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The Atlantic
John McCain's 'No' Vote Sinks Republicans' 'Skinny Repeal' Plan Senator John McCain brought down the latest Republican health-care plan early Friday morning. In a moment of high drama on the Senate floor, the Arizona senator, stricken with brain cancer and railing against his party’s secretive legislative maneuvering, provided the decisive vote against Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s proposal to partially repeal the Affordable Care Act. The amendment fell,
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The Tesla Model 3 Is More Than an Electric Car―It’s a Landmark in Automotive HistoryIt's Model 3 delivery day.
2h
Ingeniøren
Modsat andre uddannelser stiger antallet af nye studerende på ingeniørstudierI år har landets videregående uddannelser optaget to procent færre studerende end sidste år. Men det gælder ikke ingeniøruddannelserne, som oplever største tilstrømning i syv år.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Football judgments and driving too fast: The science of judging speedFootball officials watching slow-motion clips or drivers changing from motorways to 30 mph zones could be unconsciously misjudging speed -- and the motivations behind a person's movements -- because their perceptions of 'normal' have been altered by recent experiences, new research has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Omnipresent' effects of human impact on England's landscape revealedScientists show how the Anthropocene has transformed England.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Estrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cellsThe female sex hormone estrogen plays an important role in the structural stability of bones. To date, however, it had been unclear exactly which cells were involved in the hormone's protective function. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna showed for the first time that estrogen uses bone lining cells to regulate the expression of the protein RANKL. Estrogen deficiency leads to uncontrolled expression
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A molecule for proper neural wiring in the cerebellumA molecule produced by insulating glial cells facilitates the functional wiring of brain cells involved in motor coordination.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
On-chip pumps achieve high-speed sorting of large cellsNagoya University research developed a high-speed cell sorting method of large cells with high-viability using dual on-chip pumps. The microfluidic chip has three-branched microchannels. Target cells are sorted into one of two interest channels by the high-speed flow produced by the on-chip pumps, while non-target cells enter a waste channel without pump actuation. The technique overcomes the limi
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One of the first examples of a local nautical map from Hispanic AmericaIn the last third of the 16th century, the Spanish crown set in motion a project to obtain a complete map of the New World. The method thought up for this was to use surveys, known as Relaciones Geográficas. A questionnaire with more than 50 questions was sent to each settlement. These also had to be completed with a map of the local region.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making animated characters jump just got easierThe way a videogame character jumps, kicks, walks, runs or even breathes is determined by a loop of frames known as a motion cycle. Also critical for producing animated films, motion cycles are as important as they are difficult to create. But an innovative new tool from Disney Research can make the task much easier.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Design method helps animated characters gain physical formDisney Research has developed a method for designing cable-driven mechanisms that help artists and hobbyists give physical form and motion to animated characters.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abba sequence in tennis tiebreaking serves is proven to be fair -- Ben-Gurion U."The purpose of this study was to test the ABBA sequence in a real tournament setting," says Dr. Alex Krumer of the Swiss Institute for Empirical Economic Research at the University of St. Gallen. "Based on the analysis of 1,701 men's and 920 women's tiebreak games from 72 men's and 135 women's tournaments, we found no significant effect of the order of serves in tennis tiebreaks. Thus, we affirm
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interactive protein posttranslational modifications regulate stress responsesDr. Zuo Jianru's group at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences identified PRMT5, a protein arginine methyltransferase, as an S-nitrosylated protein in a nitroproteomics study in Arabidopsis. PRMT5 is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes arginine symmetric dimethylation of various proteins, including key components of the spliceosome.
7min
Popular Science
New Zealand needs to kill these adorable rabbits Animals Even the cutest animals can be pests. Eradication might seem a tad extreme to you, a lover of all things adorable. New Zealand isn’t like that.
10min
Gizmodo
Marty Sklar, Disney Legend and Futurist, Dies at 83 Marty Sklar in front of Sleeping Beauty’s Castle at Disneyland on July 11, 2005 (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Marty Sklar, arguably one of the most influential people to work at the Disney Company aside from Walt Disney himself, died yesterday . He was 83. Sklar started at Disney just a month before Disneyland opened in 1955 and would work his way up to becoming one of the most tireless and dedicated st
11min
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Breville Oracle Touch Review: It's Expensive, But It Makes a Damn Good EspressoBreville's new espresso machine costs as much as a used car. But it's totally worth it.
11min
The Atlantic
Brigsby Bear Is a Clever Bit of Fake ’80s Nostalgia In the new movie Brigsby Bear , James Pope’s favorite TV show is the kind of throwback piece of ’80s children’s entertainment that you could see easily catching on with a new generation. Shown exclusively on low-quality VHS, Brigsby Bear Adventures is a surreal blend of fantasy and educational programming of the sort that used to litter the Saturday morning television landscape. The program sees
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Gizmodo
Why Daredevil Is No More When The Defenders Begins Image: Netflix Charlie Cox explains the state of Matt Murdock when The Defenders begins. Ant-Man has another returning character and you will absolutely be able to tell the difference between the Infinity Gems in Infinity War . Spoilers ahead! Ant-Man & The Wasp Judy Greer will return for the sequel as Ant-Man’s ex-wife, Maggie Lang, according to Deadline . Little Shop of Horrors That Hashtag Sho
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The Scientist RSS
Study: DNA Folding Patterns RevealedRecent data suggest that instead of folding into rigid higher-order structures, chromatin is malleable and diverse.
17min
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Reunited and It Feels So GoodZebrafish have a remarkable ability to heal their damaged nerve fibers following a spinal injury.
17min
Ars Technica
A brief history of quantum alternatives Enlarge (credit: Central Press/Getty Images) In 1915, Albert Einstein, with a ee pittle help from his friends, developed a theory of gravity that overturned what we’d thought were the very foundations of physical reality. The idea that the space that we inhabit was not perfectly described by Euclidean geometry had been inconceivable—so much so that the philosopher Immanuel Kant, a radical thinker
23min
Gizmodo
Did Scientists Just Spot the First Exomoon? Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Thanks largely to NASA’s Kepler space telescope , astronomers have found thousands of exoplanets lurking outside our solar system. Finding what creeps around those planets, however, has proven itself to be incredibly challenging. While scientists have had a few close calls with exomoons over the years, so far, no discovery’s been legit. But a group of astronomers at Columb
23min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Newborn baby’s infection offers a cautionary tale about placenta pillsA newborn came down with a dangerous bacterial infection. The culprit, scientists suspect, was contaminated placenta pills eaten by the mother.
24min
Scientific American Content: Global
Meaningful Conversation Is a Crucial Part of MedicineA diagnosis gives a name to the struggles and pain that individuals and families experience, especially when there is uncertainty and no clear path forward -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
26min
Ars Technica
San Francisco DA: Anti-theft law results in huge drop in stolen phones Enlarge / San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón, seen here in 2014. (credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images News) San Francisco’s district attorney says that a California state law mandating "theft-deterring technological solutions" for smartphones has resulted in a precipitous drop in such robberies. In a press release sent to reporters on Thursday, George Gascón said that since the law
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug improves brain performance in Rett syndrome miceA brain penetrant drug -- a small-molecule mimetic of BDNF, or brain derived neurotrophic factor -- is able to improve brain performance in Rett syndrome mice -- specifically synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and object location memory. The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. The drug also increased the distance mice traveled in an open field test, a measure of general locomotor a
28min
Gizmodo
How Scientifically Plausible Is the ‘Simian Flu’ in Planet of the Apes? Image: War for Planet of the Apes The Planet of the Apes prequels did much to explain how humans lost their status as the dominant species on the planet—a cataclysmic set of events fueled by a global pandemic known as the “Simian Flu.” This virus, the product of a medical experiment gone horribly wrong, wiped out the vast majority of humans, but it boosted the brains of apes. And in the latest in
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Gizmodo
Spend Your Nights On Egyptian Cotton With Amazon's One-Day Sale Thread Spread Hotel Collection Egyptian Cotton Sheet Sets , $43-$52 Egyptian Cotton is one of the softest things you can sleep on, but it comes at a price. Amazon is thankfully helping you out there with their sale on Egyptian Cotton sheets from Thread Spread’s Hotel Collection . Get a set for $43-$52, depending on the size (queen sets are only $45!), with your choice from a bunch of different co
41min
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Det skal droneindustrien være opmærksom på i de kommende EU-regler Droner
42min
Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: we are starlight, we are slug slime ... Proving that Joni Mitchell is one of the greatest astrophysicists of our time (followed closely by Moby , obviously,) simulations have revealed that up to half the material in our home galaxy – and by extension in our bodies – arrived from smaller galactic neighbours , as a result of powerful supernova explosions. Add to this the news that the moon is wetter than we thought, which raises new poss
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Possible first sighting of an exomoon(Phys.org)—A team led by David Kipping of Columbia University has spotted what might be the first evidence of an exomoon. They have written a paper describing their findings and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists to settle dispute over taste of wine in bottles with corks versus screw caps(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Oxford University (with assistance from Bompas & Parr) in collaboration with the Portuguese Cork Association is gearing up to settle the dispute over whether wine tastes better when stored in bottles with corks or screw caps—and they are not simply taking the word of tasters. They are going to study wine drinkers' brains while they sip. The event, Neuroenologi
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Scientific American Content: Global
Racing to a Future of Autonomous CarsThe Robocar, a fully autonomous electric racecar, recently debuted in Times Square, New York City. Watch how the Roborace team behind it imagine a new motorsport and how the Robocar might accelerate... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Emerson Collective Acquires Majority Stake in The Atlantic David G. Bradley, the chairman and owner of Atlantic Media, is announcing this morning that he is selling a majority stake in The Atlantic to Emerson Collective, an organization led by philanthropist and investor Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple founder Steve Jobs. Bradley will retain a minority stake in The Atlantic and will continue as chairman and operating partner for at least three to
56min
The Atlantic
Pakistan's Prime Minister Quits After Supreme Court Decision Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif resigned Friday, hours after the country’s Supreme Court unanimously ruled to disqualify him from elected office, a move that is likely to spark political uncertainty in the South Asian country that has struggled with democracy for nearly seven decades. The court ruled Sharif “is not honest … [and] therefore, he is disqualified to be a Member of” parliament,”
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Croatian taxis protest Uber at height of tourism seasonHundreds of Croatian taxi drivers are protesting against Uber services, disrupting traffic at the height of the tourism season in the Adriatic country.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lonely hearts seek virtual girlfriends at Hong Kong fairVirtual reality games usually promise shoot 'em up adventures but in Hong Kong Friday lovelorn tech fans donned headsets to go on imaginary dates.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
PHOTOS: Scenes beneath the midnight sun in the ArcticIt's a special privilege for a photographer to get the chance to work in the soft light of a sun that never sets.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists unveil new 3-D view of galaxiesFor many years astronomers have struggled to get good-quality 3-D data of galaxies. Although this technique is very powerful as it allows researchers to "dissect" objects, this was a slow process as each galaxy had to be observed independently.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study helps Californians save electricity—and money—this summerElectricity demand fluctuates each day, and consumers who want to unplug during peak times to save money and help the environment now have a new tool at their disposal. Chai Energy, a partner of the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation, is making real-time energy information a reality for electricity consumers who want to reduce or shift their electricity usage during peak periods when electricity is
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Planetary defense campaign will use real asteroid for the first timeFor the first time, NASA will use an actual space rock for a tabletop exercise simulating an asteroid impact in a densely populated area. The asteroid, named 2012 TC4, does not pose a threat to Earth, but NASA is using it as a test object for an observational campaign because of its close flyby on Oct. 12, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low Frequency Array Ireland officially launchedOn 27 July 2017, the newly built Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) station in Ireland will be officially opened. This extends the largest radio telescope in the world, connecting to its central core of antennas in the north of the Netherlands, now forming a network of two thousand kilometres across. Astronomers can now study the history of the universe in even more detail. The station will be opened by
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Origin of a Feces: A Not-So-Brief History of 'The Emoji Movie''s Biggest StarWhat can brown do for you?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI advances to put greater value on human judgment: U of T expertsWith the rise of artificial intelligence and concern about its potential impact on jobs, U of T's Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans and Avi Goldfarb argue that human judgment will become an increasingly valuable skill.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting plants from the power of sunlightIt's 11pm. You don't feel good. Your palms are clammy, your mind is racing, and you just can't fall asleep. As a precaution, you measure your vitals. Blood pressure is 160/95, worryingly high. You take another measurement ten minutes later: still high.
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The Atlantic
The Limits of Bullying After Donald Trump implied Ted Cruz’s wife was ugly and accused his father of helping to kill President John F. Kennedy, and Cruz still worked the phones for him. Trump humiliated “liddle” Marco Rubio, who endorsed Trump anyway. Trump implied Ben Carson was a child molester, and then appointed him to his cabinet. Trump ran a campaign in which he exhorted audiences to call for Hillary Clinton’s im
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The Atlantic
My Eye Won’t Stop Twitching—Am I Dying? Recently a friend of mine complained of a nonstop eye twitch, so, helpful friend that I am, I looked up “eye twitch” on WebMD for her. As is usually the case when someone with zero medical background consults WebMD looking for a diagnosis, this was a huge mistake. Of course I saw the early, so-called “most likely” causes—fatigue and stress—but I scrolled right past them on to the graver possibili
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The Atlantic
Trump Tests the F-Bomb Policy at The New York Times The New York Times likes to think of itself as a family newspaper . It is also the self-described paper of record . It may not be either, but it’s definitely not both all the time. Take, for example, the moment when the Times had to choose whether to quote the new White House communications director in a particularly colorful tirade against his colleagues. Anthony Scaramucci, who joined the Trump
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient biology meets modern ingenuityThe average person might struggle to get excited about bacterium found in rabbit droppings – but it's potentially a knight in shining armour for our planet.
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Cinderella Story for Global Tiger DayA tigress named Zolushka helps establish a blueprint for the restoration of her species across Asia -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence found of ultralow-velocity zone possibly feeding Icelandic plume(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory in California has found possible evidence of an ultralow-velocity zone (ULVZ) feeding the Icelandic plume. In their paper published in the journal Science, Kaiqing Yuan and Barbara Romanowicz describe using earthquake data to gain a better perspective on the ULVZ and its possible role in the development of Iceland and part
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New Scientist - News
Keep having nightmares? You may be getting too much sleepOne of the largest ever studies of the causes of nightmares has found that they are linked to worrying before bedtime, and sleeping for more than 9 hours
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking the battle to save seagrass onlineA group of marine scientists has launched a new website to help save declining Australian and New Zealand seagrasses.
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Live Science
Why Looking for Aliens Is Good for Society (Even If There Aren't Any)The search for life elsewhere in the universe is one of the most compelling aspects of modern science.
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Gizmodo
Mike Huckabee Tweets About Scrapping the Election of Senators As US Slides Into Authoritarianism (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) In the age of Trump, a tweet from a political figure can be a canary in a coal mine. And it looks like America’s canary is currently having trouble breathing. Early this morning, Mike Huckabee tweeted out a bizarre proposal, and it legitimately makes me concerned for the future of American democracy. Or whatever’s left of it, anyway. Yes, that’s former Arkans
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Secrets of the world's toughest creatures revealedDNA analyses of tardigrades has given scientists an insight into their incredible survival abilities.
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Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Udnyt sommeren til at finde nye spændende karrieremuligheder Tech Lead for Daman eller Software Engineer for Motorola, se de spændende muligheder i ugens it-jobliste her https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-udnyt-sommeren-at-finde-nye-spaendende-karrieremuligheder-9255 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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The Atlantic
Why Russia Ordered the U.S. to Reduce Its Diplomatic Staff Russia ordered the U.S. Friday to reduce its diplomatic staff in the country to 455 and seized two American diplomatic properties, in retaliation for similar steps ordered by the Obama administration last December and a sweeping sanctions bill approved this week by the U.S. Congress. “The Russian side is suspending as of August 1 the use by the U.S. embassy in Russia of all warehouses on the Doro
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Live Science
Why a 2,500-Year-Old Hebrew Poem Still MattersPsalm 137 – best known for its opening line, 'By the Rivers of Babylon' – is a 2,500-year-old Hebrew psalm that deals with the Jewish exile -remembered each year on Tisha B'av.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Al Gore Returns with an Ever-More Inconvenient TruthThe vice president-turned-environmental crusader takes viewers to climate change’s front lines in his documentary sequel -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What Gene-Swapping Cheese Microbes Could Say About Antibiotic ResistanceThe search for lively bacterial communities led Rachel Dutton, a microbiologist at UC San Diego, to cave-aged cheese wheels.
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Science-Based Medicine
It’s Still Not Safe to Go Back in the Water, and Other Tales of WooA thoughtful discussion of water-based topics ranging from toddlers pooping in the pool to recommendations on daily alkaline water intake for newborns.
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Live Science
Canaanites Live: DNA Reveals Fate of Biblical PeopleThe Bible's maligned Canaanites persisted despite conquest.
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Live Science
Swarms of CICADA Drones Could Aid Hurricane ResearchU.S. Navy researchers are developing a tiny, gliding drone called CICADA, which could be dropped from airplanes to gather data from hurricanes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Penis Microbes Linked to Increased Risk of HIV InfectionA study of Ugandan men identified several bacterial strains associated with a higher likelihood of acquiring the virus -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
US healthcare repeal law struck down at the eleventh hourA bill that could have led to 43 million uninsured people has failed to make it through the US Senate, failing by just one vote in the middle of the night
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New Scientist - News
First proof that Facebook dark ads could swing an electionA study shows step by step how to target political opinions online. But we still don’t really know exactly how that translates to the voting booth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aalto-1 satellite sends first imageLaunched on the morning of 23 June from India, the Aalto-1 satellite's first month in space has gone according to plan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storing data in DNA brings nature into the digital universeHumanity is producing data at an unimaginable rate, to the point that storage technologies can't keep up. Every five years, the amount of data we're producing increases 10-fold, including photos and videos. Not all of it needs to be stored, but manufacturers of data storage aren't making hard drives and flash chips fast enough to hold what we do want to keep. Since we're not going to stop taking p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Communication patterns in cancer-related Facebook pagesNew research reveals how health professionals can use Facebook to communicate effectively about prevention, risk factors, and early diagnosis of cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does makeup make you feel smarter?Does wearing makeup affect academic performance? The new study investigates the "Lipstick Effect" among college students.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The scientific reason you don't like LED bulbs—and the simple way to fix themThere's a handy trick for reading station signs that otherwise fly past in a blur as you travel in a high-speed train. Look at one side of the window and then immediately at the other side of the window. When you change your gaze, your eyes will automatically make a rapid jerking movement, known as a saccade. If the direction of the saccade is the same as that of the train, your eyes will freeze t
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Scientific American Content: Global
Robots, Start Your Engines!Roborace is creating a new motorsport to accelerate the arrival of self-driving cars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Dagens rumspørgsmål: Hvor gammelt kan fremmed liv i universet være?De seneste 20 års opdagelser af exoplaneter bringer os tættere et kvalitficeret gæt på det største af alle spørgsmål: Er vi alene i universet? Dansk astrofysiker forklarer, hvor gammel en fremmed livsform i givet fald kan være.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On-chip pumps achieve high-speed sorting of large cellsA research group in Nagoya University developed a high-speed cell sorting method of large cells with high-viability using dual on-chip pumps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What marsupials taught us about embryo implantation could help women using IVFWhat do a swollen sprained ankle and a new pregnancy have in common? Believe it or not, they're both closely tied to the body's inflammation response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Death rate for depressed heart patients double than for non-depressed heart patientsPeople who are diagnosed with coronary artery disease and then develop depression face a risk of death that's twice as high as heart patients without depression, according to a major new study.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Battle Over LGBT Discrimination Is Just Beginning LGBT issues have been all over the news this week. On Wednesday, President Trump’s announced a ban on transgender Americans serving in the military. That evening, the Department of Justice made another significant move in the fight over LGBT rights, albeit with less flash than a tweet storm: It filed an amicus brief in a major case, Zarda v. Altitude Express, arguing that it’s not illegal to fire
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The Atlantic
The Return of the One-Term Presidency? The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
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The Atlantic
HBO’s Room 104 Is a Box of Chocolates The best thing about Room 104 , a new half-hour anthology show created for HBO by Jay and Mark Duplass, is that it’s completely unpredictable: The only unifying factor in the 12-episode series is a faded, unremarkable motel room where each episode is set. The antics within that room could be terrifying (a demonic child who never blinks and torments his babysitter), charming (a wannabe writer in 1
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Astronomers may have found an exomoon, and Hubble is going to checkA distant object may be the first exomoon detected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Materials emitted by a water pipe repair method may pose health risks, new safeguards and research neededNew research is calling for immediate safeguards and the study of a widely used method for repairing sewer, stormwater and drinking water pipes to understand the potential health and environmental concerns for workers and the public.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eclipse balloons to study effect of Mars-like environment on lifeSteps forward in the search for life beyond Earth can be as simple as sending a balloon into the sky. In one of the most unique and extensive eclipse observation campaigns ever attempted, NASA is collaborating with student teams across the U.S. to do just that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aggressive spiders are quick at making accurate decisions, good at hunting unpredictable preySpiders, like humans and many other animals, have distinct personalities. Two studies by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) unveiled interesting findings about the relationship between personality traits of spiders and their decision making, as well as hunting styles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists build new chemical structures on unreactive bondsMaking complicated organic molecules is like solving a Rubik's cube. Organic chemists need to design sequences of reactions to carefully build up parts of a molecule, while maintaining the structure at other sites. Although chemists have developed many ingenious ways of performing chemical transformations, some chemical reactions remain out of reach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A hybrid material to spot organic contaminants in the atmosphereThe chemist Paula Moriones-Jiménez has obtained a type of hybrid material made up of organic and inorganic components and which is highly porous, a feature of interest for industrial sectors such as the pharmaceutical, automotive and electronic sectors. This material has been applied to detect organic contaminants such as benzene, toluene or xylene in the atmosphere, and also has the potential for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Haze on the Saturn horizonThis false-color view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazes toward the rings beyond Saturn's sunlit horizon. Along the limb (the planet's edge) at left can be seen a thin, detached haze. This haze vanishes toward the right side of the scene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trigeminal nerve stimulation shows promise for management of traumatic brain injuryResearchers at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and the department of neurosurgery at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, announced today that they have published a paper with research findings that could have implications for the treatment of many neurological conditions, including severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists use new data mining strategy to spot those at high Alzheimer's riskThe push to develop treatments for Alzheimer's disease has yielded a greater understanding of the disease, but has failed to generate successful new drugs.To blame are the many undefined subtypes of mild cognitive impairment, a precursor to Alzheimer's disease. But if scientists grouped people with similar types of cognitive impairment, they could more precisely test the impact of investigational
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep or sex? How the fruit fly decidesChoosing between sex or sleep presents a behavioral quandary for many species, including the fruit fly. A multi-institution team has found that, in Drosophila at least, males and females deal with these competing imperatives in fundamentally different ways, they report July 28 in the journal Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover how human cells maintain the correct number of chromosomesResearchers at Queen Mary University of London, UK, have discovered an important part of the mechanism involved in how chromosomes are pulled apart during cell division, so that one complete set goes into each of the new cells.
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Science : NPR
A Newspaperman Looks Back On A 77-Year Career David Perlman, age 98, talks with Steve Inskeep about his career as a science writer as he gets ready to retire from the San Francisco Chronicle after 77 years.
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Science | The Guardian
Regular alcohol consumption could cut diabetes risk, study finds Drinking a moderate amount of certain drinks such as wine three to four times a week reduced diabetes risk by about 30% Regularly drinking a moderate amount of certain alcoholic drinks could reduce a person’s chances of developing diabetes, according to a study. Consuming alcohol three or four days a week was associated with a reduced risk of developing diabetes – a 27% reduction in men and a 32%
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan virker fusionsmetoden ’focus-fusion’?En læser undrer sig over, hvordan fusionsmetoden focus-fusion virker, og hvad der er af fordele og ulemper. Det svarer direktør ved Max Planck Instituttet på.
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Ingeniøren
Google-algoritme bringer os et skridt tættere på fusionskraftSammen med energivirksomheden Tri Alpha Energy har Google udviklet en algoritme, der optimerer energiforbruget under fusion og dermed gør kernereaktionen til en mere realistisk energikilde.
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The Atlantic
Could Trump’s Immigration Agenda Ever Get Through Congress? In late June, President Trump met with a dozen or so family members of Americans killed by undocumented immigrants as part of a push for two new laws targeting illegal immigration. “We’re calling on all members of Congress to honor grieving American families by passing these lifesaving measures in the House, in the Senate, and then sending them to my desk for a very rapid signature,” he said at t
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The Atlantic
Fishermen's Brexit and the Next Moon Landing: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing Shifting Current Matthew Bremner | Roads & Kingdoms “ There are now only 4,000 active fishermen in Scotland, down from 8,000 in 1970. Since 1996, the size of the Scottish fleet has been reduced by more than 219 boats, and where there were once 20 flourishing harbors scattered across its coast, there are now only three. The problem, fishermen say, is the European Union, which has thwarted the Brit
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The Atlantic
The Twilight of Brazil's Anti-Corruption Movement It should have been a climax. On July 12, Luis Inácio Lula da Silva, the former president of Brazil, was sentenced to nine and a half years in prison after Judge Sergio Moro found him guilty of accepting bribes (in the form of a beachside apartment) from the building cartel at the heart of Lava Jato , or “Operation Car Wash.” Operation Car Wash is a money-laundering investigation that began in Ma
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover how human cells maintain the correct number of chromosomesCell division is an essential process in humans, animals and plants as dying or injured cells are replenished throughout life. Cells divide at least a billion times in the average person, usually without any problem. However, when cell division goes wrong, it can lead to a range of diseases, such as cancer, and problems with fertility and development, including babies born with the wrong number of
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sleep or sex? How the fruit fly decidesChoosing between sex or sleep presents a behavioral quandary for many species, including the fruit fly. A multi-institution team has found that, in Drosophila at least, males and females deal with these competing imperatives in fundamentally different ways, they report July 28 in the journal Nature Communications.
4h
Ingeniøren
Persondata-bommert: Udbredt læringsplatform gav barn adgang til data om plejebarn Selskabet Itslearning rettede fejlen flere måneder efter henvendelsen kom https://www.version2.dk/artikel/persondata-bommert-udbredt-laeringsplatform-gav-barn-adgang-data-plejebarn-1078648 Version2
4h
Ingeniøren
ITU's softwareuddannelse tredobler antallet af kvindelige studerende på to år ITU oplever hele 24% flere nye studerende, mens resten af landets universiteter tilsammen oplever et fald. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/data-it-uddannelser-populaere-hos-unge-1078645 Version2
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Big hunt' for Russian hackers, but no obvious election linkPyotr Levashov appeared to be just another comfortable member of Russia's rising middle-class—an IT entrepreneur with a taste for upmarket restaurants, Thai massages and foreign travel.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
10 hurt in freak Istanbul stormAt least 10 people were hurt, two of them seriously, when a violent thunderstorm struck Istanbul on Thursday, bombarding the city with hailstones the size of golfballs, local media said.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists set sail to unlock secrets of 'lost continent' ZealandiaScientists are attempting to unlock the secrets of the "lost continent" of Zealandia, setting sail Friday to investigate the huge underwater landmass east of Australia that has never been properly studied.
5h
cognitive science
A Current Understanding of Migraine Disease submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple axes iPod nano and shuffleTouch became the last iPod standing on Thursday as Apple removed nano and shuffle stand-alone digital music players from its lineup.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Los Angeles to have fully electric bus fleet by 2030Known for its bouts of heavy smog , the city of Los Angeles on Thursday announced plans to have a fleet of fully electric, zero-emissions buses by 2030.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mainstream Model 3 holds promise—and peril—for TeslaFor Tesla, everything is riding on the Model 3.
6h
Ingeniøren
Klumpfisk-robot kan have fundet atombrændsel i Fukushima-reaktorVideo: Den lille svømmende robot har i modsætning til sine syv forgængere været på en succesfuld mission inde i en nedsmeltet reaktor på det katastoferamte atomkraftværk.
6h
Ingeniøren
Statens IT efter svensk it-skandale: Vi har sikret os godt Den svenske it-skandale har både kostet to ministre deres job, men også vist hvor let følsom data kan blive lækket, hvis man ikke har en ordenlig it-sikkerhedspolitik. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/statens-it-efter-svensk-it-skandale-vi-har-sikret-os-godt-1078644 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
Udvikler: Derfor skal du bruge Javas moduler Java 9's modulforslag er vedtaget, men kan det bruges til noget? Freelance-udvikler Christian Damsgaard hælder til et »ja.« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/udvikler-javas-moduler-skal-nok-blive-succes-paa-sigt-1078633 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
Fra tørt til vådt: Global opvarmning kan medføre regntid til Afrikas tørre regionerKlimamodeller spår, at Sahelregionen tværs over kontinent kan blive frodigt landbrugsområde – men overgangen vil blive hård.
7h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Lidt flere optaget på drømmestudiet7.270 ansøgere får i dag tilbudt en studieplads på Københavns Universitet....
8h
Live Science
The Evil Eye: A Closer LookThe evil eye is a specific type of magical curse. It is believed to cause harm, illness and even death.
8h
The Atlantic
Venezuela Bans Protests as Death Toll Rises The Venezuelan government banned nationwide protests on Thursday, just days before a referendum to elect a constituent assembly capable of rewriting the nation’s constitution. The ban, which begins Friday and lasts through Tuesday, was announced toward the end of a 48-hour strike conducted by the nation’s opposition members, who are rallying against the regime of Venezuelan President Nicolas Madu
8h
Live Science
Empirical Evidence: A DefinitionEmpirical evidence is information that is acquired by observation or experimentation.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2 methods to de-identify large patient datasets greatly reduced risk of re-identificationTwo de-identification methods, k-anonymization and adding a 'fuzzy factor,' significantly reduced the risk of re-identification of patients in a dataset of 5 million patient records from a large cervical cancer screening program in Norway.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Tesla’s Model 3 Is a Long Way from Elon Musk’s Grand GoalMany things still need to change before electric vehicles can become a mainstream choice.
9h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
SHARK WEEK: African Shark Safari Shark Week goes to Madagascar, a place NOT known for great white sharks. So why has a great white from South Africa made the 1500-mile trip? Craig O'Connell and the team make the trip to find out why and if this is the next great water hotspot. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to D
9h
The Atlantic
The Health Care Freedom Act Hits The Senate Floor The Senate is hurtling towards some resolution in the weeks-long saga of Obamacare repeal, and after several failed votes and amendments, the final draft is finally in view. At around 10 p.m. Thursday evening, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveiled the text of the Health Care Freedom Act , the more dignified official title for the “skinny repeal.” The legislation, which was reportedly finalized
9h
ArXiv Query
Anisotropic EM Segmentation by 3D Affinity Learning and AgglomerationThe field of connectomics has recently produced neuron wiring diagrams from relatively large brain regions from multiple animals. Most of these neural reconstructions were computed from isotropic (e.g., FIBSEM) or near isotropic (e.g., SBEM) data. In spite of the remarkable progress on algorithms in recent years, automatic dense reconstruction from anisotropic data remains a challenge for the conn
9h
cognitive science
Neuroscience-Inspired Artificial Intelligence by Demis Hassabis et al. (2017) submitted by /u/jakn [link] [comments]
10h
The Atlantic
Charlie Gard Will Be Moved to Hospice, Taken Off Life Support Days after the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard, a terminally ill baby, ended their lengthy legal battle with the UK court system, a judge ruled that Charlie must be moved to hospice care, where he will soon be taken off life support. Charlie’s parents, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, previously asked the court to allow them extra time to spend with their son, who suffers from a rare genetic con
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alexa: The roommate I need, but am not quite sure I wantWe were introduced at a party.
11h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How Will These Homesteaders Rip Down Their Shanty In Order To Start Again? Homestead Rescue | Wednesdays at 10/9c The only option for the Johnson/Hayden homestead is to start from scratch. That means watching their dreams turn to dust, as Emanuel literally pulls down his shack with a pickup truck. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/homestead-rescue/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Rescues! http://www.d
11h
Gizmodo
Oh Shit, Will.i.am Could Soon Be in Charge of Your Smart Home Image: Marvel Will.i.am has had a hard time breaking into the tech market. In his latest entrepreneurial venture, he’s jumping into the smart home game. What could go wrong? Innovator and musician Will.i.am’s lack of luck in the gadget world has always come down to the fact that he’s been so far ahead of his time. It’s not that his failed ideas’ time has ever come, but it will one day. While peop
12h
Feed: All Latest
Tesla's Model 3 Is Here: How to Watch the Big EventThe long-awaited affordable electric car is finally here, for a lucky few.
12h
Feed: All Latest
The 'Cloak & Dagger' Attack That Bedeviled Android For MonthsNot all Android attacks come from firmware mistakes.
12h
Futurity.org
New bunch of galaxy clusters may be farthest yet Researchers have created a catalog of around 200 candidate galaxy clusters that may include some of the most distant clusters ever found. A single galaxy cluster can be as massive as a quadrillion suns, yet faraway clusters are so faint that they are practically invisible to all but the biggest Earth-bound telescopes. Galaxy clusters can contain thousands of galaxies and many trillions of stars—a
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights health consequences of selectively breeding German Shepherd DogsGerman Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) could be predisposed to health conditions such as arthritis because of the way they have been bred in recent decades, according to a new study published in the open access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.
13h
Ars Technica
How a podcaster managed to confront his tech support scammer, in person Enlarge / This November 2015 photo appears to be a company photo of Accostings, which Reply All identified as an India-based tech support scam company. Kamal Verma is standing in a black shirt with a watch in the center of the photo. (credit: Kamal Verma ) The following post contains spoilers of Reply All episode #102: Long Distance , which was released on July 27, 2017. If you don't wish to know
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study highlights health consequences of selectively breeding German Shepherd DogsGerman Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) could be predisposed to health conditions such as arthritis because of the way they have been bred in recent decades, according to a new study published in the open access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.
13h
The Atlantic
Iran Claims It Launched a Satellite-Carrying Rocket Into Space Iran successfully launched an advanced satellite-carrying rocket into space on Thursday, the nation’s state news channel announced. Experts describe the “Simorgh” rocket, whose name translates to “phoenix” in Persian, as a copy of North Korea’s Unha rocket, which uses some of the same technology as a long-range ballistic missile. On Thursday, the Iranian state media said the “Simorgh,” which took
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ketamine for depression encouraging, but questions remain around long-term useA world-first systematic review into the safety of ketamine as a treatment for depression shows the risks of long-term ketamine treatment remain unclear.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Milky Way's origins are not what they seemUp to half of the matter in our Milky Way galaxy may come from distant galaxies, astrophysicists have discovered in a first-of-its-kind analysis. As a result, each one of us may be made in part from extragalactic matter. Using supercomputer simulations, the researchers found an unexpected mode for how galaxies acquired matter: intergalactic transfer. Supernova explosions eject copious amounts of g
13h
Gizmodo
These Are the Three Best Domain Name Registrars, According To Our Readers Jens Kreuter/ Unsplash In this week’s Co-Op, three domain name registrars stood out form the pack . So WHOIS going to win? ICANN tell you soon, after you check out the finalists below and vote for your favorite. Namecheap Namecheap I use both Namecheap and Google Domains (and have been a previous GoDaddy customer). I like Namecheap’s web interface, and their customer service has been very respons
13h
The Atlantic
How Long Can This Go On? If Anthony Scaramucci is conducting an experiment in radical transparency at the White House, then things are going well. Otherwise, his tenure as communications director might not be off to a great start. Thursday began with Scaramucci giving a preposterous interview to CNN —cutting off a segment with New Yorker journalist Ryan Lizza—in which he accused White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between backup immune defense, mutation seen in Crohn's disease discoveredGenes that regulate a cellular recycling system called autophagy are commonly mutated in Crohn's disease patients, though the link between biological housekeeping and inflammatory bowel disease remained a mystery.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using latest technology, MRI provides 'one-stop-shop' to evaluate potential liver donorsUsing the latest techniques, MRI can provide a 'one-stop-shop' method for evaluation of potential living liver donors, according to an article.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers crack the smile, describing three types by muscle movementThe smile may be the most common and flexible expression, used to reveal some emotions, cover others and manage social interactions that have kept communities secure and organized for millennia. But how do we tell one kind of smile from another?
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biochemists link synthetic compound to hunger-hormone productionA human-made cousin of a small molecule found in olive oil can disrupt the hunger-signaling pathway, new research suggest.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MKTP surgery has long-term benefit for restoring skin pigmentation in vitiligo patientsSkin transplant surgery has long-term benefit for restoring skin pigmentation caused by the skin disease vitiligo, new research shows. In a retrospective study, researchers found that a majority of areas of the skin treated with surgery still had 'very good to excellent' color match pigmentation five years later.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social influences can override aggression in male mice, study showsA cluster of nerve cells in the male mouse's brain have been identified that, when activated, triggers territorial rage in a variety of situations. Activating the same cluster has no such effect on female mice.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-sought mechanism of metastasis is discovered in pancreatic cancerAn important discovery establishes a cause of metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Using organoids grown from patient tissues and transplanted in mouse models of the illness, the team pinpoints an epigenetic re-programming of gene enhancers that returns cancerous cells to a more primitive developmental state, dating back to the formation of the pancreas, in which cells multiply rapidly and are not yet
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds increased risk of dementia in patients who experience delirium after surgeryDelirium is common in elderly hospitalized patients, affecting an estimated 14-56 percent of patients. It frequently manifests as a sudden change in behavior, with patients suffering acute confusion, inattention, disorganized thinking and fluctuating mental status.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astrophysicists map out the light energy contained within the Milky WayFor the first time, a team of scientists have calculated the distribution of all light energy contained within the Milky Way, which will provide new insight into the make-up of our galaxy and how stars in spiral galaxies such as ours form. The study is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three species of tiny frogs discovered in Peruvian AndesA University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues have discovered three more frog species in the Peruvian Andes, raising to five the total number of new frog species the group has found in a remote protected forest since 2012.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome-wide cancer 'dependency map' now revealedIn one of the largest efforts to build a comprehensive catalog of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer, researchers have identified more than 760 genes upon which cancer cells from multiple types are strongly dependent for their growth and survival. While many of these dependencies are specific to certain cancer types, about 10 percent are common across multiple cancers, suggesting that a relatively
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Non-LCD technology shows promise for return to work/school for postconcussion syndrome sufferersUsing a non-LCD screen for computer tasks may decrease the risk of exacerbating symptoms in sufferers of post-concussion syndrome (PCS), suggests a new pilot project.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndromeUsing the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells. The research suggests new lines of investigation into how to treat this condition — dyskeratosis congenita — which is characterized by shortened telomeres. Short telomeres lead to progressive DNA damage that ac
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No significant change seen in hearing loss among US teensAlthough there was an increase in the percentage of US youth ages 12 to 19 reporting exposure to loud music through headphones from 1988-2010, researchers did not find significant changes in the prevalence of hearing loss among this group, according to a study.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic guidelines in NICU improve prescription practices for vulnerable infantsA neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) significantly reduced the number of cases of late-onset sepsis, a leading cause of death among pre-term infants, by implementing guidelines designed to eliminate overuse of antibiotics, according to new research. The antibiotic stewardship guidelines reduced variability in treating common infections, improving clinical adherence to best practices.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three species of tiny frogs discovered in Peruvian AndesA University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues have discovered three more frog species in the Peruvian Andes, raising to five the total number of new frog species the group has found in a remote protected forest since 2012.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrophysicists map out the light energy contained within the Milky WayFor the first time, a team of scientists have calculated the distribution of all light energy contained within the Milky Way, which will provide new insight into the make-up of our galaxy and how stars in spiral galaxies such as ours form. The study is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
14h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Scaramuccian Rant and Skinny Repeal What We’re Following Clock’s Ticking: Senate Republicans are down to the last hours of their reconciliation process after failing to pass a wide-reaching repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Now, they’re considering Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s “skinny repeal” proposal, which—though the details aren’t public yet—is expected to walk back limited parts of Obama’s signature legislation. The CBO r
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effects of a major drug target regulated through molecular 'codes'For the first time, researchers reveal components of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) named rhodopsin bound to a signaling molecule called arrestin, both crucial pieces of the body's intricate cellular communication network. The new discovery further refines a landmark 2015 Nature article that first described the structure of the two molecules in complex together.
14h
Feed: All Latest
Scientists Crispr the First Human Embryos in the US (Maybe)The research was conducted by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, the same guy who first cloned embryonic stem cells in humans. And came up with three-parent in-vitro fertilization.
14h
Ars Technica
Police body cam footage of man tased in back prompts $110K settlement (video link) Body cam footage of an Aurora, Colorado, cop tasing an unarmed black man in the back paved the way for the city to pay $110,000 to settle police abuse allegations, the man's lawyers told Ars Thursday. Footage from September's tasing shows two black men being questioned by police who are responding to a weapons incident at a nearby apartment building. One of the men is seen and overhe
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ketamine for depression encouraging, but questions remain around long-term useA world-first systematic review into the safety of ketamine as a treatment for depression, published in the prestigious Lancet Psychiatry, shows the risks of long-term ketamine treatment remain unclear.
14h
Science : NPR
'An Inconvenient Sequel' Is An Effective, Cautiously Optimistic, 'I Told You So' In 2006, Al Gore issued a forceful warning about the threat of climate change in An Inconvenient Truth. He's followed it up with a sequel that shows how far we've come — but with plenty of caveats. (Image credit: Jensen Walker/Paramount Pictures)
14h
Ars Technica
Specific area of the brain helps keep the body young Enlarge (credit: Daniele Meli ) Age may not be a state of mind, but the brain is definitely involved. That's the conclusion of a study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature , which provides compelling evidence that a specific structure in the brain, called the hypothalamus, plays a significant role in controlling the entire body's aging. The results suggest stem cells play a critical role,
14h
Live Science
Orca Calf Dies at SeaWorld: Why Killer Whales Get Sick in CaptivityDozens of killer whales have died in captivity, including the 3-month-old orca named Kyara that just died at SeaWorld. So why do these marine mammals seem to fare so poorly?
15h
Live Science
Does Moderate Drinking Lower Your Risk of Diabetes?Is alcohol good for your health or bad? With no shortage of contradictory findings, it's understandable if you're left feeling like you've had a little too much to drink.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People who drink 3 to 4 times per week less likely to develop diabetes than those who never drinkFrequent alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes in both men and women, according to a new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), with alcohol consumption over 3-4 week days giving the lowest risks of diabetes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Romania prosecutes professors over medical diploma scamEight Romanian professors of medicine are being prosecuted for allegedly taking kickbacks to help foreign students pass their exams or get a key diploma, prosecutors said on Thursday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon sales surge, but spending bites into profit (Update)Internet colossus Amazon on Thursday reported its profit shrank in the recently ended quarter despite surging sales as it poured money into growth.
15h
The Atlantic
Palestinian and Israeli Leaders Are Struggling to Respond to Al Aqsa Crisis Just hours after it seemed to end, a bloody two-week standoff over Jerusalem’s holiest site roared back to life. On Thursday morning, Israel removed the last of its new security installations from the entrances to the Al Aqsa mosque. Police had put up metal detectors and cameras after a July 14 shooting that killed two officers nearby. Palestinians condemned the changes, fearing that Israel was t
15h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Cleveland Browns | The Grapevine Diddy Showed Black Women Some Tw Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Cleveland Browns | The Grapevine Diddy Showed Black Women Some Twitter Love and White Women Started Whitewomaning | Jezebel Dear Jane: How Do I Get My Grandpa to Realize He’s Acting Like a Creep? | Splinter ICE Chief Tries to Smear Sanctuary Cities but Drowns in His Own Logic |
15h
Feed: All Latest
How the Broadpwn Wi-Fi Vulnerability Impacted a Billion iPhones and Android PhonesA Broadcom flaw that undermined scores of Android and iOS devices hints the future of smartphone hacking lies in third-party components.
15h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Are Sharks Just Mindless Monsters? Enter The Shark Storm! | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Tonight and All Week Are sharks social creatures or lone wolf hunters? Enter the storm to find out, Tonight at 10p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes Now on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/shark-week/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery http
15h
Popular Science
This "map" could change the way we treat cancer Health Researchers plan to use it to develop new drugs. Researchers developed a map that tracks what cancer cells depend on to grow. They plan to use it as a way to develop new drugs to combat cancer at its roots.
15h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Vote-a-Drama Today in 5 Lines Senators will continue debate on a new health-care plan in what’s called a “vote-a-rama,” after which they could pass a “skinny” repeal of Obamacare. Alaska Dispatch News reports that Republican Senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan received calls from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke warning them that Tuesday’s procedural vote on health-care legislation threatened Alaska’s relat
15h
Live Science
The 2017 Solar Eclipse May Prove the Sun Is Bigger Than We ThinkA growing number of researchers think that the sun is actually larger than commonly thought.
15h
Feed: All Latest
How Jeff Bezos, Briefly the World’s Richest Person, Spends His CashHow do Bezos' spending habits compare with Bill Gates'?
15h
The Atlantic
The Lesson Trump Hasn't Learned The world’s best Donald Trump impersonator is now in charge of White House communications—and if nothing else, it’s making for great television. For evidence, look no further than Anthony Scaramucci’s mesmerizing Thursday morning interview with CNN. “The Mooch”—as he is known among his friends and admirers (a group that seems to include a growing number of reporters)—was coming off a late night s
15h
Ars Technica
As dominance of launch market looms, SpaceX now valued at $21 billion Enlarge / Maye Musk and Elon Musk attend the 2017 Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills. (credit: Taylor Hill/Getty Images) After two serious accidents in 2015 and 2016, SpaceX has been on a tear in 2017 with 10 successful launches, including the historic re-flight of two used boosters and a used Dragon spacecraft. These achievements suggest the company is well on its way toward developing low
16h
The Atlantic
Foxconned This week, the electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn unveiled its plans to build a massive factory in Wisconsin to make flat-screen displays—evidence, the White House proclaimed, of both an American manufacturing renaissance and the economy-boosting prowess of the new administration. “To make such an incredible investment, Chairman Gou put his faith and confidence in the future of the American
16h
The Atlantic
Trump Gives an Order Too Vague for His Generals to Obey There’s an interesting minor furor going on over a statement that the wonderfully named Admiral Scott Swift made Thursday. Would he comply if President Trump ordered a nuclear strike on China? “The answer would be yes,” Swift said . It was clearly the right answer, if a scary one. Many people are nervous about the prospect of Donald Trump controlling nuclear weapons— Marco Rubio, for example —and
16h
Science : NPR
Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk. (Image credit: Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
16h
NYT > Science
Dr. Herbert Needleman, Who Saw Lead’s Wider Harm to Children, Dies at 89Dr. Needleman studied lost baby teeth to show that any level of absorbed lead can damage young brains.
16h
NYT > Science
SpaceX Is Now One of the World’s Most Valuable Privately Held CompaniesElon Musk’s rocket company raised $350 million in new financing, raising its valuation to about $21 billion.
16h
NYT > Science
Giant Telescope Atop Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Should Be Approved, Judge SaysThe Thirty Meter Telescope, which would be the largest in the Northern Hemisphere, could survey black holes and planets orbiting distant stars, but opponents say it would desecrate a sacred mountain.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Massive RNAi Screens Probe for Genes Important to CancerTwo freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines.
16h
Live Science
Moving Nose to Tail, Shrew 'Conga Line' Shimmies OnlineA creepy, crawly video of tiny critters holding each other's tails and scurrying across the ground like a furry centipede has captured the internet's attention.
16h
Inside Science
Low Stream Levels May Concentrate Toxins That Mess With Hormones Low Stream Levels May Concentrate Toxins That Mess With Hormones Hundreds of U.S. streams may have significant levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals from treated wastewater. wastewater-outlet.jpg Image credits: Luke Jones via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 15:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- As far as most people are concerned, "down the dr
16h
The Atlantic
What Michiko Kakutani Talked About When She Talked About Books “Oh, my God, right, your book’s reviewed this week. You must be so excited!” That’s Carrie Bradshaw’s friend Stanford Blatch. And he is , Sex and the City ’s newly christened book author informs him , incorrect. “More like terrified,” Carrie tells him. “ Michiko Kakutani . She’s the Times ’s book critic.” Carrie adds: “She’s brilliant, and she’s really tough.” Brilliant and really tough is, even
16h
The Atlantic
The Senate's Blind Vote on 'Skinny Repeal' Updated on July 27 at 10:23 p.m. ET Is the “skinny repeal” of the Affordable Care Act that is nearing a vote in the Senate a means to an end, or the end itself? That is the crucial question that GOP senators are facing as they consider Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s latest—and likely final—proposal for rolling back Obamacare. Shortly before 10 p.m. on Thursday, just hours before a scheduled vo
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poll: Partisan politics sway Americans' support for Constitutional rightsAmericans are willing to sacrifice their support for basic Constitutional rights -- including freedoms of speech, assembly and the press -- when such beliefs are tested by people with opposing political views, according to a new national poll from the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VW and regulators agree on fix for cars in cheating scandalVolkswagen and U.S. environmental regulators announced agreement Thursday on a plan for the German automaker to fix most of the diesel cars involved in an emissions cheating scandal.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
I.Coast seizes record three tonnes of pangolin scalesAuthorities in Ivory Coast have seized a record haul of three tonnes of pangolin scales worth an estimated $82,000, in what officials on Thursday called a "massacre".
17h
Ars Technica
Windows 10 Creators Update now available to all, November Update end-of-life’d Enlarge / The announcement of the Creators Update in October 2016. (credit: Ars Technica) Some four months after its initial release, Microsoft says it has opened the floodgates and is now pushing out Windows 10 version 1703, the Creators Update, to every compatible PC (a category that excludes systems using Intel's Clover Trail Atoms ). Earlier this month, AdDuplex, which tracks the penetration
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochemists link synthetic compound to hunger-hormone productionNew research suggests that a man-made cousin of a small molecule found in olive oil can disrupt the hunger-signaling pathway. Researchers identified this promising new target by screening a library of roughly 1,600 small molecules for potential disruptors. Because the small molecule could influence how the body senses and utilizes energy, it has the potential to be developed into a treatment for c
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA links male, female butterfly thought to be distinct speciesResearchers recently discovered what was thought to be a distinct species of butterfly is actually the female of a species known to science for more than a century.
17h
Feed: All Latest
The Rolls-Royce Phantom Personalizes OpulenceThe latest flagship Rolls has a new, extremely fancy way to make the dashboard extra "you."
17h
Gizmodo
Moist, Warm Human Brain Saves Tesla's Ass When Autopilot Almost Wrecks I believe that it won’t be long before we have fully-autonomous cars, capable of whisking our inattentive asses around in total safety. I also know that we are by no means there yet, as this alarming video of a Tesla driver quickly taking control of the car from Autopilot to avoid a wreck shows. Just in case you think it’s okay to let a Tesla’s Autopilot completely take over while you zone out, w
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Futurity.org
Are we made of atoms from distant galaxies? New research suggests that up to half of the matter in the Milky Way may come from galaxies far, far away. Scientists say this could mean that each of us is made, in part, from extragalactic matter. Using supercomputer simulations, researchers found a major and unexpected new mode for how galaxies, including our own Milky Way, acquired their matter: intergalactic transfer. “This study transforms
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Live Science
3,500-Year-Old 'Lunch Box' with Traces of Grain Found in Swiss AlpsArchaeologists found a lost lunch box near the top of a mountain in the Swiss Alps. They were even able to identify its 3,500-year-old contents.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biochemists link synthetic compound to hunger-hormone productionNew research conducted at Syracuse University suggests that a man-made cousin of a small molecule found in olive oil can disrupt the hunger-signaling pathway.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genomeA team of researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies describe development and application of new electron microscopic imaging tools and a selective stain for DNA to visualize the three-dimensional structure of chromatin -- a complex of molecules that helps pack six feet of DNA into each cell nucleus, construct chromosomes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computingA study by MIT researchers shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them for hundreds of times longer than previously achieved in these materials. These clusters might thus serve as 'qubits,' the basic building blocks of quantum computers.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Fate of Ancient Canaanites Seen in DNA Analysis: They SurvivedA study of ancient DNA recovered from remains found in Lebanon contradicts a biblical story that an ancient war wiped out the group.
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Gizmodo
Researchers Just Launched a Prototype of Humanity's First 'Interstellar Spacecraft' Image Courtesy of Zac Manchester Last year, extraterrestrial exploration venture Breakthrough Initiatives announced an ambitious plan to send tons of tiny spacecraft to our nearest neighboring star system, Alpha Centauri. The project, called Breakthrough Starshot, is focused on launching lightweight ‘nanocraft’ to the stars at rip-roaring speeds. Recently, the project took a big leap toward achie
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Canadian sapphires fit for a queen now unearthedNew research could make it easier to find high-quality Canadian sapphires, the same sparkling blue gems that adorn Queen Elizabeth II's Sapphire Jubilee Snowflake Brooch.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists turn a crystal into an electrical circuitPhysicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.
17h
Ars Technica
Tiny pillars put light and sound in a quantum superposition Enlarge / It's now possible to precisely fabricate very small pillars. (credit: Stanford University ) In recent years, there has been a lot of interest in coupling sound and light together. Admittedly, we've been doing this for a long time, but we've always been limited in terms of what we can do with how nature puts materials together. Now, with our ability to construct structures that are the r
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Enhancers Drive Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis: StudyMouse organoids reveal that a protein active during embryonic development joins forces with gene enhancers to revert cancer cells to an earlier developmental state.
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Gizmodo
Get Instant Pot-Like Features Without the Instant Pot Price Tag T-fal 12-in-1 Pressure Cooker , $50 Our readers have bought thousands of Instant Pot pressure cookers over the last few years, and with good reason ! But this $50 T-fal alternative is far more affordable , offers basically the same array of functions, and is actually easier to clean, according to some reviewers. So if the Instant Pot is a little out of your price range and you don’t feel like wai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeing the light: Researchers seek to improve solar cell technology using new materials and nanowiresResearchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are expanding solar cell technology using nanowires to capture more of the sun's energy and transform it into usable electricity. Comparable to ultra-thin blades of grass, nanowires added to today's conventional materials are capable of capturing more light and can be cost-effective solutions for adopting solar energy into the broader consumer marke
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computingResearchers have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers, for certain kinds of problems. The new work shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them, for hundreds of times longer than researchers have previously achieved in these ma
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Science : NPR
How To Keep Friends And Influence Yourself What do you believe strongly? What, if anything, could change your mind about it? (Image credit: Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR
Is It Time To Sack Football As We Know It? A new study of 111 brains of former NFL players revealed that 110 of them had a degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (Image credit: Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Signal may be from first 'exomoon'A team of astronomers has potentially discovered the first known moon located beyond the Solar System.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers crack the smile, describing 3 types by muscle movementThe smile may be the most common and flexible expression, used to reveal some emotions, cover others and manage social interactions that have kept communities secure and organized for millennia.But how do we tell one kind of smile from another?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using latest technology, MRI provides 'one-stop-shop' to evaluate potential liver donorsUsing the latest techniques, MRI can provide a 'one-stop-shop' method for evaluation of potential living liver donors, according to an article published in the July 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
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Gizmodo
You Can Probably Tell if Other Animals Are Emotionally Aroused What’s wrong, buddy? Image: AP It is likely that you, a human, can tell when your fellow humans are upset based on the sound of their voice. You might even be able to tell when your non-human pet is upset. But what about non-mammals, like frogs? What about birds? As far back as Darwin, folks have thought that the way animals vocalize could offer hints to their emotions. Past research seems to dem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Errors made by 'DNA spellchecker' revealed as important cause of cancerImportant processes that create mutations that cause cancer have been identified by researchers studying the genomes of more than 1,000 tumors. Many mutations in human cancers are caused by mistakes made by a repair mechanism or 'DNA spellchecker' rather than the actual damage to DNA caused by the environment. Sunlight and alcohol consumption increase the rate at which this happens, resulting in m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lab-created mini-brains reveal how growing organ maintains neuronal balanceScientists can now explore in a laboratory dish how the human brain develops by creating organoids -- distinct, three-dimensional regions of the brain. Scientists coaxed early stage stem cells to create and fuse two types of organoids from different brain regions to show how the developing brain maintains proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method promises easier nanoscale manufacturingA new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials has been revealed by researchers, who say that it could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Longstanding biological mystery of DNA organization now solvedStretched out, the DNA from all the cells in our body would reach Pluto. So how does each tiny cell pack a two-meter length of DNA into its nucleus, which is just one-thousandth of a millimeter across? The answer to this daunting biological riddle is central to understanding how the three-dimensional organization of DNA in the nucleus influences our biology, from how our genome orchestrates our ce
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel perspectives on anti-amyloid treatment for the prevention of Alzheimer's diseaseFor decades, researches have been investigating the underlying foundations of Alzheimer's disease to provide clues for the design of a successful therapy. Breakthrough insights reveal the molecular basis of the hereditary form of Alzheimer's disease that strikes early in life.
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Gizmodo
Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature's Top 10 Sidekicks Image: New Line Cinema Sidekicks. Always there to lend a helping hand, or sword, or wand, as the case may be. A hero is nothing without his or her sidekick, but these companions rarely get the recognition they deserve. A few second bananas may get the spotlight on occasion—your Robins, your Chewbaccas, your Igors—but they all originated in comics, films, or on TV. This list is for the truly forgo
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The Atlantic
Why a Republican Senator Wanted a Vote on Single-Payer Health Care The Senate voted down a single-payer health care amendment introduced by Republican Senator Steve Daines on Thursday, in a political gambit aimed at putting Senate Democrats on the record on a divisive issue. The amendment failed to pass after no lawmakers from either party voted for it. Fifty-seven Senators voted against the amendment, while 43 voted simply “present.” Four Democrats voted agains
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Popular Science
Future surgeons might patch you up with synthetic slug secretions Health The adhesive is sticky even when wet with blood. Slugs use mucus to glue themselves in place so predators can't snatch them as easily. We might use the same idea to stick ourselves together again.
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Ars Technica
Genetic evidence suggests the Canaanites weren’t destroyed after all Claude Doumet-Serhal The Canaanites are famous as the bad guys of the Book of Joshua in the Tanakh , or the Hebrew Bible. First, God orders the Hebrews to destroy the Canaanites along with several other groups, and later we hear that the Canaanites have actually been wiped out. Among archaeologists, however, the Canaanites are a cultural group whose rise and fall has remained a mystery. Now, a gr
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New Scientist - News
Tardigrade genomes help explain how they survive without waterWater bears, or tardigrades, can survive long periods without any water – discovering how they do it could lead to new ways to store vaccines in desiccated form
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Scientific American Content: Global
Witness the Solar Eclipse without Frying Your Eyes or Your CameraAmerica is preparing for a sea-to-shining-sea solar eclipse. Here’s how you can watch the spectacular display, and maybe even snap a photo to commemorate the event, without burning your retinas... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Woman Makes Video for Fiverr, Gets Framed for Fake Anthrax Packages Image Source: Fiverr, Wikimedia Commons We all know that the gig economy is just a terrifying innovation that makes it easier for the moneyed class to exploit workers. But one Fiverr drone recently found out that it’s also a perfect way to get framed for doing crimes. Back in April, a woman named Alexa Emerson was taken into custody in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, as a suspect connected to more than
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA links male, female butterfly thought to be distinct speciesResearchers recently discovered what was thought to be a distinct species of butterfly is actually the female of a species known to science for more than a century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecologyBy omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Which type of cell to become: Decision through indecisionFrom the moment of fertilization, building a human body involves a series of choices where cells generated by cell division must elect which of the myriad types of cell they will become. How does this decision occur? New research suggests that fate decision is not a unique programmed event, as was believed, but the outcome of a very dynamic process.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets of the amazing tardigrades revealed by their DNANew genome sequences shed light on both the origins of the tardigrades (also known as water bears or moss piglets), and the genes that underlie their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunting-related pathogen exposure not just for adult malesHunting and slaughtering wild animals in Western and Central Africa can put humans at risk of contracting zoonotic infections, including Ebola virus and Lassa virus. While previous studies have suggested that this risky hunting behavior is mostly limited to adult males, a new study finds that women and children also participate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bronze Age Iberia received fewer Steppe invaders than the rest of EuropeThe genomes of individuals who lived on the Iberian Peninsula in the Bronze Age had minor genetic input from Steppe invaders, suggesting that these migrations played a smaller role in the genetic makeup and culture of Iberian people, compared to other parts of Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists block evolution's molecular nerve pruning in rodentsResearchers investigating why some people suffer from motor disabilities report they may have dialed back evolution's clock a few ticks by blocking molecular pruning of sophisticated brain-to-limb nerve connections in maturing mice.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sticky when wet: Strong adhesive for wound healingA super-strong 'tough adhesive' has been created that is non-toxic and binds to biological tissues with a strength comparable to the body's own resilient cartilage, even when they're wet. Inspired by the glue produced by a slug, the double-layered hydrogel material demonstrates both high adhesion strength and strain dissipation, making it useful in a variety of medical applications.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new picture emerges on the origins of photosynthesis in a sun-loving bacteriaBiologists have gained important new insights by resolving with near-atomic clarity, the very first core membrane protein structure in the simplest known photosynthetic bacterium, called Heliobacterium modesticaldum (Helios was the Greek sun god). By solving the heart of photosynthesis in this sun-loving, soil-dwelling bacterium, the research team has gained a fundamental new understanding of the
18h
Ars Technica
Goop doctor says she’s not really Goop’s doctor, calls site a “caricature” Enlarge (credit: https://aviva.herb-pharm.com/ ) A doctor who appeared to vouch for and defend Gwyneth Paltrow’s high-profile lifestyle and e-commerce site, Goop, now says that she does not see herself as a Goop doctor and would not endorse the site, according to an interview with Stat . Two weeks ago, Dr. Aviva Romm provided a signed letter included in a Goop post titled “ Uncensored: A Word fro
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Science | The Guardian
Trust me on antibiotics, doctor – I’m a patient | Anne PerkinsEvidence that finishing the course may fuel bacterial resistance will test our relationship with experts – and perhaps begin the healing process • Anne Perkins is a Guardian columnist Early in 1941 Albert Alexander, a middle-aged police officer, went to his local hospital – the John Radcliffe, in Oxford – with a nasty infected scratch on his face. Popular legend says the injury was caused by a tho
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Science : NPR
Perdue Farms Signs Up For A Chicken Welfare Revolution The poultry industry may be on the verge of adopting ambitious new animal-welfare standards, giving chickens more space and daylight, and even returning to older, slower-growing chicken breeds. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)
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Gizmodo
Scientists in the US Reportedly Just Edited a Human Embryo for the First Time Human embryonic stem cells. Image: Wikimedia China has long been ahead of the US when it comes to human genetic engineering—there, the idea seems far less morally fraught. But for the first time, scientists in the United States have now genetically modified a human embryo, according to a new report in the MIT Technology Review . At Oregon Health and Science University, the publication reports, sc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UT Southwestern finds link between backup immune defense, mutation seen in Crohn's diseaseGenes that regulate a cellular recycling system called autophagy are commonly mutated in Crohn's disease patients, though the link between biological housekeeping and inflammatory bowel disease remained a mystery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Co-infection with two common gut pathogens worsens malnutrition in miceTwo gut pathogens commonly found in malnourished children combine to worsen malnutrition and impair growth in laboratory mice, according to new research.
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Popular Science
The world's water quality might be in trouble Environment More precipitation, more problems. Increasing rains because of climate change will lead to more agricultural runoff, and more aquatic dead zones.
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The Scientist RSS
Genomic Analysis Leaves Tardigrade Phylogeny UnclearThe genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don't resolve the animals' debated evolutionary story.
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Futurity.org
Robotic ‘exosuit’ fixes stride after stroke Researchers have created a soft, lightweight bionic walking aid that straps to the leg and can be worn anywhere to help people recovering from a stroke walk faster, farther, and more safely. The medical exosuit has breathable wraps made from proprietary materials, thin cables, and a series of small motors that help it mimic human muscles and tendons. The technology has already been licensed and a
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Gizmodo
The FCC Just Got Sued Again—Now for Withholding Records About Its Alleged DDoS Attack Photo: Getty A second lawsuit has been filed against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) this week over the secrecy shrouding its plans to kill off net neutrality . An investigative journalist filed paperwork suing the FCC in New York Wednesday afternoon, accusing the agency of improperly withholding records about a May cyberattack that it claims temporarily took down a website used by th
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The Atlantic
What's Wrong With Arcade Fire's Everything Now? Arcade Fire albums usually arrive with a technological gimmick— mysterious hotlines , shell corporations , immersive apps . It's benevolent overkill: Their orchestral-rock tunes often feel like VR films anyways. The Montreal collective creates songs with texture and weight; strongly defined beginnings, middles, and ends; and a voice in the ear that’s almost vaudevillian, insisting that everything
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The Atlantic
Lawmakers Grill Defense Officials on Equipment-Transfer Program The Defense Logistics Agency, an agency within the Department of Defense that was recently found to have weaknesses in its equipment-transfer program, is suspending all federal transfers of excess military gear to agencies until they comply with new registration measures, said Mike Cannon, the director of DLA Disposition Services, during a House Armed Services Committee hearing Thursday. Cannon a
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Feed: All Latest
Goodbye iPod, and Thanks for All the TunesToday officially marks the end of Apple's era of standalone music players.
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Live Science
Slug-Inspired Glue Patches Beating HeartsA new glue inspired by slug slime can mend a broken heart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA links male, female butterfly thought to be distinct speciesResearchers recently discovered what was thought to be a distinct species of butterfly is actually the female of a species known to science for more than a century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MKTP surgery has long-term benefit for restoring skin pigmentation in vitiligo patientsA Henry Ford Hospital study has shown that skin transplant surgery has long-term benefit for restoring skin pigmentation caused by the skin disease vitiligo.In a retrospective study, researchers found that a majority of areas of the skin treated with surgery still had 'very good to excellent' color match pigmentation five years later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could insufficient sleep be adding centimeters to your waistline?Adults in the UK who have poor sleep patterns are more likely to be overweight and obese and have poorer metabolic health, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New imaging technique overturns longstanding textbook model of DNA foldingResearchers funded by NIH have developed an imaging method that reveals a much more diverse and flexible DNA-protein chromatin chain than previously thought. The result suggests a nimbler structure to regulate gene expression, and provide a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combining stroke treatments shows improved outcomes for ELVO stroke patientsIntravenous thrombolysis pretreatment may improve mechanical thrombectomy outcomes in emergent large-vessel occlusions (ELVO) patients, according to a new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 14th Annual Meeting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method promises easier nanoscale manufacturingScientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials that could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new picture emerges on the origins of photosynthesis in a sun-loving bacteriaA research group led by ASU's Raimund Fromme has gained important new insights by resolving with near-atomic clarity, the very first core membrane protein structure in the simplest known photosynthetic bacterium, called Heliobacterium modesticaldum (Helios was the Greek sun god). By solving the heart of photosynthesis in this sun-loving, soil-dwelling bacterium, Fromme's research team has gained a
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sticky when wet: Strong adhesive for wound healingA team of researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University has created a super-strong 'tough adhesive' that is non-toxic and binds to biological tissues with a strength comparable to the body's own resilient cartilage, even when they're wet. Inspired by the glue produced by a slug, the double-layered hydrogel material demonstrates both high adhesion strength and strain dissipation, making
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salk scientists solve longstanding biological mystery of DNA organizationResearchers image 3-D genome in nucleus of living human cell for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In mice, fine motor control is actively suppressedThe neural connections that endow humans with great dexterity are also present in mice at birth, but are suppressed shortly afterward, a new study reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slug mucus inspires new type of surgical glue to close woundsInspired by a type of mucus secreted by slugs, researchers have developed a sticky but flexible substance that effectively seals wounds after surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting to the root of Iceland's molten rock originsNew data reveal an unprecedented depiction of a region of partially molten rock deep within the Earth, which appears to be feeding material in the form of a plume to the surface, where Iceland is located.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change means more rain, more nitrogen runoff, more problemsAn intensifying water cycle will likely cause dramatic increases -- nearing 20% by 2100 -- in the amount of nitrogen runoff in the US, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists block evolution's molecular nerve pruning in rodentsResearchers investigating why some people suffer from motor disabilities report they may have dialed back evolution's clock a few ticks by blocking molecular pruning of sophisticated brain-to-limb nerve connections in maturing mice.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Projected precipitation increases are bad news for water qualityIf climate change is not curbed, increased precipitation could substantially overload US waterways with excess nitrogen, according to a new study from Carnegie's Eva Sinha and Anna Michalak and Princeton University's Venkatramani Balaji published by Science. Excess nutrient pollution increases the likelihood of events that severely impair water quality. The study found that impacts will be especia
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fundamental breakthrough in the future of designing materialsA team of researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough in the area of material design -- one that challenges the commonly held view on how the fundamental building blocks of matter come together. They have shown that the granular building blocks in copper can never fit together perfectly, but are rotated causing an unexpected level of surface roughness. This behavior, previousl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of EuropeThe genomes of individuals who lived on the Iberian Peninsula in the Bronze Age had minor genetic input from Steppe invaders, suggesting that these migrations played a smaller role in the genetic makeup and culture of Iberian people, compared to other parts of Europe. Daniel Bradley and Rui Martiniano of Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, and Ana Maria Silva of University of Coimbra, Portugal, re
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Co-infection with two common gut pathogens worsens malnutrition in miceTwo gut pathogens commonly found in malnourished children combine to worsen malnutrition and impair growth in laboratory mice, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
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Science : NPR
Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue The words "strong" and "inspiring" are not usually assigned to garden slugs. But slug slime inspired materials scientists to invent a new kind of adhesive that could one day help heal human wounds. (Image credit: Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer-death button gets jammed by gut bacteriumA type of bacterium is associated with the recurrence of colorectal cancer and poor outcomes, research show. Scientists found that Fusobacterium nucleatum in the gut can stop chemotherapy from causing a type of cancer cell death called apoptosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shedding light deeper into the human brainThe inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. The reality is that light scattering is the major obstacle for deep penetration into tissue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women, men report similar levels of work-family conflictsContrary to public perception and many media accounts, women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts, both in the form of work interfering with family and family interfering with work, according to research.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Tardigrades aren’t champion gene swappers after allGenetic studies reveal more secrets of the bizarre creatures known as tardigrades.
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Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on antibiotics: don’t keep taking the tablets | EditorialWhen knowledge advances, so should the advice doctors give The idea that we have a moral duty to complete any course of antibiotics that the doctor prescribes is intuitively comforting. Following the course to the end appears as an act of solidarity against the genuinely terrible threat of widespread antibiotic resistance, something that could make medicine as we know it impossibly dangerous. Foll
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Harmful protein on acid triggers a life-threatening disease, study findsUsing an array of modern biochemical and structural biology techniques, researchers have begun to unravel the mystery of how acidity influences a small protein called serum amyloid A. The findings may help design new treatments for the life-threatening human disorder called secondary systemic amyloidosis.
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One Billion Daily WhatsApp Users Prove Privacy Isn't DeadWhatsApp's rise and Twitter's decline converge to send a message about the way we communicate now.
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Climate Change-Fueled Storms Could Leave Less Water for DrinkingA new study shows that as rainfall increases, so will nutrient runoff, spurring more algal blooms, hypoxic deadzones, and less water for everyone.
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Soundcloud Isn't Dead Yet, But Its Greatest Legacy Could Soon BeThe music-sharing platform didn't just break new artists—it became a breeding ground for entirely new genres.
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Futurity.org
Reusable filter clears 99% of metals from water Researchers have created a filter comprised of carbon nanotubes immobilized in a tuft of quartz fiber that can remove toxic heavy metals from water. The researchers have shown that the new filters absorb more than 99 percent of metals from samples laden with cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, and lead. Once saturated, the filters can be washed with a mild household chemical like vinegar an
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Ars Technica
Twitter’s stock plunges as user growth stalls Enlarge / Traders at the New York Stock Exchange beneath a monitor displaying Twitter's stock symbol in 2016. (credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Several years ago, Twitter seemed like it would be the social media darling of the decade. Founders had dreams of being the first Internet company to reach one billion users, making it "the pulse of the planet." That's not going to happen
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The Atlantic
Why Does the Kremlin Care So Much About the Magnitsky Act? Let’s get something straight: The Magnitsky Act is not, nor has it ever been, about adoptions. The Magnitsky Act, rather, is about money. It freezes certain Russian officials’ access to the stashes they were keeping in Western banks and real estate and bans their entry to the United States. The reason Russian (and now, American) officials keep talking about adoption in the same breath is because
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecologyBy omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities.
19h
Science | The Guardian
From goo to glue: slug slime inspires new wound-mending surgical adhesive Impressed by the sticky and elastic properties of slug mucus, researchers have developed tough, flexible glues that can even work on bloody, moving tissue If there are two words in the English language likely to trigger a curl of the lip, “slug mucus” would be towards the top of the list. But while the molluscs and their slimy secretions are the bane of the green-fingered, it seems they have trig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fundamental breakthrough in the future of designing materialsA team of researchers from AMBER centre based in Trinity College Dublin, have made a breakthrough in the area of material design - one that challenges the commonly held view on how the fundamental building blocks of matter come together to form materials.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Projected precipitation increases are bad news for water qualityIf climate change is not curbed, increased precipitation could substantially overload U.S. waterways with excess nitrogen, according to a new study from Carnegie's Eva Sinha and Anna Michalak and Princeton University's Venkatramani Balaji published by Science. Excess nutrient pollution increases the likelihood of events that severely impair water quality. The study found that impacts will be espec
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which type of cell to become: Decision through indecisionFrom the moment of fertilization, building a human body involves a series of choices where cells generated by cell division must elect which of the myriad types of cell they will become. How does this decision occur? New research from Alice Moussy and colleagues of the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Genethon and ENSLyon in France suggests that fate decision is not a unique programmed event, as
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sticky when wet: Strong adhesive for wound healingAnyone who has ever tried to put on a Band-Aid when their skin is damp knows that it can be frustrating. Wet skin isn't the only challenge for medical adhesives - the human body is full of blood, serum, and other fluids that complicate the repair of numerous internal injuries. Many of the adhesive products used today are toxic to cells, inflexible when they dry, and do not bind strongly to biologi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new picture emerges on the origins of photosynthesis in a sun-loving bacteriaEvery day, enough sunlight hits the Earth to power the planet many times over—if only we could more efficiently capture all the energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method promises easier nanoscale manufacturingScientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials that could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.
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