Scientific American Content: Global
Psychiatry Group Says Members Can Comment on Trump's Mental HealthThe decision overturns decades-old norms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy-harvesting bracelet could power wearable electronics(Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a bracelet that harvests biomechanical energy from the wearer's wrist movements, which can then be converted into electricity and used to extend the battery lifetime of personal electronics or even fully power some of these devices.
5h
Viden
Spor af 3,7 milliarder år gammelt liv fundet i GrønlandDanske forskere har fundet spor efter noget af det tidligste liv på jorden indkapslet i ædelsten fra Grønland.
14h

LATEST

Ars Technica
Get the NES Classic on ThinkGeek, while you can ThinkGeek Nintendo may have discontinued the NES Classic Edition back in April , but there is one retailer selling new, boxed units today. Thinkgeek tells us it will be putting up an order page (currently broken) for what it say are "thousands" of NES Classic units as part of bundles that range in price from $140 to $220. The order page was supposed to go up at 3 p.m. Eastern today, according to
4min
Big Think
A Calorie is Not a Calorie and Its Source Can Significantly Affect Body Weight Evidence from recent research suggests that it does matter where a calorie comes from because its source influences the intake of the next calorie. Read More
6min
Gizmodo
ThinkGeek Is Selling a Fresh Stash of NES Classics—But There’s a Catch If you were one of the many, many sad people who missed out on snagging the NES Classic Edition before Nintendo inexplicably pulled the plug on it , there’s still a chance you can get one without spending hundreds on eBay as ThinkGeek has apparently stumbled onto a massive cache of the consoles. (The links should be live shortly.) Is there a catch? Of course there is. ThinkGeek claims to have tho
6min
Popular Science
There may be something weird going on with Western men's sperm Health The little swimmers that weren't. A meta-analysis of existing literature suggests sperm counts in Western countries have declined by as much as 50 percent.
13min
The Atlantic
The Burqini Debate's Irresolvable Tension When I wrote a largely personal, impressionistic piece last week about the burqini, it elicited one of the most charged reactions I’ve seen about anything I’ve written. The piece—or at least one reaction to the piece—went viral. The subtitle (“Is there any right way to react to the burqini?”) bothered many readers, who felt that even posing the question left open the possibility that it might be
14min
Futurity.org
Broccoli-based compound may treat melanoma A new compound may lead to a drug that can destroy melanoma cancer cells while leaving nearby healthy cells unharmed, new research on mice and human cells indicates. …the compound caused human melanoma cells to die and inhibited tumor growth by about 69% in a mouse model. Researchers designed and synthesized a compound called napthalamide-isoselenocyanate—NISC-6—to inhibit both the Akt1 pathway a
15min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study points to penile microbiome as a risk factor for HIV in menUncircumcised men with high levels of anaerobic penile bacteria at higher risk for HIV, suggests new research.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High prevalence of evidence of CTE in brains of deceased football playersChronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) was diagnosed post-mortem in a high proportion of former football players whose brains were donated for research, including 110 of 111 National Football League players, according to a study.
17min
Ars Technica
Google tells judge: Don’t let Canada force us to alter US search results Enlarge (credit: Getty Images/Ulrich Baumgartgen ) Google is taking legal action in the US to stop Canada's Supreme Court from controlling its search results worldwide. Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada ordered Google to remove links to webpages owned by a company called Datalink Technologies on all of its search websites, worldwide. Canadian courts had previously found that Datalink was il
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Well-designed visual aids improve risk understandingA University of Oklahoma professor, Edward T. Cokely, shows that informed decision making depends on the ability to accurately evaluate and understand information about risk in a newly published study in the scientific journal Human Factors. A state-of-the-science review of the literature concludes that visual aids are beneficial for diverse people with different levels of numeracy and graph liter
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IU researchers offer new insights into how communities can tap into youth sports tourismTwo Indiana University researchers say creative marketing is needed to reach visitors in what's become a multibillion-dollar-a-year segment of the tourism industry: youth sports tourism.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could spraying particles into marine clouds help cool the planet?A first test of humans' ability to modify clouds would help explain the behavior of clouds and aerosols, while also testing a possible future climate emergency measure.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mediterranean-style diets linked to better brain function in older adultsEating foods included in two healthy diets -- the Mediterranean or the MIND diet -- is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Yoga helps back pain among veteransA study that included 150 veterans with chronic low back pain found that those who completed a 12-week yoga program had better scores on a disability questionnaire, improved pain intensity scores, and a decline in opioid use. The findings jibe with those from two past clinical trials involving non-veterans.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snopes meets $500K crowdfunding goal amid legal battleFact-checking website Snopes.com has quickly met a $500,000 goal set for an online fundraiser amid a legal battle with an outside vendor that Snopes says is holding it hostage.
30min
Futurity.org
5% fewer vaccinations would spike measles cases A five percent drop in the number of children ages 2 to 11 inoculated against the measles, mumps, and rubella would triple the number of annual measles cases in this age group, a new study warns. The MMR vaccine is an inoculation against all three diseases. The additional measles cases would increase annual public health expenditures by at least $2.1 million, or $20,000 per case of measles. “I th
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene therapy helps dogs with muscle dystrophy, humans next?Researchers have used gene editing to reverse symptoms in dogs of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)—a muscle-wasting and life-shortening disease that affects one in 5,000 baby boys.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's 2017 resource 'budget' spent by next week: reportHumanity will have used up its allowance of planetary resources such as water, soil, and clean air for all of 2017 by next week, said a report Tuesday.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Musk, Zuckerberg duel over artificial intelligenceVisionary entrepreneur Elon Musk and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg were trading jabs on social media over artificial intelligence this week in a debate that has turned personal between the two technology luminaries.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists master unexplored electron propertyWhile the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the "valley" property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed "valleytronics" - similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from th
39min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How texting can protect babies from sudden deathEducational videos delivered by text or email successfully encouraged new mothers to use safe sleep practices for their babies, reducing the risk of sudden unexpected infant death, a new study has found.
42min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secret to giving the perfect gift: Stop being afraidPeople would prefer to receive sentimentally valuable gifts, but instead they often receive superficial gifts related to their personal preferences, researchers have found.
42min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change poses threat to European electricity productionThe vulnerability of the European electricity sector to changes in water resources is set to worsen by 2030 as a consequence of climate change, conclude researchers.
42min
Ars Technica
Toyota wants to commercialize solid-state EV batteries by 2022, reports say Enlarge / A power cable sits in the charge point of a Toyota Motor Corp. FT- EV III concept electric vehicle on display during the China (Guangzhou) International Automobile Exhibition in Guangzhou, China, on Saturday, November 21, 2015. Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images ) According to reports in The Wall Street Journal and Japan’s Chunichi Shim
42min
Live Science
Human Ancestor Mated with 'Ghost Lineage' And the Proof Is in Your SpitA protein that helps make human spit slimy reveals signs that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with an extinct human lineage that was an even more distant relation than Neanderthals.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health commentators say there is a lingering consent problem in biobankingResearchers throughout the world are going to great lengths to get hold of your genes, tissue and health information. Yet, remarkably, there is very little consensus on how they should be going about doing that.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite testing program, children with HIV remain undiagnosedA two-year clinic-based HIV testing program in Zimbabwe failed to diagnose many cases of HIV in children in the surrounding area, Dr. Victoria Simms from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK, and colleagues, report in PLOS Medicine.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved retention and outcomes with same-day HIV testing and treatmentInitiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the same day as HIV testing is feasible and leads to improved retention and health outcomes, according to a trial published in PLOS Medicine.
46min
Gizmodo
This TV Backlighting System Fucked Me Up All images: Marina Galperina/Gizmodo This is opulence. Suddenly, there is extra light blasting from behind my TV screen, making a day-glow title sequence positively atomic. The DreamScreen, a backlighting system that’s designed to make your TV viewing more immersive, is a luxury that I absolutely don’t need. In theory, the supplementary lights change color based on the pixels on the TV screen for
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
KSU team contributes to DUNE, the world's biggest neutrino experimentA large international team of researchers—including Kansas State University scientists—is turning to tiny particles to address big questions about dark matter, black holes and the origins of the universe.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's infrared view ofpPowerful storms surrounding Typhoon Noru's eyeNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Noru and gathered infrared data on the cloud top temperatures which gave forecasters an idea of the powerful thunderstorms circling the eye.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motionA toddler running sometimes loses footing because both feet come off the ground at the same time. Kinesin motors that move materials around in cells have the same problem, which limits how fast they can traverse a microtubule in the cell and carry cargo, according to Penn State researchers who have now seen these kinesin motors move using an unusual microscope and tagging method.
51min
The Atlantic
Whale Sharks as Good Luck Charms In Cenderawasih Bay, in West Papua, Indonesia, fishermen set out for days on hand-made floating platforms called bagans. At night, they turn on lights to attract squid and baitfish, and lower nets from their bagans—also attracting whale sharks to the smell and commotion. Bagan fishermen have long believed that whale sharks bring good luck and feed them bits of baitfish. Today, the luck comes to t
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New discovery could reverse tissue damage caused by heart attacksA new discovery helps to explain how cells which surround blood vessels, called pericytes, stimulate new blood vessels to grow with the hormone 'leptin' playing a key role. Leptin is produced by fat cells which helps to regulate energy balance in the body by inhibiting the appetite. This study may have important implications for the treatment of heart attacks and also for cancer.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large single-crystal graphene is possible, say scientistsThe target of large, cheap and quick graphene synthesis has been achieved, report researchers in a new article.
56min
New Scientist - News
Sperm count has fallen by nearly 60 per cent in richer countriesAn analysis of 185 studies has found a 59 per cent drop in the average amount of sperm produced by men from North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand
57min
New Scientist - News
Yellowstone National Park hit by 1400 earthquakes in six weeksA major quake swarm has hit Yellowstone National Park - but it’s unlikely to be a sign of an impending volcanic eruption, according to geologists
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart surface enables advanced manipulation of dropletsFor many years, engineers have sought to create a special kind of surface: one that can both repel and absorb liquids, and whose ability to do so—its "wetting behaviour"—can be quickly and precisely controlled. The technology would have a wide range of potential applications, from water filtration and biomedical devices to liquid optical lenses and lab-on-a-chip systems.
57min
Gizmodo
Watch a Firefighter Ride a High-Powered Hose Thrashing Around Like a Raging Bull GIF GIF: YouTube Among the many dangers firefighters face at work each day, those high-powered water hoses have enough pressure to cause some serious damage if they ever got loose. But they also make for an entertaining makeshift carnival ride that looks far more aggressive than any sketchy mechanical bull you’ll find at a Western-themed bar. At times this video seems more like a scene from a sci
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spots a waning Tropical Depression KulapKulap is now a tropical depression moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible light image of the diminishing storm.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CCNY physicists master unexplored electron propertyWhile the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the 'valley' property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed 'valleytronics' -- similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from t
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motionA toddler running sometimes loses footing because both feet come off the ground at the same time. Kinesin motors that move materials around in cells have the same problem, which limits how fast they can traverse a microtubule in the cell and carry cargo, according to Penn State researchers who have now seen these kinesin motors move using an unusual microscope and tagging method.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Is Complaining Good or Bad For You?Pop psychology tells us that complaining is a sort of catharsis—that by getting our feelings out rather than bottling them up, we’ll feel better. But it turns out this is largely a myth. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
See The Science Behind Michael Phelps's Shark Race | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week To prepare for his greatest adversary, Michael Phelps had to adapt his swimming style and take on new technology that transformed his body. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https:/
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Health commentators say there is a lingering consent problem in biobankingResearchers throughout the world are going to great lengths to get hold of your genes, tissue and health information. Yet, remarkably, there is very little consensus on how they should be going about doing that. In an essay publishing 25 July in the open access journal PLOS Biology, University of Alberta health law researchers Timothy Caulfield and Blake Murdoch argue that there remains a deep lac
1h
Gizmodo
The Politics of Hacking in the Age of Trump Photo: AP There are a lot of unusual things to do at DEF CON, the annual hacker conference that draws tens of thousands of security enthusiasts to Las Vegas in the depths of summer—you can learn to lockpick, go fed-spotting , or hack an internet-connected sex toy . But last year offered something new. Jeff Moss, the founder of DEF CON and its more enterprise-focused sister conference, Black Hat,
1h
The Atlantic
How 3 Americans Were Killed in Jordan Last November a Jordanian guard at a military base opened fire at a training center near Amman, killing three Americans, later identified as Special Forces soldiers. The guard, Sergeant Maarik al-Tawaiha, 39, was sentenced last week to life in prison for killing Staff Sergeant Matthew Lewellen, 27; Staff Sergeant Kevin McEnroe, 30; and Staff Sergeant James Moriarty, 27. He had pleaded not guilty,
1h
Popular Science
The troubling truth about vitamins and herbal supplements Health There’s shockingly little oversight of the companies who sell herbs and vitamins. Supplements are emblazoned with promises that offer quick and easy solutions in a way that medicine can’t—because medicine is bound by evidence. Supplements aren’t.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Playful Einstein photograph goes up for auction Signed and dated copy of the jovial 1951 image to go under the hammer on 27 July; previous copies have sold for almost $44,000 Wild haired with a bushy moustache and his tongue sticking out, the photograph revealing Albert Einstein as something of a prankster is one of the most recognisable images of the physicist. Now a signed and dated copy is about to be auctioned . Snapped by United Press Int
1h
Gizmodo
There's Now a Pro Version of the Insanely Popular Philips OneBlade, and It's $14 Off Right Now Philips OneBlade Pro , $66 | With two extra blades , $81 after $10 coupon The Philips OneBlade is the shaver of choice for our entire staff (except Jillian), and one of the most popular products we’ve ever listed , but Philips recently raised the bar with the release of the OneBlade Pro , and Amazon’s running one of the first discounts we’ve seen on it to date. First, let’s talk about what’s unch
1h
Ars Technica
India’s transport minister vows to ban self-driving cars to save jobs Enlarge / Nitin Jairam Gadkari, minister of Road Transport, Highways and Shipping of India at the India Economic Summit 2016 in New Delhi, India. Copyright by World Economic Forum / Benedikt von Loebell (credit: World Economic Forum ) Companies in the United States, Germany, Japan, and other countries are racing to develop self-driving cars. But India's top transportation regulator says that thos
1h
Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About Marvel's Legacy Project Image: Marvel. Legacy Banner Art by Joe Quesada. There’s been a lot of change at Marvel Comics over the past few years. There was All-New, All-Different . Then there was Marvel Now ( err, again ). Next up: the company is embarking on yet another major roster shake-up with Marvel Legacy — and if you don’t know where to start or how to make sense of it all, we’re here to help. Familiar Faces Return
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA spots a waning Tropical Depression KulapKulap is now a tropical depression moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible light image of the diminishing storm.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart surface enables advanced manipulation of dropletsResearchers at the University of British Columbia have developed an inexpensive, scalable smart surface that is powered by just a conventional electric battery. The copper-based surface changes from being highly water-repellent (superhydrophobic) to highly water-absorbent (superhydrophilic) as electric potential is applied.
1h
The Atlantic
The Strange Cultural Obsession With Brains in Jars Not many people get to contemplate their brain in a jar, but if all goes to plan then I’ll be in that curious position by Christmas. Happily, I’ll still have the brain I’m using right now, which is how I’ll be able to do the contemplating. The other one will be my second brain. About the size of a frozen pea, it will have been grown from a small lump of flesh that researchers at the Institute of
1h
Gizmodo
Rogue Planets May Be Even Lonelier Than We Thought GIF Artist’s impression of a rogue planet causing a gravitational microlensing event. Image: J. Skowron / Warsaw University Observatory; Gif via Gizmodo Rogue planets sound adventurous, like pirates of the final frontier minus the scurvy. The reality is much more depressing: these bodies are untethered to a star , so they’re doomed to dance around the void solo. To make things even sadder, new re
1h
Popular Science
Forget MS Paint—get these digital drawing tools and apps instead DIY You don't need paint or Paint to make a masterpiece. Microsoft Paint may be deprecated, but never fear. From drawing tools to apps, these are the accessories you need to make digital art. So go ahead—get creative.
1h
Ars Technica
The science of why eyewitness testimony is often wrong Enlarge (credit: Gramercy Pictures) The advent of DNA testing has made it uncomfortably clear that our criminal justice system often gets things wrong. Things go wrong for a variety of reasons, but many of them touch on science, or rather the lack of a scientific foundation for a number of forensic techniques. But in 70 percent of the cases where DNA has overturned a conviction, it also contradic
1h
Wired
Popular Remote Administrative Tools Turn Out to Be Easily HackedAs the debate over "hacking back" heats up, it turns out that a lot of the time actually doing so wouldn't be all that hard.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivorsA new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and 'chemo brain': a brisk walk. Researchers looked at the association between physical activity, fatigue and performance on cognitive tasks in nearly 300 breast cancer survivors.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive cross-training enhances learning, study findsJust as athletes cross-train to improve physical skills, those wanting to enhance cognitive skills can benefit from multiple ways of exercising the brain, according to a comprehensive new study. The 18-week study of 318 healthy young adults found that combining physical exercise and mild electric brain stimulation with computer-based cognitive training promoted skill learning significantly more th
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mind-body therapies immediately reduce unmanageable pain in hospital patientsAfter participating in a single, 15-minute session of certain mind-body therapies, patients reported an immediate decrease in pain levels similar to what one might expect from an opioid painkiller. This study is the first to compare the effects of mindfulness and hypnosis on acute pain in the hospital setting.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How fear alone can cause animal extinctionFear alone may contribute to the extinction of animal populations according to a recent study. When scientists exposed fruit flies to the scent of a praying mantis, a known predator, they found that the risk of extinction increased up to seven fold. The increased risk of extinction occurred because at small population sizes, as the flies spent more time being vigilant and less time eating, populat
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular hitchhiker on human protein signals tumors to self-destructEngineers have found that an existing human protein is an ideal carrier for powerful molecules that can signal tumors to self-destruct.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Catnip and dried pig testicles: study reveals medieval infertility advice Researcher finds medieval understanding of male and female infertility was more evenhanded than thought - and discovers some interesting ‘cures’ Boiled catnip taken on an empty stomach for three days could help, or a delicious goblet of dried ground pig testicles mixed with wine: a new study of medieval advice on male infertility – and recipes to remedy it – suggests people were far less ready to
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comprehensive study shows a significant ongoing decline in sperm counts of Western menA rigorous and comprehensive meta-analysis of data collected between 1973 and 2011 finds that among men from Western countries, sperm concentration declined by more than 50 percent, with no evidence of a 'leveling off' in recent years. These findings strongly suggest a significant decline in male reproductive health that has serious implications beyond fertility and reproduction, given recent evid
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bacteria Can Be Resistant To Brand New AntibioticsExposure to existing antibiotics can imbue infectious bacteria with resistance that also kicks in against new drugs related to the originals. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Atlantic
The Swedish Novel That Imagines a Dystopia for the Childless “It was more comfortable than I could have imagined,” is how The Unit begins, with Dorrit, a single, impoverished 50-year-old woman picked up from her home in a metallic red SUV and transported to a luxury facility constructed by the government for people just like her. Her new, two-room apartment is bright and spacious, “tastefully decorated,” inside a complex that includes a theater, art studio
1h
Gizmodo
Sperm Counts Have Plummeted Among Western Men, Scientists Confirm Image: Shutterstock Something weird is going on with human sperm production. For decades, scientists have warned that sperm counts are dropping among Western men, but no one has really been able to prove it. In what is now the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind, scientists have presented compelling evidence in support of this rather alarming assertion, showing that sperm counts have
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intestinal virome changes precede autoimmunity in type I diabetes-susceptible children [Medical Sciences]Viruses have long been considered potential triggers of autoimmune diseases. Here we defined the intestinal virome from birth to the development of autoimmunity in children at risk for type 1 diabetes (T1D). A total of 220 virus-enriched preparations from serially collected fecal samples from 11 children (cases) who developed serum...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Two dynamin-like proteins stabilize FtsZ rings during Streptomyces sporulation [Microbiology]During sporulation, the filamentous bacteria Streptomyces undergo a massive cell division event in which the synthesis of ladders of sporulation septa convert multigenomic hyphae into chains of unigenomic spores. This process requires cytokinetic Z-rings formed by the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ, and the stabilization of the newly formed Z-rings is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bifunctionality of a biofilm matrix protein controlled by redox state [Microbiology]Biofilms are communities of microbial cells that are encapsulated within a self-produced polymeric matrix. The matrix is critical to the success of biofilms in diverse habitats; however, many details of the composition, structure, and function remain enigmatic. Biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis depend on the production of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Attention model of binocular rivalry [Neuroscience]When the corresponding retinal locations in the two eyes are presented with incompatible images, a stable percept gives way to perceptual alternations in which the two images compete for perceptual dominance. As perceptual experience evolves dynamically under constant external inputs, binocular rivalry has been used for studying intrinsic cortical computations...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Acetylcholine-producing NK cells attenuate CNS inflammation via modulation of infiltrating monocytes/macrophages [Neuroscience]The nonneural cholinergic system of immune cells is pivotal for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Here we demonstrate the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and cholinergic enzymes in murine natural killer (NK) cells. The capacity for acetylcholine synthesis by NK cells increased markedly under inflammatory conditions such as experimental autoimmune...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synaptic properties of the lemniscal and paralemniscal pathways to the mouse somatosensory thalamus [Neuroscience]Somatosensory information is thought to arrive in thalamus through two glutamatergic routes called the lemniscal and paralemniscal pathways via the ventral posterior medial (VPm) and posterior medial (POm) nuclei. Here we challenge the view that these pathways functionally represent parallel information routes. Using electrical stimulation and an optogenetic approach in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Corticogeniculate feedback sharpens the temporal precision and spatial resolution of visual signals in the ferret [Neuroscience]The corticogeniculate (CG) pathway connects the visual cortex with the visual thalamus (LGN) in the feedback direction and enables the cortex to directly influence its own input. Despite numerous investigations, the role of this feedback circuit in visual perception remained elusive. To probe the function of CG feedback in a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prediction of intracellular exposure bridges the gap between target- and cell-based drug discovery [Pharmacology]Inadequate target exposure is a major cause of high attrition in drug discovery. Here, we show that a label-free method for quantifying the intracellular bioavailability (Fic) of drug molecules predicts drug access to intracellular targets and hence, pharmacological effect. We determined Fic in multiple cellular assays and cell types representing...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Analyses of PDE-regulated phosphoproteomes reveal unique and specific cAMP-signaling modules in T cells [Pharmacology]Specific functions for different cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) have not yet been identified in most cell types. Conventional approaches to study PDE function typically rely on measurements of global cAMP, general increases in cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), or the activity of exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC). Although newer approaches...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Loss of mouse cardiomyocyte talin-1 and talin-2 leads to {beta}-1 integrin reduction, costameric instability, and dilated cardiomyopathy [Physiology]Continuous contraction–relaxation cycles of the heart require strong and stable connections of cardiac myocytes (CMs) with the extracellular matrix (ECM) to preserve sarcolemmal integrity. CM attachment to the ECM is mediated by integrin complexes localized at the muscle adhesion sites termed costameres. The ubiquitously expressed cytoskeletal protein talin (Tln) is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Caffeine induces gastric acid secretion via bitter taste signaling in gastric parietal cells [Physiology]Caffeine, generally known as a stimulant of gastric acid secretion (GAS), is a bitter-tasting compound that activates several taste type 2 bitter receptors (TAS2Rs). TAS2Rs are expressed in the mouth and in several extraoral sites, e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, in which their functional role still needs to be clarified....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Li et al., Targeting reactive nitrogen species suppresses hereditary pancreatic cancer [Corrections]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Targeting reactive nitrogen species suppresses hereditary pancreatic cancer,” by Mo Li, Qian Chen, Teng Ma, and Xiaochun Yu, which was first published June 19, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1702156114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:7106–7111). The authors note that the author contributions footnote appeared incorrectly. Xiaochun Yu should be...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reappraisal of dioxygen binding in NOV1 crystal structures [Biological Sciences]McAndrew et al. (1) report the crystal structure of NOV1, a stilbene-cleaving carotenoid cleavage oxygenase (CCO), in substrate-free and substrate/product-bound forms, all of which with dioxygen (O2) bound to the nonheme iron center of the enzyme. In mononuclear nonheme iron enzymes studied to date, the Fe–O2 interaction is strongly promoted...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Kiser: Dioxygen binding in NOV1 crystal structures [Biological Sciences]In PNAS (1) Kiser has expressed some skepticism about the identity of the active-site dioxygen molecule and suggests that the density is better modeled with two water molecules at partial occupancy. In response, we have performed an extended analysis with the following results. There are currently 321 entries for proteins...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Linking brain networks and behavioral variability to different types of mind-wandering [Biological Sciences]Research focusing on mind-wandering (MW) has consistently shown that this mental state is accompanied by variable, error-prone behavior and increased activity within the default mode network (DMN) and the frontoparietal control network (FPN) (1–6). Given that the DMN has been implicated in internal mentation such as future planning or self-referential...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Csifcsak and Mittner: Fitting data to neural models of mind-wandering [Biological Sciences]We recently provided evidence for a nonunitary account of default mode network (DMN) function, because DMN activity was associated with greater mind-wandering (MW) on the one hand, but with behavioral stability on the other (1). Csifcsák and Mittner (2) suggest that their nonunitary model of MW could explain these results....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Stephen C. West [Profiles]Biochemist Stephen West attended university to avoid a lifetime of working with fish. Growing up near Hull, Yorkshire, England, West saw the swollen hands of the dock workers who spent their days filleting fish under ice-cold water. His father, a fish buyer, would come home with his arms covered in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Different phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate distinct phosphoproteomes during cAMP signaling [Pharmacology]Sixty years ago, Sutherland and Rall identified cAMP as the first second messenger involved in cell–cell communication (reviewed in ref. 1). For many years, Sutherland had been interested in understanding how hormones, such as catecholamines, released by one cell type could alter the characteristics of a target cell because hormones...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Uncoupling protein 1 controls reactive oxygen species in brown adipose tissue [Biochemistry]Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an organ specialized to fuel nonshivering thermogenesis for the defense of high body temperature of many eutherian mammals in the cold. Cold-induced sympathetic stimulation of brown adipocytes activates lipolysis, glucose uptake, and mitochondrial biogenesis, with the mitochondrial biogenesis providing a powerful cellular engine for heat...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Regular patterns link individual behavior to population persistence [Ecology]Resisting and recovering from disturbances is a necessity for most species. The strategy is sometimes collective, depending on the aggregation of interacting individuals into regular patterns. However, relating patterns of abundance across scales to both individual behavior and population persistence remains a major challenge for ecology. Such patterns are found...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Big-time insights from a tiny bird fossil [Evolution]Birds are among the most diverse and widely distributed groups of vertebrate animals. There are well over 10,000 recognized species alive today, occupying virtually every subaerial ecosystem (1). The amazing breadth of extant bird diversity is manifested in dizzying varieties of forms, colors, and lifestyles, ranging from iridescent, hovering, nectar-feeding...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Anti-inflammatory {omega}-3 endocannabinoid epoxides [Biochemistry]Clinical studies suggest that diets rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) provide beneficial anti-inflammatory effects, in part through their conversion to bioactive metabolites. Here we report on the endogenous production of a previously unknown class of ω-3 PUFA–derived lipid metabolites that originate from the crosstalk between endocannabinoid and cytochrome...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into lipoprotein N-acylation by Escherichia coli apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase [Biochemistry]Gram-negative bacteria express a diverse array of lipoproteins that are essential for various aspects of cell growth and virulence, including nutrient uptake, signal transduction, adhesion, conjugation, sporulation, and outer membrane protein folding. Lipoprotein maturation requires the sequential activity of three enzymes that are embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane. First, phosphatidylglycerol:
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
G9a coordinates with the RPA complex to promote DNA damage repair and cell survival [Biochemistry]Histone methyltransferase G9a has critical roles in promoting cancer-cell growth and gene suppression, but whether it is also associated with the DNA damage response is rarely studied. Here, we report that loss of G9a impairs DNA damage repair and enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapeutics. In...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Size and mobility of lipid domains tuned by geometrical constraints [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, proteins and lipids are organized in clusters, the latter ones often called lipid domains or “lipid rafts.” Recent findings highlight the dynamic nature of such domains and the key role of membrane geometry and spatial boundaries. In this study, we used porous substrates...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Functional characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived arterial endothelial cells [Cell Biology]Here, we report the derivation of arterial endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells that exhibit arterial-specific functions in vitro and in vivo. We combine single-cell RNA sequencing of embryonic mouse endothelial cells with an EFNB2-tdTomato/EPHB4-EGFP dual reporter human embryonic stem cell line to identify factors that regulate arterial endothelial...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
TRPM7 senses oxidative stress to release Zn2+ from unique intracellular vesicles [Cell Biology]TRPM7 (transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7) regulates gene expression and stress-induced cytotoxicity and is required in early embryogenesis through organ development. Here, we show that the majority of TRPM7 is localized in abundant intracellular vesicles. These vesicles (M7Vs) are distinct from endosomes, lysosomes, and other familiar...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines [Ecology]The population extinction pulse we describe here shows, from a quantitative viewpoint, that Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions. Therefore, humanity needs to address anthropogenic population extirpation and decimation immediately. That conclusion is based on analyses of the numbers and degrees...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Continuous immunotypes describe human immune variation and predict diverse responses [Immunology and Inflammation]The immune system consists of many specialized cell populations that communicate with each other to achieve systemic immune responses. Our analyses of various measured immune cell population frequencies in healthy humans and their responses to diverse stimuli show that human immune variation is continuous in nature, rather than characterized by...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Influenza infection triggers disease in a genetic model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [Immunology and Inflammation]Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Most MS patients experience periods of symptom exacerbation (relapses) followed by periods of partial recovery (remission). Interestingly, upper-respiratory viral infections increase the risk for relapse. Here, we used an autoimmune-prone T-cell receptor transgenic mouse (2D2) and a mouse-adapted...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Suboptimal T-cell receptor signaling compromises protein translation, ribosome biogenesis, and proliferation of mouse CD8 T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of T cells have been rich sources of unbiased data for understanding T-cell activation. Lack of full concordance of these datasets has illustrated that important facets of T-cell activation are controlled at the level of translation. We undertook translatome analysis of CD8 T-cell activation, combining...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Loss-of-function mutation in Mirta22/Emc10 rescues specific schizophrenia-related phenotypes in a mouse model of the 22q11.2 deletion [Medical Sciences]Identification of protective loss-of-function (LoF) mutations holds great promise for devising novel therapeutic interventions, although it faces challenges due to the scarcity of protective LoF alleles in the human genome. Exploiting the detailed mechanistic characterization of animal models of validated disease mutations offers an alternative. Here, we provide insights into...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Combined epigenetic and differentiation-based treatment inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and links HIF2{alpha} to tumor suppression [Medical Sciences]Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer characterized by variable outcomes ranging from spontaneous regression to life-threatening progression. High-risk neuroblastoma patients receive myeloablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem-cell transplant followed by adjuvant retinoid differentiation treatment. However, the overall survival remains low; hence, there is an urgent need for alternative thera
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression [Medical Sciences]Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) have been identified as key contributors to therapy resistance, recurrence, and progression of diffuse gliomas, particularly glioblastoma (GBM). BTICs are elusive therapeutic targets that reside across the blood–brain barrier, underscoring the urgent need to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Additionally, intratumoral heterogeneity and adaptations to therap
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stem cell-released oncolytic herpes simplex virus has therapeutic efficacy in brain metastatic melanomas [Medical Sciences]The recent Food and Drug Administration approval of immunogenic oncolytic virus (OV) has opened a new era in the treatment of advanced melanoma; however, approximately 50% of patients with melanoma develop brain metastasis, and currently there are no beneficial treatment options for such patients. To model the progression of metastases...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Why eyewitnesses fail [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Eyewitness identifications play an important role in the investigation and prosecution of crimes, but it is well known that eyewitnesses make mistakes, often with serious consequences. In light of these concerns, the National Academy of Sciences recently convened a panel of experts to undertake a comprehensive study of current practice...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Light-mediated self-organization of sunflower stands increases oil yield in the field [Agricultural Sciences]Here, we show a unique crop response to intraspecific interference, whereby neighboring sunflower plants in a row avoid each other by growing toward a more favorable light environment and collectively increase production per unit land area. In high-density stands, a given plant inclined toward one side of the interrow space,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cultural evolutionary theory: How culture evolves and why it matters [Colloquium Paper]Human cultural traits—behaviors, ideas, and technologies that can be learned from other individuals—can exhibit complex patterns of transmission and evolution, and researchers have developed theoretical models, both verbal and mathematical, to facilitate our understanding of these patterns. Many of the first quantitative models of cultural evolution were modified from existing...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Culture extends the scope of evolutionary biology in the great apes [Colloquium Paper]Discoveries about the cultures and cultural capacities of the great apes have played a leading role in the recognition emerging in recent decades that cultural inheritance can be a significant factor in the lives not only of humans but also of nonhuman animals. This prominence derives in part from these...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary neuroscience of cumulative culture [Colloquium Paper]Culture suffuses all aspects of human life. It shapes our minds and bodies and has provided a cumulative inheritance of knowledge, skills, institutions, and artifacts that allows us to truly stand on the shoulders of giants. No other species approaches the extent, diversity, and complexity of human culture, but we...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Older, sociable capuchins (Cebus capucinus) invent more social behaviors, but younger monkeys innovate more in other contexts [Colloquium Paper]An important extension to our understanding of evolutionary processes has been the discovery of the roles that individual and social learning play in creating recurring phenotypes on which selection can act. Cultural change occurs chiefly through invention of new behavioral variants combined with social transmission of the novel behaviors to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enhanced coupling of light into a turbid medium through microscopic interface engineering [Applied Biological Sciences]There are many optical detection and sensing methods used today that provide powerful ways to diagnose, characterize, and study materials. For example, the measurement of spontaneous Raman scattering allows for remote detection and identification of chemicals. Many other optical techniques provide unique solutions to learn about biological, chemical, and even...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
UCP1 deficiency causes brown fat respiratory chain depletion and sensitizes mitochondria to calcium overload-induced dysfunction [Biochemistry]Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria exhibit high oxidative capacity and abundant expression of both electron transport chain components and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP1 dissipates the mitochondrial proton motive force (Δp) generated by the respiratory chain and increases thermogenesis. Here we find that in mice genetically lacking UCP1, cold-induced activation...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stable membrane orientations of small dual-topology membrane proteins [Biochemistry]The topologies of α-helical membrane proteins are generally thought to be determined during their cotranslational insertion into the membrane. It is typically assumed that membrane topologies remain static after this process has ended. Recent findings, however, question this static view by suggesting that some parts of, or even the whole...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MmpL3 is the flippase for mycolic acids in mycobacteria [Biochemistry]The defining feature of the mycobacterial outer membrane (OM) is the presence of mycolic acids (MAs), which, in part, render the bilayer extremely hydrophobic and impermeable to external insults, including many antibiotics. Although the biosynthetic pathway of MAs is well studied, the mechanism(s) by which these lipids are transported across...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
mTORC1 activates SREBP-2 by suppressing cholesterol trafficking to lysosomes in mammalian cells [Biochemistry]mTORC1 is known to activate sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) including SREBP-2, a master regulator of cholesterol synthesis. Through incompletely understood mechanisms, activated mTORC1 triggers translocation of SREBP-2, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein, to the Golgi where SREBP-2 is cleaved to translocate to the nucleus and activate gene expression...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Monomeric and fibrillar {alpha}-synuclein exert opposite effects on the catalytic cycle that promotes the proliferation of A{beta}42 aggregates [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The coaggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and α-synuclein is commonly observed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The complex interplay between Aβ and α-synuclein has led to seemingly contradictory results on whether α-synuclein promotes or inhibits Aβ aggregation. Here, we show how these conflicts...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crystal structure of CO-bound cytochrome c oxidase determined by serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography at room temperature [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain, translocates protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane by harnessing the free energy generated by the reduction of oxygen to water. Several redox-coupled proton translocation mechanisms have been proposed, but they lack confirmation, in part from the absence of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antibody-induced uncoating of human rhinovirus B14 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Rhinoviruses (RVs) are the major causes of common colds in humans. They have a nonenveloped, icosahedral capsid surrounding a positive-strand RNA genome. Here we report that the antigen-binding (Fab) fragment of a neutralizing antibody (C5) can trigger genome release from RV-B14 to form emptied particles and neutralize virus infection. Using...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Otoferlin is a multivalent calcium-sensitive scaffold linking SNAREs and calcium channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Sensory hair cells rely on otoferlin as the calcium sensor for exocytosis and encoding of sound preferentially over the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin. Although it is established that synaptotagmin cannot rescue the otoferlin KO phenotype, the large size and low solubility of otoferlin have prohibited direct biochemical comparisons that could...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modeling adsorption properties of structurally deformed metal-organic frameworks using structure-property map [Chemistry]Structural deformation and collapse in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can lead to loss of long-range order, making it a challenge to model these amorphous materials using conventional computational methods. In this work, we show that a structure–property map consisting of simulated data for crystalline MOFs can be used to indirectly obtain...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Deletion of Gas2l3 in mice leads to specific defects in cardiomyocyte cytokinesis during development [Developmental Biology]GAS2L3 is a recently identified cytoskeleton-associated protein that interacts with actin filaments and tubulin. The in vivo function of GAS2L3 in mammals remains unknown. Here, we show that mice deficient in GAS2L3 die shortly after birth because of heart failure. Mammalian cardiomyocytes lose the ability to proliferate shortly after birth,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mercury evidence for pulsed volcanism during the end-Triassic mass extinction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) has long been proposed as having a causal relationship with the end-Triassic extinction event (∼201.5 Ma). In North America and northern Africa, CAMP is preserved as multiple basaltic units interbedded with uppermost Triassic to lowermost Jurassic sediments. However, it has been unclear whether this...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early Paleocene landbird supports rapid phylogenetic and morphological diversification of crown birds after the K-Pg mass extinction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Evidence is accumulating for a rapid diversification of birds following the K–Pg extinction. Recent molecular divergence dating studies suggest that birds radiated explosively during the first few million years of the Paleocene; however, fossils from this interval remain poorly represented, hindering our understanding of morphological and ecological specialization in early...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Song hybridization events during revolutionary song change provide insights into cultural transmission in humpback whales [Colloquium Paper]Cultural processes occur in a wide variety of animal taxa, from insects to cetaceans. The songs of humpback whales are one of the most striking examples of the transmission of a cultural trait and social learning in any nonhuman animal. To understand how songs are learned, we investigate rare cases...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identifying early modern human ecological niche expansions and associated cultural dynamics in the South African Middle Stone Age [Colloquium Paper]The archaeological record shows that typically human cultural traits emerged at different times, in different parts of the world, and among different hominin taxa. This pattern suggests that their emergence is the outcome of complex and nonlinear evolutionary trajectories, influenced by environmental, demographic, and social factors, that need to be...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Behavioral self-organization underlies the resilience of a coastal ecosystem [Ecology]Self-organized spatial patterns occur in many terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Theoretical models and observational studies suggest self-organization, the formation of patterns due to ecological interactions, is critical for enhanced ecosystem resilience. However, experimental tests of this cross-ecosystem theory are lacking. In this study, we experimentally test the hypothesis that...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bayesian markets to elicit private information [Economic Sciences]Financial markets reveal what investors think about the future, and prediction markets are used to forecast election results. Could markets also encourage people to reveal private information, such as subjective judgments (e.g., “Are you satisfied with your life?”) or unverifiable facts? This paper shows how to design such markets, called...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
On the debris-level origins of adhesive wear [Engineering]Every contacting surface inevitably experiences wear. Predicting the exact amount of material loss due to wear relies on empirical data and cannot be obtained from any physical model. Here, we analyze and quantify wear at the most fundamental level, i.e., wear debris particles. Our simulations show that the asperity junction...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interannual cycles of Hantaan virus outbreaks at the human-animal interface in Central China are controlled by temperature and rainfall [Environmental Sciences]Hantavirus, a rodent-borne zoonotic pathogen, has a global distribution with 200,000 human infections diagnosed annually. In recent decades, repeated outbreaks of hantavirus infections have been reported in Eurasia and America. These outbreaks have led to public concern and an interest in understanding the underlying biological mechanisms. Here, we propose a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The extension of biology through culture [Biological Sciences]Biology is the study of life. How our understanding of the nature and evolution of living systems is being enriched and extended through new discoveries about social learning and culture in human and nonhuman animals is the subject of the collection of articles we introduce here. Recent decades have revealed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gene-culture coevolution in whales and dolphins [Colloquium Paper]Whales and dolphins (Cetacea) have excellent social learning skills as well as a long and strong mother–calf bond. These features produce stable cultures, and, in some species, sympatric groups with different cultures. There is evidence and speculation that this cultural transmission of behavior has affected gene distributions. Culture seems to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cultural macroevolution matters [Colloquium Paper]Evolutionary thinking can be applied to both cultural microevolution and macroevolution. However, much of the current literature focuses on cultural microevolution. In this article, we argue that the growing availability of large cross-cultural datasets facilitates the use of computational methods derived from evolutionary biology to answer broad-scale questions about the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coevolution of cultural intelligence, extended life history, sociality, and brain size in primates [Colloquium Paper]Explanations for primate brain expansion and the evolution of human cognition and culture remain contentious despite extensive research. While multiple comparative analyses have investigated variation in brain size across primate species, very few have addressed why primates vary in how much they use social learning. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Haploid selection within a single ejaculate increases offspring fitness [Evolution]An inescapable consequence of sex in eukaryotes is the evolution of a biphasic life cycle with alternating diploid and haploid phases. The occurrence of selection during the haploid phase can have far-reaching consequences for fundamental evolutionary processes including the rate of adaptation, the extent of inbreeding depression, and the load...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fast and accurate HLA typing from short-read next-generation sequence data with xHLA [Genetics]The HLA gene complex on human chromosome 6 is one of the most polymorphic regions in the human genome and contributes in large part to the diversity of the immune system. Accurate typing of HLA genes with short-read sequencing data has historically been difficult due to the sequence similarity between...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
BMTP-11 is active in preclinical models of human osteosarcoma and a candidate targeted drug for clinical translation [Medical Sciences]Osteosarcoma occurs predominantly in children and young adults. High-grade tumors require multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings, along with surgical intervention. Despite this approach, death from respiratory failure secondary to the development and progression of pulmonary metastases remains a significant problem. Here, we identify the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
tsRNA signatures in cancer [Medical Sciences]Small, noncoding RNAs are short untranslated RNA molecules, some of which have been associated with cancer development. Recently we showed that a class of small RNAs generated during the maturation process of tRNAs (tRNA-derived small RNAs, hereafter “tsRNAs”) is dysregulated in cancer. Specifically, we uncovered tsRNA signatures in chronic lymphocytic...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Polar delivery of Legionella type IV secretion system substrates is essential for virulence [Microbiology]A recurrent emerging theme is the targeting of proteins to subcellular microdomains within bacterial cells, particularly to the poles. In most cases, it has been assumed that this localization is critical to the protein’s function. Legionella pneumophila uses a type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) to export a large number of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Auditory cortex interneuron development requires cadherins operating hair-cell mechanoelectrical transduction [Neuroscience]Many genetic forms of congenital deafness affect the sound reception antenna of cochlear sensory cells, the hair bundle. The resulting sensory deprivation jeopardizes auditory cortex (AC) maturation. Early prosthetic intervention should revive this process. Nevertheless, this view assumes that no intrinsic AC deficits coexist with the cochlear ones, a possibility...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Frequency-specific directed interactions in the human brain network for language [Neuroscience]The brain’s remarkable capacity for language requires bidirectional interactions between functionally specialized brain regions. We used magnetoencephalography to investigate interregional interactions in the brain network for language while 102 participants were reading sentences. Using Granger causality analysis, we identified inferior frontal cortex and anterior temporal regions to receive wide
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Acute inflammation regulates neuroregeneration through the NF-{kappa}B pathway in olfactory epithelium [Neuroscience]Adult neural stem cells/progenitor cells residing in the basal layer of the olfactory epithelium are capable of reconstituting the neuroepithelium even after severe damage. The molecular events underlying this regenerative capacity remain elusive. Here we show that the repair of neuroepithelium after lesioning is accompanied by an acute, but self-limited,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetic identification of a hindbrain nucleus essential for innate vocalization [Neuroscience]Vocalization in young mice is an innate response to isolation or mechanical stimulation. Neuronal circuits that control vocalization and breathing overlap and rely on motor neurons that innervate laryngeal and expiratory muscles, but the brain center that coordinates these motor neurons has not been identified. Here, we show that the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Entanglement and thermodynamics after a quantum quench in integrable systems [Physics]Entanglement and entropy are key concepts standing at the foundations of quantum and statistical mechanics. Recently, the study of quantum quenches revealed that these concepts are intricately intertwined. Although the unitary time evolution ensuing from a pure state maintains the system at zero entropy, local properties at long times are...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Probing large viscosities in glass-formers with nonequilibrium simulations [Physics]For decades, scientists have debated whether supercooled liquids stop flowing below a glass transition temperature Tg0 or whether motion continues to slow gradually down to zero temperature. Answering this question is challenging because human time scales set a limit on the largest measurable viscosity, and available data are equally well...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genomic architecture of biomass heterosis in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Heterosis is most frequently manifested by the substantially increased vigorous growth of hybrids compared with their parents. Investigating genomic variations in natural populations is essential to understand the initial molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis in plants. Here, we characterized the genomic architecture associated with biomass heterosis in 200 Arabidopsis hybrids. The...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of the Arabidopsis TOPLESS corepressor provides insight into the evolution of transcriptional repression [Plant Biology]Transcriptional repression involves a class of proteins called corepressors that link transcription factors to chromatin remodeling complexes. In plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, the most prominent corepressor is TOPLESS (TPL), which plays a key role in hormone signaling and development. Here we present the crystallographic structure of the Arabidopsis TPL...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
NLR network mediates immunity to diverse plant pathogens [Plant Biology]Both plants and animals rely on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins to respond to invading pathogens and activate immune responses. An emerging concept of NLR function is that “sensor” NLR proteins are paired with “helper” NLRs to mediate immune signaling. However, our fundamental knowledge of sensor/helper NLRs in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A social insect perspective on the evolution of social learning mechanisms [Colloquium Paper]The social world offers a wealth of opportunities to learn from others, and across the animal kingdom individuals capitalize on those opportunities. Here, we explore the role of natural selection in shaping the processes that underlie social information use, using a suite of experiments on social insects as case studies....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pursuing Darwin’s curious parallel: Prospects for a science of cultural evolution [Colloquium Paper]In the past few decades, scholars from several disciplines have pursued the curious parallel noted by Darwin between the genetic evolution of species and the cultural evolution of beliefs, skills, knowledge, languages, institutions, and other forms of socially transmitted information. Here, I review current progress in the pursuit of an...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The evolution of cognitive mechanisms in response to cultural innovations [Colloquium Paper]When humans and other animals make cultural innovations, they also change their environment, thereby imposing new selective pressures that can modify their biological traits. For example, there is evidence that dairy farming by humans favored alleles for adult lactose tolerance. Similarly, the invention of cooking possibly affected the evolution of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synchronized practice helps bearded capuchin monkeys learn to extend attention while learning a tradition [Colloquium Paper]Culture extends biology in that the setting of development shapes the traditions that individuals learn, and over time, traditions evolve as occasional variations are learned by others. In humans, interactions with others impact the development of cognitive processes, such as sustained attention, that shape how individuals learn as well as...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conformity does not perpetuate suboptimal traditions in a wild population of songbirds [Colloquium Paper]Social learning is important to the life history of many animals, helping individuals to acquire new adaptive behavior. However despite long-running debate, it remains an open question whether a reliance on social learning can also lead to mismatched or maladaptive behavior. In a previous study, we experimentally induced traditions for...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intranasal oxytocin treatment for social deficits and biomarkers of response in children with autism [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by core social deficits. Prognosis is poor, in part, because existing medications target only associated ASD features. Emerging evidence suggests that the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) may be a blood-based biomarker of social functioning and a possible treatment for ASD. However, prior OXT treatment trials...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cumulative cultural learning: Development and diversity [Colloquium Paper]The complexity and variability of human culture is unmatched by any other species. Humans live in culturally constructed niches filled with artifacts, skills, beliefs, and practices that have been inherited, accumulated, and modified over generations. A causal account of the complexity of human culture must explain its distinguishing characteristics: It...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Young children communicate their ignorance and ask questions [Colloquium Paper]Children acquire information, especially about the culture in which they are being raised, by listening to other people. Recent evidence has shown that young children are selective learners who preferentially accept information, especially from informants who are likely to be representative of the surrounding culture. However, the extent to which...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in cognitive flexibility and hypothesis search across human life history from childhood to adolescence to adulthood [Colloquium Paper]How was the evolution of our unique biological life history related to distinctive human developments in cognition and culture? We suggest that the extended human childhood and adolescence allows a balance between exploration and exploitation, between wider and narrower hypothesis search, and between innovation and imitation in cultural learning. In...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How language shapes the cultural inheritance of categories [Colloquium Paper]It is widely recognized that language plays a key role in the transmission of human culture, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which language simultaneously encourages both cultural stability and cultural innovation. This paper examines this issue by focusing on the use of language to transmit categories,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Harm to self outweighs benefit to others in moral decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]How we make decisions that have direct consequences for ourselves and others forms the moral foundation of our society. Whereas economic theory contends that humans aim at maximizing their own gains, recent seminal psychological work suggests that our behavior is instead hyperaltruistic: We are more willing to sacrifice gains to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reduced orbitofrontal cortical volume is associated with interdependent self-construal [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Interdependent self-construal refers to a view of the self as embedded in relationships with others. Prior work suggests that this construal is linked to a strong value placed on social obligations and duties. Interdependent people are therefore cognitively attuned to others and various social events in their surroundings while down-regulating...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Self-organization in biological systems Dislodged mussel on sandy sediment. Self-organized systems create patterns resulting from interactions between components. Mónica López Pereira et al. (pp. 7975–7980) evaluated intraspecific interference-driven self-organization in sunflower stands. The authors cultivated sunflower plants in rows at the typical commercial density of 5.1 plants per m2 and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
News Feature: Can animal culture drive evolution? [Anthropology]Once the purview of humans, culture has been observed in all sorts of animals. But are these behaviors merely ephemeral fads or can they shape the genes and traits of future generations? In Antarctic waters, a group of killer whales makes a wave big enough to knock a seal from...
1h
New Scientist - News
See inside the 580-million-year-old creature no one understandsWe know very little about the Ediacaran organisms that lived on Earth before true animals, but scans are now revealing what they looked like on the inside
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New shark species glows in the dark, weighs about 2 pounds and has a huge noseJust as "Shark Week" is gearing up, researchers have discovered a new species of shark 17 years in the making. Like finding a needle in a haystack, it was well worth the wait as this elusive creature is yet to be seen in the wild.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Astronaut shares 'burrito of awesomeness' aurora videoNasa's Jack Fischer gives his take on this aurora time-lapse from the International Space Station.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Sperm counts among western men have halved in last 40 years – study Reasons for the ‘shocking’ drop are unclear, say researchers, and represent a huge and neglected area of public health Sperm counts among men have more than halved in the last 40 years, research suggests, although the drivers behind the decline remain unclear. The latest findings reveal that between 1973 and 2011, the concentration of sperm in the ejaculate of men in western countries has fallen
2h
cognitive science
How real magic happens when the brain sees hidden things submitted by /u/qyfaf [link] [comments]
2h
Wired
San Quentin’s Web Design Shop Gives Inmates a Future-Ready Fresh StartA new program helps inmates learn to code, and earn a decent wage.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
TV's Big Bang Theory Inspires Real New Chemical: BaZnGa!Fictional physicist Sheldon Cooper’s catchphrase has been brought to life in the lab -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Ars Technica
Adobe ending Flash support at the end of 2020 Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) Back in 2012, Adobe recognized that Flash's end was near, with a five- to 10-year timeframe for its eventual phasing out. Today, the company got specific: Flash will be supported through to the end of 2020, after which the Flash player will cease to be developed and distributed. In the early days of the Web, Flash served an essential role, offering graphical
2h
The Atlantic
Erdogan's Anti-Westernism Picks Up Speed A foreign journalist representing a reputable German newspaper is picked up and accused of supporting a terrorist organization. A German human-rights organizer is also detained on charges of supporting a yet-to-be-defined terrorist organization. Is this happening in North Korea? Iran? No—this is occurring in Turkey, where the arrests of Deniz Yüksel, a Turkish-German dual national working for the
2h
The Atlantic
Why an Effort to Thwart Some Boycotts of Israel Fails the Free-Speech Test Like disputes over abortion, the death penalty, and drug prohibition, the conflict between Israel and Palestine divides Americans into polarized camps of mutual distrust. If any consensus is possible on those issues, it is that there is nothing like a consensus, and that the attendant conflict is better handled through politics than violence. Yet dozens of members of Congress have backed confusin
2h
Blog » Languages » English
Ketchup vs. Mustard It’s the dog days of summer here at HQ, and there seems to be some disagreement about what’s the right thing to put on hot dogs, hamburgers, fries, and more: ketchup, or mustard? Which is superior? In ballparks across the United States, for instance, this question can be a matter of life and death. Ketchup (or, if you insist, catsup): Zesty yet sweet, tomatoey but nothing like pomodoro sauce, ket
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report concludes SBE sciences help advance national health, prosperity and defenseAt the request of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has produced a report, "The Value of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences to National Priorities." The report concludes that social, behavioral and economic sciences (SBE) further NSF's mission to advance U.S. health, prosperity, welfare and defense.
2h
The Scientist RSS
Technique Rapidly Generates Monoclonal Antibodies In VitroA new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.
2h
Futurity.org
Hydraulic system in fins gives tuna extra speed New research suggests that pressurized hydraulic fin control—a vascular specialization that is unique among vertebrates—supports the outstanding maneuverability and precision locomotion of tuna. Cutting through the ocean like jets through the sky, giant bluefin tuna are built for performance, endurance, and speed. Just as the fastest planes have carefully positioned wings and tail flaps to ensure
2h
Wired
Climate Change Is Killing Us Right NowThe most obvious effect of global warming is not a doomsday scenario. Extreme heat is happening today, and wreaking havoc on vulnerable bodies.
2h
Gizmodo
Adobe Is Finally Killing Flash (For Real, This Time) Here it is, hiding halfway down the company’s latest press release , like a guillotine in a crowded town square: “Adobe is planning to end-of-life Flash.” Boom. That’s the sound of the blade dropping, and Flash, finally, thankfully, mercifully dying. Because Adobe just killed it. It’s actually slightly more complicated than that. Adobe is working with Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Mozil
2h
Gizmodo
Giphy's Mobile Web Tool Turns Your Phone's Videos and Photos Into GIFs Giphy, the popular GIF-making and sharing platform, launched a new web tool today that allows you to make GIFs right from your phone’s camera—no app download required. While on your iOS or Android device, head to their Mobile GIF Maker page in your mobile browser of choice, then upload videos or photos from your phone’s camera roll. Just like that, you’ve made a GIF! You can also snap pictures wi
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's infrared view ofpPowerful storms surrounding Typhoon Noru's eyeNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Noru and gathered infrared data on the cloud top temperatures which gave forecasters an idea of the powerful thunderstorms circling the eye.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism severity detected with brain activity testUCLA researchers have discovered that children with autism have a tell-tale difference on brain tests compared with other children. Specifically, the researchers found that the lower a child's peak alpha frequency -- a number reflecting the frequency of certain brain waves -- the lower their non-verbal IQ was. This is the first study to highlight peak alpha frequency as a promising biomarker.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Add penis bacteria to the list of HIV risk factorsCertain bacteria found on the penis raise the risk of HIV infection, a new study finds.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police turn to hackathons as crime fighting goes digitalPolice and law enforcement staff are turning to hackathons – collaborative events for developing technology – to come up with new ways of searching for clues within the terabytes of data that many people produce every year.
2h
Futurity.org
These molecules hitch a ride to destroy cancer Researchers have found that a modified ribonucleic acid molecule can “hitchhike” on a plentiful human protein to travel through the blood to a tumor, and then signal that tumor to self-destruct. Their research gives oncologists a better shot at overcoming the problems of drug resistance, toxicity to patients, and a host of other barriers to consistently achieving successful gene therapy for cance
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Freshwater flow affects Everglades fish, but how?With tarpon fishing season at its peak, FIU scientists are tracking the saltwater fish throughout the Florida Everglades. They want to know how water conditions affect some of the state's most lucrative recreational fisheries.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Sonca making landfall in VietnamNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Sonca as it began making landfall in Vietnam. Aqua gathered temperature data using infrared light that showed the extent of the strongest storms. Those storms were generating heavy rains that were expected to affect Vietnam, Thailand and Laos.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite shows Tropical Storm Greg being affected by wind shearNOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an infrared look at a disorganized Tropical Storm Greg as it continues to weaken and get battered by wind shear in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks at Hurricane Irwin in infrared lightNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Irwin as it was strengthening toward hurricane status. Aqua gathered temperature data using infrared light that revealed the power building within.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France appeals for help in fighting Cote d'Azur firesFrance asked for Europe's help Tuesday in fighting wild fires that have consumed swathes of forest in the southeast, one of which is raging near the popular resort of Saint-Tropez.
2h
Gizmodo
Wikileaks Pettiness Reveals What Might Be the Secret Amazon Account of Journalist Kurt Eichenwald Justin Berry, right, listens Kurt Eichenwald testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee regarding sexual exploitation of children over the Internet in Washington in 2006. (Photo: AP) Well, this is ugly: On Monday evening, international secret-sharing website WikiLeaks, whose founder Julian Assange’s behavior of late has been slightly concerning , tweeted out what certainly looks like
2h
Live Science
Butterfly Wing Optics Help to Cheaply Create Bright, Realistic HologramsResearchers used complex 3D nanostructures to produce holograms with the rich colors and bright display that may one day make sophisticated holograms an everyday reality.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
If Only a Simple Gadget Rating Could Save Us From CyberattackSuggestions that a security score be awarded to connected devices is a lovely idea that would be almost impossible to implement.
2h
Wired
Figma Wants Designers to Collaborate Google-Docs StyleThe startup unveiled two key features that should give its competitors pause.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Six billion records hacked so far this year: researchersA surge in computer hacking has led to the breach of more than six billion records so far this year, topping the total for 2016, security researchers said Tuesday.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Sonca making landfall in VietnamNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Sonca as it began making landfall in Vietnam. Aqua gathered temperature data using infrared light that showed the extent of the strongest storms. Those storms were generating heavy rains that were expected to affect Vietnam, Thailand and Laos.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite shows Tropical Storm Greg being affected by wind shearNOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an infrared look at a disorganized Tropical Storm Greg as it continues to weaken and get battered by wind shear in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmologists produce new maps of dark matter dynamicsNew maps of dark matter dynamics in the Universe have been produced by a team of international cosmologists.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA looks at Hurricane Irwin in infrared lightNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Irwin as it was strengthening toward hurricane status. Aqua gathered temperature data using infrared light that revealed the power building within.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shedding light on cause of resistance to tumor immunotherapyIn tumor immunotherapy, the body's own defense system is activated against the tumor cells. However, for the majority of patients, the tumor cells become resistant to the treatments used. Researchers at the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now found in skin cutaneous melanoma that an epigenetic control protein is key to the development of this resistance.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global health lessons from Thailand's successful liver fluke elimination campaignOutreach and education efforts can play an outsize role in disease elimination programs, researchers suggest in a review publishing July 25 in Trends in Parasitology. As a case study, they consider recent public health efforts in Thailand, using everything from village-wide presentations to children's comics, to elaborate traditional song-and-dance routines to try to stamp out infections caused by
2h
Gizmodo
UPS Is Scared Of Getting Hacked During DEF CON Image: Getty While tens of thousands of hackers gear up to attend hacker week in Las Vegas, UPS is taking basic precautions to protect itself from any malicious links. The Caesar’s Palace UPS store is warning hotel guest that its printing services will be limited in anticipation of DEF CON, the world’s oldest and largest hacker conference, which takes place from July 27 to July 30. Advertisement
2h
Ars Technica
Net neutrality faceoff: Congress summons ISPs and websites to hearing Enlarge / Netflix took an active role in fighting for net neutrality rules in 2014. (credit: Yuri Victor ) The biggest websites and the biggest Internet service providers are being summoned to Congress to testify about net neutrality. US Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.), chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said he is scheduling a full committee hearing titled, "Ground rules for the Interne
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colorizing images with deep neural networksFor decades, image colorization has enjoyed an enduring interest from the public. Though not without its share of detractors, there is something powerful about this simple act of adding color to black and white imagery, whether it be a way of bridging memories between the generations, or expressing artistic creativity. However, the process of manually adding color can be very time consuming and re
2h
The Atlantic
Mitch McConnell's Latest Obamacare Gambit: 'Skinny Repeal' Senate Republicans may be dramatically scaling back their ambitions for repealing the Affordable Care Act as they struggle to find the votes necessary to pass any legislation dismantling the 2010 law. Ahead of a crucial procedural vote on Tuesday, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Senator Rand Paul that if the Senate could not pass either McConnell’s proposed replacement for Obamacare or a bro
2h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Science Weekly live: call for listener's questions - Science Weekly podcastThis Thursday, we’ll be recording a very special Q&A episode with Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw and we want your questions!
2h
Science | The Guardian
Science Weekly live: call for listener's questions - Science Weekly podcast This Thursday, we’ll be recording a very special Q&A episode with Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw and we want your questions! Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter On Thursday 27 July at 5.30pm (BST), we’ll be recording a very special episode of Science Weekly, live on the Guardian’s Facebook page . Sitting down with
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cryptococcal meningitis should be classified as a 'neglected tropical disease,' researchers sayCrytococcal meningitis is a deadly invasive fungal infection which affects hundreds of thousands of HIV patients in the late stage of their disease every year.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hopes high to slash the number of deaths from killer fungal disease in AfricaExperts aim to halve the number of deaths from cryptococcal meningitis by changing drug treatment programmes after the results of a new medical trial.
2h
cognitive science
Detect and prevent Alzheimer’s disease before memory loss submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
2h
cognitive science
Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality: Anil Seth submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
2h
Popular Science
This engineer has a wild plan to save coral reefs from climate change From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News A different kind of pipeline. An American researcher wants to use energy generated by ocean waves to pump cool water to heat-stressed corals through a durable, lightweight pipe he designed.
3h
Ars Technica
MAME devs are cracking open arcade chips to get around DRM Enlarge / A look inside the circuitry of a "decapped" arcade chip. (credit: Caps0ff ) The community behind the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator (MAME) has gone to great lengths to preserve thousands of arcade games run on hundreds of different chipsets through emulation over the years. That preservation effort has now grown to include the physical opening of DRM-protected chips in order to view t
3h
Futurity.org
The inside of the moon is surprisingly wet Using satellite data, researchers have for the first time detected widespread water within ancient explosive volcanic deposits on the moon, suggesting that its interior contains substantial amounts of indigenous water. The study finds that numerous volcanic deposits distributed across the surface of the moon contain unusually high amounts of trapped water compared with surrounding terrains. The f
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
How the “Gangnam Style” Video Became a Global PandemicDo viral videos spread in the same way as infectious diseases?
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
How earthquake scientists eavesdrop on North Korea’s nuclear blastsResearchers monitor the power and location of underground nuclear weapons testing by North Korea.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mind-body therapies immediately reduce unmanageable pain in hospital patientsAfter participating in a single, 15-minute session of one of these mind-body therapies, patients reported an immediate decrease in pain levels similar to what one might expect from an opioid painkiller. This study is the first to compare the effects of mindfulness and hypnosis on acute pain in the hospital setting.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colorizing images with deep neural networksFor decades, image colorization has enjoyed an enduring interest from the public. Though not without its share of detractors, there is something powerful about this simple act of adding color to black and white imagery, whether it be a way of bridging memories between the generations, or expressing artistic creativity. A team of researchers has proposed a new technique to leverage deep networks an
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy: Microdystrophin restores muscle strength in Duchenne muscular dystrophyResearchers from Genethon, the AFM-Telethon laboratory, Inserm (UMR 1089, Nantes) and the University of London (Royal Holloway) demonstrated the efficacy of an innovative gene therapy in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Indeed, after injecting microdystrophin (a 'shortened' version of the dystrophin gene) via a drug vector, the researchers managed to restore muscle strength and stabil
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive cross-training enhances learning, study findsJust as athletes cross-train to improve physical skills, those wanting to enhance cognitive skills can benefit from multiple ways of exercising the brain, according to a comprehensive new study. The 18-week study of 318 healthy young adults found that combining physical exercise and mild electric brain stimulation with computer-based cognitive training promoted skill learning significantly more th
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Hilary on verge of major hurricane statusNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Hurricane Hilary as it continued to strengthen. The National Hurricane Center expects Hilary to become a major hurricane on July 27.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI may help predict cognitive impairment in professional fightersImages of the brain's gray and white matter obtained with multiple MRI techniques can help identify and track cognitive impairment in active professional fighters, according to a new study.
3h
Gizmodo
How the Dragonfly’s Surprisingly Complex Brain Makes it a Deadly Hunter Image: Wikimedia Like a baseball player running to make a catch, dragonflies are also capable of predicting the trajectory of a moving object, typically its next meal. New research is revealing the mechanisms behind this complex cognitive task, which was once thought to be exclusive to mammals. It’s hoped that these insights will lead to innovations in robot vision. As humans, we take it for gran
3h
New Scientist - News
Aliens slumbering for billions of years are out there – really?Trying to explain the Fermi paradox by invoking aliens that sleep for aeons is a speculative idea to be taken with a large pinch of salt, says Geraint Lewis
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM 2Q net earnings fall on loss from sale of European unitGeneral Motors' second-quarter net profit fell more than 40 percent as the carmaker lost money on the sale of its European unit and took charges for restructuring in India and selling its business in South Africa.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global ransomware attacks on the rise: EuropolGlobal ransomware attacks soared by over 11 percent in the 12 months to March, Europol reported Tuesday, but specialist tools developed with its partners had helped unlock some 28,000 encrypted devices.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team uses airborne telescopes to study Sun and Mercury during total solar eclipseA team led by Southwest Research Institute will use airborne telescopes aboard NASA research aircraft to study the solar corona and Mercury's surface during this summer's total solar eclipse. The August 21 observations will provide the clearest images to date of the Sun's outer atmosphere and attempt the first-ever "thermal images" of surface temperature variations on Mercury.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research reveals potential for synthetic materials systems that can 'count' and sense their sizeFrom the smallest cell to humans, most organisms can sense their local population density and change behavior in crowded environments. For bacteria and social insects, this behavior is referred to as "quorum sensing." Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have utilized computational modeling to mimic such quorum sensing behavior in synthetic materials, which c
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP Satellite sees Hilary on verge of major hurricane statusNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Hurricane Hilary as it continued to strengthen. The National Hurricane Center expects Hilary to become a major hurricane on July 27.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cooler cows have healthier calvesEnvironmental influences affecting cows during pregnancy have been shown to induce life-long physical and metabolic changes in the offspring. To learn more about the effects of heat stress on calves conceived during the summer, Pablo Pinedo, from Colorado State University, and Albert De Vries, from the University of Florida, examined data from more than 150 herds of dairy cattle in Florida, where
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elevated cholesterol's link with canine cancer includes a better prognosisUsually thought of as a health detriment, elevated cholesterol may play a role in longer survival times for dogs with a common form of bone cancer.
3h
Gizmodo
Moto Z2 Force Still Has Those Sad Mods, But Maybe the Phone Will Be Good This Time Photo: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Motorola stands alone. Last year LG and Google both killed their respective modular phones. So the new Moto Z2 Force, with its small array of magnetic attachments, is the closest thing we have to a smartphone with customizable modular hardware. No one actually wants this, but that’s not stopping Motorola from doubling down and insisting that the modular phone’s time has
3h
Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Sport-Brella XL, Wi-Fi Range Extender, Yoga Mat, and More Silicon Power’s rugged hard drives , a $15 TP-Link range extender , and the XL version of the ultra-popular Sport-Brella lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Silicon Power 1TB Hard Drive , $59 with code 15TYPEC4U | 2TB , $85 with code 15TYPEC4U External hard drives are pretty fragile things, so if you’re a bit of a klutz
3h
Science | The Guardian
Google enters race for nuclear fusion technology The tech giant and a leading US fusion company develop a new computer algorithm that significantly speeds up progress towards clean, limitless energy Google and a leading nuclear fusion company have developed a new computer algorithm which has significantly speeded up experiments on plasmas, the ultra-hot balls of gas at the heart of the energy technology. Tri Alpha Energy , which is backed by Mi
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chasing the Total Solar Eclipse from NASA's WB-57F jetsFor most viewers, the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse will last less than two and half minutes. But for one team of NASA-funded scientists, the eclipse will last over seven minutes. Their secret? Following the shadow of the Moon in two retrofitted WB-57F jet planes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
We have a quorumResearchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have utilized computational modeling to mimic such quorum sensing behavior in synthetic materials, which could lead to devices with the ability for self-recognition and self-regulation.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivorsA new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and 'chemo brain': a brisk walk. Researchers at the University of Illinois, along with collaborators at Digital Artefacts in Iowa City, Iowa, and Northeastern University in Boston, looked at the association between physical activity, fatigue and performance on cognitive tasks in nearly 300 breast cancer su
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elevated cholesterol's link with canine cancer includes a better prognosisUsually thought of as a health detriment, elevated cholesterol may play a role in longer survival times for dogs with a common form of bone cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research lacking when it comes to heart disease in prison populationsA multi-institution team found multiple areas of research that can be explored in both the incarcerated and released population -- which number more than 13 million Americans -- to better understand and prevent cardiovascular disease.
3h
The Atlantic
Why Hasn’t ISIS Nuked America Yet? In the last three years, I have not spent much time wondering whether ISIS has access to radioactive material. I know they have had access, because I had a hand in getting it to them. In 2005, while working for an air cargo company in Mosul, I delivered a large wooden box, marked for consignment to the University of Mosul. To fly it in, we needed a special plane, an Antonov-12, whose cargo hold w
3h
The Atlantic
The Strange, Slow-Motion Defenestration of Jeff Sessions Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III has spent much of his career making enemies. The Alabaman’s strident views have won him plenty of detractors, from civil-rights activists to fellow members of the Senate. But in Donald Trump, Sessions believed he had finally found a champion and fellow traveler. Instead, it seems Sessions has found his most formidable enemy yet. Trump is now on his second consecu
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chances to treat childhood dementiaAlthough dementia is most often seen in adults, childhood or adolescent dementia does occur. A team of researchers believes that established therapeutic drugs might be effective against childhood dementia.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
The World May Have Less Time to Address Climate Change Than Scientists ThoughtA new global temperature baseline casts doubt on humanity's ability to meet the Paris target -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Big Think
Pay with Your Microchipped Hand? You Can at This Wisconsin Company. Employees at 32M, a company based in Wisconsin, now have the option of getting microchipped. Workers implanted with the RFID chip will be able to open doors, store medical info, and pay for purchases. Should this be the future workplace? Read More
3h
Big Think
Elon Musk Warns U.S. Governors That AI Poses An "Existential Risk" to Humanity Elon Musk issues a stark warning at the National Governor's Association meeting. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lutein may counter cognitive aging, study findsSpinach and kale are favorites of those looking to stay physically fit, but they also could keep consumers cognitively fit, according to a new study from University of Illinois researchers.The study, which included 60 adults aged 25 to 45, found that middle-aged participants with higher levels of lutein -- a nutrient found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale, as well as avocados and
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chasing the Total Solar Eclipse from NASA's WB-57F jetsA team of NASA-funded scientists will take to the skies during the Aug. 21 eclipse, using two of NASA's WB-57 jet planes to chase the shadow of the moon for unparalleled observations of the sun and Mercury.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Americans say discussions about clinical trials should be part of standard of careAn overwhelming majority of Americans (86%) agree that health care professionals should discuss clinical trials with patients diagnosed with a disease as part of their standard of care, according to a new national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America. And three-quarters of respondents (75%) agree that taking part in clinical trials is as valuable to our health care system as givi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How texting can protect babies from sudden deathEducational videos delivered by text or email successfully encouraged new mothers to use safe sleep practices for their babies, reducing the risk of sudden unexpected infant death, a new study has found.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A bar magnet creates chaos in plasmaPlacing a magnet on your refrigerator might hold up your calendar, but researchers from India's Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics found that placing one outside a plasma chamber causes a localized, fireball-like structure. This work may help understand plasma dynamics under these north-south, or dipolar, magnetic fields. They present their results this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new optimization model could bring higher solar-power integrationWith numerous installations of solar power systems for residential homes, there is a challenge to balance supply and demand to make these intermittent energy sources reliable. Demand response is one promising way to increase operational flexibility and energy efficiency, and researchers in Malaysia have incorporated scenarios in case studies based on 100 urban low-voltage network samples to learn
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When shallow defects align, diamonds shine for unprecedented quantum sensitivityImagine a sensor sensitive enough to detect changes in the proton concentration of a single protein, within a single cell. This level of insight would reveal quantum-scale dynamics of that protein's function, but demands a sensor with controllable features at a similar scale. Thanks to a new technique, quantum sensing abilities are approaching this scale of precision. The researchers report their
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic predisposition to higher calcium levels linked with increased risk of coronary artery diseaseA genetic predisposition to higher blood calcium levels was associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease and heart attack, according to a study published by JAMA.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mobile health intervention improves adherence to safe sleep practices for infantsAmong mothers of newborns, participation in a mobile health intervention that included receiving frequent educational emails or texts resulted in improved adherence to infant safe sleep practices such as the appropriate sleep position and no soft-bedding use, according to a study published by JAMA.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High prevalence of evidence of CTE in brains of deceased football playersChronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) was diagnosed post-mortem in a high proportion of former football players whose brains were donated for research, including 110 of 111 National Football League players, according to a study published by JAMA.
3h
The Atlantic
The Brutal Cynicism of Lost in America Still Resonates This might sound hard to believe, but the notion that Americans all live in hermetic, deluded bubbles defined by their own narrow experiences existed long before anyone ever heard of social media. In the final act of the 1985 comedy Lost in America , a beleaguered yuppie named David Howard (Albert Brooks) finally gives up on his dream of quitting his job and traveling the country free of responsi
3h
The Atlantic
The Algorithm That Makes Preschoolers Obsessed With YouTube Toddlers crave power. Too bad for them, they have none. Hence the tantrums and absurd demands. (No, I want this banana, not that one, which looks identical in every way but which you just started peeling and is therefore worthless to me now.) They just want to be in charge! This desire for autonomy clarifies so much about the behavior of a very small human. It also begins to explain the popularit
3h
The Atlantic
Evaluating Trump's Psyche in Public It’s not hard to find somebody who’s willing to call the president of the United States crazy. “Madman” was, after all, one of the words that cropped up most frequently in coverage about him during the 2016 campaign. But psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental-health professionals have been especially careful about not speculating about the president’s mental state. Well, some of them have
3h
Ars Technica
A new deal could end Bitcoin’s long-running civil war Enlarge (credit: BTC Keychain ) The price of Bitcoin surged late last week as it became clear that a proposal to expand the Bitcoin network's capacity had the support it needed to go into effect. Supporters of the proposal hope that it will put an end to a two-year-old feud that has been tearing the Bitcoin community apart. The core dispute is over how to accommodate the payment network's growing
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dodder: A parasite involved in the plant alarm systemParasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta (dodder) not only deplete nutrients from their host plants, but also function as important 'information brokers' among neighboring plants, when insects feed on host plants, a team of scientists has discovered.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making polymer chemistry 'click'A research team has developed a faster and easier way to make a class of sulfur-containing plastics that will lower the cost of large-scale production.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical route towards electronic devices in grapheneEssential electronic components, such as diodes and tunnel barriers, can be incorporated in single graphene wires (nanoribbons) with atomic precision. The goal is to create graphene-based electronic devices with extremely fast operational speeds.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New treatment options for non-alcoholic fatty liver diseaseNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent liver diseases worldwide. The underlying causes involve obesity and decreased physical activity leading to accompanying metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Currently no approved pharmacotherapy is available. Therefore, the aim of a new joint research initiative is to employ a novel and applicable lifestyle intervention that i
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seawalls: Ecological effects of coastal armoring in soft sediment environmentsFor nearly a century, the O'Shaughnessy seawall has held back the sand and seas of San Francisco's Ocean Beach. At work even longer: the Galveston seawall, built after America's deadliest hurricane in 1900 killed thousands in Texas.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate new way to produce high-density clusters of aligned quantum sensors in diamondImagine a sensor so sensitive it can detect changes in the proton concentration of a single protein, within a single cell. This level of insight would reveal elusive quantum-scale dynamics of that protein's function, potentially even in real time, but demands a sensor with controllable features at a similar scale.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BMW to build electric Mini in Oxford despite looming BrexitGermany's BMW will make the electric version of its Mini compact cars at its factory in Oxford, England, a decision that comes at a time when automakers are scrutinizing investment plans due to Britain's impending departure from the European Union.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A bar magnet creates chaos in plasmaPlacing a magnet on your refrigerator might hold up your calendar, but researchers from India's Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics found that placing one outside a plasma chamber causes a localized, fireball-like structure. This work may help understand plasma dynamics under these north-south, or dipolar, magnetic fields. They present their results this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas.
4h
Wired
How They Pulled Off 'Atomic Blonde''s* Killer Action SequenceDirector David Leitch used analog techniques to make action cinema feel real again.
4h
Futurity.org
Married trans people less likely to face discrimination Transgender people who are married are less likely to experience discrimination than their unmarried counterparts, a new study suggests. “…there is certainly a long way to go to fully eliminate the discrimination.” The findings speak to the well-established marital advantage even among transgender couples, a fast-growing but little-studied population. Some 1.4 million adults identify as transgend
4h
Gizmodo
Shocking Study Finds Traumatic Neurological Disorder in 110 of 111 Donated NFL Player Brains Study author Robert Stern stands by bran scans at a meeting in 2016 (Image: AP) No one ever said playing football was good for your brain. By this point, most sports fans have heard that those who suffer repeated concussions could possibly also suffer early-onset dementia and other neurological symptoms. This, in fact, could have lead Kansas City Chiefs’ Jovan Belcher to kill his girlfriend and h
4h
Quanta Magazine
Building Codes for Bacterial Cities The greenish glow under the microscope might not have rivaled Times Square in its intensity, but to the microbiologist Katharine Coyte , her first glimpse of this bustling city was just as exciting. As a doctoral student at the University of Oxford, she had engineered a small plastic slab studded with holes, like the world’s tiniest slice of Swiss cheese, called a microfluidic chip. It was meant
4h
TEDTalks (video)
A simple new blood test that can catch cancer early | Jimmy LinJimmy Lin is developing technologies to catch cancer months to years before current methods. He shares a breakthrough technique that looks for small signals of cancer's presence via a simple blood test, detecting the recurrence of some forms of the disease 100 days earlier than traditional methods. It could be a ray of hope in a fight where early detection makes all the difference.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nielsen to count viewers for Hulu, YouTube live TV servicesNielsen will begin to tabulate how many people get their live TV from Hulu and YouTube, giving media companies and advertisers a better idea of how many people now stream broadcast networks rather than watching them on traditional TV.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vatican switches off fountains as Italy battles droughtThe historic fountains in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican lay empty Tuesday after the tiny city state turned them off as Italy struggles with a prolonged draught.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows India can integrate 175 GW of renewable energy into its electricity gridThe U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has confirmed the technical and economic viability of integrating 175 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy into India's grid by 2022.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows India can integrate 175 GW of renewable energy into its electricity gridThe US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has confirmed the technical and economic viability of integrating 175 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy into India's grid by 2022.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cooler cows have healthier calvesEnvironmental influences affecting cows during pregnancy have been shown to induce life-long physical and metabolic changes in the offspring. To learn more about the effects of heat stress on calves conceived during the summer, Pablo Pinedo, from Colorado State University, and Albert De Vries, from the University of Florida, examined data from more than 150 herds of dairy cattle in Florida, where
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery could reverse tissue damage caused by heart attacksA new discovery by University of Bristol scientists helps to explain how cells which surround blood vessels, called pericytes, stimulate new blood vessels to grow with the hormone 'leptin' playing a key role. Leptin is produced by fat cells which helps to regulate energy balance in the body by inhibiting the appetite. This study, described in Scientific Reports, may have important implications for
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designing soft robots: Ethics-based guidelines for human-robot interactionsSoft-bodied robots offer the possibility for social engagement, and novel tactile human-robot interactions that require careful consideration of the potential for misplaced emotional attachments and personally and socially destructive behavior by users.
4h
The Atlantic
Manafort Subpoenaed Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET The Senate Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, to appear Wednesday at a public hearing on attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Manafort’s extensive ties to Russian officials have made him a figure of scrutiny in Russia-related controversies plaguing the White House. FLAG: The Senate Judicia
4h
New Scientist - News
Lasers reactivate ‘lost’ memories in mice with Alzheimer’sIt was thought that Alzheimer’s completely erases memories, but a mouse experiment suggests the condition messes with our ability to recall them instead
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Symbiosis: Butter for my honeyTextbooks tell us that, in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses, the host plant supplies its fungal symbionts solely with sugars, in return for inorganic nutrients. New findings now show that lipids are also on the menu.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sophisticated medical imaging technique proves useful for automotive industryMany of today's cars are coated with paint that exhibits a metallic or glittery shine. The exact sparkle and color you see is determined by the distribution and characteristics of tiny metal flakes used in the paint. A new approach based on the medical imaging technique optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides the car industry with a practical way to automatically analyze these metal flakes, wh
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing soft robots: Ethics-based guidelines for human-robot interactionsSoft-bodied robots offer the possibility for social engagement, and novel tactile human-robot interactions that require careful consideration of the potential for misplaced emotional attachments and personally and socially destructive behavior by users. The ethical challenges related to human-robot interactions and how these should contribute to soft robotics design in the context of social intera
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What do Trump's tweets say about his personality?The Twitter messages of Donald J. Trump, the entrepreneurial businessman turned US president, show that he is creative, competitive and a rule-breaker, but also has neurotic tendencies. An analysis of Trump's tweets and what implications his personality traits have for political leadership are the focus of a study published in Springer's journal Small Business Economics.
4h
Live Science
Mitochondria or Midi-Chlorians? 'Star Wars' Hoax Paper Published in 4 JournalsA ridiculous hoax paper mixing up mitochondria with 'Star Wars' midi-chlorians gets published in four predatory journals.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venus's turbulent atmosphereVenus is often referred to as Earth's twin because both planets share a similar size and sur-face composition. Also, they both have atmospheres with complex weather systems. But that is about where the similarities end: Venus is one the most hostile places in our solar system. Its atmosphere consists of 96.5 percent carbon dioxide, with surface temperatures of con-stantly about 500 degrees Celsius
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sophisticated medical imaging technique proves useful for automotive industryA new approach analyzing car paint based on the medical imaging technique optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides the car industry with a practical way to automatically analyze these metal flakes, which until now have been difficult to image, in order to improve the efficiency of the automotive finishing process.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What do Trump's tweets say about his personality?The Twitter messages of Donald J. Trump, the entrepreneurial businessman turned US president, show that he is creative, competitive and a rule-breaker, but also has neurotic tendencies. An analysis of Trump's tweets and what implications his personality traits have for political leadership are the focus of a study published in Springer's journal Small Business Economics.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Natural molecule to boost the performance of electrodes for rechargeable batteriesChlorophyll, blood, and vitamin B12 are all based on the porphyrin molecule. But porphyrin can also be used as an electrode material where it speeds up the charging process of rechargeable batteries. In the 'Angewandte Chemie International Edition' journal, researchers from KIT now present the new material system that could mark the beginning of an era of high-performance energy storage and superc
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles loaded with component of common spice kill cancer cellsAttaching curcumin, a component of the common spice turmeric, to nanoparticles can be used to target and destroy treatment-resistant neuroblastoma tumor cells, according to a new study published in Nanoscale. The study, conducted in partnership by researchers at Nemours Children's Hospital and the University of Central Florida, demonstrates a potentially novel treatment for neuroblastoma, the most
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles loaded with component of common spice kill cancer cellsAttaching curcumin, a component of the common spice turmeric, to nanoparticles can be used to target and destroy treatment-resistant neuroblastoma tumor cells, according to a new study published in Nanoscale.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feeling stressed during the workday? Playing video games may helpHuman factors/ergonomics researchers found that engaging in casual video game play during rest breaks can help restore mood in response to workplace stress.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reaching black men in barbershops could lead to early detection of colorectal cancerBlack men who enrolled in a patient navigator program at local barbershops were twice as likely to get colorectal cancer screening, report investigators.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
QUT to use drones to find and protect koalasQueensland University of Technology will deploy drones in a high-tech effort to find and protect koalas in South East Queensland, with the State Government announcing a funding boost for koala conservation.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How marriage may protect transgender couplesTransgender people who are married are less likely to experience discrimination than their unmarried counterparts, indicates a national study led by a Michigan State University sociologist.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new synthesis route for alternative catalysts of noble metalsResearchers have developed a new synthesis route for alternative catalysts of noble metals for versatile chemical reactions that could help address environmental concerns.
4h
Viden
Danske gymnasieelever leverer enestående resultat i international fysikkonkurrenceFor første gang i over 50 år henter danske elever sølvmedaljer i fysikolympiaden.
4h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Don’t Look Now, But The Yankees Might Be Interested In Giancarlo Stanton | The Slot John Mc Deadspin Don’t Look Now, But The Yankees Might Be Interested In Giancarlo Stanton | The Slot John McCain Will Return to Senate Tuesday to Vote On Healthcare Bill | The Root 3 Years After Jahi McMath Was Declared Dead, Family Still Fights to Have Her Death Certificate Overturned | Splinter San Diego Teacher Films Herself Refusing to Cooperate With Border Patrol Agents |
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers hit new world efficiency record with perovskite solar cellsA recent study, affiliated with UNIST finds key to produce a new cost-efficient way to produce inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) which sets a new world-record efficiency performance of 22.1 % in small cells and 19.7 percent in 1-square-centimeter cells.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When it comes to tillage, timing mattersWith herbicide resistance on the rise, there is a renewed emphasis on soil tillage as a critical component of integrated weed management. Research shows, though, that timing matters. When tillage occurs can significantly impact both weed density and the composition of the weed community that emerges from the weed seed bank.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Giant Radio Telescope Scaled Back to Contain CostsCrowding antennas closer together may affect the Square Kilometer Array's ability to observe the early Universe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
cognitive science
How AI And Machine Learning Are Aiding Schizophrenia Research submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics come with 'environmental side effects,' experts sayResearchers writing in Microchemical Journal are bringing attention to the fact that commonly used antibiotic drugs are making their way out into the environment, where they can harm microbes that are essential to a healthy environment. Their review article has been selected for the Elsevier Atlas Award, which recognizes research that could significantly impact people's lives around the world or h
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Venus's turbulent atmosphereA research paper published today by Nature Astronomy sheds light on the so far un-explored nightside circulation at the upper cloud level of Venus. Researchers from the Rhenish Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Cologne are part of an international research project which has now presented these first comprehensive findings. They discovered unexpected patterns of slow motion
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemical route towards electronic devices in grapheneEssential electronic components, such as diodes and tunnel barriers, can be incorporated in single graphene wires (nanoribbons) with atomic precision. The goal is to create graphene-based electronic devices with extremely fast operational speeds. The discovery was made in a collaboration between Aalto University and their colleagues at Utrecht University and TU Delft in the Netherlands.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How marriage may protect transgender couplesTransgender people who are married are less likely to experience discrimination than their unmarried counterparts, indicates a national study led by a Michigan State University sociologist.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How gene silencing works in plantsThe group of Doctor Myriam Calonje Macaya have recently published a study in Genome Biology that means an advance in the knowledge of epigenetic regulation by means of Polycomb-group proteins in plants.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel class of antibiotics shows promise against plague, drug-resistant bacteriaPathogenic bacteria are rapidly developing resistance to the arsenal of microbial therapies -- and driving researchers to identify families of therapeutics with new modes of action. This week in mBio, an international group of scientists report on laboratory experiments suggesting that a novel LpxC inhibitor can treat multi-drug resistant bacterial infections, including many that originate in hosp
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychopaths are better at learning to lie, say researchersIndividuals with high levels of psychopathic traits are better at learning to lie than individuals who show few psychopathic traits, according to a study published in the open access journal Translational Psychiatry. The findings indicate that people with high psychopathic traits may not have a 'natural' capacity to lie better, but rather are better at learning how to lie, according to the researc
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study points to penile microbiome as a risk factor for HIV in menUncircumcised men with high levels of anaerobic penile bacteria at higher risk for HIV.
4h
Gizmodo
Score All-Time Low Prices On These Military-Grade Shockproof Hard Drives Silicon Power 1TB Hard Drive , $59 with code 15TYPEC4U | 2TB , $85 with code 15TYPEC4U External hard drives are pretty fragile things, so if you’re a bit of a klutz, it might be worth springing for Silicon Power’s shockproof drives. Both their 1TB and 2TB models are 15% off today with promo code 15TYPEC4U, bringing them down to all-time low prices. Both drives come with USB-A and USB-C cables, so
4h
Futurity.org
Thinking you’re not fit enough might cut lifespan New research finds that people who think they are less active than others in a similar age bracket die younger than those who believe they are more active—even if their actual activity levels are similar. “Our findings fall in line with a growing body of research suggesting that our mindsets—in this case, beliefs about how much exercise we are getting relative to others—can play a crucial role in
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of why emus are grounded takes flightResearchers from Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute have helped solve the mystery of how emus became flightless, identifying a gene involved in the development and evolution of bird wings.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new model yields insights into glaciers' retreats and advancesA University of Alaska Fairbanks study looking at the physics of tidewater glaciers has yielded new insights into what drives their retreat-and-advance cycles and the role that climate plays in these cycles.
4h
The Atlantic
How Science Can Survive Hostile Governments Though much of the Trump administration’s policy agenda has been hobbled by chaos and scandal, Scott Pruitt’s Environmental Protection Agency has been remarkably productive. Under Pruitt’s leadership, the agency has limited communication between its staffers and the public—even shuttering its own climate-change website—and undertaken a regulatory rollback of historic proportions. According to a r
4h
The Atlantic
The Bankruptcies That Would Follow an Obamacare Repeal Senate Republicans are working to pass legislation scaling back government support for health coverage, with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell calling for a vote on Tuesday to begin debate on a bill whose precise contents remain unknown. “Every Republican running for office promised immediate relief from this disastrous law,” President Trump said on Monday, referring to Obamacare. “But so far, Sena
4h
Science | The Guardian
Sydney Cohen obituary My father, Sydney Cohen, a scientist with a deep love of nature, who has died aged 95, developed from his South African education and wide travels in Africa a determination to vanquish malaria, the continent’s scourge. His pursuit of a vaccine led, in 1961, to a landmark paper in Nature, co-written with Ian McGregor , that found that immunoglobulin from immune Gambian adults had an anti-parasitic
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops new math equation to predict cavitationA popular backyard science experiment led a team of fluid dynamics experts to a new math formula that more accurately predicts cavitation and its damaging effects.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands of genes exchanged within microbial communities living on cheeseResearchers at the University of California San Diego have found that microbial species living on cheese have transferred thousands of genes between each other. They also identified regional hotspots where such exchanges take place, including several genomic "islands" that host exchanges across several species of bacteria.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noise pollution loudest in black neighborhoods, segregated citiesAs the number of white residents in a neighborhood declines, noise rises. But noise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where noise pollution is worse for everyone, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines in the United States.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secret to cell size found in group underpinning world’s biggest food producerA gene controlling cell size has been identified in a microalgal group which underpins a fifth of the world’s food chains.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New chromium-based superconductor has an unusual electronic stateWhen certain materials are cooled below a critical temperature they become superconductors, with zero electrical resistance. An international research team observed an unusual electronic state in new superconductor chromium arsenide. This finding could prove useful in future superconductor research and material design.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible treatment for deadly weight lossMany cancer patients are susceptible to potentially lethal weight loss. Now researchers understand better why this happens, and perhaps how to prevent the condition.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New strategy to design mechano-responsive luminescent materialsCrystals made from gold complexes change color as they change structure from “chiral” to “achiral” when ground, report researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dragonfly brains predict the path of their preyNew research has shown how a dragonfly's brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pattern of marijuana use during adolescence may impact psychosocial outcomes in adulthoodA pattern of escalating marijuana use in adolescents is linked to higher rates of depression and lower educational accomplishments in adulthood.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ingestible drug-delivery materials may help patients comply with treatment regimensTo ensure patients receive full medicinal treatments, engineers have developed a new set of hydrogel-based drug delivery materials, which can live in the stomach up to nine days, slowly releasing medication.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People living in rural households have lower risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseaseLiving in rural households decreases a person's risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease, particularly for young children and adolescents, according to a new study.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clues to healing spinal cord injuriesFresh insights into how zebrafish repair their nerve connections could hold clues to new therapies for people with spinal cord injuries. Researchers have pinpointed key molecules that prompt damaged nerve fibers in the fish to regenerate themselves.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toddlers begin learning rules of reading, writing at very early age, study findsNew research suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later lifeRegularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter, a new study has shown. Researchers found that owning or walking a dog was one of the most effective ways to beat the usual decline in later-life activity, even combatting the effects of bad weather. Dog owners were sedentary for 30 minutes less per day, on average.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swaziland survey shows impressive progress in confronting the HIV epidemicKey findings from the second Swaziland HIV Incidence Measurement Survey, SHIMS2, reveal impressive progress in confronting the HIV epidemic in the country. Results show a doubling in population viral load suppression since 2011 and a decrease by nearly half in the rate of new HIV infections.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to generate human antibodiesScientists have developed a method to rapidly produce specific human antibodies in the laboratory. The technique could speed the production of antibodies to treat a wide range of diseases and facilitate the development of new vaccines.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experimental HIV vaccine regimen is well-tolerated, elicits immune responsesResults from an early-stage clinical trial called APPROACH show that an investigational HIV vaccine regimen was well-tolerated and generated immune responses against HIV in healthy adults. The APPROACH findings, as well as results expected in late 2017 from another early-stage clinical trial called TRAVERSE, will form the basis of the decision whether to move forward with a larger trial in souther
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What happens when materials collide?The first direct observations of a material's dynamic fracture have been observed at the atomic scale, from X-ray diffraction measurements of tantalum.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop fast chemistry that unlocks a new class of polymersA team of researchers has developed a faster and easier way to make sulfur-containing polymers that will lower the cost of large-scale production.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wisconsin retail tech company offers to microchip its staffA Wisconsin company is offering to microchip its employees, enabling them to open doors, log onto their computers and purchase break room snacks with a simple swipe of the hand.
5h
Wired
Mexico City Is Killing Parking Spaces. Pay Attention, AmericaOne of the world’s most trafficky cities gets a parking overhaul.
5h
Wired
Film Your Greatest Hits (and Misses) With These Action Cameras From GoPro, Garmin, SonyThese high-quality 4K video cameras will survive nearly any extreme stunt, even if you don’t.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New phase change mechanism could lead to new class of chemical vapor sensorsAn interdisciplinary team of scientists at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has demonstrated optical and electronic evidence of semiconductor-to-metallic phase transition when exposed to airborne chemical vapors, and how the behavior can be used to create an entirely new class of chemical vapor sensors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Knee joint signals bones to growScientists from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, US, have revealed a communication system between the knee joint and developing bones in mice, which controls bone growth during early development and after injury.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Symbiosis: Butter for my honeyTextbooks tell us that, in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses, the host plant supplies its fungal symbionts solely with sugars, in return for inorganic nutrients. New findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers now show that lipids are also on the menu.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The microscopic origin of thermodynamicsA deep understanding of the irreversibility of the arrow of time cannot ignore the quantum nature of the world that surrounds us. The is the key result of the work carried out by Vincenzo Alba and Pasquale Calabrese of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste, recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dodder: A parasite involved in the plant alarm systemA team of scientists from the Kunming Institute of Botany in China and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena has discovered that parasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta (dodder) not only deplete nutrients from their host plants, but also function as important 'information brokers' among neighboring plants, when insects feed on host plants.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Wealthy People Give to Charity for Different Reasons Than the Rest of UsCharitable appeals work best when tailored to how people see themselves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
We're On A Mission To Better Understand The Enigmatic Hammerhead Shark #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Dr. Tristan Guttridge is about to discover why hundreds of hammerhead sharks flock to Bimini every year. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https:/
5h
Gizmodo
Watch 300 Jedi Absolutely Slaughter 60,000 Medieval Soldiers GIF Thanks to all those Star Wars movies we know the Jedi can barely survive an attack from just a pair of evil Sith lords. But pit a small battalion of 300 lightsaber-wielding Jedi knights against a giant army of 60,000 medieval soldiers armed with only swords, and it’s not even a challenge. This latest simulation, courtesy of YouTuber SergiuHellDragoonHQ and a PC game called Ultimate Epic Battl
5h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet i ferien: Kan jeg trygt rejse til Tjernobyl?En læser overvejer en tur til Tjernobyl, men undrer sig over, om ikke strålingsfaren er for høj. Det svarer specialkonsulent for Nukleart Beredskab på.
5h
Science : NPR
Hidden Brain: How Cigarette Taxes Affect Food Buying A new study shows a connection between cigarette taxes and food stamps. When cigarette taxes go up, smokers end up spending more of their income on cigarettes and that leaves less money for food. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snopes launches online fundraiser amid legal battleFact-checking website Snopes.com has launched an online fundraiser amid a legal battle with an outside vendor that Snopes says is holding it hostage.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study results suggest migration estimates due to global warming may be wrong(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam has found real-world evidence of people refusing to leave their island homes even after an earthquake has caused severe flooding to occur every high tide. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the group describes their study of the people on the islands of Tubigon, Bohol, Philippines, and what their f
5h
Futurity.org
Mussels offer glue to replace stitches and staples A non-toxic glue works better than commercially available products—and could mean surgical glues to replace sutures and staples. Scientists modeled it after the adhesive proteins that mussels and other creatures produce. More than 230 million major surgeries are performed worldwide each year, and over 12 million traumatic wounds are treated in the United States alone. Mechanical methods, such as
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans imitate in unique ways: Comparing children and bonobosA new study compared children's capacity to imitate behavior with the same capacity of humans' closest living great ape relatives, the bonobos. The study found that bonobos do not copy actions as children do, which highlights the unique nature of human imitation.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Violent sleep patterns, stress hormones change after a violent crime in the neighborhoodViolent crime changes youth's sleep patterns the night immediately following the crime and changes patterns of the stress hormone cortisol the following day, new research shows. Both may then disrupt academic performance in students.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Image Is Why Self-Driving Cars Come Loaded with Many Types of SensorsWhen’s a pedestrian not a pedestrian? When it’s a decal.
5h
Big Think
Scientists Discover The "Angel Particle" That Is Both Matter and Anti-Matter Researchers succeed in an 80-year-old quest to find the elusive "angel particle". Read More
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lipid transfer from plants to arbuscular mycorrhiza fungiTextbooks tell us that in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses, the host plant supplies its fungal symbionts solely with sugars, in return for inorganic nutrients. New findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) researchers now show that lipids are also on the menu.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change poses threat to European electricity productionThe vulnerability of the European electricity sector to changes in water resources is set to worsen by 2030 as a consequence of climate change. This conclusion is reached by researchers at Leiden University in an article published in Nature Energy this month.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical route to electronic devices in grapheneEssential electronic components, such as diodes and tunnel barriers, can be incorporated in single graphene wires (nanoribbons) with atomic precision. The goal is to create graphene-based electronic devices with extremely fast operational speeds. The discovery was made in a collaboration between Aalto University and their colleagues at Utrecht University and TU Delft in the Netherlands. The work i
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover how gene silencing works in plantsThe group of Dr. Myriam Calonje Macaya from the University of Seville,and the group of Franziska Turck from the Max Planck Institute have recently published a study in Genome Biology that advances the knowledge of epigenetic regulation by means of Polycomb-group proteins in plants.
5h
Ars Technica
The dramatic details of Steve Jobs’ life are playing out in a new opera The Making of The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs , The Santa Fe Opera Steve Jobs has been the subject of all kinds of art over the years, and now scenes from his life will play out on stage with powerful vocals in a new opera. The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs highlights the " complicated and messy " life of the Apple cofounder and is the product of a partnership between composer Mason Bates and librett
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotics come with 'environmental side effects,' experts sayResearchers writing in Microchemical Journal are bringing attention to the fact that commonly used antibiotic drugs are making their way out into the environment, where they can harm microbes that are essential to a healthy environment. Their review article has been selected for the Elsevier Atlas Award, which recognizes research that could significantly impact people's lives around the world or h
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plant hormone boost for New Zealand's critically endangered night parrotNew Zealand's nocturnal and flightless parrot, the kākāpō, may be famous for trying to mate with the head of biologist Mark Carwardine, but this unique species is facing some serious challenges.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On sexuality, the law still caters to the norms of public disgustWe tend to assume that law is objective and disembodied, but the story of the decriminalisation of homosexuality in the UK shows that, like the people who create it, it is in fact an emotional creature, animated by visceral human feelings – and as far as sexuality is concerned, the chief emotion at work is often disgust.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New phase change mechanism could lead to new class of chemical vapor sensorsAn interdisciplinary team of scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) demonstrated that monolayer 2-D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (TMDs)—atomically thin semiconductors—undergo a change from semiconductor-to-metallic phase when exposed to airborne chemical vapors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find secret to cell size in world's biggest food producerA gene controlling cell size has been identified in a microalgal group which underpins a fifth of the world's food chains.Scientists at The University of East Anglia (UEA) have discovered a gene which regulates the size of diatoms, which contribute 20 per cent of global primary production in food chains. The discovery could have implications for understanding the potential effects of climate chang
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Possible treatment for deadly weight lossMany cancer patients are susceptible to potentially lethal weight loss. Now researchers understand better why this happens, and perhaps how to prevent the condition.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chromium-based superconductor has an unusual electronic stateWhen certain materials are cooled below a critical temperature they become superconductors, with zero electrical resistance. An international research team observed an unusual electronic state in new superconductor chromium arsenide. This finding could prove useful in future superconductor research and material design. The study was published on June 5 in Nature Communications.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST hits new world efficiency record with perovskite solar cellsSouth Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has presented a new cost-efficient way to produce inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) which sets a new world-record efficiency performance of 22.1 %.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of why emus are grounded takes flightResearchers from Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute have helped solve the mystery of how emus became flightless, identifying a gene involved in the development and evolution of bird wings.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant parasite dodder transmits signals among different hostsProf. WU Jianqiang from Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KIB/CAS) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany, found out, when a host plant is attacked by insects, dodders can transmit signals to the other dodder-connected hosts, activating defense responses.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large single-crystal graphene is possible!The target of large, cheap and quick graphene synthesis achieved: 5 x 50 cm2 and beyond.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VRC01 antibody prolonged time to HIV viral rebound after treatment interruptionA new study has shown that infusion of a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 in virally suppressed, early treated volunteers was associated with a modestly delayed rebound of HIV after interruption of antiretroviral therapy.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The U.S. is predicting droughts sooner with satellitesUnlike us humans, soybeans and wheat can't turn to acupuncture or aromatherapy when they're stressed out.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is the weather like on Mercury?With the dawning of the Space Age in the 1950s, human beings were no longer confined to studying the Solar planets and other astronomical bodies with Earth-based instruments alone. Instead crewed missions have gone into orbit and to the Moon while robotic missions have traveled to every corner of the solar system. And in the process, we have learned some interesting things about the planets, plane
5h
Gizmodo
Why Bringing Back a Wooly Mammoth Is No Longer Science Fiction Flying Puffin - Mammu CC BY-SA 2.0 Dr. George Church is a real-life Dr. Frankenstein. The inventor of CRISPR and one of the minds behind the Human Genome Project is no longer content just reading and editing DNA—now he wants to make new life. In Ben Mezrich’s latest book, Wooly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic Extinct Creatures , Church and his Harvard lab try t
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New survey suggests far fewer Jupiter sized rogue planets than thought(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Warsaw University Observatory, Ohio State University and the University of Warwick has found evidence that suggests there are far fewer Jupiter-sized rogue planets roaming the Milky Way galaxy than prior surveys have shown. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes using data compiled from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment
5h
Popular Science
Is it possible to sneeze while you are sleeping? Ask Us Anything We might be too deep in our slumber to do so. Our brains make it so that we can't sneeze while we sleep. Read on.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using forests to manage carbon—a heated debateThe best way of managing trees and forests for climate change and accounting for contributions of forests and forestry activities in carbon budgets remains hotly contested. Forests can either take up carbon dioxide (CO₂) or release more CO₂ into the atmosphere. Wood can substitute fossil fuels or energy-intensive materials, but forests are also large carbon reservoirs that add emission peaks if di
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New strategy to design mechano-responsive luminescent materialsCrystals made from gold complexes change color as they change structure from 'chiral' to 'achiral' when ground.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new synthesis route for alternative catalysts of noble metalsResearchers have developed a new synthesis route for alternative catalysts of noble metals.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A secret to giving the perfect gift: Stop being afraidResearchers found that people would prefer to receive sentimentally valuable gifts, but instead they often receive superficial gifts related to their personal preferences.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consuming walnuts may help keep the gut healthy, says new animal researchConclusions from a new animal study suggest that walnut consumption may be beneficial for digestive health by increasing the amount of good probiotic-type bacteria in the gut.1 Walnuts do this by acting as a prebiotic to help nourish and grow the bacteria that keeps the digestive system healthy. In this study, researchers found that a diet with walnuts led to an overall significant increase in the
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making polymer chemistry 'click'A team including Berkeley Lab scientists has developed a faster and easier way to make a class of sulfur-containing plastics that will lower the cost of large-scale production.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feeling stressed during the workday? Research says playing video games may helpHuman factors/ergonomics researchers found that engaging in casual video game play during rest breaks can help restore mood in response to workplace stress.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New math equation predicts acceleration-induced cavitationCavitation can damage underground water pipes and ship propellers and has even been linked to some brain injuries. Now researchers are taking the mystery out of acceleration-induced cavitation with a new math formula that predicts when and where it may occur.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new model yields insights into glaciers' retreats and advancesA University of Alaska Fairbanks study looking at the physics of tidewater glaciers has yielded new insights into what drives their retreat-and-advance cycles and the role that climate plays in these cycles.
5h
The Atlantic
Australian Cabinet Minister Resigns Over Italian Citizenship Australia’s resources minister resigned Tuesday from the Cabinet because of his dual citizenship, the third high-profile departure over the issue in recent weeks. Matt Canavan said he had only learned of his citizenship of Italy recently when his mother, who, he said, had applied for Italian citizenship for him without his knowledge in January 2007, “raised the possibility.” Canavan was 25 at the
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the Philippines, climate change and conflict conspire against rural womenHeavily exposed to increasing incidence of extreme weather events, the Philippines is among one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change in the world.
5h
Ars Technica
Vitamins, supplements effective at boosting call volume to poison centers Enlarge (credit: Getty | John Greim ) Regardless the type of dietary supplements—from vitamins, energy drinks, herbal medicines, homeopathic products , to some hormonal treatments—they usually come with big claims about boosting health and wellbeing. While those claims are questionable (and often unfounded), the products collectively do enhance one thing: the volume of calls to poison control cen
6h
Wired
Humanscale, the Classic Design Tool, Gets a Second LifeThe set of nine rotating disks shows how to design objects for people, using more than 60,000 data points.
6h
Wired
The Perfect Comic to Honor Jack Kirby's 100th BirthdayJack Kirby created scores of famous heroes, but the best way to honor him is this reboot of one of his lesser-known characters.
6h
Wired
How on Earth Did Aaron Judge Bean That Stadium Roof? Physics!Stadiums are designed by engineers so that balls won't hit them—but physics finds a way.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who's afraid of the giant African land snail? Perhaps we shouldn't beThe giant African land snail is a poster child of a global epidemic: the threat of invasive species. The snails are native to coastal East Africa, but are now found across Asia, the Pacific and the Americas – in fact, almost all tropical mainlands and islands except mainland Australia.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sensor system for improved peanut dryingAgricultural Research Service (ARS) engineers in Georgia have developed a network of sensors that will save thousands of dollars in drying costs for peanut growers and processors.
6h
Gizmodo
Everything You Could Possibly Need to Know About Groot's Age in Avengers: Infinity War Glass adds an American Horror Story alum. David Harbour teases a very strange opening to Stranger Things ’ second season. Plus, tons of glorious new pictures from Thor: Ragnarok , and teases for an iconic monster’s arrival in Godzilla: King of the Monsters . Spoilers now! Avengers: Infinity War James Gunn discussed Groot’s lifecycle on Facebook, in what is likely the most detailed post you’ll rea
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Are You Afraid of Sharks? Don't BeInstead, celebrate them as magnificent predators crucial to the health of oceans—before it's too late -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmologists produce new maps of dark matter dynamicsNew maps of dark matter dynamics in the Universe have been produced by a team of international cosmologists.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking boundaries in our DNAOur bodies are composed of trillions of cells, each with its own job. Cells in our stomach help digest our food, while cells in our eyes detect light, and our immune cells kill off bugs. To be able to perform these specific jobs, every cell needs a different set of tools, which are formed by the collection of proteins that a cell produces. The instructions for these proteins are written in the app
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In adolescents, oral Truvada and vaginal ring for HIV prevention are safe, acceptableA monthly vaginal ring and a daily oral tablet, both containing anti-HIV drugs, were safe and acceptable in studies of adolescents, investigators reported today at the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris. The experimental ring is designed for HIV prevention and the oral tablet is already used for this purpose in adults. Adherence to the ring was high, while adherence to the tablet was moder
6h
Ars Technica
Elon Musk: Mark Zuckerberg’s understanding of AI is “limited” Enlarge (credit: Bill Pugliano & Justin Sullivan, Getty Images) There aren't many people in the world who can justifiably call Mark Zuckerberg a dumb-ass, but Elon Musk is probably one of them. Early on Tuesday morning, in the latest salvo of a tussle between the two tech billionaires over the dangers of advanced artificial intelligence, Musk said that Zuckerberg's "understanding of the subject i
6h
Futurity.org
4D camera gives robots a wider view Researchers have created a new camera that could create four-dimensional images and capture nearly 140 degrees of information. “We’re great at making cameras for humans but do robots need to see the way humans do? Probably not…” The camera could generate the kind of information-rich images that robots need to navigated the world. “We want to consider what would be the right camera for a robot tha
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find secret to cell size in world's biggest food producerA gene controlling cell size has been identified in a microalgal group which underpins a fifth of the world's food chains.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inside the tech that makes 'near-miss' air collisions almost impossibleThe sky is a crowded place. In June 2017, there were on average 33,000 flights every day over Europe alone.
6h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Power MoveWhen certain neurons in the prefrontal neurons cortex are turned on, mice subjugate their neighbors in a display of power.
6h
Futurity.org
Trump budget spends more, not less, on regulation Despite pledging an all-out effort to do away with wasteful regulations, President Donald Trump’s proposed 2018 budget would increase federal spending on regulatory agencies by 3.4 percent, according to a new report. “President Trump’s proposed budget calls for more staff and resources for agencies responsible for immigration and border protection, while reducing staff and resources at other agen
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chromium-based superconductor has an unusual electronic stateWhen certain materials are cooled below a critical temperature they become superconductors, with zero electrical resistance. An international research team observed an unusual electronic state in new superconductor chromium arsenide. This finding could prove useful in future superconductor research and material design. The study was published on June 5 in Nature Communications.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New strategy to design mechano-responsive luminescent materialsCrystals made from gold complexes change color as they change structure from "chiral" to "achiral" when ground.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural molecule to boost the performance of electrodes for rechargeable batteriesChlorophyll, blood, and vitamin B12 are all based on the porphyrin molecule. But porphyrin can also be used as an electrode material where it speeds up the charging process of rechargeable batteries. In the Angewandte Chemie International Edition journal, researchers from KIT now present the new material system that could mark the beginning of an era of high-performance energy storage and supercap
6h
Ars Technica
Clock ticking on Google as $2.7 billion fine takes bite out of earnings Enlarge (credit: Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images) Google's parent company Alphabet has—with relative ease—gulped down the record €2.4 ($2.7 billion) fine slapped on the ad giant by the antitrust wing of the European Commission in June, following a long-running probe of the company's abuse of dominance in Europe's search market. On Monday, Alphabet reported second quarter net income of $3.52 billio
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia's Mayak satellite: crowd-funded cosmic pest or welcome nightly visitor?Will we soon see a new bright "star" visiting our evening skies? The crowd-funded Mayak CubeSat was launched along with 72 other satellites aboard a Russian Soyuz Rocket on July 14, 2017.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Tiny dancer' atoms could prove a hit with quantum computer scientistsQuantum computers could be a step closer to practical use thanks to the work of an international team led by University of Surrey scientists. The group, led by Dr Steve Chick and Professor of Physics Ben Murdin, has developed a way of making phosphorous atoms 'dance', which could be the next breakthrough in the quest to make quantum computers a viable reality.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pinpointing sources of water pollution with a robotic eelResearchers from EPFL, together with other institutes, have developed a robotic eel that swims through contaminated water to find the source of the pollution. The sensor-equipped robot can be controlled remotely or move on its own. In tests carried out in a small section of Lake Geneva, the robot was able to generate maps of water conductivity and temperature.
6h
Wired
Dive Into a Galaxy of Footage From NASA's Legendary X-Plane Program
6h
Futurity.org
How scary smells make flies go extinct Fear may contribute to the extinction of animal populations, research shows. “It has been something of a mystery why predators are so important in animal extinctions…” When scientists exposed fruit flies to the scent of a praying mantis, a known predator, they found that the risk of extinction increased up to seven fold. The increased risk of extinction occurred because at small population sizes,
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thousands of genes exchanged within microbial communities living on cheeseUsing cheese as a novel way to study microscopic communities, researchers have found that bacteria living on artisanal cheese varieties have transferred thousands of genes between each other. They also identified regional hotspots where such exchanges take place, including several genomic "islands" that host exchanges across several species of bacteria. Microbiome communities are known to play a k
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People living in rural households have lower risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseaseLiving in rural households decreases a person's risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease, particularly for young children and adolescents, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Gastorenterology.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise pollution loudest in black neighborhoods, segregated citiesNoise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where noise pollution is worse for everyone, not just racial and ethnic minorities, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines in the United States.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measured soil moisture improves wildfire predictionNew research supports using different soil moisture measurement systems for more accurate wildfire risk assessment in Oklahoma and similar areas.
6h
Ars Technica
A limiting factor on producing electricity in a warming world? Water. Enlarge / Thermal power plant with sun in Genoa, Italy. (credit: Getty Images) Unless you work at a coal, gas, or nuclear plant, you may not think about water when you think about electricity (certainly at a household level; they don’t mix). But water plays an important part in cooling many power plants, and many power plants also depend on a nearby water source to create steam that drives turbin
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotic resistance driven by intragenomic co-evolutionScientists have discovered bacteria are able to "fine-tune" their resistance to antibiotics – raising the possibility of some superbugs being resistant to drugs which they have never even been in contact with.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What could giant batteries mean for Indonesian energy?In response to blackouts and concerns over energy supply, South Australia is getting the world's largest lithium-ion battery. What exactly does this mean for the future of energy in Australia, and could such an approach work for Indonesia?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New flexible material changes its porous nature when exposed to lightResearchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and the University of Tokyo have developed a light-responsive crystalline material that overcomes challenges faced in previous studies.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revealing the structure of an elusive quality control enzymeThe structure of the critical quality control checkpoint enzyme that oversees the production of thousands of secreted glycoproteins has been solved by a fruitful collaborative effort at Diamond Light Source. The study, recently published in PNAS, found that the enzyme had surprising flexibility that allowed it to adapt its conformation and clasp its client glycoproteins.
6h
Gizmodo
The XL Version Of The Uber-Popular Sport-Brella Is Just $40, Today Only Sport-Brella XL , $40 Update : Red sold out, but now the blue model is available for the same price. Bar none, Sport-Brella is the ultimate beach umbrella , and Amazon’s discounting the blue XL model for just $40 today , the best price we’ve ever seen. Unlike a regular umbrella, Sport-Brella leans backwards and attaches to the sand with stakes, creating a kind of semi-private cocoon with enough s
7h
cognitive science
What Hallucination Reveals About Our Minds: Oliver Sacks submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
7h
Wired
Magical, Striking Scenes From ... Google Street View?Jaqui Kenny roams the world searching for the perfect photo without ever leaving home.
7h
Ingeniøren
En Grundfos-pumpe skal have hjælp fra sin digitale tvilling i skyenVia sensordata ude fra marken vil Grundfos udvikle meget mere komplette virtuelle modeller end i dag. Digitale tvillinger af hvert eneste fysiske produkt skal bl.a. generere nye services til Grundfos’ kunder.
7h
Science | The Guardian
What does the US election integrity commission need to be credible? Some actual experts The commission includes no political scientists or election experts to test claims of voter fraud or suppression. No wonder it’s already been called ‘a sham’ Last Wednesday, the US Presidential Advisory Commission on Electoral Integrity (PACEI) held its first meeting , with many election experts and political observers anxious to get clarity on the group’s composition and stated objectives. But e
7h
Live Science
For Some Turtles, Science Is a Real Turn-OnScientists are using vibrators to coax reluctant male turtles into, um, revealing themselves.
7h
Ingeniøren
Så snart it-ansat fik fyresedlen gik der ikke længe før alle systemer på fabrikken gik i sort En medarbejder blev så vred over sin fyring at han tvang 300 ekskolleger til at nedlægge arbejdet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saa-snart-it-ansat-fik-fyresedlen-gik-ikke-laenge-foer-alle-it-systemer-paa-fabrikken-gik Version2
7h
Science | The Guardian
Bacteria from 300-year-old Ovid poetry volume inspires 'bio-artist' Sarah Craske found the copy of Metamorphoses in a secondhand bookshop and used bacteria within its pages to create art with her own blood There was more than poetry trapped between the leather covers of a 300-year-old volume of Ovid’s Metamorphoses: blood, sweat and snot feature in an art installation that displays the bacteria within its pages. The sweat and the droplets from an ancient sneeze t
7h
The Atlantic
Uber, but for Happiness
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing matters: How to use tillage more effectively for weed managementIn a study featured in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science, researchers examined the impact of tillage on four sites in the northeastern US that were tilled every two weeks during the growing season.
7h
Live Science
In Images: Solar Eclipses Depicted in Fine ArtFor hundreds of years, artists have incorporated the spectacular sight of an eclipse into their paintings.
7h
Wired
At Comic-Con This Year, the Biggest Stars Were the ModeratorsWith Reggie Watts, Terry Crews, and Damon Lindelof descending on Hall H, the era of prestige panel moderation may be upon us.
8h
Wired
'Dunkirk' Ambushed Genre Movies at the Box Office–And WonSo much for our assumption that genre movies and comedies have an unshakeable stranglehold on the summer!
8h
Wired
The Rise of AI Is Forcing Google and Microsoft to Become ChipmakersThe race to build up artificial intelligence is driving software companies to roll their own silicon.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
There’s a long way to go in understanding the brainNeuroscientists offer multiple “perspectives” on how to plug gaps in current knowledge of the brain’s inner workings.
8h
Live Science
Imaging Reveals Medieval Manuscript Hidden in Book BindingIn 1537, a bookbinder used a piece of parchment — one that was centuries old —to bind a book of poetry. This parchment's text remained unreadable for nearly 500 years, but now people can read its words once more, according to a new study.
8h
Gizmodo
President Trump is Awake, Angry, and Tweeting About Hillary's Emails Like a Petulant Toddler (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) At some point President Trump is going to forget about the 2016 election and Hillary Clinton’s emails and turn his attention to the nation’s business. But today is not that day. President Trump is awake, angry, and tweeting. And you can probably guess the topic. Yes, President Trump has been in office for over six months and is still fixated on his former opponent Hillary
8h
Science | The Guardian
We fear death, but what if dying isn't as bad as we think? Research comparing perceptions of death with accounts of those imminently facing it suggest that maybe we shouldn’t worry so much about our own end “The idea of death, the fear of it, haunts the human animal like nothing else,” wrote Earnest Becker in his book, The Denial of Death . It’s a fear strong enough to compel us to force kale down our throats, run sweatilyon a treadmill at 7am on a Monda
8h
Viden
Tidligt liv i Grønland kan måske lede til afsløring af liv på MarsEn grønlandsk ædelsten har afsløret spor efter ældgamle mikroorganismer. Måske kan man bruge samme metode på Mars, fortæller dansk forsker.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Internet of Living ThingsVolunteers around the world and pocket-size genomic sequencers could play an increasing role in protecting global health and ecosystems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ars Technica
Pyre review: A brilliant reinvention of the term “fantasy sports” Enlarge (credit: Supergiant Games) Role-playing games and sports video games have more in common than you think. Decades ago, series like Sensible World of Soccer and Tony La Russa Baseball (on PC, not console) filled their career modes with lots of money- and roster-management menus. Modern major-league games and soccer games like FIFA 17 have carried those traditions over, sporting enough card-
8h
Live Science
This New Cellphone Uses Such Little Power It Doesn't Need a BatteryThe battery-free device can stay on 24/7.
8h
Ingeniøren
Ungarsk teenager advarede om fejl i billetsystem - blev hentet af politiet om natten 45.000 brugere har på Facebook straffet et ungarsk transportselskab for at anmelde en teenager, som opdagede en svaghed i selskabets it-system. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ungarsk-teenager-advarede-fejl-billetsystem-blev-hentet-politiet-natten-1078577 Version2
8h
Ingeniøren
Skummel malware har hærget Macs i al hemmelighed i årevis Infektionen tillader angriberen at overvåge brugeren af computeren på en lang række måder, blandt andet gennem webcams. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/skummel-malware-har-haerget-macs-al-hemmelighed-aarevis-1078592 Version2
8h
Ingeniøren
Kina sætter turbo på forskning: Vil være verdens epicenter for kunstig intelligens i 2030Den kinesiske regering har en drøm om at blive verdensførende inden for kunstig intelligens inden 2030. Det vækker bekymring i USA, hvor forskningsbudgetterne beskæres, mens Kina lokker førende AI-forskere til landet.
8h
The Atlantic
Why Trump Might Fire Robert Mueller Why do Donald Trump and his advisors keep floating the possibility of firing Robert Mueller, an act that would spark the greatest constitutional crisis since Watergate, perhaps the greatest in modern American history? Partly, it’s simple rage. Mueller threatens Trump. And when Trump sees someone as a threat, he tries to discredit and destroy them—conventional norms of propriety, decency and legal
8h
The Atlantic
The Bold Type and the Enduring Appeal of the Women's Magazine In the pilot episode of The Bold Type , the dramedy that premiered this month on Freeform, Kat Edison, the social media director for the women’s magazine Scarlet , tries to convince an edgy artist to participate in a story highlighting her work. The artist, Adena El-Amin, is also a feminist, and she initially scoffs at the idea of collaborating with the Cosmo -esque publication: Adena has no inte
8h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Don't run biomedical science as a business Science should abandon its assembly-line mentality and rebuild for quality, not quantity, argues Michele Pagano. Nature 547 381 doi: 10.1038/547381a
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
China set to launch an 'unhackable' internet communicationChina might not have the lead in research but its application of secure networks is leading the way.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Verse by verse, whales learn songs like humansHumpback whales learn songs in segments – like the verses of a human song – and can remix them, a new study involving University of Queensland research has found.
9h
Science | The Guardian
‘Burrito of awesomeness’: astronaut’s stunning aurora timelapse - video Taken 250 miles (402 km) above Earth and at a speed of 17,500 mph (28,164 km/h), this stunning timelapse video of the aurora borealis was tweeted by Nasa astronaut Jack Fischer from the International Space Station. Fischer shared his enthusiasm online: ‘People have asked me what a “burrito of awesomeness smothered in awesome sauce” is … Well folks, it looks like this … awesome sauce is green.’ Au
9h
Wired
Inside Andy Rubin's Quest to Create an OS for EverythingThe Android mastermind is on a mission to connect our devices into a single consciousness. Ambitious? Absolutely. Possible? Maybe.
9h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Look At The Risks Our Crews Take To Bring You The Magic Of Shark Week! #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Watch some of the closest calls between man and shark in Shark Week history. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon nanotubes stand at attentionJust as members of a marching band align themselves for a performance, carbon nanotubes create a similar configuration.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
System to secure cryptographic keys and codes for data protectionIBM today announced that its engineers have been granted a patent on an approach for utilizing the inherent structure of a printed circuit board (PCB) to protect cryptographic keys and codes in a manner that is designed to be highly tamper-resistant. The patented system does not require extensive use of resin or other materials to encase a module or package containing keys and codes, thereby provi
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking the genomic revolution to corn fields to improve crops"Having the sequence of a genome is like having the blueprint of a house," says Natalia de Leon, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Open-source software rapidly processes spectral data, accurately identifies and quantifies lipid speciesLipids play a key role in many metabolic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. So having a complete profile of the body's lipids—its "lipidome"—is important.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who will control the swarm?The world is already well on its way to a day when innumerable autonomous cars and drones buzz about, shuffling commuters to work and packages to doorsteps. In fact, there is new term for it floating around the circles of engineers and venture capitalists who hope to see the day arrive sooner rather than later: They call it "The Swarm."
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A final farewell to LISA PathfinderWith the push of a button, final commands for the European Space Agency's LISA Pathfinder mission were beamed to space on July 18, a final goodbye before the spacecraft was powered down.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Host plants communicate warning signals through a parasite network, when insects attackA team of scientists from the Kunming Institute of Botany in China and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena has discovered that parasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta (dodder) not only deplete nutrients from their host plants, but also function as important "information brokers" among neighboring plants, when insects feed on host plants. Dodder, a parasitic vine, grows rapidly, ent
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New magnetic topological semimetal for more efficient electronicsA recent discovery by a team of researchers led by Tulane University advances fundamental knowledge that could one day lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, cellphones and other electronics.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a rare quadruple gravitational lens candidate with Pan-STARRSAstronomers from the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) in conjunction with colleagues from the University of California, Davis, and Rutgers University have discovered the first quadruple gravitational lens candidate within data from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers uncover new avenues for finding unique class of insulatorsFor the last decade, scientists have sought topological insulators, materials that are insulating on the inside but conduct current on their surfaces. Although first predicted around 2005, very few real-world examples have been found to date. Topological insulators are expected to have wide-ranging applications, including energy-efficient electronics and quantum computing—their special properties
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic quantum objects in a 'nano egg carton'Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called "fluxons," are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed while dissipating much less heat. Physicists working with Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have developed a "
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New non-photosynthesizing plant species discovered on Ishigaki island, JapanA new species of non-photosynthesizing parasitic plant, Sciaphila sugimotoi, has been discovered on the subtropical island of Ishigaki in Okinawa, Japan. The research team responsible for this discovery was led by Project Associate Professor SUETSUGU Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) and the findings will be published on July 25 in Phytotaxa.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists equip chemical sensors with 'traps' to detect toxic substancesScientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and the University of Chemistry and Technology (Prague, Czech Republic) have created novel chemical sensors for Raman spectrometers, devices that measure the quantitative and qualitative composition of substances and their structures with high accuracy. They have equipped sensors with organic chemical compounds and for determining dyes prohibited in Eur
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
World's first floating offshore wind farm in Scotland.Each wind turbine is taller than Big Ben and the farm can power 20,000 homes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zebrafish study reveals clues to healing spinal cord injuriesFresh insights into how zebrafish repair their nerve connections could hold clues to new therapies for people with spinal cord injuries. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed key molecules that prompt damaged nerve fibres in the fish to regenerate themselves.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ingestible drug-delivery materials may help patients comply with treatment regimensTo ensure patients receive full medicinal treatments, engineers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new set of hydrogel-based drug delivery materials, which can live in the stomach up to nine days, slowly releasing medication.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Princeton researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis BScientists from Princeton University have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections with the goal of testing new therapies.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New triggerable, tough hydrogels could make drug-releasing systems saferA novel material may improve the safety of drug-delivery systems that reside in the stomach.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV prevention dapivirine vaginal ring found safe and acceptable in US adolescent girlsThe dapivirine vaginal ring, which had been found safe and to help protect against HIV in two Phase III trials in African women, was shown to be safe and acceptable in a study of US teen girls. Regulatory approval is being sought for the ring in women ages 18-45; the new study provides data that would be needed for expanding approval to include girls under age 18, one of the highest-risk groups in
9h
The Atlantic
Uncovering the Moon’s Hidden Water In the 1970s, the Apollo astronauts returned from the moon with tiny beads of volcanic glass they had picked out of the lunar soil. The beads are remnants of the moon’s early history billions of years ago, when eruptions spewed magma onto the surface. The magma, exposed to the vacuum of space, cooled rapidly. Some droplets froze as they fell, hitting the ground as glass. These tiny beads became a
9h
Science : NPR
What Are The Planet's Real 'Talking' Chimps And Gorillas Saying? Movies are full of loquacious chimps, but could nonhuman apes really use language? NPR's Skunk Bear sorts through the disturbing history of research on ape language to sort fact from wishful thinking. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR)
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogel-based capsules could expand and reside in the GI tract for days, slowly releasing medicationAround half of all medications for chronic diseases are not taken as prescribed, costing the U.S. health care system more than $100 billion in avoidable hospital stays each year.
10h
Science : NPR
Alabama Woman Stuck In NYC Traffic In 1902 Invented The Windshield Wiper Entrepreneur Mary Anderson thought it made no sense that New York streetcar drivers had to keep jumping off to clean snow from the windshield. She soon won a patent for her "window cleaning device." (Image credit: The United States Patent and Trademark Office )
10h
Ingeniøren
USA-firma vil have mikrochips i de ansatteAmerikansk teknologi-selskab håber at fremme hittepåsomheden hos sine ansatte ved at tilbyde RFID-chips som implantater til brug som betalingsløsning og ved åbning af døre.
10h
Science | The Guardian
Carlo Rovelli: 'I felt the beautiful adventure of physics was a story that had to be told' How does a book about theoretical physics sell more than 1m copies? Rovelli explains how he set about sharing his wonder at quantum science There are two kinds of popular science books. The first kind is for passionate readers. Say you are mad about butterflies. You want a book that gives you all the details about all varieties of butterflies, their lives, habits and colours. You are keen to know
10h
Ingeniøren
Ung dansk forsker: Så stort er det kendte universDansk astrofysiker sidder i USA og gør sig umage med at forklare universet for alle, der kigger nysgerrigt og undrende mod nattehimlen.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-acting injectable cabotegravir for PrEP well tolerated in HPTN 077Study results released today by the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) show long-acting injectable cabotegravir (CAB LA) to be well tolerated by men and women and support the dosing schedule currently being used in a phase 3 HPTN study for HIV prevention.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SK Hynix posts 'best-ever' quarterly profitSouth Korean chipmaker SK Hynix posted record profits in the second quarter of the year, the company said Tuesday, as strong demand for its memory chips used in PCs and computer servers drove up prices.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iran's tech sector blooms under shield of sanctionsThe names may be unfamiliar but the services are immediately recognisable: Snapp is Iran's answer to Uber, Digikala is its Amazon, and Pintapin its Booking.com.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots, race cars and weather: Girl Scouts offer new badgesGirl Scouts from tiny Daisies to teen Ambassadors may earn 23 new badges focused on science, technology, engineering and math.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dassault Systemes in 'biggest ever contract' with BoeingFrench industrial software company Dassault Systemes announced Tuesday it has reached a deal with US aerospace giant to modernise its production system, in what it said was its biggest ever contract.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA encourages kids to Train Like an AstronautMission X: Train like an Astronaut, since its inception in 2011, has morphed into an international collaboration of physical fitness challenges. The program is an immersive resource that fosters mind, body and spirit in students all around the globe. It's an education unlike any other that has encouraged tens of thousands of young people to take their pulse for the first time and blast off with st
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No gene is an island: Gene's position on chromosome affects mutationsGenes do not exist in isolation. Like beads on a string, they sit next to each other on long DNA molecules called chromosomes. So far, little has been known about how the position of a gene on a chromosome affects its evolution. A new study by Calin Guet, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), and Magdalena Steinrück, PhD student in Guet's group, shows that a g
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dragonfly brains predict the path of their preyNew research from Australia and Sweden has shown how a dragonfly's brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers offer new and novel paradigm for advancing research on beneficial microbesWhile beneficial microbes are becoming a more common tool in agriculture, their effectiveness in the field is severely blunted thanks to real-world environmental stressors like heat and drought, competition with other microbes, and interactions with the host plant. Such factors can reduce the treatment's effectiveness or even drive the microbe to extinction.
11h
Science-Based Medicine
AllerVarx: A Questionable Remedy for Allergic RhinitisAllerVarx, a new dietary supplement, claims to relieve nasal allergy symptoms, but the only "evidence" is a single disreputable clinical trial with no control group. There is no reason to try this unproven remedy when there are so many effective remedies offered by mainstream medicine.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dragonfly brains predict the path of their preyNew research from Australia and Sweden has shown how a dragonfly's brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision.
12h
Ingeniøren
IBM om svensk datalæk: Vi har ikke tilsvarende problemer i Danmark Svenske personoplysninger er potentielt havnet i forkerte hænder gennem en IBM-afdeling i Tjekkiet. Men det kan ikke ske i Danmark, siger dansk direktør. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ibm-svensk-datalaek-vi-har-ikke-tilsvarende-problemer-danmark-1078586 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren
Kommentar: Gammeldags teknologi gjorde det nemmere at lære it Selvom teknologi i dag er udbredt overalt og alle bruger den, så er det ikke sikkert, at det er blevet nemmere at lære at programmere. Måske tværtimod. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kommentar-maaske-alligevel-svaert-med-at-laere-it-1078535 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren
Kunstvanding med spildevand skaber stigende sundhedsrisikoNy rapport viser, at problemets omfang er mindst 50 procent større end hidtil antaget.
13h
The Atlantic
Trump's Mistake at the Boy Scout Jamboree Donald Trump continued his ongoing tour of cherished American institutions on Monday night, delivering yet another jarringly partisan speech to an apolitical audience—this one, comprising tens of thousands still too young to vote. During the campaign, his performance at the Al Smith dinner—where presidential candidates roast their rivals and themselves every four years— devolved into overt attack
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Toddlers begin learning rules of reading, writing at very early age, study findsNew research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new and novel paradigm for advancing research on beneficial microbesWhile beneficial microbes are increasingly used in agriculture, environmental stressors such as heat can quickly kill or render them useless in the field; and discovering new and better treatments is slow due to the large microbial diversity in soils. Through a new and novel review paper titled 'Translating Phytobiomes from Theory to Practice: Ecological and Evolutionary Considerations,' Hawkes an
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No gene is an islandGenes do not exist in isolation. Like beads on a string, they sit next to each other on the chromosomes. So far, little has been known about how the position of a gene on a chromosome affects its evolution. A new study by Calin Guet and Magdalena Steinrück at IST Austria shows that a gene's neighborhood can influence whether and how the activity of a gene changes. The study was published today in
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetic quantum objects in a 'nano egg-box'Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called 'fluxons,' are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Physicists around Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have now succeeded in producing a 'quantum egg-box' with a novel and simple method. They realized a stable and regular arrangement of hundreds
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explains link between academic performance and violenceA lack of variation in the stress hormone cortisol from morning to evening is tied to a wide range of negative health conditions, including inflammation and immune system dysfunction, new Northwestern University research suggests. In the first comprehensive review of the relationship between daily cortisol fluctuations and health, researchers at the School of Education and Social Policy combined d
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pattern of marijuana use during adolescence may impact psychosocial outcomes in adulthoodA pattern of escalating marijuana use in adolescents is linked to higher rates of depression and lower educational accomplishments in adulthood.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Violent sleep patterns & stress hormones change after a violent crime in the neighborhoodA new study has found that violent crime changes youth's sleep patterns the night immediately following the crime and changes patterns of the stress hormone cortisol the following day. Both may then disrupt academic performance in students.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans imitate in unique ways: Comparing children and bonobosA new study compared children's capacity to imitate behavior with the same capacity of humans' closest living great ape relatives, the bonobos. The study found that bonobos do not copy actions as children do, which highlights the unique nature of human imitation.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
For Computers, Too, It’s Hard to Learn to Speak ChineseChallenging written characters make voice-based computing a natural for China, but computers that can hold a conversation in Chinese are some way off.
15h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
SHARK WEEK: Sharks and the City: LA Along the coastline of LA, great white sharks are increasing and they seem to be hunting out of season. Dr. Chris Lowe returns to Shark Week to find out why. His investigation takes him to Guadalupe Island, off Mexico, where he finds the answer. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to
15h
The Scientist RSS
Child Lives with HIV for Years Without TreatmentsAnother case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.
15h
Live Science
Deductive Reasoning vs. Inductive ReasoningDeduction starts out with a generalization that follows a process to reach a specific, logical conclusion. Induction is the opposite - making a generalization from a set of specific observations.
15h
The Atlantic
John McCain Is Returning to the Senate for the Health-Care Vote Arizona Republican John McCain will return to the Senate on Tuesday in time to participate in a procedural vote that could decide the future of the Affordable Care Act. In a statement released Monday night, McCain’s office said he “looks forward to returning to the United States Senate tomorrow to continue to working on important legislation, including health-care reform, the National Defense Aut
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Writing with the electron beam: Now in silverFor the first time an international team realized direct writing of silver nanostructures using an electron beam applied to a substrate. Silver nanostructures have the potential to concentrate visible light at the nanoscale. Potential applications include sensor design to detect extremely small traces of specific molecules, as well as devices for optical information processing.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Issues with maternal screening for congenital cytomegalovirus infectionHuman cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus found worldwide. When CMV infects fetuses, it can cause serious complications such as hearing difficulties and mental retardation in affected infants. A group of researchers have evaluated for the first time the efficacy of maternal universal screening using CMV IgG avidity tests for congenital CMV infection, and they have also identified issues with t
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weight in adolescence may affect colorectal cancer riskA new study has uncovered a link between being overweight or obese in adolescence and an increased risk of developing colon cancer in adulthood. Obesity was also associated with an elevated risk of developing rectal cancer.
15h
Live Science
Facts About UraniumUranium is a naturally radioactive element. It powers nuclear reactors and atomic bombs.
15h
Live Science
Anorexia: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentAnorexia nervosa involves an obsession with food and weight that can end up consuming a person's life.
15h
Gizmodo
From 2001 to Guardians of the Galaxy, Mondo's Comic-Con Offerings Were Out of This World A crop of Kevin Tong’s 2001. All Images: Mondo Every year, I make it a point to stop by the Mondo booth at San Diego Comic-Con as often as possible. No one at the entire convention releases as much exciting, vibrant, and exclusive pop culture art over the course of four days—and 2017 was no exception. Here’s everything Mondo released at Comic-Con from Wednesday night through Sunday. Most of these
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-temperature superconductivity in B-doped Q-carbonResearchers have significantly increased the temperature at which carbon-based materials act as superconductors, using a novel, boron-doped Q-carbon material.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists enlist baker's yeast in a hunt for new medicinesScientists have come up with a new way to predict potentially useful drugs from a pool of undefined chemicals. They were able to more quickly identify leads that could be used to treat a range of diseases, from infections, to cancer to Alzheimer's. The finding will also help better match drugs to a disease to maximize the benefit and reduce side-effects.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New brain death pathway in Alzheimer's diseaseNeuroscientists have identified a new way for brain cells to become fated to die during Alzheimer's diseases. The research team has found the first evidence that the activation of a biological pathway called necroptosis, which causes neuronal loss, is closely linked with Alzheimer's severity, cognitive decline and extreme loss of tissue and brain weight that are all advanced hallmarks of the disea
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Corn gene conferring resistance to multiple plant leaf diseasesResearchers have found a specific gene in corn that appears to be associated with resistance to two and possibly three different plant leaf diseases.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What do sex in moss and neurons have in common?For many years biologists have wondered why plants have so many genes coding for proteins that are known to be essential for the nervous system of animals, called glutamate receptors. Now, researchers discovered a new function for those proteins, showing that moss sperm uses them to navigate its swimming towards the female organs and ensure offspring.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Time, not material goods, 'raises happiness'Contentment comes from paying others to take on chores such as cleaning and cooking, a study says.
16h
The Atlantic
What John McCain Can Learn From Clair Engle None of us can choose how we are remembered. Most of us are not remembered at all. Senator John McCain knows that he will be remembered. He faces a choice about how his remarkable career will be noted in its autumnal phase. McCain will of course be remembered most of all for his service, and sacrifice and bravery, as a naval aviator and then as prisoner of war in Vietnam. He should also be known
16h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
When You Want To Adopt A Puppy In The Bush, It's All About Who You Know #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Cupcake wasn't always a citizen of Browntown. The tenth member of the wolf pack melted Billy's heart the moment they met. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Face
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9 prevents angiogenesis of the retinaA research team has successfully prevented mice from developing angiogenesis of the retina -- the sensory tissue at the back of the eye -- using gene-editing techniques with CRISPR-Cas9.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracyFor decades, vaccine manufacturers have used chicken eggs to grow the flu virus strains included in the seasonal vaccine. But because these human strains frequently mutate to adapt to their new environment, the resulting vaccine is often an imperfect match to the virus that it is supposed to protect against. Researchers have now devised a way to keep the human influenza virus from mutating during
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biological pest management: Infected insects cause a stinkResearchers have shown how nematodes use smell to seek out uninfected insects, which they then enter and kill. The findings support the group's long-term goal of improving how gardeners and the agricultural industry use nematodes in biological pest management.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monitoring fluid intake may help improve outcomes for bariatric surgery patientsA well-structured water distribution and documentation process led to increased water intake at one hospital.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term brain deficits in cardiac arrest survivors: Treatment?Research may lead to a treatment to prevent long-term sensory problems by restoring normal brain function in survivors of cardiac arrest.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benefits of continued statin use after adverse reactionsA new study explores outcomes for patients who continue receiving statins after experiencing an adverse reaction, finding that they had a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statin denial is an Internet-driven cult with deadly consequencesA researcher says that Internet propaganda promoting bizarre and unscientific criticisms of statins has given these life-saving drugs a bad reputation.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multitasking monolayersTwo-dimensional materials that can multitask. That is the result of a new process that naturally produces patterned monolayers that can act as a base for creating a wide variety of novel materials with dual optical, magnetic, catalytic or sensing capabilities.
17h
Gizmodo
The Republican in Charge of the House Science Committee Is Now Arguing Global Warming Has 'Benefits' Photo: AP Texas Rep. Lamar Smith, the Republican official in charge of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, has now penned an editorial urging the public not to buy into “hysteria over carbon dioxide,” which he believes could actually be good for us. The post, which can be viewed over at the fossil fuel-industry backed Heritage Foundation’s Daily Signal blog , is full of highly mis
18h
Wired
Google Fights Against Canada's Order to Change Global Search ResultsThe tech giant filed an injunction arguing a ruling from the Canadian Supreme Court requiring Google to remove search results globally violates US free speech laws.
18h
Wired
The Google Machine Barrels Along Despite Record EU FineNote To Regulators: It'll Take More than Fines to Slow Down the Search Giant
18h
Gizmodo
Trump's Absurd, Fake Voter Fraud Commission Advances After Victory Over Privacy Law in Court Photo: Getty Losing the popular vote to Hillary Clinton badly bruised President Trump’s ego—so much so that he’s cast doubt on the outcome of an election he won by repeatedly suggesting that three million votes cast were illegitimate. On Monday, efforts to combat the president’s newly formed voting commission were dealt a serious blow in court after a Washington federal judge dismissed a complain
18h
Gizmodo
The Concourse Maester Qyburn’s Big Anti-Dragon Crossbow Looks Stupid | The Slot Secretary of State R The Concourse Maester Qyburn’s Big Anti-Dragon Crossbow Looks Stupid | The Slot Secretary of State Rex Tillerson Rumored to Be Considering Resignation | Splinter ‘I Am a Girl Now,’ Sage Smith Wrote. Then She Went Missing. | The Root A Bold Sista: Move Over, Bernie Bros. Nina Turner Is the New Head of Sanders’ Our Revolution |
19h
Gizmodo
What's the Best Domain Name Registrar? Igor Miske/Unsplash Domain name registrars might seem like commodities, but ease of use and customer support can vary wildly between different companies, so we want to know which ones you trust the most. So check out the rules below, then head down to the comments to nominate your favorite service. 1) Your nomination should contain the specific name of the product, why you think this item is the
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain stimulation may improve cognitive performance in people with schizophreniaBrain stimulation could be used to treat cognitive deficits frequently associated with schizophrenia, according to a new study from King's College London.
19h
Ars Technica
Trump voting commission wins right to collect state voter data Enlarge (credit: Keith Ivey ) A federal judge on Monday refused to block President Donald Trump's advisory panel from demanding that the states hand over their registered voters' full names, political affiliations, addresses, dates of birth, criminal records, the last four digits of their Social Security numbers, and other personal identifying information, including whether they voted in election
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Kushner Speaks What We’re Following ‘I Did Not Collude With Russia’: That’s what the president’s son-in-law told the Senate Intelligence Committee , and repeated in a statement to the press today. Jared Kushner’s prepared remarks to the committee described attempts from the Russian side to contact him during Trump’s campaign, suggesting that Russia tried a variety of ways to get his team’s attention. Setting as
19h
Ars Technica
“Perverse” malware infecting hundreds of Macs remained undetected for years Enlarge (credit: Tim Malabuyo ) A mysterious piece of malware that gives attackers surreptitious control over webcams, keyboards, and other sensitive resources has been infecting Macs for at least five years. The infections—known to number nearly 400 and possibly much higher—remained undetected until recently and may have been active for almost a decade. Patrick Wardle, a researcher with security
20h
Gizmodo
Olive Garden Backs Down From Silly Legal Fight With Review Site, All of Garden Source: AP For three years, self-proclaimed Olive Garden connoisseur Vincent “Vino” Malone has used his blog All of Garden to share his love for the Italian-American restaurant chain. But last week he was bit by the hand that feeds him when he received a cease-and-desist letter. Malone started his blog after Olive Garden released the first Never Ending Pasta Passes in 2014—vowing to eat nothing b
20h
The Atlantic
Taliban Car Bombing Kills 26 in Pakistan At least 26 people were killed and more than 50 others wounded in a Monday car bombing in Pakistan’s eastern city of Lahore. The Pakistani Taliban has since claimed responsibility for the attack, confirming reports that the explosion was caused by a suicide bomber on a motorcycle. Local officials said the attack likely targeted the city’s police, who were attempting to clear illegal street vendor
20h
Gizmodo
Sweden Leaks the Personal Information of Millions of Its Own Citizens Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven holds a press conference. Photo: Getty There are security fuck-ups and there are legendary security fuck-ups. This one clearly falls into the latter category. Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven confirmed at a press conference on Monday that his administration potentially exposed the personal information of millions of Sweden’s citizens. Normally, for a fuck-
20h
Wired
Forget the Brake. Electric Cars Mean One Pedal DrivingPress to go, lift off to stop.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later lifeA new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter. Researchers found that owning or walking a dog was one of the most effective ways to beat the usual decline in later-life activity, even combatting the effects of bad weather. Dog owners were sedentary for 30 minutes less per day, on average.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reported doubling in child mortality in Iraq following UN sanctions untrueThe reported almost doubling in child mortality in Iraq following the imposition of economic sanctions in 1990 was a 'remarkable fiction' cooked up by Saddam Hussein's government to stir up international condemnation and get the sanctions lifted, say experts in the online journal BMJ Global Health.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Walking the dog may boost older people's physical activity, come rain or shineTaking the dog out for a walk may boost older people's physical activity levels -- whatever the weather -- and seems to lop an average of 30 minutes off their daily sitting time, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
20h
Live Science
Child Born with HIV is Virtually Virus-Free for 9 Years, Without MedsA child in South Africa who was born with HIV has been virtually free of the virus for nearly nine years now and didn't take anti-HIV drugs for most of that time.
20h
20hWhat's the Problem With Metal Detectors in Jerusalem?Updated on July 24 at 6:33 p.m. ET Of all the issues involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, none is more sensitive than the status of Jerusalem, which both sides claim as their capital. But the delicate status quo surrounding the holy city has been threatened in recent weeks following the installation of new security measures at the entrance of the Old City’s holy compound, culminating in the biggest crisis the site has seen in years.The Atlantic Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advancing knowledge toward more efficient electronicsA recent discovery of a new magnetic semimetal could eventually lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, radios and other electronics.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolutionary biologists solve puzzle of evolutionary relationships among vertebratesUsing the largest and most informative molecular phylogenetic dataset ever analysed, evolutionary biologists were able to construct a new phylogenetic tree of jawed vertebrates. This new tree resolves several key relationships that have remained controversial, including the identification of lungfishes as the closest living relatives of land vertebrates. The evolution of jawed vertebrates is part
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turbulence in planetary cores excited by tidesVeritable shields against high-energy particles, planets' magnetic fields are produced by iron moving in their liquid core. Yet the dominant model for explaining this system does not fit the smallest celestial bodies. Researchers have proposed a new model suggesting that turbulence in the liquid cores is due to tides produced by gravitational interactions between celestial bodies.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Greenland ice sheet: How do you go the toilet?There's one question the BBC's science editor keeps being asked about life on the ice.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Scientist describes life on the ice in GreenlandGlacial microbiologist Dr Joe Cook is in Greenland to examine the effect of algae on melting ice.
21h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Meet This Bizarre Alien Of The Deep: The Goblin Shark! | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Alien Sharks heads to Tokyo Bay in search of the fascinatingly weird goblin shark. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/Shar
21h
The Atlantic
The GOP's 'Last Chance' to Replace Obamacare? Updated on July 25 at 9:38 a.m. ET Senate Republicans on Tuesday will begin debating legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, making good on the party’s most enduring campaign promise of the last seven years. Or maybe they won’t. The Senate’s next move on health care has been cloaked in mystery over the last several days, as President Trump and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell try to clea
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Collusion, Course Not Today in 5 Lines Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, told reporters that he “did not collude with Russians, nor do I know of anyone in the campaign who did.” The remarks came after Kushner met privately with the Senate Intelligence Committee as part of its probe into Russian interference in the presidential election. During a press conference at the White House, Trump
21h
Live Science
Snooty, Oldest Manatee in Captivity, Dies at Age 69An accident led to the untimely demise of the charismatic sea cow.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saturn surprises as Cassini continues its grand finaleAs NASA's Cassini spacecraft makes its unprecedented series of weekly dives between Saturn and its rings, scientists are finding—so far—that the planet's magnetic field has no discernable tilt. This surprising observation, which means the true length of Saturn's day is still unknown, is just one of several early insights from the final phase of Cassini's mission, known as the Grand Finale.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of dapivirine ring in lactating women finds little drug gets into breast milkThe antiretroviral drug dapivirine contained in a vaginal ring for HIV prevention, is absorbed in very low concentrations into breastmilk, according to a study of the dapivirine ring in women who were no longer nursing their babies but still producing milk. Researchers are now planning studies of the ring in African women who are breastfeeding as well as during pregnancy, when there may be a great
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuroticism may postpone death for someData from a longitudinal study of over 500,000 people in the United Kingdom indicate that having higher levels of the personality trait neuroticism may reduce the risk of death for individuals who report being in fair or poor health. The research further revealed that a specific aspect of neuroticism related to worry and feelings of vulnerability was associated with lower mortality, regardless of
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tai chi may help prevent falls in older and at-risk adultsAn analysis of published studies indicates that tai chi may help reduce the number of falls in both the older adult population and at-risk adults.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatmentNew research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Campaigning on climate science consensus may backfire, warn scholarsClimate change campaigns that focus on correcting public beliefs about scientific consensus are likely to backfire and undermine policy efforts, according to an expert commentary.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between income inequality and physical activity for women, but not for menA recent paper finds that women from areas with high income inequality are less likely to meet overall physical activity recommendations than men from the same geographical area.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sports specialization may lead to more lower extremity injuriesBetter education to coaches and parents about the effects of single sport specialization is critical, say researchers.
21h
Popular Science
The best ways to follow breaking news on your phone DIY Read all about it. Make sure you're getting the headlines before everyone else with these smartphone news apps. Read more.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fact-checking site Snopes pleads for help to stay aliveSnopes, touted as the internet's oldest fact-checking website, said Monday it is in danger of shutting down due to a legal dispute with a digital services company hosting the site.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alphabet profit hit by EU fine on GoogleGoogle parent Alphabet on Monday saw shares slide as the market reacted to a massive fine by the European Commission and word that success in mobile, cloud and YouTube is coming with higher costs.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Additional studies needed to evaluate CVD risks of hormone therapy for transgender patientsAdditional studies needed to evaluate cardiovascular disease risks of long-term, hormone therapy for transgender patients
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of continued statin use after adverse reactionsA new study by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital explores outcomes for patients who continue receiving statins after experiencing an adverse reaction, finding that they had a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events.
21h
The Atlantic
Snopes Faces an Ugly Legal Battle On Monday, the editorial staff of Snopes.com wrote a short plea for help . The post said that the site needed money to fund its operations because another company that Snopes had contracted with “continues to essentially hold the Snopes.com web site hostage.” “Our legal team is fighting hard for us, but, having been cut off from all revenue, we are facing the prospect of having no financial means
21h
Gizmodo
Maester Qyburn's Big Anti-Dragon Crossbow Looks Stupid Image via HBO Game of Thrones —HBO’s hit show about camping and horny sailors—has made it very clear that the trio of dragons possessed by Daenerys Targaryen are Westeros’s ultimate weapons of destruction. She’s torched one proud city with them already, and the only reason King’s Landing didn’t go up in flames on the second episode of this season was because she realized they were too powerful an
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9 prevents angiogenesis of the retinaA research team from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear has successfully prevented mice from developing angiogenesis of the retina--the sensory tissue at the back of the eye--using gene-editing techniques with CRISPR-Cas9.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reshaping computer-aided designResearchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Columbia University are trying to make the process faster and easier: In a new paper, they've developed InstantCAD, a tool that lets designers interactively edit, improve, and optimize CAD models using a more streamlined and intuitive workflow.
22h
New Scientist - News
Our brains always plan one step ahead of our bodies when we walkA brief glimpse of upcoming terrain one stride ahead of time enables your brain to make sure your next footfall hits the right spot
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Construction of massive neutrino experiment kicks off a mile undergroundA new era in international particle physics research officially began July 21 with a unique groundbreaking held a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. Dignitaries, scientists and engineers from around the world marked the start of construction of a massive international experiment that could change our understanding of the universe. The Long-Baseline Neutr
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using money to buy time linked to increased happinessNew research is challenging the age-old adage that money can't buy happiness. The study suggests that using money to buy free time -- such as paying to delegate household chores like cleaning and cooking -- is linked to greater life satisfaction.
22h
Wired
Jared Kushner's Senate Testimony May Forget Russia Meetings, But the FBI Would RememberAnything the Russian ambassador says on the phone almost certainly gets caught on a FISA wiretap.
22h
Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Making Contact’ chronicles an astronomer’s struggle to find E.T.For decades, astronomer Jill Tarter led the hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence, as detailed in a new biography.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
After bunion surgery, immediate x-rays predict recurrence riskFor patients undergoing surgery to repair a bunion deformity of the foot, non-weight-bearing x rays taken immediately after surgery can provide a good estimate of the risk that the bunion will return over time, reports a study in the current issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNO: How can US Navy prevail in contest for maritime supremacy?The U.S. Navy has enjoyed uncontested global maritime supremacy for the past 25 years, said Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson at the Naval Future Force Science and Technology Expo, held Jul. 20-21 in Washington, D.C.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physics of bubbles could explain language patternsLanguage patterns could be predicted by simple laws of physics, a new study has found. A theory using ideas from physics predicts where and how dialects occur.
22h
Ars Technica
TSA: United made false announcement about comic book luggage ban Enlarge (credit: Adi Chappo ) Don’t worry Comic-Con fans, you don’t have to remove your comic books from your checked luggage, despite what a Sunday photo circulated on Twitter suggests. The dust-up began after a person named Adi Chappo tweeted the above, tagging United Airlines, which responded on Twitter: The restriction on checking comic books applies to all airlines operating out of San Diego
22h
Gizmodo
This Real World 'Space Opera' Lets You Become the Hubble Telescope GIF Image: “Fistful of Stars”; Gif via Gizmodo It’s easy to feel small and insignificant in the grandiose scope of the universe, because we are. At the same time, as Carl Sagan once reminded us, we’re made of the same “star stuff” as the cosmos. All too often, we forget how random, ridiculous, and resplendent it is to part of the stellar sorority of the universe. That’s why art, specifically movi
22h
The Atlantic
How Venice Beach Became a Neighborhood for the Wealthy Just over a week ago, The Wall Street Journal called the neighborhood where I rent, Venice Beach, California, the toughest place in the United States to build new housing, pointing to it as an extreme example of what is happening in a lot of wealthy urban enclaves. “Apartment developers have stepped up production focused largely on the inner cores of big U.S. cities, where millennials are flockin
22h
The Scientist RSS
USC to Fire Former Medical School DeanCarmen Puliafito, once a renowned ophthalmologist and professor, engaged in illicit drug use and partied with prostitutes.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google parent books $2.7B fine as European fight loomsGoogle parent Alphabet is taking a $2.7 billion write-down to cover a large fine EU antitrust enforcers assessed in June . While the search giant can shrug off the cost, uncertainty lingers over its ability to operate freely on the continent going forward.
22h
Gizmodo
Video Game Publishers Sure Like ‘Extending’ Betas Yesterday, Bungie announced a two-day extension for the Destiny 2 beta, continuing a long-running video game industry tradition of announcing the same surprise news again and again. It’s as sure a thing there is in video games: If there’s a beta, it will be extended. In video game parlance, a “beta” is a near-final version of a game that is used for testing, tweaking, and fixing bugs. Game compan
22h
The Atlantic
The 'Horrific' Human-Smuggling Tragedy in Texas A 10th migrant has died after being smuggled over the weekend to San Antonio inside a tractor-trailer truck with no air conditioning as temperatures touched the 100s. On Monday, the truck’s driver appeared in federal court and was reportedly told he faced the death penalty. James M. Bradley Jr., the driver, faced federal charges of illegally transporting immigrants for financial gain, resulting i
22h
Popular Science
Why scientists are racing to uncover the Greenland shark's secrets Science What’s cooler than the Arctic ocean? The sharks that live there. Researchers are racing to learn as much as possible about the once elusive Greenland shark. Read on.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC research examines lung cell turnover as risk factor & target for treatment of influenza pneumoniaMost of the 500,000 annual deaths worldwide from influenza are due to influenza pneumonia. Understanding how the transition to pneumonia occurs could shed light on interventions that could reduce that number. Research from the University of Cincinnati takes a different approach to how flu spreads through the lungs by focusing on how resistant or susceptible cells lining the airway are to viral inf
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New map may lead to drug development for complex brain disorders, USC researcher saysJust as parents are not the root of all their children's problems, a single gene mutation can't be blamed for complex brain disorders like autism, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC neuroscientist. To help researchers see the big picture, Marcelo P. Coba created the first map that highlights the brain's network of protein associations. It's a first step to developing treatment drugs tha
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent inhibits glioblastoma growth and radiation resistanceA collaborative team of neuro-oncology surgeon/scientists -- led by Ichiro Nakano, M.D., Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Maode Wang, M.D., Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China -- has discovered a unique and previously unidentified molecular mechanism that maintains glioma stem cells, and they have tested it as a potential therapeutic target in glioblastoma, using a novel small m
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists propose novel therapy to lessen risk of obesity-linked diseaseWith obesity related illnesses a global pandemic, researchers propose in the Journal of Clinical Investigation using a blood thinner to target molecular drivers of chronic metabolic inflammation in people eating high-fat diets to limit weight gain and disease.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft Paint brushed asideMicrosoft on Monday announced the end of days for its pioneering Paint application as it focuses on software for 3-D drawing.
22h
NYT > Science
Global Health: In Some Countries, Women Get Days Off for Period PainIn some countries, companies offer women paid time off for period pain. But some experts fear these policies reinforce dated stereotypes.
22h
NYT > Science
It’s High Time for Ticks, Which Are Spreading Diseases FartherThe disease-carrying blood suckers are spreading more pathogens and putting more Americans at risk for rare illnesses.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greatest threat to eastern forest birds is habitat loss on wintering groundsWithin the next few decades, human-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds. The problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study published today in the journal Global Change Biology. By the end of this century, the study's authors say predicted changes in rainfall and temperature will compound the problem for birds that
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multitasking monolayers lay groundwork for devices that can do two things at onceTwo-dimensional materials that can multitask.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reaching black men in barbershops could lead to early detection of colorectal cancerNYU Langone researchers find that black men who enrolled in a patient navigator program at local barbershops were twice as likely to get colorectal cancer screening.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greatest threat to eastern forest birds is habitat loss on wintering groundsHuman-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds. The problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study published today in the journal Global Change Biology.
23h
Gizmodo
Absolutely All of io9's Massive Coverage of San Diego Comic-Con 2017 in One Convenient Location San Diego Comic-Con 2017 may be over, but io9's coverage lives on in our many, many posts, and we’ve collected them all here for you: movie and TV news and trailers, only-at-Comic-Con footage descriptions and experiences, amazing toys from the show floor, and so much more. Movies Marvel DC Science Fiction Other Movies Television Superheroes Science Fiction Horror and Fantasy Animation Misc. TV Co
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How fear alone can cause animal extinctionResearchers have discovered that the fear of predators causes flies to spend less time eating, more time being vigilant, have less sex, and produce fewer offspring.
23h
Gizmodo
An Incredible Camcorder Tour of the Gadgets That Made Nerds Drool in 1987 GIF GIF: YouTube Fifty years ago the first Consumer Electronics Show was held in New York City, giving local nerds a sneak peek at all the electronic toys arriving in 1967. Twenty years later, Art Vuolo attended the ‘Summer’ edition of the trade show with a giant camera on his shoulder, giving us a wonderful time capsule of what was drool-worthy 30 years ago. Up until 1994, CES actually happened
23h
Wired
RIP Microsoft Paint. Thanks for All the Hideous DoodlesMicrosoft Paint is dead, but it won't be forgotten.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Algae cultivation technique could advance biofuelsWashington State University researchers have developed a way to grow algae more efficiently -- in days instead of weeks -- and make the algae more viable for several industries, including biofuels.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracyFor decades, vaccine manufacturers have used chicken eggs to grow the flu virus strains included in the seasonal vaccine. But because these human strains frequently mutate to adapt to their new environment, the resulting vaccine is often an imperfect match to the virus that it is supposed to protect against. Duke researchers have devised a way to keep the human influenza virus from mutating during
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multitasking monolayersTwo-dimensional materials that can multitask. That is the result of a new process that naturally produces patterned monolayers that can act as a base for creating a wide variety of novel materials with dual optical, magnetic, catalytic or sensing capabilities.
23h
Gizmodo
This $13 Growler Is The Perfect Thing For Any Beer Lover Stanley Classic Growler , $13 after $12 coupon Stanley’s 64oz stainless steel, vacuum insulated growler is the perfect addition to any beer lover’s collection. And at $13 (after you clip the $12 coupon) in the classic Hammertone Green , it’ll look good both on the shelf and under a tap.
23h
Futurity.org
Is NATO ‘obsolete’ or still vital? President Donald Trump has said that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), an almost 70-year-old international organization, may be “obsolete”—igniting a national debate over whether the United States should continue to take a leading role in the promised defense of European nations, who some perceive to have invested insufficiently in their own militaries. While the administration has s
23h
Gizmodo
Watching Lego Master Builders Make This Life-Sized Thor: Ragnarok Statue Is Absolutely Mesmerizing GIF Image: LEGO via Instagram The amount of technical and artistic skill that it’s taken to create nearly everything about Thor: Ragnarok from the movie itself to its gorgeous advertisements is almost unimaginable. The same goes for the life-sized Lego Thor that appeared at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. The thing about Lego is that we all understand the basic concept and steps that someone tak
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algae cultivation technique could advance biofuelsWashington State University researchers have developed a way to grow algae more efficiently—in days instead of weeks—and make the algae more viable for several industries, including biofuels.
23h
The Scientist RSS
Islands North of Antarctica Key to Fish Species DiversityTheir waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers perform first basic-physics simulation of the impact of recycled atoms on plasma turbulenceTurbulence, the violently unruly disturbance of plasma, can prevent plasma from growing hot enough to fuel fusion reactions. Long a puzzling concern of researchers has been the impact on turbulence of atoms recycled from the walls of tokamaks that confine the plasma. These atoms are neutral, meaning that they have no charge and are thus unaffected by the tokamak's magnetic field or plasma turbulen
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-temperature superconductivity in B-doped Q-carbonResearchers at North Carolina State University have significantly increased the temperature at which carbon-based materials act as superconductors, using a novel, boron-doped Q-carbon material.
23h
Science : NPR
A New Study Shows The Moon's Interior Could Contain Water Sick of your crowded neighborhood pool? A new study shows there might be quite a bit of water on a more isolated place — the moon. (Image credit: Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images)
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physics of bubbles could explain language patternsLanguage patterns could be predicted by simple laws of physics, a new study has found. Dr James Burridge from the University of Portsmouth has published a theory using ideas from physics to predict where and how dialects occur.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enhanced recovery pathway for colorectal surgical patients improves outcomes, reduces costA protocol that standardizes care before, during, and after colorectal operations has reduced hospital stays by more than half, reduced complications by more than one-third, and cut costs up to $11,000 per procedure, according to study results presented yesterday at the American College of Surgeons 2017 Quality and Patient Safety Conference.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researcher paves new path toward preventing obesityPeople who experience unpredictable childhoods face a higher risk of becoming obese as adults.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to violence hinders short-term memory, cognitive controlBeing exposed to and actively remembering violent episodes -- even those that happened up to a decade before -- hinders short-term memory and cognitive control, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular hitchhiker on human protein signals tumors to self-destructVanderbilt University engineers find existing human protein is ideal carrier for powerful molecules that can signal tumors to self-destruct.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Target 'best connected neighbors' to stop spread of infection in developing countriesAn innovative new study takes a network theory approach to targeted treatment in rural Africa, and finds that a simple algorithm may be more effective than current policies, as well as easier to deploy, when it comes to preventing disease spread -- by finding those with 'most connections to sick people.'




Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.