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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists solve longstanding biological mystery of DNA organizationStretched out, the DNA from all the cells in our body would reach Pluto. So how does each tiny cell pack a two-meter length of DNA into its nucleus, which is just one-thousandth of a millimeter across?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secrets of the amazing tardigrades revealed by their DNANew genome sequences shed light on both the origins of the tardigrades (also known as water bears or moss piglets), and the genes that underlie their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions. A team of researchers led by Mark Blaxter and Kazuharu Arakawa from the universities of Edinburgh, Scotland and Keio, Japan respectively, have carefully stitched together the DNA code for two ta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of EuropeThe genomes of individuals who lived on the Iberian Peninsula in the Bronze Age had minor genetic input from Steppe invaders, suggesting that these migrations played a smaller role in the genetic makeup and culture of Iberian people, compared to other parts of Europe. Daniel Bradley and Rui Martiniano of Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, and Ana Maria Silva of University of Coimbra, Portugal, re
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The thinnest films of copper look flat, but they aren’tIt turns out that thin films of copper don’t lay flat, a discovery that has implications for computers and handheld electronics.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Slug slime inspires a new type of surgical glueA new glue that mimics a slug’s mucus secretions sticks well, even when wet. The adhesive could be used in place of sutures or staples in surgeries.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

See How The FBI Analyzed The Unabomber's Infamous Manifesto | Manhunt: UNABOMBER Manhunt: Unabomber | Premieres Tue Aug 1 at 9/8c Retired FBI criminal profiler and forensic linguist Jim Fitzgerald explains how the FBI was able to use the language of the Unabomber's manifesto to obtain an arrest warrant. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ More info: http://www.discovery.com/manhunt-unabomber/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscri
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Gizmodo

The Original Philips OneBlade Is a Reader Favorite, and $10 Off With Extra Blades Philips OneBlade Plus Two Extra Blades , $50 after $10 coupon This week’s Philips Norelco OneBlade Pro deals are still alive, but if the improved battery and adjustable comb don’t seem worth the extra money to you, the top-selling original OneBlade also has a pretty great deal going right now . Clip the $10 coupon on the page to get the OneBlade plus two extra replacement blades (three blades tot
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene transfer corrects severe muscle defects in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophyDuchenne muscular dystrophy is a rapidly progressive disease that causes whole-body muscle weakness and atrophy due to deficiency in a protein called dystrophin. Researchers have developed a new gene transfer approach that uses an adeno-associated virus vector to deliver a modified dystrophin gene to muscle, restoring muscle strength in a mouse model that closely mimics the severe defects seen in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who were the Canaanites? Ancient human DNA evidence yields answersThousands of years ago, the Canaanite people lived in a part of the world we now recognize as Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan, establishing a culture that became influential in the Middle East and beyond. The Canaanites created the first alphabet, established colonies throughout the Mediterranean, and were mentioned many times in the Bible. But who were they and what ultimately happe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Importance of glucose control in adults with Type 1 diabetesFindings of the latest study of the Joslin 50-Year Medalists, who have had type 1 diabetes for at least 50 years, re-emphasize the importance of good blood glucose control and exercise in reducing complications and mortality rates for these older individuals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune system may mount an attack in Parkinson's diseaseT cells, which help the body's immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Very preterm birth not associated with mood, anxiety disordersDo very-preterm or very-low-weight babies develop anxiety and mood disorders later in life? Researchers have concluded a study to answer this question.
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Popular Science

Scientists know how to make mice angry—but mice know how to keep their cool Animals The first rule of mouse fight club. Scientists have found a cluster of neurons that trigger aggression in mice. But their living environment determines how aggressive they really are.
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Science current issue

ChromEMT: Visualizing 3D chromatin structure and compaction in interphase and mitotic cells The chromatin structure of DNA determines genome compaction and activity in the nucleus. On the basis of in vitro structures and electron microscopy (EM) studies, the hierarchical model is that 11-nanometer DNA-nucleosome polymers fold into 30- and subsequently into 120- and 300- to 700-nanometer fibers and mitotic chromosomes. To visualize chromatin in situ, we identified a fluorescent dye that
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Science current issue

We still need to beat HIV
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News at a glance
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Turmoil imperils research university in Andes
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Science current issue

Head of France's main funding body resigns amid acrimony
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Science current issue

Travel ban would slam university in North Korea
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Science current issue

Funders groan under growing review burden
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Science current issue

Disease sleuths unmask deadly encephalitis culprit
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Science current issue

'Scientific wellness study divides researchers
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Science current issue

Biology of the Book
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Science current issue

Nitrogen stewardship in the Anthropocene
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Science current issue

Directing reconfigurable DNA nanoarrays
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Science current issue

Photolithography based on nanocrystals
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Science current issue

The genome--seeing it clearly now
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Science current issue

East not least for Pacific bluefin tuna
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Science current issue

Genetic biomarker for cancer immunotherapy
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Science current issue

Improving global integration of crop research
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Science current issue

Al Gore's inconvenient update
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Science current issue

Inevitable or improbable?
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Science current issue

Smell Detectives: An Olfactory History of Nineteenth-Century Urban America
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Science current issue

Contingent valuation: Flawed logic?
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Science current issue

Contingent valuation: Flawed logic?--Response
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Science current issue

Call to restore NIH's cap on grant funding
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Science current issue

AAAS members stand up for science
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Science current issue

More rain means more pollution
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Science current issue

Sticky even when wet
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Science current issue

Spectral narrowing of x-rays
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Science current issue

Iceland's molten roots
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Science current issue

A stiff punishment for tumors
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Science current issue

The disappearance of fine motor control
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Science current issue

A tale of CAT tails
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Science current issue

Predicting responses to immunotherapy
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Science current issue

From stomach ache to depression
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Science current issue

Extending the coherence time of molecules
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Science current issue

A close-up view inside the nucleus
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Science current issue

Relaying information on DNA tiles
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Science current issue

Patterning without polymers
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Science current issue

Atomic hydrogen with an iron assist
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Science current issue

Low-temperature CO removal
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Science current issue

Flat-out failure of copper films
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Science current issue

Context is critical in IBD
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Science current issue

When fat is more important than muscle
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Science current issue

Nature's nature is not random
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Science current issue

The yin and yang of TDP-43 reduction
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Science current issue

Support is needed to leave the lab
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Science current issue

Diagnostic tumor methylation profiles
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Science current issue

Tumors in green turtles
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Science current issue

Getting random with thermal noise
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Science current issue

DNA methylation makes for tired T cells
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Science current issue

Smoothing graphene by encapsulation
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Science current issue

Second-scale nuclear spin coherence time of ultracold 23Na40K molecules Coherence, the stability of the relative phase between quantum states, is central to quantum mechanics and its applications. For ultracold dipolar molecules at sub-microkelvin temperatures, internal states with robust coherence are predicted to offer rich prospects for quantum many-body physics and quantum information processing. We report the observation of stable coherence between nuclear spin
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Science current issue

Spectral narrowing of x-ray pulses for precision spectroscopy with nuclear resonances Spectroscopy of nuclear resonances offers a wide range of applications due to the remarkable energy resolution afforded by their narrow linewidths. However, progress toward higher resolution is inhibited at modern x-ray sources because they deliver only a tiny fraction of the photons on resonance, with the remainder contributing to an off-resonant background. We devised an experimental setup that
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Science current issue

Tough adhesives for diverse wet surfaces Adhesion to wet and dynamic surfaces, including biological tissues, is important in many fields but has proven to be extremely challenging. Existing adhesives are cytotoxic, adhere weakly to tissues, or cannot be used in wet environments. We report a bioinspired design for adhesives consisting of two layers: an adhesive surface and a dissipative matrix. The former adheres to the substrate by elec
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Science current issue

Synthesis of FeH5: A layered structure with atomic hydrogen slabs High pressure promotes the formation of polyhydrides with unusually high hydrogen-to-metal ratios. These polyhydrides have complex hydrogenic sublattices. We synthesized iron pentahydride (FeH 5 ) by a direct reaction between iron and H 2 above 130 gigapascals in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. FeH 5 exhibits a structure built of atomic hydrogen only. It consists of intercalated layers of quas
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Science current issue

Direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials Photolithography is an important manufacturing process that relies on using photoresists, typically polymer formulations, that change solubility when illuminated with ultraviolet light. Here, we introduce a general chemical approach for photoresist-free, direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials. The patterned materials can be metals, semiconductors, oxides, magnetic, or ra
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Science current issue

Atomic-layered Au clusters on {alpha}-MoC as catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (where carbon monoxide plus water yields dihydrogen and carbon dioxide) is an essential process for hydrogen generation and carbon monoxide removal in various energy-related chemical operations. This equilibrium-limited reaction is favored at a low working temperature. Potential application in fuel cells also requires a WGS catalyst to be highly active, stable,
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Science current issue

Seismic evidence for partial melting at the root of major hot spot plumes Ultralow-velocity zones are localized regions of extreme material properties detected seismologically at the base of Earth's mantle. Their nature and role in mantle dynamics are poorly understood. We used shear waves diffracted at the core-mantle boundary to illuminate the root of the Iceland plume from different directions. Through waveform modeling, we detected a large ultralow-velocity zone an
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Science current issue

Nanocrystalline copper films are never flat We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study low-angle grain boundaries at the surface of nearly planar copper nanocrystalline (111) films. The presence of grain boundaries and their emergence at the film surface create valleys composed of dissociated edge dislocations and ridges where partial dislocations have recombined. Geometric analysis and simulations indicated that valleys and ridges wer
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Science current issue

Control of species-dependent cortico-motoneuronal connections underlying manual dexterity Superior manual dexterity in higher primates emerged together with the appearance of cortico-motoneuronal (CM) connections during the evolution of the mammalian corticospinal (CS) system. Previously thought to be specific to higher primates, we identified transient CM connections in early postnatal mice, which are eventually eliminated by Sema6D-PlexA1 signaling. PlexA1 mutant mice maintain CM co
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Science current issue

Eutrophication will increase during the 21st century as a result of precipitation changes Eutrophication, or excessive nutrient enrichment, threatens water resources across the globe. We show that climate change–induced precipitation changes alone will substantially increase (19 ± 14%) riverine total nitrogen loading within the continental United States by the end of the century for the "business-as-usual" scenario. The impacts, driven by projected increases in both total and extreme
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Science current issue

Mismatch repair deficiency predicts response of solid tumors to PD-1 blockade The genomes of cancers deficient in mismatch repair contain exceptionally high numbers of somatic mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we previously showed that colorectal cancers with mismatch repair deficiency were sensitive to immune checkpoint blockade with antibodies to programmed death receptor–1 (PD-1). We have now expanded this study to evaluate the efficacy of PD-1 blockade in patient
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Science current issue

CAT-tailing as a fail-safe mechanism for efficient degradation of stalled nascent polypeptides Ribosome stalling leads to recruitment of the ribosome quality control complex (RQC), which targets the partially synthesized polypeptide for proteasomal degradation through the action of the ubiquitin ligase Ltn1p. A second core RQC component, Rqc2p, modifies the nascent polypeptide by adding a carboxyl-terminal alanine and threonine (CAT) tail through a noncanonical elongation reaction. Here we
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New Products
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From abalone to advocacy
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Reconfiguration of DNA molecular arrays driven by information relay Information relay at the molecular level is an essential phenomenon in numerous chemical and biological processes, such as intricate signaling cascades. One key challenge in synthetic molecular self-assembly is to construct artificial structures that imitate these complex behaviors in controllable systems. We demonstrated prescribed, long-range information relay in an artificial molecular array a
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Science current issue

Cover stories: A method for revealing chromatin
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Science current issue

Kynurenines: Tryptophans metabolites in exercise, inflammation, and mental health Kynurenine metabolites are generated by tryptophan catabolism and regulate biological processes that include host-microbiome signaling, immune cell response, and neuronal excitability. Enzymes of the kynurenine pathway are expressed in different tissues and cell types throughout the body and are regulated by cues, including nutritional and inflammatory signals. As a consequence of this systemic m
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Quanta Magazine

Black-Hole Hunter Takes Aim at Einstein If you cast an observational lasso into the center of the Milky Way galaxy and pull it closed, you will find a dense, dark lump: a mass totaling some four million suns, crammed into a space no wider than twice Pluto’s orbit in our solar system. In recent years, astronomers have come to agree that inside this region is a supermassive black hole, and that similar black holes lurk at the cores of ne
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New Scientist - News

Bronze Age DNA calls famous biblical slaughter into questionDNA from five ancient skeletons confirms the Canaanites were not annihilated by the Israelites, as the Bible suggests, but live on in modern day Lebanon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Concerns that sleep apnea could impact healthspanThe number of people with obstructive sleep apnea has steadily increased over the past two decades. Obesity and advanced age, which have been reported as risk factors, are also on the rise. Scientists are concerned because sleep apnea may diminish healthspan by aggravating several cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Five vascular diseases linked to one common genetic variantGenome-wide association studies have implicated a common genetic variant in chromosome 6p24 in coronary artery disease, as well as four other vascular diseases: migraine headache, cervical artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, and hypertension. However, it has not been clear how this polymorphism affects the risk for so many diseases. Researchers show how this DNA variant enhances the activi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simulations signal early success for fractal-based retinal implantsComputer simulations of electrical charges sent to retinal implants based on fractal geometry have researchers moving forward with their eyes focused on biological testing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hostage situation or harmony? Researchers rethink symbiosisRelationships where two organisms depend on each other, known as symbiosis, evoke images of partnership and cooperation. But a new study shows that, when it comes to certain microorganisms, symbiotic partners are actually being held 'hostage.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glowing tumor technology helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cellsSurgeons were able to identify and remove a greater number of cancerous nodules from lung cancer patients when combining intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) -- through the use of a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow during surgery -- with preoperative positron emission tomograph y (PET) scans. This study shows how effective the combination of IMI with the tumor-glowing agent can be when
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solar eclipse science along the path of totalityA number of research projects will take place across the country during the upcoming Aug. 21 solar eclipse. The research will advance our knowledge of the sun's complex and mysterious magnetic field and its effects on Earth's atmosphere and land.
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The Atlantic

Why Zuckerberg and Musk Are Fighting About the Robot Future Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg are having a spat about whether or not artificial intelligence is going to kill us all. Musk, the chief of Tesla and SpaceX who has longstanding worries about the potentially apocalyptic future of AI, recently returned to that soapbox, making an appeal for proactive regulations on AI. “I keep sounding the alarm bell,” he told attendees at a National Governors Associa
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Live Science

Why We Need to Stop Talking About Work-Life Balance As a 'Female' StruggleMen and women struggle similarly to balance work and family, meaning that "having it all" is not solely a female struggle.
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Ars Technica

Stealthy Google Play apps recorded calls and stole e-mails and texts Enlarge (credit: portal gda ) Google has expelled 20 Android apps from its Play marketplace after finding they contained code for monitoring and extracting users' e-mail, text messages, locations, voice calls, and other sensitive data. The apps, which made their way onto about 100 phones, exploited known vulnerabilities to "root" devices running older versions of Android. Root status allowed the
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Ars Technica

In wake of CTE study, Ravens’ smarty John Urschel retires from football at 26 Enlarge / John Urschel, #64 of the Baltimore Ravens, retired from football. (credit: Getty | Matt Hazlett ) John Urschel, a Baltimore Ravens’ offensive lineman and PhD candidate in applied mathematics at MIT, has announced his retirement from football at the age of 26. The announcement comes just days after publication of a case study that found widespread signs of a degenerative brain disease am
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Gizmodo

Doctors Slam New Recommendation That We Should Stop Antibiotic Treatments Early Image: Rob Brewer/Flickr Scientists from the UK caused quite a stir this week, when they announced that we don’t necessarily need to complete a full course of antibiotics in order to treat infections properly. It’s a provocative message, but skeptics say their advice is grossly premature—and even reckless. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is not caused by putting an early stop to a prescribed cours
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Can Nostalgia Keep You in VR for 40 Minutes?A new collaboration from Funny or Die and Felix & Paul aims to see how long you can hang out in the headset.
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Ars Technica

Report: Human embryo edited for first time in US, pushes limits Enlarge (credit: Getty | Media for Medical ) A team of researchers in Oregon have become the first in the US to attempt genetically altering human embryos, according to reporting by MIT Technology Review . The attempt is said to represent an advance in the safety and efficacy of methods used to correct genetic defects that spur disease. Until now, the only three published reports of human embryo
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Popular Science

The Tuskegee Study reminds us that transparency in government science is vital Health For 40 years, the U.S. Public Health Service let syphilis ravage the bodies of black men. It's been 45 years since most of the nation first learned about the Tuskegee experiment—a research study that violated basic strictures of human dignity.
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The Atlantic

The Perils of Prediction in the Age of Trump More than two years ago, soon after Donald Trump entered the presidential race, I noted online that no one like him—with no political, military, judicial, or public-service experience, with no known expertise on policy matters, with a trail of financial and personal complications—had ever before become president. Therefore, I said, it wasn’t going to happen this time. Quite obviously that was wro
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The Atlantic

Why Trump Is Threatening the Wrong Republican Senator on Health Care Updated on July 27 at 1:22 p.m. ET It’s arm-twisting time in the Senate as Republicans close in on a decisive health-care vote, and the arm President Trump has decided to wring hardest belongs to Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. Murkowski, a former member of the party leadership now beginning her third six-year term, angered the president by defying him on a key procedural vote to begin debate o
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The Atlantic

More Turmoil at the National Security Council Updated on July 27 at 1:44 p.m. ET A top Middle East official on the National Security Council was removed from his post on Thursday. Derek Harvey, a former top adviser to David Petraeus who was brought into the administration by former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn to serve as the NSC’s senior director for the Middle East, was informed he was being moved off the NSC by current National
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple ordered to pay $506M in Wisconsin patent infringementA judge has ordered computer-maker Apple Inc. to pay more than $506 million in a patent infringement case brought by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation after the two sides agreed on final damages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In US first, scientists edit genes of human embryos (Update)For the first time in the United States, scientists have edited the genes of human embryos, a controversial step toward someday helping babies avoid inherited diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When forest creatures have a problem, they call an engineerCharlotte the spider saved a pig's life through clever marketing. The Cat in the Hat rescued children from a dull day indoors with magical powers of destruction and repair. Roxy the Fox, a newcomer to the pantheon of can-do critters, tapped coveted STEM skills to secure new foraging territory for her forest community.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Dark ecology project' will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrationsEvery spring and fall, billions of birds migrate across the United States, largely unseen under the cover of darkness. Now a team of researchers led by computer scientist Daniel Sheldon at the University of Massachusetts Amherst plan to develop new analytic methods with data collected over the past 20 years—more than 200 million archived radar scans from the national weather radar network—to provi
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Gizmodo

Block "Around the Web" Links With the Freedom App There’s a second use for Freedom, a simple app that lets you block distracting sites like Twitter for a few minutes, hours, or days. As the app’s blog points out, Freedom also works as a clickbait blocker that hides the gross and misleading “Around the Web” links at the bottom of news articles (aka the chumbox ). This is useful if you don’t use an ad blocker, but the principle is the same: Freedo
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Ars Technica

Microsoft rationalizes and rebrands Windows 10, Office updates again One of the more visible aspects of Windows as a Service is that Microsoft has been learning as it goes along, and didn't come straight out the gate with a clear vision of precisely how Windows updates would be delivered, or when. Initially the plan was to push each release out to consumers as the "Current Build" (CB), and a few months later bless it as good for businesses, as the "Current Build f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heavy metals in water meet their matchA newly developed filter, which removes more than 99 percent of heavy metal toxins from water, shows potential for water remediation in developing nations around the world.The project, developed in collaboration between Swansea University and Rice University, has won both national and international awards.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"True Blue" Chrysanthemum Flowers Produced with Genetic EngineeringScientists added two genes to the plant's genome to get the new hue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Marion Macleod obituary My mother, Marion Macleod, who has died aged 86, was an academic microbiologist and medical sociologist. She was also a fine example of the benefits of the postwar policy of opening up higher education to bright students from all backgrounds. Marion was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, the daughter of Roland Fairman, a coach painter, and his wife, Rhoda (nee Finch), a cleaner. The family lived in a s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA casts an infrared eye on Tropical Storm IrwinInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Irwin and found the strongest storms in the system were west of its low-level center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA-NOAA satellite spots Tropical Storm Nesat being shearedNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat being affected by vertical wind shear as it parallels the east coast of the Philippines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Effects of a major drug target regulated through molecular 'codes'A team spearheaded by Van Andel Research Institute scientists has answered a long-standing question that may lead to more effective drugs with fewer side effects for diseases ranging from heart failure to cancer.
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Ars Technica

Cable lobby claims US is totally overflowing in broadband competition (credit: Free Press ) Are you ever frustrated about a lack of choice for home Internet providers? Well, worry no more. The nation's top cable lobby group is here to let you know that the US is simply overflowing in broadband competition. In a new post titled, "America's competitive TV and Internet markets," NCTA-The Internet & Television Association says that Internet competition statistics are i
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Ars Technica

Apple discontinues iPod Nano and Shuffle, updates iPod Touch models (credit: Chris Foresman) You'll see no mention of the iPod Nano or iPod Shuffle on Apple's website anymore. Today, the company removed the two media players from its website, and reports suggest the company is discontinuing both devices. A report from Business Insider includes a statement from an Apple spokesperson citing the "simplifying" of the iPod lineup. "Today, we are simplifying our iPod l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite shows some shear in Hurricane HilaryNOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed that vertical wind shear is affecting Hurricane Hilary.
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New Scientist - News

Sneaky attacks trick AIs into seeing or hearing what’s not thereHackers could fool driverless cars into ignoring stop signs by inserting hidden noise into images – and we don’t have a way to stop them yet
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Gizmodo

What Happens When You Tell the Internet You're Pregnant Image by Angelica Alzona A month after I ordered prenatal vitamins on Amazon, I started hearing an ad on Spotify that featured the sound of a baby’s heartbeat. It was an ad for a prenatal doctor. “Fuck,” I thought, “the Internet already knows I’m trying to get pregnant.” Advertisement But it was impossible to know if it was an example of Target-style omniscience or Spotify accurately targeting my
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA-NOAA satellite spots Tropical Storm Nesat being shearedNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat being affected by vertical wind shear as it parallels the east coast of the Philippines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trauma-informed, mindfulness-based intervention significantly improves parenting among mothers in opResearchers at Jefferson's Maternal Addiction Treatment Education & Research (MATER) program found significant improvement in the quality of parenting among mothers who participated in a trauma-informed, mindfulness-based parenting intervention while also in medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Results of the study, the first to scientifically test a mindfulness-based parenting i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Aqua satellite catches Typhoon Noru's 10 mile-wide eyeNASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the eye of Typhoon Noru as it continued to track west in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The eye appeared to be about 10 nautical miles wide in satellite imagery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite shows some shear in Hurricane HilaryNOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed that vertical wind shear is affecting Hurricane Hilary.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DREAMers at greater risk for mental health distressImmigrants who came to the United States illegally as small children and who meet the requirements of the Development Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, more commonly known as DREAMers, are at risk for mental health distress
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA casts an infrared eye on Tropical Storm IrwinInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Irwin and found the strongest storms in the system were west of its low-level center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of a major drug target regulated through molecular 'codes'The findings, published today in Cell, reveal for the first time components of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) named rhodopsin bound to a signaling molecule called arrestin, both crucial pieces of the body's intricate cellular communication network. The new discovery further refines a landmark 2015 Nature article that first described the structure of the two molecules in complex together.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Aqua satellite catches Typhoon Noru's 10 mile-wide eyeNASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the eye of Typhoon Noru as it continued to track west in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The eye appeared to be about 10 nautical miles wide in satellite imagery.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Carbon-Free City Is Being Built from ScratchThe Colorado city will rely on solar energy, a king-sized lithium-ion battery, and energy efficiency schemes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inside Science

Corn Kernels Could Make Better Biofuels Corn Kernels Could Make Better Biofuels The quest for better biomass fuels takes us to America’s heartland. Corn Kernels Could Make Better Biofuels Video of Corn Kernels Could Make Better Biofuels Earth Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 12:15 Keith Landry, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Smog is choking air quality in large cities around the world. Thick smoke billows from factories. Cars clog highways a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Northwest citizen scientists among the many helping track solar eclipse across USAt the instant the moon's shadow darkens the Oregon coast on the morning of Aug. 21, a scientific relay race will kick off with Bruce and Ryan Alder at the head of the pack.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson Wants *You* to Explore Deep Space—In a Video GameTyson is helping to develop a video game all about interstellar exploration—and physics.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ancient DNA offers clues to the Canaanites’ fateDNA is painting a more detailed portrait of the ancient Canaanites, who have largely been studied through the secondhand accounts of their contemporaries.
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Gizmodo

Apple Just Killed the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle Image: Gizmodo Two more members of the Apple family just got put in the ground. On Thursday, a company spokesperson confirmed to The Verge that it has “officially discontinued” the iPod Shuffle and the iPod Nano. As first noticed by MacRumors , Apple pulled both MP3 players from its website as available products today, something the company has done in the past with products it discontinues. Adve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndromeUsing the gene-editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggests new lines of investigation into how to treat this condition -- dyskeratosis congenita -- which is characterized by shortened telo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers release first draft of a genome-wide cancer 'dependency map'In one of the largest efforts to build a comprehensive catalog of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer, researchers have identified more than 760 genes upon which cancer cells from multiple types are strongly dependent for their growth and survival. While many of these dependencies are specific to certain cancer types, about 10 percent are common across multiple cancers, suggesting that a relatively
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer-death button gets jammed by gut bacteriumResearchers at Michigan Medicine and in China showed that a type of bacterium is associated with the recurrence of colorectal cancer and poor outcomes. They found that Fusobacterium nucleatum in the gut can stop chemotherapy from causing a type of cancer cell death called apoptosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lab-created mini-brains reveal how growing organ maintains neuronal balanceScientists can now explore in a laboratory dish how the human brain develops by creating organoids -- distinct, three-dimensional regions of the brain. In research published in Cell Stem Cell, Yale scientists coaxed early stage stem cells to create and fuse two types of organoids from different brain regions to show how the developing brain maintains proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory neu
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists become research subjects in after-hours brain-scanning projectA quest to analyze the unique features of individual human brains evolved into the so-called Midnight Scan Club. Nico Dosenbach, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of pediatric and developmental neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues used imaging techniques to collect a massive amount of data on individual brains. Their work led to 10 individual-specifi
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Present-day Lebanese descend from Biblical Canaanites, genetic study suggestsIn the most recent whole-genome study of ancient remains from the Near East, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. The results, published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics sug
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel perspectives on anti-amyloid treatment for the prevention of Alzheimer's diseaseFor decades researches have been investigating the underlying foundations of Alzheimer's disease to provide clues for the design of a successful therapy. This week, VIB/KU Leuven scientists have published breakthrough insights in the prestigious journal Cell. A collaboration between Professor Lucía Chávez-Gutiérrez and Professor Bart De Strooper (both VIB-KU Leuven) revealed the molecular basis of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What fly guts could reveal about our healthTwo new studies reveal the gut bacteria composition of the common fruit fly has a significant effect on diet choice and reproductive success, and its influence can be carried down to the next generation -- with potential implications for human health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-sought mechanism of metastasis is discovered in pancreatic cancerAn important discovery at CSHL establishes a cause of metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Using organoids grown from patient tissues and transplanted in mouse models of the illness, the team pinpoints an epigenetic re-programming of gene enhancers that returns cancerous cells to a more primitive developmental state, dating back to the formation of the pancreas, in which cells multiply rapidly and are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In witnessing the brain's 'aha!' moment, scientists shed light on biology of consciousnessColumbia scientists have identified the brain's 'aha!' moment -- that flash in time when you suddenly know the answer to a difficult question. Today's findings in humans, combined with previous research, provide compelling evidence that this moment -- this feeling of having decided -- pierces consciousness when information being collected by the brain reaches a critical level. Importantly, this st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Errors made by 'DNA spellchecker' revealed as important cause of cancerCRG scientists identify important processes that create mutations that cause cancer by studying the genomes of more than 1,000 tumors. Many mutations in human cancers are caused by mistakes made by a repair mechanism or 'DNA spellchecker' rather than the actual damage to DNA caused by the environment. Sunlight and alcohol consumption increase the rate at which this happens, resulting in more mutat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social influences can override aggression in male mice, Stanford study showsStanford University School of Medicine investigators have identified a cluster of nerve cells in the male mouse's brain that, when activated, triggers territorial rage in a variety of situations. Activating the same cluster has no such effect on female mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Concerns that sleep apnea could impact healthspanThe number of people with obstructive sleep apnea has steadily increased over the past two decades. Obesity and advanced age, which have been reported as risk factors, are also on the rise. Scientists are concerned because sleep apnea may diminish healthspan by aggravating several cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers in Portugal explore this suspected relationship in an Opini
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene transfer corrects severe muscle defects in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophyDuchenne muscular dystrophy is a rapidly progressive disease that causes whole-body muscle weakness and atrophy due to deficiency in a protein called dystrophin. Researchers have developed a new gene transfer approach that uses an adeno-associated virus vector to deliver a modified dystrophin gene to muscle, restoring muscle strength in a mouse model that closely mimics the severe defects seen in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Five vascular diseases linked to one common genetic variantGenome-wide association studies have implicated a common genetic variant in chromosome 6p24 in coronary artery disease, as well as four other vascular diseases: migraine headache, cervical artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, and hypertension. However, it has not been clear how this polymorphism affects the risk for so many diseases. In Cell, researchers show how this DNA variant enhances t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who were the Canaanites? Ancient human DNA evidence yields answersThousands of years ago, the Canaanite people lived in a part of the world we now recognize as Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan, establishing a culture that became influential in the Middle East and beyond. The Canaanites created the first alphabet, established colonies throughout the Mediterranean, and were mentioned many times in the Bible. But who were they and what ultimately happe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even babies can tell who's the bossSocial dominance, and the dynamic it creates, may be so naturally ingrained, researchers say, that toddlers as young as 17 months old not only can perceive who is dominant, but also anticipate that the dominant person will receive more rewards.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infants know what we like bestBehind the chubby cheeks and bright eyes of babies as young as 8 months lies the smoothly whirring mind of a social statistician, logging our every move and making odds on what a person is most likely to do next, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experimental method measures quantum coherence, the ability of being in two states at onceResearchers have come up with a method that allows measuring the strength of the coherence of superposition in any given quantum state, similar to the famous Schrödinger's cat, which described as being simultaneously dead and alive. The method is based on the measurement of experimental parameters related to the visibility of the interference fringes pattern produced when the two states are superi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More evidence on link between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistanceThe European Food Safety Authority, the European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control are concerned about the impact of use of antibiotics on the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The report presents new data on antibiotic consumption and antibiotic resistance and reflects improved surveillance across Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Project to save the Belize coast provides valuable frameworkA coastal zone management plan designed to safeguard Belize's natural assets has produced a win-win opportunity for people and the environment, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where overfishing, development, and habitat degradation are increasingly serious problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropicsA team of researchers has recently completed a global study on the trade-offs between the benefits provided by tropical forests and its conversion for agricultural use. The team examined deforestation activities of more than 50 countries in the tropics between 2000 to 2012, and identified regions where deforestation is most and least beneficial.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Berlin pressures automakers as scandals pile upGerman political leaders took the country's auto industry to task Thursday, demanding more action to reduce harmful diesel emissions even as new cartel allegations surfaced ahead of September elections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA delays satellite launch to replace damaged antennaNASA has delayed the launch of a major communications satellite by more than two weeks to replace a damaged antenna.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change will feed wildfires: expertsOut-of-control wildfires like the ones that brought destruction to southern Europe, North America and parts of South Africa in recent weeks will likely become more frequent as global temperatures soar under climate change, experts say.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon's Jeff Bezos becomes world's richest person - briefly (Update)Amazon founder Jeff Bezos on Thursday became the world's richest person, as a jump in the share price of the US tech giant enabled him to overtake Microsoft founder Bill Gates, a new estimate showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Twitter won't ban President Donald TrumpTwitter has made it clear that it won't ban Donald Trump from its service, whether the president follows its rules against harassment or not.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Morocco arrests British Bitcoin dealer wanted in USMoroccan police have arrested a British dealer in virtual currency Bitcoin wanted on fraud charges in the United States, a source close to the investigation told AFP on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amid nationwide drought, Rome seeks ways to avoid rationingRome and its water company are working hard to avoid rationing during a nationwide drought, Italy's environment minister said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greek police see leads in money laundering suspect's phoneA cellphone seized during the arrest of a Russian man the U.S. wants extradited for allegedly laundering vast sums through bitcoin transactions should provide key data for the investigation, Greek police said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why you still can't ditch your cable boxNot that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flowering plant thought to be extinct seen in VermontBotanists in Vermont say a flowering plant long thought to be extinct in the state is making a comeback.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New chemical structures built on unreactive bondsOrganic chemists have transformed strong carbon fluorine bonds into crowded quaternary carbon centers with cobalt catalyzed Grignard chemistry.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iran claims launch of satellite-carrying rocket into spaceIran successfully launched its most advanced satellite-carrying rocket into space, the country's state media reported on Thursday, in what is likely the most significant step yet for the launch vehicle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Berlin orders recall of 22,000 Porsches over emissions cheating (Update)Germany on Thursday ordered luxury car brand Porsche to recall 22,000 vehicles across Europe over emissions test cheating amid a widening election-year scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What fly guts could reveal about our healthIncreasingly understood to be vital for wellbeing, gut microbiota are the trillion of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract of humans and other animals. Known to affect a range of physiological traits including development, immunity, nutrition and longevity, researchers are now investigating how manipulating gut microbiota might influence other aspects of health.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Present-day Lebanese descend from Biblical Canaanites, genetic study suggestsIn the most recent whole-genome study of ancient remains from the Near East, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. The results, published today (27 July) in the American Journal of Human Ge
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lab-created mini-brains reveal how growing organ maintains neuronal balanceScientists can now explore in a laboratory dish how the human brain develops by creating organoids—distinct, three-dimensional regions of the brain. In research published in Cell Stem Cell, Yale scientists coaxed early stage stem cells to create and fuse two types of organoids from different brain regions to show how the developing brain maintains proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory neuron
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simulations signal early success for fractal-based retinal implantsComputer simulations of electrical charges sent to retinal implants based on fractal geometry have University of Oregon researchers moving forward with their eyes focused on biological testing.
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Blog » Languages » English

July Scythe Marathon: Results[featured image – completed cell] And that’s a wrap! After some excellent tracing, reaping, and Scythe Completing, you’ve finished the marathon in xx hours yy minutes. Woohoo! Enjoy your bonuses, and besides giving yourselves a well-deserved pat on the back, we hope you’ll join us next week after Happy Hour for our renaming ceremony. Congrats everyone!
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Are Dogs Probiotic?Recent studies raise new questions about how much pets can help—and hurt—human health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

LG disappointed by sales of flagship smartphone Enlarge / The LG G6. Another year, another proclamation from LG that its flagship smartphone isn't selling as well as expected. Last year it was the LG G5 , when the company blamed a bad quarter on " weak sales of [the] G5." The year before that, it was the LG G4 , which had sales that " fell short of expectations ." This year it's the LG G6—in its latest earnings report, LG blamed the "challengi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research calls for enhancing long-term benefits of Farm Bill programsMany farmers, ranchers, and landowners rely on voluntary conservation incentive programs within the Farm Bill to make improvements to their land and operations that benefit them, the environment, and society.
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Gizmodo

Half of Our Galaxy Might Have Come From Other Galaxies Image Credit: NASA , ESA , Hubble Space Telescope ; Processing: Douglas Gardner Any Carl Sagan fan knows you’re made of star stuff. Protons don’t decay into any other particles (as far as we can tell ), so you can reliably assume that most bits of you have been around since a second after the Big Bang. But if you’re thinking a little more locally, you might wonder whether the Milky Way formed in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Benefits of promoting competing retail websites?A new study examines how retailers can benefit by showing ads from competing companies on their websites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell mechanism discovery could lead to 'fundamental' change in leukemia treatmentResearchers have identified a new cell mechanism that could lead to a fundamental change in the diagnosis and treatment of leukemia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Child abuse and neglect linked to gender inequalityChildren growing up in societies that experience high levels of gender inequality -- irrespective of whether these are developed or developing countries -- are more likely to be maltreated. This is according to a cross-national analysis of data from 57 countries worldwide.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Galactic David and GoliathThe gravitational dance between two galaxies in our local neighbourhood has led to intriguing visual features in both as witnessed in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The tiny NGC 1510 and its colossal neighbour NGC 1512 are at the beginning of a lengthy merger, a crucial process in galaxy evolution. Despite its diminutive size, NGC 1510 has had a significant effect on NGC 1512's st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithms identify the dynamics of prehistoric social networks in the BalkansThe pioneering application of modularity analyses in archaeology yields a powerful method for highly accurate mapping of social interaction in the human past.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-efficacy boosts physical activity in osteoarthritis patientsOsteoarthritis patients that are more confident in their abilities in the morning go on to be more physically active throughout the day, according to a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Model developed to predict, prevent power outages using big dataHigh-speed winds during a thunderstorm may cause trees around an electric grid to crash into the distribution system feeders causing an outage in that area. Currently, most utility companies diminish such accidents by scheduling regular tree-trimming operations. This effort is costly and is based on a rotational approach to different service areas, which may take months and sometimes years before
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In assessing risk of hormone therapy for menopause, dose, not form, mattersThe way estrogen therapy for menopause is delivered doesn't affect risk or benefit, new research shows. What DOES make a difference with the commonly used conjugated equine estrogen, plus progestogen, is dosage.
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Popular Science

Buy the last umbrella you'll ever need Technology Use your rainy day fund for a rainy day. A corner-store umbrella might save cash in the short term, but you’ll pay later when it fails catastrophically during a downpour. Here's what you should buy instead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food banks respond to hunger needs in rural AmericaMany images of rural America are food-related—a freshly-baked apple pie cooling on the windowsill, a roadside produce stand brimming with sweet corn and tomatoes, or a Norman Rockwell print showing a family sitting down to dinner. But the reality is that many people in rural America face hunger and don't always know where their next meal is coming from.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Effects of soil and drainage on the savanna vegetation in the northern Brazilian AmazoniaIt is a well-known fact that environmental factors such as soil texture and drainage determine to a very large degree the vegetation appearance, richness and composition at any site. However, there has been little research on how these variables influence the flora in the marvellous savannas—large open areas characterised by a complex and unique network of natural resources and life forms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unclear CEO expectations often lead chief marketing officers toward revolving doorNearly three-quarters of chief marketing officers believe their jobs aren't designed to let them have the greatest impact on their companies, according to a new survey.
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New Scientist - News

DNA of long-dead cows read from pages of Medieval booksTexts written in the Middle Ages are a rich source of information about the past – but the DNA in the animal skin pages has its own story to tell
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Ars Technica

Feds say they caught a key figure in the massive Mt. Gox Bitcoin hack (credit: Zach Copley ) On Wednesday morning we reported on the arrest of a Russian man suspected of running a $4 billion dollar money laundering scheme. Later in the day, US officials released the indictment against the suspect, Alexander Vinnik. That indictment reveals that the alleged $4 billion money laundering operation was actually BTC-e, one of the Internet's most popular Bitcoin exchanges.
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Viden

Gopler og søstjerner bliver måske snart faste retter på menuenVi bliver nødt til at tænke utraditionelt, hvis vi skal blive ved med at skaffe fødevarer i et omskifteligt klima, mener dansk professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genesPlants are among many eukaryotes that can "turn off" one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insect
21h
Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Clear the Rack, Dyson Vacuum, Electric Lawnmower, and More A new Clear the Rack sale , a discounted Dyson vacuum , and a battery-powered lawnmower lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 $70 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. Adve
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Live Science

Newfound Dino Looks Like the Creepy Love Child of a Turkey and an OstrichA farmer has discovered the remains of a dinosaur that could have passed for the ostrich-like cassowary in its day, sporting the flightless bird's head crest and long thunder thighs, indicating it could run quickly, just like its modern-day lookalike.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds breast cancer driver, HER2, in 3 percent of lung cancersThe Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium at the University of Colorado Cancer Center reports this week in the journal Cancer that 24 of 920 patients (3 percent) with advanced-stage lung cancer had mutations in the gene HER2.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blocking the back-door that cancer cells use to escape death by radiotherapyA natural healing mechanism of the body may be reducing the efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, according to a new study. Research led by scientists at the University of Alberta found that irradiation of breast fat (also known as adipose tissue) produces an inflammatory response that in normal circumstances promotes healing, but in cases of cancer, enables the cancer cells to sur
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Scientific American Content: Global

Life-Friendly Molecules on Saturn's Moon Titan Could Help Reveal Origins of Earth LifeCassini data points to Titan as a contender for hosting some sort of primitive life, researchers say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research unearths Canadian sapphires fit for a queenNew research from UBC mineralogists could make it easier to find high-quality Canadian sapphires, the same sparkling blue gems that adorn Queen Elizabeth II's Sapphire Jubilee Snowflake Brooch.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Child abuse and neglect linked to gender inequalityChildren growing up in societies that experience high levels of gender inequality—irrespective of whether these are developed or developing countries—are more likely to be maltreated. This is according to a cross-national analysis of data from 57 countries worldwide, conducted by Joanne Klevens and Katie Ports of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. The results are published i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cave mazesAnalysis of caves in Israel deserts brings to light the ancient groundwater circulation of north-western Arabia. The cave distribution, morphology, and deposit evidence indicates that they formed through dissolution by rising groundwater. This water originated as rainwater flowing from highlands around the present Red Sea, infiltrated through sandstone, and rose again through deep faults in Israel
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Gizmodo

Pedal Faster If You Want to Keep Streaming Netflix Image: Roboro Working out on a stationary exercise bike can get pretty dull really quick. But if you want to make it fun, you might want to hack your bike so you can’t watch TV unless you complete your workout. A clever engineering student named Ronan Byrne recently came up with Cyxflix, a program that interrupts your Netflix binge watching if you stop working out. He calls it “Exercise Powered E
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New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon May Be the Next Tech Giant Muscling Into Health CareBecause what else is there left for the company to try, really?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

E-cigarette use may encourage experimentation with tobaccoYoung people who have tried an e-cigarette may be more likely to go on to smoke cigarettes compared with those who have not, a new study has suggested.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reality check for 'wonder material'Topological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material', as has graphene. But so far, topological insulators have not quite lived up to the expectations fueled by theoretical studies. Physicists now have an idea about why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Best first aid treatment of jellyfish stingsNew research has identified the best way to treat a sting from the lions mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Circles in the sand reveal boating damage to marine biodiversityNew findings highlight the need for boating activities along the UK's beautiful coastlines to be conducted in a more environmentally friendly manner.
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump Eats First This week, as Donald Trump publicly attacked Attorney General Jeff Sessions, an assault one restrained observer described as “a multitiered tower of political idiocy, a sublime monument to the moronic, a gaudy, gleaming, Ozymandian folly,” even David Horowitz, the anti-Leftist intellectual and author of Big Agenda: President Trump’s Plan to Save America , felt compelled to admit something to his
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin E-deficient embryos are cognitively impaired even after diet improvesZebrafish deficient in vitamin E produce offspring beset by behavioral impairment and metabolic problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even babies can tell who's the boss, UW research saysSocial dominance, and the dynamic it creates, may be so naturally ingrained, University of Washington researchers say, that toddlers as young as 17 months old not only can perceive who is dominant, but also anticipate that the dominant person will receive more rewards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Very preterm birth not associated with mood, anxiety disordersDo very-preterm or very-low-weight babies develop anxiety and mood disorders later in life? Julia Jaekel, assistant professor of child and family studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Dieter Wolke, professor of psychology at the University of Warwick, co-authored a study to answer this question.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solar eclipse science along the path of totalityIn a briefing today on solar eclipse science, leading US. scientists highlighted research projects that will take place across the country during the upcoming Aug. 21 solar eclipse. The research will advance our knowledge of the sun's complex and mysterious magnetic field and its effects on Earth's atmosphere and land.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune system may mount an attack in Parkinson's diseaseA new study suggests that T cells, which help the body's immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson's disease. The study, published in the journal Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unclear CEO expectations often lead chief marketing officers toward revolving doorNearly three-quarters of chief marketing officers believe their jobs aren't designed to let them have the greatest impact on their companies, according to a new survey.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No significant change seen in hearing loss among US teensAlthough there was an increase in the percentage of US youth ages 12 to 19 reporting exposure to loud music through headphones from 1988-2010, researchers did not find significant changes in the prevalence of hearing loss among this group, according to a study published by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research calls for enhancing long-term benefits of Farm Bill programsUltimately, incentive programs that assist landowners with conservation efforts benefit the population as a whole. 'Private lands conservation is critical,' Dayer said. 'Often when we think about land for wildlife, we think about national parks or protected areas, but those are a small proportion. In the US, 60 percent of the land is privately owned.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Private insurance claim lines with Lyme disease diagnoses evidence notable increases 2007-16Although Lyme disease historically has been concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwest, our data suggest that it is spreading. In the United States in 2007 (as shown in the heat map below), claim lines with Lyme disease diagnoses as a percentage of all claim lines with all diagnoses in the state were highest in the Northeast. The states with the highest percentages of such claim lines were (i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Community bias predicts police use of lethal forceThe racial biases of Whites in a community predict how many African-Americans are killed by police in a given area, according to results of a paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women and men report similar levels of work-family conflictsContrary to public perception and many media accounts, women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts, both in the form of work interfering with family and family interfering with work, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hostage situation or harmony? Researchers rethink symbiosisRelationships where two organisms depend on each other, known as symbiosis, evoke images of partnership and cooperation. But a new study in Nature Ecology and Evolution shows that, when it comes to certain microorganisms, symbiotic partners are actually being held "hostage".
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genesPlants are among many eukaryotes that can 'turn off' one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insect
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grown-up gannets find favorite fishing groundsLike humans, some birds can spend years learning and exploring before developing more settled habits. A study of northern gannets has shown adults return to the same patch of sea over and over again to find food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impact of kidney injury on non-renal solid organ transplantsNew research shows the impact of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis on patients receiving non-renal solid organ transplantation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Danish reference genomeAfter close to 5 years of work, the GenomeDenmark consortium has now finalized the efforts to establish a Danish Reference genome. The result is a reference of unrivalled quality and information depth, as compared to other similar international references and studies. Due to the unique and high quality approach, the consortium has been able to analyze otherwise intractable genomics regions for the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neutrons peer into a running engineScientists have used neutrons to investigate the performance of a new aluminum alloy in a gasoline-powered engine -- while the engine was running.
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Gizmodo

Jeff Bezos Surges Ahead of Bill Gates to Become World's Richest Rich Guy [Update: Not Anymore] Source: Getty Last night, Amazon share prices surged and Microsoft shares dipped, allowing Jeff Bezos to surpass Bill Gates in new worth, dethroning Emperor Clippy to become the king of the rich nerds for the first time. At the close of trading on Wednesday, Bezos—CEO of Amazon, owner of The Washington Post , and founder of Blue Origin commercial space company—had a net worth of more than $89 bil
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Gizmodo

The Uncanny Sound Illusion That Creates Suspense in Christopher Nolan's Movies GIF Gif source: YouTube / Vox Ever notice how Christopher Nolan’s movies ( Interstellar , Inception , The Prestige ) feel like an anxiety attack? Well, maybe that’s overstating things a bit. But the director does have a knack for creating an unnerving degree of tension. Turns out he’s using a little bit of musical magic to do it. The magic is actually a science-based audio illusion called a Shepa
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Popular Science

It looks like we’re one step closer to creating genetically modified humans in a lab Health The first CRISPR-edited embryos have been produced in the U.S. Scientists in China have used the same technique before, but never with such success. And never in the United States, where the ethical debate over editing embryos has…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research findings to standardise first aid treatment of jellyfish stingsNew research from NUI Galway and the University of Hawaii at Manoa has identified the best way to treat a sting from the lions mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata). The lions mane jellyfish is the most problematic jellyfish in Ireland and the UK with 1000s of bathers being badly stung each year. With over a 1,000 tentacles that can stretch up to four or five metres in length, a bad sting from a lions
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Futurity.org

One gene’s mutations cause seizures in babies Researchers are closer to understanding how a gene known as GNAO1 causes two rare diseases that lead to seizures or involuntary movements in babies and the transformations the gene can take on. The discovery could uncover key differences in the way it functions and stop its devastating effects. “This work will really help us better understand these two rare conditions.” The rogue gene, linked to
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The Atlantic

Blowing Out Birthday Candles Increases Cake Bacteria by 1,400 Percent I can identify the exact moment when my relationship with birthday cake changed forever, and it was last week, when I read a study titled “ Bacterial Transfer Associated with Blowing Out Candles on a Birthday Cake .” Of course, the more cautious (aka germophobic) among us have already thought about it in gruesome detail. One colleague said she scrapes off the top layer of frosting, a habit that s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glowing tumor technology helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cellsSurgeons were able to identify and remove a greater number of cancerous nodules from lung cancer patients when combining intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) -- through the use of a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow during surgery -- with preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania is the first to sho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medalist study underlines importance of glucose control in adults with Type 1 diabetesFindings of the latest study of the Joslin 50-Year Medalists, who have had type 1 diabetes for at least 50 years, re-emphasize the importance of good blood glucose control and exercise in reducing complications and mortality rates for these older individuals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food banks respond to hunger needs in rural AmericaUniversity of Illinois economist Craig Gundersen's recent research sheds light on hunger-relief efforts in rural America. According to his research, Feeding America has a substantial presence in rural communities, providing food assistance through member food banks and the food pantries with which they partner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of soil and drainage on the savanna vegetation in the northern Brazilian AmazoniaDespite being an exemplar for a diverse and remarkable ecosystem, savannas are still shrouded in mystery when it comes to the environmental factors which determine their vegetation appearance, richness and composition. Therefore, a Brazilian research team investigated the influence of the soil characteristics and drainage in the northern Brazilian Amazonia. Their study is published in the open acc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers report regenerative effects of low-dose growth factors for bone defect healingResearchers compared the effects of three bone growth factors to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)--the most commonly used agent for repair of large bone defects, which is not without risks at the doses required -- and showed significant bone-healing effects including the formation of new blood vessels at low doses relative to BMP2.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 16 genetic markers that can cut a life story shortResearchers have identified 16 genetic markers associated with a decreased lifespan, including 14 new to science. This is the largest set of markers of lifespan uncovered to date. Spearheaded by scientists from the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and other Swiss institutions the study provides a powerful computational framework to uncover the genetics of our time of death, and ultimately of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genesPlants are among many eukaryotes that can 'turn off' one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insect
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria already endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman periodMalaria was already widespread on Sardinia by the Roman period, long before the Middle Ages, as research on a Roman who died 2,000 years ago indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biochar could clear the air in more ways than oneBiochar could reduce local air pollution from agriculture by reducing emissions of nitric oxide from soil. Researchers argue that a better understanding of nitric oxide response to biochar will save lives and money, especially on farms near urban areas where agricultural emissions contribute to ozone and particulate matter formation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Should we be worried about hepatitis E?Hepatitis E gets little press compared to its better-known cousins A, B and C, but Stellenbosch University virologists say we should wake up to how transmission of this virus is changing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cell therapy attacks cancer by targeting unique tissue stiffnessA stem cell-based method can selectively target and kill cancerous tissue while preventing some of the toxic side effects of chemotherapy by treating the disease in a more localized way, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Affordable Care Act reduced disparities in health care access, report showsThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped to close the gap in health care access between residents of poor and higher-income households, a new report shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A rogue gene is causing seizures in babiesTwo rare diseases caused by a malfunctioning gene that triggers seizures or involuntary movements in children as early as a few days old have left scientists searching for answers and better treatment options. Researchers are closer to understanding the source, a gene known as GNAO1 and the transformations it can take on, and potentially stopping its devastating effects by uncovering key differenc
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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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Gizmodo

Deadspin Adrian Beltre Told To Move To On-Deck Circle, Moves On-Deck Circle To Him, Gets Ejected | J Deadspin Adrian Beltre Told To Move To On-Deck Circle, Moves On-Deck Circle To Him, Gets Ejected | Jezebel Justin Bieber ‘Ran Over’ a Photographer After Church, But It Was an Accident | The Root Apparently There’s a White Supremacist Gym in Nashville, Tenn., and I Want to Go | Splinter Trump’s New White House Spokesman Gives Disastrous, Bonkers CNN Interview |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Circles in the sand reveal boating damage to marine biodiversityThe findings of a study by Swansea and Cardiff University scientists highlights the need for boating activities along the UK's beautiful coastlines to be conducted in a more environmentally friendly manner.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Grown-up gannets find favorite fishing groundsLike humans, some birds can spend years learning and exploring before developing more settled habits.
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Futurity.org

Using biochar on farms may cut health costs Widespread use of biochar made from recycled waste in farming could both enhance crop growth and reduce health care costs by clearing the air of pollutants, new research suggests. Biochar is ground charcoal produced from waste wood, manure, or leaves. Added to soil, the porous carbon has been shown to boost crop yields, lessen the need for fertilizer, and reduce pollutants by storing nitrogen tha
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

You smell with your body, not just your nose | Jennifer PluznickDo your kidneys have a sense of smell? Turns out, the same tiny scent detectors found in your nose are also found in some pretty unexpected places -- like your muscles, kidneys and even your lungs. In this quick talk (filled with weird facts), physiologist Jennifer Pluznick explains why they're there and what they do.
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Ars Technica

Meta-analysis finds sperm counts dropped 50%, media predicts human extinction Enlarge (credit: Getty | BSIP ) Men’s spunk may be getting noticeably less spunky in some high-income countries, according to a meta-analysis of international swimmers. Skimming and re-examining sperm data from 185 past independent studies, researchers estimated that sperm counts of men from select high-income regions—North America, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe—dropped about 52 percent betw
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Science | The Guardian

At this rate the only whales left for us to wonder at will be in museums | Philip HoareWhen great whales are dying in numbers not seen since hunting’s heyday, naming the Natural History Museum’s new exhibit Hope seems a forlorn gesture • Philip Hoare is an author and natural historian Hope, the name given to the Natural History Museum’s newly articulated blue whale , diving over visitors in a sublime spectacle, is already starting to look like a forlorn gesture. Last week, shortly a
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Gizmodo

Basically No One Has Joined Twitter for Months Image: Twitter/Gizmodo And why the hell should they? In the past three months, President Trump’s favorite social network has grown by zero (0) users, according to Twitter’s latest earnings report . That’s 66 million fewer new users than Facebook added in the same time period, and 9 million fewer than Twitter itself added during the first quarter of the year. If you’re worried about Twitter sudden
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_Reply All_'s Latest Episode Tackles Phone ScammersReply All trades memes for scams in its latest endeavor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds harmful protein on acid triggers a life-threatening diseaseUsing an array of modern biochemical and structural biology techniques, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have begun to unravel the mystery of how acidity influences a small protein called serum amyloid A.The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help design new treatments for the life-threatening human disorder called secondary
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Manmade peptides reduce breast cancer's spreadManmade peptides that directly disrupt the inner workings of a gene known to support cancer's spread significantly reduce metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer, scientists say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research examines benefits of promoting competing retail websitesA new study from the Naveen Jindal School of Management examines how retailers can benefit by showing ads from competing companies on their websites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Universal screening for alcohol misuse at hospital admission identifies patients at risk of developing alcoholic liver diseaseIn a landmark study of over 50,000 hospital admissions, investigators demonstrated the feasibility of introducing universal screening for alcohol misuse to identify patients at risk. They showed that patients can be easily categorized based on a simple risk score to identify people with high rates of emergency department attendance, recurrent hospital admissions, and high risk of alcohol-related l
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Futurity.org

‘Rust’ could be the real Alzheimer’s trigger Cleaning out “rust” from the brain could be a way to slow and even prevent Alzheimer’s, say researchers. The finding pinpoints iron as a potential driver of the degenerative disease. Previous research has long linked Alzheimer’s to a build-up in amyloid protein fragments in the brain that are normally broken down in healthy brains. But efforts to treat Alzheimer’s by using drugs that reduce amylo
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Futurity.org

Class teaches Navy to navigate by the stars again For the first time in nearly 20 years, more than 1,200 midshipmen enrolled in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps are learning to navigate by the stars with help from a free online program . In the 1990’s, increasing reliance on navigation technologies including GPS caused the Navy to drop celestial navigation from its officer training curriculum. Now, increasing awareness of the vulnerabili
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The Atlantic

Finally: An App That Can Identify the Animal You Saw on Your Hike The legendary naturalist John Muir once wrote: “Whenever I met a new plant, I would sit down beside it for a minute or a day, to make its acquaintance, hear what it had to tell.” The first step to making an acquaintance is to get a name—and naming nature is not easy. This weekend, while walking through Great Falls Park, a butterfly landed on my friend’s leg. It was large, with yellow and black wi
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The Atlantic

Don’t Take Mike Trout for Granted For more than a month, from the end of May to the middle of July, baseball was without its best player. Mike Trout, the 25-year-old centerfielder for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, slid into second base one afternoon, tore a ligament in his thumb, and went on the disabled list for the first time in his career. Gone were his airborne catches at the outfield wall, his piston-footed stolen bases
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The Atlantic

The Fratricidal Fight Inside the White House When Anthony Scaramucci was named White House communications director last week, he had a dual mandate to fix the president’s dysfunctional press shop and end leaks. So far, those two goals are steeply at odds, as Scaramucci’s fierce, sudden attack on White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus Wednesday and Thursday show. Related Story Anthony Scaramucci Is the Right Answer to the Wrong Question A
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Science | The Guardian

Too much sugar could increase depression risk in men, study suggests Researchers say they have found a strong association between consuming higher levels of sugar and depression in men – a link not mirrored in women Men who consume a lot of added sugar in drinks, cakes and confectionery run an increased risk of depression, according to a new study. Researchers from University College London (UCL) looked at sugar in the diet and common mental health problems in a v
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anyone for crispy jellyfish?There are far too many jellyfish in the sea, and we have an ever-increasing number of mouths to feed on the Earth. So why not eat the jellyfish? Win-win.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reality check for topological insulatorsTopological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material", as has graphene. But so far, topological insulators have not quite lived up to the expectations fueled by theoretical studies. University of Groningen physicists now have an idea about why. Their analysis was published on 27 July in the journal Physical Re
22h
Gizmodo

Google vs Apple vs Microsoft: Which Online Office Suite Should You Be Using? Image: Fabian Irsara/Unsplash /Google/Apple/Microsoft You don’t necessarily need to install a desktop application to get your hands on a decent office suite any more, and the biggest names in tech all have free, online productivity tools you can access from any browser—so which one should you be using? We take a look at the features, strengths, and weaknesses of each. For people who need to get o
22h
Live Science

Would You Drink This Mummified-Toe Cocktail?The notorious "Sourtoe Cocktail" — a shot of alcohol containing a dehydrated human toe — is a bizarre tradition at the Downtown Hotel's Sourdough Saloon, in Dawson City, Yukon Territory.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert says banning petrol and diesel cars is symbolically importantFollowing the announcement yesterday that the government plans to ban petrol and diesel cars from 2040 Professor Graham Parkhurst, Director of the Centre for Transport and Society at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol), says that this announcement is symbolically important.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Galactic David and GoliathThe gravitational dance between two galaxies in our local neighbourhood has led to intriguing visual features in both as witnessed in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The tiny NGC 1510 and its colossal neighbour NGC 1512 are at the beginning of a lengthy merger, a crucial process in galaxy evolution. Despite its diminutive size, NGC 1510 has had a significant effect on NGC 1512's st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comcast tops Street 2Q forecastsComcast is reporting second-quarter net income of $2.51 billion.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter user growth stalls, revenue dipsTwitter failed to boost its user base and saw a drop in revenues in the past quarter, the social network said Thursday, sending its shares tumbling in pre-market trade.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should we be worried about hepatitis E?Hepatitis E gets little press compared to its better-known cousins A, B and C, but Stellenbosch University virologists say we should wake up to how transmission of this virus is changing.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research highlights impact of kidney injury on non-renal solid organ transplantsResearch led by a University of Cincinnati scientist shows the impact of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis on patients receiving non-renal solid organ transplantation.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large gaps remain in colorectal cancer screening rates, study findsLarge gaps remain in colorectal cancer screening rates between poorer immigrants and wealthier long-term residents, several years after the Ontario government began mailing screening notices to eligible residents, a new study found.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithms identify the dynamics of prehistoric social networks in the BalkansThe pioneering application of modularity analyses in archaeology yields a powerful method for highly accurate mapping of social interaction in the human past.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Galactic David and GoliathThe gravitational dance between two galaxies in our local neighbourhood has led to intriguing visual features in both as witnessed in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The tiny NGC 1510 and its colossal neighbour NGC 1512 are at the beginning of a lengthy merger, a crucial process in galaxy evolution. Despite its diminutive size, NGC 1510 has had a significant effect on NGC 1512's st
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biochar could clear the air in more ways than oneBiochar could reduce local air pollution from agriculture by reducing emissions of nitric oxide from soil. Rice University researchers argue that a better understanding of nitric oxide response to biochar will save lives and money, especially on farms near urban areas where agricultural emissions contribute to ozone and particulate matter formation.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Child abuse and neglect linked to gender inequalityChildren growing up in societies that experience high levels of gender inequality -- irrespective of whether these are developed or developing countries -- are more likely to be maltreated. This is according to a cross-national analysis of data from 57 countries worldwide, conducted by Joanne Klevens and Katie Ports of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. The results are publi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell mechanism discovery could lead to 'fundamental' change in leukemia treatmentResearchers have identified a new cell mechanism that could lead to a fundamental change in the diagnosis and treatment of leukemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotic guidelines in NICU improve prescription practices for vulnerable infantsYale University School of Medicine neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) significantly reduced the number of cases of late-onset sepsis, a leading cause of death among pre-term infants, by implementing guidelines designed to eliminate overuse of antibiotics, according to new research published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of Ame
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heavy metals in water meet their matchA high school student's project removes more than 99 percent of heavy metal toxins from water. A new article demonstrates its potential for water remediation in developing nations around the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in waterA high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) has been developed, which researchers say enables atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ~1 s/frame.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineering a solution to dirty waterMore than 844 million people around the globe lack access to clean water. One of the challenges is that bacteria from rivers can flow into groundwater sources, polluting what may have been potable drinking water. Building new infrastructure to reroute clean water is expensive, especially for regions that already struggle with extreme poverty. Instead, communities often rely on water filtration sys
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologist investigates antibiotics in environmentA Binghamton University student could change how people think about antibiotics and the environment.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why World War I cultivated an obsession with insects"The soldier is no longer a noble figure," observed the war poet Siegfried Sassoon while serving on the Western Front. "He is merely a writhing insect among this ghastly folly of destruction."
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Gizmodo

Building a Molten Metal Squirt Gun Is the Worst Way to Stay Cool This Summer GIF Shortly after the Super Soaker was first released in 1990, it became surrounded with controversy about hooligans allegedly filling the toy with harmful chemicals. But if that sounds dangerous, just imagine how local news stations would freak out over a squirt gun that blasts molten liquid metal . Kevin Kohler—aka the Backyard Scientist —used pewter, a malleable metal with a low melting point,
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Gizmodo

Remake Your Wardrobe With Nordstrom Rack's Latest Clear the Rack Sale Clear the Rack Sale It’s that time again. Nordstrom Rack has brought back their Clear the Rack sale and it’s full (and I mean FULL) of really incredible deals. Designer clothing, brands you’ve never heard of, everything in clearance an extra 25% off , or a whopping 50% off when it comes to dresses . The one in the picture up there is $15! What are you waiting for? If you don’t find anything at No
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The Atlantic

The U.K.'s Mixed Messages on Migration After Brexit British ministers added more confusion Thursday about the fate of EU citizens in the U.K. the day after Brexit. It began with an op-ed in the Financial Times by Amber Rudd, the U.K. home secretary, who wrote the country’s goal was to “control migration from the EU while still attracting the best and brightest.” British businesses have urged the government to reconsider its position on tightening
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Medieval men were diagnosed with infertility and prescribed treatmentsMen could be held responsible for the failure to produce children as far back as medieval times, a new study of medical and religious texts has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart, soil-free microgarden lets users optimize growing conditions while cutting water and resource useMIT Media Lab alumna Jennifer Broutin Farah SM '13, CEO and co-founder of SproutsIO, has spent nearly a decade innovating in urban farming, designing small- and large-scale gardening systems that let anyone grow food, anywhere, at any time.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zebrafish reveal secrets of the developing gutOur intestine is a highly complex organ – a tortuous, rugged channel built of many specialized cell-types and coated with a protective, slimy matrix. Yet the intestine begins as a simple tube consisting of a central lumen lined by a sheet of epithelial cells, which are smooth cells that lie on the surface of the lumen. These intestinal epithelial cells are central players in many human diseases.
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New Scientist - News

Men’s sweet tooth may increase risk of anxiety and depressionMen who consume large amounts of sugar in cakes, biscuits and fizzy drinks are 23 per cent more likely to develop depression or anxiety over a five-year period
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists deduce the correct structure of the A and B baulamycins(Phys.org)—A team of chemists at the University of Bristol has correctly deduced the correct structure of the A and B baulamycins. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they discovered that the baulamycins had been incorrectly structured and how they developed the new method for deducing the structure of flexible compounds in general. Severin Thompson and Thomas Ho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How early career women help to open up the gender pay gapPerhaps Gary Lineker is worth more than Clare Balding? After all, the former footballer fronts the BBC's coverage of the world's most popular sport. Balding, on the other hand, presents the BBC countryside radio programme Ramblings and the BBC faith programme Good Morning Sunday, alongside other jobs for BBC Sport. In truth, though, the kerfuffle over the BBC gender pay gap is a distraction, and p
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Iranian Hackers Used a Fake Persona Named 'Mia Ash' To Ensnare VictimsA fake persona tied to a massive international spying campaign illustrates how social engineering attacks have evolved.
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Feed: All Latest

This BuzzFeed Kitchen Gadget Makes You the Best Chef EverIt makes cooking so easy, and the end result so delicious.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A tale of three stellar cities: Three different populations of baby starsUsing new observations from ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, astronomers have discovered three different populations of baby stars within the Orion Nebula Cluster. This unexpected discovery adds very valuable new insights for the understanding of how such clusters form. It suggests that star formation might proceeds in bursts, where each burst occurs on a much faster time-scale than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study by running experts: Don't change your strideA new study by a 2016 Olympian and a USA Track & Field consultant finds the stride length people naturally choose is the best for them, whether they are experienced or inexperienced runners. That means whatever shape you are in -- marathon warrior or weekend jogger -- stick with what you're doing.
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NYT > Science

Video of Shark, Seemingly Bound and Dragged by a Boat, Under InvestigationFlorida officials are looking into the video, which was posted on Instagram, but it remains unclear exactly what the creature was, whether it was alive and where the video was taken.
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NYT > Science

British Court Decides Charlie Gard Will Be Moved to a Hospice to DieThere were no further details on when life support would be removed from the chronically ill infant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experimental method measures robustness of quantum coherenceResearchers at the UAB have come up with a method to measure the strength of the superposition coherence in any given quantum state. The method, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society A, is based on the measurement of experimental parameters related to the visibility of the interference fringe patterns produced when the two states are superimposed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An app to help you zero in on summer funAn app developed by an EPFL doctoral student suggests outings you're sure to like – from sporting events to culture and outdoor fun. How does it work? The app is linked to a huge database of events and powered by a machine-learning algorithm that learns from your choices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Men with flexible working hours have successful partnersResearch conducted by Dr Laura Langner at the University of Oxford's Department of Sociology investigated changes in couples' hourly wages once one partner enters work-hour flexibility.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flock size matters for critically endangered regent honeyeatersNew research from the ANU shows the need for urgent action to boost the flock sizes of the critically-endangered regent honeyeater.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light limitation as a factor in ecological conditionsThere's a 50-hectare forested plot in Panama where researchers with the Smithsonian Institution have gathered highly detailed information about the species, distribution, and size of trees there. In a 2016 study, researchers proposed that those particular characteristics, and the forest's total metabolic rate, was limited by light. But a recent paper published in Global Ecology and Biogeography by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Grown-up gannets find favorite fishing groundsLike humans, some birds can spend years learning and exploring before developing more settled habits. A study of northern gannets has shown adults return to the same patch of sea over and over again to find food.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-efficacy boosts physical activity in osteoarthritis patientsOsteoarthritis patients that are more confident in their abilities in the morning go on to be more physically active throughout the day, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

E-cigarette use may encourage experimentation with tobacco, study findsYoung people who have tried an e-cigarette may be more likely to go on to smoke cigarettes compared with those who have not, a study led by University of Stirling researchers has suggested.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anyone for crispy jellyfish?The world needs new foods, and we are gradually getting used to the idea of having to eat seaweed and insects. So jellyfish on our plates would not put us off. Right?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Circles in the sand reveal boating damage to marine biodiversityThe findings of a study by Swansea and Cardiff University scientists highlights the need for boating activities along the UK's beautiful coastlines to be conducted in a more environmentally friendly manner.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research findings to standardize first-aid treatment of jellyfish stingsNew research from NUI Galway and the University of Hawaii at Manoa has identified the best way to treat a sting from the lions mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata).
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The Atlantic

When the President Calls You 'Sleazy' on Twitter In some of his first public remarks since the president of the United States declared him “sleazy,” Adam Schiff denied the allegation, which Donald Trump made via Twitter this week. Trump “chose a poor descriptor because I don’t think that’s people’s impression of me,” the mellow Democrat from California told me. “I’ve been called a lot of things, but ‘sleazy’ isn’t one of them.” Until, that is,
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Scientific American Content: Global

3 Myths (and 1 Truth) About Grain-Fed BeefThere's a lot to consider when deciding what kind of meat to buy--or even whether to eat meat at all. The least we can do is start with accurate information. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Jeff James and his Corvette Off Barry’s Godfather | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c The Godfather lines up against Jeff James at Dig Night in one of the closest races of the event. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Fo
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Gizmodo

The DJI Spark Is an Incredibly Exciting Start to an Insane Future All photos: Adam Clark Estes Small drones are not new. Toy-sized quadcopters have been on the market for years helping kids (and dads) start flying for a relatively reasonable price and not much expertise. Yet small drones that can do almost anything a big drone can do? That’s new. And that’s what makes the DJI Spark so exciting. The first and, ultimately, most important thing you’ll notice about
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Gizmodo

Punch Your Zip Code Into This Website To Learn If Your Tap Water Could Be Unsafe AP On Wednesday, the public health nonprofit and advocacy group Environmental Working Group released a searchable database detailing chemical and heavy metal contaminants in drinking water for all 50 states. In contrast, to the EPA’s extremely clunky site , this is highly simplified. In all, EWG compiled data from more than 50,000 water companies. By entering their zip code, users can find detail
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough lofts the smallest satellites everIn 2015, Russian billionaire Yuri Milner established Breakthrough Initiatives, a non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). In April of the following year, he and the organization be founded announced the creation of Breakthrough Starshot, a program to create a lightsail-driven "wafercraft" that would make the journey to the nearest star sys
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Ars Technica

YouTube Red and Google Play Music may merge into one service (credit: Flickr: Rego Korosi ) Google is notorious for having many services that do similar things, like its array of chat apps . Google's music services have been fragmented for years, but the company may change that soon. According to a report from The Verge, YouTube's head of music Lyor Cohen stated at the New Music Seminar conference in New York last night that YouTube Red and Google Play Mus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The real consequences of fake newsFake news, or fabricated content deceptively presented as real news, has garnered a lot of interest since the U.S. presidential election last fall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests investment pays off in safety for walkers, bikersA new study of pedestrian and bicycle travel suggests investment in infrastructure and policies to encourage walking and biking are correlated with lower rates of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths.
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Scientific American Content: Global

First Human Embryos Edited in the U.S., Scientists SayReports suggest researchers have altered DNA and made few errors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.The embryos, whose genes were altered by CRISPR, were not intended for implantation.
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The Scientist RSS

Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in MiceOnce implanted into animals' brains, neural stem cells that secrete microRNA-containing vesicles seem to contribute to an anti-aging effect.
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Futurity.org

In Arizona, monsoons are fewer but more furious Central and southwestern Arizona get fewer monsoon storms—but those they get bring heavier rain and stronger winds than storms from 60 years ago. “The monsoon is the main severe weather threat in Arizona. Dust storms, wind, flash flooding, microbursts—those are the things that are immediate dangers to life and property,” says coauthor Christopher Castro, associate professor of hydrology and atmos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reality check for 'wonder material'Topological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material', as has graphene. But so far, topological insulators have not quite lived up to the expectations fueled by theoretical studies. University of Groningen physicists now have an idea about why. Their analysis was published on 27 July in the journal Physical Re
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

EU report: More evidence on link between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistanceThe European Food Safety Authority, the European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control are concerned about the impact of use of antibiotics on the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The report presents new data on antibiotic consumption and antibiotic resistance and reflects improved surveillance across Europe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria already endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman periodMalaria was already widespread on Sardinia by the Roman period, long before the Middle Ages, as indicated by research at the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine of the University of Zurich with the help of a Roman who died 2,000 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Danish reference genomeAfter close to 5 years of work, the GenomeDenmark consortium has now finalized the efforts to establish a Danish Reference genome. The result is a reference of unrivalled quality and information depth, as compared to other similar international references and studies. Due to the unique and high quality approach, the consortium consisting of three Danish universities and the genomics company BGI Eu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing more with PET scans: New chemistry for medical imagingResearchers have found a surprisingly versatile workaround to create chemical compounds that could prove useful for medical imaging and drug development.
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Live Science

Cyclone 'Licks' Portugal Coast in Gorgeous Space ImageA curling tongue of clouds reaches out to taste the Iberian Peninsula in a new satellite image.
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Ars Technica

Thirty Meter Telescope nears a construction permit—with conditions Enlarge / On the road, near the summit. There are presently 10 optical telescopes on top of Mauna Kea. (credit: Eric Berger) The Big Island of Hawaii has perhaps the best astronomical seeing conditions in the Northern Hemisphere, and the University of California system and Caltech have a $1.4 billion plan to build the world's largest telescope there. The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) would open up
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Gizmodo

Arrow's Flashbacks Will Return For One Major Character Next Season Stefan Kapicic hypes up the return of Colossus in Deadpool 2 . Elizabeth Olsen confirms love is in the air for Infinity War . Charlie Cox talks about Matt and Foggy’s relationship in The Defenders . Plus, new Game of Thrones pictures, and Henry Cavill issues a very important statement about his mustache. To me, my Spoilers! Dumbo Deadline reports that DeObia Oparei—who plays Areo Hotah on Game of
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Science | The Guardian

Satellite Eye on Earth: June 2017 – in pictures Patagonia’s icefields, Australia’s changing tides, and volcanic activity in Alaska are among the images captured by Nasa and the ESA last month Alaska’s remote Bogoslof Island volcano erupted in a series of explosions starting in December 2016, triggering the highest aviation alert as it shot ash plumes at least 35,000ft into the atmosphere. By monitoring the volcano via satellite and seismologic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists design ultrafocused pulsesPhysicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental method measures quantum coherence, the ability of being in 2 states at onceResearchers at the UAB have come up with a method that allows measuring the strength of the coherence of superposition in any given quantum state, similar to the famous Schrödinger's cat, which was simultaneously dead and alive. The method, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society London A, is based on the measurement of experimental parameters related to the visibility of the int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of potentially inappropriate medications may increase hospitalization riskPotentially inappropriate medication use was linked with a 16 percent increased risk of hospitalization in a population-based study of elderly individuals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UBC research unearths Canadian sapphires fit for a queenNew research from UBC mineralogists could make it easier to find high-quality Canadian sapphires, the same sparkling blue gems that adorn Queen Elizabeth II's Sapphire Jubilee Snowflake Brooch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists design ultrafocused pulsesPhysicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neolithic farmers practiced specialized methods of cattle farmingSwiss farmers practiced various different methods of animal farming as early as 5,400 years ago, as demonstrated by a study by researchers from the University of Basel, as well as research institutions from Germany and the UK. The study focused on the settlement Arbon Bleiche 3 on the south bank of Lake Constance. The academic journal PLOS ONE has published the results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using tweets to decrypt the personality of Donald Trump and other powerful peopleA detailed, QUT-led study examining the tweets of US President Donald Trump reveal an 'emotionally unstable innovator' using social media as a political tool.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Negative birth outcomes linked to air pollution exposure early in pregnancy, study findsThis study, conducted in mice, found that exposure to air pollution during the equivalent of the first or second trimester in humans was linked to more negative birth outcomes than exposure later in pregnancy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women and men report similar levels of work-family conflictsContrary to public perception and many media accounts, women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts, both in the form of work interfering with family and family interfering with work, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropicsA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has recently completed a global study on the trade-offs between the benefits provided by tropical forests and its conversion for agricultural use. The team examined deforestation activities of more than 50 countries in the tropics between 2000 to 2012, and identified regions where deforestation is most and least beneficial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In assessing risk of hormone therapy for menopause, dose -- not form -- mattersUCLA-led research finds that the way estrogen therapy for menopause is delivered doesn't affect risk or benefit. What DOES make a difference with the commonly used conjugated equine estrogen, plus progestogen, is dosage.
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Futurity.org

Managers often clueless about unhappy customers New research suggests that senior managers at some of the top corporations in the world often fail to understand the feedback and expectations of their customers, despite spending millions gathering data related to customer satisfaction. In their new paper, the researchers present a disconnect between managers and customers in terms of understanding what drives customer satisfaction and loyalty.
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New Scientist - News

Lectin-free is the new food fad that deserves to be skeweredWith echoes of the gluten-free craze, lectins are being wrongly vilified with a glut of questionable health claims, says Anthony Warner
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New Scientist - News

Clinic ‘turkey baster’ method may be worth trying before IVFA medical fertility treatment that puts sperm directly into a woman’s uterus has fallen out of favour, but studies suggest it’s more effective than we thought
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When the federal budget funds scientific research, it's the economy that benefitsEmergency: You need more disposable diapers, right away. You hop into your car and trust your ride will be a safe one. Thanks to your phone's GPS and the microchips that run it, you map out how to get to the store fast. Once there, the barcode on the package lets you accurately check out your purchase and run. Each step in this process owes a debt to the universities, researchers, students and the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From flying warehouses to robot toilets – five technologies that could shape the futureFlying warehouses, robot receptionists, smart toilets… do such innovations sound like science fiction or part of a possible reality? Technology has been evolving at such a rapid pace that, in the near future, our world may well resemble that portrayed in futuristic movies, such as Blade Runner, with intelligent robots and technologies all around us.
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Ingeniøren

Lastbiler fra Østeuropa overfylder de danske rastepladserDe danske rastepladser er så overfyldte, at det er svært for chaufførerne at finde steder, hvor de kan stoppe og gå på toilet eller overholde køre- hviletidsbestemmelserne. Politiker vil indføre betaling, så rastepladser ikke ender som campingpladser for chauffører, der venter på næste ordre.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria already endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman periodMalaria was already widespread on Sardinia by the Roman period, long before the Middle Ages, as indicated by research at the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine of the University of Zurich with the help of a Roman who died 2,000 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Historian plumbs tax records for patterns of racial discriminationHistory professor Andrew Kahrl tracks racial discrimination through the tax assessor's office.
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Gizmodo

This Newly-Discovered Dinosaur Looks Just Like a Modern Day Cassowary Artistic reconstruction of Corythoraptor jacobsi (Image: Zhao Chuang) As virtually every school-aged child knows, birds are descended from dinosaurs. But holy toledo, does this newly discovered oviratporid ever look like a modern cassowary—right from the dramatic crest atop its head through to its long neck and ostrich-like shape. The paleontologists who discovered the dino are now studying moder
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The Fantastic Geometry of Greece's Fish Farms 2000 Feet UpMost people visit Greece to see ancient ruins. Bernhard Lang goes for the fish farms.
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The Beginner's Guide to PodcastsCurious about podcasts? We tell you how to listen, and which shows to listen to.
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Ars Technica

AMD Ryzen 3 1300X and 1200: True quad-core CPUs for just $130 and $110 Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Ryzen 3 1300X and Ryzen 3 1200, AMD's budget-focused quad-core CPUs, launch today for $130 and $110 respectively. UK pricing is yet to be confirmed, but don't expect much change from £120 and £100 respectively. Like the rest of the Ryzen line-up, Ryzen 3 offers more cores compared to a similarly priced Intel chip. The Ryzen 3 1200—which features four cores, four thre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hostage situation or harmony? Researchers rethink symbiosisRelationships where two organisms depend on each other, known as symbiosis, evoke images of partnership and cooperation. But a new study in Nature Ecology and Evolution shows that, when it comes to certain microorganisms, symbiotic partners are actually being held 'hostag.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel thermal ablation system for transdermal drug deliveryThe size of protein-based drug molecules prevents their absorption into the body when taken orally making injection (intramuscularly, subcutaneously, intravenously, etc.) the only effective delivery method. Research into transdermal drug delivery systems to make taking these drugs easier and cheaper has lead Japanese researchers to develop a new transdermal thermal abrasion system. It uses near-in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cave mazesAnalysis of caves in Israel deserts brings to light the ancient groundwater circulation of northwestern Arabia. The cave distribution, morphology, and deposit evidence indicates that they formed through dissolution by rising groundwater. This water originated as rainwater flowing from highlands around the present Red Sea, infiltrated through sandstone, and rose again through deep faults in Israel,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Osaka chemists build new chemical structures on unreactive bondsOsaka University organic chemists transform strong carbon fluorine bonds into crowded quaternary carbon centers with cobalt catalyzed Grignard chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shedding light deeper into the human brainThe inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. The reality is that light scattering is the major obstacle for deep penetration into tissue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biochar could clear the air in more ways than oneBiochar from recycled waste may both enhance crop growth and save health costs by helping clear the air of pollutants, according to Rice University researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: A self-driving wheelchairSingapore and MIT have been at the forefront of autonomous vehicle development. First, there were self-driving golf buggies. Then, an autonomous electric car. Now, leveraging similar technology, MIT and Singaporean researchers have developed and deployed a self-driving wheelchair at a hospital.
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Futurity.org

‘Back to normal’ isn’t easy for young cancer survivors Cancer survivors often talk about wanting to get back to normal, but new research finds that younger survivors may find that difficult for as long as two years after their diagnosis. “The research is important to help these young survivors better reintegrate into society,” says Brad Zebrack, professor of social work at the University of Michigan and coauthor of a new study in the journal Cancer .
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Ars Technica

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus—Like playing a B-movie with robot Nazis Video captured/edited by Mark Walton. In Wolfenstein: The New Order , which tells the story of an alternate history where the Nazis win the Second World War, veteran William "B.J." Blazkowicz awakens from a coma to find the Nazis have acquired the technology to build giant killer robots powered by the brains of fallen soldiers. In an effort to stop the Nazis, B.J. infiltrates a Nazi research faci
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New Scientist - News

First exomoon might have been spotted 4000 light years awayAstronomers may have found the first exomoon around a distant planet, and have asked to use Hubble to confirm whether the tantalising hints are a real discovery
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fussy fish use genetic compatibility to pick partners from afarWhen salmon spawn, the sperm of competing males are in an all-or-nothing race to be the first to reach and fertilise the eggs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New look at an old dinosaur: the rediscovery of the lost Austrosaurus siteThe discovery of new bones belonging to a long-necked sauropod named Austrosaurus mckillopi has been announced by a team of Australian and British palaeontologists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers conduct sequencing and de novo assembly of 150 genomes in Denmark(Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers has developed a Danish reference genome catalog based on the de novo assembly of 150 genomes sequenced from 50 family trios. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes the multi-year effort, its purpose, and where they believe such efforts are leading.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New robot speeds sampling of ocean's biogeochemistry and healthThe world's first underwater vehicle designed specifically to collect both biological and chemical samples from the ocean water column successfully completed sea trials off the coast of New England on July 9, 2017. The new autonomous underwater vehicle, named Clio, will help scientists better understand the inner workings of the ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Has Cassini found a universal driver for prebiotic chemistry at Titan?An important type of molecule that helps produce complex organic material has been detected within Titan's hazy upper atmosphere by a UCL-led team as part of the international Cassini-Huygens mission.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoscale magnetic device mimics behavior of neurons and can recognize human audio signals(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from France, Japan and the U.S. has created a nanoscale magnetic device that mimics the behavior of neurons and can be used to recognize human audio signals. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they built their device, how it works and how accurate they found its results. Frank Hoppensteadt with the Courant Institute
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infants know what we like best, WashU study findsBehind the chubby cheeks and bright eyes of babies as young as 8 months lies the smoothly whirring mind of a social statistician, logging our every move and making odds on what a person is most likely to do next, suggests new research in the journal Infancy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop model to predict and prevent power outages using big dataHigh-speed winds during a thunderstorm may cause trees around an electric grid to crash into the distribution system feeders causing an outage in that area. Currently, most utility companies diminish such accidents by scheduling regular tree-trimming operations. This effort is costly and is based on a rotational approach to different service areas, which may take months and sometimes years before
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are doctors prescribing antibiotics too often for sinus infections?Sinus infections are one of the most common reasons patients walk out of the doctor’s office with an antibiotic prescription in hand. The problem is that bacteria causes only about one-third of sinus infections, which means most patients are inappropriately receiving antibiotics.
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The Scientist RSS

Four Countries Launch Programs to Lure Foreign ScientistsResearchers have criticized their countries' initiatives, which some suspect were launched in reaction to a perceived anti-science sentiment from the Trump administration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No one knew just how many Ubers and Lyfts were out there—until nowIn urban areas—and in not so urban areas—around the globe, Uber and Lyft are ubiquitous. But knowing just how many are out there at a given time is a problem that's eluded municipal transportation officials since the ride-hailing services burst onto the scene. That is, until now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Promoting rival retailers can make sense, study saysA few years ago, Dr. Mohammad Zia PhD'17 was checking flight prices on Expedia when he was puzzled by a section of the website that prompted him to run the same search on competing travel websites, including Priceline and Orbitz.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study by running experts: Don't change your strideA new study by a 2016 Olympian and a USA Track & Field consultant finds the stride length people naturally choose is the best for them, whether they are experienced or inexperienced runners. That means whatever shape you are in -- marathon warrior or weekend jogger -- stick with what you're doing.
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NYT > Science

Want to Be Happy? Buy More Takeout and Hire a Maid, Study SuggestsResearchers found that spending money to save time actually makes people happier than buying material goods.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Fungi Physics: How Those Spores Launch Just RightUltrahigh-speed video footage helped researchers determine how fungi aim their spores in the right direction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Precision farming via satellite imagingPrecision farming is set to become even more precise with a new camera drawing on satellite imaging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Soyuz ready to rollThe Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft that will carry ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik and Roscosmos commander Sergey Ryazansky to the International Space Station is now on the launch pad in Kazakhstan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The four-year treasure hunt for the hoodwinker sunfish, Murdoch University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ecological model uses tournament-style framework of biodiversityA new mathematical model of ecology created by University of Chicago scientists provides the most accurate reproduction to date of natural biodiversity, according to a new paper in the journal Nature.
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New Scientist - News

Human embryo gene editing has taken place in US, claims reportA US team is said to have carried out the most extensive study of editing human embryos yet, but the full results have not yet been released
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropicsA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has recently completed a global study on the trade-offs between the benefits provided by tropical forests and its conversion for agricultural use. The team examined deforestation activities of more than 50 countries in the tropics between 2000 to 2012, and identified regions where deforestation is most and least beneficial.
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Explore the Murky Depths With an OpenROV Trident Underwater DroneWe’ve just gotten used to drones buzzing in the skies over public parks; now they’re set to invade the duck pond.
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'Pyre' Is a Game About a Game—But It's Really About Why We PlayThe new title from Supergiant is a fun, thought-provoking exploration of sports: how we play them, why, and for whom.
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Feed: All Latest

The Tesla Model 3 Launches the Electric Vehicle MarketThe "affordable" electric car is officially released this week.
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cognitive science

[Academic] How good are you at spotting intentions? (All welcome) submitted by /u/aeise [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

Finally Upgrade to a Dyson With This One-Day Refurb Sale Refurb Dyson Ball Animal , $200 Dyson vacuums dominated the nominations in our Kinja Co-Op for best vacuum, but they can be prohibitively expensive. Today though, refurbs of the popular Dyson Ball Animal are down to $200 on Amazon , one of the best prices we’ve seen. The Dyson Ball includes a brush that automatically adjusts when you move from carpets to hard floors, a ton of accessory hose tools
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Live Science

That's a Woman's Job: How Do Certain Careers Acquire a Gender?Why do we consider some occupations 'male' and other 'female'? New research sheds some light on how giving jobs genders hurts everyone, men included.
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Live Science

World's Smallest Satellites Launched into OrbitThe $100 million Breakthrough Starshot initiative has achieved what might prove to be a "Sputnik moment" in successfully lofting its first spacecraft — the smallest ever launched and operated in orbit.
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Live Science

400-Year-Old Physics Mystery Is CrackedThe mystery of Prince Rupert's drops, which are tadpole-shaped glass confections that can resist a hammer blow to the head but also shatter with slightest pressure on the tail, has finally been solved.
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The Atlantic

The 13 Writers Longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker Prize The 13 novels longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Britain’s most prestigious literary award, were announced Thursday morning. Among them are some of the biggest names in fiction (Arundhati Roy, Zadie Smith, Paul Auster, Colson Whitehead, George Saunders) as well as two first-time novelists: Fiona Mozley, a 29-year-old from northern England, and Emily Fridlund, a Cornell professor whose coming-of
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Ingeniøren

Hacket bilvask kan angribe mennesker Det første tilfælde hvor en internet-forbundet enhed kan angribe mennesker er fundet: En voldelig bilvask. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hacket-bilvask-kan-angribe-mennesker-1078630 Version2
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Ingeniøren

To ministre fyret efter svensk it-skandale To svenske ministre har forladt deres poster i regeringen som direkte konsekvens af den verserende it-skandale. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/to-ministre-fyret-efter-svensk-it-skandale-1078632 Version2
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Ingeniøren

To ministre fyret efter svensk it-skandale To svenske ministre har forladt deres poster i regeringen som direkte konsekvens af den verserende it-skandale. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/to-ministre-fyret-efter-svensk-it-skandale-1078632 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shedding light on protein interaction networks in a developing organismResearchers succeeded for the first time in mapping protein-protein interactions in living developing plant roots. The findings of three international research groups led by the department of Plant Developmental Biology at Wageningen University and Research were published in Nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in waterCalcite is one of the most abundant components of the Earth's crust, constituting the largest carbon reservoir in the global carbon cycle. Thus, large-scale dissolution of calcite would have enormous impact on the weather, geography and aquatic environment, for example, changes in the carbon dioxide concentration of the air and the acidity of the ocean. The dissolution mechanism of calcite has imp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using magnetic resonance to evaluate food qualityThe applications and benefits of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in medicine are well known, but the technology is also used in other areas such as agribusiness, where its applications include quality analysis of seeds and other products of animal and plant origin. NMR has recently reached the retail commerce sector, where it expedites the assessment of meat and fruit quality in supermarkets.
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Live Science

Next Stop, Westeros! Google Earth Posts 33 'Game of Thrones' SitesThe fantastical "Game of Thrones" world is now on Google Earth, with 33 locations — including medieval castles, maze-like gardens and rocky ports — showing exactly where key scenes were filmed.
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Live Science

Photos: 33 Stunning Locations Where 'Game of Thrones' Was FilmedThe HBO hit show "Game of Thrones" takes place in a world of fantasy, but dozens of the scenes were filmed at real medieval castles and in wild forests and craggy mountainsides across Europe and Iceland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pressure sensor can identify early stages of flat feetA team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) have designed a device for measuring pressure on human feet. Its applications include pediatric illnesses and monitoring the physical condition of professional athletes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Searching for invisible particles with the ATLAS ExperimentAs the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) smashes protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, it creates a rich assortment of particles that are identified through the signature of their interactions with the ATLAS detector. But what if the collider produces particles that travel through ATLAS without interacting? These "invisible particles" may provide the answers to some of the greatest mysteries in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher looking to shed light deeper into the human brainThe inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. The reality is that light scattering is the major obstacle for deep penetration into tissue.
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Gizmodo

The Pentagon Worried Trump Was About to Start a Nuclear War With His Tweets Yesterday (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) It’s official. President Trump is, objectively speaking, a threat to the safety and security of the United States. And perhaps nothing demonstrated that better than when Trump started a tweetstorm that sent the Pentagon into a panic yesterday. The US military spent nine full minutes wondering if the president was about to start a war with North Korea. At precisely 8:55am E
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Ingeniøren

Hjerneskade hos mange amerikanske fodboldspillereNyt studie viser, at op imod 99 procent af alle spillerene i NFL får hjernesygdommen CTE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new bird which humans drove to extinction discovered in AzoresInside the crater of a volcano on Graciosa Island in the Azores archipelago in the Atlantic, an international team of researchers has discovered the bones of an unknown species of extinct songbird, a bullfinch they have named Pyrrhula crassa. The remains were found in a small cavity through which lava flowed long ago. This bird disappeared a few hundreds of years ago due to human colonization of t
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, diabetic mice offered hope for understanding human diseaseMice described in 1967 are still helping researchers understand diabetes.
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Science-Based Medicine

Are drug expiry dates really a myth?Are drug expiry dates just an industry ploy to keep you buying new bottles of medicine?
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The Triumphs and Blunders That Have Led to Tesla’s Model 3Elon Musk's master plan finally produces an affordable electric car.
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The Trump-Russia Scandal's Many Swirling UnknownsWhat we know so far about the Trump-Russia scandal only suggests more questions—questions Special Counsel Robert Mueller is digging into.
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Feed: All Latest

Brain Trauma Scientists Turn Their Attention to SoccerNeurologists involved in the new study of brain trauma in football players say soccer may rival the sport's impact on the brain.
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The Atlantic

Why the Myth of Meritocracy Hurts Kids of Color Brighton Park is a predominantly Latino community on the southwest side of Chicago. It’s a neighborhood threatened by poverty, gang violence , ICE raids , and isolation—in a city where income, race, and zip code can determine access to jobs, schools, healthy food, and essential services. It is against this backdrop that the Chicago teacher Xian Franzinger Barrett arrived at the neighborhood’s ele
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is It Art or Is It Science?An exhibition at Princeton University is a bit of both -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Are Astronomers on the Verge of Finding an Exomoon?It would be a huge discovery, but until they train the Hubble on a possible candidate, they won't know for sure—so stay tuned -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Huge landslide triggered rare Greenland mega-tsunami Scientists hope studying last month’s deadly event will improve modelling of rockslides that could become more frequent with climate change. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22374
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New Scientist - News

Why the latest advice on stopping antibiotics is long overdueResearch shows advice to “complete the course” when taking antibiotics is outdated and could actually be making drug-resistant bacteria worse
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Scientific American Content: Global

Robotic Exoskeleton Adapts While It's WornThe decades-old pursuit of bulky, much-hyped Iron Man–like “exosuits” could give way to minimalist technologies more in sync with the human body -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A tale of three stellar citiesUsing new observations from ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, astronomers have discovered three different populations of baby stars within the Orion Nebula Cluster. This unexpected discovery adds very valuable new insights for the understanding of how such clusters form. It suggests that star formation might proceeds in bursts, where each burst occurs on a much faster time-scale than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Community bias predicts police use of lethal forceAveraging the implicit bias of hundreds of thousands of individuals to understand how 'biased' a community is, predicts the likelihood of African-Americans being killed by police.
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Ingeniøren

Dagens rumspørgsmål besvaret: Hvorfor tror vi, der findes mørkt stof i universet?Space with Sarah forklarer i dag, hvorfra vi ved, at der må være fem gange mere mørkt end synligt stof i universet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A tale of three stellar citiesUsing new observations from ESO's VLT Survey Telescope, astronomers have discovered three different populations of baby stars within the Orion Nebula Cluster. This unexpected discovery adds very valuable new insights for the understanding of how such clusters form. It suggests that star formation might proceeds in bursts, where each burst occurs on a much faster time-scale than previously thought.
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The Atlantic

Conservative Groups Fume Over Failed Repeal Votes On Wednesday afternoon, the Senate failed to pass legislation that would have repealed major parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the law’s individual and employer mandates, the Medicaid expansion, tax credits, and taxes. It was the same measure that passed the Senate through reconciliation in 2015 and was ultimately vetoed by President Obama. After failing to pass the Obamacare replacemen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulation of two-dimensional nanomaterials for lithium-ion batteriesLi-ion batteries (LIBs) are advantageous energy storage devices due to their higher specific energy density, lower self-discharge, and lower memory effect. Among the components of batteries, electrode materials play a key role in enhancing electrochemical properties. Thus, the development of advanced electrode materials for high-performance LIBs is a major objective in related research fields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

WSU physicists turn a crystal into an electrical circuitWashington State University physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heavy metals in water meet their matchA high school student's project that was developed at Rice University and won national and international awards removes more than 99 percent of heavy metal toxins from water. A new paper demonstrates its potential for water remediation in developing nations around the world.
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The Atlantic

The Skinny Repeal Gets a Score With eight hours left of debate in the Senate reconciliation process , it appears all of the Republicans’ chances of repealing (or replacing) Obamacare will come down to a single option: the “skinny repeal.” Not much is known about the skinny repeal, however. At the end of Wednesday’s debate session, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer blasted Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for keeping the text of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nokia reports loss, warns of decline in networks industryNokia continued to be hit by a decline in its core networks sector in the second quarter with almost flat sales, and cautioned Thursday that a weakening in networks would be greater than previously expected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Secret garden' filled with rare species open after centuryPink and yellow wildflowers burst from a lush bed of grass hidden from public view for more than a century. Towering trees and snow-capped mountains encircle the wild meadow, beckoning visitors to a largely untouched piece of California's Sierra Nevada.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn: World's No. 1 contract electronics makerTaiwan-based contract manufacturer Foxconn Technology Group says it plans to build a $10 billion plant in Wisconsin to make liquid-crystal display panels, or LCDs. Little known to consumers, the maker of iPhones and other gadgets is a giant in the electronics industry thanks to its dominant position in the global manufacturing supply chain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen earnings rise in stronger European economyVolkswagen's profits rose in the first half of the year as the German carmaker benefited from increased sales in a growing European economy and it moved past one-time costs for its diesel emissions scandal in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows reusable, carbon nanotube-reinforced filters clean toxic heavy metals from waterCarbon nanotubes immobilized in a tuft of quartz fiber have the power to remove toxic heavy metals from water, according to researchers at Rice University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists turn a crystal into an electrical circuitWashington State University physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.
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The Atlantic

The Intergalactic Winds That Built the Milky Way Even though there’s no air blowing around in space, the cosmos can be a pretty windy place. Winds made of gas particles whip around galaxies at high speeds, measuring hundreds of kilometers per second. Astronomers suspect they’re created by supernovae, when nearby stars explode and send streams of photons powerful enough to push around gas. This wind can be ejected out of galaxies into intergalac
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Ingeniøren

Hemmelig forskerklub overvejer dommedagsgener til krigPå vegne af det amerikanske forsvar og bag lukkede døre gransker topforskere risici og fordele ved at anvende dyr til at sprede gift og genetiske modifikationer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon and Foxconn reflect a growing trend: Deliver it nowIn today's economy, speed is everything.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese writers navigate censors to earn cash via appsWhen outspoken professor Qiao Mu posted his resignation letter on a popular Chinese messaging app, sympathetic readers tapped their phone screens to send him money, leaving him with a 20,000 yuan ($3,000) payday.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Lapland zoo polar bears enjoy snow giftChristmas has come early for Lapland zoo polar bears with snow in July.
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Viden

Antallet af sædceller falder dramatisk i VestenDansk forsker ser ikke samme mønster i unge danske mænds sæd. Men det er måske, fordi den er dårlig i forvejen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon pushes into SE Asia with Singapore launchAmazon launched its express delivery service in Singapore on Thursday, the US online retail giant's first foray into Southeast Asia and a move that puts it in direct competition with China's Alibaba.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fight against planned Nicaragua Canal goes to inter-American bodyA rural movement in Nicaragua that opposes the government's plan to build a cross-country canal to rival Panama's on Wednesday said it has taken its fight to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronauts gear up for space with tough Russian trainingWearing helmets weighing 100 kilos, spinning in a centrifuge and exercising while weightless: Russian cosmonauts and astronauts from abroad have to undergo a gruelling training process before blasting off into space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesian villagers cut down forest in orangutan sanctuaryNearly a fifth of the forest in an orangutan sanctuary on the Indonesian part of Borneo has been taken over by people, a conservation group says, threatening efforts to rehabilitate the critically endangered great apes for release into the wild.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung soars, sidestepping jailing of chief, Note 7 fiascoNo leader and scorched Note 7 smartphones? No problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Visionary' project to save the Belize coast provides valuable frameworkA coastal zone management plan designed to safeguard Belize's natural assets has produced a win-win opportunity for people and the environment, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where overfishing, development, and habitat degradation are increasingly serious problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study calls for review into census capture of 'mixed' populationsCurrent methods of capturing mixed race/ethnicity populations in global censuses are unreliable, and must be reviewed to ensure increasingly diverse populations are effectively reported, a study published today in Ethnic and Racial Studies suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing more with PET scans: Surprising new mechanism for attaching chemical tracers discoveredResearchers have found a surprisingly versatile workaround to create chemical compounds that could prove useful for medical imaging and drug development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milky Way's origins are not what they seemIn a first-of-its-kind analysis, Northwestern University astrophysicists have discovered that, contrary to previously standard lore, up to half of the matter in our Milky Way galaxy may come from distant galaxies. As a result, each one of us may be made in part from extragalactic matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook profit jumps as user ranks growFacebook on Wednesday reported a surge in profits in the past quarter, fueled by strong growth in money-making ads to its more than two billion users.
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Ingeniøren

Så skete det igen: Udskældt it-system skrottes og genstartes for 130 millioner kroner Tre år efter sidste fase af det kommunale DUBU-system blev sat i drift lægges det i graven og afløses af nyt system. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saa-skete-igen-udskaeldt-sagsbehandlings-it-udsatte-boern-skrottes-genstartes-pris-paa-130 Version2
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NYT > Science

China and India File Rival Claims Over Tibetan MedicineIn Unesco applications, the neighbors are trying to formally tie Tibetan medicine, an ancient practice with a growing commercial value, to their national patrimonies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing more with PET scans: New chemistry for medical imagingResearchers have found a surprisingly versatile workaround to create chemical compounds that could prove useful for medical imaging and drug development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in waterWe have developed high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) and enabled atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ~1 s/frame. With this AFM, we have obtained images revealing the transition region is formed along the step edges. Our simulations suggest the transition region be a Ca(OH)2 monolayer formed as an intermediate state. Thus, our understanding of the calcite dissolution in water is much i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Binge drinking down among young adults in college, up among those who are notAfter years of increasing rates of binge drinking, alcohol-impaired driving, and alcohol-related mortality among emerging adults ages 18 to 24, the numbers are finally starting to come down among college students in that age group, according to a study in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. However, those same numbers are on the rise in young adults of the same age who a
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The Atlantic

One Dead, Many in Critical Condition After Ohio State Fair Accident A ride malfunction at the state fair in Columbus, Ohio resulted in the death of at least one passenger on Wednesday. Locals officials report that at least seven others were wounded, with five of them in critical condition and two others expected to recover. The incident occurred at around 7:24 p.m. local time when passengers on the Fire Ball ride were ejected around 20 to 30 feet into the air at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber's latest bid to win over drivers: 24/7 phone supportUber added a 24-hour phone help line and a slew of new features and policy changes Tuesday in an attempt to appease drivers, who have long complained the San Francisco ride-hailing company doesn't do enough to support them.
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The Atlantic

A Longtime Senate Staffer, on John McCain I’ve had my say about John McCain’s decision to support the rushed consideration of the Republican drive to repeal Obamacare. Installment one was here , and two was here . The theme of both was that McCain missed a historic opportunity to match the scolding-and-uplift of his much-praised words, about the need to avoid simple fights for partisan victories, with the weight of his actual votes, whic
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New on MIT Technology Review

Low-Quality Lidar Will Keep Self-Driving Cars in the Slow LaneFor now, cheap laser sensors may not offer the standard of data required for driving at highway speeds.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

SHARK WEEK: Shark Exile Dr. Hazin appears on Shark Week for the first-time by traveling to Brazil to reduce the number of shark attacks by simply catching and moving sharks to the open sea. What’s his secret? And can this solution work in Australia, where attacks are a problem? From: Discovery
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Gizmodo

It Looks Like The Wrong Person Just Died In Marvel's Secret Empire Image: Marvel In the fifth issue of Marvel’s Civil War II , the Avengers, Inhumans, and more were at war with one another over whether they have the right to apprehend villains for crimes that they’ve yet to commit. But their battle stops when everyone is suddenly struck with a vision of Miles Morales, Ultimate Spider-Man, killing Captain America. The image of Miles gripping Cap’s bloody, lifeles
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Gizmodo

FCC Chair Ajit Pai Can't Come Up With a Single Plausible Reason Not to Screw Up the Entire US Internet Photo: AP FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, ISP-endorsed frontman and villain of a theoretical future Revenge of the Nerds reboot, is trying to dupe everyone into believing abandoning open internet principles is inevitable because no opponents have any convincing arguments. At an FCC oversight hearing with the House Commerce Committee this week, Democratic Rep. Michael Doyle challenged Pai to present any so
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New Scientist - News

Fish can’t recognise faces if they’re upside down – just like usJust like humans, the medaka fish that lives in rice paddies is good at identifying faces – but, again like us, it struggles when faces are the wrong way up
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Ingeniøren

DN: Fare for at danske kyster ender som skibskirkegårdeDanmarks Naturfredningsforening vil have, at staten griber ind overfor skibsvrag og lader de ansvarlige betale. Miljøministeriet nægter at gøre noget, så længe vragene ikke udgør en trussel.
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The Atlantic

U.S. Sanctions Top Venezuelan Officials The U.S. government sanctioned more than a dozen senior Venezuelan officials on Wednesday, just four days before the nation is set to elect a constituent assembly to rewrite its constitution. The election has been heavily criticized by members of Venezuela’s opposition party, who accuse Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro of plotting to gain sweeping control over the nation and its democratically
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New Scientist - News

Half the atoms inside your body came from across the universeIntergalactic winds carry gas and dust from one galaxy to the next, bringing half of the matter in our galaxy from up to a million light years away
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a 16-hour road trip led to the creation of Seattle startup ApptentiveThe idea for Seattle startup Apptentive started as a conversation on a 16-hour road trip as co-founders Robi Ganguly and Andrew Wooster drove from the Bay Area to Seattle.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch A Major Paintjob Mistake Become Inspiration For A Great Look | Vegas Rat Rods #VegasRatRods | Mondays at 10/9c There are few options for the crew after Steve's cousin Dave takes initiative and paints the cab of the truck without permission. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/vegas-rat-rods More Rat Rods: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/vegas-rat-rods/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http
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Feed: All Latest

Hacker Warns Radioactivity Sensors Can Be Spoofed Or DisabledA security researcher exposes software flaws that could prevent detection of radioactive leaks or aid in smuggling radioactive material.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Embryonic RipplesThis fluttering clump of colorful cells is a zebrafish embryo, visualized by many stacked images.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is it Alzheimer's disease or another dementia?A new method may help determine whether a person has Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia, two different types of dementia that often have similar symptoms, according to a preliminary study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying major transitions in human cultural evolutionOver the past 10,000 years human cultures have expanded from small groups of hunter-gatherers to colossal and complexly organized societies. The secrets to how and why this major cultural transition occurred have largely remained elusive. A new article outlines how advances in computational methods and large cross-cultural datasets are beginning to reveal the broad patterns and processes underlyin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How bacteria maintain and recover their shapeBacteria have an extraordinary ability to maintain and recover their morphology even after being twisted out of shape. Researchers know that shape is determined by the cell wall, yet little is known about how bacteria monitor and control it. Since the cell wall is the target of most antibiotics, understanding how bacteria grow their cell walls may provide insight into more effective medicines. Now
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Milky Way's origins are not what they seemIn a first-of-its-kind analysis, Northwestern University astrophysicists have discovered that up to half of the matter in our Milky Way galaxy may come from distant galaxies. As a result, each one of us may be made in part from extragalactic matter. Using supercomputer simulations, the researchers found an unexpected mode for how galaxies acquired matter: intergalactic transfer. Supernova explosio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As more adults are diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, radiologists look for patternsMarked improvements have been made over the past few decades in managing cystic fibrosis, but as more adults are diagnosed with the disease radiologists can do more to monitor the wide spectrum of CF in adults, including nonclassic imaging findings, according to an article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of suicide attempts in army units with history of suicide attemptsDoes a previous suicide attempt in a soldier's U.S. Army unit increase the risk of other suicide attempts?
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Science | The Guardian

We are all made of stars: half our bodies' atoms 'formed beyond the Milky Way' Simulations reveal that up to half the material in our galaxy arrived from smaller galactic neighbours, as a result of powerful supernova explosions Nearly half of the atoms that make up our bodies may have formed beyond the Milky Way and travelled to the solar system on intergalactic winds driven by giant exploding stars, astronomers claim. The dramatic conclusion emerges from computer simulatio
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Gizmodo

Adobe Flash Fans Want a Chance to Fix Its One Million Bugs Under an Open Source License Adobe co-founder John Warnock in 2001, when Flash was useful. Photo: AP While Adobe is finally mercy killing Flash , its multimedia software that helped power countless web applications like games and videos faced but widespread criticism for its rapid decline in usefulness and growing number of security vulnerabilities , some fans want to keep it alive as an open-source project for the future. A
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Feed: All Latest

Lipizzan Malware Could Take Over Android Devices Until Google Shut It DownA new, targeted malware called Lipizzan could completely take over an Android device until Android Security shut it down
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Half of the Milky Way comes from other galaxiesA galaxy may swipe up to half of its atoms from other galaxies, making the Milky Way mostly extragalactic stuff, new simulations suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impact of surgical modality on breast-specific sensualityDoes the type of surgery used to treat breast cancer impact a woman's sensuality and sexual function in survivorship? New research analyzed the association of surgical modality with sexual function and found that breast-specific sensuality and appearance satisfaction are better with lumpectomy and may correlate with improved sexual function post-operatively.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study uncovers potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating colon cancerIn preclinical experiments, researchers have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ovarian, breast, lung, prostate and potentially other cancers that depend on the same mechanism for growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk for bipolar disorder associated with faster agingPeople with a family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more rapidly than those without a history of the disease, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do people decide: Should I go, stay, drink?Many studies of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) use tasks that involve monetary rewards or losses to examine individual decision-making vis-à-vis alcohol and other substance use. Yet drinking typically occurs in specific social and incentive contexts that do not involve economic decision-making. This study examined decisions about attending, and drinking in, hypothetical drinking/social contexts wher
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical response to terrorism: French doctors outline response to attacks in Paris and NiceFollowing the terrorist attacks in Paris and Nice, French experts outline the country's medical response to terrorism in a new report.
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Gizmodo

The Mystery Of The Space Shuttle In That Simpsons Episode Where Homer Went To Space Remember the Simpsons episode where Homer was sent into orbit? It had Buzz Aldrin and James Taylor as guests, and gave the world the Overlord Meme. The episode was titled Deep Space Homer , and I have some serious questions and theories about the spacecraft featured in the episode, a strange spaceplane called the Corvair spacecraft . The episode aired on February 25, 1994, and was about a NASA pr
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Futurity.org

Zebrafish inspire retina regeneration in mice Scientists have successfully regenerated cells in the retina of adult mice, raising the hope that it may one day be possible to repair retinas damaged by eye diseases or trauma. Many tissues of our bodies, such as our skin, can heal because they contain stem cells that can divide and differentiate into the type of cells needed to repair damaged tissue. The cells of our retinas, however, lack this
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Futurity.org

Knee shot means less morphine after surgery A new study recommends an alternative method of pain relief for patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Over 250 patients having knee replacements at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) took part in the study, which appears in the Bone and Joint Journal . “This is to be welcomed as the potential risks of morphine-type pain relief are well known…” A traditional option for p
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Gizmodo

HEROCLIP: The Carabiner Gets An Upgrade At recent outdoor trade show The Outpost , we spent some time hanging out with HEROCLIP , a welcome improvement to the ubiquitous carabiner. HEROCLIP (formerly Qliplet) is a carabiner with a hook on it, that folds flush when you don’t need it. Use HEROCLIP to hang a lantern from the roof poles of your tent, a bundle of bags in your closet, or all those multitools you’ve collected from your belt o
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Scientific American Content: Global

To Buy Happiness, Spend Money on Saving TimeVolunteers who used money to save themselves time were more content than volunteers who purchased themselves physical stuff. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study calls for review into census capture of 'mixed' populationsCurrent methods of capturing mixed race/ethnicity populations in global censuses are unreliable, and must be reviewed to ensure increasingly diverse populations are effectively reported, a study published today in Ethnic and Racial Studies suggests.
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Science | The Guardian

Legalise cannabis as treatment of last resort for MS, says charity MS Society says there is sufficient evidence of drug’s effectiveness to relax ban for patients with no other options Ten thousand people with multiple sclerosis in the UK should be allowed to use cannabis legally in order to relieve their “relentless and exhausting” symptoms, experts in the disease have told ministers. The MS Society claims the one in 10 sufferers of the condition whose pain and
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Along the Divisions What We’re Following Trump’s Transgender Ban: Over Twitter, President Trump announced that transgender people would no longer be allowed to serve in the U.S. military , reversing the Obama-era plan to let them serve openly. Trump’s rationale was that inclusion would entail “tremendous medical costs and disruption.” But the actual cost of gender-reassignment surgeries would likely be small in the
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Popular Science

You may not need to finish your antibiotics (but you probably still should) Health Time for a course correction. Stopping your antibiotics mid-course probably won't cause bacteria to become resistant. But it's still not a great idea. Read on.
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Feed: All Latest

The Tech Skills Gap Will Test Foxconn's New Wisconsin FactoryThree thousand new manufacturing jobs in America is great news, if people are trained to do the work.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should doctors work longer shifts?This week, The BMJ looks at the issue of working hours and burnout among doctors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leaving Europe's nuclear regulator will put patients at risk, warns expertThe UK's proposed withdrawal from the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) would threaten the supply of essential medical isotopes (essential for some types of cancer treatment and medical imaging) putting patients at risk, argues an expert in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Time to drop 'complete the course' message for antibioticsThe deeply embedded message that patients should 'complete the course' of antibiotics to avoid antibiotic resistance is not backed by evidence and should be dropped, argue experts in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Concerns that austerity policies reversing gains to reduce health inequalities in EnglandA cross government strategy, in place from 1997 to 2010, appears to have reduced health inequalities between the most deprived areas in England and the rest of the country, finds a study in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rise in e-cigarettes linked to rise in smokers quitting, say researchersThe recent rise in e-cigarette use among US adult smokers is associated with a significant increase in smoking cessation, finds a study published in The BMJ.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Americans are quitting smoking in higher numbers; study suggests e-cigarettes helpUniversity of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers performed a population-level analysis of national surveys conducted from 2001 to 2015 and found that in the United States the smoking cessation rate increased for the first time in 15 years. The study suggests e-cigarettes helped users of the electronic devices to quit smoking traditional cigarettes.
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Gizmodo

Is This Foxconn Factory the 'Big, Big, Big' Apple Plants Donald Trump Bragged About? Photo: AP On Wednesday, top Republican leadership including President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan all appeared at the White House alongside Gov. Scott Walker and Foxconn CEO Terry Gou to announce a new LCD production line in Wisconsin. The $10 billion plant, which they said would create 3,000 jobs right away and possibly 13,000 more in the long run,
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Science | The Guardian

Rule that patients must finish antibiotics course is wrong, study says Experts suggest patients should stop taking the drugs when they feel better rather than completing their prescription Telling patients to stop taking antibiotics when they feel better may be preferable to instructing them to finish the course, according to a group of experts who argue that the rule long embedded in the minds of doctors and the public is wrong and should be overturned. Patients ha
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Big Think

Researchers Found Evidence of a Human Ancestor We’ve Never Discovered Before Seems our ancient ancestors were gettin’ jiggy with lots of other hominin species. Read More
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The Atlantic

Steve Scalise Released From the Hospital Six weeks after incurring a life-threatening gunshot wound at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise has been discharged from the Washington, D.C. hospital where he received treatment. On Wednesday, MedStar Washington Hospital Center released a statement saying Scalise had made “excellent progress in his recovery” and would begin a period of “
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Skinny, Clean, and Everything In Between Today in 5 Lines President Trump announced on Twitter that the U.S. will no longer “accept or allow” transgender people to serve in the military. Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain denounced the announcement, calling it “unclear.” During the second day of deliberations, Senate Republicans voted against repealing major parts of the Affordable Care Act. Senators are expected to mo
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Gizmodo

RIP Google Instant Search, You Were Never Necessary Photo: Getty In 2010, Google’s then-VP of Search Products Marissa Mayer called Instant Search a “fundamental shift in search,” and the media marveled at this new time-saving feat of engineering. Now that shit is dead, because technology has fundamentally shifted once again. Google Instant was the search giant’s response to the fact that a lot of users are slow typers. On a desktop, Google’s searc
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Live Science

Why You May Not Have to Finish All Your AntibioticsThe mantra to "complete the course" for antibiotics is wrong and possibly dangerous, scientists say.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Should Fighting Antibiotic Resistance Always Include Finishing a Prescribed Medication?A group of experts takes a controversial stance on how to control superbugs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Visionary' project to save the Belize coast provides valuable frameworkA coastal zone management plan designed to safeguard Belize's natural assets has produced a win-win opportunity for people and the environment, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where overfishing, development, and habitat degradation are increasingly serious problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review: Could be unintended consequences of limiting surgical residents' hoursOpinion is still divided on whether strictly limiting the number of hours surgical residents can work and train impacts patient outcomes, the residents' quality of life or the caliber of their training, according to a paper published today.
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Live Science

Angelina Jolie's Facial Paralysis: What Is Bell's Palsy?In a new interview, Angelina Jolie told Vanity Fair that she developed a condition called Bell's palsy in 2016. What is Bell's palsy?
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New Scientist - News

Smallest satellite ever paves way for planned interstellar fleetBreakthrough Starshot, the $100 million project to send tiny spacecraft to Alpha Centauri, successfully operated a mini-satellite in orbit for the first time
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Gizmodo

Splinter A Brief History of What Happens When White Women Are Killed by Cops | Deadspin This Is What Splinter A Brief History of What Happens When White Women Are Killed by Cops | Deadspin This Is What Happens When A College Football Fixer Goes Rogue | The Slot Republican Congressman Defends Trump’s Attack on Sen. Lisa Murkowski: ‘Snatch a Knot in Their Ass’ | The Grapevine Gilbert Arenas Once Again Comes for Lupita Nyong’o Over Her Dark Skin |
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New on MIT Technology Review

First Human Embryos Edited in U.S.Researchers have demonstrated they can efficiently improve the DNA of human embryos.
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cognitive science

A Mother and Son’s Incredible Journey: Battling Dementia submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

Screenwriter John Ridley on Making Scifi and Superheroes for the World We Live In Image: DC Comics Maybe you’ve seen Three Kings , Twelve Years a Slave or American Crime . Maybe you know that the Oscar-winning writer/producer behind those works also scripts comics, too. Last week at San Diego Comic-Con, John Ridley talked about why. Ridley was at Comic-Con, at least in part, to talk up The American Way: Those Above and Those Below , a miniseries just kicked off by DC Comics. I
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Gizmodo

Latest Disgraced Tech CEO Worked at a Damn HR Company Image: Linkedin Kris Duggan looms large in Silicon Valley, serving as an adjunct professor at the Ray Kurzweil-founded Singularity University, and according to his Crunchbase profile, holds advisory positions with nine different companies including the secretive Palantir Technologies. Duggan is best known for co-founding BetterWorks in 2013, which has since sopped up a generous $35 million in ven
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Popular Science

Ring Video Doorbell 2 review: Higher res and easier to recharge, but just as bulky Gadgets It's not smaller, but it is smarter. The latest smart doorbell from Ring has learned a few things but could stand to slim down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump hails $10 bn investment from Apple supplier Foxconn (Update)President Donald Trump on Wednesday unveiled a $10 billion US investment by Apple supplier Foxconn to build a plant in Wisconsin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Things looking up as Los Angeles Zoo unveils baby giraffeThings are looking up at the Los Angeles Zoo, where visitors are getting their first glimpses of a baby giraffe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Somersaulting simulation for jumping botsIn recent years engineers have been developing new technologies to enable robots and humans to move faster and jump higher. Soft, elastic materials store energy in these devices, which, if released carefully, enable elegant dynamic motions. Robots leap over obstacles and prosthetics empower sprinting. A fundamental challenge remains in developing these technologies. Scientists spend long hours bui
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Gizmodo

Walmart Cancels SNES Classic Pre-Orders, Citing A 'Glitch' Oops! If you breathed a sigh of relief as you locked down your SNES Classic pre-order on Walmart.com Friday night, it’s time to start hyperventilating again, because the retailer has just canceled the orders en masse . “Unfortunately, due to a technical glitch, the Super Nintendo Classic Edition was mistakenly made available last Friday evening ahead of the official release date,” reads an email
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The Atlantic

Making Sense of the Obamacare Repeal Process What would Schoolhouse Rock! have to say about the reconciliation process? The old animated educational short was a useful introduction to “regular order” in Congress. Add a little additional knowledge on committees, filibusters, hearings, and lobbying, and you’d have a working basic understanding on how laws are passed in the United States. That’s regular order. What’s happening on the Senate fl
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook Security Chief: Cybersecurity Pros Need More Empathy to Protect UsThe dangers facing average Internet users are only “getting worse.”
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The Entomologist Giving Bugs Their Close UpAlex Wild wants to teach you — and everyone else — how to be a bug photographer.
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Feed: All Latest

Startups' Cryptocurrency Fundraising Loophole Gets a Regulatory Reality CheckRaising money for your company by selling crypto coins just got more complicated—that’s a good thing
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Ars Technica

Judge: Waymo may be in “a world of trouble” if it can’t prove actual harm by Uber Enlarge / Autodesk VRED Design 2017. (credit: Waymo ) SAN FRANCISCO—At a court hearing on Wednesday, US District Judge William Alsup questioned whether Waymo can really show the harm from Uber's alleged trade secret theft. Waymo has been ordered to submit within a month a detailed description of how it has been harmed. The case is rapidly moving ahead toward an October trial date. If the trial ac
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The Scientist RSS

UC Berkeley: Patent Office Ignored Key EvidenceThe University of California files a brief in its appeal challenging the ruling that the Broad Institute's group would retain its CRISPR genome-editing patent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No longer lost in translationMouse models have advanced our understanding of immune function and disease in many ways but they have failed to account for the natural diversity in human immune responses. As a result, insights gained in the lab may be lost in translation. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, developed a new approach to model human immune variation in the lab that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Somersaulting simulation for jumping botsIn recent years engineers have been developing new technologies to enable robots and humans to move faster and jump higher. Soft, elastic materials store energy in these devices, which, if released carefully, enable elegant dynamic motions. A pair of new computational methods developed by a team of researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Toronto and Adobe Resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Phase 3 trial confirms superiority of tocilizumab to steroids for giant cell arteritisA phase 3 clinical trial led by a Massachusetts General Hospital physician has confirmed that regular treatment with tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6, successfully reduced both symptoms of and the need for high-dose steroid treatment for giant cell arteritis, the most common form of blood-vessel inflammation.
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Popular Science

The Navy is preparing its railgun for the future of war Military This new weapon will fire projectiles at six times the speed of sound. Instead of the gunpowder weapons of old, the Office of Naval Research is testing an electromagnetic railgun for future use on Navy ships.
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.