Gizmodo
The BBC Responds to Doctor Who Complaints: Deal With It Image: Still via Youtube This weekend, the BBC unveiled the identity of the 13th Doctor, and as with all Doctor Who castings, there was inevitable complaining—some more than usual however, because the 13th Doctor is Jodie Whittaker, the first female Doctor . Today the BBC released its official response to the complaints, and it’s basically, “It’s canon, so deal with it.” As a public broadcaster,
54min
The Atlantic
Netanyahu Admits Israel Struck Iranian Convoys 'Dozens of Times' At a closed-door meeting with eastern European leaders in Budapest on Wednesday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu revealed that his nation struck Iranian arms convoys “dozens of times” in Syria. The rare admission was captured by an open microphone and accidentally transmitted to journalists’ headphones, Israel’s local Haaretz newspaper reported . While Israel has typically refrained fro
49min
Ars Technica
Cop didn’t know his body cam was on—footage shows him planting drugs In May, we published a story about how police body cams can be employed in the worst way—for planting evidence, or staging a crime scene. In what was among the first instances of its kind, we revealed that a Colorado cop had staged the body cam footage of the search of a vehicle in which he is seen finding drugs and cash. Pueblo prosecutors dropped the drug charges, and the Pueblo Police Departme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toward 20-Story Earthquake-Safe Buildings Made From WoodA two-story wooden structure endured four different earthquake simulations on July 14, 2017 on the world's largest outdoor shake table here in San Diego. And it's still standing before more tests in the coming weeks. The goal of the tests is to gather enough data to design wood buildings as tall as 20 stories that do not suffer significant damage during large earthquakes. That is, not only can occ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Memory takes time, researchers concludeHow short-term memories become long-term ones has frequently been explored by researchers. While a definitive answer remains elusive, scientists conclude that this transformation is best explained by a 'temporal hierarchy' of 'time windows' that collectively alter the state of the brain.
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Gizmodo
Save 20% On Pop Chart's New Chart of Controllers Poster Chart of Controllers , 20% off with code NINTENDEAL64 Pop Chart Lab, purveyor of beautiful and geeky art prints, just came out with the new Chart of Controllers poster , and you can take 20% off through this weekend with promo code NINTENDEAL64 . That 20% applies not just to the poster, but any finishing options you choose to add, so you could save $12 if you get it with poster rails, or $30 if y
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Gizmodo
io9 Takes a Live Look Inside The Tick's Comic-Con 'Takeover' The Tick has taken over this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. In addition to Friday’s panel, Amazon’s new series The Tick has staged a multi-room replica of the Tick’s warehouse set and other locations from the show, which includes a 20-foot interactive animatronic version of the Tick’s helmet. Join io9's Katharine Trendacosta in an early look inside the “Tick Takeover.” The Tick debuts its first seas
18min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imaging of scar tissue formationOrgans respond to injuries with the formation of new fibrous tissue, which can result in scarring. This process called fibrogenesis can now be monitored noninvasively on a molecular level, as scientists report. They have created a new gadolinium-based probe for magnetic resonance imaging that specifically reports the proteins involved in fibrogenesis. The imaging method may provide a quantitative
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Macrophages made to engulf cancer cells in solid tumorsHuman macrophages have been engineered to ignore the 'don't eat me' signal both healthy and cancerous cells exhibit. Combined with cancer-specific targeting antibodies, these engineered macrophages invaded and engulfed human tumor cells in a mouse model.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Contrasts in how groups of neurons function during decision makingA new study in mice trained to perform a sound identification task in a virtual reality maze reveals contrasts in how groups of neurons in different regions of the brain function during decision making.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithm, metrics improve autonomous underwater vehicles' energy efficiencyRobotics researchers have found a way for autonomous underwater vehicles to navigate strong currents with greater energy efficiency, which means the AUVs can gather data longer and better.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamisScientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia have discovered the world's most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known about when earthquakes trigger massive waves.
22min
Live Science
Pregnant Women Can Do These 2 Things to Lower Odds of a C-SectionWomen may have another reason to eat healthy and exercise during pregnancy: These behaviors may lower their odds of having a cesarean section, a new meta-analysis finds.
26min
Gizmodo
Elon Musk Would Like People to Hurry Up and Start Dying on the Moon Also Photo: AP Tesla CEO Elon Musk, whose prior plan for stellar colonization involved sending people who are not Elon Musk to go die on Mars , thinks this noble endeavor will require a practice round of sending people to die on the Moon first. “Before we get the public real fired up, I think we gotta have a base on the Moon,” Musk told attendees at the International Space Station Research Development
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot dogs: Is climate change impacting populations of African wild dogs?Climate change may be harming the future of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) by impacting the survival rates of pups, according to one of the first studies on how shifting temperatures are impacting tropical species. Led by scientists from ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the study highlights how African wild dogs -- already classified as Endanger
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many pet owners unable to spot an out of hours vet emergencyUp to two-thirds of pet owners are unable to recognise veterinary emergencies requiring out of hours care, according to a survey at one clinic published in the Veterinary Record today.
30min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evidence of the Higgs particle's decay in quarksResearchers have found strong evidence that, among other things, the Higgs particle decays into quarks. The researchers analyzed data sets that were recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are sugary drink interventions changing people's behavior?An evaluation of efforts designed to reduce how many sugary drinks we consume shows some success in changing younger people's habits but warns they cannot be the only way to cut consumption.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Manipulating electron spins without loss of informationPhysicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been recently demonstrated.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The asymmetric synthesis of halogenated compounds from carboxylic acids is world firstResearchers have developed a new reaction to produce chlorinated compounds with high isomeric purity. Such compounds are important building blocks for target molecules. However the molecules come in left- and right-handed versions (enantiomers). They can be produced from carboxylic acids, by replacing an acid with a chlorine; however, conventional methods produce equal mixtures of both isomers, bu
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parasitic worms may lead to agricultural stem cell breakthroughA plant parasitic nematode is a pest that parasitizes the roots of agricultural crops and creates nests called 'galls' which deprive plants of nutrition. Research on plant reactions to parasitic worms shows that parasitism activates plant stem cells which grow to form galls on their roots. This finding is expected to improve crop breeds and alleviate nematode damage, which is estimated to cost hun
36min
Live Science
New High: Nearly Half of Americans Have Tried Pot, Gallup Poll SaysThe percentage of Americans who say they've tried pot has reached a new high.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot dogs: Is climate change impacting populations of African wild dogs?Climate change may be harming the future of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) by impacting the survival rates of pups, according to one of the first studies on how shifting temperatures are impacting tropical species.
51min
Live Science
Deadly Kiss: Can a Baby Contract a Lethal Virus from a Cold Sore?A newborn baby in Iowa died this week from an infection with the virus that causes cold sores, which she likely contracted from a kiss, her doctors say.
55min
Ars Technica
Doom’s cover art had one secret—and John Romero just spilled it Enlarge / Ars Technica's Creative Director Aurich Lawson is on vacation. When that's the case, this is what happens to our "art department." (credit: id Software / Sam Machkovech) Multiple Doom -related stories landed on the nerd newswire on Wednesday, and they focused on decidedly different eras of the decades-old series. Bethesda announced a significant freebie for the game's 2016 version, whil
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hitting the bull's eye on crop nutrient requirementsA new method can determine crop nitrogen requirements with a precision of 10-20 kg N/ha by preparing a reference curve to determine when a crop is deficient in nitrogen. The reference curve is based on comparisons of data on leaf area with data on leaf reflectance at different light wavelengths.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antiaromatic molecule displays record electrical conductanceResearchers demonstrate high electrical conductance for an antiaromatic nickel complex -- an order of magnitude higher than for a similar aromatic complex. Since the conductance is also tunable by electrochemical gating, antiaromatic complexes are promising materials for future electronic devices.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative nanosensor for disease diagnosisA research group has developed diagnostic sensors using protein-encapsulated nanocatalysts, which can diagnose certain diseases by analyzing human exhaled breath. This technology enables early monitoring of various diseases through pattern recognition of biomarker gases related to diseases in human exhalation.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Disclosure and Seizure What We’re Following The Other Russia Meeting: Last night, the White House confirmed that while President Trump was at the G20 summit, he had a second, undisclosed meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Though Trump’s team dismisses the encounter’s importance, the news comes at a tense time: The meeting joins a list of other undisclosed sit-downs between the Trump camp and the Kremlin, in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aging U.S. power plants provide risks and opportunitiesWhen it comes to the current plans to retire US power plants, researchers believe we are 'running towards a cliff with no fence.' They found that power plant retirement trends will complicate achieving long-term carbon dioxide emission reduction targets and require a significant increase in capital investments.
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Ars Technica
“Atypical” mad cow disease detected in Alabama Enlarge / Cows. (credit: Getty | KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND ) An 11-year-old cow in Alabama tested positive for an “atypical” strain of the prion disease Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, according to the US Department of Agriculture. The cow tested positive for the strain, called L-type BSE, during routine surveillance at a livestock market where the animal had s
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are magnets the secret to Elastigirl's powers?Under certain conditions, the magnetic properties of a material can predict the relationship between its elasticity and temperature, a physicist has found. Given the ease with which magnetic fields can be manipulated, the study hints that elasticity could someday be tailored with the press of a button or turn of a knob.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Despite lack of efficacy data, surprising consensus in pediatric anti-epilepsy med scriptsA new study indicates that US doctors appear to have reached an unexpected consensus about which anti-seizure medicine to prescribe to their pediatric patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Indestructible virus yields secret to creating incredibly durable materialsIt lives in boiling acid that dissolves flesh and bone. Now scientists have unlocked the secrets of the indestructible virus, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lunatic fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brainResearchers have developed a novel mouse model that for the first time selectively identifies neural stem cells, the progenitors of new adult brain cells. In these mice, researchers have found a novel mechanism by which descendants of neural stem cells can send feedback signals to alter the division and the fate of the mother cell.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fresh role for nitric oxide uncoveredChemists have uncovered a fresh role for nitric oxide that could send biochemical textbooks back for revision.
1h
Ars Technica
New Guillermo del Toro movie looks beautiful and terrifying The Shape of Water looks magical, disturbing, and weirdly romantic. Though Guillermo del Toro took Hollywood by storm with movies like Hellboy and Pacific Rim , he truly made his mark with gothic indies like the Oscar-winning Pan's Labyrinth and the sumptuous Crimson Peak . Now he's back with The Shape of Water , another intimate look at the inner lives of monsters and the humans who love them. A
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Gizmodo
Ominous 'Right to be Forgotten' Case With Global Consequences Heads to Europe's Highest Court Photo: AP Following the laws of individual nations becomes a hell of a conundrum when your business fundamentally has no borders. But recent court cases are threatening to make the situation even more difficult by demanding that a country’s laws be honored by companies like Google all around the world. On Wednesday, an ongoing case with terrifying implications was kicked up to the European Union’
1h
Live Science
Yes, Dads Give Kids Less-Healthy Food: Here's WhyNew research shows that dads really do make less-healthy choices when feeding the family — and this can take a toll on moms.
1h
Big Think
Should We Reclassify Marijuana as a Hallucinogen? A lot goes into classifying a drug, not only it’s effects but how it alters the brain. Read More
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Repeal and Dismay Today in 5 Lines President Trump invited Senate Republicans to lunch at the White House, where he asked them not to leave town until they had a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare ready, adding that “inaction is not an option.” The Congressional Budget Office projected that repealing Obamacare would increase the number of uninsured by 32 million over the next decade. The Justice Department annou
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Live Science
Surprise Fertility Treatment: How a Cancer Drug Helped One Woman Get PregnantIn a surprising case, a drug that is normally toxic to ovaries actually helped one woman get pregnant.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Could A New Breed Of Shark Be New Yorkers' Newest Neighbor? | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 This prehistoric powerhouse employed a unique strategy to feast on its prey.Sharks, seals and whales are returning to New York harbor. But is that a good thing? Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on
1h
Wired
Trump's Election Integrity Committee Made All the Wrong PointsIf you want to fix voting, don't investigate fraud. Improve the outdated, insecure tech.
2h
The Atlantic
Trump Tries for an Obamacare Repeal Revival President Trump on Wednesday convened nearly all of the 52 Republican senators bickering over health care with a seemingly impossible goal in mind: to resuscitate a bill declared dead a day earlier. By the time senators returned to the Capitol a couple of hours later, the GOP’s faltering effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act still hadn’t quite been revived. But Trump may have at le
2h
Science : NPR
Plastic Is Everywhere And Recycling Isn't The End Of It A researcher tallied how much has been manufactured since plastic's invention: "Eight point three billion metric tons of plastics produced so far. That's just really a staggering amount." (Image credit: Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A common underlying genetic basis for social behavior in dogs and humansScientists have identified genetic changes that are linked to dogs' human-directed social behaviors and suggest there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior in both dogs and humans.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This robot grows like a plantA new soft robot navigates its environment by growing in a manner inspired by plants.
2h
Gizmodo
Why Does This Dumb Worm Live to Be So Damn Old? Image: The Chemo III project, BOEM and NOAA OER Things just don’t seem to die in the deep ocean (well, except for humans). While rockfish around 100 feet below the surface live about 12 years, those living closer to 2500 feet down can live for 200 years. There’s a deep water coral that can apparently live as long as 4,000 years . But there’s one species that seems to live an especially long time,
2h
The Atlantic
How Trump Made It a Little Easier to For Assad to Stay in Power The Trump administration is ending the CIA’s covert program to arm and train Syrian rebels, The Washington Post is reporting Wednesday, a move that could be viewed as a concession to Russia, an acknowledgment of the program’s limited efficacy, as well as a tacit admission the U.S. has limited capacity to bring about political change in Syria. President Trump has long viewed Syria as the place whe
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Scientific American Content: Global
Watch a Wolf Pup Vet VisitThese eight-week-old Mexican gray wolf puppies got a clean bill of health at their first vet checkup this week. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
SolarCity co-founder Peter Rive will leave Tesla, following his brother Enlarge / Lyndon Rive, right, and Peter Rive, fellow co-founders of SolarCity. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Getty Images ) Peter Rive, the co-founder and CTO of solar panel company SolarCity, will leave Tesla to focus on other projects and spend more time with his family, according to the company . His departure comes just eight months after SolarCity was pu
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Gizmodo
Stanford Designed the Most Phallic Robot You've Ever Seen GIF GIF: YouTube Designing simpler spacecraft is what helped us finally put rovers on Mars and start exploring the Red Planet. Embracing simplicity might also give us simple, inexpensive robots that thrive doing very specific tasks, instead of multi-million dollar humanoids that have trouble just staying on their feet. Stanford University and University of California researchers are the latest to
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Gizmodo
The New KFC/DC Crossover Is a Timely Reminder Fried Chicken Is the Most Important Thing in the Multiverse Image: DC Comics. Art by Tom Derenick, Trevor Scott, Sean Parsons, and Hi-Fi. One of the highlights of Comic-Con over the past few years has been the beautiful insanity that is DC Comics ongoing advertising partnership with KFC—which has given us goofy comics in which Colonel Sanders himself rubs shoulders with DC’s finest heroes. Now, this year’s issue has taken the Colonel where no fried chicke
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study reveals contrasts in how groups of neurons function during decision makingA new study in mice trained to perform a sound identification task in a virtual reality maze reveals contrasts in how groups of neurons in different regions of the brain function during decision making.
3h
The Atlantic
Suspensions for College Students Who Thwarted Free Speech Claremont McKenna, the small, Southern California liberal-arts college, has punished seven students for their part in trying to shut down a speaking event last spring. The undergraduates targeted Heather Mac Donald, a Manhattan Institute scholar who often focuses on law enforcement. She is most controversial for arguing that aggressive policing tactics pioneered by the NYPD in the 1990s saved tho
3h
The Atlantic
Where Republicans Are Losing Ground The gender gap is making a comeback. Doubts about Hillary Clinton among women—especially working-class whites—suppressed her advantage with female voters during the 2016 campaign over Donald Trump, despite the widespread concerns they expressed about his character and qualifications in polls. But without Clinton as a contrast, Trump’s support among women has skidded since he took office. And, at
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Gizmodo
Uber and Airbnb Want To Tap Into India’s Massive and Controversial Biometric Database [Updated] Image: AP The Indian government spent seven years compiling a national database that includes citizens’ iris scans, fingerprints, addresses, and phone numbers—and now Airbnb, Uber, and India ride-hailing service Ola are all interested in incorporating the system into their services, according to a report from BuzzFeed News . The national ID database, Aadhar, contains information on about 90 perce
3h
Live Science
Images of a Primeval Underwater Forest Revealed
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX chief says first launch of big new rocket will be riskySpaceX's chief says the first launch of its big new rocket is risky and stands "a real good chance" of failure.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Northwest Passage's history marked by dangers, deathEuropean explorers had long speculated about the existence of an Arctic route that connected the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and would avoid the long journey around South America's Cape Horn.
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Big Think
A New Computer Model Suggests You Could Probably Outrun a T-Rex New research suggests that Tyrannosaurus Rex could only walk, not run, a big change in its ferocious image. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Very low rate of early use of prescription smoking cessation medications among older patients after heart attackOnly about 7 percent of older adults who smoked used a prescription smoking cessation medication within 90 days after being discharged from a hospital following a heart attack, according to a study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some women may benefit from delaying breast reconstruction following mastectomySome patients with a combination of risk factors, such as being obese and having diabetes or being a smoker, may benefit from delayed rather than immediate breast implant reconstruction after a mastectomy to decrease their risk for serious wound complications, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart toys without the batteriesA challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soil filters out some emerging contaminants before reaching groundwaterThere is considerable uncertainty surrounding emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems and groundwater, and a recent study of compounds from pharmaceuticals and personal care products didn't add much clarity. But it did provide insight into the transport of the chemicals, according to researchers.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human in vitro fertilization could evolve thanks to piglet studyIt is estimated that parents seeking to have children through in vitro fertilization (IVF) spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. Now, researchers have made a discovery that could decrease the costs associated with IVF in humans -- and it all started with piglets.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon isn't technically dominant, but it pervades our livesAmazon is already a huge part of many people's lives. And its $13.7 billion deal for the organic grocer Whole Foods will likely bind its customers even more tightly.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook working on way to charge for reading news articlesFacebook is working on a way for news organizations to charge readers for articles they share and read on the social network.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-fat ice cream may not necessarily mean tastier ice creamEven though ice cream connoisseurs may insist that ice cream with more fat tastes better, a team of Penn State food scientists found that people generally cannot tell the difference between fat levels in ice creams.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here's a tip: Indented cement shows unique propertiesRice University scientists have determined that no matter how large or small a piece of tobermorite is, it will respond to loading forces in precisely the same way. But poking it with a sharp point will change its strength.
3h
Live Science
Rare Human Syndrome May Explain Why Dogs are So FriendlyDogs and people with Williams syndrome may both owe their sociable personalities to changes in the same genes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skin vaccination with microneedle patch, influenza fusion protein improves efficacy of flu vaccinesA boosting skin vaccination with a biodegradable microneedle patch and protein constructed from sequences of influenza virus subtypes could improve the effectiveness of conventional influenza vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers engineer macrophages to engulf cancer cells in solid tumorsIn a recent study, human macrophages were engineered to ignore the 'don't eat me' signal both healthy and cancerous cells exhibit. Combined with cancer-specific targeting antibodies, these engineered macrophages invaded and engulfed human tumor cells in a mouse model.
3h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Giant Squids, Giant Eyes, but Rather Small Brain LobesA rare opportunity to study the giant squid’s visual brain suggests the deep-sea beasts don’t have the complex body-patterning skills for which their shallow-water relatives are famous.
3h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: What a Total Solar Eclipse Looks Like From SpaceA time lapse made from a Japanese weather satellite’s images shows the shadow the moon casts on the Earth when it blocks out the sun.
3h
Live Science
6 Ways Apple Messed Up Its T. Rex EmojiApple's new green-and-toothy Tyrannosaurus rex emoji may be cute, but its anatomy is wildly inaccurate, a paleontologist told Live Science.
3h
Wired
Inside Italy’s Thriving Gun Culture. Yes, ItalyGun owners make up about 5% of Italy's population. But that doesn't mean they aren't enthusiastic.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skin vaccination with microneedle patch, influenza fusion protein improves efficacy of flu vaccinesA boosting skin vaccination with a biodegradable microneedle patch and protein constructed from sequences of influenza virus subtypes could improve the effectiveness of conventional influenza vaccines, according to a study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gel coatings may lead to better catheters, condomsCatheters, intravenous lines, and other types of surgical tubing are a medical necessity for managing a wide range of diseases. But a patient's experience with such devices is rarely a comfortable one. Engineers have designed a gel-like material that can be coated onto standard plastic or rubber devices, providing a softer, more slippery exterior that can significantly ease a patient's discomfort.
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The Scientist RSS
Trump Nominates Toxicologist for Key EPA PositionMichael Dourson, a former staffer at the Environmental Protection Agency, has controversial ties to industry.
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The Scientist RSS
Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in MiceTissue 'seeds' made up of three cell types and patterned onto a scaffold develop into complex structures with some organ function, researchers show.
3h
Ars Technica
N. Korean defectors show locations of mass graves using Google Earth Much of what happens in North Korea remains hidden from the outside world. But commercial satellite imagery and Google Earth mapping software are helping a human-rights organization take inventory of the worst offenses of the North Korean regime and identify sites for future investigation of crimes against humanity. A new report from the South Korea-based Transitional Justice Working Group (TJWG)
3h
Inside Science
The Future Of Fusion The Future Of Fusion Giant magnets used for nuclear fusion weigh almost as much as 747 jet plane. The Future Of Fusion Video of The Future Of Fusion Physics Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 15:45 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- What’s 7 feet tall and 14 feet wide and weighs 125 tons? A giant magnet -- one of the largest ever built -- and there are seven of them. The magnets are p
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Popular Science
Doctors are wearing the new Google Glass while seeing patients Technology And a remote scribe does the busy work. Augmedix has built a platform that enables physicians to wear Glass Enterprise Edition as they see patients, while remote medical scribes fill out the electronic medical…
3h
New Scientist - News
Plastics made fireproof thanks to mother-of-pearl mimicA method for quickly coating objects in a thin, environmentally safe mother-of-pearl-like film could protect food or electronics from the elements
3h
New Scientist - News
Bioinspired tube robot can sneak round corners and turn on tapsIt sounds nightmarish, but a robot that "grows" like a plant at speeds of up to 35 kilometres per hour could be surprisingly useful
3h
New Scientist - News
Robot physical therapist helps people walk again after a strokeA robotic harness controlled by a neural network can adjust a person’s balance and muscle activity to help them walk normally after a spinal injury or stroke
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New Scientist - News
First dogs may have been extremely sociable wolvesWolves and dogs that are friendliest to people carry mutations in genes with links to sociability, backing the idea that this was key in dog domestication
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Ars Technica
Bug fixes abound in macOS Sierra 10.12.6, iOS 10.3.3, and watchOS 3.2.3 updates Enlarge Apple released a slew of software updates today for nearly all of its systems; you can now download macOS Sierra 10.12.6, iOS 10.3.3, watchOS 3.2.3, and tvOS 10.2.2 to any of your compatible devices. The updates appear to be minor, as most of them focus on bug fixes. MacOS Sierra 10.12.6 is the sixth update to this version of Apple's operating system, and it may very well be the last befo
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-fat ice cream may not necessarily mean tastier ice creamEven though ice cream connoisseurs may insist that ice cream with more fat tastes better, a team of Penn State food scientists found that people generally cannot tell the difference between fat levels in ice creams.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging of Scar Tissue FormationOrgans respond to injuries with the formation of new fibrous tissue, which can result in scarring. This process called fibrogenesis can now be monitored noninvasively on a molecular level, as American scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. They have created a new gadolinium-based probe for magnetic resonance imaging that specifically reports the proteins involved in fibrogenesis. The
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Here's a tip: Indented cement shows unique propertiesThree key molecular mechanisms control the mechanics of layered crystals such as tobermorite, a natural crystal used by the Romans to make concrete.
3h
Gizmodo
Check Out the TIE Silencer, Kylo Ren's Deadly New Ship In The Last Jedi GIF Image: Gif via Twitter Star Wars: The Last Jedi is giving us a ton of vehicles, new and familiar, from returning classics like the A-Wings, or the First Order’s hulking new assault Walkers. But one new vehicle just revealed is already turning heads: Kylo Ren’s sleek new personal starfighter, the TIE Silencer. Revealed on the Star Wars Show today, the Silencer—also known as the Sienar Fleet Sy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early menopause is independently linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetesWomen with early or normal onset menopause are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with late onset menopause, concludes new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New supplement can repair, rejuvenate muscles in older adultsWhey protein supplements aren't just for gym buffs according to new research. When taken on a regular basis, a combination of these and other ingredients in a ready-to-drink formula have been found to greatly improve the physical strength of a growing cohort: senior citizens.
3h
New Scientist - News
How the opioid crisis may have saved US healthcareThough Republicans in the US hold both Congress and the White House, Obamacare will not be repealed, meaning continued healthcare for millions of Americans
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Ars Technica
Buick’s 2018 Regal GS takes aim at the Audi A5 Buick MILFORD, Mich.—When Buick's invite to witness the unveiling of its new 2018 Regal GS hit our inbox, we didn't have to think long before replying in the affirmative. For one thing, despite a punishing travel schedule of late, the reveal would take place at General Motors' Milford Proving Ground. Any chance one gets to visit one of these asphalt and concrete automotive playgrounds is an oppor
3h
NYT > Science
The Immense, Eternal Footprint Humanity Leaves on Earth: PlasticsMore than 8 billion metric tons of plastic have been made since the 1950s, researchers found. Because it does not degrade, most is still in the environment.
4h
NYT > Science
Why Are Dogs So Friendly? The Answer May Be in 2 GenesA team of researchers reported that the friendliness of dogs may share a genetic basis with a human disease called Williams-Beuren syndrome.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin vaccination with microneedle patch, influenza fusion protein improves efficacy of flu vaccinesA boosting skin vaccination with a biodegradable microneedle patch and protein constructed from sequences of influenza virus subtypes could improve the effectiveness of conventional influenza vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
4h
Ars Technica
“Autumn Creators Update” was “mistranslation”; “Fall Creators Update” for all Enlarge (credit: Gordon Plant ) We wrote on Monday that Microsoft was branding the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update as the " Autumn Creators Update " in countries such as the UK and India, where the season between summer and winter isn't called "fall." Microsoft was using this British English branding on its English-language sites where British English prevails over American English. The company h
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Live Science
The Mysterious Rosetta Stone Turns 218, Here's Why It's So CoolOn July 19, 1799, the now-famous basalt tablet called the Rosetta Stone was discovered. The tablet has a weird and wild history and helped decipher masses of texts written in Egyptian hieroglyphs.
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Gizmodo
Doug Jones' New Star Trek Alien Is Discovery's Answer to Spock and Data Image: Still via Youtube Spock. Data. Odo. Tuvok. T’Pol. Every Star Trek show needs that aloof, nonhuman member of the team to comment on the weirdly human things that happen to them in life on a Starfleet vessel, and Discovery is no exception—say hello to Lieutenant Saru, Doug Jones’ freaky new Trek officer. One of the weirdest moments in Discovery ’s first trailer involves Saru—near the end, wh
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Scientific American Content: Global
Buried Tools and Pigments Tell a New History of Humans in Australia for 65,000 YearsAustralia is the end point of early modern human migration out of Africa, and sets the minimum age for the global dispersal of humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More than 8. 3 billion tons of plastics made: Most has now been discardedHumans have created 8.3 billion metric tons of plastics since large-scale production of the synthetic materials began in the early 1950s, and most of it now resides in landfills or the natural environment, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaksIn an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices, a team of researchers has developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Major communication gaps between doctors, home health care nurses revealedSerious gaps in communication have been found between physicians and home health care agencies responsible for caring for often elderly patients discharged from hospitals. The problem, the study said, can contribute to hospital readmissions.
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Gizmodo
How Exactly Did 15 Pounds of Meat End Up on a Roof in Florida? An Investigation Image Courtesy of Austin Adair In a parallel universe, there’s a planet where it rains only Italian cured meats. It appears that somehow, a wormhole has ripped through the space-time continuum and connected that world to ours, as evidenced by an assemblage of Italian sausage recently found on a family’s roof in Deerfield Beach, Florida. It’s a mystery meat whodunnit that raises more questions tha
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Ars Technica
SpaceX appears to have pulled the plug on its Red Dragon plans Enlarge / SpaceX seems to no longer be planning to land its Dragon spacecraft on Mars. (credit: SpaceX ) In recent weeks, there have been rumors that SpaceX is no longer planning to send an uncrewed version of its Dragon spacecraft to Mars in 2020, or later. Now those rumors about the Red Dragon concept have been largely confirmed. The company had planned to use the propulsive landing capabilitie
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The Atlantic
Trump's Voter-Fraud Commission Has Its First Meeting Getting served with seven different lawsuits is probably a bad way to start any job. But that’s exactly what the members of President Trump’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity faced Wednesday, when the commission met in person for the first time . The latest of these lawsuits comes from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, alleging among other things that with Trump’s creation of th
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The Atlantic
The Bipartisan Opposition to Sessions's New Civil-Forfeiture Rules Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET Attorney General Jeff Sessions rolled back a series of Obama-era curbs on civil-asset forfeiture on Wednesday, strengthening the federal government’s power to seize cash and property from Americans without first bringing criminal charges against them. In a statement announcing the Justice Department’s new policy directive, Sessions described civil forfeiture as a “key tool
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The Atlantic
Is Closing Guantanamo Still Conceivable? Tomorrow marks the six-month anniversary of the inauguration of President Donald J. Trump. But today marks six months since another key event: the most recent resettlement of detainees from Guantanamo Bay. On January 19, the last full day of the Obama presidency, one detainee from the detention facility arrived in Saudi Arabia and three landed in the United Arab Emirates. If Trump lives up to his
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Gizmodo
The Switch's Phone-Enabled Voice Chat Is As Ridiculous As Expected Pictured: Hori’s official Splatoon Headset and Nyko’s Clip Power Grip, which sadly is stuck in landscape mode. More on those optional bits later. The Nintendo Switch online app is live for Android and Apple devices. It offers some Splatoon 2 utilities that let players to keep track of their stats or buy special in-game items, which is pretty neat. It’s just not a very elegant solution for online
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Live Science
Exhuming Salvador Dalí: Paternity Suit Leads to Artist's GraveIn a surreal development almost worthy of one of his paintings, Salvador Dalí's grave is scheduled to be opened in an effort to collect DNA samples that could settle a paternity claim against the artist's estate.
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Popular Science
NASA just caught a glimpse of the mysterious object New Horizons will reach in 2019 Space There’s still more to explore after Pluto. 2014 MU69 is starting to take shape. Read on.
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Futurity.org
These viruses may skew children’s odds of diabetes Viruses in the intestines may affect a person’s chance of developing type 1 diabetes, report researchers. Children whose gut viral communities, or viromes, are less diverse are more likely to generate self-destructive antibodies that can lead to type 1 diabetes. Further, children who carried a specific virus belonging to the Circoviridae family were less likely to head down the path toward diabet
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Gizmodo
Surprise Echo Owners, You're Now Part of Amazon's Random Social Network Image by Jim Cooke Since the Echo’s release in 2014, millions of people have given in to Amazon’s nonstop advertising and welcomed Alexa into their homes. Amazon’s original sell for the always-on, voice-activated device was that users could “ask Echo for information, music, news, sports scores, and weather from across the room and get results or answers instantly.” But in the last couple of month
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Gizmodo
Keep Your Favorite Gadgets Pristine With These Anker Screen Protector Discounts For a limited time, Anker’s offering up big discounts on their popular GlassGuard screen protectors for some of the most popular gadgets out there. Just find what you need below, and be sure to note the promo code (where applicable). Bonus : Here’s a $4 Galaxy S8 case, in either black or violet.
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The Atlantic
A Typology of Undisclosed Trump-Russia Meetings We know that Donald Trump and his top aides have held a range of meetings with Russian officials—some ordinary (Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s tense visit to Moscow after U.S. airstrikes in Syria), some extraordinary (Trump revealing sensitive counterterrorism intelligence to the Russians in the Oval Office), and some thoroughly perplexing (a sit-down in which Trump did—or did not—accept Vlad
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm, metrics improve autonomous underwater vehicles' energy efficiencyRobotics researchers have found a way for autonomous underwater vehicles to navigate strong currents with greater energy efficiency, which means the AUVs can gather data longer and better.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Stellar Winds Could Be Bad News for Life on TRAPPIST-1 PlanetsTwo new studies suggest the system’s potentially habitable planets could have lost their atmospheres long ago -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Could apes ever learn to speak like people? War for the Planet of the Apes , the latest movie in the enduring Planet of the Apes franchise, took the top spot at the box office on its opening weekend and is one of the biggest films of the summer. As with all films in the franchise, which first launched in 1968, the plot of the 2017 movie is based largely on the assumption that apes could speak like humans if only they had a boost in brainpo
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Gizmodo
A Melted Duck Has Driven Japanese Twitter Users Completely Bonkers Image: Twitter It’s hot in Japan . Hot enough to melt a dashboard rubber duck into a forlorn pool of gooey plastic. And hot enough to make thousands of people intent on proving or disproving the authenticity of a now-viral tweet. The initial tweet, posted yesterday and already garnering close to 500,000 retweets, depicts a small green duck succumbing to the heat and becoming the flat-faced avatar
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Popular Science
Plant-inspired soft robot grows to reach difficult places Technology It can expand 25,000 times its original size and lift 150 pounds. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Stanford University have made a machine with long tendrils that can perform dangerous tasks like reaching…
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Live Science
Humans Have Produced Whopping 9 Billion Tons of PlasticSince large-scale manufacturing of plastics took off in the 1950s and until 2015, humans have produced approximately 9 billion tons of plastic.
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Live Science
The Larsen C Iceberg Is Already Cracking UpIt's been less than a week, but the Larsen C ice shelf and the iceberg it calved are already changing.
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Live Science
Aardvarks May Starve to Death in Warming WorldAardvarks may struggle to survive as climate change heats up their habitat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A common underlying genetic basis for social behavior in dogs and humansIn a new study published in the journal Science Advances, an interdisciplinary team of researchers, including those from Princeton University, identified genetic changes that are linked to dogs' human-directed social behaviors and suggest there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior in both dogs and humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CU Boulder discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiationA new study involving CU Boulder shows why some cells treated with radiation therapy for cancer leak chemical signals and damage unexposed healthy cells, findings that could lead to new medications that patients could take prior to radiation.
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The Atlantic
How The Fifth Element Subverted Sci-Fi Movies The most radical element of Luc Besson’s 1997 space opera The Fifth Element is not the absurdly opulent future-costumes designed by Jean Paul Gaultier. It isn’t the bizarre Southern twang of the Hitler haircut-sporting villain Zorg (Gary Oldman), nor is it Chris Tucker’s performance as an intergalactic sex symbol who hosts a radio show. It’s that Bruce Willis cries at the opera. In budget, in sca
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Gizmodo
I Just Turned Off Spotify's Sharing Feature, and I Feel So Free Photo: Getty I’m listening to Lana Del Rey right now. Her first album dropped during an emotional phase of my life, and while I’m sometimes embarrassed to admit it, I really like Born to Die . But, until a week ago, I avoided listening to it because my listening activity flipped a switch with my friends who could see me listening to Lana Del Rey on Spotify. Yes, my friends would see my listening
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a Dell XPS tower PC with a Core i7 CPU, 16GB Optane Memory for $715 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we're back to share a bunch of new deals. Of note are two high-end PCs—now you can get a Dell XPS 8920 tower desktop with a Core i7 processor and 16GB of Optane memory for $714.99. You can also get an HP Omen gaming laptop with a 4K display, Core i7 CPU, GTX 1070 GPU, and a 512GB SSD for just $1,349.99. Both are powerful systems that l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Folding robots: No battery, no wire, no problemFolding robots based on origami have emerged as an exciting new frontier of robotic design, but generally require onboard batteries or a wired connection to a power source, limiting their functionality. Scientist have now created battery-free folding robots that are capable of complex, repeatable movements powered and controlled through a wireless magnetic field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumorsAn international consortium completed a landmark study of most common pediatric brain tumor, revealing new cancer genes, laying the foundation to expand precision medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supramolecular materials with a time switchMaterials that assemble themselves and then simply disappear at the end of their lifetime are quite common in nature. Researchers have now successfully developed supramolecular materials that disintegrate at a predetermined time -- a feature that could be used in numerous applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brains are more plastic than we thoughtNew research has shown just how adaptive the brain can be, knowledge that could one day be applied to recovery from conditions such as stroke.
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Science : NPR
Getting Really Smart About Artificial Intelligence AI isn't on the way … it's already here. (Image credit: Jemal Countess/Getty Images for TIME)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panel approves bill to boost testing of self-driving carsA House subcommittee has approved legislation designed to allow automakers to increase the testing of self-driving cars on U.S. roads.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian man who helped develop Citadel malware gets five yearsA Russian man who helped develop and distribute malicious software designed to steal personal financial information was sentenced Wednesday in Atlanta to serve five years in prison.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superhero 'Deadpool' opens fire in virtual realitySmart-mouthed, mayhem-prone anti-hero "Deadpool" made a virtual reality debut on Wednesday in a "Marvel Powers United" game being tailored for Oculus Rift gear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's top court considers whether privacy is a rightIndia's Supreme Court began hearing submissions Wednesday to determine whether Indians have a constitutional right to privacy in a challenge to the government's massive biometric database, which critics argue violates that right.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite lack of efficacy data, surprising consensus in pediatric anti-epilepsy med scriptsA study that includes William D. Gaillard, M.D., among its authors indicates that US doctors appear to have reached an unexpected consensus about which anti-seizure medicine to prescribe to their pediatric patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why are dogs such doting companions? It's in their genesResearchers have identified a genetic difference in domesticated dogs and wolves that could explain the canines' contrasting social interaction with humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No battery, no wire, no problemFolding robots based on origami have emerged as an exciting new frontier of robotic design, but generally require onboard batteries or a wired connection to a power source, limiting their functionality. A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute has created battery-free folding robots that are capable of complex, repeatable movements powered and controlled through a wireless magnetic field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart walk assist improves rehabilitationA mobile harness suspended from the ceiling is now equipped with intelligent motion analysis for tailored walking rehabilitation in people suffering from spinal cord injury, stroke and other neurological disorders affecting gait.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Over 9.1 billion tons of plastic have been produced and most of it thrown awayMore than 9.1 billion tons of plastic have been manufactured since the material was initially mass-produced in the 1950s, according to 'the first global analysis of all mass-produced plastics,' which reports the majority has ended up in landfills or natural settings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineered liver tissue expands after transplantResearchers have developed a way to engineer liver tissue by organizing tiny subunits that contain cells embedded into a biodegradable tissue scaffold. In a study of mice with damaged livers, the researchers from MIT, Rockefeller University, and Boston University found that after implantation in the abdomen, the structures expanded 50-fold and performed normal liver tissue functions.
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The Atlantic
A Walk in the Woods: A Photo Appreciation of Trees A collection of images of unusual, intriguing, and beautiful trees and forests around the world, from Madagascar to Poland, Scotland to Hong Kong, the United States, and more.
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Popular Science
Discarded oyster shells can help us grow food, make cement, and fight climate change " data-lgsrc="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/large_16x9/public/images/2017/07/1-wcifduwop4mflh4wnhuw1a.jpg?itok=iryiMLF7&fc=46,49" data-medsrc="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/medium_16x9/public/images/2017/07/1-wcifduwop4mflh4wnhuw1a.jpg?itok=3o8AQrVE&fc=46,49"> From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Solutions on the half shell Crushed oyster shells can be used
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Popular Science
Humans have created 9.1 billion tons of plastic. Here's how you can help stop the madness. Environment A new study shows just how much plastic junk we've made, and the numbers are grim. We've made 9.1 billion tons of plastic since the 1950s, and if we don't change our habits, it'll only get worse in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are dogs such doting companions? It's in their genesResearchers have identified a genetic difference in domesticated dogs and wolves that could explain the canines' contrasting social interaction with humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite shows a weaker Hurricane FernandaHurricane Fernanda appears to be weakening on infrared satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery on July 19 showed a more disorganized hurricane nearing the Central Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Damming and lost connectivity for fish in northeastern ecosystemsAnadromous forage fish, which spawn in freshwater but spend much of their lives at sea, are an important food source for many species. They also play a major role in how freshwater ecosystems function. Despite their importance for ecosystems, many of these fish exist at only a tiny fraction of their previous populations. Writing in BioScience, Steven Mattocks of the University of Massachusetts, in
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New Scientist - News
First Australians may have arrived much earlier than we thoughtStone axes and the remains of fireplaces found in northern Australia appear to date to 65,000 years ago, adding 15,000 years to Australia's human prehistory
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Gizmodo
DNA Testing Suggests Dogs Needed No Convincing to Befriend Humans Photo: Getty Dogs have loved us for thousands of years, despite humanity’s many flaws and foibles. New research suggests dogs were domesticated from wolves just once—that’s all it might have taken for puppers and people to form an everlasting alliance. The study, which was published online yesterday in Nature Communications , analyzed the genomes of two ancient German doggos—one 7,000 years-old a
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Science | The Guardian
HPV vaccine: anger over decision not to extend NHS scheme to boys Health bodies condemn panel’s conclusion that more jabs against cancer-causing infection are unlikely to be cost-effective A decision not to vaccinate boys against a cancer-causing sexually transmitted infection has been condemned by health bodies and campaigners. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), which has been reviewing the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination progr
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Inside Science
Rare Human Syndrome May Explain Why Dogs are So Friendly Rare Human Syndrome May Explain Why Dogs are So Friendly Dogs and people with Williams syndrome may both owe their sociable personalities to changes in the same genes. Dog.jpg Image credits: Sergey Lavrentev via Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When it comes to sheer friendliness, few humans can match the average dog. But people
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uranium-based compound improves manufacturing of nitrogen productsScientists have developed a uranium-based complex that can allow nitrogen fixation reactions to take place in ambient conditions. The work overcomes one of the biggest difficulties to building more efficient industrial-scale nitrogen products like ammonia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Path to discovering new topological materialsResearchers have found a recipe for discovering new topological materials, which have exotic electronic properties that hold promise for future technologies. Until now, finding these materials has been a matter of trial and error.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets of our cellular 'energy sensor'Scientists have uncovered a new kind of 'energy sensor' in our cells, changing our understanding of how the body monitors glucose levels and switches on the supply of alternative 'fuels.' It is thought the research could have particular implications for diabetes, in which the level of glucose in the blood is abnormally high.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatmentHow well cancer patients fared after chemotherapy was affected by their social interaction with other patients during treatment, according to a new study. Cancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more after chemotherapy if they interacted during chemotherapy with other patients who also survived for five years or more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vaccine rejection and hesitancy examined: Effect of calls to promote vaccinationThe center of a public health debate is whether parents should have their children vaccinated. Researchers challenge statements made by influential individuals who oppose the widespread use of vaccines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising genetic variety in childhood brain cancerScientists have identified new genetic alterations and mechanisms that lead to very aggressive types of childhood brain cancer. Their results will contribute to developing novel treatment approaches for previously incurable cancer cases and to targeting tumors more specifically.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New animal models for hepatitis C could pave the way for a vaccineIn the rats that roam New York City's streets and tunnels, scientists have found a virus that resembles hepatitis C. They have used it to create the first animal model of the human disease, a breakthrough that potentially could yield a much-needed vaccine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eighteen months after double hand transplant, child is now able to write, and feed and dress himself independentlyThe world's first double hand transplant in a child has been successful under carefully considered circumstances. The recipient of the transplant was an 8-year-old boy based in the USA, who is now able to write, and feed and dress himself independently following months of occupational therapy and psychological support. A study presents the first medical report of the surgery and 18 months of follo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Shadow network' keeps communities safe from deadly volcano'Shadow networks' linking volunteers with authorities can help keep some of the millions of people living near dangerous volcanoes safer, suggests a new study. These informal networks see community members working in close collaboration with scientists and government officials on monitoring, communications, training and evacuation processes.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
These genes may be why dogs are so friendlyDog domestication may be the result of just a few genetic changes, including ones that made canines more interested in interacting with people.
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The Atlantic
Half of All Plastic That Has Ever Existed Was Made in the Past 13 Years In 2014, scientists found a new kind of of “stone” on the beaches of Hawaii. It was made of sand, organic debris, volcanic rock, all swirled together with melted plastic. So they proposed the name “plastiglomerate” and they suggested that, as plastic lasts pretty much forever, these stones could be a marker of the Anthropocene in the rock record. In the future, our time might be defined by our us
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Ars Technica
Russian man who helped create notorious malware sentenced to 5 years Mark Vartanyan, seen here in 2014. (credit: Mark Vartanyan / Instagram ) A Russian man who helped create and spread the notorious Citadel malware back in 2011 was sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta. According to the Associated Press , Mark Vartanyan will receive two years' credit for time already served in Norway, where he had been living previously. He was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite shows a weaker Hurricane FernandaHurricane Fernanda appears to be weakening on infrared satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery on July 19 showed a more disorganized hurricane nearing the Central Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Supreme Court decision complicates prosecuting child abusersNearly 42 percent of the prosecutors who participated in a national online survey reported that the US Supreme Court's 2004 decision in Crawford v. Washington increased the need for abuse victims to testify in court and decreased their prosecutions of child abuse cases either 'greatly' or 'somewhat.' University of Illinois social work senior research specialist Theodore P. Cross and independent ch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are magnets the secret to Elastigirl's powers?Under certain conditions, the magnetic properties of a material can predict the relationship between its elasticity and temperature, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln physicist has found. Given the ease with which magnetic fields can be manipulated, the study hints that elasticity could someday be tailored with the press of a button or turn of a knob.
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Gizmodo
The Staggering Amount of Plastic We’ve Produced—And What We've Done With It Image: David Lofink/Flickr Scientists have calculated the total amount of plastic ever made. Spoiler alert: it’s a lot. But what’s even more disturbing is where all this plastic is ending up. Since large-scale production of plastics began in the 1950s, our civilization has produced a whopping 8.3 billion tons of the stuff. Of this, 6.3 billion tons—around 76 percent—has already gone to waste. Suc
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Gizmodo
Lab-Grown Livers Might Save Lives Sooner Than You Think Growing liver cells and connective tissue under a fluorescence microscope. Credit: Stevens, et al. Science Translational Medicine Since at least the first time a man got on stage at a TED talk and 3D-printed a human kidney , the idea that one day we might simply grow new body parts to replace our old, out-of-service ones has existed in the collective consciousness as the pinnacle of biomedical ac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heat tweet: Users flock to Twitter when temperatures riseFor more than a decade, people have used social media to express themselves and inform and engage users across the globe. Now, a new study by Florida State University researchers examines the impact rising temperatures have on Twitter activity, and how government officials use the social media tool to warn the general public of heatwave conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
8.3 billion metric tons: Scientists calculate total amount of plastics ever producedHumans have created 8.3 billion metric tons of plastics since large-scale production of the synthetic materials began in the early 1950s, and most of it now resides in landfills or the natural environment, according to a study published today in the journal Science Advances.
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Ars Technica
Cheap catalyst takes sunlight and carbon dioxide, makes methane Enlarge / The catalyst in question. (credit: John Timmer) The carbon dioxide we're currently dumping into the atmosphere started out as atmospheric carbon dioxide hundreds of millions of years ago. It took lots of plants and millions of years of geological activity to convert it to fossil fuels. One obvious way of dealing with our atmospheric carbon is to shorten that cycle, finding a way to quic
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Scientific American Content: Global
3 Toxic Thinking Habits That Feed Your InsecurityThis week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen reveals three toxic thinking habits that keep you feeling insecure, plus offers three ways to feel more confident. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
An Experiment in Zurich Brings Us Nearer to a Black Hole’s MysteriesIBM researchers used an exotic material known as a Weyl semimetal to confirm the existence of a gravitational anomaly predicted in equations that describe the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team uncovers secrets of our cellular 'energy sensor'A scientific collaboration between researchers in Scotland and China has uncovered a new kind of 'energy sensor' in our cells, changing our understanding of how the body monitors glucose levels and switches on the supply of alternative 'fuels'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testingUsing the principles of light, University of Leeds scientists have discovered a new way to measure the strength of modern forms of concrete - giving industry a better way to understand when it could fracture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers uncover fresh role for nitric oxideCornell University chemists have uncovered a fresh role for nitric oxide that could send biochemical textbooks back for revision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way cells turn off genesFor some developmental genes one allele must stay silent, otherwise debilitating syndromes and cancers can arise. Scientists have now uncovered a new imprinting mechanism cells use to keep these genes quiet in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thoughtArcheologists have found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago -- more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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New Scientist - News
Earth’s underwater dunes help explain Venus’s weird surfaceSome of the properties of wind and dust on Venus may be similar to those of water and sediment at the bottom of our oceans
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Gizmodo
Cops Busted Planting Drugs By Their Own Body Cameras Screencap: PoliceActivity There are a lot of cops out there who work hard to have a positive impact—protecting people who can’t protect themselves, humbly serving their communities in good faith, going entire careers without betraying the public that has delegated to them unparalleled power and authority. But then, of course, we have—in no short supply—a bunch of uninformed jerkoffs who intention
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Damming and lost connectivity for fish in northeastern ecosystemsFish that migrate between freshwater and sea ecosystems play a multitude of ecological roles. In the centuries since Europeans first colonized the Americas, damming and other disruptions to river connectivity have greatly decreased the migration opportunities of these species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment guidelines for pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS/PANDAS)A panel of leading clinicians and researchers across various general and specialty pediatric fields developed comprehensive treatment recommendations to help guide the management of youngsters with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric conditions defined by the terms Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) and PAN Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection (PANDAS).
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Humans First Arrived in Australia 65,000 Years Ago, Study SuggestsAncestors of Aboriginal Australians arrived thousands of years earlier than previously believed, according to newly uncovered archaeological evidence.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The strange topology that is reshaping physics Topological effects might be hiding inside perfectly ordinary materials, waiting to reveal bizarre new particles or bolster quantum computing. Nature 547 272 doi: 10.1038/547272a
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Gizmodo
Baltimore Cop Plays Himself by Seemingly Planting Drugs in Front of Body Cam [UPDATED] Image Credit: Twitter/ Justin Fenton On Tuesday, Baltimore news outlets shared footage from a January drug bust where an officer appeared to record himself planting drugs he would later say belonged to a suspect. The video, posted by Baltimore Sun reporter Justin Fenton, is staggering: While on, Axon body cameras enter “buffering” mode, allowing them to save up to 30 seconds of video before an of
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Gizmodo
Our Readers' Favorite Cooler Is Finally On Sale RTIC Soft Packs , $100 RTIC’s Soft Packs are our readers’ favorite coolers , and the newly redesigned models have finally gone on sale, if you’ve had them on your wish list. Weirdly enough, all three sizes are marked down to a flat $100. That’s basically the regular price for the 20 can model , but it’s about $25 off for the 30-can version , and $50 off for the 40-can . So unless you’re really pr
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Gizmodo
Something Fishy Is Going On in the First Trailer for Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water GIF The first trailer has arrived for Guillermo del Toro’s latest adult fairy tale, The Shape of Water , promising a gorgeous and intense spectacle about a deaf woman’s unlikely friendship (and possible romance) with an imprisoned fish-man. Dive in. The Shape of Water stars Sally Hawkins as Elisa, a deaf woman who works as a cleaning lady in an American Cold War-era government facility. Her life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dundee-China linkup uncovers secrets of our cellular 'energy sensor'A scientific collaboration between researchers in Scotland and China has uncovered a new kind of 'energy sensor' in our cells, changing our understanding of how the body monitors glucose levels and switches on the supply of alternative 'fuels.'It is thought the research, published in the journal Nature, could have particular implications for diabetes, in which the level of glucose in the blood is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kakadu find confirms earliest Australian occupationAboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years -- much longer than the 47,000 years believed by some archaeologists. The discovery, by a team of archaeologists and dating specialists led by Associate Professor Chris Clarkson from The University of Queensland School of Social Science, has been detailed in the Nature journal this week.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thoughtA team of researchers, including a faculty member and seven students from the University of Washington, has found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago -- more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conserve intact forest landscapes to maximize biodiversity, reduce extinction riskA new global analysis of forest habitat loss and wildlife extinction risk published July 19 in the journal Nature shows that species most at risk live in areas just beginning to see the impacts of human activities such as hunting, mining, logging and ranching.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find path to discovering new topological materialsResearchers have found a recipe for discovering new topological materials, which have exotic electronic properties that hold promise for future technologies. Until now, finding these materials has been a matter of trial and error.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A uranium-based compound improves manufacturing of nitrogen productsEPFL scientists have developed a uranium-based complex that can allow nitrogen fixation reactions to take place in ambient conditions. The work overcomes one of the biggest difficulties to building more efficient industrial-scale nitrogen products like ammonia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumorsAn international consortium co-led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital completed a landmark study of most common pediatric brain tumor, revealing new cancer genes, laying the foundation to expand precision medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapyA novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center -- using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice -- has revealed new drug targets that could potentially enhance the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer immunotherapy. Research published by Na
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify new way cells turn off genesFor some developmental genes one allele must stay silent, otherwise debilitating syndromes and cancers can arise. HHMI Investigator Yi Zhang and his colleagues have uncovered a new imprinting mechanism cells use to keep these genes quiet in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising genetic variety in childhood brain cancerAn international research team led by scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Hopp Children's Tumor Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ) has identified new genetic alterations and mechanisms that lead to very aggressive types of childhood brain cancer. Their results, which have now been published in the journal Nature, will contribute to developing novel treatment approache
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify new epigenetic mechanism that switches off placental genes in miceWorking with mice, Harvard Medical School researchers have discovered a new regulatory mechanism for genomic imprinting, the process that silences one parent's gene so that only the other parent's gene is expressed in offspring. This finding could pave the way to epigenetic therapies for developmental disorders associated with faulty placental growth and other imprinting defects.
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Quanta Magazine
The Illuminating Geometry of Viruses More than a quarter billion people today are infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), the World Health Organization estimates , and more than 850,000 of them die every year as a result. Although an effective and inexpensive vaccine can prevent infections, the virus, a major culprit in liver disease, is still easily passed from infected mothers to their newborns at birth, and the medical communi
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Science : NPR
Viewing The Great American Eclipse There's something deeply moving about watching the sun become progressively covered by the moon — and you have a rare chance to see this in the U.S. on Aug. 21, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Partnering cells turn off immune attack on pancreatic tumorsTwo cell types work together to protect pancreatic tumors from destruction by the immune system. But, blocking this partnership may restore the system's ability to attack these same tumor cells, report scientists.
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Science | The Guardian
Australian dig finds evidence of Aboriginal habitation up to 80,000 years ago Artefacts in Kakadu national park have been dated between 65,000 and 80,000 years old, extending likely occupation of area by thousands of years A groundbreaking archaeological discovery in Australia’s north has extended the known length of time Aboriginal people have inhabited the continent to at least 65,000 years. The findings on about 11,000 artefacts from Kakadu national park, published on T
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK rhino eggs 'could save last northern whites'A UK zoo is taking part in a radical plan to save the world's last northern white rhinos from extinction.
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The Atlantic
Pictures of Death Photography owes much of its early flourishing to death. Not in images depicting the aftermath of violent crimes or industrial accidents. Instead, through quiet pictures used to comfort grieving friends and relatives. These postmortem photographs, as they are known, were popular from the mid-19th through the early-20th centuries—common enough to grace mantelpieces. Many can be viewed anew at onli
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Humans first settled in Australia as early as 65,000 years agoAustralia may have said “G’day” to humankind thousands of years earlier than previously believed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thoughtWhen and how the first humans made their way to Australia has been an evolving story.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A uranium-based compound improves manufacturing of nitrogen productsNitrogen is abundantly available in nature and forms the basis for many valuable products, both natural and artificial. This requires a reaction known as "nitrogen fixation", whereby molecular nitrogen is split into two atoms of nitrogen that can then be connected to other elements like carbon or hydrogen. But performing nitrogen fixation to make ammonia on an industrial scale requires harsh condi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conserve intact forest landscapes to maximize biodiversity, reduce extinction riskA new global analysis of forest habitat loss and wildlife extinction risk published July 19 in the journal Nature shows that species most at risk live in areas just beginning to see the impacts of human activities such as hunting, mining, logging and ranching.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find path to discovering new topological materialsAn international team of researchers has found a way to determine whether a crystal is a topological insulator—and to predict crystal structures and chemical compositions in which new ones can arise. The results, published July 20 in the journal Nature, show that topological insulators are much more common in nature than currently believed.
6h
Gizmodo
Scientists Just Observed an Effect of Gravity on Tiny Particles For the First Time Image: US DOE/Public Domain Bad news: Humans will probably never explore the area around a black hole, at least while you’re alive. That’s mostly because most black holes are too far away, and even if we could travel to them, it’s unlikely we’d survive their gravitational pull. That means that if we want to study the wacky effects extreme gravity might have, we’ve gotta get creative—which is exac
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Gizmodo
The Concourse Game Of Thrones Works Best When It Stays Small | Jezebel Winter Is Here For Pornhub | The Concourse Game Of Thrones Works Best When It Stays Small | Jezebel Winter Is Here For Pornhub | The Root Bernie Sanders’ Black Women Problem | Fusion Baltimore Cop Plays Himself by Accidentally Filming His Own Alleged Evidence Tampering |
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Popular Science
This smartphone stand folds to the size of a credit card Sponsored Post It works with phones and tablets, and you can currently get three for $19.99 This smartphone stand folds to the size of a credit card. It works with phones and tablets, and you can currently get three for $19.99. Read on.
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Futurity.org
Genomes suggest where wolves became dogs Researchers have found that prehistoric dogs from Germany may have been genetic ancestors to modern European dogs. The finding suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago. Dogs were the first animal that humans domesticated. The oldest dog fossils that can be clearly distinguished from wolves are from the
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
No Evidence for Past Martian Civilization, Scientists Tell CongressCongressman Dana Rohrabacher asks about ancient aliens during a routine hearing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cornell researchers uncover fresh role for nitric oxideCornell University chemists have uncovered a fresh role for nitric oxide that could send biochemical textbooks back for revision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testingUsing the principles of light, University of Leeds scientists have discovered a new way to measure the strength of modern forms of concrete -- giving industry a better way to understand when it could fracture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heat tweet: Users flock to Twitter when temperatures riseA new study by Florida State University researchers examines the impact rising temperatures have on Twitter activity, and how government officials use the social media tool to warn the general public of heatwave conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lunatic fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brainResearchers have developed a novel mouse model that for the first time selectively identifies neural stem cells, the progenitors of new adult brain cells. In these mice, researchers have found a novel mechanism by which descendants of neural stem cells can send feedback signals to alter the division and the fate of the mother cell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiationA new kind of polarizing beamsplitter has been created for terahertz radiation, which could prove useful in imaging and communications systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dust deposits give new insights into the history of the SaharaRemote Saharan dust influences Earth's radiation budget and tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere temperature variability that might even attenuate Hurricane activity. In a new research study an international team of geoscientists reconstructed the history of Saharan dust storms during the last 12,000 years. The researchers identified several millennial-scale phases of enhanced Saharan dust sup
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shark scavenging helps reveal clues about human remainsShark feeding habits are helping scientists identify marks on human bones found in the ocean. By analyzing shark scavenging behavior, researchers identified which marks were left behind by sharks, what species of sharks made the marks and where the feedings might have occurred.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Don' and 'Hilary' storm near USOff the Atlantic coast, Tropical Storm Don is thundering away. Meantime in the Pacific, a roaring tropical depression will be named Hilary if it grows into a tropical storm, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaksIn an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices, a team of University of Michigan researchers has developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors.
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New Scientist - News
We could build a galactic internet but it may take 300,000 yearsBy using the timing of planets’ orbits around their stars, all the advanced civilizations that may exist in the Milky Way could communicate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indestructible virus yields secret to creating incredibly durable materialsIt's like the Superman of viruses, astonishingly tough and able to survive in an environment that would dissolve flesh and bone. And now scientists have unlocked the secrets of its indestructibility, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaksIn an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices, a team of University of Michigan researchers has developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors.
7h
The Atlantic
Why My Dad Reads Jane Austen Elinor, in an 1899 illustration ( Chris Hammond ) If you took Elinor Dashwood, the heroine of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility , and turned her into a male software engineer in his sixties, you’d get my dad. Seriously: He’s kind, smart, moral, sometimes stoic in the extreme. He can be reserved, even about things that he enjoys, which is the only explanation I have for why I’ve never talked to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Goodbye HERA, hello sleep: NASA's HERA XIII crew returns home to slumberAfter 45 days in NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA), the four-man crew can hardly hold their eyes open. This mission was the first of its kind to last 45 days, as well as incorporate sleep reduction for research purposes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Despite a great grip, geckos sometimes slipA new theoretical study examines for the first time the limits of geckos' gripping ability in natural contexts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactionsResearchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum control of chemical reactions that could spark advances in quantum computing and sensing technologies.
7h
Live Science
Future Space Colony? Maybe We Should Look Beyond Mars to Saturn's Titan MoonInstead of just sending humans on a one-shot mission to look for life on the surface, a new paper envisions a future outpost on Titan that could generate power for years.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Goodbye HERA, hello sleepAfter 45 days in NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA), the four-man crew can hardly hold their eyes open. This mission was the first of its kind to last 45 days, as well as incorporate sleep reduction for research purposes.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indestructible virus yields secret to creating incredibly durable materialsIt lives in boiling acid that dissolves flesh and bone. Now scientists have unlocked the secrets of the indestructible virus, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Individual insight into brain networksHarvard scientists have gained new insights into how the brain networks important for thought and remembering are organized in individual people, bringing the notion of using brain scans to help personalize medical treatments one step closer to reality.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory takes time, researchers concludeHow short-term memories become long-term ones has frequently been explored by researchers. While a definitive answer remains elusive, NYU scientists Thomas Carew and Nikolay Kukushkin conclude that this transformation is best explained by a 'temporal hierarchy' of 'time windows' that collectively alter the state of the brain.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shark scavenging helps reveal clues about human remainsShark feeding habits are helping scientists identify marks on human bones found in the ocean.
7h
Wired
Your Brain Doesn't Contain Memories. It *Is* MemoriesMemories begin when your neurons respond to outside stimuli—and compound to rewire your brain.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Vaccines promoted as key to stamping out drug-resistant microbes Immunization can stop resistant infections before they get started, say scientists from industry and academia. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22324
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smallest particles and the vastness of the universe connectedAre density distributions of the vast universe and the nature of smallest particles related? Scientists have now revealed the connection between those two aspects, and argued that our universe could be used as a particle physics 'collider' to study the high energy particle physics. Their findings mark the first step of cosmological collider phenomenology and pave the way for future discovery of ne
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robotics-based study provides insight into predator-prey interactionsScientists have put forth a robotics-based study to control information flow in predator-prey interactions, as well as test the validity of transfer entropy when attempting to understand causal influences of the system.
7h
Ars Technica
Early tests show bizarre issues with Nintendo Switch voice chat app Enlarge / This is not Nintendo's solution for voice chat on the Switch, but it's closer than you might think. Our recent review of Splatoon 2 wasn't able to test Nintendo's unorthodox new voice-chat app for the Nintendo Switch, which requires a separate smartphone to let you talk to your teammates during a match. That app launched on the iOS and Android app stores today, and while we'll have a fu
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The Atlantic
Why Is Brexit So Expensive? “Why,” begins a classic joke, “is divorce so expensive?” The U.K. is now facing its own divorce bill from the European Union, and though the exact figure is still under negotiation, it fits the premise—economic analysts project the sum could fall anywhere in the range of 20 billion to 100 billion euros. But with some U.K. leaders insisting they shouldn’t have to pay at all, it’s less clear it wil
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State researcher examines vaccine rejection and hesitancy, calls to promote vaccinationThe center of a public health debate is whether parents should have their children vaccinated. Tara Smith, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology at Kent State University's College of Public Health, challenges statements made by influential individuals who oppose the widespread use of vaccines, and she calls upon her colleagues in the scientific community to speak out to promote vaccination.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatmentHow well cancer patients fared after chemotherapy was affected by their social interaction with other patients during treatment, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Cancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more aft
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Water quality improvements increase bay home pricesThis week from AGU includes research highlighted on AGU's blog and from Eos.org.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shark scavenging helps reveal clues about human remainsShark feeding habits are helping scientists identify marks on human bones found in the ocean.By analyzing shark scavenging behavior, the University of Florida's C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory identified which marks were left behind by sharks, what species of sharks made the marks and where the feedings might have occurred.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple founder Steve Jobs is the subject of a new operaIt's 2007, and Steve Jobs has just finished launching the first iPhone before an enraptured audience when he nearly collapses, exhausted by the illness that will kill him four years later.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New robotic lab tracking toxicity of Lake Erie algal bloomA new research tool to safeguard drinking water is now keeping a watchful eye on Lake Erie. This week, a robotic lake-bottom laboratory began tracking the levels of dangerous toxins produced by cyanobacteria that bloom each summer in the lake's western basin.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Land of Sharks – An Extraordinary Road Trip Through Time Land of Sharks | Sun Jul 23 at 7p Millions of years ago, ancient oceans covered the United States and prehistoric sharks roamed much of where we live today. This Shark Week, Volkswagen is taking you all the way back on an epic journey through a Land of Sharks. Follow the adventure during shark week starting Sunday, July 23rd at 7p Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.
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Popular Science
We still don’t really know where dogs came from Animals All we know is that they're very good boys. New evidence in the debate on dog origins has sparked further discussion after a 2016 paper threw a wrench into the works. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dust deposits give new insights into the history of the SaharaThe Sahara is the world's largest desert and dust source with significant impacts on trans-Atlantic terrestrial and large-scale marine ecosystems. Remote Saharan dust influences the earth's radiation budget and tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere temperature variability that might even attenuate Hurricane activity. In a new research study an international team of geoscientists reconstructed t
7h
Gizmodo
How to Tell if a Photo Has Been Doctored Image credit: Oli Scarff/ Getty Nearly every photo online has been edited in some way, whether through cropping, filtering, compressing, color-correcting, or other generally innocuous touch-ups. But a lot of people attempt to pass off doctored images as true ones, leading to hoaxes, crackpot theories, and more than one trip to Snopes for some fact-checking. You can do the world a service by helpi
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Gizmodo
BOGO Chipotle, Knife Sharpener, Gaming Laptops, and the Rest of Wednesday's Best Deals Lansky’s popular BladeMedic , an affordable Sony sound bar , and BOGO Chipotle lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Sony HT-CT390 Sound Bar, $120 If you’re still listening to your TV through its built-in speakers, listen up: This highly-rated Sony sound bar and wireless subwoofer for just $120 right
8h
The Atlantic
Will Churches Ever Be Allowed to Run Charter Schools? The reverend Michael Faulkner wanted to start a charter school through his church in Harlem. But there was a problem: New York law bars religious denominations from running charters, even if, as Faulkner promised, the school would teach a secular curriculum. So Faulkner—a one-time NFL player who ran for Congress in 2010—and his church sued. “The New York Charter Schools Act is nothing more than a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dust deposits give new insights into the history of the SaharaRemote Saharan dust influences the earth's radiation budget and tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere temperature variability that might even attenuate Hurricane activity. In a new research study an international team of geoscientists reconstructed the history of Saharan dust storms during the last 12,000 years. The researchers identified several millennial-scale phases of enhanced Saharan dust
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GW Cancer Center receives $100,000 from Avon Foundation for Patient NavigatorMandi Pratt-Chapman, MA, associate center director for patient-centered initiatives and health equity, accepted a check from the Avon Foundation at the annual walk in Washington, DC. The money will fund a patient navigator who will provide resources to help breast cancer patients in the DC area.
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Gizmodo
Check Out How Samsung Describes Its Male and Female Bixby Assistants [UPDATED] Screenshot: Adam Clark Estes After months of delays, Samsung’s much ballyhooed voice assistant Bixby is here—and users on social media are already noticing the company’s loaded , sexist characterizations of its female and male voices. Inside Bixby’s “language and speaking style” menu, Samsung describes its female voice as “chipper” and “cheerful,” while the male voice is described as “confident”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New app reveals little-known history of Rio de Janeiro portRio de Janeiro's port area may be one of the city's most inviting spots since being renovated for the Olympic Games last year. But while the area is home to attractions that include two museums and an aquarium, its rich history remains unknown to most locals and tourists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico announces new laptop, tablet security on US flightsLaptops and tablets on U.S.-bound flights from Mexico will be subjected to heightened carry-on security measures beginning Wednesday at the request of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Mexican authorities announced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiationBrown University researchers have developed a new method of manipulating the polarization of light at terahertz frequencies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not under the skin, but on it: Living together brings couples' microbiomes togetherCouples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. After analyzing skin microbiomes from cohabitating couples, microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supramolecular materials with a time switchMaterials that assemble themselves and then simply disappear at the end of their lifetime are quite common in nature. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now successfully developed supramolecular materials that disintegrate at a predetermined time - a feature that could be used in numerous applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Privacy, please: Why surveiling shoppers can inhibit sales, and how to fix itNo shopper likes being watched closely, especially if they're buying an item they find very personal and potentially embarrassing - for instance, foot fungus cream or hemorrhoid cream. Three marketing professors recently conducted research on this phenomenon and concluded that the problem is real and is relatively easy for retailers to address.
8h
Popular Science
How worried should I really be about carcinogens? Ask Us Anything Some concern is beneficial but obsessing is often futile. Carcinogens seem to be everywhere, but how much do we really have to worry about them? Read on.
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Ingeniøren
NotPetya-cyberangreb spøger stadig hos virksomheder – Mærsk er næsten klar FedEx og Nuance Communications er blandt de virksomheder, som stadig har problemer i kølvandet på NotPetya-angrebet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/efterdoenninger-notpetya-cyberangreb-volder-stadig-problemer-maersk-naesten-klar-1078481 Emner It-sikkerhed Skibe Version2
8h
Live Science
Mysterious, Gross Yellow Fluff Balls Wash Up on French ShoresThousands of clumps of weird, yellow foam have washed ashore on France's northern coastline, but no one knows exactly what it is.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiationBrown University researchers have developed a new kind of polarizing beamsplitter for terahertz radiation, which could prove useful in imaging and communications systems.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not under the skin, but on it: Living together brings couples' microbiomes togetherCouples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. After analyzing skin microbiomes from cohabitating couples, microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brains are more plastic than we thoughtResearch at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University (The Neuro) has shown just how adaptive the brain can be, knowledge that could one day be applied to recovery from conditions such as stroke.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supramolecular materials with a time switchMaterials that assemble themselves and then simply disappear at the end of their lifetime are quite common in nature. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now successfully developed supramolecular materials that disintegrate at a predetermined time -- a feature that could be used in numerous applications.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human in vitro fertilization could evolve thanks to piglet studyIt is estimated that parents seeking to have children through in vitro fertilization (IVF) spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri publishing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science have made a discovery that could decrease the costs associated with IVF i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some women may benefit from delaying breast reconstruction following mastectomySome patients with a combination of risk factors, such as being obese and having diabetes or being a smoker, may benefit from delayed rather than immediate breast implant reconstruction after a mastectomy to decrease their risk for serious wound complications, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Very low rate of early use of prescription smoking cessation medications among older patients afterOnly about 7 percent of older adults who smoked used a prescription smoking cessation medication within 90 days after being discharged from a hospital following a heart attack, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The price of increasing health-care costsNew study finds that a higher out-of-pocket price of mental health treatment is associated with reduced use, especially among those with low incomes, but also high downstream costs for the seriously ill.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teaching science subjects without trainingDespite efforts from No Child Left Behind to promote 'highly qualified' teaching, recent research shows that just 36 percent of new secondary science teachers are teaching only in their trained subject.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pangolins at huge risk as study shows dramatic increases in hunting across Central AfricaThe true scale of the problem facing world's most illegally traded mammal has been revealed in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making chicken feathersDoes each cell in the embryo have a genetically predetermined fate, or are cell interactions important? Researchers have, for the first time, linked the two, showing how the tug of war between cells in the developing skin mobilizes a protein that triggers a genetic program to differentiate into a specific cell type, a feather follicle. This could provide tips on how to make more realistic artifici
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists shed light on carbon's descent into the deep EarthThe presence of carbonates in the Earth's mantle is known from diamond inclusions, but how carbon is transported there remains a mystery. Scientists now reveal two new iron carbonate compounds and they have found that self-oxidation-reduction reactions could preserve carbonates in the mantle, hence becoming a potential carbon carrier down to the top of the Earth's core.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pre-pregnancy obesity increases risk for neurocognitive problems in premature babiesChildren born extremely premature to women who are overweight or obese before the pregnancy are at an increased risk for low scores on tests of intelligence and cognitive processes that influence self-regulation and control, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rude customers linked to workers' shopping bingesService workers who face verbal abuse from customers during the workday are more likely to go on unnecessary shopping sprees in the evening, indicates new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-energy trap in our galaxy's center, revealed by gamma-ray telescopesThe center of our Milky Way contains a 'trap' that concentrates some of the highest-energy cosmic rays, among the fastest particles in the galaxy, a combined analysis of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the High Energy Stereoscopic System, a ground-based observatory in Namibia, suggests.
8h
TEDTalks (video)
The human insights missing from big data | Tricia WangWhy do so many companies make bad decisions, even with access to unprecedented amounts of data? With stories from Nokia to Netflix to the oracles of ancient Greece, Tricia Wang demystifies big data and identifies its pitfalls, suggesting that we focus instead on "thick data" -- precious, unquantifiable insights from actual people -- to make the right business decisions and thrive in the unknown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soil filters out some emerging contaminants before reaching groundwaterThere is considerable uncertainty surrounding emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems and groundwater, and a recent Penn State study of compounds from pharmaceuticals and personal care products didn't add much clarity. But it did provide insight into the transport of the chemicals, according to researchers in the College of Agricultural Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aging power plants provide Trump administration with risks and opportunitiesWhen it comes to the current plans to retire U.S. power plants, Carnegie Mellon University researchers believe we are "running towards a cliff with no fence."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spots a diminished, but drenching ex-Tropical Cyclone DonTropical Storm Don didn't live long before it weakened to a remnant low pressure area in the North Atlantic Ocean. Before it weakened NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the storm on its approach to the Windward Islands. The GPM satellite analyzed the storm's rainfall as it developed and moderate to heavy rainfall is expected to accompany the remnants in the Windward Island
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Memory foam advances give firm support to growing mattress industryThe way we sleep started to change in 1992 with the commercial release of memory foam—a product originally developed at NASA. A decade later, the product became more accessible when the first compressed mattress sold in a box debuted. Today, the polyurethane mattress industry continues to innovate and grow thanks to new chemistry, as reported in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How off-line retailers can fight backFor retailers, the era of the online marketplace brings previously unimaginable opportunity and risk: on one hand, the universe of customers has expanded exponentially, and with it the amount of information available on individuals' buying patterns. The risk so far has fallen disproportionately on retailers who lack on online presence, as the e-commerce share of US retail nearly doubled in the pas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater may pollute area water sources for yearsGiven Pennsylvania's abundant natural resources, it's no surprise that the Commonwealth has become a mecca for hydraulic fracturing. Researchers, however, have recently discovered that releasing millions of gallons of treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater each year into area surface waters may have longer-lasting effects than originally thought.
8h
Wired
All the Gear You Need to Stay Secure While You TravelWith these accessories in your luggage, you can take your Opsec program everywhere you go.
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Live Science
Photos: Weird Yellow Fluff Balls Wash Up on French BeachesWeird, yellow fluffballs that look a bit like paraffin wax washed ashore along beaches in Northern France this week.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Schools Are Turning to Virtual Doctors for Sick KidsTelemedicine is getting an audition at more schools -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
How piglets could make IVF cheaper Scientists have made a discovery in piglets that could decrease the costs associated with in vitro fertilization in people. Parents seeking to have children through IVF spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. Scientists were working with pigs to research stem cells and the mechanisms they use to proliferate, commu
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Big Think
Is it Ethical to Automate Your Own Remote Job and Still Get Paid? A programmer was able to automate his remote job; collecting a full-time paycheck while working for two hours a week. The employer, none the wiser, is satisfied with the completed work. But is it ethical? Read More
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Inside Science
Bringing the Plight of Coral Reefs to Our Screens Bringing the Plight of Coral Reefs to Our Screens New programs highlight coral bleaching, a process driven by climate change, which could destroy most coral ecosystems by 2050. Coral-bleaching.jpg This still image from the film Chasing Coral shows brilliantly colored living coral next to weakened, bleached coral. Image credits: Courtesy of Netflix Culture Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 09:30 Ramin Sk
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study provides BRCA mutation carriers guidance for when surgery has greatest impactOf the women who carry the mutated BRCA1/2 genes, 45-65 percent will develop breast cancer, and 15-39 percent will develop ovarian cancer. Many women elect to undergo preventive surgeries that can significantly increase life expectancy, but can impact later fertility. However, few guidelines exist on the optimal age to undergo these procedures, and in what sequence. A new study in the INFORMS jour
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PETA journal article lays out steps to end flea/tick infestation tests on dogs and catsAn article just published in the peer-reviewed journal Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, authored by scientists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), calls on companies to stop testing experimental flea and tick control products on dogs and cats. The article lays out steps that companies can take to make the transition to non-animal test methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil filters out some emerging contaminants before reaching groundwaterThere is considerable uncertainty surrounding emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems and groundwater, and a recent Penn State study of compounds from pharmaceuticals and personal care products didn't add much clarity. But it did provide insight into the transport of the chemicals, according to researchers in the College of Agricultural Sciences.
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Viden
Forskere: Satellitfejl skjulte stigning i havniveauetNy analyse viser, at havniveauet på Jorden stiger voldsommere end hidtil troet. En satellit målte forkert.
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The Atlantic
How Job Loss Can Lead to Drug Use In 2013, Kentucky, Rhode Island, and Nevada had some of the highest rates of death from opioid overdoses, and they also had some of the country’s highest unemployment rates . A series of studies suggests that this joblessness might have been—at least in part—contributing to the high rates of drug addiction. A National Bureau of Economic Research paper I wrote about a few months ago found that as
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The Atlantic
Jane Austen and the Redemption of Gawkiness Here is a way to win the woman you’ve loved for eight years from afar: When you see her again, avoid speaking. Jump up and leave when she is in earshot. Do her small favors, especially ones that put you within touching distance—but never let her thank you, and be sure to avoid her gaze. Eavesdrop vigorously; should she say anything that suggests she returns your feelings, write her a letter and h
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Scientific American Content: Global
The U.S. Is Not Ready to Clean Up an Arctic Oil SpillNo viable methods exist to clean up oil from ice and drilling would occur in incredibly remote areas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart toys without the batteriesThe greatest challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds avoid crossing roads to prevent predationIt was once believed that roads posed no problem to birds because of their ability to fly. A new study finds that they can find these human-made structures problematic, especially small, forest-dwelling species. Their hesitance to cross roads could restrict their positive effects on the natural environment, such as seed dispersal, pollination and insect control.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is bone strength hereditary?A new study indicates that bone strength may be inherited and that its genetic determinants are to some extent shared with bone mineral density.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New treatment options for common debilitating skin disease Hidradenitis suppurativaResearchers focusing on the common debilitating skin disease Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), which causes deep, painful lesions and leads to a poor quality of life have isolated new treatment options after performing a comparative analysis that showed which cells were active - and responsive to medication -- in those living with HS.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enhanced oil recovery method developedA new class of materials which are suitable agents for oil displacing in enhanced oil recovery have been developed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can exacerbate colitisTitanium dioxide, one of the most-produced nanoparticles worldwide, is being used increasingly in foodstuffs. When intestinal cells absorb titanium dioxide particles, this leads to increased inflammation and damage to the intestinal mucosa in mice with colitis. Researchers recommend that patients with colitis should avoid food containing titanium dioxide particles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environmentIt took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicineMicroscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New harmless radiopaque glue to seal bleeding and guide surgeryFirst nanoparticle-based adhesive with imaging contrast effect in CT and ultrasound was successfully tested in animals and showed less toxicity than the FDA-approved glue CA-Lp.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arts-based groups benefit individuals with mental health conditionsA new study found that participation in arts-based groups -- such as those that involve choir singing and creative writing -- benefits the emotions of both healthy adults and those experiencing mental health conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The dangers of driving after restricted sleep and moderate alcohol intakeIn a recent study, combining moderate alcohol consumption (within legal limits for driving) and moderate sleep restriction led to greater drowsiness and increased deficits in attention, compared with either sleep restriction or alcohol intake alone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too many bats are being killed for researchThe work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats -- even of threatened species -- to study them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How poverty may affect children's behaviorIn a recent study of young children experiencing homelessness, high-quality parenting was associated with better peer relationships and protection from internalizing problems in the context of family adversity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea temperature changes contributing to droughtsFluctuations in sea surface temperature are a factor in causing persistent droughts in North America and around the Mediterranean, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why some women are more likely to feel depressedIt's no secret that the risk of depression increases for women when their hormones are fluctuating. Especially vulnerable times include the menopause transition and onset of postmenopause. There's also postpartum depression that can erupt shortly after childbirth. But why do some women feel blue while others seem to skate through these transitions? One answer is provided through new study results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obese patients don't need to lose weight before total joint replacement, study findsThere's good news for overweight people with painfully arthritic hips and knees: A new study finds that obese patients who underwent knee or hip replacement surgery reported virtually the same pain relief and improved function as normal-weight joint replacement patients six months after surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steering an enzyme's 'scissors' shows potential for stopping Alzheimer's diseaseScientists find that changing where an enzyme cuts amyloid beta precursor protein can determine whether Alzheimer's disease develops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Destruction of wetlands linked to algal blooms in Great LakesCanada's current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eat more chicken: Scientists hone in on genetics behind chicken weight adaptationTaking advantage of a special experimentally-bred population, the Virginia chicken lines, scientists have now achieved a better understanding of the genetic architecture behind chicken weight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Origin of modern dog has a single geographic origin, study revealsBy analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aging power plants provide Trump administration with risks and opportunitiesWhen it comes to the current plans to retire US power plants, Carnegie Mellon University researchers believe we are 'running towards a cliff with no fence.'They found that power plant retirement trends will complicate achieving long-term carbon dioxide emission reduction targets and require a significant increase in capital investments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell clinics registering for-profit, pay-to-participate studies on clinicaltrials.govA new perspective piece highlights the regulatory, ethical and scientific issues associated with US 'stem cell clinics' registering pay-to-participate stem cells studies on the NIH registry and database, ClinicalTrials.gov.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major communication gaps between doctors and home health care nurses revealedResearchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found serious gaps in communication between physicians and home health care agencies responsible for caring for often elderly patients discharged from hospitals. The problem, the study said, can contribute to hospital readmissions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory foam advances give firm support to growing mattress industryThe way we sleep started to change in 1992 with the commercial release of memory foam -- a product originally developed at NASA. A decade later, the product became more accessible when the first compressed mattress sold in a box debuted. Today, the polyurethane mattress industry continues to innovate and grow thanks to new chemistry, as reported in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news maga
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA spots a diminished, but drenching ex-Tropical Cyclone DonTropical Storm Don didn't live long before it weakened to a remnant low pressure area in the North Atlantic Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Privacy, please: Why surveiling shoppers can inhibit sales, and how to fix itThe authors designed a series of studies and field experiments that tested shoppers' reaction to being watched while shopping and found that when they feel their privacy or freedom of behavior is threatened, they will back off. Simple solutions are available to retailers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saliva as good as blood for diagnosing hepatitis E, study suggestsA saliva test developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health nearly matches the performance of a blood test widely used to assess recent or past hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite a great grip, geckos sometimes slipA new theoretical study examines for the first time the limits of geckos' gripping ability in natural contexts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does having a sibling with autism affect a child's language and motor skills?A review of published studies suggests that infants who have siblings with autism spectrum disorder may have less advanced linguistic and motor skills than siblings of children with typical development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New animal models for hepatitis C could pave the way for a vaccineIn the rats that roam New York City's streets and tunnels, scientists have found a virus that resembles hepatitis C. They have used it to create the first animal model of the human disease, a breakthrough that potentially could yield a much-needed vaccine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactionsResearchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum control of chemical reactions that could spark advances in quantum computing and sensing technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Terra satellite watching Tropical Storm GregNASA Terra satellite provided a clear view of Tropical Storm Greg, located off the southwestern coast of Mexico. Greg is one of three tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is the closest to land.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart toys without the batteriesThe greatest challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How off-line retailers can fight backFor concrete thinkers, product touch is important; for abstract thinkers, not so much. The offline retailer who can mine the wealth of consumer research data available through the internet to pinpoint these concrete thinkers, the authors suggest, can target them with appropriate marketing strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jefferson researchers identify new target for chronic painDiscovery of a phosphorylation event outside of the cell offers a new avenue for targeting chronic and pathologic pain, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater may pollute area water sources for yearsGiven Pennsylvania's abundant natural resources, it's no surprise that the Commonwealth has become a mecca for hydraulic fracturing. Researchers, however, have recently discovered that releasing millions of gallons of treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater each year into area surface waters may have longer-lasting effects than originally thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotics-based study provides insight into predator-prey interactionsA research team led by New York University professor Maurizio Porfiri put forth a robotics-based study to control information flow in predator-prey interactions, as well as test the validity of transfer entropy when attempting to understand causal influences of the system. They report their findings this week in the journal Chaos, from AIP Publishing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal new connections between small particles and the vast universeAre density distributions of the vast universe and the nature of smallest particles related? In a recent research, scientists from HKUST and Harvard University revealed the connection between those two aspects, and argued that our universe could be used as a particle physics 'collider' to study the high energy particle physics. Their findings mark the first step of cosmological collider phenomenol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactionsResearchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum control of chemical reactions that could spark advances in quantum computing and sensing technologies. The research by a multi-institutional team simulated the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reveal new connections between small particles and the vast universeOur observable universe is the largest object that physicists study: It spans a diameter of almost 100 billion light years. The density correlations in our universe, for example, correlations between numbers of galaxies at different parts of the universe, indicate that our vast universe has originated from a stage of cosmic inflation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Terra satellite watching Tropical Storm GregNASA Terra satellite provided a clear view of Tropical Storm Greg, located off the southwestern coast of Mexico. Greg is one of three tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is the closest to land.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pangolins at huge risk as study shows dramatic increases in hunting across Central AfricaThe hunting of pangolins, the world's most illegally traded mammal, has increased by 150 percent in Central African forests from 1970s to 2014, according to a new study led by the University of Sussex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antiaromatic molecule displays record electrical conductanceResearchers demonstrate high electrical conductance for an antiaromatic nickel complex—an order of magnitude higher than for a similar aromatic complex. Since the conductance is also tunable by electrochemical gating, antiaromatic complexes are promising materials for future electronic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hitting the bull's eye on crop nutrient requirementsResearchers from Aarhus University have developed a method to match crop nitrogen requirements more precisely than ever before. The method can reduce agricultural nitrogen emissions and simultaneously optimise yield.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows that just 36 percent of new science teachers are teaching only in their trained subjectResearch shows that just 36 percent of new science teachers are teaching only in their trained subject.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence of the Higgs particle's decay in quarksAs part of the ATLAS collaboration, the Freiburg research group led by Prof. Dr. Karl Jakobs and Dr. Christian Weiser has contributed to finding strong evidence that, among other things, the Higgs particle decays into quarks. The researchers analyzed data sets that were recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative nanosensor for disease diagnosisBreath pattern recognition is a futuristic diagnostic platform. Simple characterizing target gas concentrations of human exhaled breath will lead to diagnose of the disease as well as physical condition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds avoid crossing roads to prevent predationRoads can be dangerous to wildlife. Animals making the perilous journey against the traffic run the risk of meeting an untimely death. Until recently, it was widely believed, unlike other animals, birds were largely unaffected by the presence of roads and traffic, simply because they could fly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How wildfires could radically change forests—and your lifeA lonely bird call breaks my concentration and I glance upward. Where glacier-topped mountains should be filling the horizon, instead my view is obscured by a strange orange haze. Even the bright sun has given up. It seems to float in the sky as a faint pink ball.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers test 3-D-printed water quality sensorResearchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have designed a tiny device —built using a 3D printer—that can monitor drinking water quality in real time and help protect against waterborne illness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The asymmetric synthesis of halogenated compounds from carboxylic acids is world firstToyohashi University of Technology researchers led by Associate Professor Shibatomi developed new catalytic reaction to produce chlorine-containing organic molecules in isomerically pure (left- or right-handed) form
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasitic worms may lead to agricultural stem cell breakthroughThe plant parasitic nematode is an agricultural pest that has no fundamental countermeasures and requires the development of resistant plant varieties or pesticides. This parasitic pest creates a nest called a "gall" on the roots of agricultural crops which reduces the ability of a plant to absorb nutrition. Once this pest takes hold, a crop may die or its value may be significantly reduced. Furth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Supersonic parachute testingThis parachute deployed at supersonic velocity from a test capsule hurtling down towards snow-covered northern Sweden from 679 km up, proving a crucial technology for future spacecraft landing systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing better trees fasterA new research collaboration could significantly increase the quality and economic productivity of one of the UK's largest crop outputs, Sitka spruce conifer trees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study explains moss migration around the globeA new study on mosses found in the polar regions reveals how several species have migrated around the globe and are even found in their polar opposite.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein produced with electricity to alleviate world hungerA batch of single-cell protein has been produced by using electricity and carbon dioxide in a joint study by the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Protein produced in this way can be further developed for use as food and animal feed. The method releases food production from restrictions related to the environment. The protein can be produced
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bio-inspired materials—borrowing from nature's playbookNature provides myriad examples of unique materials and structures developed for specialized applications or adaptations. An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is trying to unlock the secrets that organisms use to build such complex structures so that power can be used to create materials not found in nature and not capable of being synthesize
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaning up CO2 emissions could be worth millions(Phys.org)—When most people hear the term "CO2 emissions," they probably think of several negative things: greenhouse gas, pollutant, climate change, political discord, economic burden. But a team of researchers led by Stuart Licht, a chemistry professor at George Washington University, has a vision for transforming CO2 emissions from a pollutant into a valuable resource—all while making a potenti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report on cell-permeable nanobodiesScientists at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Ludwig Maximilians University (LMU) Munich and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (FMP) have managed to introduce tiny antibodies into living cells. The researchers now report on the synthesis and applications for these nanobodies in Nature Chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manipulating electron spins without loss of informationPhysicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A powerful laser system for driving sophisticated experiments in attosecond scienceAttosecond science has revolutionized the way we look into the time-dependent evolution of the microscopic world, where the behaviour of matter is governed by the rules of quantum mechanics. The technological breakthrough that made possible the development of the field is based on the generation of ultra-short laser pulses that last only a few oscillations of the electric field. These short pulses
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does the next industrial revolution spell the end of manufacturing jobs?Robots have been taking our jobs since the 1960s. So why are politicians and business leaders only now becoming so worried about robots causing mass unemployment?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Compact, precise photon beam could aid in nuclear security, report saysA new, compact technique for producing beams of high-energy photons (particles of light) with precisely controlled energy and direction could "see" through thick steel and concrete to more easily detect and identify concealed or smuggled nuclear materials, according to a report led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
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Gizmodo
Stop Reading Into Tropical Storms Don and Hilary Tropical Storm Don, a weakening system that’s now approaching the Windward Islands (Image via Weather Underground ) Meteorologists are currently tracking a pair of weather systems, a tropical storm named Don that appears to be on its way out , and an emerging system that will be dubbed Hilary should it continue to gain strength . While the names given to these storms might seem deliberate, they’r
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Gizmodo
Controversial Treatment Appears to Reverse Brain Damage in Drowned Toddler Image: OpenStax College /Wikimedia Commons Fifteen minutes beneath 41-degree Fahrenheit water is a crippling experience, and possibly death sentence for a two-year-old. These are just not conditions that children generally survive. But a controversial treatment may have played the role in saving Eden Carlson’s life. The girl fell into her family’s pool in February 2016, according to Newsweek, and
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Gizmodo
This LSD-Fueled Rick and Morty Trailer May Actually Give You a Contact High GIF Image: Not Justin Roiland va YouTube With Rick and Morty being just days away from its third season premiere, Justin Roiland and Cartoon Network have been dropping a series of weird, unsettling shorts to get everyone back in the mood, as it were. This new trailer for the show’s upcoming third season, however, takes it about 1800 steps further. In it, Morty drops some acid (literally) and goes
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Gizmodo
Samsung Galaxy S8's Killer Feature Lands Months Late Image: Samsung Samsung’s AI assistant Bixby is finally available in the US—months late. But, hey, at least it doesn’t explode. Akin to Google’s Assistant and Amazon’s Alexa, Bixby is a voice service that lives inside the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus smartphones. It was first announced in March and was supposed to arrive by the end of spring, but the feature kept being delayed because Samsung, allegedly,
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Gizmodo
Our First Look at the Han Solo Movie's Take on Lando Calrissian Ant-Man and the Wasp adds a mysterious new star. Silver and Black could be recruiting some very obscure Marvel heroes. Rian Johnson revealed a word from Star Wars: The Last Jedi ’s opening crawl. Plus, tons and tons of Comic-Con posters, glorious new images from Black Panther , and Aquaman starts building a lighthouse. Spoilers now! Han Solo Ron Howard has given us our first ( very tiny ) look at
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Gizmodo
Boost Your TV's Audio With This $120 Sony Sound Bar Sony HT-CT390 Sound Bar, $120 If you’re still listening to your TV through its built-in speakers, listen up: This highly-rated Sony sound bar and wireless subwoofer for just $120 right now, or about $80 less than usual. In addition to delivering rich audio from your TV, the sound bar includes Bluetooth so you can stream music from your phone on the fly, and even NFC for easy device pairing. Today
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: A Swell IdeaTo improve the resolution of biological samples at the cellular level, researchers inflate tissues with 'swellable polymers' so that they're easier to see under the microscope.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can You Hear Me Now? How to Protect Yourself From Voice Hackers Security has to start with sound itself -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Uncertain Future of Genetic Testing AnneMarie Ciccarella, a fast-talking 57-year-old brunette with a more than a hint of a New York accent, thought she knew a lot about breast cancer. Her mother was diagnosed with the disease in 1987, and several other female relatives also developed it. When doctors found a suspicious lump in one of her breasts that turned out to be cancer, she immediately sought out testing to look for mutations
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Ingeniøren
Daimlers dieselskandale fortsætter: Over 3 mio. europæiske biler kaldt til eftersynEfter myndighederne gennem flere måneder har undersøgt den tyske bilproducent for snyd med NOx, vil Daimler nu efterse emissions-teknologierne i over 3 mio. dieselbiler. Det er uklart om nogle af bilerne er danske.
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Ars Technica
After 3 months, Samsung’s “Bixby” voice assistant finally launches in the US Enlarge / The hardware Bixby button on the Galaxy S8. (credit: Ron Amadeo) It has been almost three months since the launch of the Galaxy S8, and Samsung is finally ready to unleash an English-speaking version of Bixby on the world—well, on the US at least. Samsung announced today that its voice assistant can finally speak English, and it's rolling out to the Galaxy S8 and S8+ now. The UK, Austra
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Futurity.org
Watch how this shark shrugs its shoulders to eat Using X-ray movie technology, researchers have observed how bamboo sharks shift their shoulders internally to move food toward the digestive tract when they eat. By pulling their “shoulder girdle” back, the sharks create the suction needed to draw food through the back of the mouth and further into the digestive tract, says Ariel Camp, a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University and lead author
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Futurity.org
Rude customers make workers impulse shop Workers in service industries who experience verbal abuse from customers during the day are more likely to shop unnecessarily at night, a new study suggests. “…stress from customers spills over to spoil people’s experiences outside of work…” The study of 94 call-center workers at a large bank in China found that customer mistreatment (e.g., customers who yelled, argued, swore, etc.) put the emplo
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Hearing voices: the science of auditory verbal hallucinations - Science Weekly podcastWhat can advances in neuroscience and psychology reveal about this age-old phenomenon? And how might digital avatars help patients answer back?
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New Scientist - News
Blood test detects Alzheimer’s plaques building up in brainSticky plaques start forming in the brain 15 years before Alzheimer’s disease develops. A simple blood test may identify those at risk years in advance
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Science | The Guardian
Hearing voices: the science of auditory verbal hallucinations - Science Weekly podcast What can advances in neuroscience and psychology reveal about this age-old phenomenon? And how might digital avatars help patients answer back? Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Once thought to originate from the realm of the supernatural, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have a well-documented history, w
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Science | The Guardian
Give robots an 'ethical black box' to track and explain decisions, say scientists As robots start to enter public spaces and work alongside humans, the need for safety measures has become more pressing, argue academics Robots should be fitted with an “ethical black box” to keep track of their decisions and enable them to explain their actions when accidents happen, researchers say. The need for such a safety measure has become more pressing as robots have spread beyond the con
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The Atlantic
Jon Batiste Reinterprets 'Battle Hymn of the Republic' for The Atlantic Julia Ward Howe first published her iconic poem in The Atlantic in 1862 . The song quickly became an anthem of the Civil War and a touchstone of the American Idea . In that spirit, The Atlantic asked the renowned jazz musician Jon Batiste to create a new arrangement of the song for the magazine’s first podcast, Radio Atlantic .
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Ars Technica
Amazon Spark is a product discovery social network that looks like Instagram Enlarge Amazon encourages product discovery in many ways, including all those customized product lists on the site's homepage that are based on your search history and wish lists. Now the company is taking a different approach with a new feature called Amazon Spark. Tucked into the "Programs and Features" section of the Amazon iOS app is the Spark social network, in which Prime members can post p
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Live Science
New 3D Computer Chip Uses Nanotech to Boost Processing PowerA new type of 3D computer chip that combines two cutting-edge nanotechnologies could dramatically increase the speed and energy efficiency of processors, a new study finds.
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Ars Technica
White House gives thumbs up to overturning net neutrality rules Enlarge / President Donald Trump. (credit: Getty Images News | Pool ) The Trump administration supports the Federal Communications Commission effort to overturn net neutrality rules passed during the Obama years, a White House spokesperson said yesterday. "The previous administration went about this the wrong way by imposing rules on ISPs through the FCC's Title II rulemaking power,"White House D
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The Atlantic
Why France's Top General Quit The top French general resigned Tuesday following a clash with President Emmanuel Macron over proposed cuts to the defense budget that General Pierre de Villiers said would no longer “guarantee the robust defense force” needed to protect France. “In the current circumstances I see myself as no longer able to guarantee the robust defense force I believe is necessary to guarantee the protection of
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The Atlantic
The Paradox of Mitch McConnell's Repeal-Only Vote Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is not usually one for doomed gestures or abstract ideals. So why on earth is he scheduling a sure-loser vote on Obamacare "repeal today; replacement later?” Yes, President Trump has requested it—but McConnell has long since learned how to manage Trump’s fleeting mental vagaries. If this vote is held, it’s because McConnell wants it, fully aware that it will
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The Atlantic
Jeff Sessions Treads on the Property Rights of Americans Earlier this year, Justice Clarence Thomas, perhaps the most conservative jurist on the Supreme Court, attacked a government abuse that shocks many Americans when they first learn about it. In scores of cities and towns, law enforcement simply takes property from citizens, then sells or keeps it. They say that the property is related to a crime. But no one needs to prove that the property owner b
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is Anyone Home? A Way to Find Out If AI Has Become Self-AwareIt’s not easy, but a newly proposed test might be able to detect consciousness in a machine -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Shadow network' keeps communities safe from deadly volcanoNew research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that 'shadow networks' linking volunteers with authorities can help keep some of the millions of people living near dangerous volcanoes safer.These informal networks see community members working in close collaboration with scientists and government officials on monitoring, communications, training and evacuation processes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Manipulating electron spins without loss of informationPhysicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience I
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are sugary drink interventions changing people's behavior?An evaluation of efforts designed to reduce how many sugary drinks we consume shows some success in changing younger people's habits but warns they cannot be the only way to cut consumption.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment options for common debilitating skin disease Hidradenitis suppurativaThe research team behind the study pinpointed 'Th17' cells as mediating the disease (HS). A number of existing treatments target the same cellular pathway and may also be effective in treating HS.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is bone strength hereditary?A new study indicates that bone strength may be inherited and that its genetic determinants are to some extent shared with bone mineral density.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative nanosensor for disease diagnosisA research group at KAIST has developed diagnostic sensors using protein-encapsulated nanocatalysts, which can diagnose certain diseases by analyzing human exhaled breath. This technology enables early monitoring of various diseases through pattern recognition of biomarker gases related to diseases in human exhalation.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds avoid crossing roads to prevent predationIt was once believed that roads posed no problem to birds because of their ability to fly. A new study finds that they can find these man-made structures problematic, especially small, forest-dwelling species. Their hesitance to cross roads could restrict their positive effects on the natural environment, such as seed dispersal, pollination and insect control.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evidence of the Higgs particle's decay in quarksA research group at the University of Freiburg contributes significant new findings to the ATLAS experiment.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can exacerbate colitisTitanium dioxide, one of the most-produced nanoparticles worldwide, is being used increasingly in foodstuffs. When intestinal cells absorb titanium dioxide particles, this leads to increased inflammation and damage to the intestinal mucosa in mice with colitis. Researchers at the University of Zurich recommend that patients with colitis should avoid food containing titanium dioxide particles.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new application for enhanced oil recovery has been developed by university scientistsA new class of materials which are suitable agents for oil displacing in enhanced oil recovery have been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University and scientists at Islamic Azad University in Iran.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pangolins at huge risk as study shows dramatic increases in hunting across Central AfricaThe true scale of the problem facing world's most illegally traded mammal has been revealed.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antiaromatic molecule displays record electrical conductanceResearchers demonstrate high electrical conductance for an antiaromatic nickel complex -- an order of magnitude higher than for a similar aromatic complex. Since the conductance is also tunable by electrochemical gating, antiaromatic complexes are promising materials for future electronic devices.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hitting the bull's eye on crop nutrient requirementsA new method can determine crop nitrogen requirements with a precision of 10-20 kg N/ha by preparing a reference curve to determine when a crop is deficient in nitrogen. The reference curve is based on comparisons of data on leaf area with data on leaf reflectance at different light wavelengths.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teaching without trainingDespite efforts from No Child Left Behind to promote 'highly qualified' teaching, recent research shows that just 36 percent of new secondary science teachers are teaching only in their trained subject.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC researchers test 3-D-printed water quality sensorResearchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have designed a tiny device -- built using a 3-D printer -- that can monitor drinking water quality in real time and help protect against waterborne illness.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parasitic worms may lead to agricultural stem cell breakthroughA plant parasitic nematode is a pest that parasitizes the roots of agricultural crops and creates nests called 'galls' which deprive plants of nutrition. Research from Japan on plant reactions to parasitic worms shows that parasitism activates plant stem cells which grow to form galls on their roots. This finding is expected to improve crop breeds and alleviate nematode damage, which is estimated
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The asymmetric synthesis of halogenated compounds from carboxylic acids is world firstToyohashi University of Technology research team developed a new reaction to produce chlorinated compounds with high isomeric purity. Such compounds are important building blocks for target molecules. However the molecules come in left- and right-handed versions (enantiomers). They can be produced from carboxylic acids, by replacing an acid with a chlorine; however, conventional methods produce eq
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making chicken feathersDoes each cell in the embryo have a genetically predetermined fate, or are cell interactions important? UC Berkeley researchers have for the first time linked the two, showing how the tug of war between cells in the developing skin mobilizes a protein that triggers a genetic program to differentiate into a specific cell type, a feather follicle. This could provide tips on how to make more realisti
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Futurity.org
More kids live in very poor areas after Great Recession More children are living in high-poverty neighborhoods after the Great Recession of 2008, a new study suggests. Researchers also found that these children lag behind in academic performance by a full school year on average. The study examines how neighborhood and family poverty predict children’s academic skills and classroom behavior when they start school, and whether associations have changed
10h
Futurity.org
Enzyme speeds how ocean locks away carbon Scientists have found that a common enzyme can speed up—by 500 times—the rate-limiting part of the chemical reaction that helps the Earth lock away, or sequester, carbon dioxide in the ocean. “While the new paper is about a basic chemical mechanism, the implication is that we might better mimic the natural process that stores carbon dioxide in the ocean,” says lead author Adam Subhas, a Californi
10h
NYT > Science
A 9-Year-Old Tripped, Fell and Discovered a Million-Year-Old FossilJude Sparks was playing with his brothers in New Mexico when he stumbled over the fossilized tusk of a Stegomastodon, a prehistoric, elephantine creature.
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The Atlantic
Should Indian Reservations Give Local Cops Authority on Their Land? The murder scenes have left the tribe shaken. The violence wasn’t entirely unfamiliar. A high incidence of violent crime has long plagued the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, an expanse of badlands and yellow buffalo-grass prairie in southwestern South Dakota that’s home to about 20,000 members of the Oglala Lakota tribe. But this was something else. In 2016, the homicide rate on Pine Ridge nearly
10h
Wired
Segway MiniPro Vulnerabilities Would Have Let Hackers Take Over the HoverboardThe self-balancing scooter isn't quite so steady when hackers take charge.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting your smartphone from voice impersonatorsIt's a lot easier to talk to a smartphone than to try to type instructions on its keyboard. This is particularly true when a person is trying to log in to a device or a system: Few people would choose to type a long, complex secure password if the alternative were to just say a few words and be authenticated with their voice. But voices can be recorded, simulated or even imitated, making voice aut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover Earth-sized exoplanet with very short orbital period(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected a new Earth-sized exoplanet in an ultra-short period around its parent star. The alien world, designated EPIC 228813918 b, circles its host every four hours and 20 minutes, which makes it the second-shortest orbital period of a planet known to date. The finding was presented in a paper published July 14 on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aquatic plants survive in 'ghost ponds' under agricultural fieldsAquatic plants in 'ghost ponds' are able to survive more than 100 years buried beneath cropped agricultural fields, according to new UCL research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers pair robotics and information theory to better understand predator and prey relationshipsWith help from robotic fish, researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering are demonstrating how information theory can offer insight into the cause-and-effect relationships between predator and prey in the animal kingdom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests climate change may kill off the aardvark in some areas(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa has found evidence that suggests the aardvark may face a large decrease in population as the planet heats up due to global warming. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes how they fastened monitors to a group of aardvarks who by happenstance were forced to endure a severe
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber banned from operating in Czech Republic's number 2 cityA court has once again banned Uber from operating in Brno, the Czech Republic's second-largest city.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicist points way to controlling elasticity with magnetismIf Plastic Man, Elastigirl or Mr. Fantastic ever encounter Magneto, they'd better hope the iconic X-Men figure hasn't read the latest research from Christian Binek.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Selfish motives, not fairness, the best message for criminal justice advocacy groupsAdvocacy groups and activists should appeal to self-interests if they want to obtain public support for criminal justice reform, according to a new study.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Piglets might unlock keys to in vitro fertilization in humansIt is estimated that parents seeking to have children through in vitro fertilization (IVF) spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri publishing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science have made a discovery that could decrease the costs associated with IVF i
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bubble technique used to measure sheer forces between graphene sheets(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from China and the U.S. has devised a relatively simple means for measuring the shear forces that exist between sheets of graphene and other materials. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the technique and the results they found when using it to measure shear forces for several types of 2-D materials.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate scientists create Caribbean drought atlasCornell atmospheric scientists have developed the first-of-its-kind, high-resolution Caribbean drought atlas, with data going back to 1950. Concurrently, the researchers confirmed the region's 2013-16 drought was the most severe in 66 years due to consistently higher temperatures – a hint that climate change is to blame.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
European dust input linked with Saharan desertification and human impactA peat bog in Romania provides a new insight into our knowledge of when the Sahara began to transform from grassland into the desert we know today, and the impact this had on dust deposition within Eastern Europe.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AFRL researchers explore automation, additive technologies for cost efficient solar powerInspired by newspaper printing, and taking cues from additive manufacturing technology, researchers at the Air Force Research Laboratory are exploring new ways to make solar cells more cost efficient—increasing application potential in the process.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA evaluates how crew will exit Orion spacecraftWhen astronauts return to Earth from destinations beyond the moon in NASA's Orion spacecraft and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, they'll still need to safely get out of the spacecraft and back on dry land. Using the waters off the coast of Galveston, Texas, a NASA and Department of Defense team tested Orion exit procedures in a variety of scenarios on July 10-14, 2017.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Origin of the follicle pattern in avian skinThe rubber-like elasticity of skin, which contracts to its original shape after being stretched, is key to the development of regularly spaced hairs and sweat glands during development, according to new research at the University of California, Berkeley.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquake physics on multiple scalesScientists are working hard to determine the how, why and when of earthquakes, but getting answers is a complex team effort, says a Victoria University of Wellington geophysicist.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Bracing for the cost of climate changeClimate change is here to stay, irrespective of how successful the current international efforts are in preventing the direst scenarios through global collaborations.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Shadow network' keeps communities safe from deadly volcanoNew research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that 'shadow networks' linking volunteers with authorities can help keep some of the millions of people living near dangerous volcanoes safer.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New materials with important applications in enhanced oil recoveryA new class of materials which are suitable agents for oil displacing in enhanced oil recovery have been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University and scientists at Islamic Azad University in Iran.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of lung fibrogenesis with an amino acid targeted probeOrgans respond to injuries with the formation of new fibrous tissue, which can result in scarring. This process called fibrogenesis can now be monitored noninvasively on a molecular level, as American scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. They have created a new gadolinium-based probe for magnetic resonance imaging that specifically reports the proteins involved in fibrogenesis. The
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Nano-in-micro' stem cell delivery could rescue blood flow after injuryWhen blood flow is reduced or cut to tissues, cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which can lead to cell death if blood flow isn't efficiently restored. Stem cells are promising treatments, but they do not tend to stay at the site or survive long enough to heal the damage. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers combine micro and nano approaches to improve stem cell therapies and outcome
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NanoVelcro microchips could someday noninvasively diagnose prenatal conditionsMany pregnant women undergo some form of prenatal testing before their children are born. The information that expectant mothers gain from these tests vary, from the baby's gender to genetic defects. But the tests are often invasive, which can potentially harm the fetus and the mother. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they have developed a device that provides sensitive results, but in a le
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dust particles in livestock facilitiesA beam of sunlight streams into your living room, illuminating a Milky Way of dust particles hanging in the air. Although the air looks thick, those visible dust particles are so big that they can't reach the smallest branches of the respiratory tree in your lungs. It's the dust we can't see—smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM 2.5—that can cause allergies and other respiratory problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swim robot probes Fukushima reactor to find melted fuelAn underwater robot has captured images and other data inside Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant on its first day of work.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vietnam to rescue 1,000 bears in bid to end bile tradeVietnam agreed Wednesday to rescue more than 1,000 bears from illegal farms across the country, in a move to end the traditional medicine trade in the creatures' bile.
10h
Science-Based Medicine
New Review of Artificial SweetenersA new review of research finds a modest but inconsistent benefit from consuming artificial sweeteners over sugar. Their conclusion of a possible backfire effect, however, does not seem to be supported by the studies they review.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Satellite Snafu Masked True Sea Level Rise for DecadesRevised tallies confirm that the rate of sea level rise is accelerating as the Earth warms and ice sheets thaw -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Raising Alcohol Taxes Can Curtail Assaults and SuicidesIt's an effective way to curtail assaults and suicides -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Futurity.org
Babies can learn second language in 1 hour per day Researchers have developed a play-based educational program that can teach babies a second language in just one hour per day. For years, scientists and parents alike have touted the benefits of introducing babies to two languages: Bilingual experience has been shown to improve cognitive abilities, especially problem-solving. And for infants raised in households where two languages are spoken, tha
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Futurity.org
Toilet or chair? Robots that ‘see’ in 3D can tell A new technology lets machines make sense of 3D objects in a richer and more human-like way. Autonomous robots, for example, can inspect nuclear power plants, clean up oil spills in the ocean, accompany fighter planes into combat, and explore the surface of Mars. Yet for all their talents, robots still can’t make a cup of tea. That’s because tasks such as turning on the stove, fetching the kettle
10h
Ingeniøren
Økologisk Råd: Danmark skader sit grønne omdømme med nej til ammoniakreduktionerMandag stemte Danmark imod revideringen af en FN-protokol, der forpligter Danmark til at mindske sine ammoniakudledninger. Det Økologiske Råd kalder det en pinlig, politisk markering.
10h
Popular Science
It's not your imagination: 2017 has been abnormally hot so far Environment Yeah, it's a hot one. The first months of 2017 are the second hottest ever recorded. Read on.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personalized 'earable' sensor monitors body temperature in real timeWireless, wearable sensors are all the rage with millions of people now sporting fitness trackers on their wrists. These devices can count footsteps, monitor heart rate and other vital signs. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Sensors that they have developed a 3-D printed sensor worn on the ear that measures one of the most basic medical indicators of health in real time: core body tempera
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Nano-in-micro' stem cell delivery could rescue blood flow after injuryWhen blood flow is reduced or cut to tissues, cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which can lead to cell death if blood flow isn't efficiently restored. Stem cells are promising treatments, but they do not tend to stay at the site or survive long enough to heal the damage. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers combine micro and nano approaches to improve stem cell therapies and outcome
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NanoVelcro microchips could someday noninvasively diagnose prenatal conditionsMany pregnant women undergo some form of prenatal testing before their children are born. The information that expectant mothers gain from these tests vary, from the baby's gender to genetic defects. But the tests are often invasive, which can potentially harm the fetus and the mother. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they have developed a device that provides sensitive results, but in a le
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analytic technique could allow neural networks to run on cellphonesMethod for modeling neural networks' power consumption could help make the systems portable.
11h
Wired
At ClinicalTrials.Gov, Untested Stem Cell Clinics Advertise for Free!Researchers believe the ballooning stem cell clinic industry is taking advantage of the federal repository's honor system. And patients will be the ones to pay, literally.
11h
The Atlantic
Your Favorite Jane Austen Characters Last week I asked readers to tell us about their favorite characters from Jane Austen’s body of work. Janeites responded with praise for characters ranging from Pride and Prejudice ’s Lydia Bennet to Lady Susan ’s Susan Vernon—characters who made them laugh or cry, or gave them strength, or taught them something about themselves. Like me, and Jane Austen herself, many readers loved Emma Woodhouse
11h
Ars Technica
Elon Musk knows what’s ailing NASA—costly contracting Enlarge / SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches the EchoStar 23 satellite in March, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) The seas were calm in early December 2010 when a spacecraft fell out of the sky, deployed its parachutes, and splashed into the Pacific Ocean. No American spacecraft had returned this way to Earth in 35 years, not since the splashdown of the final Apollo mission. The Dragon bobbing in the blue w
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Robust Emergency Fund Needed to Respond to Future Disease OutbreaksBut the U.S. can minimize the danger with a robust health emergency fund -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Maryam Mirzakhani obituaryIranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields medal In 2014 the Iranian mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, who has died aged 40 of cancer, was awarded the Fields medal, the discipline’s most celebrated prize. The 52 previous recipients had all been men. Maryam won it “for her outstanding contributions to the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces”. Surfac
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Science | The Guardian
We can cure Alzheimer’s – if we stop ignoring it | Joseph JebelliThe disease is now the leading cause of death among the oldest people. Given focus and funding, however, Alzheimer’s will yield to science and reason • Joseph Jebelli is a neuroscientist and author The terror of Alzheimer’s is that it acts by degrees, and can therefore bewilder family members as much as its victims. Those who first notice the onset of Alzheimer’s in a loved one tell of forgotten n
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Maryam Mirzakhani, quantum teleportation and the Great Red Spot The week in science: 14–20 July 2017. Nature 547 262 doi: 10.1038/547262a
11h
The Atlantic
Qatar Crisis: Are There Signs of a Potential Deal? The Saudi-led alliance of Arab countries that severed links with Qatar is now urging Doha to accept six steps—down from 13 conditions—to combat extremism and terrorism, a sign the crisis that engulfed the region may be a step closer to resolution. Abdallah al-Mouallimi, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the UN, said Tuesday at the United Nations that the six principles included combating extremism and
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Gizmodo
Here's a Very Rare 33% Discount On Smartwool, Our Readers' Favorite Socks 33% off Smartwool socks with code SMARTWOOL Smartwool easily socked it to the competition when it came to finding out what your favorite everyday socks are, and with good reason: they’re kind of awesome. The downside to their awesomeness is they’re on the pricey side. But right now, use the code SMARTWOOL and get 33% off any three pairs of Smartwool socks on Jet.com. Just add your three favorites
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
Sucking Up CO2 Will Cost Hundreds of TrillionsStudy finds that if the world doesn’t begin cutting emissions soon, the price of capturing and storing carbon dioxide will soar.
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The Atlantic
How Checkers Was Solved Marion Tinsley—math professor, minister, and the best checkers player in the world—sat across a game board from a computer, dying. Tinsley had been the world’s best for 40 years, a time during which he'd lost a handful of games to humans, but never a match. It's possible no single person had ever dominated a competitive pursuit the way Tinsley dominated checkers. But this was a different sort of
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Scientific American Content: Global
Untangling the Mystery of How Fido Became Humankind's Best FriendNew DNA-based research suggests dogs were domesticated in a single event, in contrast with a previous hypothesis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Popular Science
How to mount your own trout DIY Now you can mount your next trophy catch—and eat it too. How to mount your own trout. Now you can mount your next trophy catch—and eat it too. Read on.
11h
Wired
Wanna Help Self-Driving Cars? Turn on Your Phone's CameraRecording the road will earn you a few pennies, and help create detailed maps.
11h
Wired
Teen Pregnancy Researchers Regroup After Trump's HHS Pulls FundingLast week, HHS abruptly canceled two years and $213 million worth of grants meant to aid teen pregnancy prevention, stunning public health researchers around the country.
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Wired
AI Could Revolutionize War as Much as NukesArtificial intelligence could make the US military more powerful—and also more vulnerable
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Wired
The Field Study Handbook Is HereThe Field Study Handbook was meant to be a guide to esoteric field research. Instead, it’s become a $110 self-help manual for the digitally disaffected.
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Wired
Meal Kits Reviewed: Amazon Fresh, Blue Apron, Purple Carrot, Home ChefWe review ready-to-cook meal kits like the Amazon Meal Kit from Amazon Fresh.
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Wired
Trump's Policies Are Already Sending Jobs to CanadaStartups look north for refuge as the US pauses a program meant to keep them here.
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Wired
Quantum Computing Is Coming for Your DataQuantum computing is going to be able to expose the data we encrypt today—and hackers are counting on it.
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Wired
What Crisis Management Is Really LikeA veteran of crisis management and corporate disasters tells you what to do when all hell breaks loose.
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Wired
Silicon Valley’s First Founder Was Its WorstWilliam Shockley brought the silicon to Silicon Valley—and laid the groundwork for tech's problematic work culture.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Space Stations: Archaeological Sites in Low-Earth OrbitFresh insights are emerging from studying the ‘microsociety’ aboard the International Space Station -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Ingeniøren
Sydjylland lige nu: 41 jobs i 22 virksomheder Det kan være den billige grænsehandel, der trækker, når man slår sig ned i det sydlige Jylland. Det kan også være de spændende job. Det sidste kan Jobfinder.dk levere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/sydjylland-lige-nu-41-jobs-22-virksomheder-9181 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
Ingeniøren
Beeeepp…Sådan lyder elbiler i 2019Medmindre EU-Parlamentet modsætter sig, skal alle elektriske køretøjer fra om to år udsende en alarm-lyd, når de kører 0-30 kilometer i timen.
12h
Live Science
Underwater Cypress Forest from Ice Age Reveals Its SecretsAn underwater forest of bald cypress that dates to 50,000 years ago may reveal secrets of a rapidly changing climate in the last ice age.
12h
Live Science
'Atomic Fingerprinting' Tech Could End Counterfeit GoodsScientists have developed a new method that can stamp things with "atomic fingerprints" to keep phony products at bay.
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Live Science
Cracking Codes: 5 Ancient Languages Yet to Be Decipheredhelped scholars decipher ancient Egyptian writing. Even so, there are still a number of ancient languages that await full decipherment.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Nasty, Brutish and Short: Are Humans DNA-Wired to Kill?Some research suggests a tendency toward violence has shaped our anatomy throughout evolution. But anthropologists are sharply divided -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Past extinctions point to a current and future biodiversity crisis Rapid climate change is a unifying feature of ancient mass extinctions – how bad might it be now? At one level extinction normal and natural. Most of the diversity of life on Earth that has ever existed is now gone, and all species will one day pass from being extant to being extinct. But although it is normal for species to die out, the normal rate is considered to be quite low. On average perha
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Science | The Guardian
Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures Since the early 19th century, artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes fictional – dinosaurs and prehistoric environments, mingling science with unbridled fantasy. This art is the subject of a new book: Paleoart Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use 'Piz Daint' simulations to track heavy summer precipitation from the MediterraneanLow-pressure weather systems that move northwards in the summer from Italy to central Europe bring with them dreaded downpours and flooding north of the Alps. But from where do they pick up this destructive moisture? The answer to that question has now been clarified by climate scientists in Bern by means of simulations they ran on CSCS's "Piz Daint" supercomputer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds in Alberta oil fields forced to raise imposters at alarming rateAlberta's oil and gas infrastructure is providing a great living to the brown-headed cowbird, a bird species that tricks other songbirds into raising its young, a new University of Manitoba study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thawing permafrost releases old greenhouse gasThe thawing permafrost soils in the Arctic regions might contribute to the greenhouse effect in two respects: On the one hand, rising temperatures lead to higher microbial methane production close to the surface. On the other hand, the thawing subsurface opens pathways for old, geologic methane. This is shown in a study in the Mackenzie Delta (Canada), conducted by scientists from the German Resea
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers create brighter, full-color holograms that can be viewed with low lightTechnology developed by a team of University of Utah electrical and computer engineers could make the holographic chess game R2-D2 and Chewbacca played in "Star Wars" a reality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environmentIt took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea temperature changes contributing to droughtsFluctuations in sea surface temperature are a factor in causing persistent droughts in North America and around the Mediterranean, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists shed light on carbon's descent into the deep EarthExamining conditions within the Earth's interior is crucial not only to give us a window back to Earth's history but also to understand the current environment and its future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamisAn international team of scientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia has discovered the world's most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known about when earthquakes trigger massive waves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicineMicroscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News
The incredible shrinking transistor just got smallerTiniest transistor, made with carbon nanotubes, suggests computers aren’t done shrinking down.
12h
Ars Technica
“Post-Ebola syndrome” is something else to keep you up at night Ebola virus (credit: CDC Global ) After the ghastly symptoms subside, Ebola may not be done; it may just shift to a clever stealth mode , a new study suggests. Examining archived tissue samples from infected monkeys, researchers found that Ebola can create a cryptic viral reservoir in certain immune cells and hide in corners of the body where the rest of the immune system has little reach. The st
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The Atlantic
How Twitter Fuels Anxiety In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous essay on self-reliance, the 19th-century writer and naturalist sang the praises of spiritual isolation and the evils of distraction, bemoaning the forces that conspired to direct his attention to "emphatic trifles." He would not be cowed, he said, but would stand resolute in the face of such bad influences: "The power men possess to annoy me, I give them by a weak
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The DeepMind debacle demands dialogue on data Mishandling of patient information shows how governments and companies must become more worthy of trust, says Hetan Shah. Nature 547 259 doi: 10.1038/547259a
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Goes On in Our Brains When We Are in Love?Xiaomeng (Mona) Xu, assistant professor of experimental psychology, and Ariana Tart-Zelvin, clinical doctoral candidate, both at Idaho State University, respond -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea temperature changes contributing to droughtsFluctuations in sea surface temperature are a factor in causing persistent droughts in North America and around the Mediterranean, new research suggests.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New harmless radiopaque glue to seal bleeding and guide surgeryFirst nanoparticle-based adhesive with imaging contrast effect in CT and ultrasound was successfully tested in animals and showed less toxicity than the FDA-approved glue CA-Lp.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Holograms taken to new dimensionUsing sophisticated algorithms and a new fabrication method, a University of Utah team of electrical and computer engineers has discovered a way to create inexpensive full-color 2-D and 3-D holograms that are far more realistic, brighter and can be viewed at wider angles than current holograms. The applications for this technology could be wide-ranging, from currency and identification badges to a
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicineMicroscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamisAn international team of scientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia has discovered the world's most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known about when earthquakes trigger massive waves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thawing permafrost releases old greenhouse gasThe thawing permafrost soils in the Arctic regions might contribute to the greenhouse effect in two respects: on the one hand rising temperatures lead to higher microbial methane production close to the surface. On the other hand thawing subsurface opens increasingly pathways for old, geologic methane. This is shown in a study in the Mackenzie Delta in Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists shed light on carbon's descent into the deep EarthThe presence of carbonates in the Earth's mantle is known from diamond inclusions, but how carbon is transported there remains a mystery. An international team has shed light on this mystery thanks to high-pressure experiments carried out at the European Synchrotron. The scientists revealed two new iron carbonate compounds and found that self-oxidation-reduction reactions could preserve carbonates
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environmentIt took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALS: New clues to the cause and how future drugs might reverse diseaseScientists have known that a protein called TDP-43 clumps together in brain cells of people with ALS. This protein is thought to cause muscle degeneration related to sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), leading many researchers to think that TDP-43 is one of the causative factors in ALS and sIBM. Now, researchers found that a specific chemical modification promotes TDP-43 clumping in animals.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Too Sunny in Philadelphia? Satellites Zero in on Dangerous Urban Heat IslandsSatellite and socioeconomic data can pinpoint which of a city’s neighborhoods are most at risk during heat waves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English
Behind the Art: Mystic It’s not every day you get to design a new Hero. With the challenge of launching Mystic , Eyewire’s most elite rank of gameplay, we went to work crafting an upgrade to the Heroes’ arguably already awesome superhero suit. What’s in a suit? That which we call an Iron Man-esque, rocket boot bearing, superhero costume would be any other name be just as sweet; however, for this project we decided to a
13h
The Atlantic
What Congressional Republicans Really Think About Trump and Russia With each new revelation in the ongoing Trump-Russia saga, the same question inevitably gets asked: Will this be the moment Republicans in Congress finally turn on the president? The answer, so far, has been an emphatic “no.” As evidence piles up pointing to the possibility that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia, Republican lawmakers have largely ignored Democrats’ calls for urgent action a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leading the way: ORNL builds more reliable, longer-lasting targets for high-powered neutron scatteringAt the heart of the world's most powerful pulsed-neutron source is a liquid mercury target.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers to study environmental, human impacts of nuclear warScientists and students led by the University of Colorado Boulder and Rutgers University are calculating the environmental and human impacts of a potential nuclear war using the most sophisticated scientific tools available.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Investments in conservation easements reap benefits for ColoradoColorado is famous for its iconic landscapes, which have helped shape the state's identity and economy. From agriculture to recreation and tourism, from minerals and fuels to forest and wildlife, Coloradans are dependent on nature for many things that enrich our lives.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rude customers linked to workers' shopping bingesService workers who face verbal abuse from customers during the workday are more likely to go on unnecessary shopping sprees in the evening, indicates new research co-authored by a Michigan State University business expert.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to escape Sao Paulo's traffic? Take a flying taxiWhile Uber has changed ground transport in many cities, Sao Paulo's infernal traffic jams have sparked a new app that opens the sky to commuters: Voom, a helicopter taxi service that charges according to distance and the passenger's weight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Control of the unfolded protein response in health and diseaseInformation generated by screening tools, readily available therapies and potential pathways to drug development are the cornerstone of informed clinical research and clinical trial design. In a new review in the August 2017 issue of SLAS DISCOVERY (formerly the Journal of Biomolecular Screening), authors Eric Chevet, Ph.D., of Inserm U1242 (Rennes, France) et al. analyze the recent literature and
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Destruction of wetlands linked to algal blooms in Great LakesCanada's current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New gel coatings may lead to better catheters and condomsCatheters, intravenous lines, and other types of surgical tubing are a medical necessity for managing a wide range of diseases. But a patient's experience with such devices is rarely a comfortable one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rwanda's essential oils offer big profits from little landInside a metal shed in southeastern Rwanda, Nicholas Hitimana brandished a plastic container holding a green liquid: geranium essential oil, freshly distilled and ready for export at more than $200 (175 euros) a kilo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare birth of endangered hairy-nosed wombat in AustraliaThe population of one of the world's rarest species has been boosted with the birth of a northern hairy-nosed wombat joey, Australian wildlife officials said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft cloud to help Baidu self-driving car effortMicrosoft's cloud computing platform will be used outside China for collaboration by members of a self-driving car alliance formed by Chinese internet search giant Baidu, the companies announced on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hi Bixby: Samsung phone's voice assistant now speaks EnglishSamsung Electronics says its Bixby voice assistant for smartphones will start speaking English but only in two countries: South Korea and the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tour de France conscious of winning its own 'green jersey'Bicycles don't pollute but the Tour de France, cycling's greatest race, does the exact opposite and organisers are trying to limit the damage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Too many bats are being killed for researchThe work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats—even of threatened species—to study them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Networking is key for cells during bone formationA new study into the way bone cells organise during bone formation could open the door to a better understanding of diseases such as osteoporosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To swallow food, some sharks shrug their shouldersSharks don't have tongues to move food through their mouths, so instead some use their... shoulders?
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Wired
Google’s New Feeds Show You the Internet You Want to SeeThink of Google's new feeds as something like a recommendations list for the entire web.
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The Atlantic
This Cave Holds a Spectacular Record of 5,000 Years of Tsunamis Benjamin Horton remembers being in southeast Asia just months after the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. “They were still dealing with a disaster,” he says. “The roads were in a terrible state.” But in those days, the formerly niche field of tsunami research had taken on new urgency. Horton, who studies sea levels at Rutgers University and Nanyang Technological University , was just one of
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Science | The Guardian
Beauty spot or landscape blot? Computer trained to judge scenery Computer trained to determine what makes places beautiful could help design new towns and decide which areas should be protected, say researchers Wordsworth found it in a host of daffodils; Nan Shepherd in the nooks of the Cairngorms. For Monet it popped up all over the place, from the windmills and canals of Amsterdam, to the sailing boats of Argenteuil. What lends a scene beauty has long been l
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Science | The Guardian
Third-hottest June puts 2017 on track to make hat-trick of hottest years June 2017 was beaten only by June in 2015 and 2016, leaving experts with little hope for limiting warming to 1.5C or even 2C Last month was the third-hottest June on record globally, temperature data suggest, confirming 2017 will almost certainly make a hat-trick of annual climate records, with 2015, 2016 and 2017 being the three hottest years since records began. The figures also cement estimati
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Science | The Guardian
First double hand transplant involving a child declared a success Zion Harvey had procedure in US in 2015 and can now use scissors and play baseball, but report highlights his difficult recovery After almost 11 hours of surgery involving four teams of doctors, Zion Harvey had earned his place in medical history. The eight-year-old had become the first child in the world to receive two new hands in a procedure that seemed to herald a revolution in transplant med
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To swallow food, some sharks shrug their shouldersSophisticated X-ray imaging technology has allowed scientists to see that to keep food moving down toward the digestive tract, bamboo sharks use their shoulders to create suction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How CD44s gives brain cancer a survival advantageIn the case of glioblastoma multiforme, the deadliest type of brain cancer, researchers have discovered that the molecule CD44s seems to give cancer cells a survival advantage. In the lab, eliminating this advantage by reducing the amount of CD44s resulted in cancer cells being more sensitive to the deadly effects of the drug erlotinib.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do BRCA1 mutations cause predominantly breast and ovarian cancer?Researchers report a new, previously unrecognized function of the BRCA1 gene that explains why BRCA1 gene mutation carriers are at increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evaluating low-dose toxicity from endocrine active chemicalsA new report proposes a strategy that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should use to evaluate the evidence of adverse human health effects from low doses of exposure to chemicals that can disrupt the endocrine system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What patients value about access to their visit notesNew findings shed light on what patients value about having access to their visit notes and being invited to participate more actively in the safety of their care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infectionsThe first large-scale genetic study of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultured from patients with bloodstream infections in England showed that drug resistant 'superbugs' don't always out-compete other strains. Research has shown that new types of E. coli occur frequently, but unlike in some other infections, drug-resistant strains do not become a dominant cause of infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA Neutron star mission begins science operationsThe Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer, or NICER, payload completed commissioning and calibration and all systems are working as expected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shadow of a cub brings more hope for tigers in RussiaA new photograph provides further evidence that tigers are re-colonizing lost habitat in Russia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New hot Jupiter marks the first collaborative exoplanet discoveryResearchers have discovered a new 'Hot Jupiter' exoplanet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapyA large-scale trial has found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping EU cities and regions cut carbon emissionsA series of first-ever maps shows regional-scale differences in carbon footprints in the EU. The maps can help guide local and regional policies designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions.
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Futurity.org
Stuff in shellfish hones medical tests A new discovery offers a simple way to boost the accuracy of diagnostic tests for medicine and common assays for laboratory research. Adding polydopamine—a material that was first isolated from shellfish—to these tests at a key step, increases the sensitivity of common bioassays by as many as 100 to 1,000 times. More sensitive tests will allow scientists to identify pathogens, diseases, and speci
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Futurity.org
Can restaurant placemats push kids to eat healthy? Placemats at restaurants—known mostly for quirky games and local business advertisements—could be a way to get kids to choose healthier menu options, a new study suggests. While most of the 4- to 8-year-old participants still picked hot dogs and chicken tenders, the placemats did convince some children to choose healthier options such as turkey on whole wheat bread (“Gobble-Me-Up Turkey Sandwich”
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How did dogs become our best friends? New evidenceDogs were tamed from a single wolf population between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago, a study suggests.
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Ingeniøren
Hovedparten af dit DNA er uden funktionMindst 75 procent af dit arvemateriale spiller ingen rolle, erklærer forskerne ud fra en nogenlunde simpel udregning af, hvordan vi skulle gøre brug af vores DNA, hvis alle molekylerne vitterligt skulle træde i funktion.
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Ingeniøren
En måneds arbejde klaret på ti minutter med et script: Skal du sige det til din arbejdsgiver? Det er én ting at blive erstattet af automatisering, men hvad gør man, når man selv har stået for automatiseringen? https://www.version2.dk/artikel/du-har-automatiseret-dit-arbejde-med-script-skal-du-sige-din-arbejdsgiver-1078468 Emner Automation Version2
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Ingeniøren
Energiprognoser afslører: Vi har ikke hørt det sidste til danske datacentreIfølge Energinets fremskrivninger vil danske datacentre forbruge 3,6 terawatttimer el årligt i 2025. Det svarer til 20-25 datacentre på størrelse med dem, Apple forventer at have i drift i 2024.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Vivian Cheung (U. Michigan / HHMI) 3: Mechanisms that underlie RNA editing and RNA-DNA differences Part 1: Individual Variation in Gene Expression: Dr. Vivian Cheung employs a genetic approach to identify regulators that influence expression levels of genes. Part 2: It’s in our RNA: A study of the RNA-DNA differences: Dr. Vivian Cheung overviews a new form of RNA editing that resulted in RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) that couldn’t be explained by previous mechanisms. Part 3: Mechanisms that under
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Vivian Cheung (U. Michigan / HHMI) 2: It’s in our RNA: A study of the RNA-DNA differences Part 1: Individual Variation in Gene Expression: Dr. Vivian Cheung employs a genetic approach to identify regulators that influence expression levels of genes. Part 2: It’s in our RNA: A study of the RNA-DNA differences: Dr. Vivian Cheung overviews a new form of RNA editing that resulted in RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) that couldn’t be explained by previous mechanisms. Part 3: Mechanisms that under
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Vivian Cheung (U. Michigan / HHMI) 1: Individual Variation in Gene Expression Part 1: Individual Variation in Gene Expression: Dr. Vivian Cheung employs a genetic approach to identify regulators that influence expression levels of genes. Part 2: It’s in our RNA: A study of the RNA-DNA differences: Dr. Vivian Cheung overviews a new form of RNA editing that resulted in RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) that couldn’t be explained by previous mechanisms. Part 3: Mechanisms that under
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Climate scientists flock to France’s call President said ‘Make Our Planet Great Again’ — and researchers signed up. Nature 547 269 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22318
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Control of the unfolded protein response in health and diseaseInformation generated by screening tools, readily available therapies and potential pathways to drug development are the cornerstone of informed clinical research and clinical trial design. In a new review in the August 2017 issue of SLAS Discovery (formerly the Journal of Biomolecular Screening), authors Eric Chevet, Ph.D., of Inserm U1242 (Rennes, France) et al. analyze the recent literature and
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steering an enzyme's 'scissors' shows potential for stopping Alzheimer's diseaseUBC scientists find that changing where an enzyme cuts amyloid beta precursor protein can determine whether Alzheimer's disease develops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way found to boost immunity in fight cancer and infectionsMedical professor Christopher Rudd and his research team have identified a key new mechanism that regulates the ability of T-cells of the immune system to react against foreign antigens and cancer.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Destruction of wetlands linked to algal blooms in Great LakesCanada's current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds obese patients don't need to lose weight before total joint replacementThere's good news from UMass Medical School for overweight people with painfully arthritic hips and knees: A new study finds that obese patients who underwent knee or hip replacement surgery reported virtually the same pain relief and improved function as normal-weight joint replacement patients six months after surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why some women are more likely to feel depressedIt's no secret that the risk of depression increases for women when their hormones are fluctuating. Especially vulnerable times include the menopause transition and onset of postmenopause. There's also postpartum depression that can erupt shortly after childbirth. But why do some women feel blue while others seem to skate through these transitions? One answer is provided through study results bein
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How poverty may affect children's behaviorIn a recent study of young children experiencing homelessness, high-quality parenting was associated with better peer relationships and protection from internalizing problems in the context of family adversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Too many bats are being killed for researchThe work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats -- even of threatened species -- to study them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The dangers of driving after restricted sleep and moderate alcohol intakeIn a recent study, combining moderate alcohol consumption (within legal limits for driving) and moderate sleep restriction led to greater drowsiness and increased deficits in attention, compared with either sleep restriction or alcohol intake alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise packs a punch against inflammationPhysical activity has strong anti-inflammatory properties, according to a recent review.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arts-based groups benefit individuals with mental health conditionsA new study found that participation in arts-based groups -- such as those that involve choir singing and creative writing -- benefits the emotions of both healthy adults and those experiencing mental health conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines birth defects following 9/11 terrorist attacksA recent study found that birth defects among male infants fell below expected values after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nipple temperature may help guide newborns to breastfeedNewborn babies instinctively have the ability to crawl to the breast when placed skin-to-skin on the mother's abdomen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antiplatelet drugs are often inappropriately prescribed in older patientsA study has found that antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, are often inappropriately prescribed in acutely hospitalized older people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding genetic synergy in cleft palateLike mechanics fixing a faulty engine, Youssef A. Kousa, M.S., D.O., Ph.D., says researchers will not be able to remedy problems related to IRF6, a gene implicated in cleft palate, until they better understand how the gene works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive test may predict asthma attacks in childrenA new technology may help to noninvasively analyze lung sounds in children and infants at risk of an asthma attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain antibiotics during pregnancy may increase risk of birth defectsA new study has found links between certain antibiotics during pregnancy and major congenital malformations in newborns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many men with diabetes experience erectile dysfunctionA review of the published literature indicates that erectile dysfunction is common in males with diabetes, affecting more than half of men with the condition and with a prevalence of approximately 3.6 times higher than in non-diabetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test IDs key Alzheimer's markerA new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that measures of amyloid beta in the blood have the potential to help identify people with altered levels of amyloid in their brains or cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, the only way to detect amyloid beta in the brain is via PET scanning, which is expensive and not widely available, or a spinal tap, whi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study looks at physicians who prescribe methadoneA small number of physicians prescribe the majority of the drugs used to treat people in Ontario who are battling opioid addictions, a new study has found.
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Gizmodo
Lawsuit: Over 99 Percent of Uber’s NYC Cars Inaccessible to People With Disabilities Photo: AP Getting rid of CEO Travis Kalanick has apparently not magically resolved all of ride-hailing giant Uber’s many, many problems, with the company now facing a lawsuit in New York over its near-total lack of cars accessible to people with wheelchairs. Disability Rights Advocates filed a lawsuit in the State Supreme Court on Tuesday on behalf of a coalition of activists, the New York Times
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Gizmodo
White House Endorses FCC Chair Ajit Pai's Quest to Murder Net Neutrality Photo: AP In between reeling from the catastrophic failure of the Republican plan to repeal Obamacare and hiding climate scientists from Mark Zuckerberg, Donald Trump’s administration found time on Tuesday to signal FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s bullshit plan to destroy net neutrality has its full backing. Deputy White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters they support Pai’s plan
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Gizmodo
Relive All of RoboCop With This Single Poster All images courtesy of Scott Park Scott Park’s art is always notable for its careful indexing of everything you could ever want to see of a given subject. Want to see pop culture’s most famous cars in Mad Max ’s world ? The badass women of film ? How about every Star Wars vehicle, to scale ? Well now, Park has illustrated all the moments that make RoboCop . The poster was created for Gallery 1988
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Gizmodo
Apple’s Patented iPhone Panic Button Might Not Make You Much Safer Photo: AP Could future iPhones come with a built-in panic button to discreetly summon the cops? It’s certainly a possibility, judging by Apple’s recent patent filings . According to a patent granted to Apple on Tuesday for “Biometric Initiated Communication,” the panic button could operate from a number of inputs including “a particular finger or finger sequence,” “a particular timing or cadence,
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Gizmodo
Russian Government Investigating Fidget Spinners, a ‘Political Technology’ That ‘Controls Children’ In America, we regularly endure news reports about some sort of War on Christmas, so don’t feel too smug. But in Russia, there’s currently an effort to paint fidget spinners as a devious plot by the opposition to “zombify” kids using “political technologies.” The man saying those silly quotes is Ruslan Ostashko, the editor in chief of the Putin-supporting news outlet, PolitRussia . As the New Yor
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Gizmodo
A Ton of Scifi Books Are Coming to TV, Including Kurt Vonnegut's Sirens of Titan Universal has just announced a slate of new genre TV shows, including three new adaptations of fantasy and scifi books. But hidden among those are the first details about Dan Harmon and Evan Katz’s next TV series: Sirens of Titan , an interplanetary epic based on the Kurt Vonnegut novel. Sirens of Titan follows the richest man in 22nd-Century America, Malachi Constant, who gathers his wealth thro
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Gizmodo
Aardvarks Might Be Doomed Because of Climate Change Image: Ewen Roberts /Flickr Creative Commons Aardvarks ( Orycteropus afer ) are probably the most endearingly doofy-looking animals ever to grace the African continent. These Seussian snufflers look like someone threw an anteater, a rabbit, a pig, and an armadillo into a smelter. Aardvarks have entered the consciousness of millions of children as both the first animal in any alphabetic listing, a
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Gizmodo
Kyle MacLachlan Making a Twin Peaks Bento Box on Japanese TV Is About as Bizarre as Twin Peaks Uh... yeah. This does what it says on the tin—it’s an unknown video from some Japanese TV show or informercial, showing Twin Peaks star Kyle MacLachlan creating a bento box that is ostensibly Twin Peaks -themed. I have my doubts. Also, this is weird as hell. The video, uploaded to YouTube by LostDogs10 , features MacLachlan assembling the traditional and sometimes very decorative Japanese boxed l
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Gizmodo
Fusion Democrats, Wake Up and Smell The Failure | Deadspin A Field Guide To Boston Sports Radio Chow Fusion Democrats, Wake Up and Smell The Failure | Deadspin A Field Guide To Boston Sports Radio Chowderheads | The Root I Was Wrong. His Name Is Doctor Umar Johnson | Jezebel British Papers Publish Nude Photos of First Woman Doctor Who |
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Gizmodo
Nerd Chef: The Ultimate Pizza Stone Nerd Chef Nerd Chef’s pizza surfaces boast 20x faster heat transfer than their ceramic counterparts, which may explain why my first attempt with the product yielded a slightly overdone pizza in under two minutes. Nerd Chef is the “sister brand” of ElevationLab , maker of our favorite under desk headphone hook and one of our favorite smartphone docks . Nerd Chef’s baking surfaces are made in the U
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Ars Technica
Alaskan eagle attacks drone above icy waters below Enlarge / Dutch Harbor at Unalaska, Alaska, as seen in 2010. (credit: Tom Doyle ) In Alaska, you don’t mess with nature—lest it mess with you. Emmett Fitch, an Alaska man who runs a small ISP in Unalaska, Alaska—1,000 miles southwest of Anchorage—told Ars that last month he was out helping a drone videographer visiting from Nevada shoot a promotional video in the nearby port of Dutch Harbor. The
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Live Science
Here's Why Newborns Know to Move Toward Mom's NippleNewborn babies can't do much, but place them on their mom's chest and they'll instinctively gravitate to the nipple, to breast-feed.
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The Atlantic
Turkish Court Jails Human-Rights Activists Six human rights activists, including the local director of Amnesty International, were jailed by a Turkish court on Tuesday for allegedly aiding an armed terror group—a common charge brought against dissidents in Turkey, where the government has instated a nationwide crackdown following a failed coup attempt last year. Earlier this month, ten activists, including the six prisoners, were forcibly
21h
Ars Technica
Daimler to offer software update for 3 million Mercedes-Benz diesels in EU Enlarge (credit: Michiel Dijcks ) On Tuesday evening, Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler released a statement saying that it would voluntarily recall three million Mercedes-Benz diesels in the EU to offer a software update that would improve emissions control system performance. The recall will cost the company about €220 million ($254 million). Mercedes-Benz was already in the process of offer
21h
The Atlantic
Russian Anti-Sanctions Campaign Turned to California Congressman Updated on July 19, 2017 The trip was two months before the now-infamous Trump Tower meeting between Trump campaign officials and a Russian lawyer and lobbyist. Representative Dana Rohrabacher, perhaps the most Russia-friendly member of the GOP caucus, led a congressional delegation to Moscow in which he was handed materials critical of the Magnitsky Act, the 2012 bill imposing sanctions on Russi
23h
Live Science
People with Alzheimer's May Have More Bacteria in Their BrainsPeople with Alzheimer's disease may have higher levels of bacteria in their brains compared to people without the condition, a small new study suggests.
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The Atlantic
The Other Putin-Trump Meeting Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET When President Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin went for more than two hours, well past the scheduled half-hour, it was a major news event. But it turns out that wasn’t even the end of the conversation between the two men. Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, first reported the second meeting Tuesday. Other outlets also reported the news, and t
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Live Science
Gunshot Victim Becomes Youngest Person in US to Receive a Face TransplantA 21-year-old woman who was shot in the face as a teenager has become the youngest person in the United States to receive a face transplant.
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The Atlantic
Officer in DuBose Murder Case Won't Be Tried Again Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing will not face a third trial for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man during a traffic stop in 2015, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters announced Tuesday. Both of Tensing’s previous hearings ended in a mistrial, with jurors unable to agree on whether the officer was guilty of murder or voluntary manslaughter. Following the latest
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Pressure's On What We’re Following Repeal and Delay: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing forward on a vote to repeal Obamacare without a plan to replace it. McConnell called last night for the vote after three more Republicans pulled their support for his replacement plan and killed its chances of passing—yet the “repeal-and-delay” proposal is likely to be just as unpopular due to the negative im
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early menopause is independently linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetesWomen with early or normal onset menopause are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with late onset menopause, concludes new research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).
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Wired
A Sorta-Self-Driving Mercedes Tackles Americans’ Greatest Fear: the RoundaboutThe 2018 S-Class takes on more sophisticated turns and lane changes—but the system ain’t perfect.
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Gizmodo
Pushing Particles Forwards Might Make Them Go Backwards Because Quantum Physics Is Bonkers Image: Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons You are very lucky that you ended up about the size that you are today, somewhere between one and ten feet tall and weighing somewhere between one and one thousand pounds. This is a very good size. Not to body shame, but if you were, say, a quadrillion times shorter and weighed a nonillion times less (that’s one followed by 30 zeros), that would be very i
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Gizmodo
What Would Happen If You Actually Walked on the Sun? [Updated] Photo: NASA We just realized it’s the 20th anniversary of Smash Mouth’s “Walkin’ on the Sun,” a song about not being a normie or giving into ephemeral fads like soul patches. Smash Mouth never did that . “Walkin’ on the Sun” is also the title of the official Smash Mouth biography, which is very good according to the 10 reviews it got on Amazon. On this special Tuesday edition of Giz Asks , we spo
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How The Megalodon Hunted | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 Proof that even sharks have a bad day. Stream Full Episodes Now on DiscoveryGO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Di
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Ars Technica
Why we don’t have a ton to say about the Destiny 2 beta Destiny 2 's major May reveal event in Los Angeles came with a substantial hands-on demo, and I walked away from it pretty impressed. Some fans were kinder to the sequel's unveil than others—with many wondering if this was really worthy of its "sequel" designation. Those fans didn't get to play what I played: the new, monstrous Inverted Spire "strike" mission. That changed on Tuesday (for those w
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: My Vote Will Go On Today in 5 Lines After the GOP health-care plan was stalled by unexpected GOP opposition, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he will instead hold a vote “in the near future” to repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it at a later date. Republican Senators Shelley Moore Capito, Lisa Murkowski, and Susan Collins came out against the plan, making it unlikely to pass. President Trump tol
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Big Think
The Science of Ghosts: What's Really Happening When Your Brain Detects a Ghoul? Research on ghost sightings reveal underlying manifestations that affect us in weird ways. Read More
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Ars Technica
California approves cap-and-trade scheme until 2030 Enlarge (credit: Chris Hunkeler ) California lawmakers voted to extend the state’s cap-and-trade program another 10 years on Monday night. The bill includes language that would gradually tighten restrictions on businesses, reducing the amount of greenhouse gases they’re allowed to put in the atmosphere by 40 percent by 2030. California’s cap-and-trade market puts a limit on the amount of greenhou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do BRCA1 mutations cause predominantly breast and ovarian cancer?Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, report a new, previously unrecognized function of the BRCA1 gene that explains why BRCA1 gene mutation carriers are at increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How CD44s gives brain cancer a survival advantageIn the case of glioblastoma multiforme, the deadliest type of brain cancer, researchers have discovered that the molecule CD44s seems to give cancer cells a survival advantage. In the lab, eliminating this advantage by reducing the amount of CD44s resulted in cancer cells being more sensitive to the deadly effects of the drug erlotinib.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eat more chicken: Scientists hone in on genetics behind chicken weight adaptationTaking advantage of a special experimentally-bred population, the Virginia chicken lines, Uppsala University scientist Orjan Carlborg has now led an international research to achieve a better understanding of the genetic architecture behind chicken weight.
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Gizmodo
Strange Pulses From Nearby Star Probably Aren’t From Aliens Artist’s depiction of a red dwarf sprouting a solar flare. This could very well be the source of what the UPR astronomers detected at Aricebo. (Image: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger) Astronomers at the Arecibo Observatory have picked up some strange signals coming from Ross 128, a red dwarf star located 11 light-years from Earth. Naturally, the inability of scientists to immedia
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Popular Science
Neato Botvac D5 Connected Review: A gifted navigator but a second-rate sucker Gadgets An infrared laser navigation system keeps this robotic cleaner on track. The Neato Botvac D5 Connected robotic vacuum makes a battle plan, then methodically picks up the crud from your floors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benefits of gastric bypass surgery linked to changes in sweet taste preferenceWorldwide, the number of patients struggling with obesity is rapidly increasing in both adults and children. Diet and exercise are the mainstays of treatment for obesity, but have limited effectiveness. While bariatric surgery can produce sustained and significant weight loss for most patients, not all patients experience similar benefits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obese and overweight less likely to consider next meal when making portion size decisionsResearchers have found that people with obesity tend to ignore how long it will be until the next meal when choosing how much to eat. In a study designed see if people consider the time interval between two meals when selecting portion sizes, the researchers found that lean people generally do.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-dose diazepam can increase social competitivenessScientists have discovered how low-dose anxiolytics increase the social competitiveness of high-anxious individuals by boosting the energy output of mitochondria in an area of the mammalian brain that controls motivation and reward.
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