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Hundreds of Giant Seafloor Craters Produced By Explosive Methane Farts Several hundred craters were documented in the area, of which around one hundred were up to one kilometer wide. (Image: K. Andreassen/CAGE) Researchers working in the Barents Sea have discovered hundreds of craters on the Arctic Sea floor, some measuring over a kilometer in width. These craters, which date back to the end of the last Ice Age, were formed when large reserves of methane exploded in
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Deep in a mine, earthquake gold awaits
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Mysterious unchanging DNA finds a purpose in life
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NIH overhead plan draws fire
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Egyptian mummy DNA, at last
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Space ripples may untangle black hole tango
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Siberia yields earliest evidence for dog breeding
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The post-op brain
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Bat patrol
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Decoding the evolution of species
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Gearing up molecular rotary motors
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A microbiome variable in the HIV-prevention equation
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Applying plasmonics to a sustainable future
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Is ice sheet collapse in West Antarctica unstoppable?
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Committing to socially responsible seafood
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Making the rounds
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Idiosyncratic desires
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The pet trade's role in defaunation
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Sex matters: Report experimenter gender
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NextGen VOICES: Submit now!
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Chemical safety must extend to ecosystems
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Building coral skeletons
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A step on the path to a Lassa vaccine
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Coupled motion in a light-activated rotor
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Entangle, swap, purify, repeat
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Methane takes the quick way out
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Local specificity of growth signals
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Vaginal microbiome influences HIV acquisition
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Human impacts on rainfall distribution
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No escape for KRAS mutant tumors
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Loss of flight in the Galapagos cormorant
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The depths of an ancient lake on Mars
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Detecting unusual oscillations
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Localizing light at the nanometer scale
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Probing the structure of the magnetopause
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A versatile synthesis of pleuromutilin
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Will ice sheets collapse in West Antarctica?
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Differentiating myeloid cells
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Flexible geckos
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Arabidopsis out of Africa
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Greening the Antarctic
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Orchestrating pathogen defenses in the skin
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Milky Way satellites going in circles
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A quantum-well magnetic tunnel junction
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Less oxygen in a warmer ocean
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Structural basis for antibody-mediated neutralization of Lassa virus The arenavirus Lassa causes severe hemorrhagic fever and a significant disease burden in West Africa every year. The glycoprotein, GPC, is the sole antigen expressed on the viral surface and the critical target for antibody-mediated neutralization. Here we present the crystal structure of the trimeric, prefusion ectodomain of Lassa GP bound to a neutralizing antibody from a human survivor at 3.2-
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Entanglement distillation between solid-state quantum network nodes The impact of future quantum networks hinges on high-quality quantum entanglement shared between network nodes. Unavoidable imperfections necessitate a means to improve remote entanglement by local quantum operations. We realize entanglement distillation on a quantum network primitive of distant electron-nuclear two-qubit nodes. The heralded generation of two copies of a remote entangled state is
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Biological control of aragonite formation in stony corals Little is known about how stony corals build their calcareous skeletons. There are two prevailing hypotheses: that it is a physicochemically dominated process and that it is a biologically mediated one. Using a combination of ultrahigh-resolution three - dimensional imaging and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that mineral deposition is biological
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Vaginal bacteria modify HIV tenofovir microbicide efficacy in African women Antiretroviral-based strategies for HIV prevention have shown inconsistent results in women. We investigated whether vaginal microbiota modulated tenofovir gel microbicide efficacy in the CAPRISA (Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa) 004 trial. Two major vaginal bacterial community types—one dominated by Lactobacillus (59.2%) and the other where Gardnerella vaginalis predomina
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Bloch oscillations in the absence of a lattice The interplay of strong quantum correlations and far-from-equilibrium conditions can give rise to striking dynamical phenomena. We experimentally investigated the quantum motion of an impurity atom immersed in a strongly interacting one-dimensional Bose liquid and subject to an external force. We found that the momentum distribution of the impurity exhibits characteristic Bragg reflections at the
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Massive blow-out craters formed by hydrate-controlled methane expulsion from the Arctic seafloor Widespread methane release from thawing Arctic gas hydrates is a major concern, yet the processes, sources, and fluxes involved remain unconstrained. We present geophysical data documenting a cluster of kilometer-wide craters and mounds from the Barents Sea floor associated with large-scale methane expulsion. Combined with ice sheet/gas hydrate modeling, our results indicate that during glaciatio
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Observation of Anderson localization in disordered nanophotonic structures Anderson localization is an interference effect crucial to the understanding of waves in disordered media. However, localization is expected to become negligible when the features of the disordered structure are much smaller than the wavelength. Here we experimentally demonstrate the localization of light in a disordered dielectric multilayer with an average layer thickness of 15 nanometers, deep
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A modular and enantioselective synthesis of the pleuromutilin antibiotics The tricyclic diterpene fungal metabolite (+)-pleuromutilin has served as a starting point for antibiotic development. Semisynthetic modification of its glycolic acid subunit at C14 provided the first analogs fit for human use, and derivatization at C12 led to 12- epi -pleuromutilins with extended-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against Gram-negative pathogens. Given the inher
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Structure, force balance, and topology of Earths magnetopause The magnetopause deflects the solar wind plasma and confines Earth’s magnetic field. We combine measurements made by the four spacecraft of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission to demonstrate how the plasma and magnetic forces at the boundary affect the interaction between the shocked solar wind and Earth’s magnetosphere. We compare these forces with the plasma pressure and examine the electron
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Locked synchronous rotor motion in a molecular motor Biological molecular motors translate their local directional motion into ordered movement of other parts of the system to empower controlled mechanical functions. The design of analogous geared systems that couple motion in a directional manner, which is pivotal for molecular machinery operating at the nanoscale, remains highly challenging. Here, we report a molecular rotary motor that translate
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mTORC1 activity repression by late endosomal phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate Nutrient sensing by mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on lysosomes and late endosomes (LyLEs) regulates cell growth. Many factors stimulate mTORC1 activity, including the production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P 3 ] by class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) at the plasma membrane. We investigated mechanisms that repress mTORC1 under conditions of
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Webinar | Monitoring immune function by imaging flow cytometry
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Let's talk about language barriers
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A genetic signature of the evolution of loss of flight in the Galapagos cormorant We have a limited understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of evolutionary changes in the size and proportion of limbs. We studied wing and pectoral skeleton reduction leading to flightlessness in the Galapagos cormorant ( Phalacrocorax harrisi ). We sequenced and de novo assembled the genomes of four cormorant species and applied a predictive and comparative genomics approach to find can
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Redox stratification of an ancient lake in Gale crater, Mars In 2012, NASA’s Curiosity rover landed on Mars to assess its potential as a habitat for past life and investigate the paleoclimate record preserved by sedimentary rocks inside the ~150-kilometer-diameter Gale impact crater. Geological reconstructions from Curiosity rover data have revealed an ancient, habitable lake environment fed by rivers draining into the crater. We synthesize geochemical and
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Erratum for the Research Article "Cassini finds molecular hydrogen in the Enceladus plume: Evidence for hydrothermal processes" by J. H. Waite, C. R. Glein, R. S. Perryman, B. D. Teolis, B. A. Magee, G. Miller, J. Grimes, M. E. Perry, K. E. Miller, A. Bouquet, J. I. Lunine, T. Brockwell, S. J. Bolton
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Erratum for the Letter "Brazil's public universities in crisis" by C. C. Siqueira and C. F. D. Rocha
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Popular Science

Intel’s new chip puts a teraflop in your desktop. Here's what that means Technology It's as fast as a turn-of-the-century supercomputer. Earlier this week in Taipei, Intel announced the most powerful desktop chip for consumers that it has ever sold. With 18 cores and a price tag of $1,999, the processor…
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China is developing a warship of naval theorists' dreams From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal An arsenal ship that can be submerged in water. The Chinese navy is taking arsenal ships in a new direction—as giant submersibles. Read on.
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Gizmodo

This Under-$50 Philips Beard, Stubble, and Body Trimmer Belongs In Your Bathroom Multigroom Beard, Stubble and Body Trimmer , $50 Keep up your appearances for less with the Philps Norelco Multigroom Beard, Stubble and Body Trimmer . This under-$50, dual-sided trimmer allows you to focus your attention below the neck and deserves a solid place in your bathroom arsenal. This is part of a Gold Box , so this price will wash down the drain at the end of the day. There are also som
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The Atlantic

Sheryl Sandberg’s Advice for Grieving, Cont’d A few weeks ago, I interviewed the Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg about her new book Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy , which describes how she learned to move forward in the wake of her husband’s sudden death. Katherine Shear, of the Center for Complicated Grief , responds: I read your article “ Sheryl Sandberg’s Advice for Grieving ” in The Atlantic and I want to t
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The Atlantic

House of Cards Season 5, Episode 10: The Live-Binge Review As in previous years , I’m binge-reviewing the latest season of Netflix’s House of Cards , the TV show that helped popularize the idea of “binge watching” when it premiered in 2013. Don’t read farther than you’ve watched. (The whole series will appear here .) Episode 10 (Chapter 62) “The dead sleep with their eyes open,” Frank said to start this hour. “‘Left for dead’ is an ancient concept,” Clai
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Big fish in big trouble in EuropeMany large fish species, including many of the sharks and rays of Europe, are threatened with extinction. Confirming the findings of previous studies, scientists highlight regional differences in fish stock status in Europe and point to overfishing in the Mediterranean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremes2016 hurricane season started in January and ended 318 days later in late-November. Hurricane Matthew was the first Category 5 in a decade, the longest stretch without one since 1950.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Steep declines in Kauai's seabird populations, radar revealsThe island of Kauai is home to two endangered seabirds, the Hawaiian Petrel and the Newell's Shearwater. Monitoring these birds, which are nocturnal and nest in hard-to-access areas, is challenging, but observing the movements of birds via radar offers a solution. A new study takes a fresh look at two decades of radar data -- and comes to worrying conclusions about the status of both species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third timeThe Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened. As was the case with the first two detections, the waves were generated when two black holes collided to form a larger black hole.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Almost a quarter of adolescents in Austria are currently suffering from a mental health problem23.93% of all adolescents in Austria are currently suffering from a mental health problem, over a third of all adolescents have had a mental health problem at some stage in their lives. That is the central finding of the first Austria-wide epidemiological study into the prevalence of mental health problems in Austria.
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Ars Technica

A new contract highlights the difference between “new” and “old” space Enlarge / An Atlas V rocket is rolled out to the launch pad in March, 2016. (credit: NASA) On May 15, SpaceX launched its heaviest payload ever to geosynchronous transfer orbit, a vantage point far above the Earth. Because the Inmarsat satellite weighed more than six tons, it was originally scheduled to launch on SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket. Back when the launch contract was signed in 2014, neit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RIT scientists measure black hole's tilt and spin for clues to how massive stars dieRIT scientists working with the LIGO Scientific Collaboration measured and interpreted the spin and alignment of a newly formed black hole detected on Jan. 4 by LIGO. The RIT team also simulated the gravitational wave signal produced in the collision that formed the new black hole.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zinc's negative effects on mineral digestibility can be mitigated, study showsResearchers at the University of Illinois have shown that a common strategy for reducing postweaning digestive problems in pigs may have negative effects on calcium and phosphorus digestibility, and are suggesting management practices to counteract the effects.
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Gizmodo

Here's Where Gorillaz Get All Their Unusual Samples GIF GIF: YouTube Daft Punk isn’t the only musical group who packs its hits full of obscure and eclectic samples. Gorillaz have been borrowing funky beats and catchy rhythms from other artists for over 16 years now, and YouTube’s Kirima Nagi has found the source of almost every last one in this comprehensive quarter-hour video . All five of the group’s studio albums are dissected here, and at time
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Live Science

Lost Since World War II, Egyptian Artifact Returns to GermanyA vivid, turquoise-colored carving from ancient Egypt has been returned to a Berlin museum more than 70 years after it was thought to have been lost during World War II.
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The Atlantic

The Accidental Killing of Philippine Troops A Philippines government airstrike targeting Islamist militants who have overrun a city in the country’s south accidentally killed at least 10 of the government’s own troops, authorities confirmed Thursday. “There were two planes flying and the first plane dropped their ordnance accurately, but the second missed and hit our troops,” Delfin Lorenzana, the country’s defense secretary, said during a
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The Atlantic

Infrared Saunas Will Not 'Detoxify' You In a basement in Manhattan, people are sweating. And—this may interest you—they’re naked. They’re sweating to detox, to lose weight, to improve their complexions, and to experience euphoria, and if you listen to purveyors of infrared saunas they’re going to achieve not only that, but also more. They’re going to improve their circulation, they’re going to relieve their pain, and they’re going to e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists slash computations for deep learningRice University computer scientists have adapted a widely used technique for rapid data lookup to slash the amount of computation—and thus energy and time—required for deep learning, a computationally intense form of machine learning.
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Science | The Guardian

China and the EU confront Trump on climate change. May just fawns over him | Ed DaveyThe Paris agreement is facing a mortal, US-led threat. But at this crucial moment, our prime minister is, once again, absent, silent and weak The most important international agreement to tackle climate change is about to be dealt a severe blow – but Theresa May is nowhere to be found. Donald Trump is expected to withdraw the United States from the Paris agreement , in which 195 countries signed u
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Ars Technica

To kill net neutrality rules, FCC says broadband isn’t “telecommunications” Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Paul Taylor) The Federal Communications Commission's plan to gut net neutrality rules and deregulate the Internet service market may hinge on the definition of the word "broadband." In February 2015 , the FCC's then-Democratic leadership led by Chairman Tom Wheeler classified broadband as "telecommunications," superseding the previous treatment of broadband as a le
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U. scientists slash computations for deep learningRice University computer scientists have adapted a widely used technique for rapid data-lookup to slash the amount of computation -- and thus energy and time -- required for 'deep learning.' The research will be presented in August at the KDD 2017 conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy not associated with neonatal problems at 2-4 weeksBabies exposed to an antidepressant or a mood disorder during fetal life did not have any more signs of irritability, difficulty feeding, sleep disturbances and respiratory problems two to four weeks after birth than babies who were not exposed. Instead, the major factor associated with newborn problems was preterm birth, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prevention to precision, SWOG presents a raft of research at ASCO 2017Researchers from SWOG, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute, will participate in 32 presentations to be made at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world's largest clinical cancer research meeting, which runs June 2-6 in Chicago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

JetBlue, Delta will test biometric boarding passesBoarding passes could someday become quaint relics for air travelers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Muon g-2 experiment has begun its search for phantom particles with its world-famous and well-traveled electromagnetWhat do you get when you revive a beautiful 20-year-old physics machine, carefully transport it 3,200 miles over land and sea to its new home, and then use it to probe strange happenings in a magnetic field? Hopefully you get new insights into the elementary particles that make up everything.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saving lives and money: the potential of solar to replace coalBy swapping solar photovoltaics for coal, the US could prevent 51,999 premature deaths a year, potentially making as much as $2.5 million for each life saved.
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Science | The Guardian

Microsoft co-founder unveils world's biggest plane Paul Allen’s Stratolaunch, which has a 117m wingspan, is designed to send satellites into orbit The world’s biggest plane, boasting a 117-metre wingspan, has been launched by the Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The six-engine, dual-hulled Stratolaunch aircraft is designed to launch satellites into orbit. Launching the satellites on rockets while the Stratolaunch is in flight has the advantage of
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Ingeniøren

Alle gode gange tre for LIGO: Ny observation af kollision af sorte huller i en fjern galakseUgens videnskabelige nyhedsstrøm bød også på nyt om de gamle egyptere og en god oversigt om navngivning inden for partikelfysikken med forklaringer, der nok vil overraske de fleste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Depression 2E moving over Mexican state of OaxacaNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Depression 2E in infrared, visible and microwave light as it began its landfall on June 1, bringing heavy rains to southern Mexico.
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New Scientist - News

Photos of human faces reassembled from monkeys’ brain signalsCracking the code on how the brain is able to compute so many different kinds of faces has made it possible to recreate the faces shown to monkeys
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Popular Science

Hot water and antimicrobial soaps don’t get your hands any cleaner Health You're probably washing your hands wrong. The best way to wash your hands means using plain soap, comfortable water, and lathering for ten to twenty seconds.
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The Atlantic

The Puzzle of Housing Aging Sex Offenders When state officials finally released William Cubbage from the Iowa Mental Health Institute in 2010, they predicted he was too sick to hurt anyone again. But the octogenarian only became an even more notorious sex offender. Between 1987 and 2000, Cubbage was convicted in four separate cases of assault. Then, a year after his release, he molested a 95-year-old woman in a nursing home. Neither the
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Gizmodo

Chloe Grace Moretz Apologizes for Her New Animated Movie's Terrible, Body-Shaming Ad All Images: Locus Photos recently surfaced of a truly terrible advertising campaign at this year’s Cannes Film Festival for Red Shoes & the 7 Dwarfs , a 2018 animated film that’s being produced by South Korean studio Locus Corporation. Star Chloe Grace Moretz has come out and apologized for the now-canceled advertising campaign, which flat-out stated Snow White was “no longer beautiful” because s
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Neuroscientists rethink how the brain recognizes faces Brain cells in monkeys are tuned to react to specific combinations of features, rather than to a whole face. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22091
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Ars Technica

Got a face-recognition algorithm? Uncle Sam wants to review it Enlarge (credit: challenge.gov ) The nation's top-level intelligence office, the Director of National Intelligence , wants to find "the most accurate unconstrained face recognition algorithm." A branch of the office, which oversees the nation's spy agencies, is holding a contest toward that end, with submissions due no later than 2pm ET June 15. "Have you developed software to identity faces in g
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Live Science

Aliens Have Visited Earth, Space Entrepreneur Robert Bigelow BelievesAliens are among us. That's the gist of comments made by billionaire space entrepreneur Robert Bigelow on CBS' "60 Minutes" last night. But how likely is this claim to be true?
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New Scientist - News

Geoengineering fears make scrutiny of ocean seeding test vitalTalk of dumping iron into the ocean off Chile to boost plankton is a return of a controversial idea that warrants questions, says Olive Heffernan
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NeuWrite San Diego

Highs and LowsHave you ever heard about the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 fun? Don’t worry, this isn’t some scientific attempt to quantify fun and render it anything but. Type 1 fun is basically anything you do that is actually fun. Playing with puppies, hanging out with friends, annoying your significant other – that sort […]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Replacing coal with solar can save lives and moneyBy swapping solar photovoltaics for coal, the US could prevent 51,999 premature deaths a year, potentially making as much as $2.5 million for each life saved. A team from Michigan Technological University calculated US deaths per kilowatt hour per year for both coal and solar finding that tens of thousands of Americans die prematurely each year from air pollution-related diseases associated with b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combined optical and molecular imaging could guide breast-conserving surgeryBreast-conserving surgery is the primary treatment for early-stage breast cancer, but more accurate techniques are needed to assess resection margins during surgery to avoid the need for follow-up surgeries. Now, in a first-in-human study, British researchers have provided a possible solution using Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), which combines optical and molecular imaging. The study is cove
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sour taste cells detect waterNew research suggests that sour-sensing taste cells also help us detect, or taste, water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Muon magnet's moment has arrivedOn May 31, the 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet at the center of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab saw its first beam of muon particles from Fermilab's accelerators, kicking off a three-year effort to measure just what happens to those particles when placed in a stunningly precise magnetic field. The answer could rewrite scientists' picture of the universe and how it works.
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Gizmodo

Protect Yourself Against Ransomware With a Solid Backup System Image: AP Data backups can save your skin from all kinds of IT mishaps like dropping your laptop in a lake or having a virus blast through your hard drive. You should be backing everything up! Thanks to the recent spree of ransomware attacks, it’s once again time to evaluate your backup system, so you’re prepared in the event that some malicious actor locks up your computer. How ransomware works
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NYT > Science

You Look Familiar. Now Scientists Know Why.Researchers reported on Thursday that they had figured out how the brain stores and retrieves information about faces.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Depression 2E moving over Mexican state of OaxacaNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Depression 2E in infrared, visible and microwave light as it began its landfall on June 1, bringing heavy rains to southern Mexico.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emotions expressed by the dying are unexpectedly positiveFear of death is a fundamental part of the human experience -- we dread the possibility of pain and suffering and we worry that we'll face the end alone. Although thinking about dying can cause considerable angst, new research suggests that the actual emotional experiences of the dying are both more positive and less negative than people expect.
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Gizmodo

OneLogin Data Breach May Have Revealed Encrypted Data Photo: AP OneLogin, an identity management software company, announced yesterday that it suffered a data breach. Although the firm hasn’t provided many details, the few that it has released suggest that the breach is extensive. Customers were warned about the incident in an email yesterday, and OneLogin also posted a short blog post about the problem. A more detailed support page is accessible to
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Ars Technica

Quack trial to resurrect brain-dead folks revived with new location Enlarge (credit: Getty | diane39 ) Indian authorities last year pulled the plug on a dubious clinical trial aiming to reverse brain death in 20 people. But, it seems, the resolve of the trial’s leaders is undying. They have revived their plans and will announce a new trial in upcoming months that will take place somewhere in Latin America, Stat reports . The trial, led by Philadelphia-based biote
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Futurity.org

Volcanoes that made tectonic plate may go deeper than we thought Measurements of energy loss near the band of volcanoes that formed the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate in the Pacific Ocean indicate that the molten rock that formed the plate may extend much deeper under the ocean’s floor than previously thought. Several hundred miles off the Pacific Northwest coast, the Juan de Fuca Plate is slowly sliding under the North American continent. This subduction has cre
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The Atlantic

House of Cards Season 5, Episode 9: The Live-Binge Review As in previous years , I’m binge-reviewing the latest season of Netflix’s House of Cards , the TV show that helped popularize the idea of “binge watching” when it premiered in 2013. Don’t read farther than you’ve watched. (The whole series will appear here .) Episode 9 (Chapter 61) The yada, yada, yada continues. Frank and Claire won the Ohio revote and therefore the presidency—and all we need to
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The Atlantic

Wonder Woman, Heroine of the Post-Truth Age “You mean—you were lying ?” Wonder Woman asks Steve Trevor, a hero and a spy, in the new film that takes her name. The Amazon takes a moment to register his deception; the princess of Themyscira , having come to the world of men from the idyllic Paradise Island, is not accustomed to such manipulation. She pauses. “How do I know you’re not lying to me right now?” With that, the superhero removes a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interview: France warns of risk of war in cyberspaceCyberspace faces an approaching risk of "permanent war" between states and criminal or extremist organizations because of increasingly destructive hacking attacks, the head of the French government's cybersecurity agency warned Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Berlin homes to be heated with energy from wind powerSwedish utility company Vattenfall is investing almost 100 million euros ($112 million) to build a power-to-heat facility in the German capital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple readying Siri-powered home assistant: reportApple is preparing to launch a connected speaker to serve as a smart home assistant in a challenge to Amazon Echo and Google Home, a news report said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public confused by climate change messagesExperts, charities, the media and government confuse the public by speaking "different languages" on climate change, a new study says.The research team focussed on Colombia and likened climate change communication to a "broken phone".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremesThe 2016 Hurricane Season is the longest hurricane season since 1951, making the 2016 season the 2nd longest on record. That's the conclusion drawn in a paper just published in Geophysical Research Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor understanding of ratios leads to bad shopping decisions, study saysConsumers make poor purchase decisions when they need to work with ratios to assess a product's value, says a new study published in the May 2017 of the Journal of Marketing Behavior, from the University of Miami School of Business Administration. In situations where consumers must average ratio information, such as comparing the fuel efficiency of two cars using the ratio miles per gallon, they o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Expert in a suitcase' cuts power bills 10 percent in small commercial buildingsThe knowledge and expertise of a seasoned energy efficiency professional has been packed into a high-tech suitcase.
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists discover how the brain recognises faces – by reading monkey's minds Using brain waves researchers were able to make almost perfect replicas of human faces shown to monkeys – raising prospect of thoughts being accessible to exploration Scientists have created eerily perfect replicas of human faces that were shown to monkeys just from recording the animal’s brain waves, in one of the most impressive feats of mind reading to date. The demonstration solves one of the
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Popular Science

Climate change will mean more rain for some—and none for others Environment We need to figure out who gets floods and who gets drought. Researchers studied the link between ancient climate and rainfall to predict what will happen as the climate warms. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New human studies show multiple health benefits from consuming mangosEmerging human studies on mango consumption have found potential health benefits associated with the superfruit including improved blood pressure, blood sugar control, and gut health. The research, conducted by of the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at Texas A&M University and the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Oklahoma State University, was presented during the 2017 Experimental B
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In utero tobacco exposure can lead to executive function issues in adolescentsPrenatal tobacco exposure is known to have negative short-term impacts including preterm birth, low birth weight and subsequent behavioral issues. However, a new study found that the negative impacts can last well into the child's future. The results showed that exposure to as few as 10 cigarettes was associated with negative impacts on the executive function of adolescents who were exposed prenat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealed: New step in plant mastermind hormone's pathwayPlants have a complex system of hormones that guide their growth and maximize their ability to take advantage of the environment. One mastermind hormone is called brassinosteroid. New research identified one missing link in the brassinosteroid signaling chain, which is called KIB1 and is an essential part of brassinosteroid's effectiveness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover clues about how HIV virus mutatesA new study published in Cell Host & Microbe led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center completely maps all mutations that help the HIV virus evolve away from a single broadly neutralizing antibody, known as PGT151.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delaying meals impacts the sugar levels of the bodyIn the first human study of its kind, researchers from the University of Surrey discovered that delaying meal times delays the circadian rhythm of sugar in the blood. The findings could prove to be a breakthrough in alleviating symptoms of jet lag and shift work, a new study in the journal Current Biology reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A protein that stem cells require could be a target in killing breast cancer cellsResearchers have identified a protein that must be present in order for mammary stem cells to perform their normal functions. When the researchers genetically removed or chemically inhibited the protein, called BPTF, stem cells could no longer maintain their 'renewing' state and began to take on the character of specialized breast cells, and soon died. Breast cancer cells with stem-like properties
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common class of chemicals cause cancer by breaking down DNA repair mechanismsA common class of chemicals found everywhere from car exhausts, smoke, building materials and furniture to cosmetics and shampoos could increase cancer risk because of their ability to break down the repair mechanisms that prevent faults in our genes, according to a study published today in the journal Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A noninvasive method for deep brain stimulationMIT researchers have developed a way to stimulate regions deep within the brain using electrodes placed on the scalp. This approach could be used to perform noninvasive deep brain stimulation on patients with brain disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yale study finds cause of, and possible cure for, genetic skin disorderYale scientists have discovered the cause of a disfiguring skin disorder and determined that a commonly used medication can help treat the condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep brain stimulation without implantsMIT researchers have developed a method that excites neurons deep within the brain without using the implants required for current deep brain stimulation methods. In the journal Cell on June 1, the researchers show how to wiggle a mouse's ears, paws, and whiskers using just electrodes on the rodent's head. The technique, called temporally interfering stimulation, opens new possibilities in brain r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers decipher the enigma of how faces are encoded in the brainWhen you look at photos of faces, your brain is able to instantly identify the ones that you know and distinguish among those that you've never seen before. In recent years, neuroscientists have begun to peek inside the brain's black box to understand how the brain is able to recognize and perceive faces. Now, in Cell, researchers report that they have cracked the code for facial identity in the p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delayed meal times reset body clocksThe human body runs according to a roughly 24-hour cycle, controlled by a 'master' clock in the brain and peripheral clocks in other parts of the body that are synchronized according to external cues, including light. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 1 have found that at least one of those clocks can also be reset based on what time a person eats breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Get to know the omentum: The apron of fat that protects your abdomenThe quirkiest organ in the human body may be a large sheet of fat that stretches over the intestines, liver, and stomach like an elastic apron. Sometimes called the 'policeman of the abdomen,' the omentum is known to secrete hormones related to obesity, and we're still learning new information about its functions. In a review published June 1 in Trends in Immunology, researchers discuss how the om
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research finds seacoast roads under new threat from rising sea levelResearch out of the University of New Hampshire has found that some roads, as far as two miles from the shore, are facing a new hazard that currently cannot be seen by drivers - rising groundwater caused by increasing ocean water levels.
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The Scientist RSS

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize FacesResearchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.
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The Scientist RSS

Deep Brain Stimulation Without SurgeryUsing interfering high-frequency currents applied to the surface of the mouse skull, scientists can noninvasively target brain regions buried below the cortical surface.
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New Scientist - News

LIGO’s third detection hints at how black hole binaries are bornThe latest signal from the gravitational wave detector backs up Einstein’s theory of general relativity and gives more clues on how black holes get their spin
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Popular Science

YouTube add-ons and tricks to improve your watching DIY Step up your video game. Whether you want to make your own GIFs, boost video quality, save clips for later, or find a backing track, we've got all the best YouTube tips and tricks.
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Live Science

Rich Kids and Drugs: Addiction May Hit Wealthy Students HardestKids in wealthy areas may be more vulnerable to addiction, a new study finds.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

LIGO spots gravitational waves for third time Detection made from another black-hole merger — but physicists are now keen to see such waves from different types of event. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22093
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealed: New step in plant mastermind hormone's pathwayPlants are stationary. This means that the way they grow must be highly internally regulated to use the surrounding resources in the most-advantageous way possible.
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Science | The Guardian

Researchers develop non-invasive deep brain stimulation method Researchers at MIT have developed a new method of electrically stimulating deep brain tissues without opening the skull Since 1997, more than 100,000 Parkinson’s Disease patients have been treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique that involves the implantation of ultra-thin wire electrodes . The implanted device, sometimes referred to as a ‘brain pacemaker’, delivers electr
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Scientific American Content: Global

Governors Pledge Climate Action in Face of Possible Paris WithdrawalHowever, states cannot be expected to lead international efforts to tackle global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

How We Save Face--Researchers Crack the Brain's Facial-Recognition CodeA Caltech team has deciphered the way we identify faces, re-creating what the brain sees from its electrical activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: May 2017 This past month we completed 51 cells (many of them huuuuge!) and set a new record marathon speed of 7 hours 5 minutes! Awesome job, Eyewirers. Now’s as good a time as any to remind you that we sincerely value all of your contributions to our research, all in the name of science! Woohoo! And meanwhile, check out these stats. New Millionaire Milestones: 10M – MaraTara 5M – cschein 2.5M – britishcl
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Popular Science

LIGO spots its third black hole merger Space The observatory could eventually detect a new collision every day. LIGO has caught sight of its third black hole union, discovering a new class of black hole and coming into its own as a black hole telescope.
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Gizmodo

Let's Take This iPhone Case All the Way to the Supreme Court Photo: Michael Hession Two extremely similar cases involving locked iPhones in two neighboring Florida counties ended up with two conflicting judgments this week. Both suspects claimed that they couldn’t remember their passcodes which prevented police from obtaining evidence. In one case, the judge slapped the suspect with contempt and sentenced him to 180 days in jail. In the other case, the jud
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Anker Flashlights, Luggage, Running Shoes, and More Anker flashlights , Amazon’s one-day luggage sale , and Saucony running shoes lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals VAVA Mechanical Keyboard , $68 You’ve probably heard a lot of fuss about mechanical keyboards lately , and if not, you’ve at least heard the clicking coming from a nearby desk. If you’re
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Science | The Guardian

Third gravitational wave detection gives hints on dark matter and black holes Latest observation by Ligo brings scientists closer to goal of using gravitational waves to see ancient events invisible to optical and radio telescopes Ripples in the fabric of spacetime triggered by the cataclysmic merger of two black holes more than 3bn years ago have been detected by physicists. The observations mark the third occasion that scientists have spotted gravitational waves– the com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH research finds seacoast roads under new threat from rising sea levelResearch out of the University of New Hampshire has found that some roads, as far as two miles from the shore, are facing a new hazard that currently cannot be seen by drivers -- rising groundwater caused by increasing ocean water levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor understanding of ratios leads to bad shopping decisions, says University of Miami studyA new study published in the Journal of Marketing Behavior, says in situations where consumers must average ratio information, such as comparing the fuel efficiency of two cars using the ratio miles per gallon, they often incorrectly assume the mathematic equation to find miles per gallon would be to average the sum of the mileage of both cars and then divide by two, instead of using a more comple
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremes2016 hurricane season started in January and ended 318 days later in late-November. Hurricane Matthew was the first Category 5 in a decade, the longest stretch without one since 1950.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third timeOne, two and now three historic waves have come from deep space to Earth. An international research team, including Northwestern University scientists and engineers, today (June 1) announced the third detection of gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of space and time, first predicted by Albert Einstein more than a century ago. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immunology: How ancestry shapes our immune cellsA genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public confused by climate change messagesExperts, charities, the media and government confuse the public by speaking 'different languages' on climate change, a new study says. The research team focused on Colombia and likened climate change communication to a 'broken phone'.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Phagocytes in the brain: Good or bad?The role of microglial cells in neurodegenerative disease is not fully understood. But new results from researchers in Munich and Basel suggest that stimulation of this arm of the immune system might well delay the onset of such disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research reveals earliest directly dated rock paintings from southern AfricaScientists have pioneered a technique to directly date prehistoric rock paintings in southern Africa, which reveal dates much older than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Auditory perception: Where microseconds matterTo localize sounds, particularly low-frequency sounds, mammals must perceive minimal differences in the timing of signal reception between the two ears. LMU researchers now describe a unique feature of the neurons responsible for this task.
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Live Science

Himalayan Salt Lamps: What Are They (and Do They Really Work)?Himalayan salt lamps are said to clean the air, neutralize electromagnetic radiation and treat allergies, but are any of these claims true?
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Gizmodo

Hell Is Empty And All the Hedge Fund Managers Are At The Bellagio Image by Jim Cooke/ GMG Blue blazers. Blue checked shirts. Collar open. No tie. Brown shoes. Black shoes. Or Nike shoes. New, new, all new. Soft leather satchels with bold brass zippers. Good cufflinks. Good watches. Better than you know. Hundred dollar haircuts. Straight razored shaves. Shaped cuticles. Manicured nails. Clean, soft, tailored. New. Talking boisterously in the check-in line at the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alleged Russia hacker appeals extradition to RussiaA Russian man who faces charges of hacking computers at LinkedIn, Dropbox and other American companies has appealed a Czech court decision that allows his extradition to Russia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple says payouts from App Store total $70 bnApple said Thursday it has paid out more than $70 billion to app developers since opening its App Store in 2008, and that the ecosystem is still growing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online game Words with Friends adds 'covfefe' to its listThe popular mobile word game Words With Friends has added one of the internet's most popular typos in recent days—"covfefe."
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WIRED

Physicists Find Another Gravitational Wave to Suggest Einstein Was Right LIGO physicists just announced that they observed a gravitational wave for the third time, ever. Here's what it says about our universe. The post Physicists Find Another Gravitational Wave to Suggest Einstein Was Right appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA to launch first-ever neutron-star missionNearly 50 years after British astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell discovered the existence of rapidly spinning neutron stars, NASA will launch the world's first mission devoted to studying these unusual objects.
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Scientific American Content: Global

What Will the World Look Like if the U.S. Bails on the Paris Climate Deal?Many scientists view the agreement as an essential step in preventing global catastrophe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inside Science

Third Detection of Gravitational Waves Confirmed Third Detection of Gravitational Waves Confirmed The signal, from two merging black holes 3 billion light-years away, is the most distant observation yet. merger-animated.gif An artist's depiction of the merging of two black holes and the gravitational waves created by the event, which ripple outward. Image credits: LIGO/T. Pyle Space Thursday, June 1, 2017 - 11:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside
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The Atlantic

What Makes Things Cool? Although trends might seem completely random, there are well-documented patterns to what becomes popular. A 20th century industrial designer, who created some of America’s most iconic looks, developed a theory of coolness that has been backed up by various scientific studies. Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic , explains the science behind why we like what we like.
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The Atlantic

House of Cards Season 5, Episode 8: The Live-Binge Review As in previous years , I’m binge-reviewing the latest season of Netflix’s House of Cards , the TV show that helped popularize the idea of “binge watching” when it premiered in 2013. Don’t read farther than you’ve watched. (The whole series will appear here .) Season 5, Episode 8 (Chapter 60) An episode ago I was calling for the show to lighten its tone a bit, and the sight of robed bazillionaire
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The Atlantic

Is This the End of Free Birth Control? According to a draft regulation leaked to Vox this week, all of the IUD preppers might have been onto something. After the election, liberal women took to the internet in droves to warn each other to get the long-acting contraceptive devices, free under Obamacare but pricey otherwise, implanted while they still could. If the draft federal rule is implemented, that option could be going away for s
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The Atlantic

Slavery in the Family Genevieve writes: I was speechless after reading Tizon’s article because I realized my family also had a slave. She wasn’t “Lola,” though, she was “Ate”: the Tagalog word for “older sister.” Ate was in her early 20s, had long, black hair, and a honey complexion like the rest of our family. When I was in first grade, my family had a vacation going to Seattle. She came with us when we went back hom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why pot-smoking declines -- but doesn't end -- with parenthoodAdults who smoke marijuana often cut back after becoming parents -- but they don't necessarily quit.The influence of a significant other and positive attitudes toward the drug overall, in addition to the onset of parenthood, also are factors in whether someone uses marijuana.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Payments linked to higher odds of doctors prescribing certain cancer drugsIn preliminary findings (abstract 6510) that will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2017 in Chicago on Saturday, June 3, researchers show that when physicians had to choose between multiple, on-patent drugs for metastatic kidney cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia, they were more likely to prescribe drugs from companies they had received general payments from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to block type 1 diabetesDisrupting the AID/RAD51 axis protects nonobese diabetic mice from type 1 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deployment stress impacts well-being through different mental health issues for female and male vetsExperiencing stress-related mental health issues following deployment exposures increases risk of reduced well-being in other life domains in the years following military service for veterans. Gender plays an important role in these associations. The findings, which appear in Clinical Psychological Science, have implications for better understanding the challenges female and male veterans face upo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low cost, scalable water-splitting fuels the future hydrogen economyThe 'clean-energy economy' always seems a few steps away but never quite here. Fossil fuels still power transportation, heating and cooling, and manufacturing, but a team of scientists from Penn State and Florida State University have come one step closer to inexpensive, clean hydrogen fuel with a lower cost and industrially scalable catalyst that produces pure hydrogen through a low-energy water-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report calls on federal and state collaboration to address brucellosis transmissionEfforts to control brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) should focus on reducing the risk of transmission from elk, which are now viewed as the primary source of the infection in new cases occurring in cattle and domestic bison, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Federal, state, and tribal groups should work in a coordinated and transpa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social laughter releases endorphins in the brainFinnish and British researchers have revealed how laughter releases endorphins in the human brain. The more opioid receptors the participants had in their brain, the more they laughed during the experiment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gravitational waves detected a third timeOn Jan. 4, 2017, an international team of scientists (including representatives from the University of Maryland) observed gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of spacetime -- for the third time. The twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors -- located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington -- detected the gravitational wave event, named GW170104.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Third gravitational wave detection offers new insight into black holesAn international team of researchers has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, in a discovery that provides new insights into the mysterious nature of black holes and, potentially, dark matter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third timeThe Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened. As was the case with the first two detections, the waves were generated when two black holes collided to form a larger black hole.
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Dana Foundation

Dana Newsletter: May Below is the latest Dana email newsletter. You can sign up to receive this (and other Dana email alerts and/or print publications) by going here . Gut Feelings on Parkinson’s and Depression by Ted Dinan, M.D., Ph.D, and John F. Cryan, Ph.D. The gut-brain axis is one of the new frontiers of neuroscience. Microbiota (the collective bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microorganisms that live in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third timeThe Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened. As was the case with the first two detections, the waves were generated when two black holes collided to form a larger black hole.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human Cell Atlas data platform kicks off with support from CZIThe Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) has announced financial support for the Human Cell Atlas, which is using sequencing technology to redefine every cell in the body. Funding and engineering support from CZI will enable the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBLEBI), the Broad Institute and the University of California Santa Cruz Genomics Institute (UCSC) to set up an open, cloud-based Data Coor
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Futurity.org

‘Scrappy’ skeleton hints earliest primates hung out in trees Earth’s earliest primates dwelled in treetops, not on the ground, according to an analysis of a 62-million-year-old partial skeleton discovered in New Mexico. The skeleton—the oldest ever found—was discovered in the San Juan Basin by Thomas Williamson, curator of paleontology at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science, and his twin sons, Taylor and Ryan. Torrejonia wilsoni . (Credit: S
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Futurity.org

Glass could be a mysterious new state of matter New research solves a long-standing mystery about glass—and a mysterious new state of matter. Zoom in on a crystal and you will find an ordered array of atoms, evenly spaced like the windows on the Empire State Building. But zoom in on a piece of glass, and the picture looks a bit messier—more like a random pile of sand, or perhaps the windows on a Frank Gehry building. The highly-ordered nature
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Ars Technica

Anti-missile test shows US can defend against N. Korean ICBMs, MDA chief says Missile Defense Agency video of the successful May 30 test of an intercontinental ballistic missile interceptor. (video link) On May 30, the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and the United States Air Force successfully tested the Homeland Missile Defense System, shooting down an intercontinental ballistic missile in the first "live fire" test of the system's Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) el
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene finding to eradicate severe blistering disorder of the skin found in dogsResearchers at the University of Helsinki have identified a novel gene defect that causes a hereditary blistering disorder of the skin, epidermolysis bullosa, in dogs. Epidermolysis bullosa, found in the Central Asian Shepherd dog breed, occurs also in humans due to an identical gene found in both canines and humans.
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The Scientist RSS

Brain FreezeMeet one child saved from brain damage by cooling therapy.
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The Scientist RSS

Gaining Proprioception with ProstheticsNew surgical techniques may help amputees feel more enmeshed with their artificial limbs.
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Gizmodo

Putin Praises 'Patriotic' Russian Hackers He Definitely Doesn't Know or Employ Image: Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP Vladimir Putin, who apparently had nothing better to do today, decided to throw water on claims that Russia had direct ties to the DNC email leaks during last year’s US election. Simultaneously, the strongman who has helmed Russia for the better part of two decades endorsed the hacks as being in his country’s best interest. Before we conti
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Gizmodo

Vatican Compares Trump to Flat Earthers Over Climate Change AP After widespread media reports that President Trump plans to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement, an international commitment between 147 nations to reduce carbon emissions, a Vatican official has said that Trump’s insistence on propping up coal while removing environmental regulations is akin to being a flat earth truther. Reuters quotes Bishop Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, head of the Pontif
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NYT > Science

Third Gravitational Wave Detection, From Black-Hole Merger 3 Billion Light Years AwayThis is the third black-hole smashup that astronomers have detected since they started keeping watch on the cosmos back in September 2015.
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The Atlantic

Putin Says 'Patriotic Hackers' May Have Targeted U.S. Election Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday his country has “never engaged in” hacking another nation’s elections, but left open the possibility that hackers with “patriotic leanings … may try to add their contribution to the fight against those who speak badly about Russia.” “Hackers are free people, just like artists who wake up in the morning in a good mood and start painting,” Putin told n
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The Atlantic

Gravitational Waves From Black Holes Are Detected for Third Time Scientists have detected for the third time gravitational waves coming from the merging of two massive black holes somewhere in the universe, the wrinkles in the fabric of space and time created by a powerful cosmic collision. About 3-billion light-years away from Earth, the two black holes, far more massive than our sun, whirled around each other and eventually collided, generating waves like ri
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Quanta Magazine

Latest Black Hole Collision Comes With a Twist Once again, a gust of gravitational waves coming from the faraway collision of black holes has tickled the instruments of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), bringing the count of definitive gravitational-wave detections up to three. The new signal, detected in January and reported today in Physical Review Letters , deepens the riddle of how black hol
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Latest Headlines | Science News

LIGO snags another set of gravitational wavesTwo black holes stirred up the third set of gravitational waves ever detected.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who has better mental health: Public or private college students?Using Reddit posts as an indicator, researchers found that students at higher-ranked schools have better mental health than those at lower-ranked colleges. The well-being index is also better at universities with higher tuition. It's lower at large public schools with a majority of female students.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HMGB1 may be linked to immunosuppression in patients who survive septic shockA study published online in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology reveals that in the late stage of sepsis, HMGB1, or the 'high mobility group box 1' protein, might be a target for future therapies because the protein plays a key role in the development of post-sepsis immunosuppression and sepsis-induced dysfunction of neutrophils.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify specific neurons that distinguish between reality and imaginationNew Western University research shows that neurons in the part of the brain found to be abnormal in psychosis are also important in helping people distinguish between reality and imagination.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First analysis of AACR Project GENIE data publishedThe first analysis of nearly 19,000 de-identified genomic records from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) international data-sharing initiative known as AACR Project Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange (GENIE) was published today in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the AACR.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Baby teeth link autism and heavy metals, NIH study suggestsBaby teeth from children with autism contain more toxic lead and less of the essential nutrients zinc and manganese, compared to teeth from children without autism, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The researchers studied twins to control genetic influences and focus on possible environmental
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Science : NPR

Trump Poised To Announce Decision On Paris Climate Agreement Nearly all the world's nations have signed the 2015 accord, which sets global goals for cutting greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is set to announce today whether the U.S. will withdraw. (Image credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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WIRED

The Consequences of Publishing Leaked Photos You may see a tattered backpack or a charred battery. Investigators see clues. And terrorists see what those investigators know. The post The Consequences of Publishing Leaked Photos appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

We Asked Lawyers to Vet Trump’s Most Controversial Tweets Because yesterday's covfefe could be tomorrow's global catastrophe. The post We Asked Lawyers to Vet Trump's Most Controversial Tweets appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Skype Hopes Its Redesign Takes It Beyond Video Chat Add a little Instagram, a dash of Messenger, a dumptruck-load of Snapchat, and stir. The post Skype Hopes Its Redesign Takes It Beyond Video Chat appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Physicists Just Spotted Gravitational Waves Again—So What's Next? Image: LIGO/Caltech/MIT/Sonoma State (Aurore Simonnet) A long, long time ago, a pair of black holes collided with such power that they created ripples in spacetime, which emanated through the universe. All the while, molecules on a tiny rock in a fairly irrelevant nook of the Milky Way galaxy arranged themselves into living things, which evolved into self-aware apes. Those apes eventually realize
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Gravitational waves: Third detection of deep space warpingScientists pick up once again the distortions in space-time resulting from a huge black hole merger.
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Ars Technica

LIGO spots a third black hole merger, tightens mass limits on gravitons Enlarge (credit: LIGO/Caltech/MIT/Sonoma State (Aurore Simonnet)) Today, the team behind the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is announcing the detection of a third black hole merger, the first from its second operational run. The merger shares some features with the previous ones: the black holes were bigger than expected, and their merger released a staggering amount o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The art of folding mitochondrial membranesOliver Daumke's lab figures out how the inner membranes of mitochondria "get their groove" and assume the complex shapes they need to carry out crucial cellular functions.
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Scientific American Content: Global

LIGO's Latest Black-Hole Merger Confirms Einstein, Challenges AstrophysicsNew results from the gravitational-wave observatory hint that black holes move in mysterious ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Verizon reportedly tried to buy #2 cable company Charter, was rejected Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Spencer Platt ) Verizon recently tried to buy Charter Communications for "well over $100 billion," but the US' second biggest cable company rejected the offer, according to a New York Post article yesterday . Charter rejected the offer "because it was too low—and because Charter was not ready to sell," the Post wrote, quoting anonymous sources. Rumors about Verizon
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key process for cell division revealed in molecular analysisResearchers have discovered important details of a vital process that enables cells to divide correctly into two.
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The Atlantic

The U.S. Embassy Stays in Tel Aviv (for Now) President Trump signed Thursday the waiver to keep the U.S. embassy in Israel in Tel Aviv, despite his campaign promise to move the mission to Jerusalem. The six-month waiver, which has been signed by every presidential administration since 1998, allows the president to override the Jerusalem Embassy Act, a law Congress passed in 1995 that requires the mission be moved to the holy city, which Isr
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TEDTalks (video)

No one should die because they live too far from a doctor | Raj PanjabiIllness is universal -- but access to care is not. Physician Raj Panjabi has a bold vision to bring health care to everyone, everywhere. With the 2017 TED Prize, Panjabi is building the Community Health Academy, a global platform that aims to modernize how community health workers learn vital skills, creating jobs along the way.
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Ars Technica

Samsung’s “Bixby” assistant still can’t grasp English, is delayed again Enlarge / The hardware Bixby button. (credit: Ron Amadeo) When Samsung announced its new flagship, the Galaxy S8 , one of the headline features was Samsung's new "Bixby" assistant. This voice assistant is supposed to be Samsung's answer to Siri, the Google Assistant, and Amazon Alexa, but when it came time to actually launch the Galaxy S8 in the US, Bixby's voice functionality was nowhere to be f
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Ingeniøren

Danfoss køber italiensk IoT-specialistEt lille italiensk it-firma skal være med til at øge Danfoss' satsning på IoT, intelligent udstyr og design af brugergrænseflader.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lupin seeds: Health impairments possible with bitter tasteFor several years now, lupin seeds have been used increasingly to produce foods such as gluten-free bakery produce and pasta, as well as diet products for people with milk protein allergies. Lupin seeds or beans are also consumed as snacks in some European and North African countries. Depending on the botanical species and geographical origin of the lupins, their seeds can contain bitter quinolizi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence predicts patient lifespansA computer's ability to predict a patient's lifespan simply by looking at images of their organs is a step closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research led by the University of Adelaide.
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Gizmodo

This Cyborg Dragonfly Is the Tiniest Drone GIF Gif source: Vimeo The smaller a drone gets, the more places it can be easily flown. But while many researchers have been trying to tackle the monumental challenge of building drones that look and behave like tiny insects, a new approach has engineers giving Mother Nature’s existing creations drone-like upgrades . The biggest hurdle with building tiny drones that can fly almost anywhere is pow
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Gizmodo

Jezebel Jennifer Garner Calls Bullshit on People Cover Story | Deadspin Here Are The Tiger Woods Arr Jezebel Jennifer Garner Calls Bullshit on People Cover Story | Deadspin Here Are The Tiger Woods Arrest Videos [Update] | The Root Calif. High Schooler Uses Blackface for ‘Promposal’ 1 Month After Another Student Used a Lynching Reference in Theirs | Fusion Some of the World’s Largest Companies Just Made a Last Ditch Appeal to President Trump Not to Screw Over the Planet |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As Europe talks tough on climate, data show emissions roseA new report showed greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union rose in 2015, the first increase since 2010, even as European officials on Thursday urged the United States to remain part of a global climate pact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China, Europe take lead on climate as world waits on TrumpChina and Europe took the lead Thursday on forging on with the Paris climate accord, as fears grew US President Donald Trump would pull Washington out of the landmark deal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Religious individuals regret having casual sex only slightly moreThe cultural differences between the United States and Norway are relatively small, but the cultures differ significantly from one another in a few very relevant areas.
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Viden

VIDEO Er sprøjtemidler usunde? Eksperterne er uenigeDet er dog altid en fordel at købe dansk frugt og grønt, fremfor udenlandske produkter, hvis man vil undgå sprøjtemidler.
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Gizmodo

Here's What That 'Faceless Fish' Actually Is Typhlonus nasus, collected east of Jervis Bay, New South Wales, May 2017. Image: Dianne J. Bray / Museum Victoria Life gets pretty weird in the cold abyss of the deep sea. One deep ocean oddity presented itself to researchers at Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) just the other day—the strange beast has now been referred to dozens of times as the “faceless fish.”
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Gizmodo

Plex Just Killed My Cable Box Rental, and It Could Kill Yours Too Image: Plex One of the dirty secrets about streaming live TV services like PS Vue and Hulu TV is that in many cases you’re paying the same amount of money as you would for basic cable. The main difference, besides the benefit of not dealing with a godforsaken cable company, is the crazy monthly fees local operators like to charge for their hardware—often $8 to $12 a month. But Plex, a popular vid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthma intervention study points to care and cost benefitsA new study showing how interventions by community pharmacists can help asthma patients achieve better asthma control could have major cost benefits for health services around the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problemGiving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pollution 'devastating' China's vital ecosystem, research showsA pioneering new international study, led by the University of Exeter, has looked at the true impact air pollutants have in impeding the local vegetation's ability to absorb and store carbon from the atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key process for cell division revealed in molecular analysisBiologists have discovered important details of a vital process that enables cells to divide correctly into two.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanosized silicon heater and thermometer combined to fight cancerRussian physicists from ITMO University have found out that spherical silicon nanoparticles can be effectively heated up, and simultaneously emit light depending on their temperature. According to the scientists, these properties coupled with a good biocompatibility will allow usage of the semiconductor nanoparticles in photothermal therapy and nanosurgery. The researchers plan to control the heat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do signs of problem gambling differ in men and women?Men and women experiencing problems with gaming machines (slot machines) display the same signs that their habit is out of control. However, the two sexes differ in how they handle the distress that accompanies their addiction. These are the findings of researchers at the University of Adelaide, the Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) and Swinburne University of Technology in Australia. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest study to date finds autism alone does not increase risk of violent offendingA diagnosis of autism alone does not increase the risk of violent offending, suggests a study published in the June 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). The study analyzed data from 295,734 individuals in Stockholm County, Sweden, of whom 5,739 had a diagnosis of autism. The researchers tracked these individuals for violent crime conviction
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A mother's age doesn't matterA mother's advanced age at childbirth is not the reason for the elevated risks of low birth weight or preterm birth -- such risks may instead be related to individual circumstances and behavioral patterns of the mother.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tobacco the 'silent killer' of HIV patients, say researchersResearchers at the University of York have shown that tobacco use is more common among HIV positive individuals than HIV negative individuals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radar reveals steep declines in Kauai's seabird populationsThe island of Kauai is home to two endangered seabirds, the Hawaiian Petrel and the Newell's Shearwater. Monitoring these birds, which are nocturnal and nest in hard-to-access areas, is challenging, but observing the movements of birds via radar offers a solution. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes a fresh look at two decades of radar data -- and comes to worrying concl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate science: Bad news gets worseAs President Donald Trump prepares to announce whether he will pull America out of the 2015 Paris Agreement sanctioned by his predecessor and nearly 200 other world leaders, the stakes on climate change have never been higher.
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Gizmodo

All Three of Anker's Ultra-Popular Flashlights Are Back On Sale Anker LC90 Flashlight , $22 with code HGBGOIWV or $30 with FREE LC40 Flashlight with code NWSSMJOF | Anker LC130 Flashlight , $45 Anker, producer of a lot of your favorite charging gear , has its own line of flashlights too, and all three are on sale today for some the best prices we’ve ever seen. The cheapest model (LC40) is IP65 dust and water resistant, but actually doesn’t include a rechargea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers untangle mystery of tiny bird's trans-Pacific flightZoologists have documented the first record of a House Swift in the Americas—and begun to unravel the mystery of how the tiny bird got from its south-east Asia breeding grounds to Ladner, BC.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atmospheric scientists conduct field experiment to study wind flow over complex mountain terrainOver the past month, researchers have descended on Portugal's Vale Do Cobrão near the Spanish border to study the valley's wind flow patterns.
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Gizmodo

The Best Fidget Spinner Has an Animated Cat Inside GIF GIF: YouTube Thanks to Jonathan Odom , a clever designer and builder who’s created everything from animatronics for films to museum exhibits, the fidget spinner has just taken a giant leap forward. Odom created One Spinner To Rule Them All: one with an animated cat video that comes to life when you flick it. Based on an old-timey device called a Zoetrope , Odom designed his fidget spinner usi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mycobacteria use protein to create diverse populations, avoid drugsSubgroups of tuberculosis-causing bacteria can persist even when antibiotics wipe out most of the population. The need to eliminate these persistent subpopulations is one reason why TB treatment regimens are so lengthy. Now, NIAID-supported researchers have shown that a single protein allows mycobacteria to generate diverse populations that can avoid TB drugs. The protein may be a target for inter
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West CoastA three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with 'hotspots' of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart rate linked to gender gap in criminal offendingA new study addresses the incomplete understanding of why males are more criminal than females by examining gender differences in biological functioning and behavior. It is the first study to demonstrate that men's lower resting heart rate partly explains the higher rate of criminal offending.
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Ars Technica

Skype goes all Snapchat with Highlights, its own riff on Stories Enlarge (credit: Microsoft ) In a bid to make Skype more social, Microsoft is launching a whole new generation of Skype clients. The big new feature? "Highlights," a way of publishing photos and videos so that your contacts can keep up with what's going on in your life. Highlights are more or less a replica of the Snapchat Story, a way of sharing time-limited pictures and videos to your contacts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technique to directly date prehistoric rock paintings in southern AfricaScientists have pioneered a technique to directly date prehistoric rock paintings in southern Africa, which reveals dates much older than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where to look for new treatments for alcoholism? The matrixA new study in Biological Psychiatry may pave the way for treating alcohol addiction by reducing motivation to drink, rather than by altering the effects of alcohol itself. Led by Drs. Kasia Radwanska and Leszek Kaczmarek of the Nencki Institute, Warsaw, Poland, the study reports a new mechanism behind alcohol seeking behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The art of folding mitochondrial membranesOliver Daumke's lab figures out how the inner membranes of mitochondria 'get their groove' and assume the complex shapes they need to carry out crucial cellular functions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The gut microbiota plays a key role in treatment with classic diabetes medicationA clearer picture of how the classic diabetes medication metformin works has emerged. A recent study at Sahlgrenska Academy and University of Girona indicates that the clinical effect -- control of blood glucose -- is achieved through modulation of the gut microbiota.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists give tumor-fighting cells a boost in battling bone marrow cancerResearchers from Belgium led by Prof. Dirk Elewaut of the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research and the team of Prof. Vanderkerken and Prof. Menu at the Hematology and Immunology lab of the VUB uncovered a new way to enhance the function of a specific type of immune cell that destroys tumors in multiple myeloma, a form of bone marrow cancer considered incurable. In their study, the scientists
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach set to make peptide stapling widely availableUK scientists have created a new method to structure peptides, which they say will be cheaper and make the process of using stapled peptides in drug discovery much more widely available.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mice exposed to prenatal stress are predisposed to eating disorders later in lifeScientists at the Weizmann Institute prevented the onset of eating disorders through dietary intervention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene finding to eradicate severe blistering disorder of the skin found in dogsResearchers at the University of Helsinki have identified a novel gene defect that causes a hereditary blistering disorder of the skin, epidermolysis bullosa, in dogs. Epidermolysis bullosa, found in the Central Asian Shepherd dog breed, occurs also in humans due to an identical gene found in both canines and humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Volcanoes, referees for the life on EarthAt the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, 200 million years ago, some 60% of species living on Earth disappeared. Scientists suspected that magmatic activity and the release of CO2 were responsible for this environmental disaster. To corroborate this, one would need to find and to precisely date traces of this activity and make sure that it coincides with this mass extinction. The precise determination o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cholesterol -- a key player at the lung surfaceCholesterol, a naturally occurring compound at the lung surface, has been shown to have a clear effect on the properties of this nanoscale film that covers the inside of our lungs. Cholesterol levels in this system may affect the lung's function, according to researchers at Lund University in Sweden who have published a new study on the significance of cholesterol for lung surface properties. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Spanish plant that was classified by mistakeSurprisingly, there are still plant species waiting to be discovered in the Iberian Peninsula. Some are detected thanks to the latest study methods, and others, such as Linaria becerrae, are described when reinterpreting species which are already known. This new Málaga plant had been classified by mistake for 176 years.
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Science : NPR

How New Roots Are Driving An Apple Renaissance The apple renaissance of recent years has given us new varieties of fruit. But that's only half of the story, and half of the tree. Another revolution is happening below ground, in the tree roots. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)
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Futurity.org

Diet gave ducks and geese their odd beaks The diets of ducks, geese, and other waterfowl have been the main evolutionary force behind the shape of their beaks, new research shows. “Waterfowl have really interesting beaks relative to other birds,” says Aaron Olsen, a postdoctoral researcher in Brown University’s department of ecology and evolutionary biology. “They are very curvy with very diverse shapes.” Waterfowl beaks vary along a duc
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WIRED

You’ll Find Far Cry 5 Provocative—Even if It’s a Mess The franchise's foray into American politics probably won't succeed, but it'll be noteworthy. The post You'll Find Far Cry 5 Provocative—Even if It's a Mess appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Wearables Reveal the Secret Lives of Farm Animals The Internet of Animals has arrived. The post Wearables Reveal the Secret Lives of Farm Animals appeared first on WIRED .
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Popular Science

Watch SpaceX try to fly a used Dragon capsule to the Space Station Space It will be the first private spacecraft to return to orbit after it's already been there before. The Dragon capsule slated to fly on June 1 will be the very first private spacecraft to return to orbit after it's already been there before.
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Science | The Guardian

New species discovered behind a pub – then saved from extinction In 2007, conservationists discovered a new species inhabiting a beach just behind a pub in Granity, New Zealand. But could they save it before erosion and rising waters wiped it off the face of the planet? Who says village life has to be boring? Granity, New Zealand may be home to less than 300 people, but this lovely seaside village on the western coast of South Island was also – until last year
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant iceberg poised to snap off from Antarctica: scientistsAn expanse of ice roughly the size of Delaware is close to breaking off from the warming Antarctic ice shelf to form one of the world's largest-ever icebergs, scientists said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walk this way with Detour app: 150 audio toursIf you're looking for a knowledgeable traveling companion, consider installing the Detour app on your smartphone.
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Ars Technica

Uber lost another $708 million in the first three months of the year Enlarge / Uber's financials remain upside down. (credit: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Uber's chief financial officer is leaving the company amid yet another loss-making quarterly result, according to the Wall Street Journal . In the first three months of 2017, the company lost $708 million on revenues of $3.4 billion. That might sound disastrous, but it's actually an improvement for th
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New on MIT Technology Review

Interstellar travel and post-humansThe stupendous time-spans of the evolutionary past are now part of common culture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report calls on federal and state collaboration to address brucellosis transmission from elkEfforts to control brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) should focus on reducing the risk of transmission from elk, which are now viewed as the primary source of the infection in new cases occurring in cattle and domestic bison, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Federal, state, and tribal groups should work in a coordinated and transpa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch testing tube unveiled for Hyperloop transport systemA Dutch tech startup and a construction company on Thursday unveiled a Hyperloop test facility, a steel tube that will be used to help develop the futuristic high-speed transportation system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook, Google crack down on hate speech: EUFacebook, Google and other US internet giants have sharply boosted efforts to clamp down on online hate speech, a top European Union official said Thursday.
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Science | The Guardian

We had to run our own trial for TB drugs – nobody else was doing it Tuberculosis kills more people than HIV, but medicines to treat the disease have barely improved in 50 years - it’s time for urgent and radical innovation Four years ago, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) made the decision to sponsor and run its own tuberculosis clinical trial. The aim was to find a new treatment regimen for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) that was radically better than what was cu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Horses masticate similarly to ruminantsIn contrast to ruminants, horses chew their food only once -- but with the same regular, rhythmic movements as cows, who ruminate their food after eating.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pay $8 for a Buddha-shaped pear foolish or fun? Your age may predict your answerSquare watermelons, star- and heart-shaped cucumbers, and even Buddha-shaped pears can be found in some grocery store produce bins. Who buys them? And why? A recent study found younger consumers with an eye for adventure are more likely to purchase these avant-garde fruits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study highlights formation of beachrock in resisting climate-induced sea level risesMicroorganisms play a crucial role in forming beachrock, a type of rock that forms on the beach and protects low-lying reef islands from erosion, a new study has revealed.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Hvem er ansvarlig, hvis en robot gør skade? Automation Robotter
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The Atlantic

'We, Too, Are Targets of Police Violence' High-profile incidents of alleged police misconduct have captured national attention in recent years, from the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown to the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling in one 48-hour period last July. These black men are part of the demographic group whose cases the press most often covers, and in many ways rightly so: Black and brown men represent the majority of those
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Reaches Record Audience of 42.3 Million in May 2017 Washington, D.C. (June 1, 2017)— The Atlantic reached new audience highs in May, drawing 42.3 million monthly unique visitors to TheAtlantic.com (Omniture), and setting new records for daily unique visitors, page views, and concurrent visits. This achievement comes in a month when TheAtlantic.com rolled out a redesigned homepage to reflect the rapid pace of news today and The Atlantic ’s growing
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The Atlantic

The College-Town Achievement Gap Politically progressive university towns with racially integrated schools like Berkeley, California; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and Ann Arbor, Michigan, might seem natural environments for black students to thrive. Each is home to a prestigious university with an activist, social justice-oriented school of education. Each school district has been a part of a network to promote equity for studen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Religious individuals regret having casual sex only slightly moreReligious and non-religious people regret casual sex about equally. They also regret missing an opportunity for casual sex to about the same degree.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial transpiration for solar water purificationSolar steam and vapor generation is a promising technology for desalination, sterilization and chemical purification. Here Zhu group at Nanjing University designs an artificial transpiration device with all three components of heat loss minimized, which enable over 85% solar steam efficiency under one sun. It is also demonstrated that this artificial transpiration device can be used for heavy meta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dual role of fruit fly protein in connecting chromosome copiesResearch at Nagoya University has identified a double function for the Drosophila Dmt protein in both establishing and maintaining cohesion whereby identical chromatids pair during DNA replication. Dmt localizes to regions of tightly packed chromatin through interactions with other proteins to launch cohesion, and protects cohesion at other cell cycle timepoints by binding different proteins. Equi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Subsidies promote overfishing and hurt small-scale fishers worldwideLarge-scale fisheries receive about four times more subsidies than their small-scale counterparts, with up to 60 per cent of those subsidies promoting overfishing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers untangle mystery of tiny bird's trans-Pacific flightZoologists have documented the first record of a House Swift in the Americas -- and begun to unravel the mystery of how the tiny bird got from its south-east Asia breeding grounds to British Columbia, Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common acne medication offers new treatment for multiple sclerosisA research team from the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute have published important research which will benefit individuals who are in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS). Study results show that a common acne medication, minocycline, can help prevent MS symptoms from developing into full-blown MS in patients who are in the early stages of the disease. The work will be
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Trump urged to retain Paris climate deal by UN chiefThe UN chief joins leaders of the EU and China in stressing the importance of the Paris agreement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A marker-free system for tracing mass componentsHighly interconnected manufacturing chains, cost issues and technical feasibility make it difficult to trace individual components in mass production. Efficient "track & trace" solutions are, however, an important prerequisite for production and process optimization—especially in the context of digitized manufacturing. With its "Track & Trace Fingerprint" solution, the Fraunhofer-Institute for Phy
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Ars Technica

This one weird antibody reduces belly fat (in post-menopausal women) Enlarge (credit: NIH) So, you know how some women of a certain age get kind of... well, thick around the middle? This “enhanced visceral adiposity” is just one of the many joys that accompany the end of fertility. Along with the constant reminder of our impending mortality, menopausal women also have to deal with bone loss, a reduced energy balance, and reduced physical activity. All of these eff
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Ars Technica

The 2017 Jaguar F-Pace marries sport and utility Jonathan Gitlin Whether we like it or not, SUVs and crossovers are fast becoming the dominant species in our automotive ecosystem. Sure, a station wagon offers all the same convenience without compromised handling, but people just aren't reaching for their wallets for those the way they do for a raised ride-height and the (theoretical) potential to drive on rough terrain. Even OEMs that ply their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mission to the sun will protect us from devastating solar storms and help us travel deeper into spaceFrom prayer and sacrifice to sunbathing, humans have worshipped the sun since time immemorial. And it's no wonder. At around 150m km away, it is close enough to provide the light, heat and energy to sustain the entire human race. But despite the fact that our parent star has been studied extensively with modern telescopes – both from home and in space – there's a lot we don't know about it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IRI unveils its new generation of climate forecastsThis spring, IRI implemented a new methodology for our seasonal temperature and precipitation forecasts around the world. We asked Simon Mason, Andrew Robertson and Tony Barnston, three of our senior climate scientists who lead the development and tailoring of IRI's forecasts, to answer some fundamental questions about the new forecast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond needles emit intense bunches of electrons when illuminated by light(Phys.org)—For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that shining a nanosecond pulsed laser at the base of a 100-µm-long diamond needle can significantly enhance electron emission from the tip of the needle. The ability to control electron emission with light in this way has potential applications in portable X-ray sources, electron microscopes, and sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach set to make peptide stapling widely availableUK scientists have created a new method to structure peptides, which they say will be cheaper and make the process of using stapled peptides in drug discovery much more widely available.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Spanish plant that was classified by mistakeSurprisingly, there are still plant species waiting to be discovered in the Iberian Peninsula. Some are detected thanks to the latest study methods, and others, such as Linaria becerrae, are described when reinterpreting species which are already known. This new plant had been classified by mistake for 176 years in Málaga.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Web of Science owner buys up booming peer-review platform Acquisition could lead to new commercial services in scientific peer review. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22094
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advances in bayesian methods for big dataBig Data has imposed great challenges for machine learning. Bayesian methods provide a profound framework for characterizing the intrinsic uncertainty and performing probabilistic inference and decision-making. Recently, substantial advances have been made on developing flexible Bayesian models, efficient and scalable inference algorithms, and distributed system implementations. Scientists based i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A brave new world for coral reefsIt is not too late to save coral reefs, but we must act now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zinc may hold key to fighting liver diseaseNew research from Sydney's Westmead Institute for Medical Research highlights the potential for zinc to be used as a simple and effective therapeutic against viral infections such as hepatitis C and influenza.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover a new way to target drug-resistant bacteriaJohn Innes Centre scientists are among an international team who have discovered a new class of compounds that target bacteria in a unique way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The immune system in spaceGetting sick when you're far from home is a drag. You'd give anything to crawl into your own soft bed and sleep, but you're stuck in a cookie-cutter hotel room feeling like a sick fish out of water. Well, it could be worse.
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Ars Technica

Apple’s Siri-controlled smart speaker could be revealed at WWDC next week Enlarge / $159/£159 Apple AirPods. Ahead of Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference next week, a report from Bloomberg suggest the company could announce a long-rumored, Siri-controlled smart speaker. "People familiar with the matter" told Bloomberg that the device could be revealed as early as WWDC, but likely would not ship until later this year. Details about the speaker are slim, but the repo
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Scientific American Content: Global

Resurrected: A Controversial Trial to Bring the Dead Back to LifeScientists remain skeptical about an experimental approach to reverse brain death -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Roofline model boosts manycore code optimization effortsA software toolkit developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to better understand supercomputer performance is now being used to boost application performance for researchers running codes at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) and other supercomputing facilities.
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Fly med verdens største vingefang præsenteretFlyet Stratolaunch blev igår vist frem for første gang. Det skal bruges til at sende raketter i kredsløb og er udstyret med seks jetmotorer af samme type, som sidder på en Boeing 747.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: How To Train Your DolphinCapitalizing on dolphins' astute and playful nature, scientists devised an underwater interactive touchscreen game to help them study and interact with these creatures.
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Gizmodo

Collapse of Enormous Antarctic Ice Shelf Imminent John Sonntag/IceBridge/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center In a dramatic development, the giant rift in the Larsen C ice shelf has grown an additional 11 miles (17 km) since last week, and the leading tip of the crack is now exceptionally close to the ocean. There’s now very little to prevent a complete collapse—an event that will produce one of the largest icebergs in recorded history. As documente
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tourists risk animal bites by misreading wild monkey facial expressions as 'kisses'Wildlife tourists frequently mistaking animals' warnings of aggression for 'smiles' and 'kisses', leading to welfare problems for primates and risk of injury for people -- and educational tools such as 2-D images and information signs like those found in zoos or animal parks aren't effective at improving recognition, according to a new study by a team of behavioral ecologists and psychologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secret of sperm's 'bendy' tail revealedA sperm tail utilizes interconnected elastic springs to transmit mechanical information to distant parts of the tail, helping it to bend and ultimately swim towards an egg, scientists have discovered.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A fresh math perspective opens new possibilities for computational chemistryGlow-in-the-dark objects seem magical when you're a kid—they can brighten up a dark room without the need for electricity, batteries or a light bulb. Then at some point you learn the science behind this phenomenon. Chemical compounds called chromophores become energized, or excited, when they absorb visible light. As they return to their normal state, the stored energy is released as light, which
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Gizmodo

More Rumors About the Next Monsters Joining Universal's Dark Universe Another familiar face returns for Avatar 2 . Sean Gunn teases the obvious for Avengers: Infinity War . Ben Mendelsohn talks about his approach to playing a villain for Ready Player One . Plus, Tom Holland on joining Uncharted , what’s to come on Fear the Walking Dead , and a kickass clip from Atomic Blonde . To me, my spoilers! Dark Universe THR reports as part of an extensive piece on Universal’
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, antibiotic resistance alarms went unheededScientists have worried about antibiotic resistance for decades.
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Ars Technica

Got an antenna and a tuner? You can now stream live TV with Plex Enlarge (credit: Plex) A new streaming company is getting in on the live TV action. Today Plex announced live TV streaming support for its Plex Pass members. The streaming content service will now be able to stream live TV from over-the-air (OTA) providers directly through the Plex app. Supported networks include major broadcast channels like ABC and CBS in the US, and most free-to-air DVB channe
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Ars Technica

OneLogin suffers breach—customer data said to be exposed, decrypted Enlarge OneLogin has admitted that the single sign-on (SSO) and identity management firm has suffered a data breach. However its public statement is vague about the nature of the attack. An e-mail to customers provides a bit of detail—warning them that their data may have been exposed. And a support page that is only accessible to OneLogin account holders is even more worrying for customers. It a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The world's coral reefs are in trouble, but don't give up on them yetThe world's coral reefs are undoubtedly in deep trouble. But as we and our colleagues argue in a review published today in Nature, we shouldn't give up hope for coral reefs, despite the pervasive doom and gloom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensor boutique for early adoptersEvery chemical substance absorbs a very individual fraction of infrared light. Like a human fingerprint, this absorption can be used with optical methods for identifying substances. Such methods are used in the chemical industry, for example, but also in the health sector or in criminal investigation. If a company plans a new project, it often needs individually tailored sensor solutions. In the s
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Science | The Guardian

Peer review is essential to good science – it’s time to credit expert reviewers Peer review recognition company Publons is set to expand under new owners. Could this boost peer review and stop it being seen as an onerous, thankless task? Although expert evaluation of research papers and funding applications is still widely regarded as central to the quality control of research, publishers and funders have increasing difficulty getting academics to agree to spend time on what
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Scientific American Content: Global

The World According to DogsScientific findings uncover what our best friends know, why they do what they do and how to keep them happy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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WIRED

Even Elon Musk May Not Be Able to Make an Electric Truck Work Battery experts have analyzed the Tesla CEO's plans for an electric big rig, and reckon it's a tough proposition. The post Even Elon Musk May Not Be Able to Make an Electric Truck Work appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Handmaid’s Tale: If You Don’t Fight the Tyranny, You’re a Part of It Even Gilead has its complacent foot soldiers. The post Handmaid's Tale : If You Don’t Fight the Tyranny, You’re a Part of It appeared first on WIRED .
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Dagens Medicin

Kommunal økonomiaftale giver lidt mere til ældre Regeringen og KL er enige om en aftale for kommunernes økonomi i 2018. Der bliver lidt flere penge til ældre, men ellers er det småt nye sundheds-initiativer i aftalen.
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Scientific American Content: Global

X-Ray Lasers Make Atoms Act Like "Black Holes" in MoleculesFindings could improve scanning of proteins, viruses and bacteria -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Avoiding material inclusions such as dross in wind turbinesWind turbines rise into the sky on enormous feet. To ensure these giants can reliably generate electricity for many years to come, the iron processing industry must manufacture their massive components in a stable, resource-saving and yet cost-effective way. However, material inclusions such as dross are often unavoidable while casting. Fraunhofer researchers are currently working to detect and an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ecosystem stress caused by micropollutantsIn Switzerland, more than 30,000 different substances are used on a daily basis in innumerable products – pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, cleaning agents or industrial chemicals. Many of these substances find their way – via WWTPs – into surface waters, where they have adverse impacts on aquatic organisms and drinking water resources. To remove micropollutants from wastewater, around a hundred strateg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

America's dam crisis—was Oroville just a drop in the bucket?Last February, record storms and snowmelt threatened to overwhelm the two spillways of California's Oroville reservoir, the tallest dam in the United States. With less than an hour's notice, nearly 200,000 people were evacuated from downstream towns and cities. In the end, emergency measures prevented a full-scale catastrophe; California officials are now working feverishly to shore up the dam bef
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Single cells lined up like ducks in a rowThe higher the concentration of tumor cells in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of metastasis. The number of circulating tumor cells indicates how well a patient is responding to therapy. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new microhole chip that enables cells to be identified and characterized reliably within minutes.
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Gizmodo

Hit the Pavement With Amazon's One-Day Sale on Saucony Running Shoes Up to 50% Off Saucony Running Shoes You’ve probably been running outside for a few weeks now, but if you were looking for an excuse to pick up new running shoes, here it is. Amazon is marking down four styles (two men’s and two women’s) of Saucony running shoes to $60. But you’d better pick up the pace, because these prices only last for today. More Deals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dual role of fruit fly protein in connecting chromosome copiesNagoya University researchers identified combined function for Drosophila protein in launching and maintaining a process enabling chromatids to pair during DNA replication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intrinsic properties—the secret lives of accelerometersWhen different laboratories test the same accelerometer, such as the one in your smartphone, they often come up with very different values. There are several possible reasons: Perhaps the axes of the gimbal system used in testing are not perfectly aligned, or the internal axes of the device under test (DUT) itself are misligned, or maybe the DUT is mounted on the test table incorrectly. To remove
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A material that can switch between multiple phases that have distinct electronic, optical and magnetic properties(Phys.org)—A large team of researchers with members from China, the U.K., the U.S. and Japan has developed a material that can switch between multiple phases with distinct electronic, optical and magnetic properties. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they made their material, how it can be caused to switch properties and possible uses for it. Shriram Ramanathan
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Futurity.org

‘Housing equals health’ for some people with HIV/AIDS For people living with HIV/AIDS who have previously been homeless, supporting housing programs may lead to better immune system health and lower viral load, according to a new study. “Without stable housing it’s hard to achieve these good health outcomes.” Ask Elizabeth Bowen, lead study author, about the intersection of homelessness and HIV/AIDS in the United States and she’ll respond without he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea level rise may drive coastal nesting birds to extinctionRising sea levels and more frequent flooding events may drive coastal nesting birds around the world to extinction, a team of international researchers say following their 20-year study of Eurasian oystercatchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: US cities have worse inequality than Mexico, with rich and poor living side by sideThe cities of the Americas are unequal places.
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Gizmodo

This Song Uses Star Sounds to Blow Your Mind Image: Meklit Hadero We’re made of star stuff, as Carl Sagan once said. Even crazier, elements heavier than iron on the periodic table mostly come from the remnants of exploding stars, or supernovae. And what better way to explain our connectedness to these explosions than with the sounds of stars themselves? That’s what songwriter Meklit Hadero (who performs as Meklit) has done in her new song,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study unusual and extremely short-lived species of hydrogenThe nuclei of atoms found in nature typically have about the same number of protons and neutrons, and are stable – that is they remain intact forever. Increase the imbalance between the numbers of protons and neutrons, however, and the lifetime of an atomic nucleus can decrease remarkably, sometimes to being so short that we wonder whether we should even call the system "a nucleus."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subsidies promote overfishing and hurt small-scale fishers worldwideLarge-scale fisheries receive about four times more subsidies than their small-scale counterparts, with up to 60 per cent of those subsidies promoting overfishing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professors call for an end to the chaotic classification of organisms(Phys.org)—A pair of professors, one with Charles Darwin University, the other Southern Cross University, both in Australia, has published a Comment piece in the journal Nature decrying the chaotic state regarding the classification of complex organisms. In their paper, Stephen Garnett and Les Christidis contend that failure to regulate taxonomy in the coming years could cause serious problems for
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sharklike Fossil Fills in the Jaws Family TreeA new analysis of an ancient specimen helps to flesh out the marine predators’ evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

How a cosmic ‘hit and run’ flipped Saturn’s moon Enceladus, a large and icy oceanic moon of Saturn, appears to have tipped away from its original axis by about 55 degrees. “We found a chain of low areas, or basins, that trace a belt across the moon’s surface that we believe are the fossil remnants of an earlier, previous equator and poles,” says Radwan Tajeddine, an astronomer at Cornell University and a Cassini imaging team associate. “Their p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key greenhouse gases higher than any time over last 800,000 yearsThe most comprehensive collection of atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements, published today, confirms the relentless rise in some of the most important greenhouse gases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chimps found to pass on knowledge to the next generationPassing skills down through the generations, previously thought to be unique to humanity, has been discovered in chimpanzees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists add amplifier to quantum communication toolboxQuantum encryption using single photons is a promising technique for boosting the security of communication systems and data networks, but there are challenges in applying the method over large distances due to transmission losses. Using conventional optical amplification doesn't help as this disrupts the quantum link between sender and receiver, but physicists in Europe have found a solution – he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two-dimensional multiferroics in monolayer group IV monochalcogenidesElectronic devices have been constantly decreasing in size and increasing in speed and efficiency, from miniaturized personal computers to pocket-sized cell phones. Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University have discovered a class of two-dimensional (2-D) materials to aid in further reducing the size and improving the performance of various devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanoes as referees for life on EarthAt the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, 200 million years ago, some 60 percent of species living on Earth disappeared. Scientists suspected that magmatic activity and the release of CO2 were responsible for this environmental disaster. To corroborate this, one would need to find and to precisely date traces of this activity and make sure that it coincides with this mass extinction. The precise determin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early black holes may have grown in fits and spurtsA long-standing question in astrophysics is: how and when did supermassive black holes appear and grow in the early universe? New research using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) suggests that an answer to this question lies with the intermittent way giant black holes may consume material in the first billion years after the Big Bang.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: James Webb Telescope tested in thermal vacuum chamberNASA's Johnson Space Center's "Chamber A" in Houston is an enormous thermal vacuum testing chamber and now appears to be opening it's "mouth" to take in NASA's James Webb Space Telescope for testing.
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Futurity.org

Does a woman’s risk of suicide peak around 50? The risk of suicide, particularly for women in English-speaking countries, peaks in midlife, according to a new study that suggests middle-aged people now commit suicide at almost twice the rate of those in their 30s or 60s. The findings are consistent with data from surveys from the UK Office for National Statistics that reveal that happiness is lowest among those close to 50 years old. Similar
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WIRED

Meet the People Who Search for Friendship on Craigslist Hello, Internet? I'm looking for a friend. The post Meet the People Who Search for Friendship on Craigslist appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Pied Piper’s New Internet Isn’t Just Possible—It’s Almost Here People in the real world are hard at work trying to rebuild the internet in a way that comes closer to its decentralized ideal. The post Pied Piper's New Internet Isn't Just Possible—It's Almost Here appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research reveals link between family breakdown and homelessnessAustralia is going through a well-documented housing affordability crisis. Single parents are especially vulnerable to rising housing costs, as they rely on a single income to provide a decent home for the family. Past research has found that:
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Stimulating a Nerve in the Ear Make You a Whiz in Mandarin Class?A technology program tries to enhance the brain’s learning ability -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Etiopien blokerer for 100 millioner borgeres internetadgangDet er tredje gang på et år, at etioperne mister adgangen til internettet pga. lækkede eksamensopgaver.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mercury emissions in Southeast Asian waters threaten Australian birdsAustralian bred Frigatebirds that migrate to Southeast Asian waters risk unacceptable levels of mercury contamination, according to a study led by a Monash University biologist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How hot were the oceans when life first evolved?We know little about Earth's surface temperatures for the first 4 billion years or so of its history. This presents a limitation into research of life's origins on Earth and also how it might arise on distant worlds as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing through materials with visible lightWith yogurt and crushed glass, University of Michigan researchers have taken a step toward using visible light to image inside the body. Their method for focusing light through these materials is much faster and simpler than today's dominant approach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How flattening our dimension can bring better graphics into the foldIn order to create 3-D models in the field of computer graphics, thin sheets of material are layered together to create a single object. Dr. Scott Schaefer, professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, is focused on peeling back those layers in order to create more realistic graphics than ever before.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen roser afklaring af akutspeciale Efter mange års diskussion er det positivt, at der med Sundhedsstyrelsens anbefaling om at indføre et akutspeciale kommer en afklaring på spørgsmålet, mener Lægeforeningen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Help astronomers find 'baby' galaxies that give birth to new starsA new citizen science project, led by astronomers at the University of Minnesota, is asking volunteers to help them with web classifications of galaxy spectra to find "baby" galaxies that are giving birth to new stars.
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Science : NPR

The Making Of Emotions, From Pleasurable Fear To Bittersweet Relief Since ancient times, philosophers and scientists have viewed emotions as innate. In the latest Invisibilia, a psychologist argues that emotions spring from the sum of our experiences, not just wiring. (Image credit: Sara Wong for NPR)
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Gizmodo

Must-Read of the Morning: Behind the Scenes at Russia's State Propaganda Machine Vladimir Putin and Editor-in-chief of RT (Russia Today) Margarita Simonyan attend an exhibition marking RT’s 10th anniversary in Moscow, on December 10, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP) The Moscow Times has a fascinating look at the Russian media outlet RT, formerly known as Russia Today. The Kremlin-funded operation is highly secretive, thanks to non-disclosure agree
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Science-Based Medicine

A closer look at generic drugsIn the struggle to contain growing healthcare costs, generic drugs have the potential to save millions. What gives us confidence they are equivalent to brand-name drugs?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Biodiversity Is More Than Just Counting SpeciesEcologists are increasingly looking at how richness of traits — rather than number of species — helps set the health of ecosystems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Lægeselskaber: Speciallæger i akutmedicin gavner ikke alle patienter Sundhedsstyrelsen anbefaler at etablere et akutspeciale. Men ikke alle patienter, der kommer ind akut, har gavn af at blive mødt af en speciallæge i akut medicin, lyder det fra flere lægevidenskabelige selskaber.
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Live Science

Asteroid Collision May Have Tipped Saturn's Moon EnceladusEnceladus, an icy moon of Saturn that could host life, may have tipped over long ago.
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Ingeniøren

Folketinget vedtager omstridt forslag om havbrugEt flertal i Folketinget har i dag vedtaget et lovforslag, der skal sikre rammerne for flere havbrug i danske farvande. Forslaget har været meget diskuteret grundet spørgsmål om de miljømæssige følger af flere havbrug.
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Ingeniøren

Prominente udfordrere på vej med ’altid lyttende højttalere’Både Apple og opfinderen af Android-styresystemet er på vej med nye enheder med indbyggede digitale taleassistenter. De skal udbrede funktioner fra smartphones og computere endnu mere i verden omkring os.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The Last Animals - fighting to save animals from extinctionKate Brooks' documentary focuses on individuals trying to save animals from extinction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Design student turns waste plastic shopping bags into skateboardsA compact press that turns plastic shopping bags into skateboards has been designed by a student at Brunel University London in a bid to tackle community litter and deforestation - and give kids a cheap new hobby.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Babies categorize colors the same way adults doBabies divide hues into five categories, much like adults, a result that suggests color categorization is built into the brain.
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Scientific American Content: Global

NIH Budget Cuts: It's Not Just the MoneyPresident Trump's proposed cutbacks could lead to the collapse of the largest biomedical research enterprise in the world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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WIRED

The Supreme Court Just Bolstered Your Right to Repair Stuff Impression Products Inc. vs. Lexmark International Inc. is an important ruling that clears the way for small businesses to fix your stuff. The post The Supreme Court Just Bolstered Your Right to Repair Stuff appeared first on WIRED .
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Dagens Medicin

Nye ansigter i Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin De to praktiserende læger Thomas Birk Kristiansen og Niels Saxtrup er begge blevet ansat i DSAM.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Space station's view of Florida at nightThis nighttime photo of Florida was taken from the International Space Station by Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency, in March 2017.
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Live Science

The Secret to Sperm's Sexy SwimmingHuman sperm cells get an extra oomph forward as they swim, thanks to interconnected elastic springs in their tails that communicate with other regions of the tail, a new study finds.
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Live Science

Brain-Hacking Tech Gets Real: 5 Companies Leading the ChargeHow will this tech help society, and which companies are leading the charge?
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Ingeniøren

Microsoft vil fjerne mystiske vinduesglimt i Windows Problemet stammer fra en opdatering af Office 365. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/microsoft-skal-fjerne-mystiske-vinduesglimt-windows-1077212 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boosting economic growth and tackling climate change go hand in handCombining growth strategies with climate agendas could have a positive impact on economic activity, according to a new OECD report involving Imperial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soaring medical costs from bicycle accidentsBicycle use has skyrocketed in popularity, but it's also led to more accidents, with medical costs from non-fatal bike crashes climbing steadily by $789 million annually, according to a new study by UC San Francisco.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Ultra-tough antibiotic to fight superbugsThe modified drug might help tackle resistant superbug infections, experts hope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cleaning up coal-mining pollution in a World Heritage-listed riverThe Wollangambe River in New South Wales is a unique gift of nature, flowing through the stunning Wollemi National Park, wilderness areas and the World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains. It's an adventure tourism hotspot, with thousands of people clambering through the river's majestic canyons each year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows Thwaites Glacier's ice loss may not progress as quickly as thoughtThe melt rate of West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier is an important concern, because this glacier alone is currently responsible for about 1 percent of global sea level rise. A new NASA study finds that Thwaites' ice loss will continue, but not quite as rapidly as previous studies have estimated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery of electric fish genus solved, new species identifiedSolving a 140-year old taxonomic puzzle, Cornell researchers have identified and described a new species of electric fish from the Ogooué River in Gabon, Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel experimental strategy elucidates complex crystal structureResearchers at the Universities of Warwick and Cardiff have used a combined powder XRD, solid-state NMR and computational approach to determine the structure of 3',5'-bis-O-decanoyl-2'-deoxyguanosine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Collagen from a Tyrannosaurus rex bone proves Jurassic Park will never existPalaeontologists at the University of Manchester have definitively proven there will never be a Jurassic Park after re-analysing collagen from a Tyrannosaurus rex bone discovered more than a decade ago.
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Science | The Guardian

US joins only Syria and Nicaragua on climate accord 'no' list Only other UN members not party to Paris agreement never signed up, but for reasons of war and principle, not disbelief Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris agreement on climate change means the US joins only two other countries not signed up to the historic accord. The only other UN members not signed up are Nicaragua and Syria, which both chose not to enter into the climate accord i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Mapping groundwater from the airStanford Earth's Rosemary Knight recently spearheaded a project to map underground freshwater resources and forecast the intrusion of saltwater into aquifers beneath the California coastal town of Marina.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First full-length structure of GLP-1 receptor bound to peptide agonistHeptares Therapeutics has published the first high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the full-length glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor bound to a peptide agonist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low cost, scalable water splitting fuels the future hydrogen economyThe "clean energy economy" always seems to be a few steps away but never quite here. Most energy for transportation, heating and cooling and manufacturing is still delivered using fossil fuel inputs. But with a few scientific breakthroughs, hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, could be the energy carrier of a future clean energy society. Taking one step closer toward the elusive go
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building better brains—a bioengineered upgrade for organoidsA few years ago, Jürgen Knoblich and his team at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) have pioneered brain organoid technology. They developed a method for cultivating three-dimensional brain-like structures, so called cerebral organoids, in a dish. This discovery has tremendous potential as it could revolutionize drug discovery and disease research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In atomic propellers, quantum phenomena can mimic everyday physicsIn molecules, there are certain groups of atoms that are able to rotate. This movement occurs under the influence of random stimuli from the environment, and is not continuous, but occurs in jumps. It is generally believed that such jumps occur in a manner that is typical of classical objects, such as a fan blade prodded by a finger. Chemists from the institutes of the Polish Academy of Sciences i
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Ingeniøren

Nu skal alle nye batterier registreres - hvis de er forbundet til elnettetEl-installatører skal fra i dag registrere, hvor i Danmark der kobles batterier på elnettet. Det vil give elnetselskaberne bedre mulighed for at sikre en høj forsyningssikkerhed, mener de.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China vows to adhere to Paris climate dealChina will "steadfastly" implement the Paris climate pact, Premier Li Keqiang said Thursday, urging others to do likewise as US President Donald Trump was due to announce whether he will keep Washington in the deal.
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The Atlantic

Ghost World Endures for Its Cynicism—and Pathos “This is so bad it’s almost good,” Rebecca (Scarlett Johansson) says with a laugh to her best friend Enid (Thora Birch) at their high-school graduation, marveling at the unironic chintziness of the band onstage. “This is so bad, it’s gone past good and back to bad again,” Enid snarks back. If the early minutes of Terry Zwigoff’s 2001 classic of disaffection Ghost World have any dramatic tension a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists improve an X-ray fluorescence analysis algorithmScientists from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have performed computations and derived new equations to conduct X-ray fluorescence analysis with higher accuracy in comparison to current algorithms. This method doesn't require a large number of reference materials and operates with complex composition samples. The chemists have represented their research in the jo
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Viden

Microsoft-grundlægger afslører verdens største flyFlyet skal bruges til at sende raketter ud i rummet langt billigere end nuværende metoder.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt studie viser genetisk sammenhæng mellem autisme og høj intelligensGenetisk score for autisme og for uddannelse hænger sammen med højere IQ.
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Ingeniøren

Dødssyge europæiske børn står i kø til genterapiBørn, som lider af en immunfejl, der forvandler alle bakterier til potentielle dræbere, håber på helbredelse med en 4,4 millioner kroner dyr genterapikur.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paleobiologists make intriguing new discoveries about dinosaur ancestorsAn international group of researchers has discovered that the most ancient dinosaurs' ancestors were quadrupedal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Generation green: smart cities bring new eco-friendly jobsSmart cities across Europe are pioneering all sorts of cutting-edge technologies to reduce pollution and boost energy efficiency, becoming green role models for others to follow. The eco-friendly push is not only helping to protect our planet, it's also stimulating growth and unleashing a new generation of jobs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First robotic cop joins Dubai policeAfter bringing in Lamborghinis and Ferraris to patrol roads, Dubai police have enrolled a robotic officer, the first in a unit that aims to make up a quarter of the force by 2030.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Once-flagging Alaska space business shows signs of liftoffWhen most people think of Alaska, they picture its thick forests, hulking grizzly bears and soaring, snow-covered peaks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A tool to protect police dogs in drug raids from overdosingPolice dogs simply follow their noses to sniff out narcotics. But inhaling powerful opioids can be deadly, so officers have a new tool to protect their four-legged partners: naloxone, a drug that has already been used for years to reverse overdoses in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geoscientific evidence for subglacial lakesDuring the last glacial period -- when the ice in the Antarctic was far thicker and extended further offshore than it does today -- it has been speculated that subglacial lakes existed beneath it. An international team of researchers has now successfully sampled the meter-thick sediment layers left behind by these lakes contemporary on the seafloor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disordersA detour on the road to regenerative medicine for people with muscular disorders is figuring out how to coax muscle stem cells to fuse together and form functioning skeletal muscle tissues. A study published June 1 by Nature Communications reports scientists identify a new gene essential to this process, shedding new light on possible new therapeutic strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultra-stable perovskite solar cell remains stable for more than a yearEPFL scientists have built a low-cost and ultra-stable perovskite solar cell that has been running at 11.2 percent efficiency for over a year, without loss in performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exposure to specific toxins and nutrients during late pregnancy & early life correlate w autism riskMount Sinai study uses a unique source -- baby teeth -- to reveal that both the timing and amount of exposure can affect diagnosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers flip the script on magnetocapacitanceThe study demonstrates for the first time a new type of magnetocapacitance, a phenomenon that could be useful in the next generation of 'spintronic' devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new twist on uranium's origin story, by CSU scientistsColorado State University biogeochemists found biogenic, non-crystalline uranium occurring naturally in a Wyoming roll front, offering new clues to the mineral's origins.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Artificial Intelligence for Everyone: A Next-Generation Customer ExperienceOrganizations today are challenged with mining, analyzing and putting to good use the vast amounts of data now flooding in from multiple checkpoints. How to utilize that data to get closer to internal and external customers? Jason Pontin sits down with Rob DeSisto, Chief Value Officer for Salesforce, to discuss the Salesforce Einstein AI initiative and how it is enabling organizations to glean bet
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder nyt krebsdyr i den mexicanske underverdenKrebsdyrspecialist Dr. Jørgen Olesen fra Statens Naturhistoriske Museum ved Københavns...
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Lyse haloer omkring klippesprækker fundet på MarsDer har eksisteret flydende vand på Mars i længere tid, end forskerne hidtil har troet. Det...
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The Atlantic

Is Trump's Climate-Change Agenda Politically Sustainable? Predictability is a necessity for the key industries that fit into America’s energy puzzle, especially electric utilities, oil and gas producers, and automobile manufacturers. All of these businesses make huge capital investments with very long lifespans. Utilities build power plants that provide electricity for decades. Oil companies drill wells that take years to complete. Auto companies plan c
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The Atlantic

How the Venezuelan Opposition Could Win In late March, the Constitutional Chamber of Venezuela’s Supreme Tribunal issued a breathtaking pair of rulings that threatened the foundations of the separation of powers. In their rulings, the judges urged President Nicolas Maduro to jail opposition figures in the National Assembly for treason, illegally authorized him to modify national hydrocarbon policy, and declared that either they themsel
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Science : NPR

A Venture Capitalist On The Paris Climate Deal Rachel Martin talks with Alan Salzman, the CEO and co-founder of VantagePoint Capital Partners, about President Trump and the Paris climate agreement. Salzman's firm has invested in renewable energy.
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Science : NPR

Invisibilia: A Man Finds A New Emotion Locked In A Word When anthropologist Renato Rosaldo went to live with a Philippine tribe that was known for beheading people, he couldn't grasp the emotion that fueled this violence. Then his wife suddenly died. (Image credit: Marina Muun for NPR)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultra-stable perovskite solar cell remains stable for more than a yearEPFL scientists have built a low-cost and ultra-stable perovskite solar cell that has been running at 11.2 percent efficiency for over a year, without loss in performance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new twist on uranium's origin story, by CSU scientistsUranium, the radioactive element that fuels nuclear power plants and occurs naturally in the Earth's crust, is typically mined from large sandstone deposits deep underground. The uranium in these deposits, which are called roll fronts, has long been thought to form over millions of years via chemical reactions of sulfur and other non-biological compounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers flip the script on magnetocapacitanceCapacitors, electronic components that store and quickly release a charge, play an important role in many types of electrical circuits. They'll play an equally important role in next-generation spintronic devices, which take advantage of not only electron charge but also spin—the tiny magnetic moment of each electron.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meltwater lakes under the Antarctic Ice Sheet accelerated glacial retreat in the Earth's pastDuring the last glacial period - when the ice in the Antarctic was far thicker and extended further offshore than it does today - it has been speculated that subglacial lakes existed beneath it. An international team of researchers has now successfully sampled the metre-thick sediment layers left behind by these lakes contemporary on the seafloor. This is the outcome of a study by Gerhard Kuhn and
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Faceless' fish, last seen in 1873, found off AustraliaThe unique deep-sea fish was last spotted back in 1873.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny forskning skal afsløre om støj kan forårsage kræftNu skal mistanken om at støj kan øge risikoen for bl.a. brystkræft undersøges nærmere. Ny nordisk undersøgelse, ledet af Kræftens Bekæmpelse, skal afsløre om støj reelt kan give kræft.
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Science : NPR

Predicting A Hurricane's Intensity May Have Gotten Easier Forecasters have had a great track record telling people about a hurricane's path. What continues to vex meteorologists is predicting how strong the storm will be — but that might be changing.
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Ingeniøren

EU: Danmark har seks år til at indføre roadpricing for lastbilerOpdateret: Lastbiler i ni EU-lande - heriblandt Danmark - skal fra 2023 betale afgift for hver kørt kilometer, mener Europakommissionen. Danske Vognmænd vil have forslaget kørt over.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The art of everyday objects growing like mushroomsWhat is nicer after a long day than sinking your feet into comfortable slippers? But one Italian designer is hoping to show that shoes made from mushrooms can be just as cosy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Renewable energy expected to continue growth, despite TrumpPresident Donald Trump may abandon U.S. pledges to reduce carbon emissions, but global economic realities ensure he is unlikely to reverse the accelerating push to adopt cleaner forms of energy.
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Viden

Nu kan du forudbestille værktøjer til hackingHemmelighedsfuld hackergruppe lover hackerværktøjer til de, der vil betale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump's cellphone use worries security expertsPresident Donald Trump, who blasted Hillary Clinton for using a personal email server, might be a walking magnet for eavesdropping and malware if he is using an unsecured cellphone to chat with foreign leaders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK campaigner takes on Facebook 'dark ads' during electionFrom a tech hub in London, a teenage entrepreneur is working to shed light on the use of targeted Facebook ads in Britain's election campaign, amid concern that they are skewing democracy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cape Town cuts back to survive worst drought in 100 yearsAs Cape Town suffers its worst drought in a century, residents have been told to restrict showers to two minutes and flush toilets only when "absolutely necessary".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investors pick Tesla's promise over GM's steady profitsWhen General Motors CEO Mary Barra introduced the Chevrolet Bolt at the CES gadget show last year, she took a shot at Tesla.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Colossal rocket-launching plane rolls toward testingA colossal aircraft capable of launching satellite-toting rockets into space is closer to testing, having been rolled out of a hangar in the desert, its creators said on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan launches satellite in bid for super accurate GPS systemJapan successfully launched a satellite Thursday as part of a broader effort to build a homegrown geolocation system that boosts the accuracy of car navigation systems and smartphone maps to mere centimetres.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europol using everyday objects to trace child sex abusersA particular shampoo brand, a magazine cover, a shopping bag or even a wallpaper pattern are among the clues Europol posted online Thursday, hoping they may help trace child sex abusers and their victims.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsstyrelsen: Ja til en akutuddannelseSundhedsstyrelsen indstiller til sundhedsministeren, at der oprettes et nyt speciale i akutmedicin i Danmark.
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Ingeniøren

Ny analyse: Nej, der findes ingen sorte huller med hård skalForskere har påvist det, som næsten alle er enige om, men ingen kunne være fuldstændigt sikre på: De supertunge objekter i galaksernes midte er sorte huller og ikke en form for supertunge objekter med hård skal.
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Science | The Guardian

Inferior by Angela Saini – a powerful exploration of women's 'inferiority' There is nothing inferior about Angela Saini’s new book on how science got women wrong and is still struggling to free itself from bias When Mrs Caroline Kennard , an active member of the women’s movement in Boston, wrote to Charles Darwin in late 1881 seeking reassurance that his theories of evolution didn’t entail the inferiority of women, she was disappointed by the great man’s reply. The auth
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The Atlantic

The Global Reaction to Trump's Climate-Change Decision The Trump administration’s reported announcement that it is withdrawing from the Paris climate change agreement has prompted nations and world leaders to reiterate their commitment to the global pact. Signed in 2015 during the Obama administration, the Paris Agreement is an unprecedented global climate deal that aims to contain greenhouse gas emissions and protect the world against global warming
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Ingeniøren

Region H sætter flere it-folk på Sundhedsplatformen for at sikre gevinsterne It-organisationen til drift og vedligehold bag Sundhedsplatformen øges til 350, 'således at gevinsterne ved investeringen i Sundhedsplatformen kan realiseres,' lyder det. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/region-h-saetter-flere-mand-fast-paa-sundhedsplatformen-1077159 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Rapport: Overfyldning, tæring og dårlige svejsninger udløste gødningskatastrofe i FredericiaDer var fyldt 1.000 ton mere gødning end tilladt i den tank, der kollapsede hos virksomheden Dan Gødning på Fredericia Havn sidste år. Det fik en dårlig svejsning til at gå i stykker og tanken til at revne fra top til tå, fastslår ny rapport.
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The Scientist RSS

Snake SecretsSee a boa species that scientists hadn't witnessed alive in more than 50 years.
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The Scientist RSS

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgEIn the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands-and under their own skin-to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.
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The Scientist RSS

How Moral Disgust Can Simultaneously Protect and Endanger HumanityThe human brain's insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.
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The Scientist RSS

Learning from Icelands Model for Genetic ResearchThe Scandinavian island's unique combination of genetic homogeneity, genealogical tradition, and high participation in research make it a prime location for discovery and validation of drug targets.
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The Scientist RSS

Amlie Gaudin studies how plants survive harsh environmentsThe UC Davis agroecologist grew up on a farm and now works to help farmers grow more resilient crops.
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The Scientist RSS

Micronutrients, Macro ImpactAt the interface of food, nutrition, and agriculture, Lindsay Allen's research has been informing nutrition guidelines and policies around the world for decades.
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The Scientist RSS

Long-term Memory Storage Begins ImmediatelyIn mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex-where memories are maintained long-term-start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.
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The Scientist RSS

Bone Marrow Isnt the Only Source of PlateletsScientists have estimated that about half of murine platelet production occurs in the lungs.
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The Scientist RSS

Genes Composition Guides More-Optimal DietsFruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.
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