. Panicked landlords have begun removing the cladding from their own buildings, but acc
16h
Gizmodo
This Mysterious New Droid Is Rolling Around the Star Wars Section at D23 Expo Meet Jake, one of the droids that might be rolling around Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge. Image: Germain Lussier/Gizmodo Disney loves a good surprise, and fans at the D23 Expo in Anaheim got plenty of those over the weekend. One of the more subtle ones featured a brand new droid, rolling around the display for the new theme park additions called Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge . The droid definitely resembles o
17h
Science | The Guardian
Stressful experiences can age brain 'by years', Alzheimer's experts hear Child’s death, divorce or job loss linked to poorer cognition in later life, study finds, with African Americans more susceptible Stressful life experiences can age the brain by several years, new research suggests. Experts led by a team from Wisconsin University’s school of medicine and public health in the US found that even one major stressful event early in life may have an impact on later br
17h
Gizmodo
Julius the Giraffe Has Died After One Month on This Godforsaken Planet Photo: Maryland Zoo On Sunday, animal lovers around the globe expressed their condolences for Julius, the baby giraffe that was born at the Maryland Zoo in June. In a statement , the zoo said that he was never able to learn how to nurse properly. Julius was born to first-time mother Kesi on June 15th and he needed around-the-clock care from the beginning. On Saturday, the zoo announced that his c
18h
cognitive science
How Can We Stop Algorithms Telling Lies?: "Algorithms can dictate whether you get a mortgage or how much you pay for insurance. But sometimes they're wrong -- and sometimes they are designed to deceive" submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
18h
Gizmodo
Marvel's New VR Game Lets You Kick Ass as Earth's Mightiest Heroes A still from Marvel Powers United VR. Image: YouTube Marvel Powers United VR makes one of your wildest dreams come true. You and three friends can all team up and fight the forces of evil, in real time, as your favorite superheroes. If you and three friends all have an Oculus Rift of course. The game was revealed at this weekend’s D23 Expo, and we got an early spin through the mission. But first,
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
Paleo Profile: The Crown ToothA 30-million-year-old whale reveals how filter feeding came before baleen -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One social hour a week in dementia care improves lives and saves moneyPerson-centered activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction can improve quality of life and reduce agitation for people with dementia living in care homes, while saving money.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug combined with care program better at reducing Alzheimer's symptoms than drug aloneCombining a specific care management program with a commonly-prescribed drug for Alzheimer's, memantine, multiplies the medication's ability to improve daily function by about 7.5 times, stalling some of the disease's most damaging effects, according to new research. With no significant new drug for Alzheimer's having been approved since 2003, the study authors say the time has come for the field
19h
Gizmodo
Twitter Has Some Advice for Avoiding Game of Thrones Spoilers GIF GIF Source: HBO Game of Thrones ’ latest season premiers tonight on HBO and you know what that means. HBO Go will crash, you won’t get to watch it tonight, and your Twitter feed will just be pictures of Cersei that are captioned “RIP.” Twitter has offered a reminder about its mute function as well some key terms to add so that you can block yourself from being spoiled. All it takes is a singl
19h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Homesteaders Could Be Trapped In Their Remote Outpost In An Instant Homestead Rescue | Wednesdays at 10/9c The Crums moved to the mountains of Montana to escape a life-threatening condition triggered by city life; but their lack of homesteading experience puts them at risk. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/homestead-rescue/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Rescues! http://www.discovery.com/tv-s
19h
Ars Technica
Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker spectacularly unveiled as the 13th Doctor Enlarge (credit: BBC) Jodie Whittaker, who worked with new Doctor Who showrunner Chris Chibnall on Broadchurch , has been unveiled as the 13th Doctor. She will be the first female actor to play the Time Lord in the history of Doctor Who . In a publicity chat with the BBC, Whittaker urged Whovians to be open about the Doctor's gender switcheroo. "I want to tell the fans not to be scared by my gend
20h
Gizmodo
Get Game Of Thrones, The Martian, And More On Your Kindle For Cheap Kindle Ebook Sale With only 13 titles on sale, this Sunday’s Kindle ebook sale is far from the biggest Amazon’s ever run, but it does includes some bona fide hits, including A Game of Thrones (timely!) and The Martian .
21h
NYT > Science
Maryam Mirzakhani, Only Woman to Win a Fields Medal, Dies at 40Dr. Mirzakhani, a mathematician at Stanford University, was the only woman and only Iranian ever to win what is often described as the Nobel Prize of mathematics.
21h
Big Think
As Robots Become More Human-Like, We’re More Likely to Reject Them Can we ensure robots are greeted into society without people getting that sinking feeling? Read More
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Can We Cultivate Grit and Imagination in the Classroom?Innovative Educator's Summit focuses on the intersection of grit and imagination in the classroom -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Ars Technica
White House voter commission publishes names, numbers of worried citizens Enlarge / Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach (right), is one of the top officials on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. (credit: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images) Shortly before the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity is set to have its first meeting on Wednesday July 19—which will be livestreamed here —the controversial committee
21h
Gizmodo
Jodie Whittaker Is Doctor Who's Next Doctor Image: Still via Youtube After months and months of rumors, speculation, and flat out waiting , we finally know who is taking on the TARDIS as the thirteenth Doctor in season 11. Ladies and gents, say hello to your new Time Lord: Jodie Whittaker, the first woman in Doctor Who ’s 54-year history to land the title role. Revealed at the end of today’s Men’s Final at Wimbledon, Whittaker—best known t
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Agent clears toxic proteins and improves cognition in neurodegeneration modelsResearchers have found cell receptors abnormally overexpressed in post-mortem brains of those with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and that they can be inhibited in animal models to clear toxic protein buildup, reduce brain inflammation, and improve cognitive performance.
21h
NYT > Science
Yoro Journal: Every Year, the Sky ‘Rains Fish.’ Explanations Vary.Residents of La Unión, Honduras, say that after a fierce storm, the ground is covered with hundreds of small fish. It could be science, or a miracle.
22h
Gizmodo
All the Details and Secrets We Spotted in the Latest Star Wars: The Last Jedi Footage GIF Image: Gif via Youtube D23 is upon us this weekend, and with it, a new behind-the-scenes glimpse at the next chapter in the Star Wars saga. But although the movie didn’t offer us a full trailer, what we did get was still jam-packed with little hints and clues as to what’s to come for Luke, Leia, Rey, Finn, and Poe. GIF The opening salvo of the reel gives us a few intriguing shots of sets, loc
22h
Ars Technica
Pocket brains: Neuromorphic hardware arrives for our brain-inspired algorithms (credit: Miguel Navarro / Getty Images) As the world’s great companies pursue autonomous cars, they’re essentially spending billions of dollars to get machines to do what your average two-year-old can do without thinking—identify what they see. Of course, in some regards toddlers still have the advantage. Infamously last year, a driver died while in a Tesla sedan—he wasn't paying attention when t
22h
Gizmodo
22,000 People Agree to Clean Toilets for WiFi Because They Didn't Read the Terms GIF GIF: Gizmodo Tim Berners-Lee, the father of the World Wide Web, listed his top worries for the future of his creation earlier this year. One of his biggest concerns is the increasingly dense terms of service agreements that companies ask users to sign. Now, a public WiFi company has demonstrated just how dangerous those complicated agreements can be by inserting absurd conditions that thousan
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Ars Technica
Defense of Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop offers case study on how to sell snake oil Enlarge / Gwyneth Paltrow attends book signing at goop-in@Nordstrom on June 8, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (credit: Gety | Phillip Faraone ) This week, Gwyneth Paltrow’s high-profile lifestyle and e-commerce site, Goop, gave birth to a beautiful gift to the Internet—and it wasn’t a moon-powered vagina egg that invigorates our mystical “life force.” No, it was a perfectly crafted reference gu
22h
Ars Technica
Review: Flying the super-small, super-fun DJI Spark Fun was had flying the DJI Spark - only one minor crash. (video link) If you're flying a drone in a public place like a park, you're going to get some looks. While consumer drones are becoming more widely available and more popular, they're still novel to most consumers. Until recently, most drones were too big and conspicuous to comfortably take anywhere, not to mention the hundreds to thousands
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Ingeniøren
Israelsk minister: Kunstig ø skal hjælpe pressede palæstinensereIsraels transportminister ønsker sig en kunstig ø kontrolleret af det internationale samfund, for at imødegå de humanitære og økonomiske problemer i Gaza.
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Gizmodo
Disney California Adventure Park Will Open an 'Immersive Super Hero Universe' Image: Disney Parks Blog Here’s one more nugget of theme park news from the D23 Expo. Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim will build off the success of the new Guardians of the Galaxy—Mission: Breakout ride with an immersive Marvel superhero universe at the park, including the Avengers and Spider-Man. That’s about all that was revealed at this early stage, but obviously we’ll be keeping a
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Science | The Guardian
Governments have to invest in the fourth industrial revolution | Larry Elliott Despite the unprecedented speed of current breakthroughs investment is weak and money is either stashed away or distributed to shareholders Prepare for the age of the driverless car and the robot that does the housework. That was the message from the World Economic Forum earlier this year as it hailed the start of a new industrial revolution. According to the WEF, the fourth big structural change
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Live Science
Is Dark Matter Real?While many people take the existence of dark matter for granted, it's still a theory that has yet to be proven. But new evidence could bolster support for dark matter theories.
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Scientific American Content: Global
On the Trail of a Dinosaur SailA mysterious skeleton in Venice is a reminder how important it is to take good field notes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
I would eat anything for lunch (but I won’t eat that) – how can I cure my aversion to eggs? Killian Fox has eaten termites, he’s tried crickets, but there’s one food he is afraid of. Can psychology and a brilliant young chef help? Why do fears exist, if not for us to confront them? This is what I’m telling myself as I enter Tim Spedding’s kitchen in east London on a brisk evening in late spring. On the face of it, it doesn’t seem like such a bad proposition: one of the most exciting you
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Gizmodo
Sunday's Best Deals: Kindle Sale, FoodSaver, DualShock 4, and More $30 true wireless earbuds , a discounted FoodSaver , and an impressive Kindle ebook sale lead off Sunday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals VAVA MOOV 20 True Wireless Earbuds , $30 Inexpensive truly wireless headphones are finally starting to become a thing, and VAVA’s new MOOV 20s are just $30 today on Amazon , one
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Science | The Guardian
Secrets of the mummies at the Church of the Holy Spirit in Vilnius Anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali discovers lessons for modern medicine among remains of 23 preserved people The crypt under the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit in the heart of Vilnius has a vivid history. The coffins hidden in the gloomy lair under the church’s altar were stripped by Napoleon’s army for wood. During the second world war, the Nazis used it as a makeshift bomb shelter. And
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The Atlantic
Friends From College Is a Tragedy of Arrested Development In the fourth episode of Friends From College , Max (Fred Savage) and Felix (Billy Eichner) are celebrating Max’s 40th birthday at The Table, a “super-exclusive” restaurant they’ve waited months to get into. The chef brings over a course on the tasting menu: a “hamburger” reconstructed from foie gras, gorgonzola foam, and toasted slices of spam. The next course is “fruit rollups” made from wild s
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Popular Science
How to choose the best digital camera for you DIY Snap happy. Your complete guide to choosing a digital camera, from the terminology you probably need to the features you probably don't.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic found in remote South PacificA mariner says there is a "raft" of plastic debris spanning 965,000 square miles in part of the South Pacific.
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Wired
Kid Rock's Senate Bid Outruns Kellyanne Conway's Signs in This Week's News RecapIf the Capitol's Kid Rockin', don't come a-knockin'—and the rest of the week's best internet kerfuffles.
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Wired
What if Sex Is Just a Garbage Dump for Genetic Mutations?Sex might help natural selection purge excessive mistakes from our genes.
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Wired
Rants and Races: In Praise of the Humble Stick PenStick pens are not elegant, effortless writing utensils. But like so many of life's best things, it's their very badness that makes them great.
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Wired
An Amazon Echo Can't Call the Police—But Maybe It ShouldThough coming from a connected home assistant, there may be such a thing as too much help.
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Wired
Oxo's Coffee Grinder and Brewer Make a Damn Good CupWe look at a coffee grinder and a brewer that double down on coffee science.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Beam me up, Scotty'Chinese scientists have "teleported" a photon particle to a satellite - could humans be next?
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Kan Bluetooth bestemme afstanden mellem enheder?En læser vil meget gerne vide, om man kan sige noget om, hvor langt andre Bluetooth-enheder er fra ens smartphone. Det svarer postdoc fra DTU Compute på.
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Viden
Faktatjek: Kan du fjerne gift fra kroppen med detox-plastre?Den alternative behandling hitter i danske webbutikker. Men overlæge mener, at det er fusk som spiller på vores frygt for gift i hverdagen.
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The Atlantic
Mitch McConnell's Heavy Health-Care Lift Say this for the health-care circus: It has been a master class in how difficult and delicate governing (as opposed to mouthing off) can be. Hill Republicans have had seven years to come up with a workable, palatable alternative to Obamacare. Instead, they have struggled and scrambled and, in shadowy, secret corners of the Capitol, cobbled together a plan—well, a succession of plans—that has thus
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The Atlantic
What The 'Crack Baby' Panic Reveals About The Opioid Epidemic Epidemics are hard to cover. Navigating the gaps between the private, personal, and societal and managing to be relatable while also true to science is a tough part of health reporting, generally. Doing those things in the middle of public panic—and its attendant misinformation—requires deftness. And performing them while also minding the social issues that accompany every epidemic means reporter
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The Atlantic
‘We’re Headed Toward One of the Greatest Divisions in the History of the Jewish People’ In late June, 19 rabbis gathered in New York City for an urgent meeting. It wasn’t secret, exactly, but it certainly wasn’t public. The Jewish leaders—all members of the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical Assembly, except for two—were there to decide what to do about intermarriage. Since the 1970s, the Conservative movement has banned its rabbis from officiating or even attending wedding ceremoni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
S.Africa's white enclave eyes move to e-cashA whites-only enclave in South Africa has resisted the country's multi-racial reality for more than two decades, even adopting its own paper money in its bid to promote self-sufficiency.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Telegram blocks terror content after Indonesia threatens banThe encrypted messaging app Telegram is forming a team of moderators who are familiar with Indonesian culture and language so it can remove "terrorist-related content" faster, its co-founder said Sunday, after Indonesia limited access to the app and threatened a total ban.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk talks cars—and humanity's fate—with governorsTesla CEO Elon Musk warned a bipartisan gathering of U.S. governors on Saturday that government regulation of artificial intelligence is needed because it's a "fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Estonia to open world's first virtual data embassyCyber-savvy Estonia has taken yet another step forward in global technology, as the small Baltic state is set to open the world's first data embassy in Luxembourg early next year.
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The Atlantic
The Young Robot-Builders of Afghanistan This year at FIRST Global Challenge , a robotics competition in Washington, D.C., an international committee of judges will assess the creativity and collaboration of 163 teams from 157 nations focused on tackling the global water crisis. From Sunday through Tuesday, the teams will present robots designed to clean contaminated water, as represented in a simulation by colored balls. One of the gro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug combined with care program better at reducing Alzheimer's symptoms than drug aloneCombining a specific care management program with a commonly-prescribed drug for Alzheimer's, memantine, multiplies the medication's ability to improve daily function by about 7.5 times, stalling some of the disease's most damaging effects, according to new research from NYU Langone Medical Center. With no significant new drug for Alzheimer's having been approved since 2003, the study authors say
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Ingeniøren
Sort fosfor overrasker igen: Forskere opdager nye egenskaberEn beskyttende belægning på et tyndt lag af fosfor har vist sig at påvirke de elektroniske egenskaber af fosforlaget på en måde, der er interessant for flere anvendelser.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One social hour a week in dementia care improves lives and saves moneyPerson-centered activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction can improve quality of life and reduce agitation for people with dementia living in care homes, while saving money. These are the findings from a large-scale trial led by the University of Exeter, King's College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. These results were presented today (July 16) at the Alzhe
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Science | The Guardian
Henry Marsh: ‘The mind-matter problem is not a problem for me – mind is matter’The celebrated neurosurgeon and writer talks about 40 years inside our skulls, what’s wrong with the NHS – and the Zen of woodwork Henry Marsh made the decision to become a neurosurgeon after he had witnessed his three-month-old son survive the complex removal of a brain tumour. For two decades he was the senior consultant in the Atkinson Morley wing at St George’s hospital in London, one of the c
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Science : NPR
Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and have many stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. (Image credit: Leland Bobbe/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian
Let’s treat online abuse as a public health hazard | Sonia SodhaSocial media bullying is getting the parliamentary attention it deserves – but politicians must focus on what’s going on behind this toxic behaviour One of the most important breakthroughs in public health came in 1847, when a Hungarian doctor, Ignaz Semmelweis, discovered that surgeons could dramatically cut mortality rates by disinfecting their hands . At the time, he was ridiculed by his medica
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Science | The Guardian
Creativity and risk taking – what exactly is the link? Quiz Disagreeing with an authority figure in public is associated with creativity but having unprotected sex is not. Answer our questions to test yourself Creativity has many different aspects, but one way to measure it is through its links with risk taking. Many pieces of art and music took risks by flying in the face of the accepted norms of the day (Michelangelo’s nudes for example). So, on a scale
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Ancient underwater forest found in USScientists have dated the trees to a previous ice age 60,000 years ago, when sea levels were far lower.
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Ars Technica
You must watch this Star Wars: The Last Jedi behind-the-scenes video It's a behind-the-scenes look at the next Star Wars flick, and everything is proceeding according to my plan that this movie will be ridiculously awesome. As soon as it was announced that Rian Johnson would be writing and directing The Last Jedi , I was sold on this flick. Johnson's previous movies include Looper and Brick , which are both incredible, action-packed indies. We've seen some glimpse
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Ars Technica
The first shiver-inducing trailer for A Wrinkle in Time is here It's the first teaser trailer for A Wrinkle in Time , and it looks appropriately creepy and insane. A lot of geeky, imaginative kids grew up with their faces jammed inside a copy of Madeleine L'Engle's book A Wrinkle in Time . It's the story of a family of science and math geniuses that gets tangled up in a physics experiment that has metaphysical implications. This new film adaptation has the pe
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BBC News - Science & Environment
A mission to the Pacific plastic patchA "raft" of plastic debris spanning more than 965,000 square miles is floating in the South Pacific.
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The Atlantic
The First Woman to Win Math's Highest Award Dies at 40 Maryam Mirzakhani, the first and only woman to win the prestigious Fields Medal, called the Nobel Prize of math, died on Saturday. Mirzakhani was a professor at Stanford University, which made the announcement, saying she had breast cancer that spread to her bones. She was 40. Mirzakhani won the distinguished award, given every four years, in 2014 for her work on geometry and dynamical systems. M
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Gizmodo
Ashley Madison Parent Company to Pay $11.2 Million to Data Breach 'Victims' Image via AP Cheating website Ashley Madison said on Friday that it will pay $11.2 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by 37 million U.S. users whose personal information was leaked in July of 2015. According to CNBC, violated users can get up to $3,500 depending on “how well they can document their losses attributable to the breach.” I like to imagine a gaggle of men tearfully typin
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Science | The Guardian
Brexit threatens Britain’s place at the nuclear top table | Ian ChapmanThe UK is currently a world leader in fusion research; leaving Euratom would be calamitous In the south of France, the largest scientific experiment mankind has ever embarked upon is rising out of the ground. This facility, the Iter project , will demonstrate nuclear fusion power on a commercial scale, involving the European Union, US, Japan, South Korea, China, Russia and India. Fusion is the pro
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cognitive science
Pain Science 101: The Neurophysiology of Pain • r/PainScience submitted by /u/singdancePT [link] [comments]
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Wired
Ava DuVernay’s 'A Wrinkle in Time' Is the Ultimate AdaptationIn the director's vision, Madeleine L’Engle’s 1963 story looks like a fantasy world—and the real one as well.
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Wired
'Avengers: Infinity War' Might Just Pull Off the ImpossibleJudging from the clip shown at D23, Marvel could actually manage to merge a decade's worth of movies into one colossal team-up.
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Big Think
New Solar Cells Capture Double the Amount of Energy from the Sun Scientists at GW School of Engineering and Applied Science develop a prototype solar panel that captures nearly double the amount of energy from light. Read More
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Big Think
What the Early Life of Bill Gates Can Teach Us He created Windows and made billions of dollars. But that wouldn't have happened if it weren't for a few small things in his early life. Read More
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Shark Cage-Divers Never Saw This Coming! Get A Sneak Peek At Shark Week 2017! #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 The countdown to Shark Week is on! Here's Sharktacular, your must-see survival guide to Shark Week. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.
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Gizmodo
AR iPhone App Rapidly Takes Photos and Leaves Them Hanging in the Air GIF GIF Source: Dan Monaghan You might be tempted to think this is just a cool experiment, but don’t be surprised when Mark Zuckerberg rips it off and it’s suddenly packaged with Instagram. According to his website , this is the first app that Dan Monaghan has ever made. Float0 is an app that utilizes the new AR toolkit for iOS 11. The idea, for now, is that you shoot a bunch of photos as you mov
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Gizmodo
The First Footage From Avengers: Infinity War Blows Away Even Your Wildest Expectations Image: Disney Marvel Studios just showed a huge chunk of footage from Avengers: Infinity War at the D23 Expo and there almost aren’t words for it. But we’re going to try. The footage began with probably a two-minute intro of footage from the first several movies, all focusing on the Infinity Stones we’ve seen so far. Then, the Marvel Studios logo, and on to the new stuff. The Guardians of the Gal
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fossil site shows impact of early Jurassic's low oxygen oceansUsing a combination of fossils and chemical markers, scientists have tracked how a period of globally low ocean-oxygen turned an Early Jurassic marine ecosystem into a stressed community inhabited by only a few species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No more queueing at the ladies' roomTwo queueing theorists investigated why queues at restrooms are invariably longer for ladies than for men. Time and time again. What are the main causes for this disparity? And how can it be overcome? Moving to unisex toilets, it appears from this study, may reduce waiting times for women from over 6 minutes to less than a minute and a half. Already a symbol for transgender equality, unisex toilet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New transistor concept developedTransistors, as used in billions on every computer chip, are nowadays based on semiconductor-type materials, usually silicon. As the demands for computer chips in laptops, tablets and smartphones continue to rise, new possibilities are being sought out to fabricate them inexpensively, energy-saving and flexibly. A research group has now succeeded in producing transistors based on a completely diff
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Gizmodo
Go Behind the Scenes of Star Wars: The Last Jedi in This Awesome New Video This isn’t just a video extolling the film’s special effects or praising the story (though there’s plenty of that). You also get to see new characters, new creatures, new settings, and what looks to be a couple of between-shot dance parties. This Last Jedi behind-the-scenes reel is jam-packed with so much awesome. We’ll have a closer look at everything revealed in this clip very soon. Star Wars:
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