Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Standardized policies needed for how and when police interact with trauma patientsInjured people often interact with police and other law enforcement agents before and during their injury care, particularly when their injuries are due to violence or major motor vehicle crashes. Yet, there are no professional guidelines in trauma medicine or nursing that standardize when and how police interact with injured patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exclusion of mothers-to-be from clinical studies unfair and potentially harmfulThe widely accepted principle that mothers-to-be are a 'vulnerable' group unfairly excludes them from taking part in clinical studies, and perpetuates the knowledge void around the impact of drugs taken during pregnancy, conclude researchers online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.
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Gizmodo

The Root Wait, NBC Sports Announcer Mike Tirico Isn’t Black? The Root Wait, NBC Sports Announcer Mike Tirico Isn’t Black? | Jezebel Some Tea About the Man Who Voiced Kermit the Frog | Fusion The Democrats Have Absolutely No Idea About What They’re Going to Do in 2018 | The Concourse Good Reporting Isn’t Impossible—It’s Just Hard |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving ICU care and communication through technology useResearchers tested a structured and technology-centered program that was focused on team communication and patient engagement. They found that this approach was associated with a lower rate of adverse events and improved patient satisfaction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

9/11 survivors may be at increased risk of heart and lung disease years laterPeople who were exposed to the dust cloud or sustained physical injuries during the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 may be at increased long-term risk of asthma, other respiratory diseases and heart attack, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medicationNegative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially life-saving drugs.
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Gizmodo

Companies Don’t Have a First Amendment Right to Talk About National Security Letters, Court Rules Photo: Getty Cloudflare and Credo Mobile today lost their fight to speak publicly about the National Security Letters they and other tech companies receive, which demand user data and frequently forbid companies from ever disclosing the demands to their users. The two companies received NSLs from the FBI in 2011 and 2013, requiring them to secretly disclose account information. The Electronic Fro
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Ars Technica

“Board game of the year” goes to Kingdomino Enlarge (credit: Spiel des Jahres ) The Spiel des Jahres—Germany's "Game of the Year"—award is the biggest prize in the board-game business. It guarantees both sales and bragging rights around the world. In May, the Spiel des Jahres jury announced its shortlist . Today, the organization crowned the winners: Kingdomino by Bruno Cathala won the main award , while Exit: The Game by Inka and Markus B
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Why Are The World's Largest Sharks Disappearing? | African Shark Safari #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Every year the world's largest great white sharks mysteriously disappear. Finding out where they go may change the future of this species. Watch The Full Episode Before It's On TV! https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www
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NYT > Science

ScienceTake: Ants, Dutiful Escape Artists, Build Towers in Constant FluxUsing their own bodies, fire ants build architectural towers to escape floods — and laboratories — that have a sound architectural structure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

T-cells lacking HDAC11 enzyme perform more effectively in destroying cancer cellsScientists have identified a role for the HDAC11 enzyme in the regulation of T-cell function. The team found that HDAC11 should be treated as an immunotherapeutic target.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oxygen and hyperbaric oxygen therapy reverses brain damage in drowned toddlerMedical researchers report the case of the reversal of brain volume loss in a 2-year-old drowning victim unresponsive to all stimuli treated with normobaric oxygen (oxygen at sea level) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climatic stability resulted in the evolution of more bird speciesMore species of birds have accumulated, in general, inhabiting climatically stable areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria found in Alzheimer's brainsResearchers have used DNA sequencing to examine bacteria in post-mortem brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Their findings suggest increased bacterial populations and different proportions of specific bacteria in Alzheimer's, compared with healthy brains. The findings may support evidence that bacterial infection and inflammation in the brain could contribute to Alzheimer's disease.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Truck Stops Here Today in 5 Lines President Trump said Republicans are “pushing very hard” to repeal and replace Obamacare, adding that he hopes Senator John McCain, who recently underwent surgery to remove a blood clot, “gets better very soon.” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Trump will host a group of Republican senators at the White House Monday night to persuade them to support the new health-car
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Popular Science

How to quickly make a bow and arrow DIY Here's how to craft a serviceable bow for survival situations. Here's how to craft a serviceable bow for survival situations. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lithuania to extradite $100 mn email fraud suspect to USA Lithuanian man who allegedly swindled $100 million (87 million euros) from tech giants Google and Facebook must be extradited to the United States, a court ruled on Monday.
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Gizmodo

Tesla Driver In Marsh Crash Now Says It Was His Fault And Not Autopilot's Tesla’s semi-autonomous Autopilot feature caught flak on Sunday, as it appeared a driver had blamed the system for causing his car to suddenly accelerate, head off a road, and roll over into a marsh. On Monday, his story changed. It wasn’t Autopilot’s fault, he said, it was his own. The incident began on Sunday, when the Kandiyohi County Sheriff’s Office in Minneapolis released a statement that s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Judge: Govt. asked Google for too much data in gender caseAn administrative law judge has ruled that Labor Department officials investigating gender pay bias had asked Google for data in a way that's too broad and intrusive on employee privacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Netflix shares jump as subscriptions top 100 millionNetflix on Monday reported that the number of subscribers climbed more than expected, topping 100 million worldwide and sending shares in the leading on-demand television service soaring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find support for redistribution is a function of compassion, self-interest and envy—but not fairnessEconomic redistribution has been a core political dispute around the world for centuries. And while intuitively fairness seems a natural explanation for why people support redistribution, researchers at UC Santa Barbara find that fairness doesn't really explain who supports redistribution or why.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Working at 'breastaurants' damaging to women's mental healthWomen who work in restaurants that require their bodies to be on display through revealing uniforms may experience higher levels of anxiety and disordered eating, according to a new University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicaid 'churning' leads to increased acute care use for patients with major depressionFor adult Medicaid beneficiaries with major depression, disruptions in coverage are followed by increases in emergency department (ED) visits and longer hospital stays after the person goes back on Medicaid, reports a study in the August issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Wired

Elon, Forget Killer Robots. Focus on the Real AI ProblemsElon Musk’s Fixation on Killer AI Distracts from Much More Immediate Problems with Smart Machines
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Wired

Myspace Security Flaw Let Anyone Take Over Any Account Just By Knowing Their BirthdayIf you know someone's date of birth, you can crack their Myspace account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research tracks global IT's shift from cost-cutting to revenue-boostingInformation technology is often credited for its role in helping companies cut costs. However, new research by Professor Sunil Mithas at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business shows that information technology actually creates increased global profits through increased revenue, not through cost cuts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gun violence prevention groups strike middle ground to meet goalsA study led by Oregon State University researchers found that American organizations identifying as gun violence prevention groups advocate for the right to bear arms and for some gun purchase and ownership conditions, which they argue will curb gun-related injuries and deaths.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global hotspots for potential water conflict identifiedMore than 1,400 new dams or water diversion projects are planned or already under construction, fueling the potential for increased water conflict between some countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodesResearchers have developed a fast, inexpensive method to make electrodes for supercapacitors, with applications in electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.
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Ars Technica

Windows 10 support could end early on some Intel systems Enlarge / One of the affected Atom processors. (credit: Intel) When Microsoft introduced Windows 10 and its "Windows as a Service" model, the company promised Windows users a steady stream of updates to their machines. The days of being stuck on an old version of Windows would be forgotten; once you were on Windows 10, you'd have access to the latest and greatest forever. But that support came wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sharing the wealthEconomic redistribution has been a core political dispute around the world for centuries. And while intuitively fairness seems a natural explanation for why people support redistribution, researchers at UC Santa Barbara find that fairness doesn't really explain who supports redistribution or why.
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The Scientist RSS

Streptococcus gallolyticus Spurs Colorectal Tumor Growth in MiceThe bacteria also promoted the growth of human colon cancer cells in a dish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes for electric cars, high-powered lasersSupercapacitors are an aptly named type of device that can store and deliver energy faster than conventional batteries. They are in high demand for applications including electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.
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Science : NPR

Students Compete In First-Ever International High School Robotics Competition The first-ever international high school robotics competition is happening in Washington, D.C., this week. Over 150 countries from six continents sent teams to compete.
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Science : NPR

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest Why aren't the biggest animals with the longest limbs the fastest? New research suggests these animals run out of fuel for their fast-twitch muscles before they can reach the maximum speed their bodies could achieve. There's a golden mean for speed, and mid-sized animals like cheetahs have it.
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Popular Science

Some invasive species actually help their new habitats thrive Environment More nuance, less nativism. In a few coastal areas, invasive species could help instead of harm. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where's the beef on the loss leader strategy?Deep discounting by retailers, accompanied by a blitz of promotions, is a long-established and well-accepted strategy for boosting brand and category sales. But relatively few studies have analyzed store-level data in an effort to compile systematic empirical evidence on the impact of deep discounting on such store performance metrics as traffic, sales, and profits. New research delves into the nu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Review article discusses potential role, benefits of non-rhizobia bacteria in root nodules of legumeFor many years, it was believed that the only nitrogen-fixing organisms of legume nodules were rhizobia. However, there is a strikingly diverse population of non-rhizobia bacteria often detected within nodules obtained from soil, revealing a complex phytomicrobiome, whose interactions likely affect the behavior and fitness of the host plant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key to speeding up carbon sequestration discoveredScientists at Caltech and USC have discovered a way to speed up the slow part of the chemical reaction that ultimately helps the earth to safely lock away, or sequester, carbon dioxide into the ocean. Simply adding a common enzyme to the mix, the researchers have found, can make that rate-limiting part of the process go 500 times faster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Material from shellfish delivers a boost to bioassays and medical testsScientists at the University of Washington have discovered a simple way to raise the accuracy of diagnostic tests for medicine and common assays for laboratory research. By adding polydopamine—a material that was first isolated from shellfish—to these tests at a key step, the team could increase the sensitivity of these common bioassays by as many as 100 to 1,000 times.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New assessment identifies global hotspots for water conflictMore than 1,400 new dams or water diversion projects are planned or already under construction and many of them are on rivers flowing through multiple nations, fueling the potential for increased water conflict between some countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA tracking tool tips the scales for distinguishing invasive fishRather than conduct an aquatic roll call with nets to know which fish reside in a particular body of water, scientists can now use DNA fragments suspended in water to catalog invasive or native species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New UMD research tracks global IT's shift from cost-cutting to revenue-boostingInformation technology is often credited for its role in helping companies cut costs. However, new research by Professor Sunil Mithas at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business shows that information technology actually creates increased global profits through increased revenue, not through cost cuts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CAR T-cell therapy for leukemia leads to remissions in clinical trialResearchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed about 70 percent of patients with the most common adult leukemia had their tumors shrink or disappear following an experimental chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy. The researchers also found that measuring genetic traces of cancer cells taken from bone marrow biopsies might be a better indicator of prognosis than the st
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Science : NPR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk Doctors, consumers and politicians say big federal cuts to Medicaid funding would jeopardize the treatment a lot of kids rely on. The state would either have to make up lost funding or cut benefits. (Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)
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The Scientist RSS

Most of Human Genome Non-functional: StudyAn estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Restores Muscle Function in MiceScientists use the gene-editing tool to treat animals with a rare form of congenital muscular dystrophy.
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The Atlantic

R. Kelly's Alleged Sex 'Cult' and the Shield of Fame R. Kelly holds a “cult”-like grip on at least six women living in his homes in Chicago and the Atlanta suburbs, fitting with a long-alleged pattern of sexual predation, according to a report at BuzzFeed . The journalist Jim DeRogatis quotes three former members of the R&B singer’s inner circle as well as the parents of two women currently said to be under his sway. On and off the record, they tol
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The Atlantic

The Businesses Against the Texas Bathroom Bill IBM is the latest major company to step up its fight against Texas’s bathroom bill, which lawmakers will likely debate in the coming week as they work through a special session. IBM sent an internal memo Monday to employees around the world that called the bill discriminatory. The company also dispatched about 20 executives to persuade lawmakers against passing the bill. The Texas bill would forc
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Gizmodo

Mischievous Monkey Causes Massive Blackout in Zambian Tourist Town A mischievous-looking baboon that has not been implicated in any blackouts—yet. Image: Shriram Rajagopalan/Wikimedia Around 50,000 residents of Zambia’s Western province were without electricity on Sunday, after a baboon wandered into a power station and fiddled with the equipment. Incredibly, the baboon managed to survive the incident. As Africa News reports , the blackout affected homes and bus
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Live Science

Why Some Plant-Based Diets Are Healthier Than OthersEating a plant-based diet is good for your health — but some plant-based diets are better than others, a new study that spanned nearly three decades finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In baby's dirty diapers, the clues to baby's brain developmentCan the kinds of microbes colonizing the gut at age 1 predict later cognitive development? Findings from the UNC School of Medicine shed light on the surprising role of bacteria in how our brains develop during the first years of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gun violence prevention groups strike middle ground to meet goalsA study led by Oregon State University researchers found that American organizations identifying as gun violence prevention groups advocate for the right to bear arms and for some gun purchase and ownership conditions, which they argue will curb gun-related injuries and deaths.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Standardized policies needed for how and when police interact with trauma patientsInjured people often interact with police and other law enforcement agents before and during their injury care, particularly when their injuries are due to violence or major motor vehicle crashes. Yet, there are no professional guidelines in trauma medicine or nursing that standardize when and how police interact with injured patients.
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Inside Science

The Future of Fusion Energy The Future of Fusion Energy Limitless, clean energy to secure our planet’s future. The Future of Fusion Energy Video of The Future of Fusion Energy Physics Monday, July 17, 2017 - 14:00 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- The United States, along with 34 other nations, is making a massive investment in time and money to help to build a huge experimental nuclear fusion reactor in the
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Science : NPR

More Than Bread: Sourdough As a Window Into The Microbiome Home bakers in the U.S., Europe and some other countries have volunteered their sourdough starters to a team of American scientists who want to unravel the microbial secrets of sourdough. (Image credit: Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodesUniversity of Washington researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive method to make electrodes for supercapacitors, with applications in electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large multi-ethnic study identifies many new genetic markers for lupusScientists from an international consortium have identified a large number of new genetic markers that predispose individuals to lupus.
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Live Science

Cotton Candy Grapes: The Science Behind the Sweet, Carnival TasteA new breed of green grape isn't fluffy or flossy, but it tastes just like cotton candy, according to news sources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Material from shellfish delivers a boost to bioassays and medical testsA simple way to raise the accuracy of diagnostic tests for medicine and common assays for laboratory research has now been identified by researchers. By adding polydopamine -- a material that was first isolated from shellfish -- to these tests at a key step, the team could increase the sensitivity of these common bioassays by as many as 100 to 1,000 times.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Late-breaking mutations may play an important role in autismMutations that occur after conception play an important role in autism, suggests a new study of nearly 6,000 families, combining three genetic sequencing technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More children living in high-poverty neighborhoods following Great RecessionMore children are living in high-poverty neighborhoods following the Great Recession -- a troubling shift because children in these neighborhoods are a year behind academically.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Elon Musk Urges U.S. Governors to Regulate AI Before “It’s Too Late”But he may struggle to get his way without hard evidence of what, exactly, needs regulating.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How dolphins inspired a potentially life-saving method for treating trauma victimsResearchers have successfully tested face cooling to prevent steep drops in blood pressure during simulated blood loss, a prehospital intervention that EMTs and battlefield medics could one day use to save lives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a costAmphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vesselsAn engineer created surgery-tested software that better marries CT scan images of the liver with a tracked tool's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lighting up the study of low-density materialsLow-density materials, from laminate layers in airplane wings to foams and epoxies that cushion parts, have been the focus of new study. In studying these materials, scientists borrowed and refined a technique being studied by the medical field, X-ray phase contrast imaging, to look inside the softer side of things without taking them apart.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to enlarge tissues gives pathologists a closer look at cellsInvestigators have developed and tested an innovative, reliable means of analyzing pre-cancerous breast lesions diagnosing certain kidney diseases and using only a conventional light microscope. The technique – dubbed “expansion pathology or ExPath – enhances pathologists’ diagnostic ability and could mean earlier interventions for high-risk patients.
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Live Science

Pacemaker Data to Be Used as Trial Evidence: What Could It Show?A judge in Ohio recently ruled that the data from the pacemaker of a man accused of arson could be used at his trial, according to news reports.
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Big Think

Violence Against Environmentalists Spikes Worldwide, Shows New Report A new report highlights the increasing violence faced by environmental activists around the world. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key to speeding up carbon sequestration discoveredScientists identify the slow part of a chemical reaction that allows carbon to be sequestered in the ocean, and demonstrate how to speed it up with a common enzyme.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New assessment identifies global hotspots for water conflictMore than 1,400 new dams or water diversion projects are planned or already under construction, fueling the potential for increased water conflict between some countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by Imperial researchEngineers from Imperial College London have dispelled a 100-year-old scientific law used to describe how fluid flows through rocks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adrenal gland activity change under severe stress causing abnormal release of glucocorticoid stressTo respond to stress optimally, the body needs to produce glucocorticoid hormones, such as cortisol, extremely quickly. New research by scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter has revealed the molecular network that enables rapid glucocorticoid production within the adrenal glands, and has shown how the behavior of this network can be altered under severe stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invasive plant species can enhance coastal ecosystemsInvasive plant species like seaweed can provide vital ecosystem functions in coastal areas where native habitats such as salt marshes and oyster reefs have severely declined. A Duke study finds that invasive species could be used to offset the loss of native habitats that provide storm protection, food production and other benefits to billions of people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What makes red algae so different and why should we care?The red algae called Porphyra and its ancestors have thrived for millions of years in the harsh habitat of the intertidal zone -- exposed to fluctuating temperatures, high UV radiation, severe salt stress, and desiccation. Despite Porphyra's ecological, evolutionary, and commercial importance, there is still relatively little known about its molecular genetics and physiology.
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The Atlantic

The Australian Woman Killed by Police in Minneapolis Justine Damond called police just before midnight Saturday to report a possible assault in the alley behind her home. Two officers responded in a squad car and, the Star Tribune reported , Damond went to the driver’s door in her pajamas; the officer in the passenger seat fired, killing her. The death of the 40-year-old Australian woman who was due to be married next month prompted global outrage
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The Atlantic

The Strange Radio Signals Coming From a Nearby Star This spring, astronomers at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico were sorting through data from recent observations when they found something strange. The radio telescope had detected what they describe as “some very peculiar signals” coming from a nearby star, unlike anything they had ever observed before. The star in question is Ross 128, a red dwarf located about 11 light-years from Earth in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

You're not yourself when you're sleepyMore than a third of Americans don’t get enough sleep, and growing evidence suggests it’s not only taking a toll on their physical health through heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and/or other conditions, but hurting their mental health as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better method for identifying aquatic species using environmental DNAResearchers have improved their method of tracking species by using the biological material those organisms leave behind known as environmental DNA (eDNA).
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Gizmodo

MySpace Nukes Massive Security Loophole (But Go Delete Your Stuff Anyways) Image: thelefty / Shutterstock.com Remember Myspace? Yeah, it’s still a thing. And for months, the social network reportedly had a security flaw that made it ridiculously easy to hack into any profile with just a date of birth. Security researcher Leigh-Anne Galloway first reported the flaw on her blog Monday morning. She said she’s been trying to get Myspace to fix it since April, but hasn’t hea
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cognitive science

Facial Recognition Coming To Police Body Cameras: "An approach to machine learning inspired by the human brain is about to revolutionize street search." submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

Vegetarian and vegan diets aren't necessarily more healthy Health Especially if they don't involve actual vegetables. A new study finds that vegetarian and vegan diets heavy in processed foods are still really unhealthy. Here's what you need to know:…
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Live Science

Bizarre Marine Worm Resembles a Christmas Ornament from HellAn 8-inch marine worm's oval body is ringed with shiny golden bristles and topped with a sharp-toothed maw.
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Live Science

Weird Radio Signals Detected from Nearby Red Dwarf StarStrange radio signals have been spotted coming from the vicinity of a nearby star — but don't get your hopes up that aliens are responsible.
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Live Science

In Photos: Weird Bristle Worm Calls Antarctica HomeThis little polychaete has a bulbous, extendable throat bearing rows of teeth and a ring of bristles around its body that it uses for crawling on the seafloor and swimming in the Antarctic Ocean.
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NeuWrite West

Making sense of a mixed-up world: learning how to pay attention Every minute of the day, our brains are bombarded with enormous amounts of information. Lights, sounds, smells and tastes of all sorts are rapidly coming into our brains, often at the same time. Yet somehow we are able to effortlessly process our complex environments and accomplish our goals. How does this happen? To get around this information overload, the brain selectively processes a subset o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Material from shellfish delivers a boost to bioassays and medical testsScientists at the University of Washington have discovered a simple way to raise the accuracy of diagnostic tests for medicine and common assays for laboratory research. By adding polydopamine -- a material that was first isolated from shellfish -- to these tests at a key step, the team could increase the sensitivity of these common bioassays by as many as 100 to 1,000 times.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes red algae so different and why should we care?The red algae called Porphyra and its ancestors have thrived for millions of years in the harsh habitat of the intertidal zone—exposed to fluctuating temperatures, high UV radiation, severe salt stress, and desiccation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invasive plant species can enhance coastal ecosystemsInvasive plant species can be a source of valuable ecosystem functions where native coastal habitats such as salt marshes and oyster reefs have severely declined, a new study by scientists at Duke University and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by new researchEngineers from Imperial College London have dispelled a 100-year-old scientific law used to describe how fluid flows through rocks.
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Gizmodo

There's Growing Evidence That Pluto's Largest Moon Had a Massive Ocean Pluto’s moon Charon is the best sidekick a dwarf planet could hope for: unwavering in its loyalty, content to be a minor character in somebody else’s narrative. But two years after the New Horizons flyby, the largest of Pluto’s five moons is finally getting some well-deserved time in the spotlight. New research suggests that Charon’s storied history includes tectonic activity, cryovolcanism, and
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New Scientist - News

At least 75 per cent of our DNA really is useless junk after allAfter decades of arguing whether junk DNA exists, a study has calculated that without it we’d all have to reproduce in huge numbers to escape harmful mutations
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Wired

'Game of Thrones' Recap: When Vengeance Becomes Your GodThe problem with revenge is that it's never enough. The past, as the women of Westeros know, is forever.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personalize your medication dosagesBiosensors could pave the way for a personalized antibiotherapy in the future, initial clinical tests suggest.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mathematics World Mourns Maryam Mirzakhani, Only Woman to Win Fields MedalThe brilliant Stanford professor, killed by breast cancer at 40, worked with shapes unconstrained by the real world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science

27 Contact Lenses Are Found in Woman’s Eye, Doctors ReportA medical team in Britain decided to publicize the case to raise awareness about safe contact lens use.
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NYT > Science

Take a Number: How a Warming Climate Will Trouble Air TravelRising temperatures will force airlines to delay flights more often and reduce the number of passengers per plane. And it’s already happening.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression among young teens linked to cannabis use at 18A study looking at the cumulative effects of depression in youth, found that young people with chronic or severe forms of depression were at elevated risk for developing a problem with cannabis in later adolescence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where's the beef on the loss leader strategy?The authors gathered data from 24 branches of a grocery chain in the Northeastern US over 49 weeks and found that deep discounting is a valid strategy supported by the numbers, with the caveat that broad discounting in a category may lead to diminishing returns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review article discusses potential role, benefits of non-rhizobia bacteria in root nodules of legumeMost scientific research on the root-soil interactions of legumes focuses on rhizobia and nitrogen-fixing root nodules. However, many forms of non-rhizobia bacteria are also detected in these nodules. What are their role in the plant's biome? This research review published in the new, open-access Phytobiomes journal highlights studies from throughout the world on these lesser-known bacteria, as we
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vesselsA Vanderbilt engineer created surgery-tested software that better marries CT scan images of the liver with a tracked tool's.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA communications satellite damaged 3 weeks before launchNASA's newest, slickest communications satellite has been damaged, just three weeks before its planned August launch.
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The Atlantic

All the Presidents' Dirty Tricks The president tweeted Monday: "Most politicians would have gone to a meeting like the one Don Jr attended in order to get info on an opponent. That's politics!" This was a shortened version of the answer the president gave during his press conference with the French President last week. "Politics," he said, "is not the nicest business." He's right. Politicians have done some grim things in pursui
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a costAmphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lymph node removal isn't necessary for all melanoma patients, new study findsMany patients with melanoma need a sentinel-lymph-node biopsy to determine if cancer cells have spread there, but a positive finding doesn't mean all the lymph nodes in the area must be removed, according to new international study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key to improved cancer immunotherapyResearchers have investigated how different subtypes of essential immune-response cells called CD8+ T lymphocytes cooperate to mount a stronger anti-tumor response. The results show that generation of an optimal immune response to cancer requires cooperation between two types of memory T cell -- one circulating in the blood and the other resident in tissues -- that can be reactivated with current
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ebola lingers in survivors' eyesThree years after an Ebola epidemic swept across West Africa, researchers have found a clue to how the virus may live on in the eyes of survivors suffering from uveitis -- one of the more serious and common complications of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice, study discoversPhysicians are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice, a new study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lab develops way to spot defects inside hard-to-image materialsIt's hard to get an X-ray image of low-density material like tissue between bones because X-rays just pass right through like sunlight through a window. But what if you need to see the area that isn't bone?
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Science | The Guardian

US millionaire who learned the value of punctuation the hard way | Brief lettersPunctuation | Solar-powered legs | Dogs and litter | Crossword themes | Puzzle change Punctuation is indeed important ( Letters , 17 July). The story goes that an American millionaire’s wife, travelling through Europe, came across a beautiful diamond ring for sale for $1,000. She sent a telegram: “Can I buy?” “No price too high” came the reply. So she purchased the ring and her husband was furious
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Gizmodo

Everything That Can Be Gleaned From the New Blade Runner 2049 Trailer All images: Fox A new Blade Runner 2049 trailer landed this morning and if you thought Jared Leto was up to no good in the last trailer, he really ups his creepiness in this one. But we also noticed new characters, new locations, and more than a few lines that are subtly different from when we heard them in the first trailer. Here’s the official movie synopsis, which gives us the bare bones of wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a costAmphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research in the emergency room helps predict organ failure in critically injured patientsTesting blood samples within the first two hours of injury could help predict which critically injured patients are more likely to develop multiple organ failure, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London. The finding that there is a specific immune response to trauma shortly after injury could also help with the development of new therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Not all plant-based diets are created equalPlant-based diets are recommended to reduce the risk of heart disease; however, some plant-based diets are associated with a higher risk of heart disease, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hyperacute immune response to traumatic injury precedes serious organ failureSpecific signatures of the immune mechanisms that lead to serious organ failure are evident in the hours immediately following injury, according to a study by Joanna Shepherd of Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues, publishing in PLOS Medicine.
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The Atlantic

Resurrecting Ancient Wines That Can Survive Climate Change The Spanish region of Catalonia is proud of its traditions. The official language, Catalan, has thrived for centuries, despite the establishment of Spanish as the rest of the country’s official language in the 1700s. Castells , or adults and children climbing on each other’s shoulders to form human towers, continues to be a popular activity at festivals. And in Vilafranca del Penedès, an hour out
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New light on the secret life of badgersPrevious studies have fuelled the assumption that badgers are a territorial and anti-social species, living in exclusive, tight-knit family groups, known as 'setts'. This picture of the mammal's social system led to the belief that they actively defend territorial borders and consequently rarely travel beyond their social-group boundaries. Some culling and vaccination programmes now rely on this p
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Popular Science

Why doctors are still studying JFK’s chronic back pain Health Did his back trouble help kill him? Doctors have examined JFK's medical records to create a detailed report of the President's back pain and how it shaped his career—and possibly even his death. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study of brain circuits finds key links to symptoms of depressionScientists have linked specific wiring in the brain to distinct behavioral symptoms of depression. In a new study, researchers found brain circuits tied to feelings of despair and helplessness and were able to alleviate and even reverse such symptoms in mice studies. Two populations of neurons were identified in the brain's ventral pallidum region (part of the basal ganglia) as key to underlying d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists pave way for better juvenile arthritis diagnosis, treatment outcome predictionA previously unknown group of regulatory T cells have been found to be linked to juvenile arthritis and DNA features that affect patients' response to treatment. These findings pave the way for improved juvenile arthritis diagnosis and prediction of treatment outcomes, and are also relevant for adult rheumatoid arthritis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space station project seeks to crystalize the means to counteract nerve poisonsThe microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) may hold the key to improving our understanding of how to combat toxic nerve agents such as sarin and VX. That is the hope of Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) project that is part of an initiative at the National Institutes of Health aimed at developing improved antidotes for chemical agents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA Neutron star mission begins science operationsNASA's new Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission to study the densest observable objects in the universe has begun science operations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Citizen science project discovers new brown dwarfOne night three months ago, Rosa Castro finished her dinner, opened her laptop, and uncovered a novel object that was neither planet nor star. Therapist by day and amateur astronomer by night, Castro joined the NASA-funded Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 citizen science project when it began in February—not knowing she would become one of four volunteers to help identify the project's first brown dwarf,
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Big Think

Three Reasons “You” Won’t Return After This Life The idea that "you" persist after death does not hold up to the current understanding of memory and identity. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How dolphins inspired a potentially life-saving method for treating trauma victimsUniversity at Buffalo researchers have successfully tested face cooling to prevent steep drops in blood pressure during simulated blood loss, a prehospital intervention that EMTs and battlefield medics could one day use to save lives.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

One Billion Bed Nets Have Cut Malaria Cases By 37%. But Their Effectiveness Is Limited. It's estimated that 700 million cases of malaria have been averted thanks to bed net distribution in sub-Saharan Africa. Still, experts have yet to find the "silver bullet" to win the war. Full special streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/mosquito/ Learn more: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mosquito Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Fac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA Neutron star mission begins science operationsThe Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer, or NICER, payload completed commissioning and calibration and all systems are working as expected.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Space station project seeks to crystallize the means to counteract nerve poisonsThe microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) may hold the key to improving our understanding of how to combat toxic nerve agents such as sarin and VX. That is the hope of Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) project that is part of an initiative at the National Institutes of Health aimed at developing improved antidotes for chemical agents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percentA new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which is published online ahead of print in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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Gizmodo

Install OxyLED's Under-Cabinet Lighting Kit For Just $28 [Exclusive] OxyLED Under-Cabinet Light Kit , $28 with code KINJAM02 OxyLED is best known for its battery-powered light strips, but this discounted kit plugs into an AC outlet, and is designed specifically for under-cabinet installation . The kit comes with three foot-long LED light bars, plus three connecting cables. You can either plug the bars into each other to create a longer strip, or use the cables to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plasmon-powered devices for medicine, security, solar cells under developmentA new method that takes advantage of plasmonic metals' production of 'hot' electrons and holes to boost light to a higher frequency could be suitable for medical, energy and security applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comparing algorithms that search for cancer mutationsScientists have teamed up to evaluate the tools used to probe the cancer genome. Their work classifies and describes the strengths and weaknesses of more than 20 algorithms developed by independent research groups.
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Futurity.org

These hormones may make breast cancer act like stem cells New research links natural and synthetic progestins and the production of specialized cancer cells that act like stem cells in the body. “These cells greatly increase the likelihood of resistance to therapies and the risk for metastasis.” The findings could help scientists target these rare cells that proliferate in breast cancers and metastasize elsewhere, and may help clinicians identify immuno
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The Atlantic

Colin Firth's Shirt: Jane Austen and the Rise of the Female Gaze Early last fall, the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., hosted an exhibition: Will & Jane: Shakespeare, Austen, and the Cult of Celebrity . The show, meant to examine the “literary afterlives” of the iconic authors, featured a series of objects that had been transformed, through the physics of fame, into bookish relics: There was a framed lock of Austen’s hair. And a tin of cheekily
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The Atlantic

Why Americans Think So Poorly of the Country's Schools Each year, parents responding to the Phi Delta Kappan poll report high levels of satisfaction with their kids’ education. Asked to assign letter grades to their children’s schools, the vast majority of parents—generally around 70 percent—issue As and Bs. If those ratings were compiled the way a student’s grade point average is calculated, the public schools would collectively get a B. When asked
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The Atlantic

Swan Upping on the River Thames The annual Swan Upping began today in London, England. The five-day census—which dates back to the twelfth century—counts swans and young cygnets belonging to the Queen, while watching for signs of injury or disease. According to Reuters, the ceremony began in the 1100s, when the Crown claimed ownership of all mute swans in the kingdom. “Today, the Crown retains the right to ownership of all unma
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The Atlantic

The Princeton Student Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison in Iran An Iranian court has sentenced an American graduate student to 10 years in prison for spying, the latest case of a U.S. citizen accused of espionage by the Islamic republic. Xiyue Wang, a Chinese-born U.S. citizen, was arrested last summer while conducting research in Iran for his doctoral dissertation, Princeton University, where he was a graduate student in history, said. Fars, a semiofficial I
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Popular Science

How to avoid eBay scams DIY Safely buy and sell your products. Most transactions on eBay are safe and hassle-free. To ensure all of them go smoothly, here's how to avoid scammers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Agent clears toxic proteins and improves cognition in neurodegeneration modelsResearchers have found cell receptors abnormally overexpressed in post-mortem brains of those with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and that they can be inhibited in animal models to clear toxic protein buildup, reduce brain inflammation, and improve cognitive performance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breivik terrorist attacks in Norway led to mental illness in DenmarkThe number of Danes diagnosed with trauma -- and stressor-related disorders (such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) -- increased substantially following the terrorist attacks carried out by Anders Breivik in Oslo and on the nearby island of Utøya in Norway in the summer of 2011. The study also suggests that the intense media coverage of the attack is likely to be partly responsible for thi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Canada should continue with separate medical stream after cannabis is legalized for recreational use: StudyAfter cannabis is legalized, Canada should continue with a separate medical cannabis stream to keep patients safe, argues a new commentary.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teens may be missing vaccines because parents aren't aware they need oneParents may be up to speed on what vaccines their children need for kindergarten, but may be less sure during high school years, a new national poll suggests.
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Gizmodo

Nearly 90,000 Sex Bots Invaded Twitter in 'One of the Largest Malicious Campaigns Ever Recorded on a Social Network' Screencap: ZeroFOX Last week, Twitter’s security team purged nearly 90,000 fake accounts after outside researchers discovered a massive botnet peddling links to fake “dating” and “romance” services. The accounts had already generated more than 8.5 million posts aimed at driving users to a variety of subscription-based scam websites with promises of—you guessed it—hot internet sex. The bullshit ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New light on the secret life of badgersBadgers are more sociable than often thought, with implications for how they transmit disease, new Oxford University research reveals. Using security tracking technology more commonly used to protect museum artwork, the Oxford research has revealed fresh insights into the animals' social behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nipple-sparing mastectomy has low rate of breast cancer recurrenceWomen with breast cancer who undergo nipple-sparing mastectomy have a low rate of the cancer returning within the first five years, when most recurrences in the breast are diagnosed, findings of a single-center study show.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA-funded citizen science project discovers new brown dwarfOne night three months ago, Rosa Castro finished her dinner, opened her laptop, and uncovered a novel object that was neither planet nor star. Therapist by day and amateur astronomer by night, Castro joined the NASA-funded Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 citizen science project when it began in February -- not knowing she would become one of four volunteers to help identify the project's first brown dwa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain connectivity after 30 may predict psychological problemsUnderdevelopment of the brain network underlying inhibition -- the ability to concentrate on a particular stimulus and tune out competing stimuli -- after 30 years of age is associated with self-reported psychological problems, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Size key to top speed in animals, study findsIt's not quite E=mc2, but scientists unveiled Monday a simple, powerful formula that explains why some animals run, fly and swim faster than all others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny particles increase in air with ethanol-to-gasoline switchThe concentration of ultrafine particles less than 50 nanometers in diameter rose by one-third in the air of São Paulo, Brazil, when higher ethanol prices induced drivers to switch from ethanol to gasoline, according to a new study. The research team also found when drivers switched back to ethanol because prices had gone down, the concentration of ultrafine particles also went down.
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The Scientist RSS

Ebola Persistence Documented in MonkeysIn tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.
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The Scientist RSS

Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier ContractsThese institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.
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Ars Technica

Lawyers score big in settlement for Ashley Madison cheating site data breach Enlarge The owners of the Ashley Madison cheating-dating website have agreed to pay $11.2 million to settle two dozen data breach lawsuits as a result of a 2015 incident involving as many as 37 million members' personal identifying information being exposed online. The deal (PDF) earmarks up to one-third, or about $3.7 million, for attorneys' fees and costs. An additional $500,000 has been set as
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Popular Science

Become a certified security expert with this ethical hacking training Sponsored Post Learn how to hack for a living and secure your own network. Become a certified security expert with this ethical hacking training. Learn how to hack for a living and secure your own network.
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Popular Science

Sorry, but artificial sweeteners won’t help you lose weight Health Quit now while you still can. If you’re gonna call something “diet,” it should have to actually help you lose weight. But like real dieting, diet foods don’t work as well in practice as they do in…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More children living in high-poverty neighborhoods following Great RecessionMore children are living in high-poverty neighborhoods following the Great Recession - a troubling shift because children in these neighborhoods are a year behind academically, according to new research from researchers at Rice University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Wisconsin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U professor developing plasmon-powered devices for medicine, security, solar cellsA new method that takes advantage of plasmonic metals' production of 'hot' electrons and holes to boost light to a higher frequency could be suitable for medical, energy and security applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More children living in high-poverty neighborhoods following Great RecessionMore children are living in high-poverty neighborhoods following the Great Recession -- a troubling shift because children in these neighborhoods are a year behind academically.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stronger winds heat up West Antarctic ice meltStronger winds 6000kms away on the East Antarctic, have generated waves that circle the continent at almost 700kmh. When these waves meet the steep underwater topography of the West Antarctic Peninsula they push warm water under the ice shelves. This helps explain the increased ice melt in this region that can lead trillion tonne ice shelves, like Larsen C, to break away from the continent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First experimental observation of new type of entanglement in a 2-D quantum materialScientists have shown experimentally, for the first time, a quantum phase transition in strontium copper borate, the only material to date that realizes a famous quantum many-body model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two new genes linked to Alzheimer's riskTwo genes that influence a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease have now been identified by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutation speeds up sperm of zebra finchesIn zebra finches, sperm velocity and morphology and hence reproductive success strongly depend on a specific mutation (an inversion) on one of the sex chromosomes, called Z. This gene inversion gives reproductive advantage to zebra finches, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A prescription of activities shown to improve health and well-beingGyms, walking groups, gardening, cooking clubs and volunteering have all been shown to work in improving the health and well-being reported by a group of people with long-term conditions. Key to the success was a 'Link Worker' who helped participants select their activity and supported them throughout the program.
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The Atlantic

DHS Provides Additional Foreign Worker Visas on ‘Made in America’ Week One of the first orders of business of the White House’s “Made in America” week is providing companies the opportunity to hire foreign workers under the H-2B visa program. The Department of Homeland Security announced Monday that it will add 15,000 seasonal visas to fill H-2B non-agricultural jobs. The annual cap, set by Congress, is 66,000. In its statement, the department said that after consul
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Gizmodo

This Printer Doodles Stick Figure Robots to Explore Areas We Can't GIF Building a robot that can replicate everything a human can do is both impossibly complicated and expensive. So, researchers at the IT University of Copenhagen are taking the exact opposite approach: building incredibly simple robots, on-demand, that only do what humans can’t. In a paper recently published to the IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters journal, a team from the IT University of Co
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Live Science

Elon Musk: Regulate AI Before Robots Start 'Killing People'Elon Musk has urged a gathering of governors to regulate artificial intelligence now, before potentially dangerous outcomes start occurring.
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Live Science

Doctors Discover 27 Contact Lenses in Woman's EyeDoctors in England recently removed 27 contact lenses from a woman's eye, according to a new case report.
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Live Science

Lawbreaking Particles May Point to a Previously Unknown Force in the UniverseScientists aren't yet certain that electrons and their relatives are violating the Standard Model of particle physics, but the evidence is mounting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A swell diagnostic methodLudwig researchers show how a method that physically expands tissues can improve early breast cancer diagnostics and extend the capabilities of ordinary pathology labs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comparing algorithms that search for cancer mutationsScientists team up to evaluate the tools used to probe the cancer genome.
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Gizmodo

This Floating Robotic Camera Is the Cutest Thing Ever Sent Into Space Image: NASA/JAXA Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have a new crew member—an adorable robotic ball capable of recording video while moving in zero gravity. Dubbed “Int-Ball,” the device will free astronauts to do more important work, while providing ground controllers with their own set of eyes. Int-Ball is short for Internal Ball Camera, and it was developed by Japan’s Aerospace
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Gizmodo

Welcome to io9's Winter Forecast, Our Weekly Livestream Discussion of Game of Thrones Pictured left to right: io9's Beth Elderkin and guest Game of Thrones lover/master of Kinja Ali Philippedes. Welcome to io9's Winter Forecast, our weekly “deathstream” covering all the carnage, mayhem, and plotting from Game of Thrones . This week, host Beth Elderkin and guest host Ali Philippedes talk about Arya’s latest act of vengeance, Euron Greyjoy’s weird outfit, and the Hound’s surprisingl
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The Atlantic

How to Find the Smallest Stars in the Universe For astronomer Alexander von Boetticher, false positives in data are actually a good thing. That’s how von Boetticher and his colleagues at the University of Cambridge discovered the smallest star ever measured. The star showed up in data from a British-led mission known as the Wide Angle Search for Planets, or WASP. WASP looks for potential exoplanets by looking for dimming in the brightness of
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The Atlantic

7 Million Venezuelans Vote Against Maduro in Referendum More than 7.1 million Venezuelans participated in a symbolic referendum vote on Sunday to reject President Nicolas Maduro’s plan to change the constitution. In two weeks, Maduro plans to reshape the country’s political system and stack supporters in the National Assembly, which is now controlled by the opposition, in an effort to give him broad control over the country. Voters made a strong showi
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Viden

Biologisk harddisk: Bakterie brugt som film-lagerNy forskning viser, at det ved hjælp af gen-saksen CRISPR er muligt at bruge levende celler til at lagre data som fx billeder og film.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No assembly required: Nanoparticles that put themselves togetherScientists may be able to use self-assembly to design new materials with custom characteristics. Understanding self-assembly is particularly important for working with nanoparticles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reduced oxygen nanocrystalline materials show improved performanceResearchers have found that reducing oxygen in some nanocrystalline materials may improve their strength and durability at elevated temperatures, a promising enhancement that could lead to better biosensors, faster jet engines, and greater capacity semiconductors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brief interactions spur lasting waves of gene activity in the brainA five-minute encounter with an outsider spurs a cascade of changes in gene activity in the brain that can last for hours, researchers report in a study of stickleback fish.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Air pollution: Diesel is now better than gas, emitting fewer carbonaceous particulatesRegulators, take note: a new international study shows that modern diesel passenger cars emit fewer carbonaceous particulates than gasoline-powered vehicles.
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Big Think

Game of Thrones: Why Samwell Tarly Was the MVP of 'Dragonstone' Poop, soup, books — repeat. Who could forget that montage? Here are the key takeaways from the first episode of Game of Thrones season 7, which crashed the HBO website like wildfire taking down the Sept. Read More
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Popular Science

Mac-n-cheese probably isn't more toxic than other foods Health Because everything you love is toxic. A new report says that mac and cheese is toxic, but the truth is a lot more complicated. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Fly Over Pluto In This Incredibly Detailed New NASA Video Image: NASA Pluto is the unquestionably the most goth (dwarf) planet in the solar system. Its cold, icy heart and underworld-themed moons are absolutely spooktacular, and yet none of us will ever get to see them in person. Thankfully, new video from NASA gives us an up close and personal tour of our favorite (former) planet. It’s almost as metal as the real deal. Using data from NASA’s New Horizo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oil impairs ability of coral reef fish to find homes and evade predatorsJust as one too many cocktails can lead a person to make bad choices, a few drops of oil can cause coral reef fish to make poor decisions, according to a paper published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. A team of fisheries biologists led by Jacob Johansen and Andrew Esbaugh of The University of Texas Marine Science Institute have discovered that oil impacts the higher-order thinking of coral r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stronger winds heat up West Antarctic ice meltNew research published today in Nature Climate Change has revealed how strengthening winds on the opposite side of Antarctica, up to 6000kms away, drive the high rate of ice melt along the West Antarctic Peninsula.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mutation speeds up sperm of zebra finchesIn zebra finches, sperm velocity and morphology and hence reproductive success strongly depend on a specific mutation (an inversion) on one of the sex chromosomes, called Z. This was discovered by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen. Males always carry two copies of the Z chromosome, but those that possess two different versions of it, one regular and one inverted,
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Live Science

Why the Biggest Animals Aren't the FastestHere's why elephants can't run as fast as cheetahs.
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Live Science

Speedy & Swift: The Fastest Animals in the WorldFrom cheetahs to the Peregrine falcon to slippery squid, the animal kingdom is full of speedy organisms built for their environment.
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The Atlantic

Trump Goes All In on the 'Collusion Is Normal' Defense After months of adamantly denying that investigators would find even a shred of evidence pointing to collusion between his campaign and Russia, President Donald Trump is aggressively embracing the view that his son’s cooperation with apparent Russian agents was entirely normal. On Monday, he acknowledged that his son, Donald Trump Jr., met with a Russian lawyer in the hopes of receiving damaging
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NYT > Science

Q&A: Why Animals Avoid Munching on FernsSome varieties contain toxins that are poisonous to predators large and small.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscopy technique could enable more informative biopsiesMIT and Harvard Medical School researchers have devised a way to image biopsy samples with much higher resolution—an advance that could help doctors develop more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists find rare disease clues in cell's recycling systemScientists have demonstrated how an investigational drug works against a rare, fatal genetic disease, Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1). They found that a closely related compound will activate an enzyme, AMPK, triggering a cellular 'recycling' system that helps reduce elevated cholesterol and other accumulated fats in the brains and livers of NPC1 patients, which are hallmarks associated with severe ne
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies tools to identify patients at risk for autism spectrum disordersA tool intended to detect signs of autism in high-risk infants can be used to help identify and treat patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, a genetic disorder, who most need early intervention. Moreover, they can identify these patients earlier than ever before.
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New Scientist - News

Why fast birds, fish and animals are never too small or bigAn animal’s maximum speed is based on how fast it can accelerate, which explains why the largest animals are not the fastest
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unbalanced wind farm planning exacerbates fluctuationsIf European countries cooperated better in the field of wind energy, wind power output would fluctuate less. This is the conclusion reached by a group of energy and climate researchers who, for the first time, have combined a long-term analysis of predominant weather patterns with Europe-wide wind electricity generation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oil impairs ability of coral reef fish to find homes and evade predatorsJust as one too many cocktails can lead a person to make bad choices, a few drops of oil can cause coral reef fish to make poor decisions. Oil impacts the higher-order thinking of coral reef fish in a way that could prove dangerous for them -- and for the coral reefs where they make their home.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breathable, wearable electronics on skin for long-term health monitoringA hypoallergenic electronic sensor can be worn on the skin continuously for a week without discomfort, and is so light and thin that users forget they even have it on, say scientists. The elastic electrode constructed of breathable nanoscale meshes holds promise for the development of noninvasive e-skin devices that can monitor a person's health continuously over a long period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mow before you spray, and other tips for protecting pollinators in grassy landscapesWith the right combination of methods, landscape managers can strike an effective balance between pest management and protecting pollinators in turfgrass settings. A new, open-access guide offers an in-depth look at best practices for protecting pollinators such as bees and butterflies while reducing pests in lawns, fields, golf courses, and other managed grass settings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radiation prior to surgery reduces risk of secondary tumors in early-stage breast cancerPatients who have neoadjuvant radiation therapy have a significantly lower risk of developing a second primary tumor at any site, report investigators.
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Dana Foundation

Successful Aging & Your Brain PSA Available in Spanish! ¿Hablas español? ¿Quieres aprender más sobre el envejecimiento provechoso? Spanish speakers, you’re in luck! Our award-winning Successful Aging & Your Brain video has been translated into Spanish and is now available to view on our YouTube channel . Check it out to learn the four steps you can start taking today to help keep your brain healthy into old age, based on research by the Institute of M
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Futurity.org

Did we evolve insomnia as a way to survive? A sound night’s sleep grows more elusive as people get older, but what some call insomnia may actually be an age-old survival mechanism. For people who live in groups, differences in sleep patterns commonly associated with age help ensure that at least one person is awake at all times, a study of modern hunter-gatherers in Tanzania shows. The findings suggest that mismatched sleep schedules and r
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Quanta Magazine

Eva Silverstein’s Spirals and Strings “My ideal day,” wrote Eva Silverstein , a leading string cosmologist and a professor at Stanford University and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), in an email to Quanta Magazine , “starts with a couple hours of uninterrupted thinking at home, then some midmorning exercise (a brief hill ride on my bike). After that I head to the office to continue working and to discuss with collaborat
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Drifting Antarctic iceberg A-68 opens up clear waterSatellite images show the colossal Larsen iceberg continuing to edge away from the White Continent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breathable, wearable electronics on skin for long-term health monitoringA hypoallergenic electronic sensor can be worn on the skin continuously for a week without discomfort, and is so light and thin that users forget they even have it on, says a Japanese group of scientists. The elastic electrode constructed of breathable nanoscale meshes holds promise for the development of noninvasive e-skin devices that can monitor a person's health continuously over a long period
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Wired

Rick Perry's Unnecessary Grid Study Could Hurt Renewable EnergyA controversial study of the electric grid, requested by Energy Secretary Rick Perry in April, is finally expected to be released this month.
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? Are you smarter than an architect? The solution to today’s 3D puzzle In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you this puzzle : Draw a 3-dimensional picture of a shape that goes through each of the holes above, exactly touching all sides as it passes through. Continue reading...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rooftop concentrating photovoltaics win big over silicon in outdoor testingA concentrating photovoltaic system with embedded microtracking can produce over 50 percent more energy per day than standard silicon solar cells in a head-to-head competition, according to a team of engineers who field tested a prototype unit over two sunny days last fall.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Do Human Beings Speak So Many Languages?Language diversity has played a key role in shaping the history of our species, yet we know surprisingly little about the factors shaping this diversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combining genomics with farmers' traditional knowledge to improve wheat productionProducing better crops to meet the needs of the growing world's population may lie in combining the traditional knowledge of subsistence farmers with plant genomics. Researchers in Italy and Ethiopia demonstrated that the indigenous knowledge of traditional farmers, passed on from one generation to generation, can be measured in a quantitative way and used with advanced genomic and statistical met
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New ligand extends the half-life of peptide drugs from minutes to daysA ligand molecule has been developed that connects peptide drugs to blood-serum albumin and keeps them from being cleared out by the kidneys too soon. The ligand is easy to synthesize and can extend the half-life of therapeutic peptides from minutes to several days.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune system found to control eye tissue renewal in zebrafishZebrafishes' natural ability to regenerate their eyes' retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes' immune systems, new research indicates. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.
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cognitive science

Anatomy of an Earworm submitted by /u/recipriversexcluson [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica

Because English isn’t the same in England, Microsoft renames Fall Update for some Enlarge (credit: Liz West ) The branding of the next major Windows 10 update, due in around September this year, was announced in May as the Fall Creators Update . Our UK siblings immediately wondered if the update would retain that same name in the UK. While American English calls the season between summer and winter "fall," most of the rest of the anglophone community uses the British English "
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Satellite snafu masked true sea-level rise for decades Revised tallies confirm that the rate of sea-level rise is accelerating as the Earth warms and ice sheets thaw. Nature 547 265 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22312
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Gizmodo

Memory Foam Pillows, Smart TV, Boogie Board, and the Rest of Monday's Best Deals A $360 4K smart TV , memory foam pillows , and a Braun grooming kit lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals TCL 49S405 49-Inch 4K Ultra HD Roku Smart LED TV , $360 TCL’s 2017 4K TVs aren’t technological marvels, but they might just represent the best value in the TV world , and the 49" model is on sale fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate impacts of super-giant oilfields go up with age, scientists sayEven oilfields aren't immune to the ravages of time: A new study finds that as some of the world's largest oilfields age, the energy required to keep them operating can rise dramatically even as the amount of petroleum they produce drops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals the mechanisms of a protein that helps moss and green algae defend against too much lightPhotosynthesis, which allows energy from the sun to be converted into life-sustaining sugars, can also be hazardous to green plants. If they absorb too much sunlight, the extra energy destroys their tissue.
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New Scientist - News

Find your next must-play game by flying through a virtual galaxyLetting algorithms suggest games and movies we might like could trap us in a filter bubble. Showing the choices as a navigable galaxy let us pick more freely
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Science | The Guardian

Dear Lord Adonis, the summer is for working Why academics feel aggrieved by Lord Adonis raising the old canard that they have too much time off in the summer “Most academics don’t teach enough,” spouted Lord Adonis , former Labour Education Minister on Twitter last week. He cites his time in Oxford as “evidence”, though I think we might more accurately call it an anecdote. Adonis is perpetuating the myth that academics are lucky so-and-sos
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Gizmodo

Chinese Censors Have Apparently Blocked ‘Winnie the Pooh’ Over a Silly Meme Image: Getty Winnie the Pooh, the adorable cartoon bear with an obsession for honey, has been censored in China. It’s all apparently due to a meme that makes fun of President Xi Jinping. Specifically, social media mentions and images of Winnie the Pooh have been blocked in the country, according to the Guardian . Stickers of the yellow bear have also been banned from WeChat’s official sticker gal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospitalizations and cognitive decline in older adultsEmergency and urgent hospitalizations are associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in older adults, report researchers at Rush University Medical Center. The results of their study suggest that hospitalization may be a more of a major risk factor for long-term cognitive decline in older adults than previously recognized.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does Medicare/Medicaid incentive payment affect home hospice care in last week of life?A new study has shown that the new Service Intensity Add-on (SIA) payment for in-person routine home hospice care during the last 7 days of life, which was added to Medicare/Medicaid coverage in 2016, could increase visits by registered nurses or social workers during a patient's last week of life.
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Big Think

LHC Researchers Discover an Extraordinarily Heavy Trio of Quarks LHC researchers discover a double-heavy set of quarks that may reveal new insights into the strong force. Read More
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The Atlantic

One Issue That Could Break the Brexit Talks Representatives of the European Union and the United Kingdom gathered in Brussels Monday to resume Brexit negotiations. The talks, slated to run through Thursday, are expected to cover everything the U.K.’s financial obligations to the standing of Northern Ireland. “For us it’s incredibly important we now make good progress,” David Davis, the U.K. Brexit secretary, told reporters Monday at a join
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The Atlantic

How the Internet Deciphered a Fake Alien Message One evening last year, when his newborn daughter was small enough to hold with one arm, René Heller reached for a book to occupy his mind while he rocked her to sleep. Heller, an astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institutes in Göttingen, Germany, picked up Is Anyone Out There? The Scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. The book is co-authored by Frank Drake, the renowned astrophysici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First experimental observation of new type of entanglement in a 2-D quantum materialMany physical phenomena can be modeled with relatively simple math. But, in the quantum world there are a vast number of intriguing phenomena that emerge from the interactions of multiple particles—"many bodies" - which are notoriously difficult to model and simulate, even with powerful computers. Examples of quantum many body states with no classical analogue include superconductivity, superfluid
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Wired

Twitter Will Never Ban Donald TrumpIf Twitter were going to ban Trump, they would have done it by now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA listens in as electrons whistle while they workSpace is not empty, nor is it silent. While technically a vacuum, space nonetheless contains energetic charged particles, governed by magnetic and electric fields, and it behaves unlike anything we experience on Earth. In regions laced with magnetic fields, such as the space environment surrounding our planet, particles are continually tossed to and fro by the motion of various electromagnetic wav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is this Gulf of Mexico tubeworm the longest living animal in the world?Large tubeworms living in the cold depths of the Gulf of Mexico may be among the longest living animals in the world. This is revealed in a study in Springer's journal The Science of Nature. According to lead author Alanna Durkin of Temple University in the US, members of the tubeworm species Escarpia laminata live around 100 to 200 years, while the longevity of some even stretches to the three ce
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Ars Technica

RCR: Underground changes soundtrack to avoid “false” DMCA takedown [Updated] Enlarge (credit: Conatus Creative Inc. ) Update - July 18: River City Ransom Underground developer Conatus says it will change the soundtrack to the game because, in short, "we can’t spend another minute thinking about the false DMCA complaints filed against us and our YouTube and Twitch community." Conatus writes in a post on the game's Steam community page today that the company's lawyers have
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Space sound waves around Earth: Electrons whistle while they work?NASA's Van Allen Probes have observed a new population of space sound waves, called plasmaspheric hiss, which are important in removing high-energy particles from around Earth that can damage satellites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily crosswords linked to sharper brain in later lifeThe more regularly people report doing word puzzles such as crosswords, the better their brain function in later life, a large-scale and robust online trial has found. Experts analyzed data from more than 17,000 healthy people aged 50 and over, submitted in an online trial.
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Big Think

NASA About to Test a Nuclear Fission Reactor for Powering Its Mars Colony NASA is close to testing its next-generation nuclear fission reactors that would power a Mars colony and propel space exploration. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'It's raining needles': Drug crisis creates pollution threatThey hide in weeds along hiking trails and in playground grass. They wash into rivers and float downstream to land on beaches. They pepper baseball dugouts, sidewalks and streets. Syringes left by drug users amid the heroin crisis are turning up everywhere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new era in the interpretation of human genomic variationIn a commentary published today in Genetics in Medicine, Heidi Rehm, PhD, highlights the pressing need for standardized human genomic variant interpretation and calls on more stakeholders to join the data sharing movement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows how exposure to a foreign language ignites infants' learningA new study by the University of Washington, published July 17 in Mind, Brain, and Education, is among the first to investigate how babies can learn a second language outside of the home. The researchers sought to answer a fundamental question: Can babies be taught a second language if they don't get foreign language exposure at home, and if so, what kind of foreign language exposure, and how much
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutation speeds up sperm of zebra finchesGene inversion gives reproductive advantage to zebra finches.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two new genes linked to Alzheimer's riskA team of researchers led by Cardiff University has identified two genes that influence a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking the mechanisms of artery formationThe Notch signal pathway could be the basis for new therapies for cardiovascular diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Late-breaking mutations may play an important role in autismA study of nearly 6,000 families, combining three genetic sequencing technologies, finds that mutations that occur after conception play an important role in autism. A team led by investigators at Boston Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard reports the findings today in Nature Neuroscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New discovery in MND and dementia could pave the way to novel treatmentsA new discovery by scientists at the University of Sheffield could help slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as motor neurone disease (MND), dementia and neurological decline associated with ageing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why Tyrannosaurus was a slow runnerA beetle is slower than a mouse, which is slower than a rabbit, which is slower than a cheetah... which is slower than an elephant? No! For small to medium-sized animals, larger also means faster, but for really large animals, when it comes to speed, everything goes downhill again. For the first time, researchers have described in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution how this parabola-like rel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oil impairs ability of coral reef fish to find homes and evade predatorsJust as one too many cocktails can lead a person to make bad choices, a few drops of oil can cause coral reef fish to make poor decisions, according to a paper published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Oil impacts the higher-order thinking of coral reef fish in a way that could prove dangerous for them--and for the coral reefs where they make their home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly identified genetic marker may help detect high-risk flu patientsResearchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified a genetic variation associated with influenza severity and the supply of killer T cells that help patients fight the infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ebola virus can persist in monkeys that survived disease, even after symptoms disappearEbola virus infection can be detected in rhesus monkeys that survive the disease and no longer show symptoms, according to research published by Army scientists in today's online edition of the journal Nature Microbiology. The study sheds light on how the virus persists in certain areas of the body, and holds promise for the development of medical products to counter the disease in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First experimental observation of new type of entanglement in a 2-D quantum materialScientists from EPFL and PSI have shown experimentally, for the first time, a quantum phase transition in strontium copper borate, the only material to date that realizes a famous quantum many-body model.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unbalanced wind farm planning exacerbates fluctuationsIf European countries cooperated better in the field of wind energy, wind power output would fluctuate less. This is the conclusion reached by a group of energy and climate researchers at ETH Zürich and Imperial College London, who for the first time have combined a long-term analysis of predominant weather patterns with Europe-wide wind electricity generation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stronger winds heat up West Antarctic ice meltStronger winds 6000kms away on the East Antarctic, have generated waves that circle the continent at almost 700kmh. When these waves meet the steep underwater topography of the West Antarctic Peninsula they push warm water under the ice shelves. This helps explain the increased ice melt in this region that can lead trillion tonne ice shelves, like Larsen C, to break away from the continent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cerebrospinal fluid of survivors of Ebola virus disease examinedA new research letter published by JAMA Neurology reports on examinations of cerebrospinal fluid collected from survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD) to investigate potential Ebola virus persistence in the central nervous system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which infants exposed to Zika virus infection in pregnancy should have eyes examined?Eye abnormalities in infants from Brazil born to mothers with confirmed Zika virus infection in pregnancy are described in an article published by JAMA Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harnessing the right amount of sunshineResearchers from MIT and the University of Verona have discovered how a key photoprotection protein allows moss and green algae to protect themselves from too much sun by dissipating the extra energy as heat. Learning more about how this protein works could allow scientists to alter it in a way that would promote more photosynthesis, potentially increasing the biomass yield of both crops and algae
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate impacts of super-giant oilfields go up with age, Stanford scientists sayNeglecting the changing energy requirements of aging oilfields can lead to an underestimate of their true climate impacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscopy technique could enable more informative biopsiesMIT and Harvard Medical School researchers have devised a way to image patient biopsy samples with much higher resolution -- an advance that could help pathologists develop more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests. The technique relies on expansion microscopy, in which researchers expand a tissue sample to 100 times its original volume before imaging it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered gene variants link innate immunity and Alzheimer's diseaseThree new gene variants, found in a genome wide association study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), point to the brain's immune cells in the onset of the disorder. These genes encode three proteins that are found in microglia, cells that are part of the brain's injury response system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breathable, wearable electronics on skin for long-term health monitoringA hypoallergenic electronic sensor can be worn on the skin continuously for a week without discomfort, and is so light and thin that users forget they even have it on, says a Japanese group of scientists. The elastic electrode constructed of breathable nanoscale meshes holds promise for the development of noninvasive e-skin devices that can monitor a person's health continuously over a long period
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ozone pollution connected to cardiovascular healthExposure to ozone, a risk for impaired lung function, is also connected to health changes that can cause cardiovascular disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure and stroke, according to a new study of Chinese adults. A JAMA Internal Medicine study followed 89 healthy adults living in Changsha City for one year. They showed blood platelet activation and an increase in blood pressure, sugge
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TEDTalks (video)

Can clouds buy us more time to solve climate change? | Kate MarvelClimate change is real, case closed. But there's still a lot we don't understand about it, and the more we know the better chance we have to slow it down. One still-unknown factor: How might clouds play a part? There's a small hope that they could buy us some time to fix things ... or they could make global warming worse. Climate scientist Kate Marvel takes us through the science of clouds and wha
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Ars Technica

Amazon-made meal kits could come to your doorstep soon Enlarge / Amazon's first public grocery store, now open in the Seattle neighborhood of Ballard. But you can't go inside. Pickup only. (credit: Sam Machkovech) Amazon's grocery ambitions were clear long before the Internet giant bought Whole Foods last month, and the company is moving ahead with those ambitions after purchasing the grocery chain. According to a report from the British publication
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The Atlantic

Federer’s Wimbledon Win Was Anything but Nostalgic It seems almost bizarre to say that one of the greatest tennis players of all time is proving that he is here to stay. But, a little over a year after Roger Federer’s painful, injury-plagued semi-final loss at Wimbledon to Milos Raonic had many claiming the end of a career , the Swiss legend continued his remarkable return to form this year on Sunday, as he clinched a record eighth Wimbledon titl
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The Atlantic

Why Canada Is Able to Do Things Better When I was a young kid growing up in Montreal, our annual family trips to my grandparents’ Florida condo in the 1970s and ‘80s offered glimpses of a better life. Not just Bubbie and Zadie’s miniature, sun-bronzed world of Del Boca Vista, but the whole sprawling infrastructural colossus of Cold War America itself, with its famed interstate highway system and suburban sprawl. Many Canadians then sa
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Gizmodo

Subway's High-Tech Redesign Is Bad and Wrong All photos: Subway I’m not scared to say it: I love a good Subway sandwich. My dad used to take me to the only Subway in town after we went grocery shopping, and I remember tracking my growth based on how much of the toppings I could see over the tall counter. Now, it seems, Subway wants to ruin that experience for future generations. The global chain of faux-bodega sandwiches announced a flashy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome therapy could lead to new treatment for life-threatening blood disordersBy introducing a beneficial natural mutation into blood cells using the gene-editing technique CRISPR, scientists have been able to switch on production of fetal haemoglobin - an advance that could eventually lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whole genome sequences of rare red batScientists have presented the whole genome sequence and analyses of the rare red bat, Myotis rufoniger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issuesArtificial sweeteners may be associated with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

5 Things to Know about the Experimental Therapy for Charlie GardThe British baby has a rare, lethal disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why the cheetah is a champion sprinterNew research reveals why bigger is not always better in the animal world when it comes to speed.
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NYT > Science

In South Asian Social Castes, a Living Lab for Genetic DiseaseMillenniums of marriages within well-defined subgroups in South Asia have created many populations with higher risks of recessive disease, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bac-for good: Bacteria passed between generations benefits you more than othersBacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New test paves way for potential treatments to target Alzheimer's and other conditionsA simple methodology for capturing proteins implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions has been developed by researchers at the University of Bradford and University of Dundee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying argon gas trapped in two-dimensional array of tiny 'cages'Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory had just finished an experiment with a two-dimensional (2D) structure they synthesized for catalysis research when, to their surprise, they discovered that atoms of argon gas had gotten trapped inside the structure's nanosized pores. Argon and other noble gases have previously been trapped in three-dimensional (3D)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mow before you spray, and other tips for protecting pollinators in grassy landscapesWith the right combination of methods, landscape managers can strike an effective balance between pest management and protecting pollinators in turfgrass settings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers look inside dangerous blood clots with optical clearing techniqueA new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3-D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better approach to disease prediction through big data analyticsBig data holds great promise to change health care for the better. However, much of the technology that will someday transform health care and its delivery is not yet mature enough for hospitals and other systems to use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reduced oxygen nanocrystalline materials show improved performanceResearchers at the University of Connecticut have found that reducing oxygen in some nanocrystalline materials may improve their strength and durability at elevated temperatures, a promising enhancement that could lead to better biosensors, faster jet engines, and greater capacity semiconductors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart design carries sound one wayA new computer simulation shows the promising possibilities of the booming field of topology. Smartly designed mechanical structures carry sound exclusively one way and are immune to fabrication errors. The study has been published in Nature Physics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

O2 and hyperbaric oxygen therapy reverses brain damage in drowned toddlerDr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the case of the reversal of brain volume loss in a 2-year-old drowning victim unresponsive to all stimuli treated with normobaric oxygen (oxygen at sea level) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

T-cells lacking HDAC11 enzyme perform more effectively in destroying cancer cellsA team of researchers at the GW Cancer Center has identified a role for the HDAC11 enzyme in the regulation of T-cell function. The team found that HDAC11 should be treated as an immunotherapeutic target.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Utilities Are Giving People Cash for Clean CarsAutomakers, regulators, legislators and utilities are increasingly working together to boost sales of electric vehicles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeatIn a small proof-of-concept study, researchers report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the standard of care treatment for atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat disorder. This has the potential to let physicians and patients know immediately following treatment whet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Peering inside dangerous blood clots with optical clearing techniqueA new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studying argon gas trapped in two-dimensional array of tiny 'cages'For the first time, scientists have trapped a noble gas in a two-dimensional porous structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable detailed studies of individual gas atoms in confinement -- research that could inform the design of new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New test paves way for potential treatments to target Alzheimer's and other conditionsA simple methodology for capturing proteins implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions has been developed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is this Gulf of Mexico tubeworm the longest living animal in the world?Large tubeworms living in the cold depths of the Gulf of Mexico may be among the longest living animals in the world. The tubeworm species Escarpia laminata live around 100 to 200 years, while the longevity of some even stretches to the three century mark.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New device detects tumor cells in bloodResearchers have patented a portable device that can detect tumor cells in blood. The device counts the number of tumor cells in a blood sample and is a highly effective tool for improving the monitoring, treatment and diagnosis of cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world overNew research that looked into people's kissing bias could have wider implications for cognitive and neuroscience.
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Futurity.org

Why asthma can be worse for obese people People with asthma who are obese have harder-to-treat symptoms than lean or overweight patients. A large, bouquet-shaped molecule called surfactant protein A, or SP-A, may be why. Researchers compared SP-A levels in lean and overweight asthmatics against SP-A levels in obese asthmatics (those with a body mass index, or BMI, over 30). The obese individuals had significantly less of the protein. SP
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The Atlantic

Will North Korea Accept the South's Offer of Talks? South Korea offered Monday talks with the North to defuse tensions on the Korean Peninsula prompted by Pyongyang’s regular missile and nuclear tests. Vice Defense Minister Suh Choo-suk said in Seoul, the South Korean capital, that the South had proposed talks be held July 21 at Tongilgak, the North Korean building in Panmunjom, which lies on the demilitarized zone (DMZ) between the two countries.
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The Atlantic

Game of Thrones: About That Cameo Warning: Game of Thrones Season 7 spoilers ahead. It starts with a song. Arya Stark, having just taken her revenge on the men who had slaughtered her relatives at the Red Wedding, is riding her horse through a tranquil forest in the Riverlands . The setting is idyllic: Sunshine streams through a light mist. There’s a babbling brook. There’s also, in the near distance, music: a man, dulcet of voic
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Gizmodo

The Grapevine Parents Say R. The Grapevine Parents Say R. Kelly Has Been Holding Their Daughters in Sex-Obsessed, Abusive ‘Cult’: Report | Deadspin The Big3 Pulled A Bait-And-Switch On Philadelphia | Jezebel Minneapolis Yoga Teacher Fatally Shot By Police After Calling to Report Disturbance | Fusion Ann Coulter’s Meltdown Over a $30 Delta Upgrade Is Making Me Cheer for an Airline and I Hate It |
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Inside Science

Is There Something Special About Our Galaxy's Dark Matter? Is There Something Special About Our Galaxy's Dark Matter? Astrophysicists offer a possible explanation for why dark matter seems to behave differently in the Milky Way. Artist%27s_impression_of_the_expected_dark_matter_distribution_around_the_Milky_Way.jpg An artist’s impression of the Milky Way galaxy. The blue halo of material surrounding the galaxy indicates the expected distribution of dark
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Ars Technica

HTC U11 becomes first phone with Amazon Alexa hot-word support The HTC U11 on a beach. HTC has been promising Amazon Alexa integration for its newest flagship, the U11 , since before it hit the market. Two months after release, it has finally arrived. U11 customers can now download the HTC Alexa app to enable the feature. This isn't the first Android phone with Alexa integration (that honor goes to the Huawei Mate 9 ), but it's the first smartphone to have a
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Popular Science

This ancient one-ton crocodile had steak knives for teeth Science Rawr. Meet the Razanandrongobe sakalavae, an ancient crocodile with teeth scarier than a T. rex's.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diesel is now better than gasRegulators, take note: a new international study shows that modern diesel passenger cars emit fewer carbonaceous particulates than gasoline-powered vehicles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black light helps diagnose common skin problem found in pregnant womenResearchers at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine have found that using a black light, or Wood's light, helps dermatologists determine disease extent of melasma, a hyperpigmentation condition that causes brown and gray patches to appear on the face.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA listens in as electrons whistle while they workNASA's Van Allen Probes have observed a new population of space sound waves, called plasmaspheric hiss, which are important in removing high-energy particles from around Earth that can damage satellites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bac-for good: Bacteria passed between generations benefits you more than othersBacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brief interactions spur lasting waves of gene activity in the brainA five-minute encounter with an outsider spurs a cascade of changes in gene activity in the brain that can last for hours, researchers report in a study of stickleback fish.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving ICU care and communication through technology useIn new research, led by Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers tested a structured and technology-centered program that was focused on team communication and patient engagement. They found that this approach was associated with a lower rate of adverse events and improved patient satisfaction.
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Science : NPR

Elon Musk Warns Governors: Artificial Intelligence Poses 'Existential Risk' At a bipartisan governors conference in Rhode Island, the CEO of Tesla urged politicians to impose proactive regulations on AI development. (Image credit: Stephan Savoia/AP)
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Gizmodo

Horrified Surgeons Discover 27 Contact Lenses in Woman’s Eye The clump of 17 contact lenses. (Image: BMJ) While prepping a 67-year-old female patient for routine cataract surgery at England’s Solihull Hospital, physicians noticed a strange bluish blob in one of her eyes. On closer look, the blob turned out to be 17 contact lenses stuck together. Another 10 lenses were subsequently discovered in the same eye. The surgeons have never seen anything quite like
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Gizmodo

Game of Thrones Is Back, and Things Are About to Get Very, Very, Very Bad All images: HBO After last year’s incredible, explosive, monumental season finale, last night’s quiet season seven premiere almost seems like a PG fantasy film... even despite it beginning with bit of mass murder. But watching it closely, you can see the new problems that will plague the characters this season, and will likely lead to their downfall—assuming an army of the dead doesn’t get them f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Happiness can affect physical healthA new review indicates that subjective well-being -- factors such as life satisfaction and enjoyment of life -- can influence physical health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epigenetics between the generations: We inherit more than just genesWe are more than the sum of our genes. Epigenetic mechanisms modulated by environmental cues such as diet, disease or our lifestyle take a major role in regulating the DNA by switching genes on and off. It has been long debated if epigenetic modifications accumulated throughout the entire life can cross the border of generations and be inherited to children or even grand children. Now researchers
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Futurity.org

Treating ADHD may lower risk of drug trouble For teens and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using medication to treat the condition may significantly reduce the risk for drug and alcohol abuse. The risk of substance use problems during periods of medication use was 35 percent lower in men and 31 percent lower in women in the study. The results, which appear in the American Journal of Psychiatry , are based upon n
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The Atlantic

The Disturbing Process Behind Trumpcare Since I came to Washington in 1969, I have been immersed in Congress and its policy process. I have seen many instances of unpopular bills considered and at times enacted. I have seen many instances of bills put together behind closed doors. I have seen bills enacted and repealed after a public backlash. I have seen embarrassing mistakes in bills, and lots of intended consequences. But I have nev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computers helping emergency doctors make better choicesEmbedded clinical decision support in electronic health record decreases use of high-cost imaging in the emergency department.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reduced oxygen nanocrystalline materials show improved performanceResearchers at the University of Connecticut have found that reducing oxygen in some nanocrystalline materials may improve their strength and durability at elevated temperatures, a promising enhancement that could lead to better biosensors, faster jet engines, and greater capacity semiconductors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

FOXI3 gene is involved in dental cusp formationThe teeth of hairless dogs teach researchers about the development and evolution of mammalian teeth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radiation prior to surgery reduces risk of secondary tumors in early-stage breast cancerMoffitt researchers found that patients who have neoadjuvant radiation therapy have a significantly lower risk of developing a second primary tumor at any site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mow before you spray, and other tips for protecting pollinators in grassy landscapesWith the right combination of methods, landscape managers can strike an effective balance between pest management and protecting pollinators in turfgrass settings. A new, open-access guide in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management offers an in-depth look at best practices for protecting pollinators such as bees and butterflies while reducing pests in lawns, fields, golf courses, and other manag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers look inside dangerous blood clots with optical clearing techniqueA new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeatIn a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the standard of care treatment for atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat disorder. This has the potential to let physicians and patients know immediately followi
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Ars Technica

UK to implement age-verification system for porn sites (credit: frankieleon ) The wobbly, squabbling, minority Tory government— propped up by Northern Ireland's DUP —has laid before MPs its first commencement order for the recently passed Digital Economy Act , in which it confirmed that an age checker system for access to porn sites will be brought in next spring. "We have taken steps to implement the new age verification requirement for online porno
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Gizmodo

What's the Best Song, According to Science? Image: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo Some songs stick to your soul like ectoplasm. Whether you’re at the club or Chuck E. Cheese, sometimes you hear a certain song that brings you back to a moment in your life you’d forgotten. Good music is fun but ephemeral—the best music stays with you forever, sometimes a little too long. Seriously, stop buying Phish t-shirts. Obviously, all art—and taste—is subjective. B
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Gizmodo

Grow Your Own Herbs and Vegetables In This $27 Garden Bed Greenes Fence Cedar Raised Garden Kit , $27 Growing your own herbs and vegetables can be a cathartic experience, but it doesn’t have to be a difficult or expensive one. Amazon will ship you an easy-to-assemble garden bed kit for just $27 today . You’ll still have to supply the soil and seeds, but once you buy this, you might finally have the motivation to start planting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New species of dinosaur named after Canadian iconA new species of troodontid theropod dinosaur identified, Albertavenator curriei, named after renowned Canadian palaeontologist Dr. Philip J. Currie. Palaeontologists initially thought that the bones of Albertavenator belonged to its close relative Troodon, which lived around 76-million-years-ago. This new species of troodontid in the Late Cretaceous of North America indicates that small dinosaur
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The Scientist RSS

On Blacklists and WhitelistsExperts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.
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Ars Technica

Woman goes in for cataract surgery, has 27 contact lenses removed from her eye Enlarge (credit: Getty | UniversalImagesGroup ) Sometimes, there’s more to old age than meets the eye—sometimes, it’s 27 contact lenses jammed in there , according to a case study published this month in the British Medical Journal . A 67-year-old British woman, complaining of eye discomfort and dryness, was scheduled last November to have routine surgery to remove cataracts when doctors discover
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Ingeniøren

Glødende solceller sprænger grænser for solenergiSolceller med 1000 grader varme filtre vil sprænge grænserne for at udnytte sollys. De skaber dobbelt som meget elektricitet, som de nuværende standard-solceller.
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Viden

Egern er gode til at knække nødden i jagten på madNår et egern har fundet ud af, hvordan den skal løse et problem, kan den huske teknikken i månedsvis.
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Wired

Firms Pledge to Stamp Out Sexual Harassment. Sounds FamiliarWe already have a case study for when VCs promise progress, and it doesn’t look good.
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Futurity.org

Added ‘loops’ make flu model more useful A model of the influenza genome architecture—untouched since the 1970s—isn’t so perfect after all. Scientists are ready to give it an overhaul. New research reveals loopholes in the way the virus packages its genetic material. When one strain of flu co-mingles with another strain inside a cell, the loopholes allow the viruses to swap genetic material and give rise to new strains of flu. Knowing a
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