NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Big names in statistics want to shake up much-maligned P value One of scientists’ favourite statistics — the P value — should face tougher standards, say leading researchers. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22375
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BBC News - Science & Environment
New diesel and petrol cars face 2040 ban in UKMinisters have also unveiled a £255m fund to help councils introduce steps to deal with pollution.
21h
The Atlantic
Trump’s Transgender Ban Could Force Out Thousands of Service Members Updated July 26 at 3:31 pm EST President Trump has announced that transgender Americans will not be allowed to serve “in any capacity” in the U.S. military, a move that could affect thousands of people serving in the armed forces and which resulted in almost immediate pushback from influential Republicans. Trump tweeted Wednesday that the U.S. military “must be focused on decisive and overwhelmin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing deep learning to big screen animationModern films and TV shows are filled with spectacular computer-generated sequences computed by rendering systems that simulate the flow of light in a three-dimensional scene and convert the information into a two-dimensional image. But computing the thousands of light rays (per frame) to achieve accurate color, shadows, reflectivity and other light-based characteristics is a labor-intensive, time-
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
KC team comes up with a chatbot to corral your drug billYou leave your doctor's office with a prescription that the physician's office sends to your regular pharmacy.
0min
Live Science
Western Men See Drop in Sperm Counts, But Cause Remains a MysterySperm counts among men in Western countries have dropped considerably in the last several decades, according to a new study.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber's going big into trucking business, and nowhere bigger than TexasOne of the biggest technology disruptors when it comes to shuttling people is now trying to transform the way goods are moved around the country.
12min
Ars Technica
iPhone-maker Foxconn to build flat-screen display factory in Wisconsin Enlarge / The OLED-toting Google Pixel (left) next to the iPhone 7 Plus' LCD panel. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Foxconn, one of the electronics manufacturers that makes Apple's iPhones, is set to reveal plans to build a factory in Wisconsin to product flat-screen displays. Foxconn has been in talks with state governments about investing $7 billion in US manufacturing since Donald Trump took office as Pr
16min
Gizmodo
Jeff Bezos in Instagram Debut: ‘I Am Fun’ Video still: Jeff Bezos/Instagram Commercial space tourism company Blue Origin, and its overlord Jeff Bezos, have been pretty quiet over the last few months. But last week, the Amazon founder made his first Instagram post, which appears to show the billionaire stranded on the roof of his own rocket facility in Florida. Because he is Fun. Haha. The video opens with a spectacular view of Blue Origi
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook's ads just keep creeping into new appsScrolling through an ad-free Instagram is now a distant memory, much like the once ad-free Facebook itself. Soon, users of its Messenger app will begin to see advertisements, too—and WhatsApp may not be too far behind.
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Feed: All Latest
A New Toolkit Hopes to Fix the SS7 Flaws That Plague Cell networksCarriers have ignored flaws in SS7 that allow hackers easy access to telecoms. A new set of open-source tools hopes to jumpstart a fix.
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Feed: All Latest
Our Minds Have Been Hijacked by Our Phones. Tristan Harris Wants to Rescue ThemThe founder of a nonprofit aimed at stopping tech companies from “hijacking our minds” says internet users must rise up and reclaim their humanity.
18min
NYT > Science
Case of Zika Virus, Likely Spread by Mosquito, Is Reported in TexasFor the first time this year, health officials have documented a case of local mosquito transmission of the virus within the contiguous United States.
18min
Ars Technica
Using a blockchain doesn’t exempt you from securities regulations Enlarge / Ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin. (credit: Techcrunch ) The DAO, a blockchain-based organization created last year, was supposed to demonstrate the potential of Bitcoin competitor Ethereum. Investors pumped $150 million of virtual currency into the project. But then in June 2016, hackers found a bug in the DAO's code that allowed them to steal $50 million from the organization, creating
23min
The Atlantic
John McCain Makes His Choice The effort to repeal Barack Obama’s health-care bill is not over, and neither presumably is the public career of John McCain. But each crossed an important threshold yesterday, and Senator McCain gave us a clearer idea of who he is and what he stands for. The repeal effort isn’t over, because debate and further voting is now underway to determine whether the bill will pass and, more basically, to
26min
Ars Technica
Microsoft expands bug bounty program to cover any Windows flaw Some bugs aren't worth very much cash. (credit: Daniel Novta ) Microsoft today announced a new bug bounty scheme that would see anyone finding a security flaw in Windows eligible for a payout of up to $15,000. The company has been running bug bounty schemes, wherein security researchers are financially rewarded for discovering and reporting exploitable flaws, since 2013 . Back then, it was paying
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For women called Alexa, it's funny, frustrating to share name with Amazon deviceSince Amazon introduced the Alexa-enabled Echo device in 2014, the jokes have become so omnipresent that Alexa Philbeck, 29, briefly considered changing, or at least obscuring, her name.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early dementia care improvement findings to be sharedDistractions during drug rounds contribute to the challenges of treating hospital patients living with dementia, but the involvement of family or carers can be hugely beneficial, according to early results from a five-year research programme into improving care. The first findings from the ongoing Peri-operative Enhanced Recovery hip FacturE Care of paTiEnts with Dementia (PERFECTED) programme wil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A rogue gene is causing seizures in babies -- here's how MSU wants to stop itTwo rare diseases caused by a malfunctioning gene that triggers seizures or involuntary movements in children as early as a few days old have left scientists searching for answers and better treatment options. Michigan State University researchers are closer to understanding the source, a gene known as GNAO1 and the transformations it can take on, and potentially stopping its devastating effects b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is it Alzheimer's disease or another dementia?A new method may help determine whether a person has Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia, two different types of dementia that often have similar symptoms, according to a preliminary study published in the July 26, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
38min
Ars Technica
Lawsuit seeks Ajit Pai’s net neutrality talks with Internet providers Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai testifying before a Senate subcommittee on May 11, 2016, when he was a commissioner. (credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images) The Federal Communications Commission was sued today by a group that says the commission failed to comply with a public records request for communications about net neutrality between FCC officials and Internet service providers. On April 26
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tests to produce sonic booms on Florida coast in AugustScientific research at Kennedy Space Center could mean some loud booms along Canaveral National Seashore on Space Coast between New Smyrna Beach and Titusville next month, NASA officials said.
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From coast to coast, towns anticipate celestial event of a lifetimeIt looks like an ordinary Nebraska cornfield, but Louis Dorland sees something more: an ideal place to observe the Great American Eclipse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitationExosuits can be used to improve walking after stroke, say researchers. This is a critical step in de-risking exosuit technology towards real-world clinical use.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How plant architectures mimic subway networks3-D laser scanning has been used to understand how plants optimize their growth, explains a new report.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACA reduced disparities in health care access, report showsThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped to close the gap in health care access between residents of poor and higher-income households, a new report by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers shows.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As more adults are diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, radiologists look for patternsMarked improvements have been made over the past few decades in managing cystic fibrosis, but as more adults are diagnosed with the disease radiologists can do more to monitor the wide spectrum of CF in adults, including nonclassic imaging findings, according to an article published in the July 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Easy-to-use devices analyze, watch, and retouchThe pocket-sized (4.0-by-2.0-by-0.6-inches) Alcomate Revo is a great device for accurately reading an individual's blood-alcohol level.
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Popular Science
Parasitic plants dwell in darkness, feeding on mold and mushrooms Science They have great taste. A new species of Japanese plant is a fungi-eating parasite—and it's already in trouble.
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Live Science
Stunning Dark Images Reveal Movement of Trillion-Ton Antarctic IcebergStunning new images capture the movement of a gigantic iceberg that recently broke off from the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What are risk factors for melanoma in kidney transplant recipients?Kidney transplant patients appear to be at a greater risk of developing melanoma than the general population and risk factors include being older, male and white, findings that corroborate results demonstrated in other studies, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Delaying bariatric surgery until higher weight may result in poorer outcomesObese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were more like to achieve a body mass index (BMI) of less than 30 one year after surgery if they had a BMI of less than 40 before surgery, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cultural flexibility was key for early humans to survive extreme dry periods in southern AfricaThe early human techno-tradition, known as Howiesons Poort, associated with Homo sapiens who lived in southern Africa about 66,000 to 59,000 years ago indicates that during this period of pronounced aridification they developed cultural innovations that allowed them to significantly enlarge the range of environments they occupied.
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Gizmodo
Jet's Running a Rare Sitewide Electronics Sale, With Up to $40 Off Your Order $25 off any $150 electronics order with code ITSELECTRIC25 | $40 off any $250 electronics order with code ITSELECTRIC40 If you’re in the market for a TV, computer, graphics card, camera, smartphone, drone, speaker system, or pretty much anything else that could be broadly considered “electronic,” Jet’s taking $25 off basically any $150 electronic order with promo code ITSELECTRIC25, or $40 off an
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Borrowed genes give mums the bluesScientists have genetically modified chrysanthemums to be “true blue” for the first time.
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Gizmodo
Brilliant Augmented Reality App Lets You Star in Your Own '80s Music Video GIF GIF: YouTube One of the most memorable music videos of the 1980s is A-ha’s “Take On Me” featuring a young woman who’s pulled into a world that looks like it only exists as crude pencil sketches. The video took 16 weeks to animate by hand, but Trixi Studios created an augmented reality app that can recreate the effect in real-time. Ever since Apple announced the availability of ARKit—a suite o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons peer into a running engineIn a first-of-a-kind experiment, researchers used neutrons to investigate the performance of a new aluminum alloy in a gasoline-powered engine—while the engine was running.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robot-driven device improves crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy3.6 out of 1,000 children in the US are diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Their symptoms can include abnormal gait patterns such as crouch gait, characterized by excessive flexion of the hips, knees, or ankles. A pilot study demonstrates a robotic training method that improves posture and walking in children with crouch gait by enhancing their muscle strength and coordination.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilResearchers have discovered a new virus in a white-rumped sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis), a migratory bird species captured in April 2012 in the Lagoa do Peixe National Park in Rio Grande do Sul State. The current evidence suggests that it is not a risk to humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motionA toddler running sometimes loses footing because both feet come off the ground at the same time. Kinesin motors that move materials around in cells have the same problem, which limits how fast they can traverse a microtubule in the cell and carry cargo, according to researchers who have now seen these kinesin motors move using an unusual microscope and tagging method.
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Science : NPR
PHOTOS: Japanese Scientists Turn Chrysanthemums 'True Blue' The scientists introduced genes from two other flowers that allowed the mums to mimic the chemical process producing blue pigment. This might be applicable to other flowers, like roses and lilies. (Image credit: Naonobu Noda/NARO)
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Popular Science
NASA needs your help during the August eclipse Space Don’t worry, it's not rocket science. On August 21, a shadow will fall across North America, and we can't wait. If you’re going to be anywhere near the eclipse path, NASA scientists need your help.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A First-of-a-Kind Gene Therapy Cure Has Struggled to Find a MarketGlaxoSmithKline’s drug Strimvelis is for sale, a sign of how hard it is to commercialize the future of medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Now hiring at Amazon: Thousands of people in one dayAmazon plans to make thousands of job offers in just one day as it holds a giant job fair next week at nearly a dozen warehouses across the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pew poll: A quarter of blacks have been harassed onlineA new study says African-American adults are facing more harassment online than other races and ethnicities in the United States.
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Ars Technica
Verizon accused of violating net neutrality rules by throttling video Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Steven Puetzer) The Federal Communications Commission should investigate whether Verizon Wireless violated net neutrality rules by throttling video applications on its mobile network, advocacy group Free Press says. Free Press is asking people to sign a petition that will be delivered to the FCC. "Late last week Verizon Wireless customers started to notice somethin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New York eyes 'textalyzer' to bust drivers using phonesPolice in New York state may soon have a high-tech way of catching texting drivers: a device known as a "textalyzer" that allows an officer to quickly check if a phone has been in use before a crash.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts: Software theft shows threat of mercenary hackersOn an October morning in 2012, the system administrator of a tiny Vermont defense contractor arrived at work to find the business' computers had been hacked and a sophisticated software program stolen. Prosecutors later concluded the thieves were a group of Iranians who sold the software to organizations within the Iranian government.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VW directors mull cartel claims, no comment on detailsAutomaker Volkswagen says its management has informed its supervisory board about "the current situation regarding possible cartel law issues" following a report that Germany's biggest car makers colluded for years over diesel technology and other issues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligent animation—engineers collaborate to incorporate AI into a computer-based rendering systemModern films and TV shows are filled with spectacular computer-generated sequences computed by rendering systems that simulate the flow of light in a three-dimensional scene and convert the information into a two-dimensional image. But computing the thousands of light rays (per frame) to achieve accurate color, shadows, reflectivity and other light-based characteristics is a labor-intensive, time-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite sees Tropical Depression Greg as a ghostly swirl of cloudsTropical Depression Greg appears as a ghostly swirl of low clouds on satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on July 27.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Terra Satellite catches the end of Tropical Depression KulapNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Kulap as the storm was winding down in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Strong wind shear was affecting the storm as a result of nearby Typhoon Noru.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dawn of the cosmos: Seeing galaxies that appeared soon after the Big BangAstronomers have discovered 23 young galaxies, seen as they were 800 million years after the Big Bang.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Explaining why perovskite solar cells are more efficientExperimenters with a powerful 'electron camera' have discovered that light whirls atoms around in perovskites, potentially explaining the high efficiency of these next-generation solar cell materials and providing clues for making better ones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductorsScientists have found surprising electron behavior that may help unravel the ever-elusive mechanism behind high-temperature superconductivity -- a phenomenon in which electrical current flows freely without resistance through a material at unusually high temperatures relative to those of conventional superconductors.
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The Atlantic
The Taliban's Steady Gains Afghan troops have suffered significant losses to the Taliban in recent days, highlighting their country’s security vulnerabilities more than 15 years after the U.S.-led invasion ousted the militant group, as well as President Trump’s reported reluctance to send more troops to the country. At least 26 Afghan soldiers were killed in the Taliban’s attack Tuesday night on a military base in Khakriz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing deep learning to big screen animationModern films and TV shows are filled with spectacular computer-generated sequences computed by rendering systems that simulate the flow of light in a three-dimensional scene and convert the information into a two-dimensional image. But computing the thousands of light rays (per frame) to achieve accurate color, shadows, reflectivity and other light-based characteristics is a labor-intensive, time-
2h
Live Science
5 Facts About Transgender Individuals in the MilitaryPresident Donald Trump said today (July 26) that transgender individuals could not serve in the military.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest herding strategies used during the NeolithicAnalysis of strontium isotopes in teeth from Neolithic cattle suggest that early Europeans used different specialized herding strategies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How body may detect early signs of cancerFresh insights into how cells detect damage to their DNA -- a hallmark of cancer -- could help explain how the body keeps disease in check. Scientists have discovered how damage to the cell's genetic material can trigger inflammation, setting in motion processes to remove damaged cells and keep tissues healthy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Terra Satellite catches the end of Tropical Depression KulapNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Kulap as the storm was winding down in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Strong wind shear was affecting the storm as a result of nearby Typhoon Noru.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite sees Tropical Depression Greg as a ghostly swirl of cloudsTropical Depression Greg appears as a ghostly swirl of low clouds on satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on July 27.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Brain's Stem Cells Slow Ageing in MiceTransplanted cells offer middle-aged rodents an increased lifespan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Apple must pay $506M for infringing university’s patent Enlarge / Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation will be able to collect more than $500 million in royalties on Apple products that used the A7, A8, and A8X chips. That includes the iPad Air, pictured here in 2013. (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) A judge has ordered Apple to pay $506 million to the research arm of the University of Wisconsin. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, or WARF, sued
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
'True blue' chrysanthemum flowers produced with genetic engineering Scientists added two genes to the plant's genome to get the new hue. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22365
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using powerful Dark Energy Camera, scientists reach the cosmic dawnArizona State University astronomers Sangeeta Malhotra and James Rhoads, working with international teams in Chile and China, have discovered 23 young galaxies, seen as they were 800 million years after the Big Bang. The results from this sample have been recently published in the Astrophysical Journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DAWN of a new day for stroke patients as study promises new options and a wider treatment windowResults of the first study showing some acute stroke patients could benefit from neuroendovascular surgery 6 to 24 hours after a stroke will be presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 14th Annual Meeting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Post-stroke patients reach terra firma with Wyss Institute's exosuit technologyIn a new study published in Science Translational Medicine, a research team led by Conor Walsh collaborating with BU faculty members Terry Ellis, Lou Awad, and Ken Holt have demonstrated that exosuits can be used to improve walking after stroke -- a critical step in de-risking exosuit technology towards real-world clinical use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soft robotic exosuits help patients walk after strokeScientists have created lightweight and low-profile soft robotic ankle supports that could help stroke patients walk with less difficulty and more normal strides.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI stem cell therapy attacks cancer by targeting unique tissue stiffnessA stem cell-based method created by University of California, Irvine scientists can selectively target and kill cancerous tissue while preventing some of the toxic side effects of chemotherapy by treating the disease in a more localized way.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Group relocation preserves social connections among elderly Japanese Tsunami survivorsRelocating in groups, rather than individually, increased informal socializing and social participation among older survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, a new study shows. The finding suggests local authorities should consider moving residents
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robot-driven device improves crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy3.6 out of 1,000 children in the US are diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Their symptoms can include abnormal gait patterns such as crouch gait, characterized by excessive flexion of the hips, knees, or ankles. A pilot study led by Columbia Engineering's Sunil Agrawal was published today in Science Robotics that demonstrates a robotic training method that improves posture and walking in children with
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atomic movies may help explain why perovskite solar cells are more efficientExperiments with a powerful 'electron camera' at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered that light whirls atoms around in perovskites, potentially explaining the high efficiency of these next-generation solar cell materials and providing clues for making better ones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest herding strategies used during the NeolithicAnalysis of strontium isotopes in teeth from Neolithic cattle suggest that early Europeans used different specialized herding strategies, according to a study published July 26, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Claudia Gerling from University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues.
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Futurity.org
Catalyst can split water into atoms for less Scientists have created a single catalyst that could simplify the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen to produce clean energy. The electrolytic film is a three-layer structure of nickel, graphene, and a compound of iron, manganese, and phosphorus. The foamy nickel gives the film a large surface, the conductive graphene protects the nickel from degrading and the metal phosphide car
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Futurity.org
Access to health care has declined in Afghanistan Vulnerable groups in Afghanistan, including people with disabilities, cite a growing rate of insufficient access to quality health care, a new study finds. The findings, published in Lancet Global Health , come after 15 years of investment in the Afghan health care sector by the international community. “We find that access to quality health care has decreased significantly between 2004 and 2014,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whole Foods sales struggle shows Amazon buying a fixer-upperAmazon is set to have a fixer-upper on its hands, with Whole Foods reporting that a key sales figure declined again.
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The Scientist RSS
Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on StiffnessThe technique, demonstrated in mice using engineered mesenchymal stem cells, has potential for both diagnosis and treatment.
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The Atlantic
Judge: Kobach Statements 'Demonstrate a Pattern' of Misleading Claims Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach could use a little credibility at the moment. President Trump’s so-called election-integrity commission, of which he is the de facto chief, has come under suspicion for both its methods and its purpose . But citizens seeking assurance about Kobach’s motives won’t find that from the federal courts. In a ruling yesterday, flagged by the indefatigable Rick Hasen
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The Atlantic
Wildfires Force Evacuations Along the French Riviera French authorities have evacuated more than 10,000 people from parts of southern France, ahead of several raging wildfires along the Mediterranean coast. Hundreds of firefighters are engaged on the ground and in the air, chasing fires driven by strong winds and tinder-dry conditions. Photos here are from the past few days along the French Riviera.
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New Scientist - News
Tech giants don’t want you fixing your phone. Time to fight backLaws that would force gadget-makers to release repair manuals and tools are starting to win support, but meanwhile consumers are taking a DIY approach
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New Scientist - News
Stem cells in the brain’s hypothalamus help mice stay youngA cluster of brain stem cells fight ageing in mice. They may do this by releasing molecules of micro-RNA – a process that anti-ageing drugs may be able to mimic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain cells found to control agingScientists have found that stem cells in the brain's hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body. The finding, made in mice, could lead to new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists regenerate retinal cells in miceScientists have succeeded in regenerating functional retinal cells in adult mice. Like humans, mice cannot repair damage to their retinas. However, because zebrafish can, researchers created in mice a version of the fish gene responsible for turning Muller glia into retinal cells if eye injury occurs. Researchers found way to prevent the gene's activity from being blocked as the mice got older. Th
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Gizmodo
Is It Possible to Engineer a Truly Blue Flower? Genetically engineered ‘blue’ chrysanthemums. Credit: Science Advances In nature, blue is much rarer than you might think. Sure, the sky is blue when the weather’s nice, and so is the ocean. But the vast majority of plants and animals are incapable of making blue pigment . Brilliantly-colored peacocks appear blue not because their feathers are colored that way, but because of how they reflect lig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic movies may help explain why perovskite solar cells are more efficientIn recent years, perovskites have taken the solar cell industry by storm. They are cheap, easy to produce and very flexible in their applications. Their efficiency at converting light into electricity has grown faster than that of any other material - from under four percent in 2009 to over 20 percent in 2017 - and some experts believe that perovskites could eventually outperform the most common s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest herding strategies used during the NeolithicAnalysis of strontium isotopes in teeth from Neolithic cattle suggest that early Europeans used different specialized herding strategies, according to a study published July 26, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Claudia Gerling from University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Build Your Own Blacksmith's Forge From Spare Truck And Appliance Parts Homestead Rescue | Wednesdays at 10/9c These homesteaders need a blacksmith shop at their remote encampment. Can Marty throw together a working forge just from what's available at the site? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/homestead-rescue/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Rescues! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/homestead-re
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Futurity.org
Cannabis risk awaits young teens with depression Young people with chronic or severe depression face an elevated risk of developing a problem with cannabis by the time they reach 18, research suggests. For the new study in the journal Addiction , researchers interviewed 521 students recruited from four Seattle public middle schools. Researchers used data from annual assessments when students were ages 12 to 15 and then again when they were 18.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gamma-ray burst captured in unprecedented detailGamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic and explosive events in the universe. They are also short-lived, lasting from a few milliseconds to about a minute. This has made it tough for astronomers to observe a gamma-ray burst in detail. Using a wide array of ground- and space-based telescope observations, astronomers constructed one of the most detailed descriptions of a gamma-ray burst to dat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevicesScientists have demonstrated how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Passers-by rescue dolphin on Weymouth beachPeople wade into the water to help save a dolphin which was stranded close to the shore
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Gizmodo
Ogle Next Month's Solar Eclipse With These Discounted Safety Glasses 6-Pack Eclipse Glasses , $8 with code ECLIPSE6 The solar eclipse is less than a month away, and if you want to see it without melting your eyeballs, you can pick up a 6-pack of ISO and CE-certified safety glasses for just $8 today on Amazon.
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Science : NPR
Looking Back At The Most Powerful Earthquake Ever To Strike North America Science writer Henry Fountain says the deadly quake that shook Alaska in 1964 was so loud some thought it was the beginning of World War III. His new book is The Great Quake.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Brain’s stem cells slow ageing in mice Transplanted cells offer middle-aged rodents an increased lifespan. Nature 547 389 doi: 10.1038/547389a
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Viden
Ny forskning: Månen kan indeholde store mængder vandMere vand kan betyde næste skridt i udforskningen af vores Solsystem.
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Gizmodo
Amid Chaos, We’re About to Get a Whole New Kind of Bitcoin Photo: Getty Less than a week ago, headlines declared that a market-shaking fork in Bitcoin had been averted. But the people backing a new cryptocurrency called Bitcoin Cash have now announced that the expected compromise between warring factions is dead. Next week, the huge Bitcoin fork will begin, and here’s what it’s all about. The debate over a so called “hard fork” in Bitcoin has been going
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Ars Technica
Japanese company preparing for country’s first private rocket launch Interstellar Technologies The United States has by far the most rich and diverse commercial aerospace industry in the world, but that doesn't mean companies in other countries aren't giving it a go as well. One of those companies is Interstellar Technologies, which began as a group of hobbyists in 1997 and became a corporation in 2003. After more than a decade of engine and booster development, I
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Balloons will broadcast the 2017 solar eclipse live from on highAstrophysicist Angela Des Jardins is coordinating the first-ever livestream of a solar eclipse filmed from balloons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At hacker summit, a new focus on preventing brazen attacksAgainst a backdrop of cyberattacks that have grown into full-fledged sabotage, Facebook chief security officer Alex Stamos brought a sobering message Wednesday to hackers and security experts at the Black Hat conference.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World gears up for electric cars despite bumps in roadTechnological advances mean fossil fuel in cars could be phased out within decades but switching to electric carries its own environmental and economic concerns as more and more countries announce radical plans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Health risk alarm over water rationing in RomePlans to ration water in drought-hit Rome could have serious consequences for public health, Italy's health minister warned Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists uncover a hidden calcium cholesterol connectionIt's well known that calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, but new research shows it also plays a key role in moderating another important aspect of health—cholesterol.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New bird that humans drove to extinction discovered in AzoresInside the crater of a volcano on Graciosa Island in the Azores archipelago, in the Atlantic Ocean, an international team of researchers has discovered the bones of a new extinct species of songbird, a bullfinch which they have named Pyrrhula crassa. The remains were found in a small cavity through which time ago the lava flowed. This bird disappeared a few hundreds of years ago due to human colon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Managers often fail to use or understand their own data on customer satisfactionDespite the millions companies spend to gather information about customer satisfaction, senior managers often fail to understand those customers' expectations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Talking to yourself in the third person can help you control emotionsThe simple act of silently talking to yourself in the third person during stressful times may help you control emotions without any additional mental effort than what you would use for first-person self-talk -- the way people normally talk to themselves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists produce robust catalyst to split water into hydrogen, oxygenSplitting water into hydrogen and oxygen to produce clean energy can be simplified with a single catalyst developed by scientists at Rice University and the University of Houston.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees newly formed Tropical Storm Nesat near PhilippinesTropical Storm Nesat formed early on July 26 just east of the Philippines and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering temperature data to determine the location of the most powerful storms. Imagery showed strong storms from Nesat's western side were affecting the central Philippines.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traces of adaptation and cultural diversification found among early North American stone toolsUsing new methods to analyze stone projectile points crafted by North America's earliest human inhabitants, Smithsonian scientists have found that these tools show evidence of a shift toward more experimentation in their production beginning about 12,500 years ago, following hundreds of years of consistent stone-tool production created using uniform techniques. The findings provide clues into chan
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's webbcam shows Webb telescope chilling in Chamber AThe temperature of Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston is steadily dropping, creating a frigid environment for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is in stark contrast to the heat of the city.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic discovery opens door to greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitryA key step in unlocking the potential for greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry was taken recently by a group of researchers led by UAlberta physicist Robert Wolkow.
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Gizmodo
Disney Is Building Facial Recognition to Figure Out When You'll Laugh During Toy Story 5 Source: Getty The Walt Disney Company is using AI to determine how much audiences enjoy every single moment of their films. At IEEE’s Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition last weekend, Disney Research and Caltech explained their technique for tracking the facial expressions of people watching movies. Advertisement The research team calls their new algorithm “factorized variational autoencoders
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The Scientist RSS
Stems Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in MiceOnce implanted into animals' brains, neural stem cells that secrete microRNA-containing vesicles seem to contribute to an anti-aging effect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UAlberta and McGill scientists uncover a hidden calcium cholesterol connectionIt's well known that calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, but new research shows it also plays a key role in moderating another important aspect of health -- cholesterol.Scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University have discovered a direct link between calcium and cholesterol, a discovery that could pave the way for new ways of treating high blood cholesterol.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Triple-layer catalyst does double dutyA single, robust catalyst that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen has been developed with Earth-abundant materials that approach the efficiency of more expensive platinum, according to Rice and University of Houston scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Massive star's dying blast caught by rapid-response telescopesA blast of gamma rays from space detected in June 2016 is helping astronomers resolve long-standing questions about the universe's most powerful explosions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Programming cells with computer-like logicA team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering is presenting an all-in-one solution that imbues a molecule of 'ribo'nucleic acid or RNA with the capacity to sense multiple signals and make logical decisions to control protein production with high precision. The study's approach resulted in a genetically encodable RNA nano-device that can perform an unprecedented 12-input
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists regenerate retinal cells in mice in UW Medicine-led studyScientists have succeeded in regenerating functional retinal cells in adult mice. Like humans, mice cannot repair damage to their retinas. However, because zebrafish can, researchers created in mice a version of the fish gene responsible for turning Muller glia into retinal cells if eye injury occurs. Researchers found way to prevent the gene's activity from being blocked as the mice got older. Th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductorsScientists have found surprising electron behavior that may help unravel the ever-elusive mechanism behind high-temperature superconductivity -- a phenomenon in which electrical current flows freely without resistance through a material at unusually high temperatures relative to those of conventional superconductors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain cells found to control agingScientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that stem cells in the brain's hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body. The finding, made in mice, could lead to new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan. The paper was published online today in Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gamma-ray burst captured in unprecedented detailUsing a wide array of ground- and space-based telescope observations, an international team led by University of Maryland astronomers constructed one of the most detailed descriptions of a gamma-ray burst to date. The event, named GRB160625B, revealed key details about the initial "prompt" phase of gamma-ray bursts and the evolution of the large jets of matter and energy that form as a result of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevicesIn new research, Alex Green, an assistant professor at ASU's Biodesign Institute and School of Molecular Sciences, demonstrates how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA watching Typhoon Noru head west in Northwestern PacificNASA's Aqua satellite provided a near-infrared look at Typhoon Noru as it continued its western track at sea, far to the southeast of Japan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How bacteria maintain and recover their shapeBacteria come in all shapes and sizes—some are straight as a rod, others twist like a corkscrew. Shape plays an important role in how bacteria infiltrate and attack cells in the body. The helical shape of Helicobacter pylori, a species of bacteria which can cause ulcers, may help it penetrate tissues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Investigation tests new methods of water recycling in spaceSometimes the best solution to a complex problem is the simplest one. That's the approach that the Capillary Structures for Exploration Life Support (Capillary Structures) team took when designing the fluid physics investigation aboard the International Space Station. The Capillary Structures investigation uses capillary action, or the ability for a liquid to flow through a narrow spaces, such as
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New Scientist - News
Donate your voice so Siri doesn’t just work for white menVoice assistants can struggle with accents outside their test base of white, male users. Mozilla wants samples to create systems that can handle diversity
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diet quality matters not just quantity in mid-to-late-adulthoodA new study has investigated the impact of diet quality in mid-to-late-adulthood on visceral and liver fat not solely relying on Body Mass Index (BMI). Four different measures of diet quality were used to evaluate dietary intake of the multiethnic population over a twenty-year span. Maintaining a high quality diet during mid-to-late adulthood may prevent adverse metabolic consequences related to v
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning dirty tinfoil into biofuel catalystA researcher has discovered a way to convert dirty aluminium foil into a biofuel catalyst, which could help to solve global waste and energy problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New membranes help reduce carbon dioxide emissionScientists are developing membranes for an efficient separation of gasses, to use for the production of oxygen or hydrogen, for example.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a lethal type of bacteria spreads resistance to antibioticsInfection by S. aureus is a serious threat in hospitals worldwide. Now, scientists have identified a key component of the machinery that allows Staphylococcus aureus to transfer genes that confer antibiotic resistance. Halting the spread of resistant bacterial strains is one of the strategies available to tackle hospital infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 3-D technique uses water and robotics to reconstruct complex objects'Using a robotic arm to immerse an object on an axis at various angles, and measuring the volume displacement of each dip, we combine each sequence and create a volumetric shape representation of an object,' says an expert.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Expert eavesdroppers occasionally catch a breakActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the many ways we watch, listen and learn about science.
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Gizmodo
Wild Rabbits Caught Hitchhiking on Sheep to Escape Flood Image: Ferg Horne/Associated Press Well here’s something you don’t see everyday—wild rabbits riding on the backs of sheep to flee rising floodwaters. The remarkable scene was captured by a New Zealand farmer who said he’s never witnessed anything quite like it. As reported in the Associated Press, the event was captured by Ferg Horne, 64, on July 22 on a farm near Dunedin, New Zealand. He was tru
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Gizmodo
Astronomers Capture Wild Intergalactic Gamma Ray Burst As it Happens Snapshot of burst via S.Karpov, G.Beskin (SAO RAS and Kazan Federal University, Russia), S.Bondar, E.Ivanov, E.Katkova, N.Orekhova, A.Perkov (OJS RPC PSI, Russia), A.Biryukov (SAI MSU and Kazan Federal University, Russia), V.Sasyuk (Kazan Federal University, Russia) On June 25, 2016 at 6pm ET, a flash of visible light appeared in the sky that, depending on your location, could have been visible w
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers question hominid family treeReaders sent feedback on hominid origins, fast cameras, slimy sea creatures and more.
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Science | The Guardian
Stem cell brain implants could 'slow ageing and extend life', study shows Researchers hope to launch human trials as breakthrough shows hypothalamus controls ageing, with treated mice remaining fitter and living 10-15% longer Scientists have slowed down the ageing process by implanting stem cells into the brains of animals, raising hopes for new strategies to combat age-related diseases and extend the human lifespan. Implants of stem cells that make fresh neurons in th
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The Atlantic
The Cost of Banning Transgender Service Members President Donald Trump issued a ruling on Wednesday outlawing military service by people who do not conform to a binary gender system. “Please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military,” he wrote in a string of tweets. “Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory and cannot be b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice U. scientists map ways forward for lithium-ion batteries for extreme environmentsRice University materials scientists map the possibilities to improve commercial lithium-ion batteries expected to operate in extreme hot or cold.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Massive star's dying blast caught by rapid-response telescopesIn June 2016, an international team of 31 astronomers, led by the University of Maryland's Eleanora Troja and including Arizona State University's Nathaniel Butler, caught a massive star as it died in a titanic explosion deep in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel RNA nanodevices in living cells can sense and analyze multiple complex signalsThe interdisciplinary nexus of biology and engineering, known as synthetic biology, is growing at a rapid pace, opening new vistas that could scarcely be imagined a short time ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductorsThe perfect performance of superconductors could revolutionize everything from grid-scale power infrastructure to consumer electronics, if only they could be coerced into operating above frigid temperatures. Even so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) must be chilled to hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit below zero.
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Science | The Guardian
Helen Carty obituaryPioneering paediatric radiologist and authority on the x-ray diagnosis of child abuse When Helen Carty was appointed in 1975 as a specialist in paediatric radiology at the Royal Liverpool Children’s hospital in Alder Hey, Merseyside, x-rays were just about the only tool available to diagnose many disorders in children. Helen, who has died aged 72, set about changing all that. She became a driving
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Ars Technica
Travelers’ electronics at US airports to get enhanced screening, TSA says Enlarge (credit: jennifer ) Aviation security officials will begin enhanced screening measures of passengers' electronics at US airports, the Transportation Security Administration announced Wednesday. Travelers must remove electronics larger than a mobile phone from their carry-on bags and "place them in a bin with nothing on top or below, similar to how laptops have been screened for years. Thi
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Popular Science
Want to get rid of cellulite? There's only one thing worth trying. Health Contrary to what dozens of “cellulite solutions” companies want you to believe. None of the beauty products or dermatologic treatments sold for cellulite have long-lasting effects, and plenty of them don't have short-term ones either.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Longer-lasting fragrance is just a shampoo away, thanks to peptidesMany people select their shampoo based on smell. Unfortunately, that scent usually doesn't last long on hair. Now, one team reports a new way to help the fragrance 'stick' to hair longer.
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Gizmodo
What's the Most Secure Way to Lock Your Smartphone? Image: Samsung Smartphone owners today have a plethora of ways to lock and unlock their phones: face scans, finger presses, PIN codes, location detection, and so on. Are some of these options more secure than others? And which one should you use? First, let’s recap of what’s actually available. iPhone owners have the option of Touch ID fingerprint scans and a PIN code, which these days has to be
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Quanta Magazine
First Support for a Physics Theory of Life The biophysicist Jeremy England made waves in 2013 with a new theory that cast the origin of life as an inevitable outcome of thermodynamics. His equations suggested that under certain conditions, groups of atoms will naturally restructure themselves so as to burn more and more energy, facilitating the incessant dispersal of energy and the rise of “entropy” or disorder in the universe. England sa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opting for weight-loss surgery at lower BMIs may be best for patients' healthThe struggle to escape obesity is pointing more Americans toward bariatric surgery. But a new study shows that only one in three patients who have an operation succeed in getting their body-mass index below 30, the cutoff for obesity, in the first year. The odds were better for those who had surgery while they were still below a 'morbid obesity' BMI of 40.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees newly formed Tropical Storm Nesat near PhilippinesTropical Storm Nesat formed early on July 26 just east of the Philippines and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering temperature data to determine the location of the most powerful storms. Imagery showed strong storms from Nesat's western side were affecting the central Philippines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA watching Typhoon Noru head west in Northwestern PacificNASA's Aqua satellite provided a near-infrared look at Typhoon Noru as it continued its western track at sea, far to the southeast of Japan.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atomic discovery opens door to greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitryA key step in unlocking the potential for greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry was taken recently by a group of researchers led by UAlberta physicist Robert Wolkow.The research team found a way to delete and replace out-of-place atoms that had been preventing new revolutionary circuitry designs from working. This unleashes a new kind of silicon chips for used in common electronic products
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Researchers uncover 200-year-old sunspot drawings in MaineThis week from AGU is a compilation of recent publications featuring research published in an AGU journal.
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Futurity.org
To fight inequality at school, work with parents Partnering with parents and giving families a greater hand in decision-making could be a way for schools to dismantle race- and class-based power structures, the author of a new paper suggests. Most schools offer parents specific ways to help out: Join the PTA, chaperone a field trip, grade papers for a teacher, or assist on a classroom art project. “At the end of the day, educators cannot addres
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Gizmodo
FCC Sued Over Failure to Comply With Transparency Law Amid Net Neutrality Debate Photo: Getty The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is being sued over its failure to adhere to a federal transparency law and for wrongfully withholding agency records about net neutrality from the public. American Oversight, a legal watchdog group formed this year to expose conflicts and fraud in the Trump’s administration’s executive departments, filed a lawsuit Tuesday morning against th
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Gizmodo
All 28 DC Animated Original Movies, Ranked Image: Warner Bros. Now that Wonder Woman has put DC back in the good graces of fans and critics alike, we can turn our attention to the rest of the DC movie universe while we await Justice League . (Please be good. Please be good.) This list contains the 28 DC Animated Original movies released so far, ranked from worst to best on the quality of their story, characters, and adaptation of the sour
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Live Science
How to Make Puffy SlimeLove to play stretchy taffy-like substances? Or are you inside on a rainy day with a hankering for getting your hands messy? Here's a recipe for making puffy, fluffy slime for you and your kids.
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Live Science
Goopy Science: How to Make Slime with GlueHere's a simple photo-illustrated guide to making colorful and goopy slime with your kids.
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The Atlantic
Republicans Reject Another Obamacare Repeal Plan Updated on July 26 at 4:35 p.m. One by one, the Senate’s options for overhauling the nation’s health-care system are dwindling—but they still have a few left. Republicans on Wednesday rejected a straight repeal of much of the Affordable Care Act, leaving them far short of a consensus one day into debate on health-care legislation passed by the House in May. The amendment was virtually identical t
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Gizmodo
A Mysterious Emu Gene Could Help Humans With Health Abnormalities Photo: Getty Emus are big, fluffy, flightless birds indigenous only to Australia . They are also the biggest dufuses in the animal kingdom, and are constantly getting themselves caught up in all sorts of tomfoolery, which is documented in obscure subreddits . Now, Australian researchers at Monash University might have found another reason to love these giant goofballs—a gene that appears to contr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traces of adaptation and cultural diversification found among early North American stone toolsUsing new 3-D methods to analyze stone projectile points crafted by North America's earliest human inhabitants, scientists have found that these tools show evidence of a shift toward more experimentation about 12,500 years ago, following hundreds of years of consistent stone-tool production. The findings provide clues into changes in social interactions during a time when people are thought to hav
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coral gardening is benefiting Caribbean reefs, study findsA new study found that Caribbean staghorn corals (Acropora cervicornis) are benefiting from 'coral gardening,' the process of restoring coral populations by planting laboratory-raised coral fragments on reefs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How bacteria maintain and recover their shapeBacteria have an extraordinary ability to maintain and recover their morphology even after being twisted out of shape. Researchers know that shape is determined by the cell wall, yet little is known about how bacteria monitor and control it. Since the cell wall is the target of most antibiotics, understanding how bacteria grow their cell walls may provide insight into more effective medicines. Now
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Involvement of prescription opioids in fatal car crashes climbs sevenfoldThe percentage of fatally injured drivers who tested positive for prescription opioids rose sevenfold from 1 percent in 1995 to over 7 percent in 2015, according to a new study at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traces of adaptation and cultural diversification found among early North American stone toolsUsing new 3-D methods to analyze stone projectile points crafted by North America's earliest human inhabitants, Smithsonian scientists have found that these tools show evidence of a shift toward more experimentation about 12,500 years ago, following hundreds of years of consistent stone-tool production. The findings provide clues into changes in social interactions during a time when people are th
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Incorporating 12-step program elements improves youth substance-use disorder treatmentA treatment program for adolescents with substance-use disorder that incorporates the practices and philosophy of 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous produced even better results than the current state-of-the art treatment approach in a nine-month, randomized trial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With new ventures to show, MIT Hacking Medicine shares its model for successSince 2010, MIT Hacking Medicine has grown from a one-time event to a global brand, with more than 80 healthcare hackathons being hosted this year, from Cambridge, Mass., to Quito, Ecuador. At least 15 groups have started companies and raised more than $100 million in venture funding after meeting at a Hacking Medicine event. In a commentary published July 26 in Cell Systems, the organizers descri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How plant architectures mimic subway networksSalk scientists use 3-D laser scanning to understand how plants optimize their growth.
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Gizmodo
America's Biggest Public Union Leader Is in The Fight of His Life Photo via AP With more than 1.6 million members, AFSCME is the nation’s biggest union of public employees, and one of the most politically powerful—and now, one of the most threatened. We spoke to Lee Saunders, the president of the union, about trying to survive the “battle” of the vicious new Trump era. The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees represents public workers r
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Scientific American Content: Global
Watchdog Group: U.S. Electric Industry Knew of Climate Threat Decades AgoDocuments reportedly show warnings made in 1968 of “catastrophic effects” from fossil fuel carbon emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Au revoir to the original kilogram: Le Grand K joins the list of relegated metricsThe platinum-iridium cylinder used to standardise the kilogram is getting an upgrade – to a complicated process that involves the measuring of light Time is running out for Hollywood to make its big metrology action thriller. In late 2019, the chance for a leathered-up Jeremy Irons to cut through several thick vaults in Paris suburb Sèvres and ransom the world’s kilogram will end. Kept under three
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar scientists rough up silicon panels to boost light captureScientists enhance conversion efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells by effectively preventing reflection loss, passivating a submicron silicon structure, and adding a rough nanoscale surface texture using simple and inexpensive processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diffusion dynamics play an essential role in regulating stem cells and tissue developmentNew work describes vital aspects of diffusion processes in tissue development, including the roles that molecular diffusion gradients have on stem cell signaling pathways along with new modeling tools that describe gradients of nutrients and signaling factors in three-dimensional tissue constructs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomarkers for identifying tumor aggressivenessFuture early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision regarding chemotherapy. Two of the biomarkers are the MACC1 gene, high levels of which promote aggressive tumor growth and the development of metastasis, and a defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) system, which plays a role in tumor formation. Life
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Competition for survival signals maintains immune balanceAlthough scarce, the recently discovered innate lymphoid cells vie with T cells for a shared source of interleukin-7, which helps them to survive. These findings could deepen our understanding of immune memory in vaccine and aging.
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New Scientist - News
Donald Trump tweets plan to ban transgender people from militaryThe US president says it’s too expensive and disruptive to let transgender people serve in the armed forces, but a study commissioned by the Pentagon disagrees
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Popular Science
Tomatoes and subway systems might have something in common Science They're both just trying to get the biggest bang for their buck. Plants and transportation systems have developed similar solutions to efficiently deliver cargo.
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The Atlantic
Jeff Flake’s Gamble T he constituents filing into the Mesa Convention Center one evening in mid-April for the Republican senator Jeff Flake’s town hall had a decidedly un-Republican look. Tattoos and political T-shirts abounded. Activists stood near the entrance distributing stickers, flyers, and other paraphernalia of the resistance and urging attendees to get loud. While chants of “No stupid wall!” and “Health car
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Perovskites power up the solar industryPerovskites are the latest hot materials in solar energy production.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plant architectures mimic subway networksIt might seem like a tomato plant and a subway system don't have much in common, but both, it turns out, are networks that strive to make similar tradeoffs between cost and performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA eyes compact Hurricane HilaryWhen the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 25 it captured a visible close-up of Hurricane Hilary.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Biologics: The Pricey Drugs Transforming MedicineRather than being designed by chemists, this class of pharmaceuticals is produced by living cells. Here's where they come from and how they work -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Facebook Shells Out $500,000 For Project to Fight Election Hacking Photo: Getty Facebook is sponsoring the efforts of former Hillary Clinton and Mitt Romney campaign managers to combat hacking and disinformation campaigns designed to interfere with elections. Facebook’s chief security officer Alex Stamos announced the company’s $500,000 investment in the effort, called Defending Digital Democracy , today during a keynote at the security conference Black Hat. The
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Gizmodo
The Year's Best Astronomy Photos Will Transport You to Another World Image: Nicholas Roemmelt The Royal Observatory Greenwich in the UK has shortlisted its nominees for its annual Insight Astronomer of the Year competition. From stunning aurora and shooting stars through to solar flares and distant nebulae, these images are guaranteed to astound. This competition is now in its ninth year, and it only seems to be getting better. The shortlisted candidates (shown be
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New Scientist - News
UK ban on polluting cars by 2040 is just a cynical smokescreenThe UK government’s plan to ban the sale of diesel and petrol cars in two decades’ time is no help for those affected by air pollution
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New Scientist - News
The games that build playgrounds out of impossible physicsGames that ask you to piece together alien physics are a great way for people to grasp the head-twisting concept of higher dimensions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA eyes compact Hurricane HilaryWhen the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 25 it captured a visible close-up of Hurricane Hilary.
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Live Science
Dangerous Dance: Hurricanes' Dalliance May End in 'Cannibalism'Hurricanes swirling in the Pacific Ocean could lock arms in a dance step meteorologists call the Fujiwhara effect. The do-si-do may lead in Hurricane Hilary cannibalizing Irwin.
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Gizmodo
Meet The Shell Company Uber Used to Acquire Otto Illustration: Sam Woolley When General Motors acquired Cruise Automation in a deal worth more than $1 billion, Cruise transferred its patents directly to GM. When Google spun out its self-driving car experiment into a full-fledged company, it transferred its patents directly to its new subsidiary, Waymo. But when Uber acquired the self-driving truck startup Otto for $680 million, Otto’s intellect
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Pool Inflatables, OneBlade Pro, Solar Battery Pack, and More Intex pool inflatables , a digitally-augmented tape measure , and the new OneBlade Pro shaver lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals iClever 10,000mAh Solar Battery Pack , $15 with code ICSOLAR2 $15 is a pretty good price for a 10,000mAh battery pack. It’s absolutely insane for one with a solar panel
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Science | The Guardian
Mosquitoes review – sparring sisters collide in Lucy Kirkwood's science stormer Dorfman, London Olivias Williams and Colman give a spellbinding account of sibling strife in this wonderfully ambitious play set during the Higgs boson breakthrough Lucy Kirkwood has proved, with Chimerica and The Children , that she is a dramatist of dauntless ambition. She pushes the boat out even further with her new play, which uses experiments in particle physics as a way of exploring the co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Irwin before it weakened to a Tropical StormIrwin was still a hurricane when the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 25. Eighteen hours later, Irwin weakened to a tropical storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists gain new insights into nanosystems with spherical confinementTheoretical physicists led by Professor Kurt Binder and Dr. Arash Nikoubashman at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have used computer simulations to study the arrangement of stiff polymers in spherical cavities. These confined systems play an important role for a wide range of applications, such as the fabrication of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and for tailored nan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Compound shows promise in treating melanomaWhile past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward creating a drug that can kill melanoma cancer cells without harming nearby healthy cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lake Baikal: Protection of a unique ecosystemResearchers are studying the impact of climate change and environmental toxins on the lake's fauna. They addressed the question of how Baikal amphipods that fulfill important ecological functions in the lake react to pollutants in the water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Magic Bench' lets users see, hear and feel animated charactersSit on Disney Research's Magic Bench and you may have an elephant hand you a glowing orb. Or you might get rained on. Or a tiny donkey might saunter by and kick the bench. It's a combined augmented and mixed reality experience, but not the type that involves wearing a head-mounted display or using a handheld device. Instead, the surroundings are instrumented rather than the individual, allowing pe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do all people experience similar near-death-experiences?New research examines how frequently and in what order different aspects of self-reported near-death-experiences occur. By analyzing written first-hand accounts of near-death-experiences, the researchers looked at whether specific aspects of these experiences tend to occur in the same order for different people. They found that even though some events are more common, and some are more likely to f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large-mouthed fish was top predator after mass extinctionThe food chains recovered more rapidly than previously assumed after Earth's most devastating mass extinction event about 252 million years ago as demonstrated by the fossilized skull of a large predatory fish called Birgeria americana discovered by paleontologists from the University of Zurich in the desert of Nevada.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How marriage may protect transgender couplesTransgender people who are married are less likely to experience discrimination than their unmarried counterparts, indicates an American national study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study recommends alternative pain relief for knee replacement patientsA new study led by researchers at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust and the University of Warwick has recommended an alternative method of pain relief for patients undergoing knee replacement surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Irwin before it weakened to a Tropical StormIrwin was still a hurricane when the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 25. Eighteen hours later, Irwin weakened to a tropical storm.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists gain new insights into nanosystems with spherical confinementTheoretical physicists led by Professor Kurt Binder and Dr. Arash Nikoubashman at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have used computer simulations to study the arrangement of stiff polymers in spherical cavities.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford researchers engineer 3-D hydrogels for tissue-specific cartilage repairUnlike the one-size-fits-all, homogeneous approach to tissue engineering for cartilage replacement, a new study reports the ability to encapsulate cartilage-forming chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells in 3-D hydrogels within a stiffness gradient.
5h
Live Science
Gulls' Love of Baby Seal Poop Leads to Gouged ButtsSeagulls target seal pups' poop, and the pups get it in the end. Maybe don’t read this one during lunch.
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The Atlantic
Trump’s Legislative Health-Care Miracle Like a figure in a classic Western—whether he’s a hero or villain depends on your political views—Donald Trump keeps being left for dead in the desert, and he keeps sauntering into the town saloon with a smirk on his face, to gasps all around. Tuesday afternoon, the Senate voted to proceed on debate on the latest attempt to repeal Obamacare . It is an early, incremental, and partial victory for t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adjusting fertilizers vital in claypan ag soilsNew research could help claypan farmers improve yields while saving costs.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atlantic/Pacific ocean temperature difference fuels US wildfiresA new study shows that difference in water temperature between the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans together with global warming impact the risk of drought and wildfire in southwestern North America.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans identify emotions in the voices of all air-breathing vertebratesAmphibians, reptiles, mammals -- all of them communicate via acoustic signals. And humans are able to assess the emotional value of these signals. The authors interpreted their findings as evidence that there might be a universal code for the vocal expression and perception of emotions in the animal kingdom.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Are we there yet?' Explaining ADHD science to childrenResearchers reported their latest brain research on ADHD in a scientific journal targeting -- and peer-reviewed by -- children.
5h
Ars Technica
Democrat asks FCC chair if anything can stop net neutrality rollback Enlarge / US Rep. Michael Doyle (D-Penn.). (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) US Rep. Michael Doyle (D-Penn.) yesterday accused Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai of pursuing an agenda that harms both consumers and small businesses. "Chairman Pai, in the time that you have been head of this agency, we have seen an agenda that is anti-consumer, anti-small business, anti-competitio
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What are risk factors for melanoma in kidney transplant recipients?Kidney transplant patients appear to be at a greater risk of developing melanoma than the general population and risk factors include being older, male and white, findings that corroborate results demonstrated in other studies, according to a new article published by JAMA Dermatology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delaying bariatric surgery until higher weight may result in poorer outcomesObese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were more like to achieve a body mass index (BMI) of less than 30 one year after surgery if they had a BMI of less than 40 before surgery, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of suicide attempts in army units with history of suicide attemptsDoes a previous suicide attempt in a soldier's U.S. Army unit increase the risk of other suicide attempts?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New global aging index gauges health and wellbeing of aging populationsResearchers have developed a new barometer that estimates how countries are adapting to the dramatic increases in the number and proportion of older persons. The Index is composed of specific measures across five social and economic Indicators that reflect the status and wellbeing of older persons in a country and which can be followed over time and used to compare across nations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why some people are so sure they're right, even when they are notTwo studies examine the personality characteristics that drive dogmatism in the religious and nonreligious. In both groups, higher critical reasoning skills were associated with lower levels of dogmatism. But these two groups diverge in how moral concern influences their dogmatic thinking.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chatting coordinates heterogeneity in bacteriaBacterial populations can, under certain conditions, react in a coordinated manner to chemical messages produced by a minority of their members, as a new theoretical study carried out by biophysicists shows.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking technology to the next levelPhysicists have developed a new hybrid integrated platform, promising to be a more advanced alternative to conventional integrated circuits. The researchers demonstrated their approach is mass manufacturable, making it possible to integrate the platform into everyday electronic equipment like smartphones. For end users this technical advance means it may lead to faster internet on their next-gener
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to hitting the gym: Optimizing weight and endurance trainingSports scientists are warning that fatigue from weight training can carry over to endurance training and the two activities must be better coordinated to maximize athletes' performance.
5h
The Atlantic
Europe Warns Against Tightened U.S. Sanctions on Russia The European Union is pushing back against the House-approved measure to strengthen sanctions against Russia, arguing “America first cannot mean that Europe’s interests come last.” “The U.S. bill could have unintended unilateral effects that impact the EU’s energy security interests,” Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, said in a statement. “This is why the Commission conclude
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The manipulative tricks tech companies use to capture your attention | Tristan HarrisA handful of people working at a handful of tech companies steer the thoughts of billions of people every day, says design thinker Tristan Harris. From Facebook notifications to Snapstreaks to YouTube autoplays, they're all competing for one thing: your attention. Harris shares how these companies prey on our psychology for their own profit and calls for a design renaissance in which our tech inst
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Gizmodo
The Bogus Rationale for Trump's Trans Military Ban Is Some Bigoted Bullshit On today’s date in 1948, President Harry Truman desegregated the American military with an executive order . On the same date almost 70 years later, President Donald Trump announced he was kicking transgender people out of the military on Twitter, the platform he usually uses to spew stream-of-conscious nonsense and bigoted vitriol. Why? Apparently, transgender healthcare is too much of a burden
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Feed: All Latest
Rep. Blake Farenthold's Early '90s Internet Message Board Posts Show a Whole New SideThe dueling Congressman had some strong opinions about telecom and nudity.
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New Scientist - News
Oldest mass animal stranding revealed in Death Valley fossilsAbout 540 million years ago a group of jellyfish washed ashore, died and fossilised – preserving evidence of the earliest example of an animal mass death event
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Latest Headlines | Science News
More hints of Martian hot springs may hold promise for Mars 2020 missionAn analysis of ridges in a crater of Margaritifer Terra on Mars offers evidence of ancient hot springs and also hints at the potential for finding signs of life.
5h
Ars Technica
USB 3.2 will make your cables twice as fast… once you’ve bought new devices Enlarge (credit: USB-IF ) If you've invested heavily in USB Type-C cables, the USB Promoter Group has some good news for you. The next version of USB, USB 3.2, will double the speed of existing Type-C cables. Cables currently qualified for USB 3.1 generation 1's 5Gbps will be able to operate at 10Gbps; those qualified for generation 2's 10Gbps will be able to run at 20Gbps. The only small inconve
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Vegan advert claiming 'Humane milk is a myth' cleared by ASAComplaints from the dairy industry are dismissed as vegan group's advert is given the green light.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Cost of Medical Care for Transgender Service Members Would Be Minimal, Studies ShowPresident Trump announced that the military would no longer allow transgender people to serve, citing “tremendous medical costs” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Britain Is Getting Rid of the Internal-Combustion EngineU.K. drivers won’t be able to buy new cars and vans that run on gas or diesel starting in 2040.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research evaluates impact of surgical modality on breast-specific sensualityDoes the type of surgery used to treat breast cancer impact a woman's sensuality and sexual function in survivorship? New research from Women & Infants Hospital analyzed the association of surgical modality with sexual function and found that breast-specific sensuality and appearance satisfaction are better with lumpectomy and may correlate with improved sexual function post-operatively.
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The Atlantic
An Inconvenient Time for An Inconvenient Sequel An Inconvenient Sequel , the follow-up to Al Gore’s blockbuster 2006 global-warming documentary, An Inconvenient Truth , spends a major chunk of its screen time on an intellectual-property deal—one that was imagined, brokered, and sealed by the former popular-vote winner himself. Not that that’s a bad thing. The arrangement, which saw SolarCity donate one of its newest solar-panel designs to Indi
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Ars Technica
Olive Garden apologizes to AllOfGarden blog, offers $50 gift card Enlarge (credit: Mike Mozart ) The man behind the AllOfGarden.com blog wrote Tuesday that he has been granted a "total pardon"—as he described it in a four-stanza limerick. Said blogger, Vincent "Vino" Malone, is the proprietor of AllOfGarden.com , a website that chronicles a quest to eat as much Olive Garden pasta as possible (via the Never Ending Pasta Pass ). Last week, Malone announced that h
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Futurity.org
How to talk to yourself to control emotions During stressful times, talking to yourself in the third person—silently—could help you control your emotions. This method doesn’t take any more mental effort, say researchers, than talking to yourself in the first person, which is how people normally talk to themselves. The study in Scientific Reports indicates that such third-person self-talk may constitute a relatively effortless form of self-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sharks revealed as the great protectors of seagrassSharks, marine scientists say, are often misunderstood, described as ravenous man-eaters. In reality, sharks are critically important to the health of the world's oceans, yet a quarter of all shark species are threatened with extinction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientists redesign DNA codesScientists are working to create yeast that operates with custom-made DNA.
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Futurity.org
Dark matter may be ‘cold’ not ‘fuzzy’ New research on the nature of dark matter casts doubt on a relatively new theory called “fuzzy dark matter,” and instead lend credence to a different model called “cold dark matter.” Dark matter is the aptly named unseen material that makes up the bulk of matter in our universe. But what it’s is made of is a matter of debate. Scientists have never directly detected dark matter. But over decades,
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Diesel and petrol car ban: Clean air strategy 'not enough'The clean air strategy should include a scrappage scheme and clean air zones, campaigners say.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Social-Media Messages Are Becoming More Complex, and Nobody Knows WhySociologists have long puzzled over why IQ scores have risen dramatically. Now the complexity of social messages is increasing, too.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantifying lower limb muscle weakness in Osteogenesis Imperfecta type IVTo date, muscle function, and in particular that of the lower extremity, in OI type IV has not been investigated systematically. This study now assesses upper and lower extremity muscle function finding that lower limb weakness may contribute to limitations in mobility in people with OI Type IV despite multidisciplinary treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compound shows promise in treating melanomaWhile past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward creating a drug that can kill melanoma cancer cells without harming nearby healthy cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new bird which humans drove to extinction discovered in AzoresInside the crater of a volcano on Graciosa Island in the Azores archipelago, in the Atlantic Ocean, an international team of researchers has discovered the bones of a new extinct species of songbird, a bullfinch which they have named Pyrrhula crassa. The remains were found in a small cavity through which time ago the lava flowed. This bird disappeared a few hundreds of years ago due to human colon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study uncovers potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating colon cancerIn preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ovarian, breast, lung, prostate and potentially other cancers that depend on the same mechanism for growth.
6h
The Atlantic
Talking About Trump's Ban on Trans Americans in the Military In a series of tweets this morning, President Trump announced that “the United States Government will not accept or allow ... Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military.” My colleague Emma Green gives context : Former Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter had announced last June that transgender individuals would be able to serve openly in the military. He issued guidance fo
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Minds and machines: can we work together in the digital age? - Science Weekly podcastIan Sample sits down with Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson to discuss the future of the workplace and the role artificial intelligence will play
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Gizmodo
Breathtaking Timelapses Turn Massive Stormfronts Into Swirling Masterpieces GIF GIF: Vimeo It might seem like photographer Mike Olbinski is always at the right place at the right time to capture Mother Nature’s fury. But for his latest film, Pursuit , he says he actually spent three months driving across 10 states to capture this amazing timelapse footage, chasing storms and weather patterns for over 28,000 miles. Recorded using a pair of Canon 5DS R cameras which featur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adjusting fertilizers vital in claypan ag soilsAll soils are not equal. Rich loams support the world's most productive agricultural regions, including swaths of the American Midwest. But in some parts of the Midwest, including areas in Missouri and Illinois, claypan soils dominate. And where claypans reign, problems for producers abound. New research from the University of Missouri could help claypan farmers improve yields while saving costs.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New law could shore up US helium supplyHelium is essential for MRIs, the fiber optics that deliver images to our TVs, scientific research and of course, party balloons. In the past decade, helium prices have sky-rocketed due to supply shortages. But if small updates are made to an old law, the U.S. could boost its domestic helium output and help keep critical medical tests and electronics running, reports Chemical & Engineering News (C
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chatting coordinates heterogeneityBacterial cells communicate with one another by using chemical signal molecules, which they synthesize and secrete into their surroundings. By this means, the behavior of an entire population can be controlled and coordinated. Biophysicists led by Professor Erwin Frey, who holds the Chair of Biological and Statistical Physics at LMU, have now shown theoretically how this can be accomplished even w
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research at Lake Baikal—for the protection of a unique ecosystemLake Baikal, with its exceptional species diversity and unique wildlife, is a UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site. As part of the Helmholtz Russia Research Group LaBeglo, UFZ researchers are studying the impact of climate change and environmental toxins on the lake's fauna. In a recent study, together with researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and the University
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying major transitions in human cultural evolutionOver the past 10,000 years human cultures have expanded from small groups of hunter-gatherers to colossal and complexly organized societies. The secrets to how and why this major cultural transition occurred have largely remained elusive. In an article published on July 24 by Russell Gray and Joseph Watts in PNAS they outline how advances in computational methods and large cross-cultural datasets
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Science | The Guardian
Minds and machines: can we work together in the digital age? - Science Weekly podcast Ian Sample sits down with Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson to discuss the future of the workplace and the role artificial intelligence will play Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 2016 Klaus Schwab, founder and chairman of the World Economic Forum, wrote : “We stand on the brink of a technological revolu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Body ownership is not impaired in schizophreniaSchizophrenia patients often experience an altered sense of self, for example, as if someone else is controlling their actions. This impairment is described as a deficit in the “sense of agency”, and while it has been well established and linked to problems with sensorimotor brain signals, another category has been left unexplored: the “sense of body ownership” by which we feel that our bodies bel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Residual echo' of ancient humans in scans may hold clues to mental disordersResearchers have produced the first direct evidence that parts of our brains implicated in mental disorders may be shaped by a 'residual echo' from Neanderthal DNA in our genomes. Evidence from MRI scans suggests that such ancient genetic variation may affect the way our brains work today -- and may hold clues to understanding deficits seen in schizophrenia and autism-related disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New DNA sunscreen gets better the longer you wear itWhy use regular sunscreen when you can apply a DNA film to your skin? Researchers have developed a coating made out of DNA that gets better at protecting skin from ultraviolet light the more you expose it to the sun, and it also keeps your skin hydrated.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Waterlogged brain region helps scientists gauge damage caused by Parkinson's diseaseScientists have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease, which destroys neurons important for movement. The development suggests that fluid changes in a specific brain area could provide a way to track that damage.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trees can make or break city weatherEven a single urban tree can help moderate wind speeds and keep pedestrians comfortable as they walk down the street, according to a new study that also found losing a single tree can increase wind pressure on nearby buildings and drive up heating costs.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wet or dry in an instant: Smart surface enables advanced manipulation of dropletsResearchers have developed an inexpensive, scalable smart surface that is powered by just a conventional electric battery. The copper-based surface changes from being highly water-repellent (superhydrophobic) to highly water-absorbent (superhydrophilic) as electric potential is applied.
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Futurity.org
How should we judge policing tactics? A new article outlines a “formal model of optimal policing” that can be used to resolve tensions between public safety and community trust—and can also help the public keep both in mind. How much does a tactic reduce crime and how much does it interfere with innocent people’s lives? “In our view, dispassionate evaluation of policing tactics is the best way to both honor and achieve the sometimes
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Longer-lasting fragrance is just a shampoo away, thanks to peptidesMany people select their shampoo based on smell. Unfortunately, that scent usually doesn't last long on hair. Now, one team reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new way to help the fragrance "stick" to hair longer.
6h
Gizmodo
The Coolest Tape Measure You've Ever Seen Is Just $20 Today eTape16 Tape Measure , $20 It’s hard to get excited about a tape measure, but this one looks cool as hell . The eTape16 works just like a regular 16' tape measure, but a digital display on the top gives you an easy read-out of your current distance, converts fractions to decimals and imperial units to metric, and will even store a few measurements in memory so you don’t have to write them down. T
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research at Lake Baikal -- for the protection of a unique ecosystemAs part of the Helmholtz Russia Research Group LaBeglo, UFZ researchers are studying the impact of climate change and environmental toxins on the lake's fauna. In a recent study, together with researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and the University of Irkutsk, they addressed the question of how Baikal amphipods that fulfil important ecological functions in the
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chatting coordinates heterogeneityBacterial populations can, under certain conditions, react in a coordinated manner to chemical messages produced by a minority of their members, as a new theoretical study carried out by LMU biophysicists shows.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studies help understand why some people are so sure they're rightTwo studies examine the personality characteristics that drive dogmatism in the religious and nonreligious. In both groups, higher critical reasoning skills were associated with lower levels of dogmatism. But these two groups diverge in how moral concern influences their dogmatic thinking.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is extended-release guanfacine effective in children with chronic tic disorders?A new study assessed the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of extended-release guanfacine in children 6-17 years of age who have chronic tic disorders including Tourette's disorder.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New law could shore up US helium supplyHelium is essential for MRIs, the fiber optics that deliver images to our TVs, scientific research and of course, party balloons. In the past decade, helium prices have sky-rocketed due to supply shortages. But if small updates are made to an old law, the US could boost its domestic helium output and help keep critical medical tests and electronics running, reports Chemical & Engineering News (C&E
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Longer-lasting fragrance is just a shampoo away, thanks to peptidesMany people select their shampoo based on smell. Unfortunately, that scent usually doesn't last long on hair. Now, one team reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new way to help the fragrance 'stick' to hair longer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identifying major transitions in human cultural evolutionOver the past 10,000 years human cultures have expanded from small groups of hunter-gatherers to colossal and complexly organized societies. The secrets to how and why this major cultural transition occurred have largely remained elusive. In an article published on July 24 by Russell Gray and Joseph Watts in PNAS they outline how advances in computational methods and large cross-cultural datasets
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug combination shows better tolerance and effectiveness in metastatic renal cell cancerA novel combination of nivolumab plus ipilimumab for patients with metastatic kidney cancer is proving to be a more effective treatment with more durable tumor response than the two immunotherapies used separately. The promising combination therapy demonstrated manageable safety, notable antitumor activity, and durable responses with better long term overall survival in patients with metastatic re
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists propose new approach to hitting the gymJames Cook University sports scientists are warning that fatigue from weight training can carry over to endurance training and the two activities must be better coordinated to maximise athletes' performance.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adjusting fertilizers vital in claypan ag soilsNew research could help claypan farmers improve yields while saving costs.
6h
The Atlantic
This Is the Way the College ‘Bubble’ Ends For the past few decades, the unstoppable increase in college tuition has been a fact of life, like death and taxes. The sticker price of American college increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years, while median household income growth was relatively flat. Student debt soared to more than $1 trillion , the result of loans to cover the difference. Several people—with varying degrees of expe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fifty years on, the Breeding Bird Survey continues to produce new insightsIn 1966, a US Fish and Wildlife Service biologist named Chan Robbins launched an international program designed to measure changes in bird populations using volunteers recruited to count birds on pre-set routes along country roads. The result, the North American Breeding Bird Survey or BBS, is still going strong more than five decades later.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologists find key to tracking ancient wheat in frozen Bronze Age boxA Bronze Age wooden container found in an ice patch at 2,650m in the Swiss Alps could help archaeologists shed new light on the spread and exploitation of cereal grains following a chance discovery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Longer cooling may not harm, may even help out of hospital cardiac arrest patients, study showsEight out of 355 cardiac arrest patients who did not immediately wake up after hospitalization, have benefited from being cooled down to a temperature of 33°C for as long as 48 hours. However, this does not provide researchers with evidence to conclude that 48-hour cooling is preferable to the typical 24 hours when it comes to preventing brain damage. The level of uncertainty is too high and the d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Color-shifting electronic skin could have wearable tech and prosthetic usesResearchers have developed a new type of user-interactive electronic skin, with a color change perceptible to the human eye, and achieved with a much-reduced level of strain. Their results could have applications in robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fungal spores harness physics to launch themselvesMore than a century ago, Reginald Buller discovered that a spherical drop of water that forms close to a spore is crucial to the spore's dispersal. Now, using an ink jet printer and high speed cameras, researchers have uncovered the detailed mechanics of the way fungal spores have evolved to harness the power of merging water droplets to launch in a uniform manner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women entrepreneurs still lag behind men in accessing new business fundingWomen entrepreneurs are finding it increasingly difficult to access venture capital funding for start-up businesses and remain much less likely to attract funding than male entrepreneurs, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyleA new study determined that it doesn't matter where a person lives or the choices they make, male hepatitis B patients will always be at greater risk for more severe liver illnesses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Explaining failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer: Timing keyEstrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment -- and breast cancers with higher CK5 expression have poorer prognosis. These cells, which have characteristics of stem cells, often survive treatment to drive or even restart cancer grow
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The Cowboys Might’ve Really Screwed Up This Lucky Whitehead Business | The Muse The 150 Wor Deadspin The Cowboys Might’ve Really Screwed Up This Lucky Whitehead Business | The Muse The 150 Worst Albums Made By Men | The Root ‘Stupid or Liar’: What Justine Damond’s Death Proves About All Lives Matter | Splinter Trump Announces That Trans People Will Be Banned From Military Service |
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Feed: All Latest
Hollywood’s VR Fantasy Was Everywhere at Comic-Con—With a CatchVirtual reality grabbed plenty of attention at Comic-Con this year, but only rarely did it live up to its promise.
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Feed: All Latest
How They Make Those Squishy Air Pillows Inside Amazon BoxesCall them pillows of love.
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Feed: All Latest
Meizu Pro 7: When One Screen Isn't Enough, Try Meizu's Two-Screen PhoneThe Chinese phone manufacturer's unorthodox solution to screen addiction: add another screen.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Managers often fail to use or understand their own data on customer satisfactionDespite the millions companies spend to gather information about customer satisfaction, senior managers often fail to understand those customers' expectations.
6h
Ars Technica
Officials arrest suspect in $4 billion Bitcoin money laundering scheme (credit: fdecomite ) Police in Greece have arrested a man wanted in the United States for allegedly running a massive Bitcoin-based money laundering operation, according to the Associated Press . Authorities say the 38-year-old Russian man was responsible for converting $4 billion in illicit, conventional cash into virtual currency. The suspect hasn't been publicly named, but Reuters got a pictur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new platform making next-generation electronic devices more advancedPhysicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) developed a new hybrid integrated platform, promising to be a more advanced alternative to conventional integrated circuits. The researchers demonstrated their approach is mass manufacturable, making it possible to integrate the platform into everyday electronic equipment like smartphones. For
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trees can make or break city weatherEven a single urban tree can help moderate wind speeds and keep pedestrians comfortable as they walk down the street, according to a new University of British Columbia study that also found losing a single tree can increase wind pressure on nearby buildings and drive up heating costs.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atlantic/Pacific ocean temperature difference fuels US wildfiresAn international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
6h
Live Science
What Is a Scientific Hypothesis? | Definition of HypothesisA hypothesis is the first step in the scientific method. It begins by asking, 'What if …?'
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The Atlantic
Venezuela's Deadline Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro will take the first step at the end of the week to reorganize the government. Voters will select a constituent assembly to rewrite the constitution, and because the opposition has refused to participate, the outcome likely means the end of the opposition-led National Assembly, the only remaining institution outside Maduro’s grasp. On Wednesday, the opposition b
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Scientific American Content: Global
9 Hidden Signs of PerfectionismAre you a perfectionist? Most perfectionists don’t identify with the label. But Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers nine signs that might make you come out of the (perfectly... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Reaching for the Stars, Breakthrough Sends Smallest-Ever Satellites into OrbitDespite technical glitches and regulatory hurdles, nanosatellite swarms could someday be the cornerstone for revolutionary interplanetary or even interstellar space-science missions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diffusion dynamics play an essential role in regulating stem cells and tissue developmentGradients of molecular signaling factors play an essential role in numerous events in embryonic development, from patterning limb and organ formation to the intricate shaping of the brain and neuroanatomical architecture. These gradients are a consequence of diffusion dynamics in tissues, and newly published work describes two vital aspects of these diffusion processes in tissue development—first,
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Scientist Is Taking the Next Step in GeoengineeringHarvard’s David Keith explains why it’s time to move forward with outdoor experiments and broader research programs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2017 Annual MeetingFor this episode of BioScience Talks, we chatted with presenters and personnel from SICB's 2017 annual meeting, which was held earlier this year in New Orleans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Queen's University Belfast researcher turning dirty tinfoil into biofuel catalystA researcher at Queen's University Belfast has discovered a way to convert dirty aluminum foil into a biofuel catalyst, which could help to solve global waste and energy problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Managers often fail to use or understand their own data on customer satisfactionDespite the millions companies spend to gather information about customer satisfaction, senior managers often fail to understand those customers' expectations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on how body may detect early signs of cancerFresh insights into how cells detect damage to their DNA -- a hallmark of cancer -- could help explain how the body keeps disease in check. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered how damage to the cell's genetic material can trigger inflammation, setting in motion processes to remove damaged cells and keep tissues healthy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SA child living with HIV maintains remission without ARVs since 2008A 9-year-old South African diagnosed with HIV at a month old who received antiretroviral treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus for almost 9 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Talking to yourself in the third person can help you control emotionsThe simple act of silently talking to yourself in the third person during stressful times may help you control emotions without any additional mental effort than what you would use for first-person self-talk -- the way people normally talk to themselves.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs more likely to quitNew research published in the scientific journal Thorax has found that smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs are more likely to quit smoking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding cell segregation mechanisms which help prevent cancer spreadScientists have uncovered how cells are kept in the right place as the body develops, which may shed light on what causes invasive cancer cells to migrate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ECDC estimate: Around 9 million Europeans are affected by chronic hepatitis B or CAn estimated 4.7 million Europeans are living with chronic hepatitis B and almost 4 million with chronic hepatitis C infection. But large numbers of them are not aware of their infection as they have not yet been diagnosed. On of World Hepatitis Day, ECDC Director Andrea Ammon highlights the need for Europe to scale-up coverage of testing, prevention interventions and linkage to suitable treatment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibioticsA study performed at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and involving the collaboration of the Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas (CIB-CSIC) in Madrid has identified the key component of the machinery that S. aureus uses to acquire and transfer genes that confer resistance to antibiotics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking technology to the next levelPhysicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) developed a new hybrid integrated platform, promising to be a more advanced alternative to conventional integrated circuits. The researchers demonstrated their approach is mass manufacturable, making it possible to integrate the platform into everyday electronic equipment like smartphones. For
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
A Thin Aluminum Cage Is All That Separates These Divers From Razor-Sharp Shark Jaws! #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Will a flimsy cage be a match for bone-crushing shark jaws?? Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitte
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Gizmodo
Trump Considers Staying in Afghanistan So He Can Exploit Its Natural Resources Photo: Getty Donald Trump loves a good deal. And sitting in Afghanistan, much of it in Taliban-controlled regions, there’s a doozy: deposits of rare-earth minerals once estimated to be worth $1 trillion. So the president is considering keeping troops in the country so that they can blaze the way to the country’s untapped natural resources and give America a big fat payday . This might be a good d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
User research at BER II: Lupin roots observed in the act of drinkingLupins produce colourful blossoms and nutritious beans. Just how these plants draw water has now for the first time been observed in three dimensions by a University of Potsdam team at the HZB-BER II neutron source in Berlin. They improved the temporal resolution of neutron tomography more than onehundred-fold and obtained a detailed 3D image every ten seconds. This ultrafast neutron tomography is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materialsResearchers have developed a light-responsive crystalline material that overcomes challenges faced in previous studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Selfish motives, not fairness, the best message for criminal justice advocacy groupsAdvocacy groups and activists should appeal to self-interests if they want to obtain public support for criminal justice reform, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cultural flexibility was key for early humans to survive extreme dry periods in southern AfricaThe early human techno-tradition, known as Howiesons Poort, associated with Homo sapiens who lived in southern Africa about 66,000 to 59,000 years ago indicates that during this period of pronounced aridification they developed cultural innovations that allowed them to significantly enlarge the range of environments they occupied.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Competition for survival signals maintains immune balanceAlthough scarce, the recently discovered innate lymphoid cells vie with T cells for a shared source of interleukin-7, which helps them to survive. These findings could deepen our understanding of immune memory in vaccine and aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarkers for identifying tumor aggressivenessFuture early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision regarding chemotherapy. Two of the biomarkers are the MACC1 gene, high levels of which promote aggressive tumor growth and the development of metastasis, and a defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) system, which plays a role in tumor formation. Life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regulation of two-dimensional nanomaterials: New driving force for lithium-ion batteriesTwo-dimensional nanomaterials have offered an unprecedented opportunity as electrode materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries. To further improve their electrochemical performance, some strategies, including hybridization with conductive materials, surface/edge functionalization, and structural optimization, were developed for manipulating the structures and properties of these sheet-l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid electrolyte contacts for advanced characterization of resistive switching memoriesA new methodology to study resistive switching memories, based on the combination of ionic liquid gating experiments plus conductive atomic force microscopy, has been presented at the 2017 ChinaRRAM International Workshop.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diffusion dynamics play an essential role in regulating stem cells and tissue developmentNew work describes vital aspects of diffusion processes in tissue development, including the roles that molecular diffusion gradients have on stem cell signaling pathways along with new modeling tools that describe gradients of nutrients and signaling factors in three-dimensional tissue constructs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-mouthed fish was top predator after mass extinctionThe food chains recovered more rapidly than previously assumed after Earth's most devastating mass extinction event about 252 million years ago as demonstrated by the fossilized skull of a large predatory fish called Birgeria americana discovered by paleontologists from the University of Zurich in the desert of Nevada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do all people experience similar near-death-experiences?New research examines how frequently and in what order different aspects of self-reported near-death-experiences occur. By analyzing written first-hand accounts of near-death-experiences, the researchers looked at whether specific aspects of these experiences tend to occur in the same order for different people. They found that even though some events are more common, and some are more likely to f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Are we there yet?' -- explaining ADHD science to childrenA collaboration between OIST and Brazilian researchers reported their latest brain research on ADHD in a scientific journal targeting -- and peer-reviewed by -- children.
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Futurity.org
2090: Heat in U.S. cities could kill 26K people a year If climate change continues unabated, heat-related deaths in 10 major US metropolitan areas will increase sharply as temperatures rise due to climate change, report researchers. “These results show the cost in terms of human lives due to just this one aspect of climate change: temperature.” “The conversation about climate change is typically focused on the costs of mitigation, but this paper show
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Futurity.org
Big buildings in the country kill more birds A new study suggests that while smaller buildings cause fewer bird deaths than larger ones, larger buildings in rural areas are deadlier for birds than if buildings of the same size were located in urban areas. Such collisions are the largest unintended human cause of bird deaths worldwide… About one billion birds die every year when they unwittingly fly into human-made objects such as buildings
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Greatest threat to Eastern forest birds is habitat loss on wintering groundsHuman-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds. The problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study.
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Gizmodo
Sad New Deep Sea Shark Reminds Us We Can't All Be Great Whites Credit: Florida Atlantic University The tiger shark patrols the seas alone at night, prepared to eat anything from a bird to a dolphin. The goblin shark live in the ocean’s canyons and abysses, grabbing prey by surprise with its extendable jaws. A great white shark can grow as large as a Mercedes. This new shark species is only a foot long, glows in the dark, and is very ugly. Advertisement Scien
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
HIV milestone, discrimination suit and China's AI plans The week in science: 21–27 July 2017. Nature 547 384 doi: 10.1038/547384a
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Ingeniøren
Indien siger nej til selvkørende bilerDen indiske transportminister frygter, at millioner af chaufførjob vil forsvinde, hvis vejene åbnes for selvkørende biler. Über og Google tvivler dog på, at selvkørende biler kan indpasses i den kaotiske indiske trafik.
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Ingeniøren
Sædkvaliteten hos vestlige mænd er halveret på 40 årEt overset og særdeles bekymrende problem, siger danske og udenlandske fertilitetsforskere. Udviklingen kan blive en direkte trussel mod videreførsel af slægten.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
User research at BER II: Lupin roots observed in the act of drinkingLupins produce colourful blossoms and nutritious beans. Just how these plants draw water has now for the first time been observed in three dimensions by a University of Potsdam team at the HZB-BER II neutron source in Berlin. They improved the temporal resolution of neutron tomography more than onehundred-fold and obtained a detailed 3D image every ten seconds. This ultrafast neutron tomography is
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans identify emotions in the voices of all air-breathing vertebratesAmphibians, reptiles, mammals -- all of them communicate via acoustic signals. And humans are able to assess the emotional value of these signals. This has been shown in a new study reported in 'Proceedings of the Royal Society B'. The authors interpreted their findings as evidence that there might be a universal code for the vocal expression and perception of emotions in the animal kingdom.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osaka solar scientists rough up silicon panels to boost light captureOsaka University scientists enhance conversion efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells by effectively preventing reflection loss, passivating a submicron silicon structure, and adding a rough nanoscale surface texture using simple and inexpensive processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Body ownership is not impaired in schizophreniaAnswering a long-standing question, EPFL scientists have determined that the sense of body ownership is not affected in schizophrenia patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do we need separate his and hers medicine cabinets?"We know that inflammatory diseases occur much more frequently in women than in men," says Prof. Oliver Werz of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. The german pharmacist and his team, together with colleagues from Italy, Denmark and Sweden, have uncovered a significant cause for these sex differences at the molecular level. In two high-profile publications they show how the male sex hormone te
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Longer cooling does not harm and may even help out of hospital cardiac arrest patientsEight out of 355 cardiac arrest patients who do not immediately wake up after hospitalisation, have benefited from being cooled down to a temperature of 33°C for as long as 48 hours. However, this does not provide researchers from Aarhus University and elsewhere with evidence to conclude that 48-hour cooling is preferable to the typical 24 hours when it comes to preventing brain damage. The level
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atlantic/Pacific ocean temperature difference fuels US wildfiresA new study shows that difference in water temperature between the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans together with global warming impact the risk of drought and wildfire in southwestern North America.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trees can make or break city weatherEven a single urban tree can help moderate wind speeds and keep pedestrians comfortable as they walk down the street, according to a new University of British Columbia study that also found losing a single tree can increase wind pressure on nearby buildings and drive up heating costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 3-D technique uses water and robotics to reconstruct complex objects'Using a robotic arm to immerse an object on an axis at various angles, and measuring the volume displacement of each dip, we combine each sequence and create a volumetric shape representation of an object,' says Professor Andrei Scharf, of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Computer Science.
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Popular Science
Planes can fly in a blizzard because they are tested in this indoor one first Science At McKinley Climate Lab, researchers create fearsome weather to test cars and planes. At the McKinley Climatic Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base, researchers create fearsome weather to put our most important machinery to the test.
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Gizmodo
The Flash Might Have Lost a Team Member For Season Four And Grant Gustin teases how Barry’s time in the speedforce has changed him. James Cameron has a progress update on his plans for Terminator . The J.R.R. Tolkien biopic might have found its star. Plus, David Leitch on what Josh Brolin brings to Deadpool 2 and even more teasers for Rick & Morty ’s return. Behold, Spoilers! Terminator James Cameron stated to News.com.au he’s currently negotiating a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make augmented reality a group experienceSit on Disney Research's Magic Bench and you may have an elephant hand you a glowing orb. Or you might get rained on. Or a tiny donkey might saunter by and kick the bench.
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Feed: All Latest
How 'Comedy Bang! Bang!' Perfected the Podcasting Long GameThroughout its 500 episodes, the comedy podcast has revolutionized not just the medium, but our expectations of it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four new short-period giant planets discovered(Phys.org)—Astronomers have detected four new giant exoplanets as part of the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network-South (HATSouth) exoplanet survey. The newly found alien worlds are about the size of Jupiter, but less massive. They transit moderately bright stars and have short orbital periods. The findings were presented July 22 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Ars Technica
Who owns Snopes? Fracas over fact-checking site now front and center Enlarge / David Mikkelson, the founder of Snopes, seen here at the US Embassy in Vienna, in June 2017. (credit: US Embassy Vienna ) As of Tuesday evening, Snopes.com , one of the Internet’s most longstanding fact-checking websites, successfully raised over $600,000 in less than 48 hours—an effort to stay afloat while an ugly legal battle is underway. Snopes’ founder, David Mikkelson, told Ars in
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Gizmodo
How Vibrators Could Help Save Turtles From Extinction Image Courtesy of Donald McKnight Turtles have been around since the time of the dinosaurs, but they now are struggling to survive, with about half of all species threatened with extinction. To save them, scientists need accurate data on how many males and females of each species are left, but there’s a problem—the two sexes can look essentially identical, with the male’s penis tucked inside his
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking cue from nature, Disney Research designs machines that bendReplacing rigid joints and linkages with mechanisms that bend offers a number of potential advantages, even as it makes designing devices more difficult. A computational design tool developed by Disney Research promises to make this transition from rigid to compliant mechanisms easier.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disney Research makes augmented reality a group experienceSit on Disney Research's Magic Bench and you may have an elephant hand you a glowing orb. Or you might get rained on. Or a tiny donkey might saunter by and kick the bench. It's a combined augmented and mixed reality experience, but not the type that involves wearing a head-mounted display or using a handheld device. Instead, the surroundings are instrumented rather than the individual, allowing pe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Residual echo' of ancient humans in scans may hold clues to mental disordersResearchers have produced the first direct evidence that parts of our brains implicated in mental disorders may be shaped by a 'residual echo' from Neanderthal DNA in our genomes. Evidence from MRI scans suggests that such ancient genetic variation may affect the way our brains work today -- and may hold clues to understanding deficits seen in schizophrenia and autism-related disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospitals should examine physician call coverage at stroke centersStroke centers average mechanical thrombectomies once every five days with nearly 60 percent of the procedures occurring during non-work hours.
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Ars Technica
UK government wants to ban sale of gas and diesel cars starting in 2040 Enlarge (credit: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images) All new petrol and diesel cars and vans will be banned from UK roads from 2040, the government will announce on Wednesday in a revised "controversial bomb" air pollution plan. The Tory government published a draft air pollution plan in May , but it faced criticism from environment lawyers and clean air campaigners for being too floppy at curbing the nitr
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The Atlantic
How Much Discrimination Do Muslims Face in America? Whatever Muslims may be in Trump’s America, they’re not invisible. Everyone—the president, pundits, pollsters—keeps talking about the religious minority group, which makes up roughly 1 percent of the country’s population. According to new data from the Pew Research Center, the intense political focus on Islam has yielded a sort of dual life for American Muslims. On one hand, many Americans are su
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Arctic is unforgiving; riding in this icebreaker isn'tWhile it may be frigid and wet on deck, the crew of a modern icebreaker can expect creature comforts inside the ship, even saunas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bienvenue! French zoo announces first ever panda pregnancyDelighted French zoo officials were bursting with joy Wednesday at the news their female panda is pregnant—a first for France.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People and wildlife now threatened by rapid destruction of central America's forestsCentral America's largest remaining forests are disappearing at a precipitous rate due to illegal cattle ranching, oil palm plantations, and other human-related activities, all of which are putting local communities and the region's wildlife species at high risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optic lobe of giant squid found proportionally smaller than for other cephalopods(Phys.org)—A team of researchers in Taiwan has found that despite having outsized eyes, giant squid do not have an overly large optic lobe to match. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes carrying out a study of a giant squid captured alive by local fishermen and what they found upon examining the vision processing parts of its brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher turning dirty tinfoil into biofuel catalystA researcher at Queen's University Belfast has discovered a way to convert dirty aluminium foil into a biofuel catalyst, which could help to solve global waste and energy problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematical model confirms the hypothesis of the origin of auroral soundsThe video is grainy and the sound is scratchy. However, "Clap Sounds of Northern Lights?" is No. 1 on Aalto's YouTube channel with almost a quarter-million views.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thais free 1,066 turtles to celebrate King's birthdayHundreds of Thai schoolchildren and naval officers sent 1,066 turtles scuttling into the sea on Wednesday in a ceremony aimed at bringing good fortune to the new King Maha Vajiralongkorn, who turns 65 on Friday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk for bipolar disorder associated with faster agingNew King's College London research suggests that people with a family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more rapidly than those without a history of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People and wildlife now threatened by rapid destruction of central America's forestsCentral America's largest remaining forests are disappearing at a precipitous rate due to illegal cattle ranching, oil palm plantations, and other human-related activities, all of which are putting local communities and the region's wildlife species at high risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Senate vote starts process to take coverage from millionsThe American College of Physicians (ACP) is gravely disappointed that 50 Senators plus Vice President Pence voted to begin debate on still-secret legislation that could result in tens of millions losing insurance coverage. They now must be held accountable to their constituents, and to our members' patients, who may be harmed by their vote. We thank the 50 Senators who voted against it, especially
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Popular Science
You actually can buy happiness—by buying time Science Having someone come clean your bathroom? $40. Having more time? Priceless. Feeling crunched for time? Consider paying someone to do your laundry, grocery shopping, or any other time-sucking chore. It may make you happier.
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Science | The Guardian
Government's air quality plan branded inadequate by city leaders Michael Gove’s pledge to ban new petrol and diesel cars in 23 years is not enough to tackle health crisis now, say campaigners The government’s new clean air plan has been branded inadequate by the leaders of eight heavily polluted cities, as campaigners said banning petrol and diesel cars from 2040 would not help the thousands dying each year from illnesses linked to toxic fumes. The long-awaite
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Proba-V monitors African SahelESA's Proba-V minisatellite reveals the seasonal changes in Africa's sub-Saharan Sahel, with the rainy season allowing vegetation to blossom between February (top) and September (bottom).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visualization of transcription initiation at single-molecule resolutionA novel approach developed at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) has allowed scientists in Dirk Schübeler's group to dissect and quantify the individual steps of transcription initiation. Unexpectedly, they observed that RNA polymerases frequently dissociate from the DNA template, rather than pause, before transcription continues. They thus gained new mechanistic insigh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify the component that allows a lethal type of bacteria to spread resistance to antibioticsAntibiotic resistance of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for 11,300 deaths a year in the United States alone—a figure that corresponds to half of all deaths caused by gram-positive resistant bacteria in that country. Such high mortality is related to the speed at which the bacterium acquires resistance to antibiotics. A study performed at the Institute for Research in Biomedicin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early human's ability to survive through prolonged arid areas in southern AfricaThe flexibility and ability to adapt to changing climates by employing various cultural innovations allowed communities of early humans to survive through a prolonged period of pronounced aridification.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar scientists rough up silicon panels to boost light capturePower generation cost using solar panels depends on getting as much electricity out of the panels as possible while keeping the manufacturing costs low. Anyone who has considered installing solar panels might be aware of the trade-off between efficiency and the initial cost of the panels. Engineers and researchers are finding new ways to obtain power out of solar modules, but doing so without addi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People found able to recognize emotional arousal in vocalizations of land vertebrates(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Germany, France, the Netherlands and Canada has found that human beings are able to accurately recognize emotionally based vocalizations made by a wide variety of land vertebrates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team describes experiments they conducted with volunteers listening to recorded animal sounds and wh
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Ingeniøren
Svensk it-skandale står til at fælde tre ministre Den svenske opposition har sikret flertal til at gennemføre et såkaldt mistillidsvotum efter potentielt læk af følsomme svenske persondata. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/svensk-it-skandale-staar-at-faelde-tre-ministre-1078614 Version2
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Futurity.org
Brain disease found in 110 of 111 deceased NFL players Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—a progressive, degenerative brain disease found in people with a history of repeated head trauma—may be more widespread among football players than once thought, a new study suggests. The study found CTE in 99 percent of brains obtained from National Football League players, as well at 91 percent of college football players and 21 percent of high school foot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why looking for aliens is good for society (even if there aren't any)The search for life elsewhere in the universe is one of the most compelling aspects of modern science. Given its scientific importance, significant resources are devoted to this young science of astrobiology, ranging from rovers on Mars to telescopic observations of planets orbiting other stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Venus chamber breaks record with completion of 80-day testAfter an 80-day test at Venus surface conditions and a two-week cooling period, samples were removed from Glenn's Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, July 13, nearly doubling the facility's previous duration record of 42 days.
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Gizmodo
Cannonball Into Amazon's One-Day Inflatable Sale Intex Gold Box I’m not sure if anyone has noticed, but it’s pretty hot outside! Luckily, Amazon’s coming to the rescue with a big one-day sale on Intex inflatables for your pool, your local river, or whatever body of water you can find. You could blow up your own family wading pool for under $20 , grab a bottle of champagne and make like Johnny Football on an inflatable swan for $14, or or tube d
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The Atlantic
Europe's Top Court Rules Austria Can Deport Some Asylum Seekers The European Court of Justice (ECJ), the bloc’s apex court, ruled Wednesday that migrants must seek asylum in the first country they reach, a ruling that could have far-reaching consequences for many of those who arrived in 2015 and 2016 during Europe’s most-severe refugee crisis since World War II. The case involved Khadija and Zainab Jafari, two sisters from Afghanistan, and their children. The
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The Atlantic
What Christopher Nolan Gets Right About Netflix Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk is not what you’d call a typical summer blockbuster in 2017. It’s a sober, intense World War II epic, starring a total unknown (Fionn Whitehead), with no potential as a franchise. It’s not a story of triumph, but rather an edgy chronicle of soldiers surviving by the skin of their teeth (it also features only British troops; at the time of the Dunkirk evacuation, Americ
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Not aLeafWith brown splotches artfully strewn against its bright yellow coloring, the striking imperial moth (Eacles imperialis) appears more leaf than Lepidoptera.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harddrive boost comes in layers of iron and cobaltA*STAR researchers have created a promising new material from thin layers of iron and cobalt that could enable magnetic recording technologies such as hard drives to be boosted with microwaves.
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Feed: All Latest
Anti-Drone Tools Tested: From Shotguns To SuperdronesFrom anti-drone shotgun shells to a drone-snagging megadrone, security researchers put the drone defense arsenal to the test.
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Feed: All Latest
Inside Dodge’s Face-Warpingly Fast Demon DragsterHow to build a production car so speedy, it's been banned by the National Hot Rod Association.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zinc link in safer roof catchment rainA new study of Wellington roof catchment rainwater has found that zinc in galvanised steel roofs can kill some bugs. But households concerned about the safety of emergency roof catchment rainwater in the event of an earthquake still need to disinfect it before drinking it.
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Science-Based Medicine
Increase In Supplement PoisoningsCurrent supplement regulations in the US (and many countries) are overtly anti-consumer and pro-industry, and are the direct result of aggressive industry lobbying and having powerful senators in their pocket. The rise in calls to poison control for supplements are just one manifestation of this situation.
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Gizmodo
This Is Not How Science Works Photo: Getty Last week, a draft of a Department of Energy study on electric grid reliability leaked . Though its final version could change, it essentially found that an increased reliance on renewable energy sources, including solar and wind, have not made the grid less stable. Instead, electric grids are “more reliable today” than before the ongoing adoption of renewable energy, due to better p
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Ars Technica
Aboard the NS Savannah, America’s first (and last) nuclear merchant ship (credit: Sean Gallagher) BALTIMORE—Alongside a former grain pier in a strangely quiet corner of this cargo port, there's a ship straight out of the future—the future, that is, as seen from the 1950s. Featuring sleek, modern lines and a giant insignia of an atom, the Nuclear Ship Savannah once sailed the world to demonstrate the peaceful potential of atomic energy. Constructed at a cost of $46.9 m
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Scientific American Content: Global
Medicine's Movable Feast: What Jumping Genes Can Teach Us about Treating DiseaseAncient viruses “fossilized” in the genome may contribute to maladies from autoimmune diseases to schizophrenia -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studies help understand why some people are so sure they're rightDogmatic individuals hold confidently to their beliefs, even when experts disagree and evidence contradicts them. New research from Case Western Reserve University may help explain the extreme perspectives, on religion, politics and more, that seem increasingly prevalent in society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new low-cost battery offers a hefty voltage and sustained energy capacityA zinc-based battery that delivers a high voltage and substantial energy capacity could be set to rival conventional lithium-ion batteries, A*STAR researchers have found.
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Popular Science
Sea ice, before it's too late Environment Stunning views of the imperiled Arctic. After three straight years of declining sea ice cover, NASA launched a supplementary Operation IceBridge mission to figure out what's going on in the Arctic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large-mouthed fish was top predator after mass extinctionThe most catastrophic mass extinction on Earth took place about 252 million years ago – at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geological periods. Up to 90 percent of the marine species of that time were annihilated. Worldwide biodiversity then recovered in several phases throughout a period of about five million years. Until now, paleontologists have assumed that the first predators at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward additive manufacturingAutomation, robotics, advanced computer-aided design, sensing and diagnostic technologies have revolutionized the modern factory, allowing the building of complex products, from microchips to cars and even airplanes, with unprecedented cost-efficiency, scale and reliability. The modern factory represents the pinnacle of mass production technology, refined over a hundred years or more, to produce i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing quantum algorithms for optimization problemsQuantum computers of the future hold promise for solving complex problems more quickly than ordinary computers. For example, they can factor large numbers exponentially faster than classical computers, which would allow them to break codes in the most commonly used cryptography system. There are other potential applications for quantum computers, too, such as solving complicated chemistry problems
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring an animal's painA new device designed by engineers and veterinarians at Massey University seeks to change the way we understand animal pain, starting with sheep.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cooling curtain made of a porous triple-layer membrane—alternative to electrically powered air conditioningClimate change is leading to ever higher temperatures and aridity in many areas, making efficient room cooling increasingly important. An ETH doctoral student at the Functional Materials Laboratory has developed an alternative to electrically powered air conditioning: a cooling curtain made of a porous triple-layer membrane.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In longitudinal studies, dried blood spot samples have a role to playLongitudinal studies of disease require collecting biofluids, preferentially blood. But getting serum blood samples takes the work of a professional, and storing thousands of such samples at -80 degrees C means using a lot of energy and freezer space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study projects deaths from heat and cold for 10 U.S. metros through 2090A new study projects that if climate change continues unabated, heat-related deaths will rise dramatically in 10 major U.S. metropolitan areas compared to if the predicted increase in global warming is substantially curbed and cities take steps to adapt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers prove existence of unique but ill-fated New Zealand black swanNew Zealand once had its own species of black swan but, like the moa, it was hunted to extinction soon after humans arrived in the late 13th century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conductivity key to mapping water inside EarthHydrogen at elevated temperature creates high electrical conductivity in the Earth's mantle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physics discovery unlocks ingredients of 2-D 'sandwich'Everything that exists in the digital world—photos, tweets, online courses, this article—is stored as 1's and 0's. At the software level, this information is written as computer code. At the hardware level, that code is brought to life by billions of transistors turning on (1) and off (0).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein crystals grown in microgravity could yield antidotes for nerve agentsOn a balmy evening in early June, Space X launched the Falcon 9 rocket, which ferried the Dragon spacecraft toward the International Space Station (ISS). As the Dragon broke the tethers of Earth's gravity three small, black boxes were safely nestled in its cargo hold. These innocuous boxes house an experiment that may help researchers develop new antidotes for nerve agents used in conflict zones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Spectacular aurora from orbitExpedition 52 Flight Engineer Jack Fischer of NASA shared photos and time-lapse video of a glowing green aurora seen from his vantage point 250 miles up, aboard the International Space Station.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA solves a drizzle riddleA new NASA study shows that updrafts are more important than previously understood in determining what makes clouds produce drizzle instead of full-sized raindrops, overturning a common assumption.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Virtual Drive Test method improves cellular and internet connectionWhen purchasing a new car, customers demand high-quality cellular and internet access. No matter how good the car, poor wireless communications are no longer accepted and the introduction of connected and driverless cars is increasing the need for strong wireless performance. New research by the University of Bristol, in collaboration with Jaguar Land Rover, has developed a new Virtual Drive Testi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeology shows there's more to millet than birdseedArchaeological research shows that our prehistoric ancestors built resilience into their food supply. Now archaeologists say 'forgotten' millet – a cereal familiar today as birdseed – has a role to play in modern crop diversity and in helping to feed the world's population.
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Ingeniøren
Cyklister kan blive selvkørende bilers værste mareridtTeknologien bag selvkørende biler kæmper lige nu med at kunne genkende cyklister. Løses det problem, kan det paradoksalt nok gå hen og blive et problem for trafikken.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Learning from Nature: Moth Eyes Inspire Nonreflective Screen CoatingA new technique could make digital devices easier to read in bright sunlight -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Brains of former football players donated to science are rife with disease Enlarge / The Denver Broncos' offensive line collides with the Kansas City Chiefs' defense November 27, 2016. (credit: Getty | Steve Nehf ) Signs of a degenerative brain disease were widespread among a sample of donated brains of former football players, researchers reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The finding bolsters the connection between playing American fo
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rail-like waveguides simplify miniaturizing photonic components on silicon wafersHigh-speed optical circuits and sensors generally require strict control over light polarization to minimize loss and cross-talk in photonic devices such as waveguides. An A*STAR team now predicts that noise resulting from imperfect polarizations can be eliminated using microstructures known as 'slot' waveguides.
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The Tricked-Out Research Planes That Fly Through WildfiresThe best way to test the gases created by wildfires is to fly a plane directly above the conflagration.
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Repealing Net Neutrality is Easy. Replacing It Will Be HardThe next fight over the future of the open internet will fall to the U.S. Congress.
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Shred the Trails All Day Long With E-Mountain Bikes from Specialized and Riese & MüllerThese electric rides aren’t for lazy days on the trail.
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Luxembourg's New Law Lets Space Miners Keep Their PlunderOn August 1, Luxembourg plans to adopt a new law that gives empyrean mining companies the rights to whatever they pull from asteroids.
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Grasping Robots Compete to Rule Amazon’s WarehousesA warehouse-themed automated rodeo has robots auditioning to work in Amazon’s fulfillment centers
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The Camera Drone Company That Fell to EarthWith two young founders and a much-hyped product, Lily Robotics promised that its camera drone would transform photography. Then it came crashing down.
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Science : NPR
3, 2, 1 ... Bake Off! The Mission To Make Bread In Space On Earth, crumbs are harmless, but in orbit they can be perilous. But bread is a big deal in Germany, so scientists and engineers there are teaming up to create an oven and dough fit for microgravity. (Image credit: NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH)
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Viden
Boble-forskerens bogtip: Fem gode fra Vincent F. HendricksVincent F. Hendricks forsker i samfundsbobler og information. Få hans bedste bud på sommerlæsning her.
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Gizmodo
Listen to Rick Perry Get Pranked by the Jerky Boys of Russia (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) Rick Perry had a phone call with Ukrainian Prime Minister Volodymyr Groysman last week. Well, at least he thought it was the Prime Minister of Ukraine. It was actually two Russian pranksters known locally as the Jerky Boys of Russia. And Perry, as Secretary of Energy, wound up talking to them for a full 22 minutes. Rick Perry, it should be noted, is in charge of
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Quantum tunneling takes time, new study showsA new measurement disfavors the idea that electrons can escape atoms instantaneously.
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Ars Technica
Whistleblower calls out problems with military drone accuracy and ethics Ars Technica Live #15, produced by Jennifer Hahn and filmed by Chris Schodt. (video link) Lisa Ling served almost two decades in the Air National Guard, working on communications technology and drones. After an honorable discharge, she discovered her work had led to the deaths of hundreds of people. On our latest episode of Ars Technica Live, she tells Ars editors Annalee Newitz and Cyrus Farivar
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Ingeniøren
Dansk astrofysiker: Derfor støder galakser sammen, selvom universet udvider sigMælkevejen støder sammen med nærmeste galakse om fire milliarder år. Dansk astrofysiker forklarer, hvordan det kan ske, når universet samtidig udvider sig.
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Ingeniøren
Kinesisk provins tvinger muslimer til at installere spion-app App’en skanner borgernes telefoner for materiale, der forbindes med terrorisme. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kinesisk-provins-tvinger-muslimer-at-installere-spion-app-1078608 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Appel til ing.dk læsere: Hvordan optimerer vi Foucault-pendulet?Vinden forstyrrede, da verdens største udendørs Foucault-pendul i november sidste år blev testet fra en kran i Lindø Industripark. Nu beder initiativgruppen Ingeniørens læsere om hjælp til, hvordan wiren kan optimeres.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Nobelists, Students and Journalists Grapple with the Antiscience MovementThe annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in an ancient German city takes on an extremely timely problem -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Military Assigns the Homework in This College CourseA new initiative is building a pipeline of tech know-how from America’s finest universities to the military. No one’s freaking out—yet.
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The Digital Divide Isn't Microsoft's First PriorityMicrosoft says it wants to use spare TV bandwidth to close the digital divide. But the company has even bigger plans than that.
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Killing the Blue Whale ChallengeSocial media companies like Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr enabled the Blue Whale Challenge. They must do more to curb it.
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From Elon Musk to Bill Gates: Tech’s Most Dubious PromisesElon Musk’s NY-DC hyperloop isn’t the first outrageous claim we’ve heard from Silicon Valley.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sperm Count Dropping in Western WorldThe trend has occurred over 40 years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Exquisite Horror in Lana Del Rey's Nostalgia Scroll through the photos that David LaChapelle recently shot with Lana Del Rey and you may be hit with a whiff of linoleum, or microwave dinner, or asbestos. She descends a spiral staircase next to a gaudy fake Christmas tree of the kind you just don’t see anymore, wearing an equally gaudy coat, her eyes squinting, the camera having snapped at the wrong moment. She stains a wedding table with re
10h
The Atlantic
The Worst Birds Pity the fur seal pups of Guafo Island. If they can evade being battered by the storms that pound the island, and avoid being trampled by the huge adult males that periodically charge across the beach, and dodge the killer whales that patrol the surrounding waters, then they might just live to get their perineums pecked raw by seagulls. Guafo, sitting just off the coast of Chilean Patagonia, is h
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Ars Technica
Great Scott! This astronaut has probably endured more extremes than anyone NASA Scott Parazynski has chased extremes all of his life. Not in a reckless way, perhaps, but rather because his life's goal seems to have been to experience just about as much crazy stuff that one human possibly could. As a result, it seems plausible that Parazynski has experienced more extreme environments than any human ever has—and he has written a new book that brings the reader along for t
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Asomándonos a la Revolución Cubana de Internet Hecha por los Propios CEn Cuba, donde los datos gotean vía una red sobrecargada controlada por el gobierno—en su caso—la gente ha puesto en escena la revolución del auto autor.
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Feed: All Latest
Inside Cuba's D.I.Y. Internet RevolutionIn Havana, where data trickles in via overloaded, government-controlled networks—if at all—the people have taken matters into their own hands.
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NYT > Science
How California Plans to Go Far Beyond Any Other State on ClimateCalifornia wants to cut greenhouse gas emissions more than even President Barack Obama had proposed. But can the state pull it off, or will it falter?
10h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Check Out The Top 6 Epic Shark Dance Moves | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Sharks may not often breach, but when they do – it's worthy of a mirror-ball trophy! Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/Sh
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ATLAS Experiment explores how the Higgs boson interacts with other bosonsSince resuming operation for Run 2, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been producing about 20,000 Higgs bosons per day in its 13 TeV proton–proton collisions. At the end of 2015, the data collected by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations were already sufficient for new observations of the Higgs boson at the new collision energy. Now, having recorded more than 36,000 trillion collisions between 2015
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematics yields techniques for more accurate weather predictionsWeather forecasting is one of the most computationally challenging problems in science. Forecasts are produced by simulating a numerical model of the Earth's weather patterns and then predicting its future behaviours. For such simulations to correctly reflect actual weather conditions with high accuracy, it is important to update the model with the latest satellite data. This is an extremely chall
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social cues are key to vocal learning in birds and babiesWhen a baby bird learns a song, is it simply mimicking and practicing its father's tune? Or do chicks learn by first putting out nonsensical sounds – akin to a human infant's babble – which they then build upon based on their parent's response?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New shark species glows in the dark, weighs two pounds and has a huge noseLike finding a needle in a haystack, a team of scientists has discovered a new species of shark measuring less than a foot long and weighing under 2 pounds full-grown. This miniature, "glow-in-the-dark" shark is a member of the Lanternshark family (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae), which was serendipitously found 1,000 feet below the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Daimler stands by diesel despite growing controversyGerman automaker Daimler's profits barely rose and were short of market expectations in the second quarter, as its Mercedes-Benz luxury car division boomed while earnings lagged at its truck, van and bus businesses.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU court: EU-Canada passenger data deal breaches privacyThe European Union's top court says in an advisory opinion that a deal between the EU and Canada on sharing airline passenger data breaches citizens' privacy and cannot be concluded in its current form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Italian bank says 400,000 loan account details hackedItaly's largest bank, Unicredit, says accounts of some 400,000 customers in Italy have been hacked.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK to ban sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2040: reportBritain will outlaw the sale of new diesel and petrol cars and vans from 2040 in a bid to cut air pollution, the government was set to announce later Wednesday.
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Live Science
Get Better Sleep in 2017Falling asleep — sounds simple, right? But for people who struggle to fall asleep or stay asleep through the night, or for those who can't stop hitting the snooze button in the morning, getting good sleep can feel pretty complicated.
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Live Science
Lego Boost Review: The Best Robot Kit for KidsThe best robot kit for younger kids, Lego Boost turns programming into a game your child will want to play.
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Live Science
Bazinga! 'Big Bang Theory' Catchphrase Inspires New CompoundThe catchphrase "bazinga" — a zinger commonly uttered by Dr. Sheldon Cooper, a fictional theoretical physicist on the TV show "The Big Bang Theory" — has inspired the creation of a novel compound.
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Live Science
Booze in Space: The Universe Is Drowning in AlcoholIt's like one great big distillery up there.
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Live Science
Upcoming Solar Eclipse Is a Chance to Prove Einstein Right (Again)For some skywatchers, the upcoming total solar eclipse is an opportunity to duplicate one of the most famous experiments of the 20th century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilResearchers at the University of São Paulo's Biomedical Science Institute (ICB-USP) in Brazil have discovered a new virus in a migratory bird species. This is such a rare find that it can be considered a stroke of luck, especially because the virus in question is avian paramyxovirus 15, which belongs to the same family as avian paramyxovirus, the pathogen that causes Newcastle disease. This diseas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large single-crystal graphene is possibleThanks to its conductivity, strength and flexibility, graphene is considered as one of the most likely substitutes for silicon and other materials. However, it has not yet resulted in industrial applications. High-quality single-crystal graphene can only be produced in quantities a couple of millimeters to mere centimeters in size. Recently, a team led by Prof. Feng Ding and Prof. Rodney Ruoff wit
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds light on the role of the entropy in a quantum systemAny understanding of the irreversibility of the arrow of time should account the quantum nature of the world that surrounds us. The is the key result of the work carried out by Vincenzo Alba and Pasquale Calabrese of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste, recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeologists find key to tracking ancient wheat in frozen Bronze Age boxA Bronze Age wooden container found in an ice patch at 2,650m in the Swiss Alps could help archaeologists shed new light on the spread and exploitation of cereal grains following a chance discovery.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers overturn wisdom regarding efficacy of next-generation DNA techniquesMetagenomics enables us to investigate microbial ecology at a much larger scale than ever before and sheds light upon the previously invisible diversity of microscopic life. A new study appearing in Scientific Reports reveals that a favored method for measuring microbial biodiversity is not as accurate as previously thought.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop DNA sunscreen that gets better the longer you wear itWhy use regular sunscreen when you can apply a DNA film to your skin? Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a coating made out of DNA that gets better at protecting skin from ultraviolet light the more you expose it to the sun, and it also keeps your skin hydrated.
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The Atlantic
What's the Real Goal of Trump's Voter-Fraud Commission? The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity had its first official meeting last week, launching its agenda amid widespread controversy about Vice Chair Kris Kobach’s request for all 50 states’ individual voter data, and while facing seven federal lawsuits related to that request. Although the stated mission of the group, as outlined in President Trump’s May executive order , is to
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The Atlantic
Brezhnev's Secret Pledge to 'Do Everything We Can' to Re-Elect Gerald Ford Putin’s covert support for Donald Trump has not been the first time Russia aspired to influence an American presidential election. Forty-two years ago, a Russian leader privately pledged his government’s support for a president’s reelection: “We for our part will do everything we can to make that happen,” Leonid Brezhnev said to Gerald Ford. I know, because I’m the last surviving participant in t
11h
Science : NPR
After A Year In Space, The Air Hasn't Gone Out Of NASA's Inflated Module The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module was pumped up after it arrived at the International Space Station in 2016. NASA says it's doing well in the harsh environment. (Image credit: NASA)
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists find key to tracking ancient wheat in frozen Bronze Age boxA Bronze Age wooden container found in an ice patch at 2,650m in the Swiss Alps could help archaeologists shed new light on the spread and exploitation of cereal grains following a chance discovery.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers overturn wisdom regarding efficacy of next-generation DNA techniquesMetagenomics enables us to investigate microbial ecology at a much larger scale than ever before and sheds light upon the previously invisible diversity of microscopic life. A new study appearing in Scientific Reports reveals that a favored method for measuring microbial biodiversity is not as accurate as previously thought.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop DNA sunscreen that gets better the longer you wear itWhy use regular sunscreen when you can apply a DNA film to your skin? Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a coating made out of DNA that gets better at protecting skin from ultraviolet light the more you expose it to the sun, and it also keeps your skin hydrated.
12h
Ingeniøren
ESS i pengemangel: Verdens største neutronkilde nedskaleresEfter planen skal en fuldt udbygget neutronkilde ved ESS have en størrelse på 5 MW. Men problemer med budgettet får nu ESS' ledelse til at overveje 2 MW i stedet.
12h
The Atlantic
Why Germany's New Muslims Go to Mosque Less Germany has welcomed more than a million refugees and asylum seekers from Muslim-majority countries since 2015, more than any other European country. The issue of their integration has provided fodder for far-right voices in German politics, who used incidents like the 2016 attack at Berlin’s Christmas market and New Year’s sexual assaults in Cologne to suggest that Muslim newcomers are a threat
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The Atlantic
Why People Have Out-of-Body Experiences In 1958, Robert Monroe floated out of his body for the first time. It began “without any apparent cause,” he wrote . His doctor, finding no physical ailment, prescribed tranquilizers. A psychologist friend, meanwhile, told me him to try leaving his body again. After all, the friend said, “some of the fellows who practice yoga and those Eastern religions claim they can do it whenever they want to.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Waterlogged brain region helps scientists gauge damage caused by Parkinson's diseaseScientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease, which destroys neurons important for movement. The development suggests that fluid changes in a specific brain area could provide a way to track that damage. The study, published in the journal Brain, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders an
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Authorities warn virtual kidnapping scams are on the riseThe caller who rang Valerie Sobel's cellphone had a horrifying message: "We have Simone's finger. Do you want to see the rest of her in a body bag?"
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Differences in subtypes of gastric cancer may determine prognosis and response to treatmentMolecular classification of the four distinct subtypes of gastric cancer could potentially shape tailored treatment options by helping to predict survival outcomes and patients' response to chemotherapy.
13h
Science | The Guardian
Cats vs dogs: in terms of evolution, are we barking up the wrong tree? | Elsa Panciroli New research reveals humans have identified as either cat or dog lovers since the stone age, but in fact, our pets are more closely related than you might think Are you a dog person , or a cat person ? The question is often treated as dichotomous: if you appreciate the solidity of a steadfast pooch, you can’t also relish the coquettish companionship of a kitty. Recent studies suggest humankind co
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Science | The Guardian
Can humans live on Mars? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Ian SampleEvery day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries • Ian Sample is the Guardian’s science editor Wanted: men and women to leave the birthplace of humanity and the only safe haven in the solar system for an interminable voyage in a cramped container with people you will probably learn to hate. Destination:
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Live Science
Drinking Water Database: Put in Your ZIP Code and Find Out What's in Your WaterWhat's in your drinking water? Whether you're wondering if your water is safe or just what that weird smell is, a new tool is now available that could help.
14h
cognitive science
How real magic happens when the brain sees hidden things submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren
Statens IT gør op med virvar af outsourcing-kontrakter: »Vi får et overblik, der ikke eksisterer i dag« Mens svenskerne raser over landets seneste outsourcing-bøf, er Statens IT ved at strømline kravene i de danske outsourcing-kontrakter. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/statens-it-samler-alle-outsourcing-kontrakter-vi-faar-overblik-ikke-eksisterer-dag-1078599 Version2
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Women entrepreneurs still lag behind men in accessing new business fundingWomen entrepreneurs are finding it increasingly difficult to access venture capital funding for start-up businesses and remain much less likely to attract funding than male entrepreneurs, according to a new study published in Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds get new wings at Brazil rehab centerNot a single wing flutters in the Seropedica aviary near Rio de Janeiro, where aras and others parrots are learning how to fly again after they were rescued from traffickers.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists build DNA from scratch to alter life's blueprintAt Jef Boeke's lab, you can whiff an odor that seems out of place, as if they were baking bread here.
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Science | The Guardian
Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2017 shortlist - in pictures The Milky Way, the Northern Lights and hurtling asteroids feature in the shortlist for the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year award. The winners will be announced on 14 September, and an exhibition of the winning images will be displayed in a free exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich’s Astronomy Centre from 16 September Continue reading...
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The Atlantic
U.S. Navy Fires Warning Shots at Iranian Ship A U.S. Navy patrol ship known as the U.S.S. Thunderbolt fired warning shots at an armed Iranian vessel after the vessel came within 150 yards of it on Tuesday. Both boats were stationed in the northern end of the Persian Gulf, according to U.S. defense officials, who said the Iranian vessel ignored repeated warnings from the U.S. As the Iranian ship advanced toward the Thunderbolt at a high speed
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A large-scale 'germ trap' solution for hospitalsA team led by CU Boulder researchers has demonstrated a way for hospitals to create large negative pressure wards in order to prepare for disease outbreaks. By sealing off a whole hospital wing and adjusting the existing ventilation system, hospitals can dramatically increase their capacity to contain and treat large numbers of patients with airborne illnesses.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materialsResearchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and the University of Tokyo have developed a light-responsive crystalline material that overcomes challenges faced in previous studies.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fifty years on, the Breeding Bird Survey continues to produce new insightsIn 1966, a US Fish and Wildlife Service biologist named Chan Robbins launched an international program designed to measure changes in bird populations using volunteers recruited to count birds on pre-set routes along country roads. The result, the North American Breeding Bird Survey or BBS, is still going strong more than five decades later. This month The Condor: Ornithological Applications is pu
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Gizmodo
Apple Declines to Comment on Donald Trump's Claim Tim Cook 'Promised Me 3 Big Plants—Big, Big, Big' Photo: AP President Donald Trump told the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday that Apple CEO Tim Cook had called him up and “promised me three big plants—big, big, big.” “I said you know, Tim, unless you start building your plants in this country, I won’t consider my administration an economic success,” Trump added. “He called me, and he said they are going forward.” Advertisement Apple, which does do
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fifty years on, the Breeding Bird Survey continues to produce new insightsIn 1966, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist named Chan Robbins launched an international program designed to measure changes in bird populations using volunteers recruited to count birds on pre-set routes along country roads. The result, the North American Breeding Bird Survey or BBS, is still going strong more than five decades later. This month The Condor: Ornithological Applications is
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Tech World Is Convinced 2021 Is Going to Be the Best Year EverIf the crystal ball is right, you’ll be eating lab-grown chicken nuggets in your autonomous car and thanking your lucky stars for male birth control.
17h
Live Science
Not Aliens: Weird Radio Signal from Star Likely Has Duller ExplanationA strange radio signal that seemed to emanate from a small nearby star probably came from Earth-orbiting satellites, astronomers said.
17h
Live Science
Facts About GalliumProperties, sources and uses of the element gallium.
17h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
SHARK WEEK: The Lost Cage Shark Week sends underwater cameraman Devin Massyn with a team of explorers to float in a one-of-a-kind shark cage, 500 miles into the Gulf of Mexico. Acting as human lures in the open ocean will they encounter its deadliest predator? From: Discovery
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Gizmodo
The UK Plans to Ban All New Gas and Diesel Cars and Vans by 2040 Photo: AP The days of the good old trusty internal combustion engine, which revolutionized transportation but also maybe helped usher in a looming environmental apocalypse , may be numbered across the pond. Reports in the Guardian and Financial Times both indicated the UK is set to ban the sale of all diesel and petrol-burning cars and vans by the year 2040 as part of an air quality plan, includi
17h
Ingeniøren
Ny lov for nye køretøjer sender skateboards ud i trafikkenDer er ingen lovgivning for de små motoriserede køretøjer, der vinder frem. Og ser man på lovgivningen for skateboards, er de mere eller mindre ulovlige at køre på. Ny lovgivning på vej.
17h
Ingeniøren
3 spørgsmål du skal stille dig selv, når du vil vise personlighed i din ansøgning Det er en svær balancegang at skrive en ansøgning, som fremviser din unikke personlighed, uden den kommer til at fremstå uprofessionel og fjollet. Her er 3 råd til, hvordan du gør det rigtigt. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/3-spoergsmaal-du-skal-stille-dig-selv-naar-du-vil-vise-personlighed-din-ansoegning-8968 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
17h
Big Think
Elon Musk’s Fears of AI Aren’t Shared By All AI Experts Some experts take issue with Elon Musk’s frightening warning about AI taking over. Read More
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Gizmodo
Here's What An Obamacare Repeal Means for Uber And Lyft Drivers Image via AP Don Creery signed up for health care on the Affordable Care Act as soon as it went live. Creery drives for Uber full-time in Seattle, earning $700 a week for 50 to 55 hours of work. With $900 premiums for private healthcare, he said an Obamacare repeal would leave him uninsured. Fellow Seattle-based Uber driver Musse Bhata also uses Obamacare, and though he doesn’t think Republicans
18h
Gizmodo
Wonder Woman 2 Will Be in Theaters December 2019 She’s baaaack. Image: Warner Bros. Warner Bros. just made it official. Diana Prince will ring in the holidays on December 13, 2019. That’s the date Wonder Woman 2 will be released in theaters. Gal Gadot returns, of course, and Patty Jenkins is expected to direct, though her deal has not yet been finalized. Advertisement The news comes mere days after Warner Bros. took the stage at Comic-Con 2017
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon nanotubes turn electrical current into light-emitting quasi-particlesLight-matter quasi-partic­les can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes, report scientists. Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers, they add.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Raccoon roundworm: Hidden human parasite?The raccoon that topples your trashcan and pillages your garden may leave more than just a mess. More likely than not, it also contaminates your yard with parasites -- most notably, raccoon roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis).
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Gizmodo
Ignore Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg's War Over Killer Robots, the Real Challenge Is Already Here Photo: AP Tech giants Elon Musk and Mark Zuckeberg have been engaged in a very public, somewhat silly and self-indulgent battle over artificial intelligence lately. Musk has warned AI-powered robots could usher in some form of automated war to give humanity its richly deserved demise, while Zuckerberg responded by saying he is “really optimistic” it could usher a golden age of lifesaving technolo
19h
The Atlantic
A Dozen Dead in Mumbai Building Collapse At least 12 people were killed in Mumbai after a five-story building collapsed on Tuesday morning in the working-class suburb of Ghatkopar. Local officials said the forty-year-old building, known as the Saidarshan, was home to 12 families, with around three to four families occupying each floor. The ground floor of the building also contained a nursing home, which was vacant at the time of the co
19h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Matt Brown's Got One Key Dating Tip: Make 'Em Laugh | Alaskan Bush People #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Matt divulges his tried-and-true methods for picking up women. Hint: It involves juggling. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
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NYT > Science
Celgene to Pay $280 Million to Settle Fraud Suit Over Cancer DrugsThe lawsuit accused the pharmaceutical company of marketing Thalomid and Revlimid for unapproved use on a broader range of cancers.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
China’s quest to become a space science superpower With major spaceflight milestones behind it, China is working to build an international reputation for space science. Nature 547 394 doi: 10.1038/547394a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Budding UK innovation agency gains cash — and clout Business-focused funding agency Innovate UK is driving British efforts to commercialize research. Nature 547 390 doi: 10.1038/547390a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Australia cuts conservation protections in marine parks Conservationists accuse government of ignoring science-based recommendations. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22369
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New Scientist - News
Mysterious mega-swan once waddled through New ZealandA larger relative of Australia’s black swan thrived in New Zealand – until humans arrived and helped bring about its extinction
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New Scientist - News
Fungi use water droplet cannons to fling spores into the breezeA pair of merging droplets help fungi to disperse their spores. Now researchers have figured out exactly how
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New Scientist - News
Maths explains how bees can stay airborne with such tiny wingsThe tiny wings on bees shouldn’t be able to lift their big bodies. How they fly has eluded mathematicians since the 1930s, but the mystery is now solved
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Venus's turbulent atmosphereAstronomers shed light on the so far unexplored nightside circulation at the upper cloud level of Venus. Researchers have discovered unexpected patterns of slow motion and abundant stationary waves in Venus's nighttime sky.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thousands of genes exchanged within microbial communities living on cheeseUsing cheese as a novel way to study microscopic communities, researchers have found that bacteria living on artisanal cheese varieties have transferred thousands of genes between each other. They also identified regional hotspots where such exchanges take place.
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent DilemmaIs the deep uncertainty surrounding fundamental legal and ethical norms putting biobanks in a precarious position?
20h
Ars Technica
US Energy Secretary takes 22-minute prank call from “Ukrainian Prime Minister” Enlarge / WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 19: Former Texas Governor Rick Perry, President-elect Donald Trump's choice as Secretary of Energy, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Capitol Hill January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images) Last week, US Department of Energy Secretary
20h
NYT > Science
Marina Ratner, Émigré Mathematician Who Found Midlife Acclaim, Dies at 78Dr. Ratner defied the notion that the brightest in her field do their best work when they are young.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women entrepreneurs still lag behind men in accessing new business fundingWomen entrepreneurs are finding it increasingly difficult to access venture capital funding for start-up businesses and remain much less likely to attract funding than male entrepreneurs, according to a new study published in Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance.
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Ars Technica
Patent-holder that sued EFF for defamation won’t show up in court A blog post by EFF attorney Daniel Nazer about his selection for the "Stupid Patent of the Month" resulted in an Australian lawsuit and a $750,000 damage demand. EFF has challenged the Australian order in US federal court. (credit: EFF ) An Australian patent-holding company that's filed dozens of federal lawsuits can't seem to find its way into court, now that it's facing off with the Electronic
20h
Gizmodo
American Psychoanalytic Association Says Its Members Are Free to Weigh in on Donald Trump's Obviously Troubled Mind Photo: AP This month, the American Psychoanalytic Association told its roughly 3,500 members a decades-old rule against speculating on the mental health of some public figures does not apply to their members—and yup, this rule change indeed has something to do with the aggressively Freudian president in the White House. According to Scientific American , one of the association’s past presidents,
21h
Gizmodo
Oru: A Kayak You Can Fold Up and Take on the Subway GIF Oru Kayak We’ve had to turn down various opportunities to fly halfway around the world to take out one of Oru’s folding kayaks . At The Outpost this year, we finally got on the water. Oru Kayaks fold down to the shape of a messenger bag, and since they start at just 26 pounds, you can carry them like one too. Advertisement Advertisement We got to watch the Oru staff put together an original O
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BBC News - Science & Environment
On a mission to Mars (with Hawaii stopover)Researchers living near the active Hawaiian Volcano Mauna Loa are simulating what it's like to "live" on Mars.
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The Atlantic
Libyan Rivals Agree to a Ceasefire and Elections Libya’s two leading political rivals, Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj and General Khalifa Haftar, agreed to a ceasefire and fresh set of elections on Tuesday following talks hosted by French President Emmanuel Macron in a suburb west of Paris. While Sarraj is the leader of Libya’s UN-backed interim government in Tripoli, the Government of National Accord (GNA), Haftar maintains control over the Li
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Didier Stainier (MPI) 3: Genetic Compensation Part 1: Vertebrate Organ Development: The Zebrafish Heart: Zebrafish heart development requires the orchestration of cell proliferation, differentiation, and movement. How is this complex process regulated? Part 2: Cardiac Trabeculation: Trabeculae are muscular ridges that form in the heart ventricle and allow it to pump more forcefully. What controls the localization and development of these str
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Didier Stainier (MPI) 2: Cardiac Trabeculation Part 1: Vertebrate Organ Development: The Zebrafish Heart: Zebrafish heart development requires the orchestration of cell proliferation, differentiation, and movement. How is this complex process regulated? Part 2: Cardiac Trabeculation: Trabeculae are muscular ridges that form in the heart ventricle and allow it to pump more forcefully. What controls the localization and development of these str
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Didier Stainier (MPI) 1: Vertebrate Organ Development: The Zebrafish Heart Part 1: Vertebrate Organ Development: The Zebrafish Heart: Zebrafish heart development requires the orchestration of cell proliferation, differentiation, and movement. How is this complex process regulated? Part 2: Cardiac Trabeculation: Trabeculae are muscular ridges that form in the heart ventricle and allow it to pump more forcefully. What controls the localization and development of these str
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Color-shifting electronic skin could have wearable tech and prosthetic usesResearchers in China have developed a new type of user-interactive electronic skin, with a color change perceptible to the human eye, and achieved with a much-reduced level of strain. Their results could have applications in robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fungal spores harness physics to launch themselvesMore than a century ago, Reginald Buller discovered that a spherical drop of water that forms close to a spore is crucial to the spore's dispersal. Now, using an ink jet printer and high speed cameras, researchers have uncovered the detailed mechanics of the way fungal spores have evolved to harness the power of merging water droplets to launch in a uniform manner.
21h
NYT > Science
Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, Longevity Expert, Dies at (or Lives to) 105The advice of Dr. Hinohara, who cautioned against early retirement and advocated climbing stairs regularly, helped make Japan the world leader in longevity.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fungal spores harness physics to launch themselvesResearchers from Duke University have uncovered the detailed mechanics of the way fungal spores have evolved to harness the power of merging water droplets to launch in a uniform manner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Color-shifting electronic skin could have wearable tech and prosthetic usesThe ability of some animals, including chameleons, octopus, and squid, to change their skin colour for camouflage, temperature control, or communication is well known.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Procedural Drama What We’re Following Health Care: The Senate voted narrowly to start debate on a repeal of the Affordable Care Act , the first step toward passing legislation that many had considered certain to fail. Senator John McCain, who returned from his home state of Arizona for the vote after being diagnosed with brain cancer , cast one of the key votes to proceed—and then delivered a passionate critique
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EPA chief pledges to streamline Superfund pollution cleanupsPresident Donald Trump's environmental chief issued a list of directives on Tuesday he says will revitalize the federal program that cleans up hazardous waste sites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adobe bidding Flash farewell in 2020Adobe on Tuesday said its Flash software that served up video and online games for decades will be killed off over the next three years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google asks US court to block Canadian global delisting orderGoogle on Tuesday asked a California court to block an order from Canada that would require the US internet giant to remove a website from worldwide search results.
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Gizmodo
Adequate Man 2017 America Is The Perfect Hellscape For A Free O.J. Adequate Man 2017 America Is The Perfect Hellscape For A Free O.J. Simpson | The Slot Sen. Susan Collins Said Some Real Good Shit on a Hot Mic | The Root Stop Calling John McCain a Hero for Flying to DC to Kill Other People’s Health Care | Splinter Republican Rebels Will Not Save You Because They Don’t Exist |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AT&T tops Wall Street's profit, revenue forecastsShares of AT&T Inc. rose Tuesday after the company's second-quarter profit and revenue beat industry analysts' projections.
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Science : NPR
Student Athletes Who Specialize Early Are Injured More Often, Study Finds High school athletes who tended to focus on one sport were 50 percent more likely to get hurt than those who hadn't specialized. Injuries included ankle sprains, knee tendonitis, and stress fractures. (Image credit: Hero Images/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR
Kids Who Specialize In One Sport Get More Injuries A new study finds kids who specialize in one sport are more likely to get injured. Injuries include ligament and muscle sprains and tendonitis to knees and ankles. The sports with the highest specialization rates include soccer, baseball and basketball. Researchers conclude that more needs to be done to educate coaches, parents and athletes about the increased risk of injuries for kids who specia
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mediterranean-style diets linked to better brain function in older adultsEating foods included in two healthy diets -- the Mediterranean or the MIND diet -- is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could spraying particles into marine clouds help cool the planet?A first test of humans' ability to modify clouds would help explain the behavior of clouds and aerosols, while also testing a possible future climate emergency measure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychopaths are better at learning to lie, say researchersIndividuals with high levels of psychopathic traits are better at learning to lie than individuals who show few psychopathic traits, according to a new study. The findings indicate that people with high psychopathic traits may not have a 'natural' capacity to lie better, but rather are better at learning how to lie, according to the researchers.
22h
The Atlantic
Bill Browder's Testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee The financier Bill Browder has emerged as an unlikely central player in the ongoing investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections. Sergei Magnitsky, an attorney Browder hired to investigate official corruption, died in Russian custody in 2009. Congress subsequently imposed sanctions on the officials it held responsible for his death, passing the Magnitsky Act in 2012. Russian Presid
22h
Live Science
Striking Study Shows How Football Affects the BrainA study of the brains of more than 200 deceased football players — including 111 who played in the National Football League (NFL) — reveals that nearly 90 percent of the players had a brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).
22h
Live Science
Images: Brains with CTEThe vast majority of brains donated to science by former football players show signs of a debilitating brain condition.
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NeuWrite West
How do I become a neuroscientist (Ask a Neuroscientist) “ I’m interested in studying neuroscience. Where could I learn more about research topics and other aspects of life as a neuroscience researcher? ” — Nickolai Hi Nickolai, Thank you for your interest in neuroscience. Can I share my story how I went into neuroscience research with you? I was living in Singapore when I attended high school and at the time there was hardly any neuroscience classes b
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Inside Science
Six Morbidly Fascinating Creatures You Might Find at the Beach Six Morbidly Fascinating Creatures You Might Find at the Beach Read on to learn about strange seashore phenomena, from cannibalistic shark embryos to worms whose butts become autonomous sex machines. SeaCreatures_topNteaser.jpg When this bristle worm is ready to have sex, sections of its rear end carry its eggs or sperm to the surface. Image credits: Damon Tighe Rights information: This photo may
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The Scientist RSS
Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene TherapyResearchers restored muscle function in animals with muscular dystrophy.
23h
Gizmodo
Speedrunner Accused Of Cheating Just Had A Really Good Monitor Speedruns are about completing a game in the fastest time possible, but can someone go too fast? According to rules, absolutely. Equipment can change how fast a game runs, leading to results that are so wild that communities come together to ban those settings entirely. Mathias is a speedrunner from Denmark who streams under the handle LoveBotFF . Five days ago, he achieved a new world record on
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Maybe They're Ready For Their Close-ups? Great White Sharks Are Moving To LA! #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week The great white population of Southern California is growing fast…but why? Find out Tonight at 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery
23h
Ars Technica
Democrats slam EPA head, want to understand his climate inquiry Enlarge / Texas' Eddie Bernice Johnson. (credit: Getty Images/Tom Williams ) Lamar Smith, head of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, has a penchant for releasing letters in which he complains about issues related to climate change. He has targeted everyone from state attorneys general who are investigating fossil fuel companies to NOAA scientists (and their e-mails ). But Eddi
23h
Live Science
Slimy Science! Make Two Types of Gooey, Goopy SlimeAnimals use slime for defense, but these colorful, slippery slime recipes are purely for fun.
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
Your Roomba Is Also Gathering Data about the Layout of Your HomeThe CEO of iRobot is pushing the company toward a broader vision of the smart home. It could soon sell maps of the interiors of people’s houses.
23h
Ars Technica
Zuckerberg and Musk are both wrong about AI Enlarge / Enjoy your little squabbles. You foolish men know nothing about AI. (credit: Universal Pictures ) Back in 2015, a group of business leaders and scientists published an "open letter" about how controlling artificial superintelligence might be the most urgent task of the twenty-first century. Signed by luminaries like Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, the letter has defined debates over AI i
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Votes Are In Today in 5 Lines Vice President Mike Pence provided the tie-breaking vote in the Senate’s motion to begin debate on repealing the Affordable Care Act. Arizona Senator John McCain voted to proceed, but in a speech on the Senate floor, he added that he “will not vote for this bill as it is today.” During a joint news conference with Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, President Trump praised the S
23h
The Atlantic
John McCain's Incongruous Speech It was a day of contradictions for John McCain: Returning from his own sickbed, he flew into Washington to vote to open debate on a bill that could strip others of their coverage. Met with a standing ovation on the Senate floor, he was also denounced fiercely for his vote in favor of debate, which allowed the bill to move forward after Vice President Pence broke a 50-50 tie. And then there was th
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The Atlantic
Will U.S. Arms Resolve the Conflict in Ukraine? The new U.S. special envoy to Ukraine negotiations announced the Trump administration is actively considering sending arms to Kiev’s forces so they can defend themselves against pro-Russian separatists. “Defensive weapons, ones that would allow Ukraine to defend itself, and to take out tanks for example, would actually help,” Kurt Volker, the U.S. special representative for Ukraine negotiations,
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Gizmodo
Lyft Announces Deal With Taco Bell But Drivers Do Not Want That Shit in Their Cars Source: Getty Lyft has partnered with Taco Bell to debut a new feature that allows passengers to tack on a trip to the pseudo-Mexican fast food restaurant. The “Taco Mode” option is clearly an effort to woo late-night riders with the munchies, but some Lyft drivers are unsurprisingly disgusted by the thought of sloppy drunks defiling their backseats with nacho cheese and mystery beef. A redditor
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Scientific American Content: Global
Here's What to Expect after the Senate Health Bill VoteThis is where it gets complicated -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Everything We Know About the 'Aggressive Squirrel' Terrorizing Brooklyn Photo: AP Summer—the season when everything smells like hot garbage—is finally in full-swing in New York City. With the MTA seemingly intent on preventing us from going anywhere—never mind outside the city—folks from Brooklyn and beyond trek to Prospect Park to cool down and escape the pungent odors in the air. Unfortunately, our idyllic summer days at the park might already be over as an “unusua
23h
Ars Technica
Moto Z2 Force hands-on—Motorola bets the farm on Moto Mods, loses Remember the Moto Z ? The Lenovo-controlled redesign of Motorola's flagship smartphone bet the farm on a modular phone idea, and the modular system kind of sucked. The modules were expensive, only worked with brand-new Motorola smartphones, and didn't offer anything useful over a non-modular version of the same accessory. To limit the effect the bulky modules would have on the phone, Motorola sli
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The Scientist RSS
Turkish University Censors Research StudyA cardiovascular surgeon's research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CU Cancer Center study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer'What has been missing in clinical trials may just be the timing of the treatments,' says first author Lynsey Fettig.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilResearchers at the University of São Paulo's Biomedical Science Institute (ICB-USP) in Brazil have discovered a new virus in a white-rumped sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis), a migratory bird species captured in April 2012 in the Lagoa do Peixe National Park in Rio Grande do Sul State. The current evidence suggests that it is not a risk to humans. The discovery was published in PLOS ONE.
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Gizmodo
Tesla Model 3 Reservation Holders Say They’ve Had Radio Silence From Tesla Photo: Elon Musk via Twitter Many Tesla Model 3 reservation holders are looking for guidance on when they can expect the car to be delivered, as a Bloomberg report today showed. More info is expected at a Tesla event on Friday, but several who’ve paid a $1,000 deposit for the car offered Jalopnik varied opinions about the car’s delivery date. What’s clear is that Tesla has been virtually radio si
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Popular Science
Why the latest study on football players’ brains is so important Health Researchers found evidence of CTE in 99 percent of the deceased former NFL players they studied. Scientists have published one of the most definitive studies on CTE’s connection to football thus far.
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Feed: All Latest
Adobe Flash Will Finally Die Off in 2020No, for real this time.
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Ars Technica
What is the car industry’s problem with over-the-air software updates? Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock ) General Motors has announced plans to offer over-the-air (OTA) software updates "before 2020." The company's CEO, Mary Barra, announced the plan on an analyst call on Tuesday. The capability will require the deployment of a new electric vehicle architecture and a new infotainment system. OTA updates are high on the tech-savvy car buyer's wishlist, but
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Live Science
Adorable Hedgehogs Want You to Know About This Common Health ProblemA new public health campaign features something most people can't resist — adorable animal videos.
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Gizmodo
Certain Penis-Dwelling Bacteria Might Increase Your HIV Risk “A health worker counts antiretroviral drug tablets for a patient at The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) in the capital Kampala, Uganda” - Image: AP HIV transmission is a complex process with factors beyond just who you sleep with and how. The virus ultimately needs to find its way to the correct kinds of cells in order to wreak havoc. And some of the risk, at least for those with penises, may c
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Ars Technica
Study: US is slipping toward measles being endemic once again Enlarge / Child with a classic four-day rash from measles. (credit: CDC ) With firm vaccination campaigns, the US eliminated measles in 2000. The highly infectious virus was no longer constantly present in the country—no longer endemic. Since then, measles has only popped up when travelers carried it in, spurring mostly small outbreaks—ranging from a few dozen to a few hundred cases each year—tha
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Science | The Guardian
Storm that nearly swept away the Met Office Victorian-era weather alerts saved many mariners but a row over ‘useless’ Met Office forecasts halted warnings for two years Storm warnings are a vital part of the work of the Met Office based in the UK, but 150 years ago the very idea of such forecasts was highly controversial. In July 1867 William Sykes MP drew attention in the Commons to the fact that storm warnings had been suppressed, and ca
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Most football players who donated their brains to science had traumatic injuryA self-selected sample of 202 deceased football players, the largest to date, finds that the majority suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
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Big Think
Does The West’s Way of Life Face One "Last Chance"? Edward Luce's new book is The Retreat of Western Liberalism , but let's clarify its logic. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large, distant comets more common than previously thoughtThere are about seven times more long-period comets measuring at least 1 kilometer across than previously predicted, suggests new research. The researchers also found that long-period comets are, on average, nearly twice as large as 'Jupiter family' comets, whose orbits are shaped by Jupiter's gravity and have periods of less than 20 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists master unexplored electron propertyWhile the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the 'valley' property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed 'valleytronics' -- similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study: Yoga helps back pain among veteransThose who completed a 12-week yoga program had better scores on a disability questionnaire, improved pain intensity scores, and a decline in opioid use, a study that included 150 veterans with chronic low back pain found. The findings jibe with those from two past clinical trials involving non-veterans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Well-designed visual aids improve risk understandingInformed decision making depends on the ability to accurately evaluate and understand information about risk, suggests a new study. A state-of-the-science review of the literature concludes that visual aids are beneficial for diverse people with different levels of numeracy and graph literacy. The study identifies five categories of practical, evidence-based guidelines for the evaluation and desig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improved imaging of neonatal soft-tissue tumors can help radiologists improve patient careBetter understanding of practical imaging techniques with regard to neonatal soft-tissue tumors can improve patient care, according to an article.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyleA new study determined that it doesn't matter where a person lives or the choices they make, male hepatitis B patients will always be at greater risk for more severe liver illnesses.
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Big Think
Is There a Link between Creativity and Mental Illness? “No great genius has ever existed without a strain of madness.” -Aristotle Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coral gardening is benefiting Caribbean reefs, study findsA new study found that Caribbean staghorn corals (Acropora cervicornis) are benefiting from "coral gardening," the process of restoring coral populations by planting laboratory-raised coral fragments on reefs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When should the police use confrontational tactics?Citizens depend on police to provide public safety while maintaining the trust of the community. How can democratic societies balance these two, often conflicting, aims—given citizens' often divergent views over basic tenets of criminal justice policy?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large, distant comets more common than previously thoughtComets that take more than 200 years to make one revolution around the sun are notoriously difficult to study. Because they spend most of their time far from our area of the solar system, many "long-period comets" will never approach the sun in a person's lifetime. In fact, those that travel inward from the Oort Cloud—a group of icy bodies beginning roughly 300 billion kilometers away from the sun
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Tomorrow’s Mini Medical Robots Could Squirm Like MaggotsEngineers are prototyping a soft-bodied drug delivery system capable of wriggling through flesh.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Results of NRG-RTOG 0436 highlight need for biomarkers in treatment of esophageal cancerNRG-RTOG 0436 has determined that adding an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor to a chemo-radiation regimen does not improve overall survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated in a non-operative manner. These results are reported in 'Effect of the Addition of Cetuximab to Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy for Patients with Esophageal Cancer -- T
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cosmologists produce new maps of dark matter dynamicsNew maps of dark matter dynamics in the Universe have been produced by a team of international cosmologists, outlines a new report.
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Gizmodo
Uber Begins Apology Tour With More Driver Benefits If you’re tired of seeing headlines about Uber, know they wont dissipate anytime soon. Uber is working feverishly to reverse its bad image now that founder Travis Kalanick has one foot out of the company, so you’ll see a lot of new updates in the coming months. Uber recently announced its “ 180 Days of Change ” campaign—basically an apology to drivers and employees who’ve dealt with the company’s
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Futurity.org
Are estimates of our ‘carbon budget’ wrong? While most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define “preindustrial” to be in the late 1800’s, new research suggests that a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past. The researchers are concerned because the baseline affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) w
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Live Science
'Holy Grail of Civil War Swords' Found in Massachusetts AtticThe sword led the way for the first Union regiment made up of African-American soldiers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large, distant comets more common than previously thoughtA team of astronomers led by James Bauer, a research professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland, found that there are about seven times more long-period comets measuring at least 1 kilometer across than previously predicted. The researchers also found that long-period comets are, on average, nearly twice as large as 'Jupiter family' comets, whose orbits are shaped by Jupiter's gravity an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When should the police use confrontational tactics?In a newly published article, Northwestern University economist Charles F. Manski and his co-author, Carnegie Mellon University criminologist Daniel S. Nagin, outline a 'formal model of optimal policing' that can be used to resolve tensions between public safety and community trust -- and that also can help a public that is prone to privileging one over the other, depending on the circumstances, t
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The Atlantic
What It Takes to Mentor Poor Kids In January 2015, Brandon Stanton, creator of the popular photo blog Humans of New York , interviewed a middle school student named Vidal Chastanet. He asked Chastanet, who goes to school in Brownsville, a neighborhood with one of the highest crime rates in New York City, who had influenced his life the most. Chastanet told Brandon about his school principal , Nadia Lopez. “When we get in trouble,
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The Atlantic
Mayors, Health Experts, and Artists to Discuss Trends Impacting Cities at First Ever “CityLab Baltimore” Washington, D.C. and New York City (July 25, 2017) -- The Atlantic, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and the Aspen Institute will host CityLab Baltimore , a half-day “pop-up” summit exploring the key challenges and opportunities faced by American cities today, from public health to cultural investment. The event, which is part of an ongoing partnership, will take place on Wednesday, August 2, from 2-5pm
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Lenovo Y700 Core i5 laptop for only $569, restocked AirPods, and other deals Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we're back with a big new list of deals to share. Of note is a the Lenovo Y700 gaming notebook, complete with a Core i5 processor, a 14-inch 1080p display, 4GB AMD R9 M375 GPU, 128GB SSD, and 1TB HDD, for just $569 (over $200 off its original price). Apple's AirPods are also back in stock, so now's your chance to get your hands on the
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Gizmodo
Verizon Now Says That Throttling Video Is Totally Cool GIF GIF Source: Fight for the Future Verizon set off alarm bells among net neutrality advocates last week when customers reported that the ISP was throttling Netflix video. If true, that would likely be a violation of current FCC guidelines. Verizon responded that it was just testing throttling technology on all video. On Tuesday, it went a step further and laid out a legal argument for why it ca
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Gizmodo
Incredible Video Reveals that Rainbows Actually Go All the Way Around GIF It turns out the recognizable half-circle arch of a rainbow is a complete lie. When you’re standing on the ground looking up at a rainbow in the sky, the curvature of the Earth usually blocks its bottom half. But when viewed from a higher vantage point , like from a plane, or the top of a crane , rainbows are magically revealed to be a complete circle. This video was captured by a crane opera
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Allowable 'carbon budget' most likely overestimatedWhile most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define 'pre-industrial' to be in the late 1800s, a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past, according to an international team of researchers who are concerned because it affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First image of major brain receptor caught in actionResearchers have captured the first three-dimensional snapshots of the AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor in action. The receptor, which regulates most electrical signaling in the brain, is involved in several important brain activities, including memory and learning.
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Google Keeps Employees Confused During Wage Gap Investigation, Says FedA lawyer for the Department of Labor says, "Google’s response to the judge’s order appears to be a deliberate effort to confuse the media and their own employees."
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coral gardening is benefiting Caribbean reefs, study findsA new study found that Caribbean staghorn corals (Acropora cervicornis) are benefiting from 'coral gardening,' the process of restoring coral populations by planting laboratory-raised coral fragments on reefs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify gene mutations in smoking-related cancersAfrican-Americans typically have worse outcomes from smoking-related cancers than Caucasians, but the reasons for this remain elusive. However, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have taken a big step toward solving this puzzle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved imaging of neonatal soft-tissue tumors can help radiologists improve patient careBetter understanding of practical imaging techniques with regard to neonatal soft-tissue tumors can improve patient care, according to an article published in the July 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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