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The Atlantic
Former Penn State President Sentenced to Jail Over Sandusky Scandal Former Pennsylvania State University President Graham Spanier received a minimum sentence of two months in jail, followed by two months of house arrest, on Friday after failing to report a 2001 allegation that the university’s ex-assistant football coach, Jerry Sandusky, had sexually abused a young boy. Despite his refusal to plead guilty, Spanier was convicted of child endangerment, a misdemeano
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the oppositeLow levels tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, does reduce stress, but in a highly dose-dependent manner, new research confirms.
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cognitive science
Sex Robots Are Coming, And They're Not As Skeevy As You Think: "Sex doll manufacturers and independent roboticists are designing and building the first humanlike robots that people can have sex with." submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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LATEST

The Atlantic
UN Security Council Increases Sanctions on North Korea The United Nations Security Council voted Friday to broaden sanctions on North Korea in a unanimous decision from the council’s 15 member nations. The new sanctions will apply a travel ban and asset freeze to 14 people and four North Korean entities. Among the blacklisted officials is the head of North Korea’s overseas spying operations, senior members of North Korea’s Workers’ Party, and heads o
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Ars Technica
Crazy VR game lets you explore a world made from 4D mathematical models Enlarge / Prepare to unlock a new world of dimensional perception thanks to the mind-blowing VR app 4D Toys . (credit: 4D Toys) I'm hesitant to describe a virtual reality experience as a "killer app" ever again , but I'm oh so tempted once more. I just emerged from a glimpse into the fourth dimension by way of a VR experience, and I'm still amazed and perplexed by what I played with. My extra-dim
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Live Science
Uterine Fibroids: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment
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Live Science
Spider Bites and Bee Stings: Symptoms and TreatmentsMost bug bites and stings are usually just uncomfortable. However, some people are allergic to the venom of certain insects or spiders and can have severe, even life-threatening reactions.
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Live Science
Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment & PreventionAbdominal pain, bloating and gas all symptoms of IBS
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The Atlantic
Japan's Lower Parliament Passes Law Allowing Its Emperor to Abdicate When Japanese Emperor Akihito announced his plans to retire last summer following a bout of ill health, he faced a major logistical barrier: The Imperial Household Law, which governs Japan’s royal line of succession, did not allow for his abdication. Before Akihito’s reign, the last abdication in Japan occurred in 1817. On Friday, Japan’s lower parliament agreed on a solution to its legal obstacl
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Women Are Proving They Don't Need Men Around To Make It In The Wild #NakedAndAfraidXL | Sundays at 11/10c While the men go off on their own, the women take matters into their own hands and try to catch some dinner. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid-xl More info: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid-xl/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.fa
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NYT > Science
Meeting the Paris Climate Goals Was Always Hard. Without the U.S., It Is Far Harder.World leaders insist they will tackle global warming without the cooperation of the United States. But it’s unclear how they can stave off rising temperatures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are soft contact lenses safe for children? Risks seem no higher than in adultsSoft contact lenses can be safely prescribed to children and adolescents, with no increase in adverse effects compared to adults, according to a review.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists launch global agenda to curb social, human rights abuses in seafood sectorAs the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bone loss is another hidden pathology caused by malaria infectionMalaria infection causes bone loss as a result of chronic bone inflammation induced by accumulated Plasmodium by-products in bone, report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists measure black hole's tilt, spin for clues to how massive stars dieScientists working with the LIGO Scientific Collaboration measured and interpreted the spin and alignment of a newly formed black hole detected on Jan. 4 by LIGO. The team also simulated the gravitational wave signal produced in the collision that formed the new black hole.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Details of Lassa virus structure could inform development of vaccines, therapiesA 10-year Lassa virus research project has yielded structural and functional details of a key viral surface protein that could help advance development of Lassa vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics, which are currently lacking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dairy products a good dietary source of some types of vitamin KUS dairy products are a significant source of the MK form of vitamin K and indicates that MK forms of the nutrient are more present in commonly-consumed foods than previously thought, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding a river's 'thermal landscape' may be the key to saving itInexpensive sensor technologies have enabled an explosion in the availability of river temperature data and in statistical models for understanding them. These new data and tools are enabling a deeper understanding of the important role of fluctuations in a river's thermal regimes that will enable more effective ecosystem management and restoration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tumor induction from a distanceNeighboring tissues can send signals inducing tumorigenesis, researchers suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mice will help reveal the roles of human brown fatMice have metabolically active brown fat deposits similar to the largest depot found in people, scientists have discovered.
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Gizmodo
Anker's Racing Into the Car Accessory Market With an Affordable Dash Cam Roav DashCam Having conquered the USB charger market, and with impressive inroads in smart home goods and personal health devices , Anker’s ready to start taking over your car, starting with a brand new dash cam . The DashCam is marketed under a new brand called Roav, which will be the home for all of Anker’s automotive initiatives going forward (I’m patiently waiting for the Anker electric car).
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The benefits of beaversThey can be controversial, but scientists say beavers are good for the environment and biodiversity.
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The Atlantic
Mueller’s Investigation Goes Wide Special Counsel Robert Mueller is casting a wide net in his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and whether President Trump’s campaign colluded with Moscow. The Associated Press reported Friday that the former FBI director’s inquiry will absorb a federal criminal investigation into Paul Manafort, the taciturn political operative who led Trump’s campaign last
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Climate Fallout and Pharma Faults What We’re Following After Paris: In the aftermath of President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Accord, many world leaders have expressed disappointment in the U.S. and reaffirmed their own commitment to the pact. Perhaps more than any other problem facing the world, climate change demands a collective solution—and as Uri Friedman argues , Trump’s withdrawal marks a dangerous return t
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Gizmodo
It Comes at Night Gouges Out an Intensely Intimate Horror Story From an Unseen Apocalypse There’s an apocalypse happening in It Comes at Night but we never get to see it. We see and hear only faint inklings of its terrors. What we do see—the desperation of a family trying to stay alive—is far more terrifying than any monster or zombie lurking in the darkness. It Comes at Night examines the idea of community, how one grows and what can make it wither. At first blush, the world doesn’t
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Live Science
Want to Really Boost the Economy? Stay in the Paris AgreementPresident Trump cited economic factors for withdrawing from the Paris climate accord, but most research suggests reducing emissions will actually boost the economy.
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Science | The Guardian
CSIRO cooperation with Chinese defence contractor should raise questions The national science agency is in a research partnership with a Chinese state-owned enterprise responsible for the same advanced military technologies Australia’s intelligence community is working hard to guard against In April 2017 a joint centre for advanced science and technology research was launched at the University of Technology, Sydney. The partner and funder is the China Electronics Grou
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Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 13. Five rad and random things I found this week.The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 13. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Wonder Woman is awesome, but it’s got some major problems DC Wonder Woman is a terrifically fun movie, deftly balancing action sequences and emotional beats. Gal Gadot is charismatic as the eponymous anti-war Amazon princess, easily carrying the movie on her armored shoulders. But there's one basic problem. The storytelling is aimless and occasionally just downright incoherent. Light spoilers ahead! Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frailer patients at much greater risk of institutional care and death after discharge from hospitalIndependent of age, frail patients are almost twice as likely to die in the year following admission to critical care, and even more likely to need nursing home care after discharge from hospital, compared with patients who are not frail, according to new research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older patients have a higher pain tolerance after major surgery -- or do they?New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting in Geneva (June 3-5) suggests that age plays a part in the level of pain experienced after major surgery, with older people most likely to better tolerate serious post-operative pain. However, pain-related impact on physical function does not decline, suggesting older patients are in fact experiencing pain but not admitting to it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International variation on definition of brain death must be cleared up to restore public confidenceA session at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Geneva, Switzerland (June 3-5) will focus on the international variation in the definition of death, which experts say must be cleared up to restore both public and professional confidence, and also to help improve management of patients at the end of life to improve successful organ donation.
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The Atlantic
The Trump Administration Issues a Defense of Stonewalling Congress In early 2011, a Republican senator wrote to the Obama administration asking for a response to claims by a whistleblower that firearms lost in a sting operation gone awry had been used in the murder of a federal border patrol agent named Brian Terry. The GOP was in the minority then, and the senator, Charles Grassley of Iowa, controlled no committee nor had any power to compel the Obama administr
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Spicer, No Spicing Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt refused to provide President Trump’s position on climate change. European Council President Donald Tusk called Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement a “big mistake” and touted new agreements between China and Europe as demonstrating “solidarity with futur
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The Atlantic
Q of the Week: Are You Optimistic About Mitigating Climate Change? On Thursday, President Trump decided to pull the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, an international pact that aims to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. This week, we asked our Politics & Policy Daily readers whether they are optimistic about the United States’ ability to address climate change. Here’s what they said. Betsy Schneier, a Seattle resident, is confident that states like hers can m
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The Atlantic
Is the Unemployment Rate Real, or What? The Trump administration is touting the new jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Indeed there is tout-worthy material. Although the pace of job creation has slowed, the unemployment rate is now at its lowest point since March 2001. Rather remarkably, it is lower now than in any single month in the quarter-century between 1971 and 1998 . This morning, Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway twe
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Sig Hansen's Doctor Is Worried About One Thing With Sig's Heart Health #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Captain Sig may be cleared for opilio season, but his doctor warns him about the potential risks of being in situations that are too stressful. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Gizmodo
Former Trump Spokeswoman Cries Censorship Because She Has No Idea How Twitter Works CNN Who among us hasn’t claimed censorship from “the man” at the slightest inconvenience? On Friday, political strategist and former Trump campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson took to Twitter to suggest the site was “suppressing” her tweets about Kathy Griffin. Given the absurdity of whining about a comedian while the president is selling out planet Earth to Big Oil interests, that may have been
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The Scientist RSS
Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders TrapsPrey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.
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Popular Science
New heat-resistant ceramic can be squished like a marshmallow Science Potential applications include insulation, firefighter protection, and water filtration. It’s light enough to balance on a fuzzy blade of grass, incredibly heat-resistant, and can be squished like a marshmallow. It’s also a ceramic. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees strengthening and weakening of Tropical Depression BeatrizNASA satellites have been keeping an eye on the tropical depression over southern Mexico that strengthened into a tropical storm for half of a day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Olive oil nutrient linked to processes that prevent cancer in brainResearch into oleic acid -- the primary ingredient in olive oil -- has shown how it can help prevent cancer-causing genes from functioning in cells, and may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain.
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Gizmodo
The More Female Dumpling Squids Bone, the Sooner They Die Image: Mark Norman / Museum Victoria/ Wikimedia Commons Female dumpling squids just can’t catch a break—mating is awful for them. Insemination can induce physical trauma, take a long time, and sometimes the male will just keep boning the female while predators are around. Poor, tiny little boning dumpling squids. Given the apparent horrors of sex, some scientists from Australia and the United Sta
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Viden
Tre virtuelle videoer til weekendenVirtual og augmented reality lader dig blandt andet spille Mario i en kagebutik
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NYT > Science
Does Donald Trump Still Think Climate Change Is a Hoax? No One Can SayNo one working for President Trump who was sent out to explain his decision on the Paris accords knows or would say if he believes in climate change.
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Live Science
1st Test Track for Superfast Hyperloop Transport System Opens in EuropeEurope’s first hyperloop test facility was unveiled this week.
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Live Science
Man Dies After His Tattoo Gets Infected with Ocean BacteriaA 31-year-old man died after he went swimming in the Gulf of Mexico and his tattoo became infected with flesh-eating bacteria.
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Big Think
Why Promoting Human Rights May Not Be the Way To a More Peaceful World Stephen M. Walt, a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, tackles some seemingly non-controversial statements about human rights, democracy, and international law. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemical 'dance' of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuelsIn a new study, scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen - the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.
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WIRED
String Theory’s Weirdest Ideas Finally Make Sense—Thanks to VR This isn't a video game. It's a classroom. The post String Theory's Weirdest Ideas Finally Make Sense—Thanks to VR appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
The Echo and Echo Dot Are Both on Sale For Some of the Best Prices Ever Echo Dot , $40 with code DOTSAVE10 | Echo , $140 with code ECHOSAVE40 - Prime members only. Update : This deal will only work if you’ve never purchased an Echo device previously on the same account. You’ll also need to either be a Prime member, or have purchased an Alexa-compatible smart home device in the past. We’ve seen a few discounts lately on Amazon’s uber-popular Echo and Echo Dot smart sp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ceramic nanofiber 'sponges' could be used for flexible insulation, water purificationCeramic materials tend to shatter when deformed, but new research shows a way of using ultra-thin ceramic nanofibers to make squishy, heat-resistant sponges with a wide variety of potential uses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are dense star clusters the origin of the gravitational waves discovered by LIGO?Much to their surprise, scientists are finding dozens of black holes deep within densely packed collections of stars called globular clusters.
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Gizmodo
Neptune's Rings Are Tragically Underrated A look at some of Neptune’s rings from Voyager 2. (Image: NASA) Saturn’s rings are easy to love. They’re hauntingly beautiful reminders of how insignificant we are in the scope of the universe. But they also unfairly outshine the rest of the gas giants’ ring systems. Uranus, for example, is a wonderland encompassed by at least 13 rings . Jupiter’s got its own ghostly rings , too. But perhaps the
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Science : NPR
What Leaving The Paris Climate Accord Means For Corporations NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Christopher Flavelle, who covers climate change for Bloomberg , about some of the corporate winners and losers of President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement.
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Science : NPR
Week In Politics: Trump Withdraws U.S. From Paris Climate Accord NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times , about President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement and what it means for the country's role on the world stage.
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Science : NPR
White House Defends U.S. Withdrawal From Paris Climate Agreement The Trump administration is defending its decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement, despite international condemnation.
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Ars Technica
Data mining astronomical records fails to falsify Einstein Enlarge / The orbits of stars and gas around the Milky Way's black hole. (credit: M. Schartmann and L. Calcada/ European Southern Observatory and Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik. ) Testing general relativity is a fraught business. The theory has proven to be so robust that anyone who thinks it's wrong gets slapped around by reality in a pretty serious way. The tests that we appl
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Gizmodo
Researchers Used Rideshare Service To Test a Stingray-Detecting Device Photo: Getty Researchers at the University of Washington are developing tech to detect the use of a controversial device used by law enforcement to track and surveil cellphones. Recently, the researchers conducted tests in Seattle and Milwaukee over a two-month period, paying rideshare service drivers $25 a week to haul around a device which may detect cell-site simulators. Law enforcement agenci
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Live Science
Sleepiness and Snoring Tougher for Women, Study SuggestsSleep disorders may affect women more severely than men.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic’s Week in Culture Don’t Miss Imagining a Black Wonder Woman — Maya Rupert reflects on how the Amazon warrior’s struggles always felt uniquely similar to her own. Credit Film Wonder Woman, Heroine of the Post-Truth Age — Megan Garber points out that the character is perfectly at home in a culture contending with weaponized lies. With Wonder Woman , DC Comics Finally Gets It Right — Christopher Orr describes how a l
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The Atlantic
Leo Varadkar: Ireland's New Prime Minister Leo Varadkar was voted the new leader of Ireland’s ruling Fine Gael party Friday, putting him in line to become the country’s next prime minister, or Taoiseach. It’s a victory that’s nothing short of historic: The 38-year-old son of an Indian immigrant will become the country’s first openly gay premier and the youngest leader in its history. “If my election today shows anything, it is that prejud
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy could 'turn off' severe allergiesA single treatment giving life-long protection from severe allergies such as asthma could be made possible by recent immunology research.
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WIRED
Hack Brief: Dangerous ‘Fireball’ Adware Infects a Quarter Billion PCs A widespread adware infection hides the ability to inflict far worse than spammy browser tweaks. The post Hack Brief: Dangerous 'Fireball' Adware Infects a Quarter Billion PCs appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Of Course Google’s Waymo Is Building Self-Driving Trucks Autonomous big rigs could make trucking safer, and make Waymo some money too. The post Of Course Google's Waymo Is Building Self-Driving Trucks appeared first on WIRED .
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Inside Science
The Science Behind Michael Phelps' Success The Science Behind Michael Phelps' Success Renowned swimmer discusses the strategies and expert guidance that helped him win 28 Olympic medals. Michael_Phelps_conquista_20ª_medalha_de_ouro_e_é_ovacionado_1036422-09082016-_mg_7107_cropped.jpg Michael Phelps at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, where he won five gold medals and one silver. Image credits: Fernando Frazão/Agência Brasil vi
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Gizmodo
Switch's Netflix-Like Classic Game Service Is A Rare Example Of Nintendo Listening The noun “Nintendo” can also be used as an adjective. When a company makes players download a separate smartphone app for voice chat? That’s Nintendo. Friend codes? Very Nintendo. Not making Metroid Prime 4 ? SO NINTENDO. But last night, the company behind Switch made a move that was resoundingly un-Nintendo: it actually listened to fans. In January, when first detailing how the Switch’s online s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For older adults, antibiotics may not be appropriate treatment for some UTIsIn a new research paper published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Thomas E. Finucane, M.D., of the Johns Hopkins Geriatrics Center at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, suggests that prescribing antibiotics for urinary tract infections (or 'UTIs') may often be avoided among older adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specific long-term therapy may not prevent fractures in older womenBisphosphonates are sometimes used to treat osteoporosis. Studies have shown that the risk for bone fractures lessens when women with low bone mineral density take these medications for between one and four years. However, little is known about whether taking bisphosphonates for longer has the same effect. A team of researchers examined whether older women taking bisphosphonates for 10-13 years ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees strengthening and weakening of Tropical Depression BeatrizNASA satellites have been keeping an eye on the tropical depression over southern Mexico that strengthened into a tropical storm for half of a day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncovering why playing a musical instrument can protect brain healthA recent study uncovered a crucial piece into why playing a musical instrument can help older adults retain their listening skills and ward off age-related cognitive declines.
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Scientific American Content: Global
French Prez Invites Trumped ResearchersNew French President Emmanual Macron reacted to the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement by inviting disaffected U.S. researchers to make France "a second homeland." -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
These Noise-Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones Are Back In Stock For $39 Cowin E-7 Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones , $39 with code K8WP23JH You don’t need to sell a kidney to afford noise-cancelling Bluetooth headphones; these 4 star-rated Cowin E-7s are just $39 right now , or $31 off with promo code K8WP23JH. They might not have the brand recognition of Sony or Bose, but these headphones pack in 30 hours of battery life, the ability to use them in wired mode i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fieldsMoney isn't always everything: Taiwanese rice farmers are willing to produce in an environmentally friendly fashion if this would earn them an eco-label. For such a label, they would accept lower compensation payments for a reduction in the use of fertilizers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sydney Harbor emissions equivalent to 200 cars on the roadsThe first footprint of Sydney Harbor's carbon emissions has found it is roughly equivalent to similar natural 'drowned river' estuaries in the US but significantly less than polluted water sources straddling build-up areas in Europe and Asia. The footprinting of the growing megacity icon has implications for planning and remediation efforts in highly urbanized areas in an environment of climate ch
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meet the most nimble-fingered robot ever builtRoboticists have a built a robot that can pick up and move unfamiliar, real-world objects with a 99 percent success rate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tuberculosis bacterium may undermine immune regulation to drive disease progressionThe bacterium that causes tuberculosis -- Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) -- may disrupt human immune system regulation processes to promote destruction of lung tissue, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain vaginal bacteria render HIV microbicide less effectiveCertain types of vaginal bacteria rapidly degrade a medication used to prevent HIV, a study of South African women reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Telehealth reduces wait time, improves care for children with autism living in remote areasExpanding ECHO Autism will help families and children with autism around the world, especially those living in remote areas, suggests a new report.
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Science : NPR
The Soprano And The Scientist: A Conversation About Music And Medicine NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., discuss music and medicine. They also sing a duet. (Image credit: Shelby Knowles/NPR)
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Science | The Guardian
Children who survive cancer face fewer serious long-term health issues – study Report covering children diagnosed from 1970 to 1999 finds rate of severe long-term side effects dropped from 12.7% to 8.8% More children are surviving childhood cancer with fewer debilitating long-term side effects, a new study has found. The study used data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a US database supported by the National Cancer Institute, which collects information on long-term
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Science | The Guardian
Meditation reduces cancer survivors' fear of disease coming back, study finds Fear of recurrence is significant, especially in young survivors of breast cancer Research part of new push to improve psychological wellbeing of patients Practicing meditation and other relaxation techniques can reduce cancer survivors’ fear that they will face a recurrence of the disease, a new study has shown. The findings, presented on the first day of the world’s largest annual showcase for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination therapy targets genetic mutation found in many cancersA study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shown promise for effective treatment of therapy-resistant cancers caused by a mutation of the RAS gene found in many cancers. The pre-clinical study combined therapies targeting the inhibitors polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK). The findings were published this week in Science Translational M
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The Atlantic
Is China Becoming the World's Most Likeable Superpower? Public diplomacy is perception. Remarkably—and, unthinkably, as recently as one year ago—today China seems to be the world’s most likeable superpower. Compare Donald Trump’s recent visit to Europe with that of Premier Li Keqiang, China’s second-in-command. Li, who landed in Berlin on Wednesday, hoped to use his three-day trip, with stops in Germany and Belgium, to “voice support for an open econo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic sequencing could influence treatment for nearly three-quarters of advanced cancer patientsNearly three-quarters of 500 patients with advanced cancer could be referred to a potential targeted treatment based on the results of a comprehensive analysis of their tumor's genetic landscape, a new analysis finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
STD treatment for two?In some states, patients who test positive for chlamydia or gonorrhea leave the clinic with not only a prescription for themselves, but also one for their sexual partner -- who was not seen by a doctor. States that allow doctors to treat a patient's sexual partner without an in-person visit may find more success lowering rates of sexually transmitted diseases, shows a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hubble 'traps' a vermin galaxyA new Hubble image shows a distant galaxy as it begins to align with and pass behind a star sitting nearer to us within the Milky Way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Catching the IMSI-catchers: SeaGlass brings transparency to cell phone surveillanceSecurity researchers have developed a new system called SeaGlass to detect anomalies in the cellular landscape that can indicate where and when IMSI-catchers, cell-site simulators and other devices used in cell phone surveillance are present.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in 3 hospitalized patients experience symptoms of depression, study showsAbout one in three hospitalized patients shows symptoms of depression, potentially affecting their clinical outcomes, a new Cedars-Sinai study has found. The study appears in the Journal of Hospital Medicine and shows that screening hospitalized patients for depression is both feasible and important.
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The Atlantic
'America's Pledge': Can States and Cities Really Address Climate Change? Countries around the world—including Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, China, and South Africa—condemned President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement on climate change on Thursday. Emanuel Macron, the president of France, even ended a speech decrying the withdrawal with the words “Make the Planet Great Again!” But one reaction stood out. Justin Trudeau,
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Gizmodo
Dozens of Cities and States Are Initiating Rogue One, Planning to Independently Rejoin the Paris Agreement AP Former New York City major, Michael Bloomberg, is coordinating an effort among 30 mayors, three governors, 80 university presidents and over 100 businesses to independently align with the Paris Agreement’s goal of curbing US carbon emissions, the New York Times reported Friday . Additionally, 83 mayors have signed the Climate Mayors Agreement, similarly with the goal of independently reducing
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Live Science
Beyond Wonder Woman: 12 Mighty Female WarriorsFictional Wonder Woman has no shortage of precedents — history offers plenty of examples of women who were fierce fighters and highly skilled military leaders.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Next-generation cancer drugs boost immunotherapy responses Early clinical trial data suggest that combining medicines improves treatment. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22092
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are soft contact lenses safe for children? Risks seem no higher than in adultsAvailable evidence suggests that soft contact lenses can be safely prescribed to children and adolescents, with no increase in adverse effects compared to adults, according to a review in the June issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolismNew findings suggest eating late at night could be more dangerous than you think. Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin and cholesterol levels, and negatively affect fat metabolism, and hormonal markers implicated in heart disease, diabetes and other health problems, according to recent results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imaging technique for treating heart condition should be more widely used to minimize radiation exposureA technique to treat an irregular heartbeat that limits or eliminates patients' exposure to radiation should be more widely adopted by physicians, cardiologists argue in a new review article. They posit that the primary obstacle to the procedure's widespread use -- physicians' discomfort with a different visual tool -- can be overcome with training and experience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein that stem cells require could be a target in killing breast cancer cellsResearchers have identified a protein that must be present in order for mammary stem cells to perform their normal functions. When the researchers genetically removed or chemically inhibited the protein, called BPTF, stem cells could no longer maintain their 'renewing' state and began to take on the character of specialized breast cells, and soon died. Breast cancer cells with stem-like properties
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Five years before brain cancer diagnosis, changes detectable in bloodChanges in immune activity appear to signal a growing brain tumor five years before symptoms arise, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected mechanism behind chronic nerve painIt has long been assumed that chronic nerve pain is caused by hypersensitivity in the neurons that transmit pain. Researchers now show that another kind of neuron that normally allows us to feel pleasant touch sensation can switch function and instead signal pain after nerve damage. The results can eventually lead to more effective pain treatments, say the researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers uncover clues about how HIV virus mutatesA new study completely maps all mutations that help the HIV virus evolve away from a single broadly neutralizing antibody, known as PGT151.
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The Atlantic
Why Mueller Is Taking Over the Michael Flynn Grand Jury Special Counsel Robert Mueller is reportedly taking command of the federal probe into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn’s Turkish lobbying deals, a move that could give him leverage over a central figure in the broader Russia investigation. Reuters reported Friday that Mueller will now oversee an ongoing federal grand-jury investigation in eastern Virginia into Flynn’s relationship w
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The Atlantic
Are Pharmaceutical Companies to Blame for the Opioid Epidemic? Opioid abuse is rampant in states like Ohio, where paramedics are increasingly spending time responding to overdoses and where coroners’ offices are running out of room to store bodies. In 2012, there were 793 million doses of opioids prescribed in the state, enough to supply every man, woman, and child, with 68 pills each. Roughly 20 percent of the state’s population was prescribed an opioid in
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Ars Technica
NY prosecutor says Exxon needs to hand over documents on climate change risk Enlarge / Photo by Gary Gardiner/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Getty Images) New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman wants a state court to make oil giant Exxon Mobil turn over more documents in an investigation into whether the company lied to investors about the risks of climate change policy. Schneiderman launched the investigation of Exxon in 2015 , claiming that the company was dow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the oppositeResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Chicago report that low levels tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, does reduce stress, but in a highly dose-dependent manner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walmart touts traditional retailing roots as an advantageWalmart CEO Doug McMillon is touting the company's traditional retailing roots as a competitive advantage as it seeks to take sales away from online giant Amazon at a time of industry upheaval.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waymo turning tech talent to self-driving trucksAlphabet-owned Waymo is putting its autonomous driving expertise to work in trucking, in a new track for the unit formerly known as Google Car.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: A New Formula to Help Tame China’s Yellow RiverChina discharges water from the Xiaolangdi Dam in an annual cleansing ritual to prevent flooding along the Yellow River. New research could improve the results.
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NYT > Science
Can China Take the Lead on Climate Change? That Could Be DifficultBeijing and Washington were once partners on cutting greenhouse gases. Now, China is expected to lead the way while facing strong domestic divisions on energy policy.
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Gizmodo
20 T-Rexes Fighting 10,000 Chickens Is All l Ever Wanted in a Jurassic Park Sequel GIF GIF: YouTube When The Lost World (the first sequel to Jurassic Park ) came out, audiences weren’t really interested in another sermon on the risks of cloning. All we wanted was more dinosaurs, ideally fighting, which is what this CG simulation mostly delivers . After all, chickens are just tiny dinosaurs, right? You might think that 20 of the most ferocious carnivores ever to walk the planet
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The Atlantic
Why the ‘End of TV’ Is Great for Facebook and Google Facebook and Google are in completely different businesses from Netflix. They are essentially advertising companies that are largely platforms for content that they don’t own. Netflix, on the other hand, is spending $6 billion a year to buy its own content, and it doesn’t show ads to its viewers. But zooming out to consider the full scope of the media landscape, this tech triumvirate is surprisin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ceramic nanofiber 'sponges' could be used for flexible insulation, water purificationResearchers have found a way to make ultralight sponge-like materials from nanoscale ceramic fibers. The highly porous, compressible and heat-resistant sponges could have numerous uses, from water purification devices to flexible insulating materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the Galapagos cormorant lost its ability to flyChanges to the genes that shortened the Galapagos cormorant's wings are the same genes that go awry in a group of human bone disorders characterized by stunted arms and legs, suggests new research. The findings shed light on the genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of limb size and could eventually lead to new treatments for people with skeletal ciliopathies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Details of Lassa virus structure could inform development of vaccines, therapiesA 10-year Lassa virus research project has yielded structural and functional details of a key viral surface protein that could help advance development of Lassa vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics, which are currently lacking. The work was led by the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of He
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients nearing end of life receptive to having cholesterol medicine 'deprescribed'New research suggests patients nearing the end of their lives because of a 'life-limiting illness' such as cancer or heart disease may not feel medically abandoned if their doctor wants to take them off the statins that control their cholesterol.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ceramic nanofiber 'sponges' could be used for flexible insulation, water purificationCeramic materials tend to shatter when deformed, but new research shows a way of using ultra-thin ceramic nanofibers to make squishy, heat-resistant sponges with a wide variety of potential uses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bone loss is another hidden pathology caused by malaria infectionOsaka University Researchers at the Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC) have discovered that malaria infection causes bone loss as a result of chronic bone inflammation induced by accumulated Plasmodium by-products in bone.
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The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: After Paris
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The Atlantic
House of Cards Season 5, Episode 13: The Live-Binge Review As in previous years , I’m binge-reviewing the latest season of Netflix’s House of Cards , the TV show that helped popularize the idea of “binge watching” when it premiered in 2013. Don’t read farther than you’ve watched. (The whole series will appear here .) Episode 13 (Chapter 65) By all rights, House of Cards should be winding down, five seasons in. There were only four episodes in the origina
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The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘Bored’ by Margaret Atwood Whether because of the political events currently unfolding in America, the debut of the much - discussed Hulu adaptation in April, or a combination of the two, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale , first published in 1985, has recently climbed back to the top of bestseller lists. Set in a dystopian future in which a totalitarian theocracy has taken over the United States, the novel, and the sh
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Latest Headlines | Science News
When it comes to the flu, the nose has a long memoryMice noses have specialty immune cells with long memories.
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Science : NPR
Bloomberg Promises $15 Million To Help Make Up For U.S. Withdrawal From Climate Deal "Americans will honor and fulfill the Paris Agreement by leading from the bottom up — and there isn't anything Washington can do to stop us," Michael Bloomberg said. (Image credit: Christophe Ena/AP)
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Gizmodo
The Ultimate Wonder Woman Analysis, by the Women of io9 All Photos Courtesy Warner Bros. Praise Zeus, Wonder Woman is finally here and it’s even better than we hoped it would be. While it’s a standout superhero film all on its own, there’s something inherently special for women to see Diana of Themyscira, an iconic female and feminist role model, onscreen for the first time. io9's Katharine Trendacosta, Alex Cranz, Cheryl Eddy, and I sat down to discu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolismNew findings suggest eating late at night could be more dangerous than you think. Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin and cholesterol levels, and negatively affect fat metabolism, and hormonal markers implicated in heart disease, diabetes and other health problems, according to results from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New therapeutic attack point: Scientists find off-switch for the mTor complexAs the cell's molecular control center, the mTor kinase regulates cellular metabolism, growth and division. However, in cells affected by pathological change, the regulation goes array. Scientists have succeeded in locating a crucial off-switch for the central cell control. Paradoxically, this 'off-switch' is a lipid kinase producing a product previously known for its role in the activation of mTo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Binge and high-intensity drinking is increasing for US young adults in their late 20sMonitoring changes in drinking patterns and amounts helps researchers, prevention professionals, and treatment providers plan for and respond effectively to personal and public harms associated with alcohol consumption. This information is particularly important for young adults, who tend to drink large amounts of alcohol. This study examined historical changes in binge and high-intensity drinking
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Compression tights don't help runners reach finish line, study revealsDespite the fact that distance runners swear by them, a new study finds compression tights don’t help runners go farther or faster.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ethnicity and breastfeeding influence infant gut bacteriaA new study looked at the microbial population in the gastrointestinal tract of infants at a formative stage of life when metabolic set points are being established. The study analyzed the stool samples from 173 white Caucasian and 182 South Asian one-year-olds recruited from two birth cohort studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover a new way to target drug-resistant bacteriaA new class of compounds that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase has been discovered by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extreme geothermal activity discovered beneath New Zealand’s Southern AlpsUnusually high temperatures, greater than 100°C, have been found close to Earth’s surface in New Zealand – a phenomenon typically only seen in volcanic areas such as Iceland or Yellowstone, USA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Volcanoes: Referees for the life on EarthAt the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, 200 million years ago, some 60% of species living on Earth disappeared. Scientists suspected that magmatic activity and the release of carbon dioxide were responsible for this environmental disaster. To corroborate this, one would need to find and to precisely date traces of this activity and make sure that it coincides with this mass extinction.
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New Scientist - News
Giant bumphead parrotfish begin mating in their hundredsThe metre-long fish, which live on tropical reefs, usually mate in pairs. An uptick in their numbers around Palau may explain why they have begun mass mating
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Ars Technica
ISPs denied entry into apartment buildings could get help from FCC Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Riou) Exclusive deals between broadband providers and landlords have long been a problem for Internet users, despite rules that are supposed to prevent or at least limit such arrangements. The Federal Communications Commission is starting to ask questions about whether it can do more to stop deals that impede broadband competition inside apartment and condominium b
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Gizmodo
Scientists Reignite Thirty-Year-Old Debate About Glass With New Calculation Image: Flickr/ H.Adam Mathematics is far more fraught with debate and disagreement than you might imagine. Arguments about things some of the smartest physicists have trouble understanding rage for years. Recently, a pair of mathematicians ignited some old flames—or rather, shattered some glass—with a new set of results that, if correct, have far-reaching implications in physics and even cybersec
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Gizmodo
Seriously, Get Yourself Anova's Sous-Vide Circulator For $109 Anova 800W Bluetooth Precision Cooker , $109 If you’ve ever eaten at a nice steakhouse, you were probably eating sous-vide meat. Here’s a secret though: It’s really easy to get those kinds of results yourself, and Amazon’s here to help with another $109 deal on the Anova Bluetooth sous-vide circulator . Lifehacker has a great explainer on Sous-Vide cooking for you to check out, but the basic idea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Off US coast, Tangier Island disappearing under waterOn Virginia's Tangier Island, about 100 miles and a ferry ride from Washington, the waters of the Chesapeake Bay are edging dangerously close to William Eskridge's house.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicist builds on Einstein and Galileo's workSixteenth century scientist Galileo Galilei threw two spheres of different mass from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to establish a scientific principle. Now nearly four centuries later, a team of physicists has applied the same principle to quantum objects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model deepens understanding of the dynamics of quark-gluon plasmasNew theoretical approaches have been presented by researchers to explain and predict high-energy nuclear collisions experiments. Computer simulations performed enabled the researchers to make predictions to test, validate or correct the model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why antibiotics failBiologists have corrected a flaw in the way bacterial susceptibility to antibiotic drugs is tested.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deployment stress impacts well-being through different mental health issues for female and male vetsExperiencing stress-related mental health issues following deployment exposures increases risk of reduced well-being in other life domains in the years following military service for veterans. Gender plays an important role in these associations. The findings have implications for better understanding the challenges female and male veterans face upon returning from service and may lead to ways car
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor understanding of ratios leads to bad shopping decisions, says University of Miami studyIn situations where consumers must average ratio information, such as comparing the fuel efficiency of two cars using the ratio miles per gallon, they often incorrectly assume the mathematic equation to find miles per gallon would be to average the sum of the mileage of both cars and then divide by two, instead of using a more complex equation needed to accurately compare ratios.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In utero tobacco exposure can lead to executive function issues in adolescentsPrenatal tobacco exposure is known to have negative short-term impacts including preterm birth, low birth weight and subsequent behavioral issues. However, a new study found that the negative impacts can last well into the child's future. The results showed that exposure to as few as 10 cigarettes was associated with negative impacts on the executive function of adolescents who were exposed prenat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Subsidies promote overfishing and hurt small-scale fishers worldwideLarge-scale fisheries receive about four times more subsidies than their small-scale counterparts, with up to 60 per cent of those subsidies promoting overfishing.
12h
Live Science
Northern Lights from Space! Astronaut Captures Aurora Over EuropeThe northern lights shimmer over Europe in a new Space Station photo.
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Live Science
Knowing Yourself: How to Improve Your Understanding of OthersGaining a better understanding of yourself may also improve your capacity to better understand other people, a new study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who will suffer the most from US climate exit?In withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate pact, President Donald Trump claimed that honouring its terms would cost the country billions of dollars for a miniscule change to the global warming trajectory.
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Gizmodo
What's the Best Way to Binge-Watch the Entire DC/CW Universe? Image: CW. Greeting, my Global Express Guaranteed packages of fun. Sorry “Postal Apocalypse” is a day late, but this time I did an extra extra-long version to make up for it—you get a free 50 percent more of my shenanigans! This week: The future of Batfleck! The future of Ghostbusters ! The future of the Star Wars prequels! And I’m finally back to answering questions about where superheroes go to
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Approach to Amputation Could Reduce Phantom PainThe technique, tested in rodents, could yield better sensation and control of prosthetic limbs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular system for artificial photosynthesisA molecular system for artificial photosynthesis is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants -- light absorption, charge separation, and catalysis -- to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cold brown dwarf discovered close to our solar systemA new citizen-science tool released earlier this year to help astronomers pinpoint new worlds lurking in the outer reaches of our solar system has already led to a discovery: a brown dwarf a little more than 100 light years away from the Sun. Just six days after the launch of the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 website, four users alerted the science team to the curious object, whose presence has since
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic ice rift close to calving, after growing 17km in 6 days, latest data from ice shelf showsThe rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica has grown by 17km in the last few days and is now only 13km from the ice front, indicating that calving of an iceberg is probably very close, researchers revealed after studying satellite data. The rift is likely to lead to one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugsResearchers have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes -- used by plants to defend against predators and microbes -- in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs.
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NYT > Science
The Mummies’ Medical Secrets? They’re Perfectly PreservedMummified bodies in a crypt in Lithuania are teaching scientists about health and disease among people who lived long ago.
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NYT > Science
How to Make a Mummy (Accidentally)Bodies can be preserved spontaneously under certain conditions, leaving remains that are of tremendous scientific importance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hackers break into centralized password manager OneLoginHackers have gained access to OneLogin, an online password manager that offers a single sign-on to multiple websites and services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists launch global agenda to curb social, human rights abuses in seafood sectorAs the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry.
12h
New Scientist - News
Drug that boosts confidence in your own actions may help OCDAre you sure you locked the front door this morning? Sometimes it can be hard to judge your own behaviour, but a drug that blocks noradrenaline seems to help
12h
Big Think
It's No Coincidence That Hitler Was a Germaphobe Hitler appeared to have been highly sensitive to disgust, and research shows this trait is linked to numerous dimensions of ideology. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crystalline structures database provides recipes for non-expert 'chefs' cooking up new materialsIn response to popular demand, materials scientists at Duke University have resurrected an online cookbook of crystalline structures that started when the World Wide Web was Netscape Navigator and HTML 1.0.
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Ars Technica
Google prepares publishers for the release of Chrome ad-blocking Enlarge (credit: Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images) News that Google intends to install an ad-blocker in its Chrome browser shocked the tech and publishing world in April. Now, details of how the program will work are starting to become clear. The Google ad-blocker will block all advertising on sites that have a certain number of "unacceptable ads," according to The Wall Street
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The Atlantic
What Got Buried in the Crazy News Cycle: 'Forgotten War' Edition Whether you’re recovering from your coal-drunk celebration of President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, or if you’re just checking out of the hospital after suffering a rage-induced stroke, you might have missed a few stories this week. Still, as we all know, the best way to recover from a news hangover is the hair of the dog that bit you. Here’s a few stories t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble 'traps' a vermin galaxyThe NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is famous for its jaw-dropping snapshots of the cosmos. At first glance this Picture of the Week appears to be quite the opposite, showing just a blur of jagged spikes, speckled noise, and weird, clashing colors—but once you know what you are looking at, images like this one are no less breathtaking.
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Gizmodo
Narwhals Are Actually Unicorns Of Death Image: Wikimedia Commons Narwhals are empirically cute—they’re the closest we’ll ever get to seeing real-life unicorns. However, new drone footage from the WWF in Canada suggests these “unicorns of the sea” are also pretty hard core. The video illuminates what narwhals actually use their “horn” for, and let me tell you, folks, it’s not fuzzy happy times. Based on the footage, scientists have dete
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: I gotta vole lotta love for this week's science Voles have almost perfected monogamy, which has made them perfect subjects for studying the neuroscience of love. With the help of rodent Romeos and Juliets, scientists have now pinpointed the specific patterns of brain activity that accompany romance . It’s an exciting development, but this next one blew me away: scientists have also now discovered how the brain recognises faces - effectively by
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Gizmodo
How to Watch Today's Sean Spicer Shitshow, With Special Guest Scott Pruitt From the EPA GIF A visual approximation of White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer any time he’s asked a question about Russia, global climate change, or the pee tape ( Imgur ) White House press secretary Sean Spicer will answer questions this afternoon about President Trump’s decision to exit the Paris Accord, a move that was wildly unpopular with people who care about the continued existence of life on Eart
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Gizmodo
Nike-Funded Study Shows Compression Tights Are Basically Useless Image: Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center Compression tights are touted as enabling athletes to run faster and farther, while reducing injuries, but a new Nike-funded study—one that appears to have backfired on the clothing manufacturer—suggests these trendy items don’t work as advertised. The idea behind compression tights is that they greatly reduce muscle vibration, which in turn re
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Gizmodo
NYPD Fails to Convince Court Its Deafening Sound Cannon Is Just a ‘Communication Tool’ AP On Wednesday, a federal judge ruled that the sound emitted from the NYPD’s Long Range Acoustic Devices—portable sound cannons that blast noise—could be considered a use of force, contrary to the police department’s claims. The LRAD can blast sound as loudly as 136 decibels . That’s louder than a jackhammer or a jet engine and above the 120 db threshold for immediate human hearing loss. The NYP
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Ars Technica
Trump administration rolls out social media vetting of visa applicants Enlarge (credit: oddharmonic ) Visa applicants who the US State Department suspects may pose a danger if allowed into the country will be required to provide their social media handles on a new application (PDF) the government just unveiled. The new vetting, the State Department said, would likely ensnare about 0.5 percent of visa applicants annually—the equivalent of roughly 65,000 people. The s
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Live Science
False! Trump Claims Paris Deal Would Only Make 'Tiny' DifferenceA comment that Donald Trump made yesterday in the White House Rose Garden when he announced the United States would pull out of the international Paris climate agreement was not based in science.
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Popular Science
Please don’t put ground-up wasp nests in your vagina Health Seriously, your vajayjay is just fine. There are far better ways to tighten your vagina than shoving powdered wasp nests up there.
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New Scientist - News
The strange Cook pine trees that always lean towards the equatorThe Cook pine has been spread across the world by cultivators, and their efforts have revealed something unusual – the trees always lean towards the equator
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New Scientist - News
Automatic sign language translators turn signing into textTranslation devices are being put to work in places like banks to help deaf people talk to non-signers
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 5/27–6/2 A gothic "Victorian picnic" in Leipzig, floating down a Texas river, continued unrest and protest in Venezuela, a police robot marks the start of Ramadan in Dubai, a metal hijab band in Indonesia, and much more
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The Atlantic
Bathing in Controversy In March, the U.S. Supreme Court vacated a case about whether schools have to let transgender students use bathrooms and locker rooms that are consistent with their gender identity. Similar issues will now be re-heard in courts of law and of public opinion. School bathrooms have become an epicenter in the culture wars, however unlikely they might seem as a civil-rights battleground. Yet school ba
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Gizmodo
Was Eddy Cue Yelling at Rihanna During Last Night's NBA Finals? (Probably) Last night was game one of the NBA finals, and anticlimactic as the game itself was there was no shortage of action off-court. As our colleagues at Deadspin wrote this morning , Rihanna was the highlight of Game 1, allegedly getting into a staredown with the Warriors’ Kevin Durant and, in general, kicking up a fuss and being the most compelling factor of a 113-91 washout. As our sports sister sit
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NYT > Science
Fruit Flies and Mice to Get New Home on Space Station, at Least TemporarilyThe next SpaceX mission will carry insects and rodents to help scientists understand the effects of long-term life in space.
13h
Live Science
When You Eat Can 'Reset' Your Biological ClockWant to reset your biological clock? Try eating at a different time of day.
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The Atlantic
Why Can't Companies Get Mentorship Programs Right? It’s hard, and expensive, to find and retain good employees; conservative estimates place the average cost to recruit and train a new employee at half an employee’s salary . With that in mind, it’s no surprise that companies are willing to try all sorts of things to make sure people stick around. One thing lots of companies have tried is establishing corporate mentorship programs, in which newer
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Popular Science
Transparent frogs, solar arrays that look like fruit roll-ups, and other amazing images of the week Science Newsworthy eyecandy Our favorite images from this week in science, space, and health news. Read on.
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Ars Technica
As hurricane season begins, NOAA told to slow its transition to better models Enlarge / Hurricane Matthew is seen in 2016, closing in on Florida. (credit: NOAA) It's a lousy time to be a US weather forecaster. Even as the Atlantic Ocean heats up, wind shear falls, and the potential for an active hurricane season looms, vacancies have been mounting at the National Hurricane Center in Miami and at National Weather Service offices around the country. According to a new US Gov
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Live Science
Save $51 on This All-Inclusive Raspberry Pi Starter Kit [Deal]The Raspberry Pi 3 is a versatile, credit card-sized PC that can be used as the foundation for a variety of projects, from a retro 16-bit gaming console to a media streaming PC for your living room.
13h
Big Think
Elon Musk Quits Trump's Councils in Protest Elon Musk and many top CEOs condemned President Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris Agreement on climate change. Read More
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Ars Technica
Want to get your game on Steam? $100 is all you need [Updated] Enlarge (credit: Valve Software) Valve announced today that anyone will be able to publish games on Steam through its previously announced Steam Direct program for "a $100 recoupable publishing fee per game." In announcing the direct publishing fee, Valve says it "wanted it to be as small as possible to ensure it wasn't a barrier to beginning game developers, while also not being so small as to i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
STD treatment for two?In some states, patients who test positive for chlamydia or gonorrhea leave the clinic with not only a prescription for themselves, but also one for their sexual partner -- who was not seen by a doctor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists launch global agenda to curb social, human rights abuses in seafood sectorAs the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry.
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Gizmodo
There Are Now Two American Supercarriers Off The Korean Peninsula Photo credit: U.S. Navy When you want to send an international message that can’t be missed, you send an aircraft carrier. When you want to put up a neon sign, you send two. And yesterday, the U.S. Navy did just that, by confirming that the USS Carl Vinson and the USS Ronald Reagan carrier strike groups had joined up off the Korean coast. The Sea of Japan. Image credit: Google Maps It’s quite a s
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Internet Doesn’t Have to Be Bad for DemocracyA new form of online survey uses crowdsourcing and data visualization to reveal the hidden nuances in partisan debates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreational running benefits hip and knee joint healthRecreational runners are less likely to experience knee and hip osteoarthritis compared to sedentary individuals and competitive runners, according to a new study published in the June issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catching the IMSI-catchers: SeaGlass brings transparency to cell phone surveillanceUniversity of Washington security researchers have developed a new system called SeaGlass to detect anomalies in the cellular landscape that can indicate where and when IMSI-catchers, cell-site simulators and other devices used in cell phone surveillance are present.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble 'traps' a vermin galaxyThis Hubble image shows a distant galaxy as it begins to align with and pass behind a star sitting nearer to us within the Milky Way.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fertility preservation for children with differences of sex developmentArticle explores unique ethical issues for children with differences of sex development on whether or not they should pursue fertility preservation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic sequencing could influence treatment for nearly 3/4 of advanced cancer patientsA new analysis finds that nearly three-quarters of 500 patients with advanced cancer could be referred to a potential targeted treatment based on the results of a comprehensive analysis of their tumor's genetic landscape.
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The Atlantic
People Are Turning to Outer Space for Relief From Trump News Last month, in a midst of a wave on nonstop, breaking-news reports about President Donald Trump—the surprise firing of “nut job” James Comey, the divulgence of classified information to Russian officials inside the Oval Office, the apparent attempts to stymy an FBI investigation—Christine Beavers felt overloaded. She’d heard and seen and read enough news. So Beavers opened a new tab in her browse
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The Atlantic
House of Cards Season 5, Episode 12: The Live-Binge Review As in previous years , I’m binge-reviewing the latest season of Netflix’s House of Cards , the TV show that helped popularize the idea of “binge watching” when it premiered in 2013. Don’t read farther than you’ve watched. (The whole series will appear here .) Episode 12 (Chapter 64) Are we watching Frank’s dream? Or did he really push Cathy Durant down the stairs, and did Claire really poison Tom
14h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Scientists Reacted to the US Leaving the Paris Climate AgreementWhat the United States' departure from the historic pact means for efforts to fight global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Microsoft rolls out not one but two bad builds to the Windows Insider program (credit: Microsoft ) Microsoft's Windows Insider program suffered an awkward setback last night as the company released two different builds—one for desktop users, another for mobile— without apparently meaning to . In both cases, systems configured to use the fast ring could find themselves downloading and installing Windows releases that weren't supposed to ship to the general public. For deskt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Follistatin is a key player in embryo implantationFollistatin plays a key role in establishing receptivity of the uterus to embryo implantation in an animal model.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DIY crystal-makers get refurbished online cookbookIn response to popular demand, materials scientists at Duke University have resurrected an online cookbook of crystalline structures that started when the World Wide Web was Netscape Navigator and HTML 1.0. Cataloguing 288 crystalline structures, the database provides recipes for non-expert "chefs" cooking up new materials.
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Gizmodo
Incredible Storm Footage Makes It Look Like the Apocalypse Has Arrived GIF GIF: Vimeo Meteorologists can predict, with surprising accuracy, when a storm will roll through your town. But predicting exactly how severe it will be can still be hit and miss. That’s why it took filmmaker Chad Cowan six years to capture the spectacular timelapses he assembled into this awe-inspiring compilation. If you’ve got access to a 4K TV or monitor, you can enjoy Fractal in all of it
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Marvel Comics, Golf Practice Set, Beverage Samples, and More Thousands of digital Marvel comics , a golfing practice set for Dad , and Amazon’s premium beverage sample box lead off Friday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Aukey Apple Watch Charging Stand with Suction Cup , $6 with code AUWATCH3 There are probably thousands of Apple Watch charging stands out there, but basica
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TEDTalks (video)
How to design a library that makes kids want to read | Michael BierutWhen Michael Bierut was tapped to design a logo for public school libraries, he had no idea that he was embarking on a years-long passion project. In this often hilarious talk, he recalls his obsessive quest to bring energy, learning, art and graphics into these magical spaces where school librarians can inspire new generations of readers and thinkers.
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WIRED
What An Old Moon Globe Says About the Nature of Science I found a moon globe made in 1960. The back side is blank, because that's how science works. The post What An Old Moon Globe Says About the Nature of Science appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
Is Noise Pollution Making Desert Bugs Disappear? In the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, far from human habitation, there is a cacophony of man-made noise. The Basin is the nation’s second-largest natural gas field, and for miles in every direction, gas compressors are running more or less constantly, filling the desert with their eerie, broadband roar. When compressors are built near where people live, the machines, which can range from the size
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Ars Technica
Rime allegedly runs faster with Denuvo DRM stripped out Enlarge / Was Denuvo's DRM slowing down this darling fox? Whatever your thoughts on the use of digital rights management to protect games against piracy, you probably don't want any DRM solution to actually have a negative impact on the performance of the game or your computer ( SecuROM, anyone ?). Now, though, crackers are alleging that Denuvo's DRM protection is causing performance issues in Ri
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Futurity.org
Hear the ‘chirp’ of gravitational waves passing through Earth Researchers have announced the third detection of gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of space and time. Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves as part of his theory of general relativity more than 100 years ago, but it has taken astrophysicists more than 50 years of trial and error to find the direct evidence to support his theory. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Late-night tweeting by NBA players linked to worse game performanceNBA players had worse personal statistics in games that followed a late-night tweet between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m, preliminary data from a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A better dye job for roots -- in plantsA chemical dye has been discovered that reveals how a critical plant hormone helps root growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cholesterol: Key player at the lung surfaceCholesterol, a naturally occurring compound at the lung surface, has been shown to have a clear effect on the properties of this nanoscale film that covers the inside of our lungs. Cholesterol levels in this system may affect the lung’s function, according to researchers.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Scientists dispute the 'tiny, tiny' impact of Paris dealPresident accused of "cherry picking" science to bolster argument for withdrawal from Paris accord.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google Sprinkles AI on Its Spreadsheets to Automate Away Some Office WorkWant to turn boring numbers into a cool chart? Just ask, and Google’s algorithm will do the rest.
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Ingeniøren
Slut med at malke fjernvarmekunder: Bredt politisk flertal indgår aftale om fjernvarmeRegeringen har i dag indgået en bred politisk aftale på fjernvarmeområdet. Sammen med et netop vedtaget lovforslag skal aftalen sikre, at fjernvarmekunder ikke bliver ramt af ekstraregninger.
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Gizmodo
Y’all’s President Just Put Captain Planet on Suicide Watch and Further Endangered the Entire World President Donald Trump announces his decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement June 1, 2017, in Washington, D.C. (Win McNamee/Getty Images) When flooding gives way to the destruction of American coastal cities, when the increased droughts and decreases in annual water lead to fewer crops and greater hunger scares among the poorest, when the day comes that today’s warmest temper
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cognitive science
A paper in the May issue of Psychological Science explores two ways of implementing portion limits on sugary drinks to see what policies would actually reduce consumption. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Futurity.org
Alternative to X-rays uses yogurt and crushed glass Scientists have created a simpler and faster method for focusing visible light through a range of materials that mirror human skin’s light-scattering properties. The work is a step toward using visible light to image inside the body. Dense structures like bone show up clearly in X-rays, but softer tissues like organs and tumors are difficult to make out. That’s because X-rays are strongly deflect
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Science | The Guardian
Aerial footage of the split in the Larsen C ice shelf Footage taken at the beginning of the year shows the split in an Antarctic ice shelf. A giant section is hanging by a thread and is due to break off at any moment Giant Antarctic iceberg ‘hanging by a thread’, say scientists Continue reading...
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Ars Technica
Anti-vaccine groups step up work as Minnesota measles outbreak rages Enlarge / HOPKINS, MN - APRIL, 27: Abdullahi Mohamud, 5, awaits returning to school after two of his siblings contracted the measles during the current outbreak. He received one dose of the vaccine in January and did not get sick. (credit: Getty | Courtney Perry ) After years of being the target of anti-vaccine groups , a vulnerable Somali immigrant community in Minnesota is now fighting a raging
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Popular Science
China's new submarine engine is poised to revolutionize underwater warfare From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal It looks a lot like 'Red October' in real life. A Chinese admiral reveals that China has mastered a new and silent electrical propulsion system for submarines.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Paris climate deal: Buildings 'go green' in protestBuildings around the world are lit green after the US withdraws from the Paris climate agreement.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'World won't laugh any more'President Trump says pulling out of Paris climate deal will stop world laughing at the US.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientists uncover a cold new world near sunA new citizen-science tool released earlier this year to help astronomers pinpoint new worlds lurking in the outer reaches of our solar system has already led to a discovery: a brown dwarf a little more than 100 light years away from the Sun. Just six days after the launch of the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 website in February, four different users alerted the science team to the curious object, who
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Inside Science
How to Synchronize Like Fireflies How to Synchronize Like Fireflies Study shows how collective cooperation can develop in systems even when benefits are not obvious to individuals. Untitled-1.gif Image credits: Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Physics Friday, June 2, 2017 - 08:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Every June in Elkmont, Tennessee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen scientists uncover a cold new world near sunA new citizen-science tool released earlier this year to help astronomers pinpoint new worlds lurking in the outer reaches of our solar system has already led to a discovery: a brown dwarf a little more than 100 light years away from the Sun. Just six days after the launch of the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 website, four users alerted the science team to the curious object, whose presence has since
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Gizmodo
What to Expect From Apple WWDC 2017: iOS, Siri Speaker, MacBooks, and More Image: Apple On Monday, Apple’s annual developer conference, WWDC, kicks off, and that means we will soon learn more about the company’s newest and most exciting products. This year, the event runs from June 5-June 9 and is expected to serve as the launching point for major updates to iOS and macOS, as well as some new hardware. This will be the first time in roughly 15 years that Apple will not
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virgin Galactic conducts 9th unpowered test flightVirgin Galactic has conducted another unpowered test flight of its space tourism spacecraft over the Southern California desert.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronauts return after marathon ISS mission (Update)A Soyuz MS-03 spacecraft carrying French astronaut Thomas Pesquet and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy landed on the Kazakh steppe Friday, ending their marathon 196-day mission to the International Space Station.
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Popular Science
Watch a Navy robot submarine launch a drone Military The future of war is robots ordering robots to send video to humans Newly released video shows robots working together at a Navy technical demonstration…
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Elizabeth Bramson-Boudreau Takes on Role of CEO and Publisher of MIT Technology Review as Jason Pontin Departs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google moves to block 'annoying' ads in browserGoogle is working to block "annoying" ads in its Chrome browser, part of a broader effort by industry players to filter out certain types of marketing messages that draw complaints.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noninvasive method for deep brain stimulationA new way to stimulate regions deep within the brain using electrodes placed on the scalp has now been developed by researchers. This approach could be used to perform noninvasive deep brain stimulation on patients with brain disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surface gravity on many exoplanets similar to that of Earth, study findsA recent statistical study has revealed that exoplanets with a mass of between 1 and 100 times the mass of Earth have a surface gravity surprisingly similar to terrestrial gravity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding a river's 'thermal landscape' may be the key to saving itRiver temperatures have long been an area of study, but until recently, the field has been hampered by technological constraints. Fine-scale measurements over large distances and long time periods have been difficult to collect, and research efforts have focused instead on average river temperatures, lethal extremes, and small-scale patterns. However, a suite of new technologies and methods, drive
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Ars Technica
YouTube clarifies “hate speech” definition and which videos won’t be monetized Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The ad exodus from YouTube has died down since its peak in March, but YouTube continues to update its guidelines to reassure advertisers and, in some ways, its creators. In a blog post , YouTube outlined more specific definitions of hate speech and what kinds of incendiary content wouldn't be eligible for monetization. Three categories are classified as hate
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WIRED
Paul Allen Built the World’s Largest Plane to Fling Satellites Into Space The twin-hulled behemoth has a wingspan three times that of a Boeing 737, and should make space launches cheaper and more flexible. The post Paul Allen Built the World's Largest Plane to Fling Satellites Into Space appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
These GIFs of Endlessly Looping Waves Will Soothe Your Battered Soul Okay, so technically they’re not GIFs, but “cinemagraphs,” short, seamlessly repeating videos. Either way, these incredible loops of dramatic waves from Ray Collins and Armand Dijcks are endlessly soothing. Just watch and watch and watch and forget that the Earth will soon be one giant ocean . Collins captured the photographs these loops are based on while swimming in massive waves with a Nikon D
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mice will help reveal the roles of human brown fatScientists have discovered that mice have metabolically active brown fat deposits similar to the largest depot found in people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recommendations to optimize continuous glucose monitoring in diabetes clinical researchThe advantages of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for obtaining real-time blood glucose measurements and its ability to detect and even predict hypo- and hyperglycemic events make it a very useful tool for evaluating experimental glucose-lowering drugs and new approaches for treating diabetes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UQ physicist builds on Einstein and Galileo's workSixteenth century scientist Galileo Galilei threw two spheres of different mass from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to establish a scientific principle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sydney Harbor emissions equivalent to 200 cars on the roadsThe Sydney Harbour is renowned as a beautiful landmark straddling our thriving city but a new study has shown it is also a source of significant carbon emissions, which requires careful management as the city is poised to double its population by the end of the century.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin I’m Just Here For The Rihanna-Kevin Durant Feud | Jezebel Kathy Griffin Claims Donald Trump Deadspin I’m Just Here For The Rihanna-Kevin Durant Feud | Jezebel Kathy Griffin Claims Donald Trump Is Bullying Her, Will Hold a Press Conference Today To Explain | Fusion NatSec Chiefs Reportedly Thought It Was Laugh Out Loud Funny When Trump Called Casino Robbery a ‘Terrorist Attack’ | The Root NC Elementary School Teacher Caught on Camera Hitting 11-Year-Old Student With a Broom: Report |
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Science : NPR
Many COPD Patients Struggle To Pay For Each Breath One in 9 Medicare enrollees have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and many of them can't afford the inhalers that keep them out of the emergency room. (Image credit: Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fieldsMoney isn't always everything: Taiwanese rice farmers are willing to produce in a more environ-mentally friendly fashion if this would earn them an eco-label for their products. For such a label, they are even prepared to accept lower compensation payments for a reduction in the use of fertilizers. These were the findings of a study conducted by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) at the Chai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic ice rift close to calving, after growing 17km in 6 daysThe rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica has grown by 17km in the last few days and is now only 13km from the ice front, indicating that calving of an iceberg is probably very close, Swansea University researchers revealed after studying the latest satellite data.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Sooty terns’ migration takes the birds into the path of hurricanesSooty terns migrate south from southern Florida and back again. The track sometimes takes the birds into the path of hurricanes, a new study finds.
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The Atlantic
Chess Champions and Budget Bellwethers: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Puerto Rico’s Universities Molly Hensley-Clancy | BuzzFeed Puerto Rico’s public university system is facing an unprecedented round of funding cuts that students and observers say will decimate the island’s college campuses. The 55,000-student public university system, a fiercely guarded point of pride for the island, is being asked to slash $450 million from a budg
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The Atlantic
The One-Paragraph Letter From 1980 That Fueled the Opioid Crisis What do you do when a letter in a prestigious medical journal has been so routinely mis-cited it’s taken on a life of its own? Like when pharmaceutical companies have used its data to spin their dangerous painkillers as safe, and the resulting overprescription fueled an opioid epidemic now consuming the country? So this week, the New England Journal of Medicine , which published the original lett
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The Atlantic
Mercury Is the Inspectah Deck of Planets Wu-Tang Clan rapper Method Man once said the following about fellow member Inspectah Deck: “He’s like that dude thatta sit back and watch you play yourself … and see you sit and know you lyin’, and he’ll take you to court after that.” The same can probably be said of Mercury, the best planet in the solar system (other than Earth). Mercury puts up with more crap than anyone else, so I stayed quiet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalytic converter composite reduces rare earth element usageAutomobiles are facing increasingly strict emissions regulations in an effort to reduce the amount of harmful air pollutants that are released into the environment. In Japan, for example, the current emissions standards for NOx and nonmethane hydrocarbons are less than 0.05 g/km. Currently, one method of reducing harmful emissions is with a high-performance, three-way catalytic (TWC) converter. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Observation of the phase transition of liquid crystal defects for the first timeKAIST researchers observed the phase transition of topological defects formed by liquid crystal (LC) materials for the first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forensic chemical analysis of wood could stop illegal loggingTackling the problem of illegal logging is particularly challenging as it is often nearly impossible to tell where a piece of wood came from. Now, researchers in Oregon, USA, have developed a technique that uses the chemical fingerprint of a wood sample to pinpoint its origin to a smaller area than ever before.
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Gizmodo
The Moon's South Pole May Be Icier Than We Realized Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio For decades, scientists have wondered if frost persists inside the dark and cold craters of the Moon’s poles. The recent discovery of unusually bright areas near the Moon’s south pole suggests this very well may be the case. But as a potential source of water for aspiring lunar colonists, the quantity of this surface frost
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soaring medical costs from bicycle accidentsBicycle use has skyrocketed in popularity, but it's also led to more accidents, with medical costs from non-fatal bike crashes climbing steadily by $789 million annually, according to a new American study.
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Ars Technica
Curiosity rover finds its crater was habitable for 700 million years Enlarge / This fracture with discoloration may provide an indication of groundwater intrusion later in the history of Gale Crater. (credit: NASA ) Gale Crater, the site being explored by the Curiosity rover, was chosen as a landing site because its structure and composition suggested that it might preserve information about Mars' past. As Curiosity climbed the slopes of the crater's central peak,
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