Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New images of Alaska sub-seafloor suggest high tsunami dangerScientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign. They say the feature closely resembles one that produced the 2011 Tohoku tsunami off Japan, killing some 20,000 people and melting down three nuclear reactors. Such structures may lurk unrecognized in other areas
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Administration Advances School Vouchers Despite Scant EvidenceStudies show that school vouchers lead to lower math and reading scores. So why has the Trump administration embraced them? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
55min
Ingeniøren
Nyt hus foldes ud på ti minutterEt britisk firma med speciale i foldbare strukturer har bygget et hus, der kan foldes ud på kun ti minutter. Se videoen her.
4h

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Gizmodo
The NYC Subway Is Still Getting Ready for the Next Hurricane Sandy So far, the MTA’s “summer of hell” included a power failure that trapped train passengers in A/C-less car for two hours, a track fire that resulted in disastrous delays, and a train derailment caused by “improper maintenance.” Incredibly, some passengers have even been walking the tracks to escape stalled trains. Last Tuesday, the MTA dropped its new $800 million proposal suggesting, among other
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are there so few women screen composers?Just 13 percent of those composing music for screen are women, according to membership figures from APRA AMCOS, the organisation that looks after copyright for songwriters, composers and music publishers in Australia.
6min
New Scientist - News
Hacking a US electronic voting booth takes less than 90 minutesAt security conference DEF CON hackers proved it is possible to manipulate votes on the same voting machines used in US elections in the time it takes to watch a movie
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The good news and bad news about the rare birds of Papua New GuineaThe rainforests of Papua New Guinea are home to one of the richest bird populations in the world. But many are threatened by logging and palm oil farming.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sex matters: Male bias in the lab is bad scienceWhen I first started doing experimental biology, I noticed that we only looked at males.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Planners know depressingly little about a city's impacts on our mental healthA large body of research shows that living in cities can harm our health. We know poor urban design can lead to people being less physically active, which is a factor in weight problems, obesity and cancers. But did you know urban life might lead to poor mental health?
12min
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How Long Tesla Will Take to Deliver Your Tesla Model 3—And How to Make It Happen FasterGet the long-range version, spring for the fancy features, skip the white interior, and make do with rear-wheel-drive.
18min
Feed: All Latest
The Physics Behind the Magical Parallax Effect Running Your AR AppsWhat magic does Apple use to turn a 2-D image into something that looks like it is there in real life? The answer is parallax.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla's Model 3 and the transition to sustainabilityThe first Model 3s were delivered this week, and with it, perhaps the beginning of the end of the internal combustion era. This might be the way horse stable owners felt when they first saw a Ford Model T. The new Tesla is as snazzy as the very expensive earlier models, but its price is a more affordable $35,000 rather than the upwards of $100,000 cost of more luxurious models. Elon Musk, like the
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking microbial succession in petroleum wellsMicrobes are invisible to the naked eye, but play key roles in maintaining the planet's biogeochemical cycles. In the Earth's subsurface, microbes have adapted to thrive in the relatively stable extreme conditions. To learn more about how some of these populations respond to disruptions in their environment, researchers in the petroleum industry conducted a comparative genetic analysis of the micr
18min
Live Science
Fit for a King: Tut's Camping Bed Was an Ancient MarvelKing Tutankhamun, the pharaoh who ruled Egypt more than 3,300 years ago, slept on the forerunner of our modern camping bed, researchers have found.
20min
Ars Technica
Negative mass swing beats the uncertainty principle Enlarge (credit: Christopher Gutiérrez, Daniel Walkup/NIST ) Quantum mechanics comes with something called the uncertainty principle. This states that there are pairs of properties that cannot be simultaneously known to arbitrary precision. This is not due to the way a measurement changes the properties of what it measures. Instead, it is due to how quantum mechanics forces us to make measurement
21min
Gizmodo
Terrifying Ocean Predator Changes Our View of the Worst Mass Extinction in History The 26 cm long fossil preserving the right side of the skull of Birgeria americana. Image: University of Zurich 252 million years ago, the Earth was in a really bad place. At the boundary of the Permian and Triassic periods, our biosphere experienced its most dramatic mass extinction event ( so far ), one so utterly complete that it has been solemnly termed the “Great Dying.” Precious little was
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What are our social and psychological responses to environmental disasters?The Exxon Valdez oil tanker strikes a reef in Prince William Sound in 1989, releasing 11 million gallons of crude oil into the environment. A storm blows in soon after, spreading the oil over more than 1,000 miles of coastline.
24min
Scientific American Content: Global
Should the World Tap Undersea Methane Hydrates for Energy?Debate rises over whether mining frozen gas beneath the ocean would aggravate global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diversity onscreen and behind the camera remains elusiveWhite, straight, able-bodied men remain the norm on screen in film, according to a new report on inclusion in 900 top movies of the last decade.
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creating a high-speed internet lane for emergency situationsDuring large disasters, like hurricanes, wildfires and terrorist attacks, people want emergency responders to arrive quickly and help people deal with the crisis. In order to do their best, police, medics, firefighters and those who manage them need lots of information: Who is located where, needing what help? And what equipment and which rescuers are available to intervene? With all of the techno
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survey reveals why WA horses are saddled with tooth decayHorses fed oaten hay are almost three times more likely to develop tooth decay according to a new study at The University of Western Australia.
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research raises hope for erbium-based integrated photonics deviceAn Arizona State University researcher has made another breakthrough using the rare-earth metal erbium as the gain material for an optical amplifier, this time with an achievement that will enable its use for the first time with small chip optical technologies. The discovery attains a decades-long goal in the field of photonic integration, in which different small optical components are tightly co
36min
Ingeniøren
Droner er langt farligere for flytrafikken end fugleSammenstød med droner medfører en betydeligt større risiko for skader på fly end kollisioner med fugle. Det viser en ny rapport fra de britiske myndigheder, som bliver mødt med skepsis fra droneindustrien.
37min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Tornado creates amazing Dorset water spoutA number of people across Weymouth reported seeing the phenomena earlier.
45min
Gizmodo
Anker's Indispensable PowerCore Fusion Is a Battery Pack And A Wall Charger - Get It For 20% Off [Exclusive] Anker PowerCore Fusion (White) , $24 with code KINJAFBG The most versatile member of Anker’s insanely popular PowerCore battery pack family pulls double duty as a USB wall charger , and you can save 20% on the new white model with promo code KINJAFBG. I’ve owned the Fusion since it launched earlier this year, and it’s an indispensable part of my bag. Now, rather than traveling with a wall charger
45min
Live Science
46 Prehistoric Sites with Paleolakes Discovered in 'Green Arabia'Forty-six sites containing artifacts, mainly stone tools, have been discovered beside the remains of ancient lakes in the western Nefud desert in Saudi Arabia.
48min
Live Science
In Photos: Paleolakes Dot 'Green Arabia'Photos reveal the remains of hundreds of ancient lakes that were discovered in the Nefud Desert in Saudi Arabia. They date back to a time when the climate there was wet and humans roamed the region.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can insects be used as evidence to tell if a body has been moved?The use of insects as indicators of post-mortem displacement is a familiar technique depicted on many crime investigation TV shows. In reality, this practice is far from clear-cut. To cut through the hype, researchers have looked across existing studies to review how exactly insects have been used in legal investigations and to what extent these methods have been useful.
1h
The Atlantic
The Unexpected Value of the Liberal Arts Growing up in Southern California, Mai-Ling Garcia’s grades were ragged; her long-term plans nonexistent. At age 20, she was living with her in-laws halfway between Los Angeles and the Mojave Desert, while her husband was stationed abroad. Tired of working subsistence jobs, she decided in 2001 to try a few classes at Mount San Jacinto community college. Nobody pegged her for greatness at first. A
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cognitive scientist calls for integration in language sciencesIn a new opinion piece in a major publication, Morten Christiansen, professor of psychology, describes how the study of language has fragmented into many highly-specialized areas of study that tend not to talk to each other. He calls for a new era of integration in the paper, published July 31 in Nature Human Behaviour.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micro-membrane diaphragm pump for delivering ambient air to gas sensorsParticulate matter harms the heart and lungs. In the future, a smartphone with an inbuilt gas sensor could be used to warn of heavy exposure. To help the sensor respond quickly and provide accurate measurements, researchers at Fraunhofer have developed a powerful micro diaphragm pump for delivering ambient air to the sensor.
1h
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Bitcoin Is Splitting in Two. Now What?Dispute over currency’s path sparks creation of offshoot Bitcoin Cash
1h
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The Plan to End Science’s Sexist #Manel ProblemIn the past few months, three high-profile science conferences have ignited internet ire for their lack of representation.
1h
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5 Penny-Pinching Apps for Saving and Budgeting Your Money: Mint, Acorns, YNAB, Credit Karma, DigitThese apps will help you keep your accounts afloat.
1h
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Voting Machine Hacks Help Show How to Protect ElectionsAt the DefCon security conference in Las Vegas, the hackers descended on America's vulnerable voting machines.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Embryos rapidly outgrow mother's genetic kick-startAttaining independence from one's parents is an enduring theme in the lives of many organisms. Birds must fly the nest, just as mammals must wean off their mother's milk.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Automated painting of individual piecesReductions of 20 percent in paint use, 15 percent in energy consumption and 5 percent in production time – the SelfPaint automated painting system offers significant advantages compared to manual painting operations, which have previously been the preferred option. SelfPaint's biggest advantage could well be that it is also suitable for painting individual pieces, known in industry as batch size 1
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Evidence mounts for an ocean on early VenusNot long after its birth, Venus may have rocked a water ocean, new simulations suggest.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can insects be used as evidence to tell if a body has been moved?The use of insects as indicators of post-mortem displacement is a familiar technique depicted on many crime investigation TV shows. In reality, this practice is far from clear-cut.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Education Be Rescued?Students across the U.S. are in jeopardy, but smart policies can help schools -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Science | The Guardian
Ancient statue unearthed at Cambodia's Angkor temple complex Archaeologists have unearthed two-metre high, centuries-old object during an excavation of an ancient hospital Archaeologists have unearthed a large, centuries-old statue that is believed to have once stood guard over an ancient hospital at Cambodia’s famed Angkor temple complex. The nearly two metre tall carving, which is thought to be from the late 12th to the early 13th century, was discovered
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reliably determining and predicting attitude motion of defunct satellitesUncontrollable flying objects in the Earth's orbit are an enormous risk for active satellites and for spacecraft in general. Since April 2012, the European environmental satellite ENVISAT has also been adrift in orbit. Now, the Fraun-hofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR has developed pioneering methods to precisely determine the attitude rotation of malfunctioning sa
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering data theft quicklyComputer experts have always struggled to find solutions for protecting businesses and authorities from network breaches. This is because there are too many vague indicators of potential attacks. With PA-SIEM, IT managers have a solution that effectively protects their systems while exposing data thieves and criminal hackers more quickly than conventional software.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sunrise through the solar arraysOn July 26, 2017, a member of the Expedition 52 crew aboard the International Space Station took this photograph of one of the 16 sunrises they experience every day, as the orbiting laboratory travels around Earth. One of the solar panels that provides power to the station is seen in the upper left.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What does Trump's climate policy mean for greenhouse gas reduction goals?When the Trump administration announced that the United States was withdrawing from the Paris accord on climate change, many observers felt that this would have catastrophic results for efforts to mitigate global climate change. But given the scale of carbon reduction efforts, how much of an impact could Trump's climate policies have?
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Disease Hunters Enlarge the Enemy to Get a Better LookNew “expansion pathology” technique lets optical microscopes go where only electrons could go before -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scholar analyzes responses to algorithms in journalism, criminal justiceAdvanced algorithms shape and guide our every step in the online world. They are also increasingly penetrating everyday life as more sectors of society, from finance and health care to human resources and criminal justice, incorporate them into daily decision-making.
1h
Live Science
Pet Boa Bites Woman's Face in Unusual AttackFirefighters were forced to decapitate a boa constrictor that had latched its teeth onto a woman's nose and wound its body around her neck. The woman survived, but the incident raises the question: Do boas typically attack the faces and necks of people?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Intense star formation in the Westerhout 43 regionHidden from our sight, the Westerhout 43 star-forming region is revealed in full glory in this far-infrared image from ESA's Herschel space observatory. This giant cloud, where a multitude of massive stars come to life in the billowing gas and dust, is almost 20 000 light-years away from the Sun, in the constellation of Aquila, the Eagle.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trading on human tides— the 'free market' of people smugglingCambridge criminologists are using emerging sources of information – from court records to Facebook groups – to analyse the networks behind one of the fastest-growing black markets on the planet: the smuggling of people into Europe.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Voyager spacecraft still reaching for the stars and setting records after 40 yearsHumanity's farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, achieve 40 years of operation and exploration this August and September. Despite their vast distance, they continue to communicate with NASA daily, still probing the final frontier.
2h
The Atlantic
The Real Reason Trump’s Obamacare Repeal Push Failed Obamacare repeal has failed again, almost certainly for the final time. Seven years of Republican promises to uproot the thing and mulch the stump have ended in rejection by a Senate with a Republican majority. It’s hard to recall when last a political party inflicted such a defeat upon itself. Obamacare repeal was not one policy idea among many for Republicans, akin to the cap-and-trade plans th
2h
Ingeniøren
Eks-ansatte: USA’s energiministerium er ved at selvdestruereMinisteriet, som forhindrer plutonium i at ende i en beskidt bombe, og sørger for at Tesla får den nødvendige støtte til at producere biler, befinder sig angiveligt på randen af kaos efter Trump-administrationen har taget over.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular nanoparticles lead to major advancement in the development of solar cellsA new study by researchers at the University of St Andrews could herald a major advancement in the development of solar cells.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soy microbeads are ecofriendly alternative to plastic microbeads used in cosmetic, soap productsRecent graduates from Purdue University have started a company to further develop and bring to market their SoyFoliate innovation, a soy microbead technology that could offer an environmentally friendly alternative to plastic microbeads that have been banned in the United States.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big-headed gecko shows human actions are messing with evolutionEvolution doesn't have to take millions of years. New research shows that a type of lizard living on man-made islands in Brazil has developed a larger head than its mainland cousins in a period of only 15 years.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reinforces the Amazon forest's importance in regulating atmospheric chemistryAirborne measurements made as part of the Green Ocean Amazon experiment (GOAmazon) show that the Amazon rainforest emits at least three times more isoprene than scientists had previously thought. The research findings were published in Nature Communications.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create one-nanometer trimetallic alloy particlesThe principal components of petroleum and natural gas are hydrocarbons and their mixtures, indispensable as resources supporting modern infrastructure as raw materials for the petrochemical industry. A technique conventionally used to create beneficial chemical products from hydrocarbons is using a large amount of metallic peroxides in hazardous organic solvents to oxidize hydrocarbon compounds.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnon circular birefringence—polarization rotation of spin waves and its applicationsAn international team of researchers from Thailand, the U.S. and Japan has conducted a thorough study of an exotic behavior of material called a noncentrosymmetric antiferromagnet. The team, monitoring the behavior of the propagation of spin waves in magnetic material, has reported its findings, which show the first direct evidence of the nonreciprocal magnons.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Punisher's Lexi Alexander Fights Sexism in HollywoodThe martial artist turned director has taken a lot of punches from the industry—and thrown plenty back.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Father, son prepare for eclipse after missed 1979 viewingThe last time a total solar eclipse blacked out the sun in Oregon nearly 40 years ago, Gene Brick was working in a timber mill that refused to shut down for the spectacle.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia lifts threat to ban encrypted app TelegramThe Indonesian government has lifted its threat to ban the encrypted messaging app Telegram because it's taking steps to address "negative" content that includes forums for Islamic State group supporters, the information technology minister said Tuesday.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boat noise disrupts fish cooperationNoise from motorboats changes the behavior of cleaner fish and the species they help.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers describe structures, mechanisms that enable bacteria to resist antibioticsIowa State University's Edward Yu has spent years studying the structures and mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics. He and his research group recently published two more papers describing the efflux pumps and transporters that certain disease-causing bacteria use to keep antibiotics away. Yu is beginning to use that knowledge to look for ways to disable the structures and restore the effe
3h
The Atlantic
Can Republicans Stop Trump From Sabotaging Obamacare? Congressional Republicans spent months fighting among themselves over how to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. In the wake of last week’s Senate failure , however, GOP lawmakers find themselves increasingly at odds with President Trump. The president wants to “let Obamacare implode” in the hopes of forcing Democrats to the negotiating table. Republicans on Capitol Hill plainly don’t. Bu
3h
Ingeniøren
Danskere omdanner blævrende vandmænd til sprøde chipsGastrofysikere fra SDU udvikler smart opskrift, der ved hjælp af alkohol speeder tilberedningen af vandmands-chips markant op.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers describe structures, mechanisms that enable bacteria to resist antibioticsTwo new discoveries from Edward Yu's Iowa State University laboratory are adding to the scientific understanding of how bacteria resist antibiotics.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boat noise disrupts fish cooperationNoise from motorboats changes the behaviour of cleaner fish and the species they help.
3h
The Atlantic
What Steve Bannon Wants to Do to Google Over the past year, the old idea of enforcing market competition has gained renewed life in American politics. The basic idea is that the structure of the modern market economy has failed: There are too few companies, most of them are too big, and they’re stifling competition. Its supporters argue that the government should do something about it, reviving what in the United States we call antitru
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sony net profit soars in April-June quarterJapanese electronics giant Sony said on Tuesday its net profit nearly quadrupled in the three months to June, backed by brisk sales of smartphone components and cameras as well as solid revenue from its game business.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Undocumented immigration doesn't worsen drug, alcohol problems in US, study indicatesDespite being saddled with many factors associated with drug and alcohol problems, undocumented immigrants are not increasing the prevalence of drug and alcohol crimes and deaths in the United States, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop alternative to wasteful methane flaringJean-Sabin McEwen knocks out a web search for "North Dakota," "night sky" and "flaring," and quickly finds a picture from space showing a glowing cluster bigger than Minneapolis. It's from oil and gas fields burning off methane, producing as much greenhouse gas in a year as 1 million cars.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elephants, tigers kill one human a day in IndiaEndangered elephants and tigers are killing one person a day in India as humans put a growing squeeze on their habitat, according to new government figures.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech advances will lead to MH370 discovery - Malaysia AirlinesThe resting place of missing flight MH370 will eventually be found but it will require advances in science and technology, including artificial intelligence, Malaysia Airlines' chief said Tuesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Army corps to release delayed report on blocking Asian carpThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it will release a previously delayed report on measures that could be taken at an Illinois waterway chokepoint to prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virgin America computer systems hackedAlaska Airlines says it is taking precautions including requiring employees to change their passwords after Virgin America's computer systems were hacked.
5h
Science | The Guardian
We'll never tackle climate change if academics keep the focus on consensus | Warren Pearce Media and political attention is being wasted on boosting the public’s notion of scientific consensus, crowding out more important discussion and action In a democracy, we hope that science helps to inform the public about its problems. In the case of climate change, believe it or not, the evidence suggests this is going relatively well. Climate science is a vast, sprawling field of knowledge tha
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Typhoon weakens but could still threaten JapanA typhoon that briefly strengthened into the Northern Hemisphere's strongest storm of the year has lost much of its punch but could still hit Japan by this weekend.
5h
Ars Technica
How Gone Home’s creators rewound time to find their sci-fi future Enlarge / A quiet moment for two Tacoma crew members. PORTLAND—At most offices, the employees don't take kindly to a stranger rifling through their personal and professional effects. But most offices aren't Fullbright. You may best know this game-development studio as the makers of Gone Home , the 2013 video game that ushered in a new era of "interactive narrative" hits. Gone Home focused on char
5h
Science-Based Medicine
The Antithesis of Science-Based Medicine: The Medical Medium’s Fantasy-Based Health AdviceAnthony William, the Medical Medium, hears voices that give him advanced scientific information from the spirit world. He offers reams of health advice based on nothing but fantasy. He even tells readers to call on 12 angels out loud by their name. I call bull.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seas rise, trees die: Climate change before your eyesThey're called "ghost forests"—dead trees along vast swaths of coastline invaded by rising seas, something scientists call one of the most visible markers of climate change.
5h
Ingeniøren
Sådan skabes for 40 milliarder ny kryptovaluta: I dag deles Bitcoin i to En mindre fraktion i Bitcoin-netværket forlader kryptovalutaen midt i kritisk opdatering. Manøvren skaber milliarder i ny digital valuta - men har en usikker fremtid. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-skabes-40-milliarder-ny-kryptovaluta-dag-deles-bitcoin-to-1078730 Version2
6h
Science | The Guardian
Nearly all men over 60 and women over 75 eligible for statins, analysis suggests 11.8 million adults in England are eligible to be offered cholesterol-lowering drugs, say researchers who examined 2014 guidance on statins set out by Nice Almost all men over 60 and women over 75 should be eligible for statins, according to a new analysis. After examining guidance on which patients should be offered statin therapy, researchers calculated 11.8 million English adults are eligible
7h
cognitive science
Infograph On Chatbots In Auto Dealership ! submitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
7h
The Atlantic
Video Shows Possible Failure of North Korean ICBM Test Just days after North Korea test fired an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that experts say is capable of reaching major U.S. cities like Los Angeles, Denver, and Chicago, new video footage suggests that a key part of the missile broke into pieces upon re-entering the earth’s atmosphere. The evidence—taken by the Japanese public broadcaster NHK—was first identified by Michael Elleman, a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU researchers develop alternative to wasteful methane flaringWSU researchers say they have a solution to the oil field flares wasting 3.5 percent of the world's natural gas: an inexpensive reactor that can convert methane to electricity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resistance training may slow down the progression of multiple sclerosisIn the past, multiple sclerosis patients were advised not to exercise for fear of exacerbating the illness. However, it is now known that physical training can relieve many of the symptoms, including the excessive fatigue and mobility impairments that are often seen. New research now shows that resistance training may protect the nervous system and thus slow the progression of the disease.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: History of gum disease increases cancer risk in older womenPostmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a new study of more than 65,000 women that's also the first to report an association between gum disease and gallbladder cancer risk.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Periodontal disease is associated with higher risk of several cancer typesPeriodontal disease was associated with increased risk of several types of cancer in postmenopausal women, even in women who had never smoked.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Ford's 2018 Mustang Uses 'Quiet Mode' to Hush Its ExhaustFor those rare times that demand a silent start.
8h
Gizmodo
Read a Bunch of Trump Administration Dummies Argue With an Email Troll They Thought Was Their Coworkers Photo: AP Secretary of Energy Rick Perry is not the only member of Donald Trump’s White House with a “Jerky Boys” problem . A CNN report on Monday indicated a number of Trump administration officials, including dearly departed communications director Anthony Scaramucci, Homeland Security Adviser Tom Bossert and ambassador to Russia-designate Jon Huntsman all fell for an email prank from Twitter u
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
Machines Are Developing Language Skills Inside Virtual WorldsIt’s hard to teach machines to use language. That’s why they should teach themselves instead.
8h
Gizmodo
Grover Norquist Has Somehow Concluded Vaping Is What Will Make the Republican Party Cool Again Image: Screengrab via HBO Go President Donald Trump’s administration is currently imploding in spectacular fashion, from the meteoric rise and equally meteoric collapse of week-long communications director Anthony Scaramucci to high-profile legislative disasters . Grover Norquist, the arch-conservative president of Americans for Tax Reform, thinks Republicans will be able to partially cover all o
8h
Ingeniøren
Raffinaderi-grund skal undersøges for olie-forurening efter brandAvista Oil skal nu undersøge, om området omkring det nu brændte raffinaderi er blevet forurenet. Kalundborg Kommune har en ‘begrundet mistanke’ om forurening fra slukningsvand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insufficient sleep may be adding to your waistlineAdults in the UK who have poor sleep patterns are more likely to be overweight and obese and have poorer metabolic health, according to a new study.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in ChinaThe Chinese government finds almost 500 researchers guilty of misconduct in relation to a recent spate of retractions from a cancer journal.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aalto-1 satellite sends first imageThe photograph was taken with the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland developed hyperspectral camera's secondary camera.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists watch 'artificial atoms' assemble into perfect lattices with many usesSome of the world's tiniest crystals are known as 'artificial atoms' because they can organize themselves into structures that look like molecules, including 'superlattices' that are potential building blocks for novel materials. Now scientists have made the first observation of these nanocrystals rapidly forming superlattices while they are themselves still growing.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with autism are less surprised by the unexpectedAdults with autism may overestimate the volatility of the world around them, finds a new study.
9h
Live Science
Facts About VanadiumProperties, sources and uses of the element vanadium.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New genomics tool CITE-Seq enables large-scale multidimensional analysis of single cellsA new technique represents an important step forward for single-cell RNA sequencing, an advancing field of genomics that provides detailed insights into individual cells and makes it possible to distinguish between different cell types and to study disease mechanisms at the level of individual cells.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell senescence is regulated by innate DNA sensingScientists have made new insights into the control of cell senescence, which is intimately linked to the development of cancer and aging.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists make laser-induced graphene from woodScientists have made a form of graphene that can be cut with a table saw. They turned pine into laser-induced graphene and used it to make proof-of-concept electrodes for water splitting and supercapacitors.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles: Viable skin infection treatmentDermatologists have found that topically applied nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles are a viable treatment for deep fungal infections of the skin caused by dermatophytes.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Home-based kit to increase HIV testingResearchers have found that 86 percent of heterosexuals who are at high risk for HIV would use a home-based test kit provided by mail and 99 percent would seek treatment based on a positive result. This self-administered alternative may lead a group whose high risk is under-recognized to treatment sooner.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How central are female characters to a movie?A new study -- which creates automatic tools for signal analysis and linguistic assessment -- uncovers how media communicates about gender, race and age finding that in the majority of films, females roles are not central to the plot.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New drug therapy targets in a range of diseasesScientists have a better understanding of the immune system at a molecular level, thanks to research that may now lead to a range of new treatments for disease. The research provides a new foundation for therapeutic strategies against a wide range of diseases and infections.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Netflix drama '13 Reasons Why' linked to suicidal thoughtsA new study has delved into Americans' internet search history in the days after Netflix's '13 Reasons Why' series aired, and found that queries for suicide and how to commit suicide spiked in the show's wake.
9h
Live Science
Who Invented Zero?The concept of zero, both as a placeholder and as a symbol for nothing, is a relatively recent development.
9h
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The 10 Most-Read WIRED Stories in July
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tobacco industry steps up tactics to reduce impact of display banTobacco manufacturers are offering retailers incentives to promote their products in a bid to mitigate the effects of the advertising ban, a new study has found.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statistical analysis to explain mechanism in state of general anesthesiaAlthough the mechanisms by which anesthetic drugs induce the state of general anesthesia have been considered one of the biggest mysteries of modern medicine and science, new research is deciphering this unknown.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
U.S. states find rewards from high-tech investments, given time and patienceStates have spent millions to develop high-tech industry, with its promise of good jobs and economic growth. And the public investment generally pays off, including in places that might seem less than ideal, according to a national study of such investments in the 1980s and 1990s. The key for these state programs is often time, patience and modest expectations, says the study's lead author.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carrion flies used to survey tropical forest mammalsScientists have tested a new technique: recruiting carrion-eating flies to detect mammals. This new method surpasses standard techniques, detecting more species than researchers could count along trails or photograph with hidden cameras.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New drug may treat and limit progression of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers have developed a new drug that may limit the progression of Parkinson's disease while providing better symptom relief to potentially hundreds of thousands of people with the disease.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biofeedback technology helping improve balance in Parkinson's patientsResearchers are helping patients with Parkinson's disease regain stable balance and confidence in performing daily activities in their own homes. A research team is developing the Smarter Balance System (SBS), a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system that guides patients through a series of balance exercises using wearable technology.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into gastrointestinal dysfunction in Parkinson's patientsConstipation is one of the most common non-motor related complaints affecting Parkinson's disease (PD) patients.
10h
NYT > Science
U.S. Nuclear Comeback Stalls as Two Reactors Are AbandonedTwo South Carolina utilities said they would halt construction on a pair of reactors, dealing a major blow to the future of American nuclear power.
10h
NYT > Science
Success of North Korean Missile Test Is Thrown Into QuestionThe test Friday suggested that Pyongyang may now have the ability to strike the continental U.S. But video analysis shows the mock warhead shattering on re-entry.
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Gizmodo
Here's A Practical Use For A Tesla Model S: A U-2 Spy Plane Chase Car Designed in the 1950s and still used today, the Lockheed U-2 (nicknamed Dragon Lady) is a super specialized, high-altitude spy plane. It’s light enough to fly at 70,000 feet, but notoriously difficult to operate. Especially land. Landing is a bitch and a half. That’s where a Tesla Model S comes in. The easiest way to land a U-2, the Air Force eventually discovered, was to have a chase car on the
10h
Ars Technica
Second body cam video of Baltimore cops manufacturing evidence discovered Enlarge (credit: Barbara Friedman ) More get-out-of-jail-free cards are being issued by Baltimore prosecutors—and more are likely, after Monday's disclosure of a second police body cam video that defense attorneys say shows cops manufacturing evidence. The Maryland Office of the Public Defender said that charges against at least one suspect were dropped on Monday. Charges were dropped in light of
10h
New Scientist - News
Signs of Alzheimer’s found in chimpanzees for the first timeOur closest evolutionary relatives develop Alzheimer’s plaques and tangles too but don’t necessarily get dementia - a finding that may need to new treatments
10h
The Atlantic
Trump Awards Medal of Honor to Army Medic President Trump awarded his first Medal of Honor on Monday to 71-year-old James McCloughan, a former army medic who served during the Vietnam War. At a Monday ceremony at the White House, McCloughan accepted the military’s highest honor for his “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity” during a bloody, 48-hour battle in 1969. He joins a group of more than 3,500 U.S. service members who have receive
11h
Gizmodo
No, Facebook Did Not Panic and Shut Down an AI Program That Was Getting Dangerously Smart Photo: AP In recent weeks, a story about experimental Facebook machine learning research has been circulating with increasingly panicky, Skynet-esque headlines. “Facebook engineers panic, pull plug on AI after bots develop their own language,” one site wrote . “Facebook shuts down down AI after it invents its own creepy language,” another added . “Did we humans just create Frankenstein?” asked ye
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How camouflaged birds decide where to blend inAnimals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows.
12h
Science | The Guardian
Break down barriers to breastfeeding in the UK | LettersThe government must take the lead on ensuring that terms of employment do not deter women who wish to breastfeed and social attitudes must also improve, write Neena Modi and 17 other signatories The evidence that breastfeeding has long-lasting benefits for infant and mother is clear. Further, though some women are unable to breastfeed and some choose not to, with the right support, the vast majori
12h
Science | The Guardian
Trump urged to declare national emergency over US opioid epidemic Report from Chris Christie panel lays out stark depiction of addiction crisis Overdoses are claiming the lives of 142 Americans every day President Trump is being urged to declare a federal state of emergency to address the epidemic of opioid overdoses that is claiming as many American lives as the terrorist attacks on 9/11 every three weeks. Related: Route to recovery: how people overcome an opi
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Gizmodo
What's Your Favorite Web Hosting Service? dariorug/ Flickr Last week, we found our readers’ favorite domain name registrars , but owning a domain isn’t very useful unless you can put a website on it. So this week, we’re looking for nominations for the best hosting service. Check out the rules below, then head down to the comments to support your pick. 1) Your nomination should contain the specific name of the product, why you think this
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A closer look at osteoporosis medication's mechanisms may improve outcomesOsteoporosis is the primary cause of bone fractures in the elderly, reflecting an imbalance between osteoclasts, bone-degrading cells, and osteoblasts, bone-building cells. Teriparatide is the only FDA-approved treatment for osteoporosis that increases osteoblast activity and lifespan. Medical researchers now report that teriperatide treatment also stimulates the formation of new osteoblasts. Howe
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first timeA large species of green algae was discovered alive in North America for the first time ever, with the only previous record being fossils dating back to the time of the dinosaurs.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coordinated care organizations lead to more timely prenatal carePregnant women on Medicaid are more likely to receive timely prenatal care following Oregon's implementation of coordinated care organizations, or CCOs, which are regional networks of health care providers who work together to treat patients, a new study has shown.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processingScientists have produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to violence and obesity linked in teensTeens consumed more unhealthy foods and beverages on days they were exposed to violence, and suffered from fatigue due to poor sleep the following day, according to a new study. Those behaviors, especially increased soda consumption, are important predictors of weight gain.
12h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Chicago Bears | The Slot Mooch Screws Pooch [Updating] | The Grap Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Chicago Bears | The Slot Mooch Screws Pooch [Updating] | The Grapevine Shady Phaedra Parks Caught in Yet Another Whopper, This Time About Trying to Rent Out Her House | Splinter I Am the World’s First Abortion Refugee |
12h
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How to Record Calls on Your SmartphoneWe look at TapeACall, Google Voice, and other software and hardware options.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Glaciers may have helped warm EarthWeathering of Earth by glaciers may have warmed the planet over eons by aiding the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. A new study shows the cumulative effect may have created negative feedback that prevented runaway glaciation.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tactic to curb obesity: Address physician biasAn educational initiative is reducing medical students' negative attitudes toward people with obesity, a finding researchers hope will translate into better outcomes for patients struggling with weight, according to new research.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique enables photographers to adjust image compositions after captureWhen taking a picture, a photographer must typically commit to a composition that cannot be changed after the shutter is released. For example, when using a wide-angle lens to capture a subject in front of an appealing background, it is difficult to include the entire background and still have the subject be large enough in the frame.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Screams Heard Round the Animal WorldHumans appear well equipped to recognize the alarm calls of other animals—perhaps because sounds of distress tend to have higher frequencies. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Mooch Ado About Staffing What We’re Following Team in Turmoil: Anthony Scaramucci was fired from his post after just 10 days as the White House communications director, during which he accused then-chief of staff Reince Priebus of leaking information in an expletive-filled interview. A day after the interview, Priebus was forced out and replaced by Homeland-Security Secretary John Kelly, who promptly fired Scaramucci to
13h
The Atlantic
Meet The Atlantic Daily’s Team Every weekday, we bring the best of The Atlantic to your inbox in a free email newsletter, The Atlantic Daily . Check out our past issues , and subscribe here . Rosa Inocencio Smith , Lead Writer I collect the top stories of the day in the “What We’re Following” module and curate the most fascinating long reads and thought-provoking comments in “Evening Read” and “Reader Response.” When I’m not w
13h
The Atlantic
L.A. to Host the 2028 Summer Olympics Los Angeles is set to host the 2028 Summer Olympics after reaching an agreement with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the office of L.A City Council President Herb Wesson confirmed Monday. The deal will be formally announced at a Monday evening news conference and reviewed by the Olympic council later this week. The decision was widely anticipated, given that L.A. and Paris were the onl
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Niagara Falls: Smelly black water shocks visitorsThe local water board apologises for "causing alarm" with discharge from sewage tank maintenance.
13h
Big Think
An Anti-Inflammatory Diet Now Can Protect Your Brain From Dementia Later "Currently, inflammation is considered a major factor in the development of depression, dementia, and other brain disorders," says Dr Drew Ramsey. Read More
13h
Gizmodo
Tech's Biggest CEOs Are Too Chickenshit to Defend Net Neutrality Photo: Getty Last week, the House Energy and Commerce Committee invited the CEOs of Netflix, Facebook, Amazon, and Google’s parent company Alphabet to take part in discussions about net neutrality. Telecoms were also invited and the two groups were expected to play good cop/bad cop on the issues. Now, the committee has extended the RSVP deadline because apparently no one wants to show up. Accordi
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tobacco industry steps up tactics to reduce impact of display banTobacco manufacturers are offering retailers incentives to promote their products in a bid to mitigate the effects of the advertising ban, a University of Stirling study has found.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taboo around vaginal bleeding endangering women's healthThe culture of silence surrounding vaginal bleeding at all stages of life is endangering women's health and is being made worse by limited access to clean water, sanitation, and factual information in low and middle income countries, concludes an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.
13h
Gizmodo
Stranger Things Producer Shawn Levy Had to Move Mountains to Get the Rights to 'Thriller' Image: Netflix At the recent San Diego Comic-Con, we got a chance to talk to Stranger Things executive producer Shawn Levy moments after the awesome season two trailer dropped. Naturally, the first word on our lips was “Thriller”—and as Levy revealed, the iconic Michael Jackson song almost didn’t make it into the clip. We have to agree — it’d be a great trailer no matter what, but Vincent Price’s
13h
Live Science
Rare 'Balloon Syndrome' Causes Hedgehog to Puff Up Like a Beach BallWhat do you do when find a puffed-up, beach ball-size hedgehog? You take it to the vet to be deflated.
14h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Too Mooch Too Soon Today in 5 Lines President Trump removed Anthony Scaramucci from his role as White House communications director, just 10 days after Scaramucci was brought on staff. The move reportedly came at the behest of John Kelly, who was sworn in as chief of staff earlier in the day. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that “everybody at the White House” will report to Kelly. Treasury S
14h
Futurity.org
Are yearly TB tests too much for health workers? Tuberculosis is a recognized hazard for health care workers, but screening them every year—the current practice in the Canada and the United States—is costly, has very limited health benefits. and should be reconsidered, according to a new study. Health agencies in North America should consider switching to a targeted strategy focusing on high-risk health care workers only, advise the researchers
14h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Happened To Matt When An Explosion Rocked Browntown? | Alaskan Bush People #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Alone in Browntown, Matt suffers a head injury from an accidentally detonated bear deterrent - proving how dangerous the isolation of the bush can be. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subsc
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
To Build a Smarter Chatbot, First Teach It a Second LanguageTranslation can help an algorithm’s overall language skills.
14h
The Atlantic
Trump's Opioid Commission Calls for a State of Emergency A government opioid commission chaired by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has called for President Trump to declare a state of emergency in dealing with the opioid epidemic, which now kills more than 100 Americans daily. Such a declaration, which several states have already made, “would empower your cabinet to take bold steps and would force Congress to focus on funding and empowering the exec
14h
The Scientist RSS
Molecules that Could Form Membranes Found Above TitanVinyl cyanide is thought to rain down onto Saturn's largest moon, though whether the molecule self-assembles into membrane-like structures is unclear.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inattention, poor memories shape inflation expectationsPeople have a haphazard approach to assessing inflation, research shows. Most citizens only pay attention to the topic intermittently, and they overestimate how bad inflation will become.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earth-like atmosphere may not survive Proxima b's orbitAn Earth-like planet outside the solar system may not be able to keep a grip on its atmosphere, leaving the surface exposed to harmful stellar radiation and reducing its potential for habitability.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's something in the water: Scientists extract hydrogen as potential fuel sourceA new technique that helps extract hydrogen from water efficiently and cheaply has now been developed by a team of scientists.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How DNA damage turns immune cells against cancerThe delayed arrival of immune cells after cancer therapy is well documented and critical for responses to chemotherapy and radiation, yet the events underlying their induction remain poorly understood. Now, researchers have discovered how DNA damage is a clarion call for the immune system.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spanking can be detrimental for children's behavior, even 10 years laterPhysical discipline experienced during infancy can negatively impact temperament and behavior among children in the fifth grade and into their teenage years, new research indicates.
14h
Inside Science
July's Stunning Space Pictures July's Stunning Space Pictures This month’s slideshow features an exotic sunrise in our solar system and a comic about exoplanets. 3_eso1723a_crop.jpg Image credits: ESO/G. Beccari Space Monday, July 31, 2017 - 13:45 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) -- Fascinating photos of planets, stars and galaxies come together in this month’s astronomy slideshow. Check out recent snapshots
14h
NYT > Science
How to Build Resilience in MidlifeThere are active steps you can take during and after a crisis to speed your emotional recovery.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big data approach can predict toxicity of chemicals, save animalsExperts from across India will gather from July 31-Aug. 1 at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi for a national conference, 'Breaking Barriers Through Bioinformatics and Computational Biology,' to share information on the latest developments in this area.
15h
New Scientist - News
Blood biomarkers may help diagnose chronic fatigue syndromeThe severity of chronic fatigue syndrome, also called myalgic encephomyelitis, has been linked to higher levels of 17 inflammation biomarkers in the blood
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reinforces the Amazon forest's importance in regulating atmospheric chemistryAirborne measurements show that the Amazon rainforest emits three times more isoprene than was previously estimated. Isoprene is one of the main precursors of ozone and indirectly influences the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For infants with skull flattening, earlier helmet therapy gives better resultsFor infants with skull flattening related to sleep position, starting helmet therapy at a younger age, especially before 24 weeks, increases the treatment success rate, suggests a study in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Undocumented immigration doesn't worsen drug, alcohol problems in US, study indicatesDespite being saddled with many factors associated with drug and alcohol problems, undocumented immigrants are not increasing the prevalence of drug and alcohol crimes and deaths in the United States, according to a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study published in the American Journal of Public Health.
15h
The Atlantic
Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Convicted Criminal Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Arizona is now a convicted criminal. The longest-serving lawman of the state’s most populous county, where he became a national figure known for immigration raids and sweeps aimed at rounding up illegal migrants, was found guilty Monday of contempt of court. He faces up to six months in jail. The ruling was made by U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton, and sentencing coul
15h
The Atlantic
Depravity Is Downstream of Donald Trump On Sunday, Breitbart published a column by Susan Berry, who began by invoking the web site’s late founder: “Andrew Breitbart famously said , ‘Politics is downstream of culture,’” she began, using the hyperlink to direct readers to this Red State post : Andrew Breitbart, the late ever-controversial right-wing gonzo journalist (not to be confused with the dreary Trump-propaganda organ that now bear
15h
Science | The Guardian
'There are things worse than death': can a cancer cure lead to brutal bioweapons? John Sotos, chief medical officer at Intel, paints a dark picture of technology turned to nefarious purposes, with tailored diseases rewriting genomes on the fly Splitting the atom brought humanity nuclear power and nuclear weapons. A cure for cancer could have the same potential for pushing humanity to new highs – or terrifying lows. According to John Sotos, the chief medical officer of Intel, t
15h
Ars Technica
Kitchen sponges are festering germ dens—and sanitizing them doesn’t help Enlarge / Some germy places in the house include the kitchen faucet and sponges. Typically people wash their hands after handling raw meat in the kitchen and frequently use sponges or cloths to wipe germs from surfaces in the kitchen. (Photo by Zbigniew Bzdak/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images) (credit: Getty | MCT ) Scientists have long thrown shade at the unassuming kitchen sponge. The househ
15h
Feed: All Latest
iPhone 8 Leak: How an iOS Developer Discovered Apple's Slip-UpInside Apple's big cellphone self-own.
15h
Gizmodo
Reddit Raised $200 Million And Is Redesigning to Look More Like Facebook Image: Reddit/Gizmodo Reddit, the “front page of the internet,” is about to catch up with the rest of the internet with a slick redesign, thanks to $200 million in new venture funding. The news aggregation and discussion site is now worth $1.8 billion after receiving funding from investment firms Andreessen Horowitz and Sequoia Capital, as well as Fidelity Investments, Y Combinator President Sam
15h
Ars Technica
Apple can’t end lawsuit over “breaking” FaceTime on iPhone 4, judge rules Enlarge / The iPhone 4S. (credit: Andrew Cunningham ) Back in February 2017, two Californians sued Apple in a proposed class-action lawsuit over the fact that the company disabled an older version of iOS. Disabling the outdated iOS had the effect of making FaceTime stop working on the customers' iPhone 4 devices. According to a ruling issued last Friday by a federal judge in San Jose, California,
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A closer look at osteoporosis medication's mechanisms may improve outcomesOsteoporosis is the primary cause of bone fractures in the elderly, reflecting an imbalance between osteoclasts, bone-degrading cells, and osteoblasts, bone-building cells. Teriparatide is the only FDA-approved treatment for osteoporosis that increases osteoblast activity and lifespan. This week in the JCI, Henry Kronenberg and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital report that teriperatide
16h
The Atlantic
The Gulf Crisis, as Told Through Cartoons In May, on his first official trip overseas, President Donald J. Trump engaged in good-natured chinwag with Arab presidents and emirs, and even bobbed his head along to a traditional Saudi sword dance in Riyadh. Perhaps the most memorable image of his Mideast sojourn was a comical photo-op with the Saudi king, the Egyptian president, and a certain glowing orb as they announced the launch of joint
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding how fishers fish on coral reefs can inform fishery management strategiesA study of spearfishing on a Caribbean coral reef illustrates how understanding the process of fishing can help in developing management strategies to address overfishing and coral reef protection worldwide. Understanding which fish are targeted, when, why and where in a coral reef habitat, are important details that extend beyond catch limits or even bans that so often define fishing regulations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic testing helps detect cause of early life epilepsyA new study supports routine genetic testing for initial evaluation of seizures as the first step toward precision medicine and improved outcomes.
16h
Live Science
Rare Conjoined Bat Twins Found in BrazilConjoined twins are rare, but the condition is likely no rarer in bats than in any other mammals.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HBO programming stolen in cyberattackHBO has had some of its programming stolen in what is being described as a cyber incident.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cable company Charter says no interest in buying SprintCharter, one of the largest cable companies in the U.S., says it's not interested in buying wireless carrier Sprint.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discharge turns water at base of Niagara Falls blackThe water near the base of Niagara Falls turned an alarming shade of black before tourists' eyes following a foul-smelling discharge from a wastewater treatment plant.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Threat of a bitcoin split avoided, for nowOn the eve of a major change in bitcoin, a threat of a split in the digital currency has been avoided—for now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biofeedback technology helping improve balance in Parkinson's patientsUniversity of Houston researchers in the Department of Health and Human Performance are helping patients with Parkinson's disease regain stable balance and confidence in performing daily activities in their own homes. A research team is developing the Smarter Balance System (SBS), a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system that guides patients through a series of balance exercises using
16h
Ars Technica
All the things the Internet hates about the Tesla Model 3 have me excited Enlarge / The first batch of production Tesla Model 3s, ready to be handed over to their new owners. (credit: Tesla) Last Friday, Tesla's new Model 3 electric vehicle finally hit the streets. At an event in California , the company handed over the first few production vehicles, a process that will continue for quite some time as Tesla fills what could be half-a-million prospective orders on its b
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structural and functional MRI in children resuscitated after drowning pinpoints site of anoxic brain injuryStructural and functional MRI in children resuscitated after drowning pinpoints the site of anoxic brain injury to regions controlling movement, while providing strong evidence that networks controlling perception and cognition remain largely intact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mental health visits spike prior to burn injury, indicating opportunity for interventionIn a new study examining the relationship between mental health and burn injury, researchers note that burn injuries may be preventable through increased access to high-quality mental health care. The study's findings also show that burn injury victims experience significantly increased rates of self-harm after their injuries.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollutionFuture climate change, if left unaddressed, is expected to cause roughly 60,000 deaths globally in the year 2030 and 260,000 deaths in 2100 due to climate change's effect on global air pollution, a new study estimates.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher dementia risk associated with birth in high stroke mortality statesIs being born in states with high stroke mortality associated with dementia risk in a group of individuals who eventually all lived outside those states? A new article suggests it might be.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers discover 'heavy metal' supernova rocking outAn extraordinarily bright supernova occurred in a surprising location, astronomers have found. This 'heavy metal' supernova discovery challenges current ideas of how and where such super-charged supernovas occur. In the past decade, astronomers have discovered about 50 supernovas, out of the thousands known, that are particularly powerful. Following the recent discovery of one of these, the resear
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Formation of porous crystals observed for the first timeFor the first time, scientists have observed the formation of a crystal gel with particle-level resolution, allowing them to study the conditions by which these new materials form.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs, suggests studyIn the first study of its kind, an international team of scientists has concluded, on a global scale, that the economic and long-term benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh their initial cost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believedThe pollen record of a plant that is currently being eradicated extends much further back than the 100 years it is believed to be growing in the Lesotho Highlands, a new study concludes. The research confirms that a shrub believed to be an invasive in the eastern Lesotho Highlands has been growing in the region for over 4,000 years.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biofeedback technology helping improve balance in Parkinson's patientsUniversity of Houston researchers in the Department of Health and Human Performance are helping patients with Parkinson's disease regain stable balance and confidence in performing daily activities in their own homes. A research team is developing the Smarter Balance System (SBS), a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system that guides patients through a series of balance exercises using
16h
The Atlantic
What's Left to Sanction in North Korea? The Trump administration’s public response to North Korea’s latest ICBM test has been to criticize China for not doing enough to pressure its client in Pyongyang. President Trump said China was doing “ nothing ” on North Korea while “our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade.” (Xinhua, the state-run Chinese news agency, rejected that linkag
16h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Chop Off This Worm’s Head and It Can Still Detect LightPlanarian flatworms can react to light when they lose their heads and brains, and gradually regain their ability to distinguish different hues as they regenerate their bodies.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Farmer suicides rise in India as climate warms, study showsWhen Rani's husband died by drinking pesticide, he left the family in debt. But even if they could pay off the loans, Rani said their farming days are over.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Game of Thrones' script leaked after HBO hackHBO said Monday its network was victimized by a cyberattack, and media reports said the hack resulted in the leak of a script of the popular series "Games of Thrones" and content from other productions.
16h
Gizmodo
Monitor Your Home From Anywhere With Yi's Security Camera, Now Just $29 Yi Home Camera , $29 with code 4OQZ2K88 Yi, manufacturer of your favorite affordable action cam, also makes a home IP security camera, and you can pick it up for just $29 today with promo code 4OQZ2K88, the best deal we’ve ever seen. The Yi Home Camera includes all the basic features you’d expect, including two-way audio, automatic activity alerts to your phone, and remote monitoring. And unlike
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first timeImagine you're at work and suddenly, a cheetah pokes its head through your window.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Irwin moving in post-Tropical Storm Hilary's wakeSatellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed two areas of circulation in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. One of the areas was the remnant circulation from former Tropical Storm Hilary and the other was Tropical Storm Irwin, located southeast of Hilary.
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Gizmodo
Research Finds Disturbing Suicide Search Trends Following Release of Netflix's 13 Reasons Why Image: Netflix 13 Reasons Why, Netflix’s recent drama about the suicide of a teen, was a big hit when it premiered in March, but it also inspired fierce debate among critics about whether its depiction of suicide was irresponsible. Now, new research shows a significant uptick in suicide-related searches after the show premiered, a finding that one expert says confirms his worst fears. The researc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rusting fool's gold in glaciers a sign of increased carbonOxidation of pyrite shows glaciers contribute to the Earth's carbon cycle feedback.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds cardiac complications high after orthopedic surgery for heart disease patientsA new study published in the HSS Journal, the leading journal on musculoskeletal research, sheds light on reducing cardiac complications in orthopedic surgery. The study found the incidence of myocardial ischemia, defined by an elevated troponin level, after major orthopedic surgery in patients with cardiac risk factors is high. HSS researchers recommend a simple blood test to measure troponin, an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug may treat and limit progression of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers at Binghamton University have developed a new drug that may limit the progression of Parkinson's disease while providing better symptom relief to potentially hundreds of thousands of people with the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supreme Court rulings can signal a shift in societal normsWhen the Supreme Court issued its 2015 ruling in favor of same-sex marriage, Americans understood the decision as a signal of Americans' increasing support of same-sex marriage, according to a study published by Princeton University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links violence exposure, obesity in teensTeens consumed more unhealthy foods and beverages on days they were exposed to violence, and suffered from fatigue due to poor sleep the following day, according to a new study by Duke researchers. Those behaviors, especially increased soda consumption, are important predictors of weight gain.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Emily before and after landfallNASA has captured infrared and visible imagery before and after Tropical Storm Emily formed in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall in Florida.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nesat landfall in ChinaNASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat after it made landfall its second and final landfall in eastern China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An Earth-like atmosphere may not survive Proxima b's orbitProxima b, an Earth-size planet right outside our solar system in the habitable zone of its star, may not be able to keep a grip on its atmosphere, leaving the surface exposed to harmful stellar radiation and reducing its potential for habitability.
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The Scientist RSS
Pioneering Neuroscientist DiesMarian Diamond, a former University of California, Berkeley, professor, discovered the first evidence for neuroplasticity and studied Einstein's brain.
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The Atlantic
The Spectacular Self-Destruction of Anthony Scaramucci Anthony Scaramucci’s reign as White House communications director—a reign of terror and vulgarity, marked by two outlandish interviews and the departures of two top West Wing officials—has ended, just 10 days after it began. The New York Times broke the news Monday afternoon , just hours after Trump tweeted that there was “No W[hite] H[ouse] chaos!” It was not clear whether Scaramucci would take
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tests the Webb telescope's communication skillsNASA called, and the Webb telescope responded. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope recently completed its Ground Segment Test Number 1 (GSEG-1), for the first time confirming successful end-to-end communication between the telescope and its mission operations center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen science volunteers driven by desire to learnPeople who give up their time for online volunteering are mainly motivated by a desire to learn, a new study has found.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use carrion flies to survey tropical forest mammalsHow many mammal species live in a tropical forest? Some are nocturnal. Others are small, furtive or live at the tops of trees. Scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama tested a new technique: recruiting carrion-eating flies to detect mammals. This new method surpasses standard techniques, detecting more species than researchers could count along trails or
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA satellite sees Typhoon Noru in infrared lightNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image of Typhoon Noru that showed the structure and cloud top temperatures of the powerful thunderstorms circling its eye.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy storage solution combines polymers and nanosheetsA new, lightweight composite material for energy storage in flexible electronics, electric vehicles and aerospace applications has been experimentally shown to store energy at operating temperatures well above current commercial polymers, according to a team of Penn State scientists. This polymer-based, ultrathin material can be produced using techniques already used in industry.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New system could remove two water pollutants from agricultural fieldsAlgae blooms in the Gulf of Mexico use up the majority of the oxygen in the water, leading to massive "dead zones" that cannot support fish or other wildlife. The culprit? Nitrate, running off agricultural fields through tile drainage systems. But nitrate is only part of the problem. Algae in freshwater lakes and ponds flourishes when exposed to a different pollutant, phosphorus, and the tiniest a
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
States find rewards from high-tech investments, given time and patienceStates have spent millions to develop high-tech industry, with its promise of good jobs and economic growth.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processingLos Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths. These carbon nanotube quantum light emitters may be important for optically-based quantum information processing and information security, while also being of significant interest for ultrasensitive sensing, metrology and imaging needs an
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NYT > Science
Out There: The Eclipse That Revealed the UniverseIn 1919, British astronomers photographed a solar eclipse and proved that light bends around our sun — affirming Einstein’s theory of general relativity.
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NYT > Science
A Dangerous, ‘Silent Reservoir’ for Gonorrhea: The ThroatOral gonorrhea is hard to detect and treat. And with drug-resistant strains of the bacteria on the rise, experts are concerned about so-called super gonorrhea.
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Gizmodo
An Emoji-Only Review of The Emoji Movie Image: Sony Pictures
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New system could remove two water pollutants from agricultural fieldsAlgae blooms in the Gulf of Mexico use up the majority of the oxygen in the water, leading to massive "dead zones" that cannot support fish or other wildlife. The culprit? Nitrate, running off agricultural fields through tile drainage systems. But nitrate is only part of the problem. Algae in freshwater lakes and ponds flourishes when exposed to a different pollutant, phosphorus, and the tiniest a
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Methane-eating microbes may reduce release of gases as Antarctic ice sheets meltA lake beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet contains large amounts of methane and describes how methane-eating microbes may keep the climate-warming gas from entering the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing a 'trust but verify' model to journal peer reviewIncentives have been identified that could encourage journals to 'open the black box of peer review' for the sake of improving transparency, reproducibility and trust in published research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Towards a safe and scalable cell therapy for type 1 diabetes by simplifying beta cell differentiationWith the vision of providing a cell therapy for type 1 diabetes patients, scientists have identified a unique cell surface protein present on human pancreatic precursor cells providing for the first time a molecular handle to purify the cells whose fate is to become cells of the pancreas -- including insulin-producing cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When push comes to injury: What pushing a wheelchair does to your backWhen asked to push a simulated wheelchair against increasing resistance, study participants typically exceeded the recommended limits to avoid back injury by nearly 20 percent before they decided to quit.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A semiconductor that can beat the heatA newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity - a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glaciers may have helped warm EarthWeathering of Earth by glaciers may have warmed the planet over eons by aiding the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. A new study shows the cumulative effect may have created negative feedback that prevented runaway glaciation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds parallels between unresponsive honey bees, human autismHoney bees that consistently fail to respond to obvious social cues -- the presence of an intruder or of a queen larva, for example -- share something fundamental with autistic humans, researchers report in a new study. Genes most closely associated with autism spectrum disorders in humans are regulated differently in unresponsive honey bees than in their more responsive nest mates, the study foun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights underlying mechanisms of fractures associated with osteoporosis drugThere is no disputing that the use of bisphosphonates -- with brand names such as Fosamax, Boniva and Reclast -- is proven to combat bone loss and fragility fractures in millions of osteoporosis patients for whom a fracture could be debilitating, even life-threatening.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bold new approaches needed to shrink Gulf of Mexico dead zone and meet elusive goalsShrinking the annual Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' down to the size of Delaware will require a 59-percent reduction in the amount of nitrogen runoff that flows down the Mississippi River from as far away as the Corn Belt.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding how fishers fish on coral reefs can inform fishery management strategiesA Dartmouth study of spearfishing on a Caribbean coral reef illustrates how understanding the process of fishing can help in developing management strategies to address overfishing and coral reef protection worldwide. Understanding which fish are targeted, when, why and where in a coral reef habitat, are important details that extend beyond catch limits or even bans that so often define fishing re
17h
Popular Science
Last Week in Tech: Reports of MS Paint’s death have been greatly exaggerated Technology The Tesla Model 3 made its debut, Nokia has a nifty new camera, and we start healing from the Emoji Movie. Not even the release of The Emoji Movie could dampen our spirits about all the cool new tech that happened last week.
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Science : NPR
Country Music And Brain Research Come Together At Nashville Summer Camp Researchers in Nashville are tapping into a country music camp to learn more about Williams Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder. Many people who have it love music but don't know why. (Image credit: Emily Siner/WPLN)
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The Atlantic
Remembering Sam Shepard Sam Shepard was a titan of American theater whose darkly funny, sometimes surreal, and often frightening evocations of the fringes of American life formed the backbone of a storied career as a writer and actor. He died last Thursday at his home in Kentucky at the age of 73 of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, according to a spokesman for the family. Shepard is best remembered for
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Gizmodo
Freaky New Sea Snake Has a Terrifying Hunting Strategy Image: Brooke L. Bessesen, Gary J. Galbreath/ZooKeys A new subspecies of sea snake has been discovered off the coast of Costa Rica, and it’s got a unique hunting style that’s never been seen before in aquatic reptiles. Hanging from the surface like a coiled spring, it preys upon unsuspecting fish as they swim below. As described in the science journal ZooKeys , the sea snake “opportunistically” f
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Science : NPR
To Help Keep Sturgeon Sustainable, Farm And Fishery Work Together Because demand for seafood is rising and wild stocks are not, a hatchery owner in Canada is hoping his model of "responsible agriculture" can keep the prized fish both on the menu and in the water. (Image credit: Nancy Matsumoto for NPR)
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Science : NPR
Scientists Edge Closer To Elusive Lab Test For 'Chronic Fatigue Syndrome' Stanford University scientists have found an array of proteins in the blood whose levels correlate closely with the severity of symptoms of the mysterious illness that's increasingly known as ME/CFS. (Image credit: Malte Mueller/Getty Images)
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Futurity.org
Sensor traps light to help detect drugs and doping A new device improves on the sensitivity and versatility of sensors that detect doping in athletics, bomb-making chemicals, or traces of drugs. It could also cut costs. To conduct these kinds of searches, scientists often shine light on the materials they’re analyzing. This approach is known as spectroscopy, and it involves studying how light interacts with trace amounts of matter. One of the mor
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coral disease outbreaks fluctuate with El Niño years, new research findsOccurrences of three common diseases affecting Caribbean corals spike during El Niño years, an alarming association given how climate change may boost the intensity of El Niños.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Methane-eating microbes may reduce release of gases as Antarctic ice sheets meltLurking in a lake half a mile beneath Antarctica's icy surface, methane-eating microbes may mitigate the release of this greenhouse gas into the atmosphere as ice sheets retreat.
17h
Science : NPR
Country Music And Brain Research Come Together At Nashville Summer Camp Researchers in Nashville are tapping into a country music camp to learn more about Williams Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder. Many people who have it love music but don't know why. (Image credit: Emily Siner/WPLN)
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glaciers may have helped warm EarthIt seems counterintuitive, but over the eons, glaciers may have made Earth warmer, according to a Rice University professor.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover unique thermoelectric properties in cesium tin iodideA newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity - a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds parallels between unresponsive honey bees, human autismHoney bees that consistently fail to respond to obvious social cues share something fundamental with autistic humans, researchers report in a new study. Genes most closely associated with autism spectrum disorders in humans are regulated differently in unresponsive honey bees than in their more responsive nest mates, the study found.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bold new approaches needed to shrink Gulf of Mexico dead zone and meet elusive goalsShrinking the annual Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" down to the size of Delaware will require a 59-percent reduction in the amount of nitrogen runoff that flows down the Mississippi River from as far away as the Corn Belt.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Projected precipitation increases are bad news for water qualityIncreased precipitation from a changing climate could pollute US waterways with excess nitrogen, increasing the likelihood of severe water quality impairment from coast to coast, according to a new study by scientists Eva Sinha and Anna Michalak of the Carnegie Institution for Science and Venkatramani Balaji of Princeton University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spanking can be detrimental for children's behavior, even 10 years laterResearchers at the University of Missouri have found that physical discipline experienced during infancy can negatively impact temperament and behavior among children in the fifth grade and into their teenage years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New in the Hastings Center Report, July-August 2017Moral implications of the 'Precision Medicine Nation,' radical life extension, artificial wombs, and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The undertaker's censusScientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama tested a new technique: recruiting carrion-eating flies to detect mammals. This new method surpasses standard techniques, detecting more species than researchers could count along trails or photograph with hidden cameras.
17h
Live Science
Blowing Out Birthday Candles Is Grosser Than You ThinkIt's hard to turn down birthday cake, but a new study might have you thinking twice about taking a slice.
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Gizmodo
Anthony Scaramucci, White House Communications Director (July 21, 2017 - July 31, 2017) The New York Times reports that President Trump has removed Anthony Scaramucci from his role as White House communications director. It has only been ten days since the wealthy New York financier was named for the job. It all happened so fast. While his initial start date was supposed to be August 15, that was later moved up to July 26, according to Scaramucci . That means Scaramucci’s official t
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Ars Technica
HBO confirms hack that reportedly included script to upcoming GoT episode Enlarge (credit: HBO ) HBO said it was the victim of a hack that may have leaked as much as 1.5 terabytes of show data, including a script to an upcoming episode of Game of Thrones . "HBO recently experienced a cyber incident, which resulted in the compromise of proprietary information," the network said in a statement sent to Entertainment Weekly , which broke the news of the breach . "We immedi
17h
The Scientist RSS
Human Genetic Variation May Complicate CRISPRSlight sequence differences confound target sites in precision genome-editing, a study shows.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Typhoon Noru in infrared lightNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image of Typhoon Noru that showed the structure and cloud top temperatures of the powerful thunderstorms circling its eye.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processingLos Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advancing public engagement at the Ecological Society of AmericaThis year, the annual meeting of the ESA in Portland, Ore., Aug. 6-12, 2017, will be the locus of multiple efforts to train and connect ecologists who are deeply interested in public engagement of their research. Special sessions that feature case studies of successful engagement events, approaches and protocols will be offered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coordinated care organizations lead to more timely prenatal carePregnant women on Medicaid are more likely to receive timely prenatal care following Oregon's implementation of coordinated care organizations, or CCOs, which are regional networks of health care providers who work together to treat patients, a new study has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How DNA damage turns immune cells against cancerThe delayed arrival of immune cells after cancer therapy is well documented and critical for responses to chemotherapy and radiation, yet the events underlying their induction remain poorly understood. Now, Penn researchers have discovered how DNA damage is a clarion call for the immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Domestic violence twice as likely to start for pregnant women after HIV diagnosisFor women who have never experienced intimate partner violence before, a diagnosis of HIV during pregnancy means that they are twice as likely to experience violence after their child is born, a new study found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first timeA large species of green algae was discovered alive in North America for the first time ever, with the only previous record being fossils dating back to the time of the dinosaurs.
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Science | The Guardian
Follow professional advice on antibiotics | LettersThe idea that patients should stop taking antibiotics ‘when they feel better’ is too subjective, say representatives of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy We welcome the debate sparked by your article ( Keep taking the tablets? Antibiotics rule could be wrong , 27 July). The British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) is keen to safely reduce the overall use of antibiotic
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Gizmodo
The Tesla Model 3 Frunk Is A Triumph Of Marketing Among my many strange, off-putting car fetishes, there’s one that is consistently, creepily powerful: my love for unusual trunks. I’m especially fond of front trunks, or ‘frunks,’ since they tend to be more difficult to pull off well. The Tesla Model 3 has a frunk, and the very nature of that frunk is an important lesson we can all benefit from. This lesson has to do with Tesla’s claim that the M
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Popular Science
Come see China's new hexacopters and self-detonating drones From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal What the People's Liberation Army has up its sleeve. China confirms that some interesting high tech tactical drones are already operational. Read on.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
We’re Thinking about Cybersecurity All WrongObama’s former cyber advisor, Michael Daniel, on how we need to overhaul the way we manage the new “tool for statecraft.”
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NYT > Science
Q&A: What Gives the Sycamore Its Smell?Organic chemicals in the leaves and bark of the sycamore — and the unrelated sycamore fig — give the plants a characteristic odor.
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NYT > Science
A Conversation With: Dr. Raj Panjabi Goes the Last Mile in LiberiaA charity dispatches community health workers to the most remote communities in Africa — beyond “the last mile” of the organized health care system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New statistical model examines massive amounts of data to automatically spot anomaliesWith the number of security breaches and cyber-attacks on the rise, cyber-security experts may soon have a new tool in the fight against online threats. Scientists have developed a new statistical method for monitoring networks to automatically detect 'strange behavior' and ultimately prevent intrusion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coral disease outbreaks fluctuate with El Niño years, new research findsDisease outbreaks in corals have followed El Niño-fueled coral bleaching events in the past, leading to speculation about the connection between the diseases and the El Niño cycles. This new study confirms the speculation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Refuting the idea that mutations cause cancerMedical researchers offer evidence that it is forces of evolution driven by natural selection acting in the ecosystem of the body that, in the presence of tissue damage, allow cells with dangerous mutations to thrive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Picture perfectWhen taking a picture, a photographer must typically commit to a composition that cannot be changed after the shutter is released. For example, when using a wide-angle lens to capture a subject in front of an appealing background, it is difficult to include the entire background and still have the subject be large enough in the frame.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's something in the water: LLNL scientists extract hydrogen as potential fuel sourceLawrence Livermore scientists have developed a technique that helps extract hydrogen from water efficiently and cheaply.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nesat landfall in ChinaNASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat after it made landfall its second and final landfall in eastern China.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An Earth-like atmosphere may not survive Proxima b's orbitAn Earth-like planet outside the solar system may not be able to keep a grip on its atmosphere, leaving the surface exposed to harmful stellar radiation and reducing its potential for habitability.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Irwin moving in post-Tropical Storm Hilary's wakeSatellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed two areas of circulation in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. One of the areas was the remnant circulation from former Tropical Storm Hilary and the other was Tropical Storm Irwin, located southeast of Hilary.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Emily before and after landfallNASA has captured infrared and visible imagery before and after Tropical Storm Emily formed in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall in Florida.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy storage solution combines polymers and nanosheetsA new, lightweight composite material for energy storage in flexible electronics, electric vehicles and aerospace applications has been experimentally shown to store energy at operating temperatures well above current commercial polymers, according to a team of Penn State scientists. This polymer-based, ultrathin material can be produced using techniques already used in industry.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop technology to make aged cells youngerResearchers at Houston Methodist have made a surprising discovery leading to the development of technology with the ability to rejuvenate human cells. Taking a different approach to age-reversal at a cellular level, Dr. John P. Cooke and his colleagues studied cells from children with progeria, a rare condition marked by rapid aging. Their findings appear online July 31 and in print Aug. 8 in the
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The Atlantic
Earliest Crossing of the Northwest Passage Ever The Finnish icebreaker MSV Nordica just set a new record, sailing through the Northwest Passage above North America earlier than ever before. It took 24 days at sea to travel the 6,215 miles (10,000 kilometers) from Alaska to Greenland, arriving on July 29. Arctic sea ice has been melting sooner every year, opening the route earlier and for a longer time each summer. A team from the Associated Pr
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
An icy break up, Higgs history and a very messy eater July’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature ’s photo team. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22385
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Feed: All Latest
Game of Thrones Leak Puts Unreleased Script and Other HBO Shows OnlineThis hack could go way deeper than Game of Thrones
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen science volunteers driven by desire to learnPeople who give up their time for online volunteering are mainly motivated by a desire to learn, a new study has found.The research surveyed volunteers on 'citizen science' projects and suggests that this type of volunteering could be used to increase general knowledge of science within society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inattention, poor memories shape inflation expectationsA new study co-authored by an MIT economist reveals that people have a haphazard approach to assessing inflation. Most citizens only pay attention to the topic intermittently, and they overestimate how bad inflation will become.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds promise in new tactic to curb obesity: Address physician biasAn educational initiative at Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine is reducing medical students' negative attitudes toward people with obesity, a finding researchers hope will translate into better outcomes for patients struggling with weight, according to research published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Unabomber's Haunting Message To His Targets: "I Can Reach Out And Touch You" Manhunt: Unabomber | Premieres Tue Aug 1 at 9/8c The Unabomber begins his reign of terror by sending his homemade bombs through the mail. Who will receive the next deadly package? Stream The Premiere Before It Airs On TV: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMTwrx7ehhc Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter
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Ars Technica
Google’s new scheme to connect online to offline shopping scrutinized Enlarge / Physical home button surrounded by typical Android capacitive buttons. A privacy advocacy group has filed a formal legal complaint with the US Federal Trade Commission, asking the agency to begin an investigation "into Google’s in-store tracking algorithm to determine whether it adequately protects the privacy of millions of American consumers." In the Monday filing, the Electronic Priv
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Newly discovered lymph hydraulics give tunas their fancy movesThere’s still some anatomy to discover in fishes as familiar as bluefin and yellowfin tunas.
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Futurity.org
Politics splits what we mean by words like ‘deal’ New research finds a split between the same words presidential candidates from the United States’ two major political parties used and what those words mean. This semantic divide appears to be growing, add the researchers, which may continue to make the possibility of dialogue difficult, if not impossible. “In a lot of ways, it’s worse than speaking two different languages.” “This work was actual
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The Atlantic
Trump's Worst Week Yet There hasn’t been a single smooth week in the Trump presidency, but last week was, by popular consensus, the worst of them so far. Given the struggles of this president, that’s no small statement. What was remarkable was the breadth of Trump’s troubles. His top legislative priority was, once again, knocked flat. He had to replace Reince Priebus, making Priebus the shortest-tenured chief of staff
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Into a competitive world, guppies are born not just bigger, but more matureWhen scientists took a deeper look into a classic example of parenting strategy in nature, they found that what really matters may be more than what meets the eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two degrees of warming already baked inEven if humans could instantly turn off all our emissions of greenhouse gases, the Earth would continue to heat up about two more degrees Fahrenheit by the turn of the century, according to a sophisticated new analysis.
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Feed: All Latest
'Game of Thrones' Recap Season 7, Episode 3: The Fury That Drives YouWho will you be when the whip is finally in your hand: the woman who gets to wield it, or the one who drops it in the sand?
18h
Ars Technica
Kepler data may hold a Neptune-sized surprise, our first exomoon Enlarge (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech ) One of the most important things we've learned from the Kepler mission is that, in many ways, our Solar System isn't unique. Lots of stars have planets, many have multiple planets, and the list of planets includes many with sizes and densities similar to our eight planets. But there are lots of details of our own planets, like the composition and presence of at
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Gizmodo
Get Ready For Your Next Home Improvement Project With Amazon's One-Day DEWALT Sale DEWALT 20V Drill/Driver Kit + Hammer Driver , $169 Whether you have a home improvement project on the horizon, or just like collecting tools, Amazon’s one-day DEWALT deal is pretty spectacular. $169 gets you a 20V drill/driver kit , plus a 20V impact driver that runs off the same battery. Buying them separately, these tools would set you back $225, so you’re saving over $50 by bundling. Just reme
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Ars Technica
Sprint still seeks merger partner after being rejected by Charter Enlarge (credit: Mike Mozart ) Cable company Charter Communications said it has no interest in buying Sprint. After reports that Sprint owner SoftBank proposed a merger with Charter, the cable company said it will move forward in its plan to offer wireless service without buying the carrier. "We understand why a deal is attractive for SoftBank, but Charter has no interest in acquiring Sprint," Ch
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Gizmodo
Will Healthcare Inequality Cause Genetic Diseases to Disproportionately Impact the Poor? Artwork via Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo Today in America, if you are poor, you are also more likely to suffer from poor health. Low socioeconomic status—and the lack of access to healthcare that often accompanies it—has been tied to mental illness , obesity , heart disease and diabetes , to name just a few. Imagine now, that in the future, being poor also meant you were more likely than others to suf
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Among gun owners, culturally tailored suicide prevention messages work bestGun owners are much more receptive to suicide-prevention messages tailored to respect their rights as firearms enthusiasts than they are to messages that use language that aims to be culturally neutral, a study published last week suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New system could remove two water pollutants from ag fieldsAlgae blooms in the Gulf of Mexico use up the majority of the oxygen in the water, leading to massive "dead zones" that cannot support fish or other wildlife. The culprit? Nitrate, running off agricultural fields through tile drainage systems. But nitrate is only part of the problem. Algae in freshwater lakes and ponds flourishes when exposed to a different pollutant, phosphorus, and the tiniest a
18h
Popular Science
Five advanced Google Chrome hacks to level up your browsing DIY Search harder, better, faster. The world's most popular web browser has a few tricks up its sleeves. Dig under the skin of Google Chrome with these hidden features, expert tips, and upgrades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New optical device could help detect drugs, bomb-making chemicals and moreScientists searching for traces of drugs, bomb-making components and other chemicals often shine light on the materials they're analyzing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New and novel technologies successfully demonstrated in soilborne disease studySudden Death Syndrome (SDS), a prominent soilborne disease of soybean, can be devastating. Yield losses from SDS can reach 100%, depending on the soybean variety affected and stage of development when symptoms appear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells may help improve corneal wound healingA new review is the first to directly examine the role of various stem cells in the healing of wounded cornea, the outermost part of the eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loss of Arctic sea ice impacting Atlantic Ocean water circulation systemArctic sea ice is not merely a passive responder to the climate changes occurring around the world, according to new research. Scientists say the ongoing Arctic ice loss can play an active role in altering one of the planet's largest water circulation systems: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statistical analysis for optimal immunization: New insights into T cell developmentWhen T cells encounter an antigen, they proliferate and produce various types of daughter cells. Medical researchers have now refuted the prevailing hypothesis that this immune response is largely predetermined by the individual structure of the T cell receptor. Instead, the influence of the T cell receptor can be described only in probabilistic terms. Such mathematical models may help to improve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materials emitted by water pipe-repair method may pose health risksNew research is calling for immediate safeguards and the study of a widely used method for repairing sewer-, storm-water and drinking-water pipes to understand the potential health and environmental concerns for workers and the public.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D MRI predicts pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restrictionUsing three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, a research team characterized the shape, volume, morphometry and texture of placentas during pregnancy and, using a novel framework, predicted with high accuracy which pregnancies would be complicated by fetal growth restriction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New genomics tool CITE-Seq enables large-scale multidimensional analysis of single cellsA new technique developed by scientists at the New York Genome Center (NYGC) represents an important step forward for single-cell RNA sequencing, an advancing field of genomics that provides detailed insights into individual cells and makes it possible to distinguish between different cell types and to study disease mechanisms at the level of individual cells.
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Gizmodo
Hadouken! Flamethrower Gloves Let You Blast Street Fighter Fireballs With Every Punch GIF Hacker Allen Pan built a pair of custom gloves featuring a butane dispenser, parts from an electric arc lighter, and a motion sensor that automatically trigger a terrifying blast of fire with every detected punch. Pan says he was inspired by Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra for this build, but to us these gloves are the perfect way to recreate Ryu’s Street Fighter “hadouken!
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
States find rewards from high-tech investments, given time and patienceStates have spent millions to develop high-tech industry, with its promise of good jobs and economic growth. And the public investment generally pays off, including in places that might seem less than ideal, according to a national study of such investments in the 1980s and 1990s. The key for these state programs is often time, patience and modest expectations, says University of Illinois sociolog
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beware doping athletes! This sensor may be your downfallA new light-trapping sensor, developed by a University at Buffalo-led team of engineers and described in an Advanced Optical Materials study, makes infrared absorption more sensitive, inexpensive and versatile. It may improve scientists' ability use to sleuth out performance-enhancing drugs in blood samples, tiny particles of explosives in the air and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing a 'trust but verify' model to journal peer reviewIn a commentary published July 20 in the journal Science, lead author Carole Lee and co-author David Moher identify incentives that could encourage journals to 'open the black box of peer review' for the sake of improving transparency, reproducibility and trust in published research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Refuting the idea that mutations cause cancerWriting today in the journal Cancer Research, James DeGregori, Ph.D., deputy director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center offers evidence that it is forces of evolution driven by natural selection acting in the ecosystem of the body that, in the presence of tissue damage, allow cells with dangerous mutations to thrive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Methane-eating microbes may reduce release of gases as Antarctic ice sheets meltA new paper co-author by a University of Florida researcher reveals that a lake beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet contains large amounts of methane and describes how methane-eating microbes may keep the climate-warming gas from entering the atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coral disease outbreaks fluctuate with El Niño years, new research findsDisease outbreaks in corals have followed El Niño-fueled coral bleaching events in the past, leading to speculation about the connection between the diseases and the El Niño cycles. This new study confirms the speculation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'My kid is in there,' UT Health San Antonio imaging studies confirmStructural and functional MRI in children resuscitated after drowning pinpoints the site of anoxic brain injury to regions controlling movement, while providing strong evidence that networks controlling perception and cognition remain largely intact.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statistical analysis to explain mechanism in state of general anesthesiaEmery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and of Computational Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, will present new insight involved in conducting and analyzing experiments in this field July 31 at the 2017 Joint Statistical Meetings
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shared housing, shared behavior in mouse model of autismMice genetically modified to model autism spectrum disorders (ASD) cause changes in the behavior of their unmodified littermates when housed together. The findings, published in eNeuro, show how social environment shapes behaviors characteristic of mouse models for ASD and have implications for the interpretation of results obtained from mouse models of psychiatric disorders.
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The Atlantic
Game of Thrones: That Girl Was Poison Warning: Spoilers ahead through Season 7, Episode 3 of Game of Thrones . “Your daughter will die here in this cell,” the one mother, Cersei, informs Ellaria, the other. “And you will be here watching when she does. You will be here for the rest of your days .... You will live to watch your daughter rot, to watch that beautiful face collapse to bone and dust. All the while contemplating the choice
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Gizmodo
Hackers Breach Cybersecurity Company In Apparent Revenge On Employee Photo: Getty A threat analyst at the cybersecurity firm Mandiant has been hacked and the attackers are claiming to have lurked on his computer for a year, collecting his login credentials for various sites and tracking his location. The hackers got their hands on some internal data about the clients Mandiant and its parent company FireEye protect, including the Israeli Defense Forces. Mandiant co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-nanometer trimetallic alloy particles createdScientists have succeeded in developing precisely controlled alloy nanoparticles 'multimetallic nanoclusters (MNCs)' made of three metals: copper, platinum, and gold. They also discovered that MNCs show catalytic activity that is 24 times greater than commercially available carbon-supported platinum catalysts in the oxidization of hydrocarbons using oxygen in the air.
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Big Think
Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen's Face-to-Face Shows the Myopia of Climate Change Denial Ice finally met fire on last night's episode of Game of Thrones, and their first conversation proved a perfect case study in the distance between power and reality. Read More
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New Scientist - News
US plan to cut smoking with non-addictive cigarettes has flawsA bold proposal in the US to cut cigarette nicotine to sub-addictive levels is interesting, but there are big challenges to making it work, says Linda Bauld
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Ars Technica
State attorneys general team up to scare you from “content theft sites” Fifteen state attorneys general have teamed up with a pro-Hollywood group to launch a campaign aimed at dissuading the public from visiting file sharing sites. To be sure, it's true that ads and other content on piracy sites can infect unsuspecting visitors with malware. But these attorneys general, in conjunction the Digital Citizens Alliance (DCA), really want you to know that visiting pirate s
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NYT > Science
Is This Dog Dangerous? Shelters Struggle With Live-or-Die TestsA standard method for evaluating shelter dogs’ behavior — the results often meant the difference between adoption and euthanasia — is under scrutiny.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Lovers Share Colonies of Skin Microbes, Study FindsCouples who live together come to share similar communities of bodily bacteria — especially on the feet.
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Live Science
Dark Ages Fort Built by Mysterious 'Painted People' Found in ScotlandA Pictish fort that was long thought demolished has recently been unearthed under a town in Scotland.
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Popular Science
Four ways anyone can be a scientist during the solar eclipse Space Citizen scientists, assemble. Dreamt of being a scientist? The Great American Eclipse could be your chance to take part in nationwide research projects.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mice with a mutation linked to autism affect their littermates’ behaviorGenetically normal littermates of mutated mice behave strangely, suggesting that the social environment plays a big role in behavior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Statistical analysis to explain mechanism in state of general anesthesiaAlthough the mechanisms by which anesthetic drugs induce the state of general anesthesia have been considered one of the biggest mysteries of modern medicine and science, new research is deciphering this unknown. Emery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and of Computational Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Warren M. Zapol Professor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise in early life has long-lasting benefitsThe researchers found that bone retains a "memory" of exercise's effects long after the exercise is ceased, and this bone memory continues to change the way the body metabolizes a high-fat diet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Availability of cheap tobacco undermining efforts to cut smokingNew research highlighting how cheap tobacco is undermining public health initiatives designed to reduce smoking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New genomics tool CITE-Seq enables large-scale multidimensional analysis of single cellsA new technique developed by scientists at the New York Genome Center (NYGC) represents an important step forward for single-cell RNA sequencing, an advancing field of genomics that provides detailed insights into individual cells and makes it possible to distinguish between different cell types and to study disease mechanisms at the level of individual cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding how fishers fish on coral reefs can inform fishery management strategiesA Dartmouth study of spearfishing on a Caribbean coral reef illustrates how understanding the process of fishing can help in developing management strategies to address overfishing and coral reef protection worldwide. Understanding which fish are targeted, when, why and where in a coral reef habitat, are important details that extend beyond catch limits or even bans that so often define fishing re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New and novel technologies successfully demonstrated in soilborne disease studySoil profiling is a powerful tool used in researching sudden death syndrome of soybean. In a new Phytobiomes journal article, titled 'Unraveling Microbial and Edaphic Factors Affecting the Development of Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybean,' Srour, et al. demonstrate, for the first time, the latest technologies to detect and profile microbial populations in 'diseased' and 'healthy' soils and to corre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mental health visits spike prior to burn injury, indicating opportunity for interventionIn a new study examining the relationship between mental health and burn injury, researchers note that burn injuries may be preventable through increased access to high-quality mental health care. The study's findings also show that burn injury victims experience significantly increased rates of self-harm after their injuries.
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Big Think
Study Finds Marijuana Negatively Affects Some University Courses A large-scale study of students in Maastricht provides valuable data on student performance. Read More
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The Atlantic
Violence and Claims of Fraud in Venezuela's Controversial Vote Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET The White House imposed sanctions Monday on Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, a day after he claimed victory in his attempt to rewrite the Constitution. The sanctions would freeze all Maduro’s assets “subject to U.S. jurisdiction” and prohibit any U.S. citizen from doing business with him. In its decision, the U.S. Department of Treasury said Maduro had “deliberately an
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The Atlantic
The Native Alaskan Hunters Teaching Scientists About Whales On the northernmost tip of America’s northernmost state is the city of Utqiaġvik, Alaska. Hans Thewissen, a Dutch-born whale scientist who lives in Ohio, has been making the journey up here for more than a decade—at first once a year, now multiple times a year, always to coincide with local whale hunts. Utqiaġvik is one of the only places in America where one can legally procure a piece of fresh
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The Atlantic
The U.S. Government's Fight Against Violent Extremism Loses Its Leader George Selim, the federal counterterrorism official who works most closely with the organized American Muslim community, tendered his resignation on Friday. His ouster is a victory for Trump officials like Steve Bannon and Sebastian Gorka, who see mainstream Muslim organizations as Islamist fronts, and for those American Muslims who oppose any counterterrorism cooperation with Washington. “There
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Gizmodo
Every Voting Machine at This Hacking Conference Got Totally Pwned Photo: Gizmodo A noisy cheer went up from the crowd of hackers clustered around the voting machine tucked into the back corner of a casino conference room—they’d just managed to load Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” onto the WinVote, effectively rickrolling democracy. The hack was easy to execute. Two of the hackers working on the touchscreen voting machine, who identified only by their fi
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Live Science
'13 Reasons Why': Suicide-Related Searches Spike After Show's PremiereInternet searches about suicide increased in the weeks following the release of the Netflix series "13 Reasons Why."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How mice babies ensure mother's protectionThe calls of new-born mice draw the attention of their mother. A group of neuronal cells in the brain stem, which coordinate exhalation and tension of muscles in the larynx is essential for this process. Without these cells, the mice are mute. The cries of human babies may well depend on similar connections, which could also be impaired in speech disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of investments in dikes worldwide knownThe economic benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh the costs at the global scale. In many parts of the world, it is even possible to reduce the economic damage from river floods in the future to below today's levels, even when climate change, growing populations, and urbanization are taken into account.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taboo around vaginal bleeding endangers women's healthThe culture of silence around vaginal bleeding at all stages of life endangers women's health and is compounded by limited access to clean water, sanitation, and factual information in low and middle-income countries, according to a study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. An approach that looks at vaginal bleeding as more than a monthly period and addresses the ne
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Caregivers Are Too Slow to Reach for EpiPens, Study FindsJust 36 percent of children having strong allergic reactions receive epinephrine before arriving at the emergency room, suggesting more education is needed.
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The Atlantic
Vladimir Putin to America: You've Let Me Down Sunday night, Vladimir Putin went on national television and explained his decision to slice American diplomatic staff in Russia by two-thirds. He was retaliating for Barack Obama’s December expulsion of 35 Russian diplomats, as well as newly passed congressional sanctions, by kicking out 755 American diplomatic staff—a response over 20 times stronger than Obama’s original retaliation for Russian
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The Atlantic
The Watchdog Inside the DA's Office PHILADELPHIA—In the 24 years former inmate Shaurn Thomas spent trying to convince others of his innocence, he maintained that “the justice system was going to prevail sooner or later, and that somebody would hear my cries.” Letters he’d written claiming he wasn’t involved in a 1990 murder convinced local lawyers to offer their help, but Thomas wouldn’t have gone free without the assistance of the
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Gizmodo
Someone Hacked Into HBO and Is Now Releasing Game of Thrones Info Image: HBO It’s cyber deja vu time in Hollywood. HBO just confirmed that hackers broke into their servers and stole an unknown quantity of data. Now, unreleased episodes of Ballers and Room 104 have appeared online as well a script that looks an awful lot like next week’s Game of Thrones episode. This is not a drill. “HBO recently experienced a cyber incident, which resulted in the compromise of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK minister to meet Silicon Valley over online extremismBritain's interior minister Amber Rudd will meet with tech leaders in California's Silicon Valley this week to try and combat online content inciting extremism, the government said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High altitude research aircraft explores the upper levels of the Asian MonsoonThe Asian Monsoon System is one of the Earth's largest and most energetic weather systems, and monsoon rainfall is critical to feeding over a billion people in Asia. An international team of scientists led by the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) is now conducting the first-ever scientific mission to the upper levels of the monsoon system, using a high-
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Ars Technica
FCC says its specific plan to stop DDoS attacks must remain secret Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Nicholas Rigg) The Federal Communications Commission has told members of Congress that it won't reveal exactly how it plans to prevent future attacks on the public comment system. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and Democratic lawmakers have been exchanging letters about a May 8 incident in which the public comments website was disrupted while many people were trying to file
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yellowstone grizzlies removed from threatened species listFor the second time in a decade, the U.S. government has removed grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region from the threatened species list.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Into a competitive world, guppies are born not just bigger, but more matureThroughout nature, moms engage in a trade-off: Churn out a bevy of offspring and hope for the best, or have fewer kids but invest more in their survival. Trinidadian guppies provide a model example of this pervasive parenting poser, but a new study by Brown University researchers provides uniquely deep insight into how guppy moms equip their babies for the environment they'll face.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New statistical model examines massive amounts of data to automatically spot anomaliesWith the number of security breaches and cyber-attacks on the rise and reports of the financial burden of these varying from $400 billion a year to $2.1 trillion by 2019, cyber-security experts may soon have a new tool in the fight against online threats. Patrick Rubin-Delanchy, Heilbronn Research Fellow in Statistics at the University of Oxford, will present a new statistical method for monitorin
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Our Favorite Gear This Month, From Cameras to CookwareMaster & Dynamic's dope concrete speaker, e-bikes to drool over, BuzzFeed's new cooking gadget, and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two new studies offer insights into gastrointestinal dysfunction in Parkinson's patientsConstipation is one of the most common non-motor related complaints affecting Parkinson's disease (PD) patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New statistical model examines massive amounts of data to automatically spot anomaliesWith the number of security breaches and cyber-attacks on the rise, cyber-security experts may soon have a new tool in the fight against online threats. Patrick Rubin-Delanchy, Heilbronn Research Fellow in Statistics at the University of Oxford, will present a new statistical method for monitoring networks to automatically detect 'strange behavior' and ultimately prevent intrusion on Monday, July
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists challenge next-generation sequencing dogmaNext-generation sequencing -- the ability to sequence millions or billions of small fragments of DNA in parallel -- has revolutionized the biological sciences, playing an essential role in everything from locating mutations that cause human disease to determining how a newly discovered animal fits into the tree of life. But a study published today in the journal Scientific Reports reveals that a f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Into a competitive world, guppies are born not just bigger, but more matureWhen Brown University scientists took a deeper look into a classic example of parenting strategy in nature, they found that what really matters may be more than what meets the eye.
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Are you smarter than a forester? The answers to today’s puzzles Earlier today in my puzzle blog I asked the following problems about planting trees on an island: (For the purposes of this puzzle the island is empty apart from the trees, and a tree is hidden only when it lies directly behind another tree from the perspective of the observer). Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leaf beetles: Even a tiny dose of pesticide will impair reproductionOne finding is that leaf beetles lay roughly 35 per cent fewer eggs after coming into contact with traces of a frequently used pesticide: a pyrethroid. The researchers also showed that female offspring develop malformations through the poison. The biologists have published their study in the journal Environmental Pollution.
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Ars Technica
Niantic cancels European Pokémon Go gatherings after Chicago fiasco Enlarge / Much of Europe will have to wait for Niantic's planned Safari Zone events. Niantic's first attempt at a live Pokémon Go gathering in Chicago last week went so badly that attendees are organizing a class-action lawsuit after shoddy cell reception prevented most of the 20,000 attendees from playing the game during the paid event. In the wake of that fiasco, the Pokémon Go developers are p
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The Atlantic
Democrats Pitch a Kinder, Gentler Populism Last week was an intriguing one for fans of economic populism. Maybe not a White-House-staffers-threatening-to-sic-the-FBI-on-each-other level of intriguing. But intriguing nonetheless for anyone wondering how the U.S. landed itself in this topsy-turvy political freakshow. On Monday, Democratic lawmakers unleashed upon the nation their “Better Deal,” the latest move in the party’s scramble to win
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Gizmodo
Super Rare Atari 2700 Found At California Thrift Store Image via eBay According to Redditor L064N , he was shopping at a thrift store in Oceanside, California last week when he came across a very strange Atari console. Some quick Googling told him it was a rare prototype for the Atari 2700, an un-produced wireless follow-up to the 2600. He bought it for $30. And then he sold it on eBay for $3,000 . Advertisement Planned for release in 1981, the Atari
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making dew droplets so small, they're invisibleBy better understanding the behavior of water in its smallest form, researchers could be improving the efficiency of removing condensation in a major way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Public trust in science spiked after media coverage of Zika vaccine trialDoes a scientific breakthrough increase confidence in science? The question is raised by a study of public attitudes about trust in science following media coverage of the Zika vaccine trial in 2016.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnon circular birefringence: Polarization rotation of spin waves and its applicationsAn international team of researchers has conducted a thorough study of an exotic behavior of material called 'noncentrosymmetric antiferromagnet.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The new yellow sea snake assumes an unusual ambush postureCarrying its petite frame and all-yellow skin, the recently scrutinized sea snake populations from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, already seem different enough to be characterized as a new subspecies. However, their most extraordinary trait is only exposed at night when the serpents go hunting for small fish as they hang upside down just below the water surface assuming a peculiar sinusoidal ambush post
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Quanta Magazine
Cookie-Cutter Supernovas Might Come in Different Flavors Of all the mysteries in astrophysics, supernova explosions may seem to be the best-understood, at least to a lay person. A star runs out of fuel and goes boom. But most of what we know is based on guesswork. My recent article on supernovas, “ Lucky Break Leads to Controversial Supernova Discovery ,” focused on the puzzles surrounding just one class of these objects — so-called “Type II core-colla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavier Asian Americans seen as 'more American,' study saysWhat makes people look "American"? The way they dress? Maybe their hairstyle, or mannerisms? How much they weigh?
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Ars Technica
Can cellphones handle vehicle-to-vehicle comms better than radio networks? Nexar NEW YORK— Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication (aka V2V) sometimes feels like the automotive world's Duke Nukem Forever . The idea of vehicles communicating with each other over short distances to warn drivers of potential obstacles or dangers is compelling. But it may as well be vaporware. Nearly 20 years after the Federal Communications Commission allocated radio spectrum for it, we're still
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Scientific American Content: Global
Forget That Big Iceberg--A Smaller One in the Arctic Is More TroublingA chunk of ice the size of three Manhattans just broke free in the Arctic, and it has a much clearer link to climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Air-Breathing Fish 'Hibernate' in Pods on Dry Land (Video)Most fish would be left high and dry during arid drought periods when bodies of water shrink and disappear — but African lungfish aren't most fish.
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Live Science
Weird 'Rocks' at Robotics Test Site Turn Out to Be Dinosaur FossilsStudents searching for a Mars-like landscape in a Canadian park took an unexpected detour into paleontology.
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Live Science
How Exercise Fights InflammationA new review explains exactly how exercise works to lower inflammation in your body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New MRI contrast agent tested on big animalsThe top causes of death worldwide, ischemic heart diseases and stroke, together with another major source of illness, that is cancer, require proper imaging of blood vessels. A team formed by the Center for Nanoparticle Research, within the Institute for Basic Science, in collaboration with scientists at Anhui Provincial Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital, have tested a new non-toxic
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Gizmodo
Bummer News For Future Humans Hoping to Escape to Europa Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Humans hoping to launch themselves to another planet or even into the Sun are sadly out of luck—for now. But in a few billion years, when the Sun becomes a red giant and destroys our terrestrial oceans, future folk will hypothetically be able to make their homes elsewhere. Saturn and Jupiter’s icy moons—Enceladus and Europa, respectively— have topped the list for future Ea
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Gizmodo
The 5 Tasks You Should Automate As Soon As You Get a New Phone Image: IFTTT You’ve probably got enough on your plate without wasting time on phone chores that could be running automatically—like clearing out old photos, muting and unmuting your handset, posting to all of your social media accounts at once, and so on. Here are five automations you can set up quickly and for free as soon as you get a new iPhone or Android device (or apply whenever you like to
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Fire HD 10, DEWALT Tools, Samsung Sound Bar, and More Amazon’s Fire HD 10 , a DEWALT combo kit , and an exclusive deal for our new Facebook community group lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Kinja Deals Community Facebook Group We just launched a community-driven Facebook group where our readers can share the best deals they’ve found with each other, bu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When push comes to injury: What pushing a wheelchair does to your backWhen asked to push a simulated wheelchair against increasing resistance, study participants typically exceeded the recommended limits to avoid back injury by nearly 20 percent before they decided to quit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LSUHealthNO research finds home-based kit would increase HIV testingResearch led by William Robinson, PhD, Associate Research Professor of Behavioral & Community Health Sciences at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, has found that 86 percent of heterosexuals who are at high risk for HIV would use a home-based test kit provided by mail and 99 percent would seek treatment based on a positive result. This self-administered alternative may lead a group wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research on nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles reveals viable skin infection treatmentA research team led by Adam Friedman, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has found that topically applied nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles are a viable treatment for deep fungal infections of the skin caused by dermatophytes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Canadian study calls for targeted screening of high-risk healthcare workers for tuberculosisTuberculosis is a recognized hazard for healthcare workers, but the annual screening strategy currently in place in Canada and the United States is costly with very limited health benefits and should be reconsidered, According to a new study led by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal. The findings suggest health agencies in North America should con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel framework powered by 3-D MRI accurately predicts pregnancies complicated by FGRUsing three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, a Children's National research team characterized the shape, volume, morphometry and texture of placentas during pregnancy and, using a novel framework, predicted with high accuracy which pregnancies would be complicated by fetal growth restriction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leaf beetles: Even a tiny dose of pesticide will impair reproductionThe number of insects in Germany is declining rapidly - in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia alone, it has dropped by three-quarters within only 25 years. In a new study, biologists at Bielefeld University show the effects of pesticides and how even slight traces lead to long-term damage to beetles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gallium in lunar samples explains loss of moon's easily vaporized elementsA pair of researchers with Institut Universitaire de France has found more evidence of a large evaporative event in the moon's past. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Chizu Kato and Frédéric Moynier describe their study of gallium isotopes from lunar samples, what they found, and why they believe it sheds some light on how the moon was formed.
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Gizmodo
New Technique Creates Stunning 3D Images of Live Insects (Image: D. Poinapen et al., 2017) When taking high-resolution 3D scans of insects, scientists typically have to kill their test subjects, which isn’t always ideal. By taking advantage of an insect’s ability to survive oxygen-poor conditions, scientists have now used carbon dioxide to keep bugs in a state of suspended animation for upwards of seven hours at a time—and with no apparent side effects
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Futurity.org
Turning pine into graphene lets it carry electricity Scientists have turned wood into an electrical conductor by making its surface graphene. Chemist James Tour of Rice University and his colleagues used a laser to blacken a thin film pattern onto a block of pine. The pattern is laser-induced graphene (LIG), a form of the atom-thin carbon material discovered at Rice in 2014. “It’s a union of the archaic with the newest nanomaterial into a single co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women show cognitive advantage in gender-equal countriesWomen's cognitive functioning past middle age may be affected by the degree of gender equality in the country they live in, according to new findings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quasars may answer how starburst galaxies were extinguishedAstronomers have located quasars inside four dusty starburst galaxies. The observations suggest quasars may starve this type of galaxy of energy needed to form stars.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Meet Spot, the robot dog that can run, hop and open doors | Marc RaibertThat science fiction future where robots can do what people and animals do may be closer than you think. Marc Raibert, founder of Boston Dynamics, is developing advanced robots that can gallop like a cheetah, negotiate 10 inches of snow, walk upright on two legs and even open doors and deliver packages. Join Raibert for a live demo of SpotMini, a nimble robot that maps the space around it, handles
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Loss of Arctic sea ice impacting Atlantic Ocean water circulation systemArctic sea ice is not merely a passive responder to the climate changes occurring around the world, according to new research.
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Ars Technica
Con man, brilliant mind, or myth? Jury in Shkreli trial now decides Enlarge / NEW YORK, NY - JULY 31: (L to R) Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli and attorney Benjamin Brafman arrive at the US District Court for the Eastern District of New York , July 31, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. After hearing closing arguments on Friday, jurors are set to begin deliberations on Monday morning. (credit: Getty | Drew Angerer ) The fate of Martin S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heavier Asian Americans seen as 'more American,' study saysA University of Washington-led study has found that for Asian Americans, those who appear heavier not only are perceived to be more 'American,' but also may be subject to less prejudice directed at foreigners than Asian Americans who are thin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Materials emitted by water pipe-repair method may pose health risksNew research is calling for immediate safeguards and the study of a widely used method for repairing sewer-, storm-water and drinking-water pipes to understand the potential health and environmental concerns for workers and the public.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Systems medicine roadmap update published by the CASyM consortiumThe development of a strategic roadmap represents a core objective of the CASyM project. Clinical needs are the main driver of this roadmap, that functions as an overarching conceptual framework and guide for citizens, policy-makers, funders, scientists, clinicians and industry. The underlying foundation of the CASyM roadmap is a framework of research priorities for developing and structuring syst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statistical analysis for optimal immunization: New insights into T cell developmentWhen T cells encounter an antigen, they proliferate and produce various types of daughter cells. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now refuted the prevailing hypothesis that this immune response is largely predetermined by the individual structure of the T cell receptor. Instead, the influence of the T cell receptor can be described only in probabilistic terms. Such mathematic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells that stand in the way of HIV cure: Discovery expands understanding of marrow's roleNew research into HIV's hiding places reveals new clues about exactly how it persists in the body for years, in hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. The discovery could speed the search for drugs that can flush HIV out of its long-term hideouts and cure an infection for good.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol intake may increase risk of nonmelanoma skin cancersIn a recent analysis of published studies, higher alcohol intake was linked with an increased risk of both basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, which are nonmelanoma skin cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loss of Arctic sea ice impacting Atlantic Ocean water circulation systemArctic sea ice is not merely a passive responder to the climate changes occurring around the world, according to new research. Scientists at Yale University and the University of Southampton say the ongoing Arctic ice loss can play an active role in altering one of the planet's largest water circulation systems: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell senescence is regulated by innate DNA sensingEPFL scientists have made new insights into the control of cell senescence, which is intimately linked to the development of cancer and aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New MRI contrast agent tested on big animalsExperiments in dogs, rabbits and monkeys show the efficacy and biocompatibility of a new MRI/MRA contrast agent in detecting stroke. This T1 MRI contrast agent based on ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles could become a possible alternative to clinically used gadolinium-based agents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with autism are less surprised by the unexpectedAdults with autism may overestimate the volatility of the world around them, finds a new UCL study published in Nature Neuroscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How camouflaged birds decide where to blend inAnimals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs -- effective measures for reducing future floodingIn the first study of its kind, an international team of scientists -- including the University of Bristol -- has concluded, on a global scale, that the economic and long-term benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh their initial cost.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Formation of porous crystals observed for the first timeScientists at the University of Bristol have, for the first time, observed the formation of a crystal gel with particle-level resolution, allowing them to study the conditions by which these new materials form
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists watch 'artificial atoms' assemble into perfect lattices with many usesSome of the world's tiniest crystals are known as 'artificial atoms' because they can organize themselves into structures that look like molecules, including 'superlattices' that are potential building blocks for novel materials. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first observation of these nanocrystals rapidly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Netflix drama '13 Reasons Why' linked to suicidal thoughtsA new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine and led by San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health Associate Research Professor John W. Ayers delved into Americans' internet search history in the days after Netflix's '13 Reasons Why' series aired, and found that queries for suicide and how to commit suicide spiked in he show's wake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher dementia risk associated with birth in high stroke mortality statesIs being born in states with high stroke mortality associated with dementia risk in a group of individuals who eventually all lived outside those states?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internet searches for suicide after '13 Reasons Why'Internet searches about suicide were higher than expected after the release of the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' about the suicide of a fictional teen that graphically shows the suicide in its finale, according to a new research letter published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earth likely to warm more than 2 degrees this centuryA new statistically-based analysis, rather than the previous scenarios, shows a 90 percent chance that average warming this century will be greater than 2 degrees Celsius. It finds only 1 percent chance that warming will be less than 1.5 C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two degrees of warming already baked inEven if humans could instantly turn off all our emissions of greenhouse gases, the Earth would continue to heat up about two more degrees Fahrenheit by the turn of the century, according to a sophisticated new analysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollutionA new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill estimates that future climate change, if left unaddressed, is expected to cause roughly 60,000 deaths globally in the year 2030 and 260,000 deaths in 2100 due to climate change's effect on global air pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bubbles help new catalysts self-optimizeScientists predicted and created new two-dimensional electrocatalysts to extract hydrogen from water with high performance and low cost. In the process, they also created a simplified model for testing next-generation catalysts.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study opens new drug therapy targets in a range of diseasesScientists have a better understanding of the immune system at a molecular level, thanks to University of Queensland-led research that may now lead to a range of new treatments for disease. The research provides a new foundation for therapeutic strategies against a wide range of diseases and infections, said Professor Bostjan Kobe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic testing helps detect cause of early life epilepsyStudy supports routine genetic testing for initial evaluation of seizures as the first step toward precision medicine and improved outcomes.
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Gizmodo
Looks Like Apple Leaked Details of the New iPhone in the HomePod Firmware Image: Apple / Gizmodo If you had any doubts about Apple releasing a bezel-free iPhone in September, you can probably throw those out the window. The company just pushed out a version of the HomePod firmware , and not only does the code tell us more about how Apple’s smart speaker will work, it also offers a few clues about the next iPhone. Developer Steve Troughton-Smith spotted the release on F
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New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon’s New Robo-Picker Champion Is Proudly InhumanIt only needs to see seven images of a new object before it can reliably spot and grab it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Other planets may never be as hospitable as Earth: studyScientists dealt a blow Monday to the quest for organisms inhabiting worlds besides Earth, saying our planet was unusual in its ability to host liquid water—the key ingredient for life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting the properties of subatomic particles using large scale computer simulationsPredicting the properties of subatomic particles before their experimental discovery has been a big challenge for physicists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are the world's highest paid football players overpaid? Big data says yesComputer scientists used machine learning and data science to analyze the salaries of professional football players. A computational model was developed to show the world's most overpaid and underpaid players, and to identify skills that can earn footballers more Euros.
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Gizmodo
Your Kitchen Sponge Contains More Bacteria Than Any Other Object in Your House Image: Spongebob/Nick/Screenshot By this point, it shouldn’t surprise you to know that the world is full of bacteria. But the numbers can still be baffling. Take your body: it probably has 37 trillion cells or so, and maybe the same number of bacterial cells. Now think about your kitchen sponge. Advertisement I don’t care if you want to think about it or not. You’re thinking now. And based on a n
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Ars Technica
Photons direct photons, giving hope for all-optical quantum logic Photons, always surprising . (credit: mit.edu ) All the early quantum computing work was done with light. Light is very easy to manipulate: a few mirrors, crystals, and light detectors and you to can have your very own quantum computer. Over the last two decades, though, that's changed. Almost all the major developments have used things like ions, rings of superconducting current, or defects in c
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Gizmodo
Last Night's Game of Thrones and the Impossible Expectations of Ice Meeting Fire All images: HBO About a million things happened on “The Queen’s Justice” last night, but there’s only thing that really matters—the long, long, long -awaited moment where the King in the North met the Mother of Dragons, and the series’ two main characters finally came face-to-face. The scene could not have been more anticipated… and maybe that was the problem. I don’t want to deny the thrill of D
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Gizmodo
We're Not Totally Sure How Much the Planet Will Warm This Century—But We Still Need to Act Image: Lima Andruška /Flickr Creative Commons It’s a well-worn fact that our round Earth is warming, and that human carbon emissions are the cause. What’s less well-known is how much warming we’ve already committed our planet to in the future. A new study crunched some numbers and came to an alarming answer—but other experts are already criticizing its approach, reminding us that the course of cl
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Feed: All Latest
Science Says _13 Reasons Why_ May Be the Public Health Scare People ThoughtGoogle searches for all things suicide spiked in the wake of the Netflix original series premiere, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poland to keep logging in ancient forest despite EU orderPoland will keep logging in the ancient forest of Bialowieza despite an order from the EU's top court to halt the practice, the country's environment minister said Monday.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollutionA new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill estimates that future climate change, if left unaddressed, is expected to cause roughly 60,000 deaths globally in the year 2030 and 260,000 deaths in 2100 due to climate change's effect on global air pollution.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bubbles help new catalysts self-optimizeScientists at Rice University and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have predicted and created new two-dimensional electrocatalysts to extract hydrogen from water with high performance and low cost.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How camouflaged birds decide where to blend inAnimals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs—effective measures for reducing future floodingIn the first study of its kind, an international team of scientists—including the University of Bristol—has concluded, on a global scale, that the economic and long-term benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh their initial cost.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Formation of porous crystals observed for the first timeScientists at the University of Bristol have, for the first time, observed the formation of a crystal gel with particle-level resolution, allowing them to study the conditions by which these new materials form.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists watch 'artificial atoms' assemble into perfect lattices with many usesSome of the world's tiniest crystals are known as "artificial atoms" because they can organize themselves into structures that look like molecules, including "superlattices" that are potential building blocks for novel materials.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth likely to warm more than 2 degrees this centuryWarming of the planet by 2 degrees Celsius is often seen as a "tipping point" that people should try to avoid by limiting greenhouse gas emissions.But the Earth is very likely to exceed that change, according to new University of Washington research. A study using statistical tools shows only a 5 percent chance that Earth will warm 2 degrees or less by the end of this century. It shows a mere 1 pe
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Viden
Dansk ekspert: Om 10 år er smartphones historieDet er vigtigt, vi finder ud af, hvordan vi som mennesker får størst gevinst af mulighederne med den computerskabte virkelighed, mener dansk ekspert.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One-nanometer trimetallic alloy particles createdA researcher group of Tokyo Institute of Technology succeeded in developing precisely controlled alloy nanoparticles 'multimetallic nanoclusters (MNCs)' made of three metals: copper, platinum, and gold. They also discovered that MNCs show catalytic activity that is 24 times greater than commercially available carbon-supported platinum catalysts in the oxidization of hydrocarbons using oxygen in th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough software teaches computer characters to walk, run, even play soccerComputer characters and eventually robots could learn complex motor skills like walking and running through trial and error, thanks to a milestone algorithm.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Clues Emerge in Mystery of Flickering QuasarsSome of the universe's most luminous objects have disappeared much faster than expected -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Black-Hole Hunter Peering Into the Heart of Our Galaxy If you cast an observational lasso into the center of the Milky Way galaxy and pull it closed, you will find a dense, dark lump: a mass totaling some four million suns, crammed into a space no wider than twice Pluto’s orbit in our solar system. In recent years, astronomers have come to agree that inside this region is a supermassive black hole, and that similar black holes lurk at the cores of ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists at Angkor Wat find large buried statueArchaeologists at Cambodia's Angkor Wat temple complex studying the site of a hospital from eight to nine centuries ago say they have found a large statue in their excavations.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Availability of cheap tobacco undermining efforts to cut smokingNew research in the Journal of Nicotine & Tobacco Research highlighting how cheap tobacco is undermining public health initiatives designed to reduce smoking.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells may help improve corneal wound healingA new review is the first to directly examine the role of various stem cells in the healing of wounded cornea, the outermost part of the eye.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise in early life has long-lasting benefitsThe researchers, from the Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland, found that bone retains a "memory" of exercise's effects long after the exercise is ceased, and this bone memory continues to change the way the body metabolises a high-fat diet.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice University chemists make laser-induced graphene from woodRice University scientists have made a form of graphene that can be cut with a table saw. They turned pine into laser-induced graphene and used it to make proof-of-concept electrodes for water splitting and supercapacitors.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Towards a safe and scalable cell therapy for type 1 diabetes by simplifying beta cell differentiationWith the vision of providing a cell therapy for type 1 diabetes patients, scientists at the University of Copenhagen have identified a unique cell surface protein present on human pancreatic precursor cells providing for the first time a molecular handle to purify the cells whose fate is to become cells of the pancreas -- including insulin-producing cells.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal instability achieves energy-efficient nanotechnologyOsaka University and Italian researchers show their nanowire resonators can be used to miniaturize energy-efficient electronics
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What does trophy hunting contribute to wild lion conservation?Trophy hunting of lions, the killing of selected individual animals for sport, is highly controversial, and there is much debate about what it contributes to conservation.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aalto-1 satellite sends first image -- the camera developed by VTTThe photograph was taken with the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland developed hyperspectral camera's secondary camera.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications journal (volume 2 issue 3) publishedThe new journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications has just published the third issue of Volume 2. This issue brings together a diverse set of papers from authors from China, Chile, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States.
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Science | The Guardian
Want to sound cleverer than Jacob Rees-Mogg? Here are five long words to drop into conversation The record for the longest word spoken in parliament has been broken with pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis – but there are plenty of alternatives Is this the first sign of Moggmentum draining away? We can but hope. Jacob Rees-Mogg , the MP for North East Somerset and the 18th century, has been knocked off his perch as utterer of parliament’s longest word. Michael Bryan’s use of “pneu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predicting the properties of subatomic particles using large scale computer simulationsPredicting the properties of subatomic particles before their experimental discovery has been a big challenge for physicists. In a recent paper published on 28 July in Physical Review Letters Nilmani Mathur from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, and M. Padmanath, a former student from TIFR, have predicted the quantum numbers of five Ω0c baryons which have recently been discovered
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Futurity.org
Asteroid flyby will test NASA’s defense skills For the first time, NASA will use an actual asteroid for an observational campaign to test its network of observatories and scientists who work on planetary defense. The asteroid, named 2012 TC4, will do a close flyby on October 12, 2017, but don’t worry. It doesn’t pose a threat to Earth. This animation depicts the safe flyby of asteroid 2012 TC4 as it passes under Earth on October 12, 2017. (Cr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare whole genome duplication during spider evolution could reveal more about animal diversificationIn collaboration with scientists from the U.K., Europe, Japan and the United States, researchers at the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor College of Medicine have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions. The study appears in BMC Biology.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Everything After Daniel Cormier Got Knocked Out Was A Disaster | Jezebel Angelina Jolie Cal Deadspin Everything After Daniel Cormier Got Knocked Out Was A Disaster | Jezebel Angelina Jolie Calls Reaction to Vanity Fair Story About Her Audition Process ‘False and Disturbing’ | The Grapevine Sunday’s Game Of Thrones Was A Message To Black America | Splinter Ivanka Trump ‘Desperately’ Wants You to Lower Your Expectations of Her |
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The new yellow sea snake assumes an unusual ambush postureCarrying its petite frame and all-yellow skin, the recently scrutinized sea snake populations from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, already seem different enough to be characterized as a new subspecies. However, their most extraordinary trait is only exposed at night when the serpents opportunistically feed on small fish by hanging upside down from the water surface, assuming a peculiar sinusoidal ambush
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover 'heavy metal' supernova rocking outMany rock stars don't like to play by the rules, and a cosmic one is no exception. A team of astronomers has discovered that an extraordinarily bright supernova occurred in a surprising location. This "heavy metal" supernova discovery challenges current ideas of how and where such super-charged supernovas occur.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Study Tracks Gender Ratios at ConferencesWhile men make up the majority of invited speakers at four major virology conferences, recent trends demonstrate a greater inclusion of women.
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Futurity.org
Segregated cities have more noise pollution As white people move out of neighborhoods, noise pollution rises. And noise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where it is worse for everyone, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines in the United States. A new study is the first to examine noise pollution nationally through the lens of racial disparities and the extent to which
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Futurity.org
Clear evidence points to Majorana fermions After an 80-year quest, researchers have discovered evidence of particles that are their own antiparticles. These “Majorana fermions” could one day help make quantum computers more robust. In 1928, physicist Paul Dirac made the stunning prediction that every fundamental particle in the universe has an antiparticle—its identical twin but with opposite charge. When particle and antiparticle met the
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Gizmodo
Neil Armstrong's Solid Gold Moon Lander Replica Stolen From Museum Photo: Cartier Collection It’s been a bad couple of weeks for priceless artifacts from NASA history. First, a moon-dusted sample bag from Apollo 11 was privately auctioned , and now a solid gold moon lander replica that was gifted to Neil Armstrong in 1969 has been stolen from his museum. On Sunday, a NASA investigator worried that the thieves don’t even know what they have on their hands. On Fri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How central are female characters to a movie?A new study from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab (SAIL)—which creates automatic tools for signal analysis and linguistic assessment —uncovers how media communicates about gender, race and age finding that in the majority of films, females roles are not central to the plot.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How mice babies ensure mother's protectionThe calls of new-born mice draw the attention of their mother. A group of neuronal cells in the brain stem, which coordinate exhalation and tension of muscles in the larynx is essential for this process. Without these cells, the mice are mute. These are the results of a study by a research team at the Max Delbrück Center in Berlin, which appears in the journal PNAS. The cries of human babies may w
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers discover 'heavy metal' supernova rocking outA team of astronomers led by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has discovered that an extraordinarily bright supernova occurred in a surprising location. This 'heavy metal' supernova discovery challenges current ideas of how and where such super-charged supernovas occur. In the past decade, astronomers have discovered about 50 supernovas, out of the thousands known, that are particul
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
P-values, hypotheses and inference ... new appraoches to reproducibility at JSM 2017Andrew Gelman, professor of statistics and political science and director of the Applied Statistics Center at Columbia University; Blake McShane, associate professor of marketing at Northwestern University; and Jeffrey Leek, associate professor in the department of biostatistics at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, will present new approaches to addressing the 'reproducib
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are the world's highest paid football players overpaid? Big data says yesSome professional European football players are earning jaw-dropping salaries while other athletes on the same football pitch earn much less. This may lead many football fans, wondering if these athletes are worth such high paychecks. For example, FC Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi earns some hundreds of thousands more than other players.
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Gizmodo
Watch This Heroic Captain Use His Boat's Powerful Jet Stream to Put Out a Massive Fire GIF GIF: Facebook It doesn’t take long for a grass fire to turn into a raging inferno that sweeps through entire forests, so a pair of quick-thinking boaters in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada, used their jet boat to create a massive rooster tail that helped douse the flames before firefighters arrived on scene. Tasha Hunt and Koyne Watson’s were taking their 1987 Eliminator Scorpion jet boat
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Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Mattress With This Discounted Plush Topper ExceptionalSheets Mattress Pad with Fitted Skirt , $104-$138 If your mattress doesn’t leave you feeling as well-rested as you’d like, it’s a whole lot cheaper to upgrade it with a mattress pad than to buy a new one, especially today . Amazon is offering highly-rated ExceptionalSheets two piece, extra thick pads for $104-$138 as part of a one-day Gold Box deal. ExceptionalSheets is the same compan
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Scientific American Content: Global
FDA Plans to Regulate Nicotine Levels in CigarettesThe agency hopes to bring the substance down to “nonaddictive” levels, but there’s no consensus on what those are -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanowire resonators can be used to miniaturize energy-efficient electronicsComputers that fit in our pockets, television screens no thicker than a door, and cars only slightly bigger than their passengers, technology is constantly getting smaller. A major reason for this miniaturization is the development of nano-size resonators, which convert small levels of electrical power into mechanical oscillations at high frequencies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muted stress response linked to long-term cannabis useA new study reveals a dampened physiological response to stress in chronic cannabis users. This is the first study to examine the effects of acute stress on salivary cortisol levels in chronic cannabis users compared to non-users.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise incentives do little to spur gym-goingEven among people who had just joined a gym and expected to visit regularly, getting paid to exercise did little to make their commitment stick, according to a new study.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research models spread of disease through aquatic communitiesThe interaction of species within an ecosystem is important in predicting how they will respond when diseases are introduced, Bournemouth University (BU) modelling has found.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How central are female characters to a movie?A new study from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab (SAIL) -- which creates automatic tools for signal analysis and linguistic assessment -- uncovers how media communicates about gender, race and age finding that in the majority of films, females roles are not central to the plot.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An evolutionary breakpoint in cell divisionJapanese researchers from Osaka University have discovered that the interaction between two proteins, M18BP1/KNL2 and CENP-A, is essential for cell division in various species except for mammals including humans.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More rain for the Red Sea if El Niño breezes inModeling leads to a better understanding of the role El Niño plays in increasing rainfall along the Red Sea coast.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature provides a key to repelling liquidsA nature-based technique paves the way for cheaper and environmentally friendly liquid-repellent materials.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Hidden' experiences of men forced to have sex with women revealedThe most frequent strategy used by women forcing men to have sex with them against their will is blackmail and threats, according to researchers at Lancaster University. This accounted for the experiences of more than one-fifth of the men who completed an online survey, the first of its kind in the UK, examining the extent of men who have been 'forced to penetrate' women.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial skin could allow robots to feel like we doArtificial skin with post-human sensing capabilities, and a better understanding of skin tissue, could pave the way for robots that can feel, smart-transplants and even cyborgs.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anonymity, scoundrels, and free speechChristoph Bezemek of the Institute of Public Law and Political Science, at the University of Graz, Austria, tells a tale of his school history teacher who purported that only "scoundrels" sent letters to a newspaper anonymously. His teacher's argument being that public discourse as a democratic society's bonding agent and so those who wish their voice to be heard should not hide behind a veil of a
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Feed: All Latest
The Space Junk Problem Is About to Get a Whole Lot GnarlierThousands and thousands of satellites are set to launch before 2025. Things just got real in low Earth orbit.
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Gizmodo
This $590,000 iPhone Robbery Sounds Like the Craziest Heist Movie Image: YouTube / Romanian Police A year-long manhunt ended last weekend, when police arrested a gang of five Romanian stunt thieves near a large collection of Van Gogh paintings in the Netherlands. In their hideout, the cops found $590,000 worth of iPhones that the suspects allegedly lifted off the back of a truck—while it was barreling down a highway. Dutch press are calling the highway maneuver
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel porous rhodium catalystsScientists have succeeded in developing rhodium nanomaterials with uniform nanopores (mesoporous rhodium) using polymeric templates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An evolutionary breakpoint in cell divisionResearchers have discovered that the interaction between two proteins, M18BP1/KNL2 and CENP-A, is essential for cell division in various species except for mammals including human.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People find it difficult to judge how good their intuitions areWhether people believe they are 'intuitive' or not may have no bearing on how they perform in tasks that require intuition, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover biomarkers which could lead to better treatments for CF patientsResearchers have identified two new biological markers of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which affects children and young adults, leaving them with lifelong health complications including digestive problems and persistent lung infections. The findings shed new light on the underlying mechanisms of CF and could lead to improved prognosis and better therapies for a disease which is quite va
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What caused the world's greatest extinction?Researcher offers new clues to what may have triggered the world's most catastrophic extinction, nearly 252 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving habitats for batsThe effects of 160 years of woodland creation on bats has been revealed by a natural experiment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using step width to compare locomotor biomechanics between dinosaurs and modern bipedsRemember the classic flocking scene from Jurassic Park? Alan and the kids are walking over a grassy plain. A flock of ostrich-like dinosaurs appear. Alan is amazed at how similar their movements are to a flock of birds, while the kids are more concerned that they are flocking in their direction…
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Ars Technica
Russian official on new US sanctions and NASA: “Nothing lasts forever” Enlarge / Expedition 52-53 crewmembers Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left), Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Randy Bresnik of NASA, were all smiles last week before their launch. (credit: NASA) Last Thursday, the United States overwhelmingly passed a new round of sanctions against Russia, taking the executive actions made by then presiden
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aardvarks' fate points to worrying consequences for wildlife, due to climate changeAardvarks prove to be highly susceptible to the warmer and drier climates that are predicted for the western parts of southern Africa in the future. During the study of a number of aardvarks by researchers of the Brain Function Research Group at the University of the Witwatersrand, all but one of the study animals -- as well as other aardvarks in the area -- died because of a severe drought, with
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists map the distribution of antimicrobial resistance across Chinese major citiesProfessor ZHU Yongguan from the Institute of Urban Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators recently conducted a nationwide survey of antimicrobial resistance elements in China's urban sewage and showed that the distribution of antimicrobial-resistant genes (ARG) was characterized by the well-known 'Hu Huanyong line,' which delineates a striking difference in the distri
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The new yellow sea snake assumes an unusual ambush postureCarrying its petite frame and all-yellow skin, the recently scrutinized sea snake populations from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, already seem different enough to be characterized as a new subspecies. However, their most extraordinary trait is only exposed at night when the serpents go hunting for small fish as they hang upside down just below the water surface assuming a peculiar sinusoidal ambush post
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Public trust in science spiked after media coverage of Zika vaccine trialDoes a scientific breakthrough increase confidence in science? The question is raised by a study of public attitudes about trust in science following media coverage of the Zika vaccine trial in 2016.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnon circular birefringence: Polarization rotation of spin waves and its applicationsAn international team of researchers from Thailand, USA and Japan, has conducted a thorough study of an exotic behavior of material called 'noncentrosymmetric antiferromagnet.'
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believedA new study, Chrysocoma ciliata L. (Asteraceae) in the Lesotho Highlands: an anthropogenically introduced invasive or a niche coloniser?, published in Biological Invasions, confirms that a shrub believed to be an invasive in the eastern Lesotho Highlands has been growing in the region for over 4,000 years.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting the properties of subatomic particles using large scale computer simulationsPredicting the properties of subatomic particles before their experimental discovery has been a big challenge for physicists. Now, scientists from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research have predicted the quantum numbers of five Ω_c^0 baryons which have recently been discovered by an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. These results will help in understanding the nature of strong
22h
The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: Saddle Up
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deadline for race to host EU agencies after BrexitEuropean Union countries faced a deadline Monday to submit their bids to host the post-Brexit locations of key banking and medical agencies currently based in London.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change threatens some of the world's best winesMillions of people across Europe have experienced soaring temperatures in the summer of 2017, with sizzling barbeques, good food, and fine wine. But as both global and regional records are broken, the wine growers supplying these summer feasts are feeling the effects of climate change on their trade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why plants represent 'untapped potential' for innovative drug discoveryThe field of medicine has come a long way from using heroine as a cough remedy or magnet therapy to improve blood flow. These outdated methods were put to bed decades ago. But there are plenty of ancient medicinal practices that have stood the test of time. In fact, many of the life-saving pharmaceuticals we rely on today are derived from plants first discovered by indigenous communities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's the best way to rank research institutes?(Phys.org)—Assessing and ranking research institutes is important for awarding grants, recruiting employees, promoting institutes, and other reasons. But finding a fair and accurate method for assessing the performance of research institutes is challenging due to the many factors involved, such as the number of published papers and citations, the unreliability of some citations, and the fact that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research could make dew droplets so small, they're invisibleBy better understanding the behavior of water in its smallest form, a Virginia Tech professor and his undergraduate student could be improving the efficiency of removing condensation in a major way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What does trophy hunting contribute to wild lion conservation?Trophy hunting of lions, the killing of selected individual animals for sport, is highly controversial, and there is much debate about what it contributes to conservation. A new article highlights significant 'unknowns' that thwart conservationists from making any robust conclusions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metal instability achieves energy-efficient nanotechnologyResearchers show their nanowire resonators can be used to miniaturize energy-efficient electronics.
22h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Release Your InhibitionsA drug commonly used to treat clinical depression sets its effects in motion by hampering the release of an inhibitory neurotransmitter in mice.
22h
Ingeniøren
Indien sætter solceller på togeneIndens statsejede jernbaneselskab, Indian Railways, har som de første i verden idriftsat tog, der bliver drevet af solceller.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Always take the weather with youThe advent of mobile communications devices and in particular the internet-connected smart phone and tablet means that users can have access to almost any information they desire with the tap or swipe of a screen. That evergreen conversational topic, the weather forecast, is perhaps one of the most universally accessed pieces of information that people access. Now, writing in the International Jou
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making clothes from milkIn the EU, residents waste an estimated 88 million tonnes of food every year, according to the latest estimates. That is roughly 170 kilogrammes per person. But what if scientists could turn some of that waste into useful products?
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop ranking system to scale the impact of alien speciesA transparent ranking system for measuring the socio-economic impact of plants and animals that are introduced by humans to areas where they do not naturally occur (termed "aliens") has been developed by an international team of scientists, from UCL, Université de Fribourg and Stellenbosch University.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists make laser-induced graphene from woodRice University scientists have made wood into an electrical conductor by turning its surface into graphene.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What does trophy hunting contribute to wild lion conservation?Trophy hunting of lions, the killing of selected individual animals for sport, is highly controversial, and there is much debate about what it contributes to conservation. A new article highlights significant 'unknowns' that thwart conservationists from making any robust conclusions.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough software teaches computer characters to walk, run, even play soccerComputer characters and eventually robots could learn complex motor skills like walking and running through trial and error, thanks to a milestone algorithm developed by a University of British Columbia researcher.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research could make dew droplets so small, they're invisibleVirginia Tech researchers expect that the findings will maximize the efficiency of jumping-droplet condensers, which could make power plants more efficient and enable robust anti-fogging and self-cleaning surfaces.
23h
Popular Science
Why your muscles hurt so much the day after you work out Ask Us Anything Next time: Slow and steady. It may seem counterproductive to not push yourself to the limit when trying to get fit, but slow and steady wins the race when it comes to avoiding soreness. Read on.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Space Launch System—the most powerful rocket ever builtNASA is in an awkward in-between time right now. Since the beginning of the space age, the agency has had the ability to send its astronauts into space. The first American to go to space, Alan Shepard, did a suborbital launch on board a Mercury Redstone rocket in 1961.
23h
Feed: All Latest
The Super Cute Porgs of 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Will Give BB-8 a Run for Its MoneyIf there's a cuteness race in the world of Star Wars, these puffin-like creatures could take the lead in December.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery and Scripps seek to tie up in $12 billion TV dealDiscovery Communications will buy Scripps Networks for close to $12 billion, tying together two powerful stables of TV shows ranging from Animal Planet to the Food Network.
23h
Gizmodo
Blade Runner 2049 Will Be Missing One Much-Hated Element From the Original Image: Warner Bros. Joe Mangianello is very close-lipped about The Batman . Some Marvel concept has been revealed to the world at large. And news about when Misha Collins will return to Supernatural . Spoilers ahead! Blade Runner 2049 In an interview with Collider , Denis Villeneuve confirmed there will be no narration in the film. That’s a joke I made with Harrison Ford when he came to do his AD
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU study shows muted stress response linked to long-term cannabis useA new study by Washington State University psychology researchers reveals a dampened physiological response to stress in chronic cannabis users. This is the first study to examine the effects of acute stress on salivary cortisol levels in chronic cannabis users compared to non-users.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are the world's highest paid football players overpaid? Big data says yesComputer scientists used machine learning and data science to analyze the salaries of professional football players. A computational model was developed to show the world's most overpaid and underpaid players, and to identify skills that can earn footballers more Euros.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Touring senior centers, interacting with residents positively impacts health studentsA new study has found that a community-based service learning experience involving greater interaction with older adults had a positive impact on career development for medical residents (physicians who have graduated from medical school and are starting work at a healthcare facility under supervision).
23h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #11: Drømmer robotter om jazz?Podcast: Robotter kan have en blød krop som en hoppeborg fuld af luft. Og de kan improvisere jazzmusik i et tæt samarbejde med musikere af kød og blod. Ja, en robot er faktisk allerede den tredje arm på en enkelt trommeslager i et nyt menneske-maskine samarbejde, hvor en kreativ kunstig intellige...
23h
The Atlantic
ISIS Attacks the Iraqi Embassy in Kabul Afghan official say they killed three militants who attacked the Iraqi Embassy in Kabul Monday, an operation that highlights the precarious security situation in the Afghan capital 16 years after the U.S.-led invasion. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack in which a suicide bomber detonated a device outside the entrance to the embassy. Three militants then entered the compound and engaged i
23h
New Scientist - News
Jellyfish blooms linked to offshore gas platforms and wind farmsVast blooms of jellyfish are becoming increasingly common – perhaps because human-made offshore platforms act as ideal nursery grounds for young jellies
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snakebites are rarer than you think, but CPR can save your lifeDespite the common belief that Australia has some of the most venomous snakes in the world, our new research shows being bitten by a snake is uncommon in Australia and dying from a snakebite is very rare.
23h
Ars Technica
The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes Nota bene: This is the concluding part of the surprisingly interesting history of the IBM PC. You should probably read part one of the story if you haven't already. In November 1979, Microsoft's frequent partner Seattle Computer Products released a standalone Intel 8086 motherboard for hardcore hobbyists and computer manufacturers looking to experiment with this new and very powerful CPU. The 808
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pig-hunting dogs and humans are at risk of a disease that can cause miscarriages and infertilityA disease called swine brucellosis is emerging in New South Wales, carried by feral pigs. Endemic to feral pigs in Queensland, and sometimes infecting the dogs used to hunt them, it can be transmitted to humans through blood contact with infected pigs. A number of people have already been infected in NSW.
23h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Blowing Out The Last Of Their Fire HD 10s For $120, While Supplies Last Refurb Amazon Fire HD 10 , $120 Amazon appears to have killed off the Fire HD 10, which is a shame, because it was a really solid full-sized tablet for the money. Luckily, you still have a chance to get one as Amazon is clearing out refurbs for just $120 today . That’s $80 less than the usual refurb price, and $110 less than what Amazon used to charge for new ones.
23h
Ars Technica
RX Vega 64 and RX Vega 56: AMD will “trade blows” with GTX 1080 for $499 Enlarge RX Vega 64 Liquid Cooled Edition. RX Vega—AMD's long awaited follow up to the two-year-old Fury and Fury X high-performance graphics cards—launches on August 14 in two core versions: the $499 Radeon RX Vega 64, and the $399 Radeon RX Vega 56 (UK prices TBC). A limited edition version of RX Vega 64, which features a slick aluminium shroud, costs $599 as part of a bundle that includes disco
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds aardvarks suffering as African climate heats upA new study says hotter temperatures caused by climate change are taking their toll on the aardvark, whose diet of ants and termites is becoming scarcer because of reduced rainfall.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the search for mythical monsters can help conservation in the real worldAfter fears the Loch Ness Monster had "disappeared" last winter, a new sighting in May 2017 was celebrated by its enthusiasts. The search for monsters and mythical creatures (or "cryptids") such as Nessie, the Yeti or Bigfoot is known as "cryptozoology".
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature provides a key to repelling liquidsInspired by nature, an inexpensive green technique that enables common materials to repel liquid has been developed by KAUST scientists and could lead to diverse applications from underwater drag reduction to antifouling.
23h
Futurity.org
Telescoping design would make awesome robots Researchers have created a way to design telescoping structures that can twist and bend, which could allow the creation of robots that collapse themselves to make transport easier or stretch out to reach over large obstacles. The researchers devised algorithms that can take a suggested shape that includes curves or twists and design a telescoping structure to match. They also created a design too
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guidelines for assessing orthostatic hypotension should be changed, new study recommendsA new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests that testing for the presence of orthostatic hypotension, a form of low blood pressure, be performed within one minute of standing after a person has been lying down. Current guidelines recommend taking the measurement three minutes after a person stands up.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover biomarkers which could lead to better treatments for CF patientsResearchers have identified two new biological markers of cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which affects children and young adults, leaving them with lifelong health complications including digestive problems and persistent lung infections.The findings, published in the journal ACS Central Science, shed new light on the underlying mechanisms of CF and could lead to improved prognosis and be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Toward a better sweat test for babies with cystic fibrosisCystic fibrosis (CF) is an incurable genetic disease in which patients have chronic lung infections. The sooner CF is diagnosed, the better the symptoms can be managed. But current tests can give ambiguous results that do not reflect disease progression. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal a new type of sweat test that can overcome this challenge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there such a thing as a 'true self'?"To thine own self be true", the saying goes. It is often taken as sage advice, a remnant scrap of Elizabethan life coaching, but Shakespeare may have meant it to be heard as a stale platitude. He puts it in the mouth of Polonius, a windbag given to hackneyed pronouncements. But what is this true self to which we should be true?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simplifying the complexities of human traffickingHuman trafficking is much more than kidnapping and selling people. Those who commit labour exploitation can, for example, also be sentenced for human trafficking. Criminologist Masja van Meeteren hopes to simplify the complexity of the phenomenon by charting the different forms of labour exploitation.
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Ars Technica
LinkedIn: It’s illegal to scrape our website without permission LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner (left) and Chairman Reid Hoffman (right) with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella (center). Microsoft bought LinkedIn last year. (credit: Microsoft ) A small company called hiQ is locked in a high-stakes battle over Web scraping with LinkedIn. It's a fight that could determine whether an anti-hacking law can be used to curtail the use of scraping tools across the Web. HiQ scrapes
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The Atlantic
How Scared Should I Be of Macaroni and Cheese? Asking for a Friend, Being a first-time father to a 1.5-year-old child means addressing unexpected questions from the first-time grandparents of a 1.5-year-old child. My father sent my wife and me a somewhat guilty-sounding email about the latest New York Times scare piece on the topic of mac and cheese, a foodstuff he presents to my son when he visits their home each week ... I would love your t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Downsizing cost trap awaits retirees – five reasons to be waryIt's time to debunk the myth of zero housing costs in retirement if we want to understand why retirees resist downsizing. Retirees have at least five reasons to be wary of the costs of downsizing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Super-intelligence and eternal life—transhumanism's faithful follow it blindly into a future for the eliteThe rapid development of so-called NBIC technologies – nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science – are giving rise to possibilities that have long been the domain of science fiction. Disease, ageing and even death are all human realities that these technologies seek to end.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Editing human embryos with CRISPR is moving ahead – now's the time to work out the ethicsThe announcement by researchers in Portland, Oregon that they've successfully modified the genetic material of a human embryo took some people by surprise.
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Feed: All Latest
Strange, Twisted Fragments of Bullets After They Hit TargetsGarrett Hansen photographs mangled bullets from a local firing range.
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Feed: All Latest
Facebook and Google Policing the Web Will Do More Harm Than GoodOpinion: A new German law could curtail free speech on social media sites.
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Futurity.org
Confidence fuels activity for people with arthritis Osteoarthritis patients who feel more confident in their abilities in the morning are more physically active over the course of the day, new research suggests. The findings suggest that self-efficacy—one’s confidence in their ability to do something—influences physical activity independent from other such factors as pain, mood, and support from others. “It’s all about what you think you’re able t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For bacteria, smaller is better for causing superbug infectionsScientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered a new insight into how one of the most common hospital superbugs causes infections – something which could be used to develop new antibiotic treatments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The global food system still benefits the rich at the expense of the poorRamen noodles in Sweden, wheat bread in Tanzania and Chilean wines in China. The cross-Atlantic transit of the potato and the tomato from the Andes to Europe, and back again as French fries and pasta sauce. We think of the world as globalised and sophisticated in its food tastes, and our palettes as curious and ever-expanding. Food spreads cultural acceptance and understanding.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The outer galaxyThe sun is located inside one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way galaxy, roughly two-thirds of the way from the galactic center to the outer regions. Because we are inside the galaxy, obscuration by dust and the confusion of sources along our lines-of-sight make mapping the galaxy a difficult task. Astronomers think that the galaxy is a symmetric spiral, and about 10 years ago, CfA astronomers To
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Art of NeuroscienceThe winners of an annual contest capture the brain at its most beautiful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Sprække i Preikestolen skal undersøges med ny teknikRisikoen for, at Norges kendteste fjeldplateau skal styrte ned i dalen, skal nu undersøges med ny teknik.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bryde's whales share secrets with their finsResearch into the long-term survival and abundance of the Hauraki Gulf's Bryde's whale population has used photographs of their fins to aid efforts in improving the management of the small population.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extraplanar diffuse ionized gas detected in a nearby galaxyA research group led by Erin Boettcher of the University of Wisconsin-Madison has detected and characterized an extraplanar diffuse ionized gas in the nearby galaxy Messier 83. The study, published July 25 on arXiv.org, provides important insights into kinematics of the diffuse gas in this galaxy.
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Ars Technica
What Fitbit needs to do to make a great smartwatch in 2017 (credit: Valentina Palladino) It's no secret that Fitbit is making a smartwatch. The company signaled its serious plans with the purchase of Pebble at 2016's end and the purchase of the lesser-known Vector shortly after. Fitbit was supposed to release a smartwatch this spring, but product issues delayed those plans. Rumors suggest we won't have to wait much longer, though, as the company may rele
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An evolutionary breakpoint in cell divisionJapanese researchers from Osaka University have discovered that the interaction between two proteins, M18BP1/KNL2 and CENP-A, is essential for cell division in various species except for mammals including human.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Development of novel electron microscopy techniques to extract obscured information on material propertiesNIMS researchers Bo Da (researcher at the RCAMC and the CMI2, MaDIS) and Hideki Yoshikawa (leader of the Surface Chemical Analysis Group) and a research group led by Shigeo Tanuma (NIMS Special Researcher), Kazuhito Tsukakoshi (MANA Principal Investigator, NIMS), Kazuyuki Watanabe (Professor, Tokyo University of Science) and Zejun Ding (Professor, University of Science and Technology of China) joi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modeling leads to a better understanding of the role El Niño plays in increasing rainfall along the Red Sea coastThe El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has been shown, for the first time, to play a role in increased rainfall and storms along the Red Sea and surrounding regions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Same-race friends, peers tied to puberty-related outcomes among black girlsGirls who develop early are better adjusted when their friends are on a similar timeframe for puberty and of the same race, a new study shows.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ældste spor af liv indkapslet i grønlandske ædelstenForskere har fundet de ældste spor af liv indkapslet i 3,7 milliarder år gamle ædelsten...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar eclipse a chance to study life's resilienceOn August 21, as North America experiences its first total eclipse of the Sun in 38 years, astrobiologists are taking advantage of this rare celestial event to conduct experiments on life's ability to survive hostile conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clarifiying complex chemical processes with quantum computersScience and the IT industry have high hopes for quantum computing, but descriptions of possible applications tend to be vague. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now come up with a concrete example that demonstrates what quantum computers will actually be able to achieve in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smarter electrification—providing energy isn't enoughFour years ago life in Pulau Bau, a village on a tiny island off North Maluku in Indonesia, was transformed. The community was supplied with electricity via small-scale diesel generators and a state-of-the-art solar energy system with battery backup.
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Live Science
Super Schnozzle: Tiny, Glow-in-the-Dark Shark Has a Huge NoseA glow-in-the-dark shark that has a mouthful of pointy teeth and an impressively large bulbous nose is also quite small — about the weight of a pineapple, according to a new study.
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Live Science
In Photos: The World's Largest Bony FishOcean sunfish are the world's largest bony fish, weighing up to a whopping 2,205 pounds and measuring more than 8 feet long. Now, scientists have discovered a new species of this monstrous fish hiding in plain sight.
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Live Science
New Sunfish Species Is 8 Feet Long and Looks Like a Giant PancakeThis fish looks like a head with fins.
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Live Science
Sticky, Gooey Science! Why Slime Is AwesomeSlime's slippery, gooey texture helps certain animals fend off predators or fight disease. It's also a lot of fun to make, as Live Science recently demonstrated.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Coming Soon? A Solar Eclipse Near YouUse the interactive map below to find the next solar spectacular in your region -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest
Trump Wants the EPA Radon Program Cut. So Do Some ScientistsA rising chorus of radiation professionals says the way the US measures radiation risk is all wrong.
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Feed: All Latest
The Man Who Calls His Trolls to Talk It OutNight Vale Presents’ latest podcast tries to humanize harassers through in-depth conversations
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Feed: All Latest
Canceling Your Tesla Model 3 Deposit? Don't Count on a Timely RefundTesla is taking weeks or months longer than promised to refund Model 3 deposits. Why so long?
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Feed: All Latest
What Google's New Autoplay Experiment Means for the Future of SearchThe search giant gives users another reason to try out the competition
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Live Science
Curious Kids: What Started the Big Bang?This is one of the two questions I get asked a lot (the other one is: do aliens exist?) Both are very good questions!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers re-classify mistaken-identity mushroomsSome discoveries come from the stars – and some from beneath our feet.
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Science : NPR
Why We All Scream When We Get Ice Cream Brain Freeze When temperatures soar, there's nothing like a frozen treat to take off the edge. But if we dive in too fast, our brains are thrown for a distressing and sometimes painful loop. Here's why. (Image credit: Ashlie Stevens/WFPL)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Diamond joins the realm of 2-D thin films, study suggestsScientists squeezed graphene sheets into diamondene.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Need to Move Fast and Break ThingsResearch labs should take a page from the tech companies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Japans debut i det private rumkapløb blev en fuserRaketten Momo fra japansk startup nåede kun en højde af cirka 40 kilometer. Firmaet regner alligevel med at nå rummet inden udgangen af 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Addressing root causes of forest firesIn a new video, the European Forest Institute (EFI) looks at the key factors of increased forest fire risk in the Mediterranean region and advocates for a new vision based on shifting the focus from reactive fire suppression to long-term proactive fire prevention and forest management at the landscape scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printing technologies transport students to ancient greeceThe use of 3-D printing technologies in Victoria University of Wellington's Classics Museum has students using ancient Greek artefacts the way they were intended—from interacting with 3-D printed ancient objects to designing their own amphorae (storage jars).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early example of a local nautical map from Hispanic AmericaIn the last third of the 16th century, the Spanish crown launched a project to obtain a complete map of the New World. The project used surveys known as Relaciones Geográficas. A questionnaire with more than 50 questions was sent to each settlement. These also had to be completed with a map of the local region. These maps, known as pinturas (paintings), lacked ground measurements and therefore sca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Broadband light sources with liquid coreResearch scientists from Jena have produced broadband laser light in the mid-infrared range with the help of liquid-filled optical fibers. The experiment produced proof of a new dynamics of hybrid solitons—temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting from the unique characteristics of the liquid core.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interactive protein posttranslational modifications regulate stress responsesMethylation and nitric oxide (NO)-based S-nitrosylation are highly conserved protein posttranslational modifications that regulate diverse biological processes, including abiotic stress responses. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms.
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New Scientist - News
Taking back control must not mean a return to overfishingThe return of North Sea cod to sustainable status has been greeted with glee in the UK. We must not let Brexit jeopardise this success
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists determine algae biofuel compositionScientists have used high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine the composition of a biofuel obtained from the microalgae Spirulina platensis. The researchers studied two biofuel fractions obtained using a special algal mass treatment method. The researchers also proved that biofuel has little to do with oil in terms of its composition. However, it is similar to the "brilliant green" antisepti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intermittent attention, poor memory shape public perceptions of inflationDo you know your country's current inflation rate? What do you think it will be in the future? And how do you, personally, try to plan your finances accordingly?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean circulation, coupled with trade wind changes, efficiently limits shifting of tropical rainfall patternsThe Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), also known as the doldrums, is one of the dramatic features of Earth's climate system. Prominent enough to be seen from space, the ITCZ appears in satellite images as a band of bright clouds around the tropics. Here, moist warm air accumulates in this atmospheric region near the equator, where the ocean and atmosphere heavily interact. Intense solar radia
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Kan vi bremse næste istid med CO2?En læser vil gerne vide, om vi kan styre uden om næste istid ved at forøge CO2-niveauet i atmosfæren. Det svarer professor fra NBI på.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel technique using graphene to create solar cellsImagine a future in which solar cells are all around us—on windows and walls, cell phones, laptops, and more. A new flexible, transparent solar cell developed at MIT is bringing that future one step closer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flavor scientists create a lexicon of terms to describe nuances of rumAficionados use words like "oaky" to describe some wines, or "hoppy" when talking about certain beers. But for rum—a product with over 1,000 different varieties—putting the words together to describe what imbibers are smelling and tasting is a bit more difficult.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Vita dockingReplay of the docking of the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft to the International Space Station with ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik and Roscosmos commander Sergey Ryazansky. The astronauts were launched to Space Station on 28 July from Baikonur Cosmodrome.
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The Atlantic
Why Americans Get Conned Again and Again For decades, Donald Trump has been compared to the legendary showman P.T. Barnum. Trump himself has publicly embraced being likened to a man described by historians as “ vulgar, childish, surely just a little crooked .” His willingness to invoke that set of values—quite different from the Horatio Alger-style “luck and pluck” that serve as an unofficial national ethos—may be what his supporters ar
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The Atlantic
The Decline of the American Laundromat Lavanderia, one of San Francisco’s largest laundromats, is an urban relic. Its peeling aquamarine walls house some 110 machines. Telenovelas play on a TV and arcade games from the 1990s are tucked into unexpected nooks. After opening in 1991, Lavanderia—like so many other laundromats in big cities—became a social hub in a neighborhood where renters lacked the space or funds for their own machines
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Science | The Guardian
How to conquer our obsession with eternal life | Matt Haig Our anti-ageing quest only increases anxiety, says Matt Haig. Instead, we need to understand the tricks of time As a culture, we are obsessed with ageing. We have always been obsessed but now, paradoxically, in an era where we live longer than ever, we fear it more than ever before too. There is, of course, a whole industry devoted to capitalising on our fears of the natural ageing process and it
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Gizmodo
William Shatner Attacks Snowflakes, Social Justice Warriors, and Misandrists William Shatner as Captain Kirk in the classic 1968 anti-Nazi Star Trek episode, Patterns of Force (five years after the production of his best known film, Operation Bikini) William Shatner, perhaps best known as the narrator of the 1963 film Operation Bikini , is at it again. This time he’s taken aim at the snowflakes, misandrists, and social justice warriors (SJWs) that have annoyed him so much
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geologist offers new clues to cause of world's greatest extinctionA study by a researcher in the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences offers new clues to what may have triggered the world's most catastrophic extinction, nearly 252 million years ago.
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The Atlantic
The Downsides of John Kelly's Ascension Donald Trump is not much of a man. He feels sorry for himself, he whines, he gropes women; he bullies the weak. He brags and he lies. As a young man, this self-proclaimed athlete collected five draft deferments rather than wear his country’s uniform. He doesn’t even work out. The motto emblazoned on Trump’s bogus coat of arms should probably be “faithless,” which makes it odd that he has picked a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geologists offer new clues to cause of world's greatest extinctionA study by a researcher in the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences offers new clues to what may have triggered the world's most catastrophic extinction, nearly 252 million years ago.
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Science : NPR
New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks The new bill was pushed by a conservative group critical of the way evolution, climate change and government were being taught in Florida schools. (Image credit: Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR
Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds Data from nearly 43,000 men around the world found that sperm counts dropped by more than half in Western countries. It could reflect a decline in health overall, scientists say. (Image credit: Hanna Barczyk for NPR)
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Ingeniøren
Hør solvindens susen: Amerikaner sætter lyd på videnskabelige dataAmerikansk musikteknolog omformer datasæt fra neutronstjerner, solvinde og havets dyb til små musikstykker. Ideen er, at lydindtryk kan give ny forståelse af ellers kun visuelle data.
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rambøll, Ambu og Forsvaret har flere ledige job På dagens liste er der bud efter en bred vifte af ingeniører. Som eksempelvis drift- og testingeniører, projektledere og elektroingeniører. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-ramboell-ambu-forsvaret-har-flere-ledige-job-9281 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo
That Viral Photo of Theresa May With The Scream Painting is Totally Fake Have you seen that photo of Theresa May and her fellow Tories in front of the Edvard Munch painting, The Scream? It’s going viral on Twitter at the moment . But sadly, it’s completely fake. The photo actually dates back to September 2016 and shows British Prime Minister Theresa May with 27 cabinet members. The photo took some heat when it was first released for showing a “genuinely impressive lac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People find it difficult to judge how good their intuitions areWhether people believe they are 'intuitive' or not may have no bearing on how they perform in tasks that require intuition, according to new research by psychologists at the University of Kent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ex-NASA agent fears gold lunar module will be melted downWhoever broke into an Ohio museum and stole a solid-gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module likely intends to melt it down for the value of the gold instead of trying to sell what could be a collectible worth millions of dollars, said a retired NASA agent who has helped recover stolen moon rocks worth millions of dollars.
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Science-Based Medicine
Abraham Cherrix is alive and well because of science-based medicineAlthough I haven't discussed it here in depth, the case of Abraham Cherrix is an instructive example. Eleven years ago, he and his parents chose quackery over science-based medicine to treat his cancer. He's alive now because he finally realized the error of his decision and underwent chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drifting word meanings may be creating two different political languagesIf the current political discourse sounds a little like people are speaking two different languages, Penn State psychologists, who studied political rhetoric over the past three presidential elections, say that may be close to the case, semantically speaking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quasars may answer how starburst galaxies were extinguishedSome of the biggest galaxies in the universe are full of extinguished stars. But nearly 12 billion years ago, soon after the universe first was created, these massive galaxies were hotspots that brewed up stars by the billions.
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Are you smarter than a forester? A puzzle about planting trees UPDATE: You can read the solution here. Hello guzzlers, Your mission today is to design an arrangement of trees on a desert island, like the one below. Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren
Fire løgne du aldrig må fortælle chefen Løgne kan være fristende til at bortforklare fravær eller personlige brølere, men fanges du i en løgn, kan konsekvensen være en fyring. Jobfinder giver dig fire løgne, som du især skal holde dig fra. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fire-loegne-du-aldrig-maa-fortaelle-chefen-9280 Emner Arbejdsmarked Arbejdsmiljø Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
It-ekspert: Offentlig software er ikke skrevet for medarbejdernes skyld Det er ikke underligt, hvis sagsbehandlere, læger og skat-medarbejdere ikke føler, at deres hverdag bliver nemmere med ny offentlig it. Det er nemlig ikke meningen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/it-ekspert-offentlig-software-ikke-skrevet-medarbejdernes-skyld-1078676 Version2
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The Atlantic
Game of Thrones: All the Queens’ Men Every week for the seventh season of Game of Thrones , Lenika Cruz , David Sims , and Spencer Kornhaber will discuss new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we'll be posting our thoughts in installments. Lenika Cruz: Three episodes into this season, I’m still getting used to just how much more quickly things are unfolding on Game of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sad! Drifting word meanings may be creating two different political languagesIf the current political discourse sounds a little like people are speaking two different languages, Penn State psychologists, who studied political rhetoric over the past three presidential elections, say that may be close to the case, semantically speaking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise incentives do little to spur gym-going, study showsEven among people who had just joined a gym and expected to visit regularly, getting paid to exercise did little to make their commitment stick, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women show cognitive advantage in gender-equal countriesWomen's cognitive functioning past middle age may be affected by the degree of gender equality in the country they live in, according to new findings from Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quasars may answer how starburst galaxies were extinguishedUniversity of Iowa astronomers have located quasars inside four dusty starburst galaxies. The observations suggest quasars may starve this type of galaxy of energy needed to form stars. Results published in the Astrophysical Journal.
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New on MIT Technology Review
These New Devices Promise to Fight Pain without OpioidsCompanies want to replace addictive painkillers and help people detox from opioids.
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Ingeniøren
Svalbards frøbank lider under dyr byggebommertTunnelen ind til Svalbards globale frøbank indeholder unødige varmekilder og leder vand fra optøet permafrost tæt på de vigtige frø.
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Gizmodo
Game of Thrones Finally Gave Us the Moment We've All Been Waiting For Man, I wish I hadn’t used the word “satisfying” to describe last week’s episode, because good lord, tonight—tonight was the night Game of Thrones fans ( to say nothing of A Song of Ice and Fire fans! ) have been looking forward to since the series began. Ice and Fire finally met in Dragonstone, and it was just as wonderful and powerful and awkward as I’d hoped it would be. Meanwhile, Cersei is al
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
GP-based testing for HIV is cost-effectiveOffering HIV testing to people at health checks when they register at a new GP surgery in high-prevalence areas is cost-effective and will save lives, according to a study involving over 86,000 people from 40 GP surgeries.
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The Atlantic
Four Positive Developments—and a Negative One Two weeks ago I wrote about the things that had gone as expected in the Trump era—namely, the character and conduct of the man himself—plus a roundup of parts of the civic fiber that were responding more healthily than one might have expected, under unusual stress. Here are few other illustrations of what they call in the aeronautics world “positive dynamic stability”: That is, a system that push
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New Scientist - News
HIV testing at some GP surgeries would save lives and NHS moneyRoutinely testing for HIV in some areas of England would cost the NHS more at first, but save money in the longer term by finding and treating unknown cases
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Futurity.org
Glial cells botch wiring in childhood schizophrenia Malfunctioning glial cells that keep nerve cells from forming working communication networks may be the basis of the wiring problems in the brains of people with schizophrenia, new research suggests. “The inability of these cells to do their job…appears to be a primary contributor to the disease.” When researchers transplanted human brain cells generated from individuals diagnosed with childhood-
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Futurity.org
Babies learn what we like by watching us closely New research suggests that, behind their chubby cheeks and bright eyes, babies as young as eight months are watching and thinking about our behavior patterns, logging our every move, and making odds on what we’re most likely to do next based on their perceptions of our preferences. Infants as young as eight months are already developing the ability to see the world through someone else’s eyes… “E
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Futurity.org
This blood test could fight antibiotic resistance Antibiotics are lifesaving drugs, but overuse is leading to one of the world’s most pressing health threats: antibiotic resistance. Researchers are developing a tool to help physicians prescribe antibiotics to patients who really need them—and avoid giving them to individuals who don’t. Antibiotic resistant bacteria cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths each year in the United Sta
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The Atlantic
The Final Humiliation of Reince Priebus Six years ago, a humble party hack from Kenosha, Wisconsin, took on the thankless job of turning around the Republican Party. As he exits the White House—battered, bruised, and humiliated—Reince Priebus argues he accomplished just what he set out to do. “We won,” Priebus told me in an interview. Calling from the golf course on Sunday afternoon, he sounded both defiant and relieved. “Winning is wh
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Elephants in Malawi relocated as part of conservation projectRangers in Malawi take on the mammoth task of moving hundreds of elephants into safer national parks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GP-based testing for HIV is cost-effective and should be rolled out in local authoritiesOffering HIV testing to people at health checks when they register at a new GP surgery in high-prevalence areas is cost-effective and will save lives, according to a study involving over 86,000 people from 40 GP surgeries, led by Queen Mary University of London and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
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Science | The Guardian
HIV tests for GPs' new patients could save lives and money, says study Researchers find fourfold increase in diagnosis rate when testing carried out as part of surgeries’ registration health check Offering routine HIV tests to people when they register with new GP surgeries in high-risk areas is cost-effective and could save lives, a study has shown. The researchers are calling for HIV screening to be introduced in all 74 local authorities in England with high rates
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Gizmodo
Travis Kalanick Is Already Plotting His Return to Power at Uber Photo: AP Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is down, but he somehow does not yet consider himself out, according to a Sunday report in the New York Times . Kalanick, who resigned in June amid widespread reports he let a culture of sexual harassment run rampant at the company and lawsuits by angry drivers , has apparently injected himself into the search for his replacement—and may have already scar
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