Ars Technica
You’ll never guess where Russian spies are hiding their control servers Enlarge (credit: Instagram ) A Russian-speaking hacking group that, for years, has targeted governments around the world is experimenting with a clever new method that uses social media sites to conceal espionage malware once it infects a network of interest. According to a report published Tuesday by researchers from antivirus provider Eset, a recently discovered backdoor Trojan used comments po
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Motor-boat noise makes fish bad parents, leading to the death of their babiesNoise from motorboats is making fish become bad parents, and reducing the chance of their young surviving, research led by marine experts at the University of Exeter has shown.
10min
Big Think
Opioids Don't Treat Depression, Yet People Turn to Them Anyway There's been an alarming uptick in sufferers of depression turning to opioids, increasing addiction numbers. Read More
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The Atlantic
U.S. Carries Out Another Airstrike in Syria U.S.-led forces have carried out another airstrike on Syria, the International Coalition for Operation Inherent Resolve—responsible for U.S. military operations in the fight against ISIS—confirmed in a statement Tuesday afternoon. According to the Coalition, Syrian and allied forces breached an established deconfliction zone on Tuesday near al-Tanf, the site of a U.S. military base in southern Sy
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Impact of protective bacteria linked to infection route, study findsThe benefits of protective bacteria - which safeguard organisms from further disease without causing harm - depend on how subsequent infections enter the body, a study of fruit flies has shown.
10min
Popular Science
China just flew a 130-foot solar-powered drone designed to stay in the air for months From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The CH-T4 has already set a national flight record. China's enormous solar powered drone set a national flight record, reaching an altitude of over 20,000 meters, and can stay airborne for months.
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Popular Science
Even moderate drinking might be bad for your brain Health Sorry. Those who drank five glasses of wine a week showed a reduction in the volume of areas of the brain associated with memory and learning. Read on.
25min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Trump says Francis Collins will stay on at the NIH Geneticist has led the biomedical research agency since 2009. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22117
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chemotherapy approach offers breast cancer patients a better quality of lifeThe chemotherapy drug capecitabine gives patients a better quality of life and is as effective at preventing breast cancer from returning as the alternative regimen called CMF, when given following epirubicin.
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even moderate drinking linked to a decline in brain health, finds studyAlcohol consumption, even at moderate levels, is associated with increased risk of adverse brain outcomes and steeper decline in cognitive (mental) skills, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
30min
The Scientist RSS
CAR-T Trials Boast Promising ResultsThe results of two small clinical trials show that the immunotherapy is effective for multiple myeloma patients, at least in the near term.
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Science | The Guardian
Even moderate drinking can damage the brain, claim researchers Moderate alcohol consumption can impair cognitive function, says study, countering suggestions that low levels of drinking can help protect the brain Drinking even moderate amounts of alcohol can damage the brain and impair cognitive function over time, researchers have claimed. While heavy drinking has previously been linked to memory problems and dementia , previous studies have suggested low l
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Gizmodo
Researcher Found Another Twitter Vulnerability That Allowed Tweeting From Any Account Photo: Getty A bug in a Twitter product could have allowed attackers to send tweets from any account and delete photos and videos from published tweets, according to a recent blog post by the security researcher who discovered it. It’s the second broad vulnerability in the product, called Studio, that’s come to light recently, raising questions about how well Twitter secures its platform. Twitter
46min
The Atlantic
Amazon's Pivot to Poor People On Tuesday, Amazon announced that it will slash the price of membership to its Prime program by almost 50 percent for low-income shoppers on federal welfare. The move might seem like a unique form of private-sector charity for poor Americans, after decades of disappointing wage growth. But it’s also a direct challenge to Walmart, the reigning king of American retail, which relies heavily on low-i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First farmer lawsuit begins against Syngenta over China tradeThe first of tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits over Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta's introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed variety is underway in a Kansas federal courtroom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Texas governor signs texting-while-driving ban into lawTexting while driving will soon be illegal in Texas.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Witness The Battle Against The Most Dangerous Animal In The World Shot on four continents, MOSQUITO features insights from world and health leaders as well as intimate stories of the men, women, and children who are living in fear that the next bite could be a deadly one. Premieres Thurs Jul 6 at 9/8c on Discovery. Learn more: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mosquito Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.fa
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Ars Technica
Covfefe aside, late-night tweets are bad news Enlarge (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) Beware the late-night tweeting. However amusing the typos, staying up to share 140 character quips can throw you off your game the next day—whether that’s going to your 9-to-5, playing on an NBA team, or, you know, running the free world. According to preliminary data from a study of 112 professional basketball players and 30,000 of their tweets, nocturnal Twi
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Gizmodo
The Root Hey Charlottesville, Va.: The KKK Is Coming to Town! The Root Hey Charlottesville, Va.: The KKK Is Coming to Town! | Fusion Seeing My Mother in Mary Kay Letourneau | The Slot Are You Surprised That the Trumps Pocketed Donations Intended for a Pediatric Cancer Center? | The Concourse The Nine Scariest-Ass Things About Owning A House |
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Gizmodo
NSA Leaker Outed Thanks to Modern Printer Technology Image credit: Aaron Yoo/ Flickr On Saturday NSA contractor Reality Leigh Winner, who leaked classified documents to The Intercept , was arrested. The leaked intelligence report from the NSA detailed Russian cyberattacks allegedly directed at election officials and electronic voting equipment company VR Systems. The Justice Department’s arrest warrant request stated the classified information prin
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WIRED
Want to Understand Creativity? Enlist an AI Collaborator Scientists and artists are working to nurture creativity in computers. The post Want to Understand Creativity? Enlist an AI Collaborator appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
Live Results in the New Jersey Governor's Primary Race Republican primary results: Democratic primary results: The race to replace Chris Christie is on. Polls close at 8 p.m. EST on Tuesday in the New Jersey primary elections to pick the Republican and Democratic candidates who will face off in November’s general election to be the state’s next governor. Phil Murphy, a former Goldman Sachs executive is expected to win the Democratic nomination in Tue
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Luck Be a Comey Today in 5 Lines President Trump said he wishes former FBI Director James Comey “good luck” ahead of his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. In a series of tweets, Trump took credit for Saudi Arabia’s decision to sever ties with Qatar, an important U.S. ally. Virginia Senator Mark Warner said the extent of Russia’s interference in the U.S. presidential election “is muc
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The Atlantic
Don and Eric's American Idea It’s difficult to discuss President Donald Trump without delving, at least tangentially, into the urban-rural divide that ran through the 2016 election. Though subsequent analysis has complicated the notion that Trump won thanks mainly to rural, white, blue-collar voters, dozens of articles have been—and continue to be—written about small-town supporters who saw voting for Trump as a means of voi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hiding in plain sight: New species of flying squirrel discoveredFor hundreds of years, a species of flying squirrel was hiding right under (actually, above) our noses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly discovered enzyme complexes in herbivore digestive tracts show promise for sustainable fuels and medicinesHerbivore gut fungi hold a lot of promise. Just ask Michelle O'Malley.
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Ars Technica
Twitter users threaten legal action if Trump doesn’t unblock them Enlarge (credit: Twitter ) President Donald Trump regularly blocks people from following him on his @realDonaldTrump feed on Twitter. But now, two Twitter users who were blocked by Trump after they criticized the president are claiming that their exclusion from being one of Trump's 31.7 million followers amounts to a First Amendment breach of their constitutional rights. Because of that, the Knig
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Ars Technica
Decrypted: American Gods takes a shot at patriotism and gun worship Starz In this very special episode, we go all out for you. First I discuss the gun-worship theme with Ars' own senior tech editor and gun geek, Lee Hutchinson. Then our correspondent Genevieve Valentine sits down with actors Ricky Whittle (Shadow Moon) and Orlando Jones (Mr. Nancy) to talk about the series and getting into character. It's long, but it's worth it. Here there be spoilers! Read 12 r
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Live Science
George & Amal Clooney's Twins: How Can You Get 1 Boy and 1 Girl?George and Amal Clooney are the parents of twins: Amal Clooney gave birth to a boy and a girl today (June 6), People Magazine reported.
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Viden
Nyt fra Apple: Smart højttaler, virtual reality og opdateringer galoreApple fremlagde det kommende års planer i en over to timer lang åbningstale
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WIRED
Want to Understand Creativity? Enlist an AI Collaborator Scientists and artists are working to nurture creativity in computers. The post Want to Understand Creativity? Enlist an AI Collaborator appeared first on WIRED .
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New pediatric protocol reduces missed sepsis diagnoses by 76 percentAn electronic sepsis alert using a combination of vital signs, risk factors and physician judgment to identify children in a pediatric emergency department with severe sepsis reduced missed diagnoses by 76 percent. The results of the study, along with an accompanying editorial, were published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Device designed to exploit scattering of light by mechanical vibrationsResearchers at the University of Campinas's Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, have theoretically developed a silicon photonic device with a diameter of approximately 10 microns (μm), equivalent to one tenth of the thickness of a human hair, that would enable optical and mechanical waves vibrating at tens of gigahertz (GHz) to interact.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coming out of their shellsThe loss of turtle hard shells at different evolutionary branch points resulted in adaptive changes because of changes in respiration. They could maintain aerobic respiration for longer periods of time, and sustain deeper dives.Scientists Tibisay Escalona, and Agostinho Antunes from the CIIMAR research institute in Porto, Portugal, and Cameron Weadick from Sussex University in Brighton, United Kin
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Live Science
Saint John Bosco's Brain Vanishes from Italian BasilicaA Catholic church near Turin, Italy, reported part of the brain of Don Bosco, a revered saint, has been stolen.
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Popular Science
Scientists have a fascinating new way to determine the age of skeletal remains Health Sinuses could give forensic anthropologists a hand. Forensic scientists have uncovered an X-ray technique to age skulls, even if they no longer have teeth or skeletons attached. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guts to glory?Newly discovered enzyme complexes in herbivore digestive tracts show promise for sustainable fuels and medicines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hiding in plain sight: New species of flying squirrel discoveredA new study published May 30 in the Journal of Mammalogy describes a newly discovered third species of flying squirrel in North America -- now known as Humboldt's flying squirrel, or Glaucomys oregonensis. It inhabits the Pacific Coast region of North America, from southern British Columbia to the mountains of southern California.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study identifies energy metabolism adaptations linked to soft shell turtle evolutionAround 250 million years ago, terrestrial-bound turtles began to explore the aquatic environments, and with it, a profound, new ability first developed.
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Gizmodo
These Are the Essential Comics to Read After You've Watched Wonder Woman Image: DC Comics. DC Essentials Graphic Novels 2017 cover art by Sandu Florea and Tony S. Daniel If, like us, after seeing Wonder Woman you’d pray to the entire pantheon on Olympus to be watching Wonder Woman 2: Wonder Harder right now, we’ve got the next best thing while you wait for the sequel: the most outstanding comics to dive into starring everyone’s favorite Amazon warrior princess. We’re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber probe of cut-throat workplace triggers firingsUber said Tuesday that an internal investigation into workplace misdeeds has resulted in 20 people being fired.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New evidence reveals source of 1586 Sanriku, Japan tsunamiA team of researchers, led by Dr. Rhett Butler, geophysicist at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM), re-examined historical evidence around the Pacific and discovered the origin of the tsunami that hit Sanriku, Japan in 1586—a mega-earthquake from the Aleutian Islands that broadly impacted the north Pacific. Until now, this was considered an orphan tsunami, a historical tsunami without an obv
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence reveals source of 1586 Sanriku, Japan tsunamiA team of researchers, led by Dr. Rhett Butler, geophysicist at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM), re-examined historical evidence around the Pacific and discovered the origin of the tsunami that hit Sanriku, Japan in 1586 -- a mega-earthquake from the Aleutian Islands that broadly impacted the north Pacific. Until now, this was considered an orphan tsunami, a historical tsunami without an
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Viden
NASA vil gøre fremtidens luftfart mere sikkerRumfartsorganisationen vil bl.a. studere mulighederne for flyvende biler.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living long and living well: Is it possible to do both?Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, are developing metrics to identify the health markers for old age in the roundworm, C. elegans, a popular model in aging research. Their research, which provides insight into the tradeoffs between lifespan and health span, is the subject of a recent paper in Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, a publication of the Gerontol
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Gizmodo
Free Speech Group Says Trump Violates the First Amendment by Blocking Critics on Twitter Photo: AP The Knight First Amendment Institute, a digital rights group out of Columbia University, published an open letter to President Trump on Tuesday asking him to unblock his critics on Twitter or potentially face legal action for violating their constitutional rights. In the four-page letter , the lawyers argue that Twitter “operates as a ‘designated public forum’ for First Amendment purpos
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Live Science
Self-Replicating 3D Printers Could Build Moon Bases, Fight Global WarmingA 3D-printer that could re-create itself from lunar material is in development at a university in Canada.
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Big Think
One Speech by This 90s Literary Giant Holds the Key to Ending Polarization in America “The most important, obvious realities are often the ones that are the hardest to see.” Read More
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The Atlantic
The Mysterious Printer Code That Could Have Led the FBI to Reality Winner Across the computer security world yesterday, heads were shaking. The FBI filed a criminal complaint against Reality Winner , an NSA contractor, who the agency alleges stole classified documents and shared them with an “online news outlet” believed to be The Intercept . Because the documents in question appear to have been printed, some security experts have been wondering if a mysterious code us
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Science : NPR
Polar Photographer Shares His View Of A Ferocious But Fragile Ecosystem Paul Nicklen has spent decades documenting the Arctic and the Antarctic. "I want people to realize that ice is like the soil in the garden," he says. "Without ice the polar regions cannot exist." (Image credit: Paul Nicklen Gallery)
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Live Science
After a Life in Slow Motion, World's Oldest Sloth DiesThe world's oldest sloth, and the last one living in Australia, has died at the Adelaide Zoo.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digital games improve mental health & educational outcomes of Syrian refugee childrenDigital games can effectively teach refugee children much-needed skills -- including a new language, cognitive skills, and coding -- while also improving their mental health, finds research by New York University, the City University of New York, and Turkey's Bahcesehir University.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jackpot! Cosmic magnifying-glass effect captures universe's brightest galaxiesBoosted by natural magnifying lenses in space, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured unique close-up views of the universe's brightest infrared galaxies, which are as much as 10,000 times more luminous than our Milky Way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sweden's Museum of Failure celebrates products that floppedGreen Heinz ketchup? Fat-free Pringles? Colgate frozen lasagna? You don't need to be an expert to know these products weren't successful.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pittsburgh zoo says premature elephant born at nature centerPittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium has unveiled an elephant calf born about a month prematurely.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmic magnifying-glass effect captures universe's brightest galaxiesBoosted by natural magnifying lenses in space, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured unique close-up views of the universe's brightest infrared galaxies, which are as much as 10,000 times more luminous than our Milky Way.
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Gizmodo
Stunning Timelapse of Rolling Clouds Looks Like Someone Flipped the Ocean Upside Down GIF GIF: Vimeo He’s been chasing storms for eight years, but filmmaker Mike Olbinski called this event—a sunset that blasted a rare display of rolling undulatus asperatus clouds with an amazing lightshow of colors—“one of the most incredible scenes [he’s] witnessed.” The resulting 4K timelapse is one you’re going to want to watch in fullscreen. GIF GIF: Vimeo Were you to lay on your back and watc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical benefit of clot retrieval now proven up to 24 hours after major ischemic strokeResults of an international, randomized controlled research study show that mechanical thrombectomy, which is an endovascular treatment to remove a stroke-causing blood clot in the brain, is effective in some patients even when performed within 6 to 24 hours after a stroke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Celestial boondocks: Study supports the idea we live in a voidCosmologically speaking, the Milky Way and its immediate neighborhood are in the boondocks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explain mystery of 'banging' galaxy clustersTwo galaxy clusters in the process of merging created a layer of surprisingly hot gas between them that University of Colorado Boulder astronomers believe is from turbulence caused by banging into each other at supersonic speeds.
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Gizmodo
Particle Accelerators Are Changing the Way We Look at Ancient Turds A fossil poop (Image: Poozeum /Wikimedia Commons) Shit’s wild. No, seriously, there’s so much you can learn about animals, their lifestyles, and the world they interacted with based on what shows up in their poo. Especially if the poo is over 200 million years old. Most of the methods used to look at fossilized shit, more commonly called coprolites, are fairly outdated. Scientists mainly use two-
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Gizmodo
This Discounted Lightning Cable Is So Metal iClever BoostLink Metal Lightning Cable , $9 with code ICCABLE3 Just when you thought you’d seen it all when it comes to Lightning cables, iClever just released one that’s braided on the outside with stainless steel . Obviously, this won’t be as flexible as a rubber or nylon-coated cable, but it’s impossible to tangle, and should stand up to even the most reckless iPhone owner. Plus, it just look
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Quanta Magazine
Wanted: More Data, the Dirtier the Better To distill a clear message from growing piles of unruly genomics data, researchers often turn to meta-analysis — a tried-and-true statistical procedure for combining data from multiple studies. But the studies that a meta-analysis might mine for answers can diverge endlessly. Some enroll only men, others only children. Some are done in one country, others across a region like Europe. Some focus o
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Ars Technica
Verizon is forced to fix 15,000 “double poles” and other network problems Enlarge / Dangling bits of old poles hanging off new poles, from a union complaint against Verizon in October 2015. (credit: CWA ) Verizon and a union representing its workers have reached a settlement requiring the company to fix thousands of problems in areas of Pennsylvania where it hasn't upgraded its copper network to fiber. The settlement of the union's complaint "will require the company t
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Latest NSA Leak Reveals Exactly the Kind of Cyberattack Experts Had Warned AboutThe Russian-backed assault, outlined in a newly public NSA analysis, targeted a particularly vulnerable component of the U.S. voting system.
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Live Science
In Photos: WWII Ship Discovered 77 Years After It SankThe sunken Italian naval ship was discovered by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's research vessel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mining the data mother lodeSocial media content combined with other sources of health information in a unique way has helped researchers understanding how people use language to communicate health needs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enrollment in early intervention services may be influenced by administering agencyMany eligible children do not enroll in services to improve cognitive, behavioral and physical skills under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the rates of enrollment vary in part by which agency at the state level is serving as the lead administrator.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does the sex of a cell matter in research?Scientists who study obesity, diabetes or other metabolic diseases can now better account for inherent sex differences in research, explains a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurodegenerative disease mechanism and potential drug identifiedTwo new studies of neurodegenerative diseases linked to mitochondrial defects offer hope for developing a new biomarker for research and diagnostics, and a drug for treating such diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is white or whole wheat bread 'healthier?' Depends on the personDespite many studies looking at which bread is the healthiest, it is still not clear what effect bread and differences among bread types have on clinically relevant parameters and on the microbiome. Researchers report the results of a comprehensive, randomized trial in 20 healthy subjects comparing differences in how processed white bread and artisanal whole wheat sourdough affect the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How neurons use crowdsourcing to make decisionsWhen many individual neurons collect data, how do they reach a unanimous decision? New research from a collective computation group suggests a two-phase process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Encouraging results from combination therapy in Hodgkin lymphomaCombination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and gemcitabine in patients is "highly active" regimen for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors of a phase II clinical study report.
3h
The Atlantic
To Be Sick Without Obamacare People who have any kind of medical condition are at the heart of the debate over repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. About a quarter of adults under 65 have these so-called preexisting conditions, and they are most vulnerable to any change in the current law, which prohibits charging sick people more for insurance. The replacement bill that passed the House of Representatives, the A
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Ars Technica
Enthusiasts warn planetary protection may stop humans from going to Mars Enlarge / Robert Zubrin, an aerospace engineer who formed the Mars Society, photographed in Red Rocks, Colorado. (credit: John B. Carnett/Bonnier Corporation via Getty Images ) ST. LOUIS, Mo.—More than just about anything, Robert Zubrin would like to see humans visit and then settle on Mars during his lifetime. The aerospace engineer has made a living of identifying technologies needed to get ast
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WIRED
Trump’s Twitter Blocking May Violate First Amendment The Knight First Amendment Institute has sent a letter to President Trump, arguing that blocking Americans on Twitter violates their First Amendment rights. The post Trump's Twitter Blocking May Violate First Amendment appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New target found to attack an incurable brain tumor in childrenResearch shows that a tumor suppressor gene p16 is turned off by a histone mutation (H3.3K27M), which is found in up to 70 percent of childhood brain tumors called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New planet found to be hotter than most starsA newly discovered Jupiter-like world is so hot that even its nights are like the flame of a welding torch. Planet KELT-9b is hotter than most stars. With a day-side temperature of more than 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,600 Kelvin), it is only about 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,200 Kelvin) cooler than our own sun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Celestial boondocks: Study supports the idea we live in a voidA new study by a UW-Madison undergraduate not only firms up the idea that we exist in one of the holes of the Swiss cheese structure of the cosmos, but helps ease the apparent disagreement between different measurements of the Hubble Constant, the unit cosmologists use to describe the rate at which the universe is expanding today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer cells send signals boosting survival and drug resistance in other cancer cellsResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that cancer cells appear to communicate to other cancer cells, activating an internal mechanism that boosts resistance to common chemotherapies and promotes tumor survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CU Boulder researchers explain mystery of 'banging' galaxy clustersJune 6, 2017 -Two galaxy clusters in the process of merging created a layer of surprisingly hot gas between them that University of Colorado Boulder astronomers believe is from turbulence caused by banging into each other at supersonic speeds.
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Gizmodo
4,000 Google Earth Photos Were Edited and Assembled Into This Dizzying Race Across the Earth GIF You don’t always need a wealthy record label to create a memorable music video. As YouTube’s Adnaan demonstrates, all you need is access to the massive archive of satellite photos on Google Earth, and enough time to painstakingly assemble over 4,000 of them into a frantic race across the Earth. Set to the track Midnight by Caravan Palace , the video also highlights the differences between the
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Live Science
Lip-Smacking Good! How 'Mushroom-Lipped' Fish Score Hard-to-Get MealsFor a reef fish species, sloppy, slimy lip dribbles serve as a vital defense against its coral prey's venomous stings.
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Ars Technica
Uber fires 20 employees as fallout from sexual harassment investigation Enlarge (credit: freestocks.org ) Uber CEO Travis Kalanick kicked off a sexual harassment investigation in February after a female engineer said that institutional sexism at the ride-hailing company had forced her to quit her job. The fallout from that probe has resulted in the firing of 20 workers, and more may be on the way. That's according to Bloomberg News, which cited an anonymous source. T
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Live Science
Sunken WWII Destroyer Found by Paul Allen's Research CompanyThe naval ship was sunk in 1940 during the Battle of Cape Passero in World War II.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does the sex of a cell matter in research?Over the last decade, many drugs that have been pulled from the market due to toxicity were withdrawn because they affected women more than men. It turns out, the studies that brought the drugs to market were designed using only male cells and animal models, a common flaw a Tulane endocrinologist is working to help correct.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Difficulties diagnosing delirium in older adults after surgeryExperts still don't always agree on delirium symptoms or diagnoses, even when they are assessing the same symptoms in the same people. A team of researchers from the Netherlands designed a study to look at the accuracy of delirium diagnoses in older adults after surgeries. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurodegenerative disease mechanism and potential drug identifiedTwo new, UC Davis-led studies of neurodegenerative diseases linked to mitochondrial defects offer hope for developing a new biomarker for research and diagnostics, and a drug for treating such diseases.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Gut bacteria can stop cancer drugs from working Presence of particular microbes or enzymes could explain why some treatments are ineffective for certain people. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22109
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is 'doing good' bad for a company's bottom line? Yes, says studyCompanies that try to "do good" are likely to find that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is bad for their bottom lines, according to a new study from Florida Atlantic University's College of Business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Variable speed limits could reduce crashes, ease congestion in highway work zonesAs the summer months approach, most people turn to thoughts of sunshine, outdoor barbecues and destination trips. Yet travelers often are greeted by detours, lane closures and delays for road repairs that generally are reserved for warmer weather. Researchers at the University of Missouri have studied systems to alleviate inevitable backups and delays. Researchers found that using variable speed l
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Ars Technica
Kids who weather bitter divorce are 3 times more vulnerable to colds as adults Enlarge (credit: Billie Grace Ward ) It’s hard to avoid invisible wounds from the blast force of a divorce. But how gracefully parents navigate the emotional rubble afterward can determine the extent of some of their children’s injuries—particularly those to their immune systems. According to a small study, adults who braved a bitter parental divorce as kids were three times more vulnerable to co
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New Scientist - News
General relativity passes test at Milky Way’s central black holeStars orbiting the supermassive black hole have been used to test Einstein’s famous theory for the first time, with no sign found of a fifth fundamental force
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Gizmodo
How My Arranged Marriage With Volvo Got Hot Again Image: Raphael Orlove / Jalopnik I met Volvo for the first time in the year 2000. My dad introduced us, both shy and unsure of our futures, on a balmy summer day not long after my 16th birthday. He’d already paid the $500 dowry, and I had little choice in the matter. That rusty 1985 Volvo 740 Turbo would be mine, ’til death do us part. And then, the Volvo died. My fault. I spent 20 years feeling
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines caregiving by family members, other unpaid individualsCaregiving is a significant public health topic because it affects the health and well-being of both the older adult and his or her caregivers. Recently, a team of researchers examined the various characteristics of people who serve as unpaid caregivers. They also estimated how many people serve in this capacity. The researchers took note of the health-related tasks the caregivers provided, as wel
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Popular Science
Fun activities for your next vacation to Mercury Entertainment Excerpt: Vacation Guide to the Solar System. Check out an out-of-this-world excerpt from Intergalactic Travel Bureau: Vacation guide to the Solar System by Olivia Koski and Jana Grcevich.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study could help explain link between seizures and psychiatric disordersScientists have identified different types of neurons in a brain region called the reticular thalamus. A better understanding of these cells could eventually help explain how both seizures and certain psychiatric disorders can occur at the same time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A star is born: Lesser-known brain cell takes center stageA new method efficiently grows human astrocytes in a dish, advancing studies of stroke, Alzheimer's and depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drinking diet beverages during pregnancy linked to child obesity, study suggestsChildren born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day during pregnancy were more likely to be overweight or obese at age 7, compared to children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank water instead of artificially sweetened beverages, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Variable speed limits could reduce crashes, ease congestion in highway work zonesAs the summer months approach, most people turn to thoughts of sunshine, outdoor barbecues and destination trips. Yet travelers often are greeted by detours, lane closures and delays for road repairs that generally are reserved for warmer weather. Researchers have studied systems to alleviate inevitable backups and delays. Researchers found that using variable speed limits in construction zones ma
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The Atlantic
The Six-Day War Was a Step Backward for Zionism Israel’s victory in the 1967 Six-Day War and its resulting military occupation of the West Bank and its Palestinian residents transformed the Jewish state, providing it with both a measure of security it had not enjoyed and the responsibility of governing a people it did not want. It also transformed Zionism—from an ideology of pragmatism and activism into an ideology of utopianism and passivity.
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Science : NPR
PHOTOS: Here's What Climate Change Looks Like To Uganda's Coffee Farmers Coffee is Uganda's most valuable industry, but climate change could cut production by half by 2050. Small farmers there are already feeling the effects, as they document in these photos. (Image credit: Beatrice Nandudu)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older married couples and advance directivesA new study examined the effects spouses had on the decision of older adults to have advance directives. The study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should your primary care physician be a generalist or specialist? New study exploresRecently, researchers studied how seeing a PCP or seeing a specialist for most of an older person's outpatient care (impacted their health outcomes. The research team published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does the sex of a cell matter in research?A Tulane University endocrinologist co-authored a guide in the latest issue of Cell Metabolism to help scientists who study obesity, diabetes or other metabolic diseases better account for inherent sex differences in research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sequential options prompt future thinking, boost patienceWhen faced with a tempting choice, it can be hard to stop and think through the potential consequences, but new research suggests that framing the choice as a sequence of events can help us exercise patience by prompting us to imagine the future. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enrollment in early intervention services may be influenced by administering agencyMany eligible children do not enroll in services to improve cognitive, behavioral and physical skills under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the rates of enrollment vary in part by which agency at the state level is serving as the lead administrator.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-nausea drug could help treat sleep apneaAn old pharmaceutical product may be a new treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, according to new research presented today by University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University scientists at the SLEEP 2017 annual meeting in Boston.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease ratesNew research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes a movement feel strenuous?Scientists have determined which characteristics of an arm movement influence the subjective effort associated with this movement. In a study publishing on June 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology they found that duration, biomechanics and force had an influence on the effort, while movement amplitudes had no effect. Their results shed light on a postulated link between two important functio
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food policies have potential to lower US cardiovascular disease ratesFood policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States, researchers project in a study published in PLOS Medicine by Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard from the University of Liverpool, UK and Imperial College London, UK, and c
4h
Live Science
Trump's Seldom-Seen Glasses: Why Vision Declines with AgePresident Donald Trump is 70 years old, an age at which many people need reading glasses or other devices to aid their vision. So where are Trump's glasses?
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Gizmodo
Uber Has Already Fired More Than 20 Employees While Investigating Harassment [Updated] Photo: AP The details of an independent investigation into Uber’s workplace culture that was sparked after a female engineer came forward with allegations of sexual harassment are starting to come out. Uber’s independent investigators looked into 215 complaints and ended up firing more than 20 employees since this February. Bloomberg first reported the numbers and Gizmodo has confirmed them. In 1
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Ars Technica
Can you commit manslaughter by sending texts? We’re about to find out Enlarge / Michelle Carter faces involuntary manslaughter charges for texts prosecutors say encouraged a 17-year-old boy to commit suicide. (credit: WCVB 5 ) An involuntary manslaughter trial began Tuesday for a Massachusetts woman who as a teen texted her boyfriend and urged him to commit suicide. The woman, Michelle Carter, faces a maximum 20-year prison term if convicted at a bench trial in Bri
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Get A Sneak Peek of Discovery's MANHUNT: UNABOMBER Manhunt: Unabomber | Premieres Tue Aug 1 at 9/8c Manhunt: Unabomber tells the story of how the FBI tracked down notorious Unabomber Ted Kaczynski (Paul Bettany), told from the point of view of the FBI profiler (Sam Worthington) in charge of the manhunt. Manhunt: Unabomber — an 8 episode event — starts Tuesday, August 1 at 9/8c on Discovery. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://ww
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is 'doing good' bad for a company's bottom line? Yes, says studyCompanies that try to 'do good' are likely to find that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is bad for their bottom lines, according to a new study. CSR is defined as strategies that appear to foster some social good, including programs that benefit community engagement, diversity, the environment, human rights and employee relations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into how cancer spreadsEngineers have offered new insight into how cancer cells move based on their ability to sense their environment. The discovery could have a major impact on therapies to prevent the spread of cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is there a link between infertility and child educational outcomes?Involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement -- both test scores and grade point average -- at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own, research indicates.
5h
Ars Technica
California gov to work with China on clean energy tech, defying US reversal Enlarge / Governor and Minister of Science and Technology Wan Gang. (credit: California Office of Governor) On Tuesday, California Governor Jerry Brown and China’s Ministry of Science and Technology agreed to work together on climate issues. The governor pledged to work with China to push forward clean energy technology like carbon capture and storage, emissions trading, and other “climate positi
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Nose Takes a Starring RoleThe star-nosed mole has what is very likely the world's fastest and most fantastic nose -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precision therapy enasidenib effective in treating deadly form of leukemiaSome patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant acute myeloid leukemia, a form of blood cancer for which there are few treatments, may achieve remission with an experimental targeted therapy, according to early trial data published online today in Blood, a Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).
5h
Gizmodo
OxyLED's New $15 Motion-Sensing Night Light Still Sticks Anywhere, But Is Easier to Charge OxyLED T-04 Motion Activated Light , $15 with code OXYT04NL Our readers have bought thousands of OxyLED’s T-02 motion-sensing light strips over the years, but if you’ve found them to be to annoying to charge, the new T-04 looks like a great upgrade. Like the T-02, the T-04 can attach to basically any surface via the included adhesive strips, and will automatically light up when it detects motion
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The rise of political apathy in two charts In turbulent times, voting should seem even more important — but in Europe, turnouts are lower than ever. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22106
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Variable speed limits could reduce crashes, ease congestion in highway work zonesAs the summer months approach, most people turn to thoughts of sunshine, outdoor barbecues and destination trips. Yet travelers often are greeted by detours, lane closures and delays for road repairs that generally are reserved for warmer weather. Researchers at the University of Missouri have studied systems to alleviate inevitable backups and delays. Researchers found that using variable speed l
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is 'doing good' bad for a company's bottom line? Yes, says FAU studyCompanies that try to 'do good' are likely to find that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is bad for their bottom lines, according to a new study from Florida Atlantic University's College of Business. CSR is defined as strategies that appear to foster some social good, including programs that benefit community engagement, diversity, the environment, human rights and employee relations.
5h
Live Science
Scary Snake Strategy: Cuban Boas Hunt in PacksSnakes are more social than scientists thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineer unveils new spin on future of transistors with novel designA researcher has designed a novel computing system made solely from carbon that might one day replace the silicon transistors that power today’s electronic devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global warming may cause spike in asthma, allergy symptomsExposure to a widespread outdoor fungus can increase cell damage (oxidative stress) in the airways, research shows. This spike weakens the airways’ barrier defense system that, when functioning normally, removes infection- and allergy-causing organisms (mucociliary clearance).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key controller of biological machinery in cell's 'antenna' discoveredA new discovery of a regulatory enzyme working at the primary cilium could lead to treatments for the brain tumor medulloblastoma, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
El Niño and global warming combine to cause record-breaking heat in Southeast AsiaA devastating combination of global warming and El Niño is responsible for causing extreme temperatures in April 2016 in Southeast Asia, scientists have found.
5h
Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get two free audio books when you start a 30-day Audible trial Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we have a new list of deals to share, with ample time to save before Father's Day. Now you can get two free audio books when you sign up for an Audible free 30-day trial. Only new Audible customers can take advantage of this deal, so now's the time to give audio books a try if you've been on the fence. The best part is that you can ke
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sea-Level Rise Poses a Rising Risk to U.S. ShoresA recent report forecasts that waters could swell as much as seven feet by 2100 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
After Trump's Withdrawal from Paris, Nukes Are More Crucial Than EverSolar and wind cannot entirly replace fossil fuels, making nuclear power an essential part of the fight against climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The Atlantic
Bob Dylan’s Nobel Lecture Says the Unsayable If you’ve never gotten around to sitting down and reading Moby Dick , fear not, Bob Dylan will summarize it for you. Excerpted from his newly released Nobel Lecture in Literature, here is the opening paragraph of his description of Herman Melville’s opus: Moby Dick is a fascinating book, a book that’s filled with scenes of high drama and dramatic dialogue. The book makes demands on you. The plot
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The Atlantic
Tiny Jumping Spiders Can See the Moon Last Wednesday, a spider fell onto Jamie Lomax’s laptop. Two days later, it happened again . Soon enough , several spiders were crawling across the ceiling of her office. “It was a little unnerving,” says Lomax, who’s an astronomer at the University of Washington. “I’m not scared of spiders but if someone else wants to take care of the spider in a room, I’ll gladly let them do it over me. And I d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
R Aquarii: Watching a volatile stellar relationshipIn biology, "symbiosis" refers to two organisms that live close to and interact with one another. Astronomers have long studied a class of stars—called symbiotic stars—that co-exist in a similar way. Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers are gaining a better understanding of how volatile this close stellar relationship can be.
5h
Ars Technica
How one patent troll is desperately trying to stay in East Texas Is this enough to keep Google in East Texas courts? Uniloc, one of the nation's most well-known patent-holding companies, sued Google earlier this year in the Eastern District of Texas. Even though neither Uniloc nor Google has meaningful ties to that area, the lawsuit was no surprise— East Texas has long been the most popular venue for patent-holding companies to file lawsuits. But the rules aro
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Live Science
One of Malaysia's Last Sumatran Rhinos DiesFewer than 100 Sumatran rhinoceroses are left on the planet.
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Popular Science
How to use Google Earth and Street View to explore the planet DIY Globetrot from the comfort of the couch Using Google's latest online apps, you can take a close-up look at any location in the world, right from your regular web browser.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mini-flares potentially jeopardize habitability of planets circling red dwarf starsCool dwarf stars are hot targets for exoplanet hunting right now. The discoveries of planets in the habitable zones of the TRAPPIST-1 and LHS 1140 systems, for example, suggest that Earth-sized worlds might circle billions of red dwarf stars, the most common type of star in our galaxy. But, like our own sun, many of these stars erupt with intense flares. Are red dwarfs really as friendly to life a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel innovation could allow bullets to disintegrate after designated distance, help prevent collateral damageStray-bullet shootings are an often-overlooked consequence of gunfire that can cause severe injury or death to bystanders, or collateral damage victims in the military. A novel technology being developed at Purdue University could help prevent these incidents.
5h
Gizmodo
The Good, the Bad, and the Weird as Hell Wonder Woman Merchandise Walgreens. Now that Wonder Woman has taken over the box office and our lives, it’s high time to really lean into the franchise and stock up on all the best merchandise the internet has to offer. In the past, female characters in major franchises have been left out of the merch— Gamora was nowhere to be seen on several Guardians of the Galaxy shirts, Black Widow was largely kept out of the Avenger
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Popular Science
How to not get deadly flesh-eating bacteria in your new tattoo Health A recent case study is scary, but tattoos aren't really to blame. Doctors report on the case of a man who died of sepsis after flesh-eating bacteria infiltrated his new tattoo. Here's what you need to know.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What the hair of a fly tells us about cancerCells divide into two identical cells that then divide in turn, meaning that any tissue can grow exponentially. But the moment comes when some of them have to develop into specialized cells. On the back of a fly, for example, a cell must know that when it splits, it will give birth to two different cells: a hair and a neuron. How do these asymmetric divisions function? To answer this question, res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ethiopia mobile internet still off after a weekEthiopians were still unable to surf the web via mobile networks on Tuesday, despite government claims the nationwide internet shutdown, which began a week ago, had been lifted.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Czech scientists see growing risk of asteroid hitting EarthThe risk is growing that Earth will be hit by an asteroid from a meteor stream known as the Taurids, Czech astronomers said on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keeping captive-bred fish has gotten easierRemember when keeping a saltwater aquarium was just for experts? Now, the technology has advanced to the point where just about anyone can do it and expect to keep the fish alive and healthy.
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Live Science
These Lab Chimpanzees Are Getting a 2nd Lease on LifeChimpanzees that formerly served as laboratory research subjects will receive long-term care on island sanctuaries in Liberia.
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Live Science
Why Are Super-Destructive Supervolcanoes So Rare?The most powerful and destructive volcanic eruptions — called super-eruptions — can take millions of years to form because magma doesn't gush, but rather slowly trickles into the system, a new study finds.
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inhibitors of hepatitis C virus entry may be potent ingredients of optimal drug combinations [Biological Sciences]With the large number of drugs now approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and an even larger number under development, rational identification of effective drug combinations becomes necessary for better disease management and the judicious design of clinical trials. In PNAS, Koizumi et al. (1)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Padmanabhan and Dixit: Hepatitis C virus entry inhibitors for optimally boosting direct-acting antiviral-based treatments [Biological Sciences]We thank Padmanabhan and Dixit for their comments (1) on our paper (2). They pointed out that entry inhibitors might form potent partners for optimal drug combinations. They analyzed previously published data on 10 hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry inhibitors that are under clinical or preclinical development and found some...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spatiotemporal dynamics of word retrieval in speech production revealed by cortical high-frequency band activity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Word retrieval is core to language production and relies on complementary processes: the rapid activation of lexical and conceptual representations and word selection, which chooses the correct word among semantically related competitors. Lexical and conceptual activation is measured by semantic priming. In contrast, word selection is indexed by semantic interference...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic insight into the nucleus-vacuole ȷunction based on the Vac8p-Nvȷ1p crystal structure [Biochemistry]Formation of the nucleus–vacuole junction (NVJ) is mediated by direct interaction between the vacuolar protein Vac8p and the outer nuclear endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein Nvj1p. Herein we report the crystal structure of Vac8p bound to Nvj1p at 2.4-Å resolution. Vac8p comprises a flexibly connected N-terminal H1 helix followed by 12...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiscale model predicts increasing focal adhesion size with decreasing stiffness in fibrous matrices [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We describe a multiscale model that incorporates force-dependent mechanical plasticity induced by interfiber cross-link breakage and stiffness-dependent cellular contractility to predict focal adhesion (FA) growth and mechanosensing in fibrous extracellular matrices (ECMs). The model predicts that FA size depends on both the stiffness of ECM and the density of ligands...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Physicochemical code for quinary protein interactions in Escherichia coli [Biophysics and Computational Biology]How proteins sense and navigate the cellular interior to find their functional partners remains poorly understood. An intriguing aspect of this search is that it relies on diffusive encounters with the crowded cellular background, made up of protein surfaces that are largely nonconserved. The question is then if/how this protein...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Angular measurements of the dynein ring reveal a stepping mechanism dependent on a flexible stalk [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The force-generating mechanism of dynein differs from the force-generating mechanisms of other cytoskeletal motors. To examine the structural dynamics of dynein’s stepping mechanism in real time, we used polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with nanometer accuracy localization to track the orientation and position of single motors. By measuring the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective regulation of Notch ligands during angiogenesis is mediated by vimentin [Cell Biology]Notch signaling is a key regulator of angiogenesis, in which sprouting is regulated by an equilibrium between inhibitory Dll4-Notch signaling and promoting Jagged-Notch signaling. Whereas Fringe proteins modify Notch receptors and strengthen their activation by Dll4 ligands, other mechanisms balancing Jagged and Dll4 signaling are yet to be described. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Major contribution of the 3/6/7 class of TRPC channels to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion and cellular hypoxia/reoxygenation injuries [Cell Biology]The injury phase after myocardial infarcts occurs during reperfusion and is a consequence of calcium release from internal stores combined with calcium entry, leading to cell death by apoptopic and necrotic processes. The mechanism(s) by which calcium enters cells has(ve) not been identified. Here, we identify canonical transient receptor potential...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Data-driven modeling reveals cell behaviors controlling self-organization during Myxococcus xanthus development [Developmental Biology]Collective cell movement is critical to the emergent properties of many multicellular systems, including microbial self-organization in biofilms, embryogenesis, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. However, even the best-studied systems lack a complete picture of how diverse physical and chemical cues act upon individual cells to ensure coordinated multicellular behavior. Known...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Integrative modeling of gene and genome evolution roots the archaeal tree of life [Evolution]A root for the archaeal tree is essential for reconstructing the metabolism and ecology of early cells and for testing hypotheses that propose that the eukaryotic nuclear lineage originated from within the Archaea; however, published studies based on outgroup rooting disagree regarding the position of the archaeal root. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
cGAS is essential for cellular senescence [Immunology and Inflammation]Cellular senescence is a natural barrier to tumorigenesis and it contributes to the antitumor effects of several therapies, including radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs. Senescence also plays an important role in aging, fibrosis, and tissue repair. The DNA damage response is a key event leading to senescence, which is characterized by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The FERM protein EPB41L5 regulates actomyosin contractility and focal adhesion formation to maintain the kidney filtration barrier [Medical Sciences]Podocytes form the outer part of the glomerular filter, where they have to withstand enormous transcapillary filtration forces driving glomerular filtration. Detachment of podocytes from the glomerular basement membrane precedes most glomerular diseases. However, little is known about the regulation of podocyte adhesion in vivo. Thus, we systematically screened for...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
RNA editing of SLC22A3 drives early tumor invasion and metastasis in familial esophageal cancer [Medical Sciences]Like many complex human diseases, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is known to cluster in families. Familial ESCC cases often show early onset and worse prognosis than the sporadic cases. However, the molecular genetic basis underlying the development of familial ESCC is mostly unknown. We reported that SLC22A3 is significantly...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prognostic and biological significance of the proangiogenic factor EGFL7 in acute myeloid leukemia [Medical Sciences]Epithelial growth factor-like 7 (EGFL7) is a protein that is secreted by endothelial cells and plays an important role in angiogenesis. Although EGFL7 is aberrantly overexpressed in solid tumors, its role in leukemia has not been evaluated. Here, we report that levels of both EGFL7 mRNA and EGFL7 protein are...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective lowering of synapsins induced by oligomeric {alpha}-synuclein exacerbates memory deficits [Neuroscience]Mounting evidence indicates that soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid proteins linked to neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyloid-β (Aβ), tau, or α-synuclein (αSyn) might be the major deleterious species for neuronal function in these diseases. Here, we found an abnormal accumulation of oligomeric αSyn species in AD brains by custom ELISA,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modulation of sensory information processing by a neuroglobin in Caenorhabditis elegans [Neuroscience]Sensory receptor neurons match their dynamic range to ecologically relevant stimulus intensities. How this tuning is achieved is poorly understood in most receptors. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans avoids 21% O2 and hypoxia and prefers intermediate O2 concentrations. We show how this O2 preference is sculpted by the antagonistic action of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Parallel memory traces are built after an experience containing aversive and appetitive components in the crab Neohelice [Neuroscience]The neurobiology of learning and memory has been mainly studied by focusing on pure aversive or appetitive experiences. Here, we challenged this approach considering that real-life stimuli come normally associated with competing aversive and appetitive consequences and that interaction between conflicting information must be intrinsic part of the memory processes....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
KEAP1-modifying small molecule reveals muted NRF2 signaling responses in neural stem cells from Huntington's disease patients [Neuroscience]The activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-derived factor 2 (NRF2) is orchestrated and amplified through enhanced transcription of antioxidant and antiinflammatory target genes. The present study has characterized a triazole-containing inducer of NRF2 and elucidated the mechanism by which this molecule activates NRF2 signaling. In a highly...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HDAC1 links early life stress to schizophrenia-like phenotypes [Neuroscience]Schizophrenia is a devastating disease that arises on the background of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors, such as early life stress (ELS). In this study, we show that ELS-induced schizophrenia-like phenotypes in mice correlate with a widespread increase of histone-deacetylase 1 (Hdac1) expression that is linked to altered DNA...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Collective action and the evolution of social norm internalization [Anthropology]Human behavior is strongly affected by culturally transmitted norms and values. Certain norms are internalized (i.e., acting according to a norm becomes an end in itself rather than merely a tool in achieving certain goals or avoiding social sanctions). Humans’ capacity to internalize norms likely evolved in our ancestors to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effects of habitat disturbance on tropical forest biodiversity [Ecology]It is widely expected that habitat destruction in the tropics will cause a mass extinction in coming years, but the potential magnitude of the loss is unclear. Existing literature has focused on estimating global extinction rates indirectly or on quantifying effects only at local and regional scales. This paper directly...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Discovery of a widespread metabolic pathway within and among phenolic xenobiotics [Environmental Sciences]Metabolism is an organism’s primary defense against xenobiotics, yet it also increases the production of toxic metabolites. It is generally recognized that phenolic xenobiotics, a group of ubiquitous endocrine disruptors, undergo rapid phase II metabolism to generate more water-soluble glucuronide and sulfate conjugates as a detoxification pathway. However, the toxicological...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Extraordinarily rapid speciation in a marine fish [Evolution]Divergent selection may initiate ecological speciation extremely rapidly. How often and at what pace ecological speciation proceeds to yield strong reproductive isolation is more uncertain. Here, we document a case of extraordinarily rapid speciation associated with ecological selection in the postglacial Baltic Sea. European flounders (Platichthys flesus) in the Baltic...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Repression of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein {alpha} ameliorates the pathology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy [Genetics]Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle wasting disease caused by X-linked inherited mutations in the DYSTROPHIN (DMD) gene. Absence of dystrophin protein from the sarcolemma causes severe muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and inflammation, ultimately leading to cardiorespiratory failure and premature death. Although there are several promising strategies under investigation...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CCR8+FOXp3+ Treg cells as master drivers of immune regulation [Immunology and Inflammation]The current study identifies CCR8+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) as drivers of immunosuppression. We show that in human peripheral blood cells, more than 30% of Treg up-regulate CCR8 following activation in the presence of CCL1. This interaction induces STAT3-dependent up-regulation of FOXp3, CD39, IL-10, and granzyme B, resulting in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inducible CTCF insulator delays the IgH 3' regulatory region-mediated activation of germline promoters and alters class switching [Immunology and Inflammation]Class switch recombination (CSR) plays an important role in adaptive immune response by enabling mature B cells to switch from IgM expression to the expression of downstream isotypes. CSR is preceded by inducible germline (GL) transcription of the constant genes and is controlled by the 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) in...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visualization and characterization of individual type III protein secretion machines in live bacteria [Microbiology]Type III protein secretion machines have evolved to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. Although electron microscopy has provided a detailed view of these machines in isolation or fixed samples, little is known about their organization in live bacteria. Here we report the visualization and characterization of the...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The pentameric complex drives immunologically covert cell-cell transmission of wild-type human cytomegalovirus [Microbiology]Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strains that have been passaged in vitro rapidly acquire mutations that impact viral growth. These laboratory-adapted strains of HCMV generally exhibit restricted tropism, produce high levels of cell-free virus, and develop susceptibility to natural killer cells. To permit experimentation with a virus that retained a clinically relevant...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unique clade of alphaproteobacterial endosymbionts induces complete cytoplasmic incompatibility in the coconut beetle [Microbiology]Maternally inherited bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods manipulate host reproduction to increase the fitness of infected females. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, in which uninfected females produce few or no offspring when they mate with infected males. To date, two bacterial endosymbionts, Wolbachia and Cardinium, have been reported as...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prediction of disease activity in models of multiple sclerosis by molecular magnetic resonance imaging of P-selectin [Neuroscience]New strategies for detecting disease activity in multiple sclerosis are being investigated to ameliorate diagnosis and follow-up of patients. Today, although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to diagnose and monitor multiple sclerosis, no imaging tools exist to predict the evolution of disease and the efficacy of therapeutic strategies....
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in perceptual sensitivity related to spatial cues depends on subcortical activity [Neuroscience]Spatial cues allow animals to selectively attend to relevant visual stimuli while ignoring distracters. This process depends on a distributed neuronal network, and an important current challenge is to understand the functional contributions made by individual brain regions within this network and how these contributions interact. Recent findings point to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Learned response sequences in cerebellar Purkinje cells [Neuroscience]Associative learning in the cerebellum has previously focused on single movements. In eyeblink conditioning, for instance, a subject learns to blink at the right time in response to a conditional stimulus (CS), such as a tone that is repeatedly followed by an unconditional corneal stimulus (US). During conditioning, the CS...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Wild tobacco genomes reveal the evolution of nicotine biosynthesis [Plant Biology]Nicotine, the signature alkaloid of Nicotiana species responsible for the addictive properties of human tobacco smoking, functions as a defensive neurotoxin against attacking herbivores. However, the evolution of the genetic features that contributed to the assembly of the nicotine biosynthetic pathway remains unknown. We sequenced and assembled genomes of two...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Emergence of categorical face perception after extended early-onset blindness [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]It is unknown whether the ability to visually distinguish between faces and nonfaces is subject to a critical period during development. Would a congenitally blind child who gains sight several years after birth be able to acquire this skill? This question has remained unanswered because of the rarity of cases...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Verhille et al., Structure and mechanics of aegagropilae fiber network [Correction]APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Structure and mechanics of aegagropilae fiber network,” by Gautier Verhille, Sébastien Moulinet, Nicolas Vandenberghe, Mokhtar Adda-Bedia, and Patrice Le Gal, which appeared in issue 18, May 2, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:4607–4612; first published April 17, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1620688114). The authors note that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Lucotte et al., Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy [Correction]PHYSIOLOGY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy,” by Bertrand M. Lucotte, Chloe Powell, Jay R. Knutson, Christian A. Combs, Daniela Malide, Zu-Xi Yu, Mark Knepper, Keval D. Patel, Anna Pielach, Errin Johnson, Lyudmyla Borysova, Kim A. Dora, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Memory formation in crabs N. granulata. Image courtesy of Luis Pérez-Cuesta (New York University, New York). A key factor in the survival of animals in the wild is the ability to learn and remember places associated with danger and reward. Experiments on learning and memory in animals have focused on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Alta Charo and George Church [QnAs]When the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine released a long-awaited report on human genome editing in February 2017, it was met with the media attention that befits a signal moment in science policy. Among a raft of measured recommendations, the report notes that heritable modifications...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The fibrous cellular microenvironment, and how cells make sense of a tangled web [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The physiology and fate of living cells have long been known to be guided by their niche-specific microenvironments. Certain lineage-specific traits arise in mesenchymal stem cells from the elastic stiffness of the substratum on which they are cultured (1). This observation helped launch mechanobiology as a modern field, and has...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global biodiversity loss from tropical deforestation [Ecology]Tropical forests are incredibly biodiverse; they support at least two-thirds of the world’s biodiversity (1) despite covering less than 10% of Earth’s land surface (2). Unfortunately, prospects for tropical forests and the biodiversity therein are becoming increasingly bleak owing to unabated deforestation and forest alteration (3) that stem from human...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gene regulatory networks and network models in development and evolution [Introductions]The passion, energy, and intellectual rigor that the late Eric Davidson brought to science transformed fields and the lives of many scientists working in them. Key among his many contributions was developing a testable framework and global approach to understanding the mechanics of gene regulation and development. For several decades,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Healthy offspring from freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa held on the International Space Station for 9 months [Agricultural Sciences]If humans ever start to live permanently in space, assisted reproductive technology using preserved spermatozoa will be important for producing offspring; however, radiation on the International Space Station (ISS) is more than 100 times stronger than that on Earth, and irradiation causes DNA damage in cells and gametes. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insect pathogenic fungus interacts with the gut microbiota to accelerate mosquito mortality [Agricultural Sciences]The insect gut microbiota plays crucial roles in modulating the interactions between the host and intestinal pathogens. Unlike viruses, bacteria, and parasites, which need to be ingested to cause disease, entomopathogenic fungi infect insects through the cuticle and proliferate in the hemolymph. However, interactions between the gut microbiota and entomopathogenic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thoracic vertebral count and thoracolumbar transition in Australopithecus afarensis [Anthropology]The evolution of the human pattern of axial segmentation has been the focus of considerable discussion in paleoanthropology. Although several complete lumbar vertebral columns are known for early hominins, to date, no complete cervical or thoracic series has been recovered. Several partial skeletons have revealed that the thoracolumbar transition in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Blue fluorescent amino acid for biological spectroscopy and microscopy [Applied Biological Sciences]Many fluorescent proteins are currently available for biological spectroscopy and imaging measurements, allowing a wide range of biochemical and biophysical processes and interactions to be studied at various length scales. However, in applications where a small fluorescence reporter is required or desirable, the choice of fluorophores is rather limited. As...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spatial evolutionary games with weak selection [Applied Mathematics]Recently, a rigorous mathematical theory has been developed for spatial games with weak selection, i.e., when the payoff differences between strategies are small. The key to the analysis is that when space and time are suitably rescaled, the spatial model converges to the solution of a partial differential equation (PDE)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bio-inspired self-healing structural color hydrogel [Applied Physical Sciences]Biologically inspired self-healing structural color hydrogels were developed by adding a glucose oxidase (GOX)- and catalase (CAT)-filled glutaraldehyde cross-linked BSA hydrogel into methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) inverse opal scaffolds. The composite hydrogel materials with the polymerized GelMA scaffold could maintain the stability of an inverse opal structure and its resultant structural...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
B12-dependent photoresponsive protein hydrogels for controlled stem cell/protein release [Biochemistry]Thanks to the precise control over their structural and functional properties, genetically engineered protein-based hydrogels have emerged as a promising candidate for biomedical applications. Given the growing demand for creating stimuli-responsive “smart” hydrogels, here we show the synthesis of entirely protein-based photoresponsive hydrogels by covalently polymerizing the adenosylcobalamin (Ad
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interplay of catalysis, fidelity, threading, and processivity in the exo- and endonucleolytic reactions of human exonuclease I [Biochemistry]Human exonuclease 1 (hExo1) is a member of the RAD2/XPG structure-specific 5′-nuclease superfamily. Its dominant, processive 5′–3′ exonuclease and secondary 5′-flap endonuclease activities participate in various DNA repair, recombination, and replication processes. A single active site processes both recessed ends and 5′-flap substrates. By initiating enzyme reactions in crystals, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Histone-binding of DPF2 mediates its repressive role in myeloid differentiation [Biochemistry]Double plant homeodomain finger 2 (DPF2) is a highly evolutionarily conserved member of the d4 protein family that is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and was recently shown to inhibit the myeloid differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor and acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tandem...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism of H2S-mediated protection against oxidative stress in Escherichia coli [Biochemistry]Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) renders bacteria highly resistant to oxidative stress, but its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report that 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) is the major source of endogenous H2S in Escherichia coli. Cellular resistance to H2O2 strongly depends on the activity of mstA, a gene that encodes 3MST....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary steps involving counterion displacement in a tunicate opsin [Biochemistry]Ci-opsin1 is a visible light-sensitive opsin present in the larval ocellus of an ascidian, Ciona intestinalis. This invertebrate opsin belongs to the vertebrate visual and nonvisual opsin groups in the opsin phylogenetic tree. Ci-opsin1 contains candidate counterions (glutamic acid residues) at positions 113 and 181; the former is a newly...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstructing blood stem cell regulatory network models from single-cell molecular profiles [Colloquium Paper]Adult blood contains a mixture of mature cell types, each with specialized functions. Single hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been functionally shown to generate all mature cell types for the lifetime of the organism. Differentiation of HSCs toward alternative lineages must be balanced at the population level by the fate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Active depinning of bacterial droplets: The collective surfing of Bacillus subtilis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]How systems are endowed with migration capacity is a fascinating question with implications ranging from the design of novel active systems to the control of microbial populations. Bacteria, which can be found in a variety of environments, have developed among the richest set of locomotion mechanisms both at the microscopic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in conformational equilibria regulate the activity of the Dcp2 decapping enzyme [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Crystal structures of enzymes are indispensable to understanding their mechanisms on a molecular level. It, however, remains challenging to determine which structures are adopted in solution, especially for dynamic complexes. Here, we study the bilobed decapping enzyme Dcp2 that removes the 5′ cap structure from eukaryotic mRNA and thereby efficiently...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nanomechanics of the substrate binding domain of Hsp70 determine its allosteric ATP-induced conformational change [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Owing to the cooperativity of protein structures, it is often almost impossible to identify independent subunits, flexible regions, or hinges simply by visual inspection of static snapshots. Here, we use single-molecule force experiments and simulations to apply tension across the substrate binding domain (SBD) of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Engineering Cu surfaces for the electrocatalytic conversion of CO2: Controlling selectivity toward oxygenates and hydrocarbons [Chemistry]In this study we control the surface structure of Cu thin-film catalysts to probe the relationship between active sites and catalytic activity for the electroreduction of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. Here, we report physical vapor deposition of Cu thin films on large-format (∼6 cm2) single-crystal substrates, and confirm epitaxial...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Understanding the essential proton-pumping kinetic gates and decoupling mutations in cytochrome c oxidase [Chemistry]Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and uses the released free energy to pump protons against the transmembrane proton gradient. To better understand the proton-pumping mechanism of the wild-type (WT) CcO, much attention has been given to the mutation of amino acid residues along the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Confined catalysis under two-dimensional materials [Chemistry]Confined microenvironments formed in heterogeneous catalysts have recently been recognized as equally important as catalytically active sites. Understanding the fundamentals of confined catalysis has become an important topic in heterogeneous catalysis. Well-defined 2D space between a catalyst surface and a 2D material overlayer provides an ideal microenvironment to explore the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Melting dynamics of ice in the mesoscopic regime [Chemistry]How does a crystal melt? How long does it take for melt nuclei to grow? The melting mechanisms have been addressed by several theoretical and experimental works, covering a subnanosecond time window with sample sizes of tens of nanometers and thus suitable to determine the onset of the process but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bcl11b and combinatorial resolution of cell fate in the T-cell gene regulatory network [Colloquium Paper]T-cell development from hematopoietic progenitors depends on multiple transcription factors, mobilized and modulated by intrathymic Notch signaling. Key aspects of T-cell specification network architecture have been illuminated through recent reports defining roles of transcription factors PU.1, GATA-3, and E2A, their interactions with Notch signaling, and roles of Runx1, TCF-1, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gene regulation during Drosophila eggshell patterning [Colloquium Paper]A common path to the formation of complex 3D structures starts with an epithelial sheet that is patterned by inductive cues that control the spatiotemporal activities of transcription factors. These activities are then interpreted by the cis-regulatory regions of the genes involved in cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. Although this...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dissecting BMP signaling input into the gene regulatory networks driving specification of the blood stem cell lineage [Colloquium Paper]Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that sustain lifelong blood production are created during embryogenesis. They emerge from a specialized endothelial population, termed hemogenic endothelium (HE), located in the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (DA). In Xenopus, we have been studying the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) required for the formation of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gene regulatory networks and cell lineages that underlie the formation of skeletal muscle [Colloquium Paper]Skeletal muscle in vertebrates is formed by two major routes, as illustrated by the mouse embryo. Somites give rise to myogenic progenitors that form all of the muscles of the trunk and limbs. The behavior of these cells and their entry into the myogenic program is controlled by gene regulatory...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamic regulation of Nanog and stem cell-signaling pathways by Hoxa1 during early neuro-ectodermal differentiation of ES cells [Colloquium Paper]Homeobox a1 (Hoxa1) is one of the most rapidly induced genes in ES cell differentiation and it is the earliest expressed Hox gene in the mouse embryo. In this study, we used genomic approaches to identify Hoxa1-bound regions during early stages of ES cell differentiation into the neuro-ectoderm. Within 2...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Drosophila Pax6 promotes development of the entire eye-antennal disc, thereby ensuring proper adult head formation [Colloquium Paper]Paired box 6 (Pax6) is considered to be the master control gene for eye development in all seeing animals studied so far. In vertebrates, it is required not only for lens/retina formation but also for the development of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. Although Pax6 plays important roles in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genome-wide use of high- and low-affinity Tbrain transcription factor binding sites during echinoderm development [Colloquium Paper]Sea stars and sea urchins are model systems for interrogating the types of deep evolutionary changes that have restructured developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Although cis-regulatory DNA evolution is likely the predominant mechanism of change, it was recently shown that Tbrain, a Tbox transcription factor protein, has evolved a changed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Whole-organism cellular gene-expression atlas reveals conserved cell types in the ventral nerve cord of Platynereis dumerilii [Colloquium Paper]The comparative study of cell types is a powerful approach toward deciphering animal evolution. To avoid selection biases, however, comparisons ideally involve all cell types present in a multicellular organism. Here, we use image registration and a newly developed “Profiling by Signal Probability Mapping” algorithm to generate a cellular resolution...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Listening in on the deep sea [Environmental Sciences]Ecologist Erin Oleson’s research area spans 1.8 million square miles of sea. In this vast space in the Pacific Ocean, she must somehow track over 25 species of whales and dolphins. When Oleson started her work 8 years ago, she felt overwhelmed and thought, “How can we ever possibly understand...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High Arctic Holocene temperature record from the Agassiz ice cap and Greenland ice sheet evolution [Environmental Sciences]We present a revised and extended high Arctic air temperature reconstruction from a single proxy that spans the past ∼12,000 y (up to 2009 CE). Our reconstruction from the Agassiz ice cap (Ellesmere Island, Canada) indicates an earlier and warmer Holocene thermal maximum with early Holocene temperatures that are 4–5...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Causes and evolutionary consequences of primordial germ-cell specification mode in metazoans [Colloquium Paper]In animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) give rise to the germ lines, the cell lineages that produce sperm and eggs. PGCs form in embryogenesis, typically by one of two modes: a likely ancestral mode wherein germ cells are induced during embryogenesis by cell–cell signaling (induction) or a derived mechanism whereby...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Paleogenomics of echinoids reveals an ancient origin for the double-negative specification of micromeres in sea urchins [Colloquium Paper]Establishing a timeline for the evolution of novelties is a common, unifying goal at the intersection of evolutionary and developmental biology. Analyses of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) provide the ability to understand the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms responsible for the origin of morphological structures both in the development of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanosensing of shear by Pseudomonas aeruginosa leads to increased levels of the cyclic-di-GMP signal initiating biofilm development [Microbiology]Biofilms are communities of sessile microbes that are phenotypically distinct from their genetically identical, free-swimming counterparts. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a solid surface. Attachment triggers intracellular signaling to change gene expression from the planktonic to the biofilm phenotype. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it has long been known that intracellular...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Applying gene regulatory network logic to the evolution of social behavior [Colloquium Paper]Animal behavior is ultimately the product of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for brain development and neural networks for brain function. The GRN approach has advanced the fields of genomics and development, and we identify organizational similarities between networks of genes that build the brain and networks of neurons that encode...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Syringe-injectable mesh electronics integrate seamlessly with minimal chronic immune response in the brain [Neuroscience]Implantation of electrical probes into the brain has been central to both neuroscience research and biomedical applications, although conventional probes induce gliosis in surrounding tissue. We recently reported ultraflexible open mesh electronics implanted into rodent brains by syringe injection that exhibit promising chronic tissue response and recording stability. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Core Concept: How Bose-Einstein condensates keep revealing weird physics [Physics]A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), the first of which was shown experimentally 22 years ago, isn’t your garden variety state of matter. It formed at a fraction above absolute zero and only in atoms that act like bosons, one of two types of fundamental particles. Bosons don’t follow the Pauli exclusion...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Female peer mentors early in college increase women’s positive academic experiences and retention in engineering [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Scientific and engineering innovation is vital for American competitiveness, quality of life, and national security. However, too few American students, especially women, pursue these fields. Although this problem has attracted enormous attention, rigorously tested interventions outside artificial laboratory settings are quite rare. To address this gap, we conducted a longitudinal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Facial appearance affects science communication [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]First impressions based on facial appearance predict many important social outcomes. We investigated whether such impressions also influence the communication of scientific findings to lay audiences, a process that shapes public beliefs, opinion, and policy. First, we investigated the traits that engender interest in a scientist’s work, and those that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Perceived social presence reduces fact-checking [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Today’s media landscape affords people access to richer information than ever before, with many individuals opting to consume content through social channels rather than traditional news sources. Although people frequent social platforms for a variety of reasons, we understand little about the consequences of encountering new information in these contexts,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mental models accurately predict emotion transitions [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Successful social interactions depend on people’s ability to predict others’ future actions and emotions. People possess many mechanisms for perceiving others’ current emotional states, but how might they use this information to predict others’ future states? We hypothesized that people might capitalize on an overlooked aspect of affective experience: current...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reassessment of 20th century global mean sea level rise [Sustainability Science]The rate at which global mean sea level (GMSL) rose during the 20th century is uncertain, with little consensus between various reconstructions that indicate rates of rise ranging from 1.3 to 2 mm⋅y−1. Here we present a 20th-century GMSL reconstruction computed using an area-weighting technique for averaging tide gauge records...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exceptional and rapid accumulation of anthropogenic debris on one of the world’s most remote and pristine islands [Sustainability Science]In just over half a century plastic products have revolutionized human society and have infiltrated terrestrial and marine environments in every corner of the globe. The hazard plastic debris poses to biodiversity is well established, but mitigation and planning are often hampered by a lack of quantitative data on accumulation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Logical modeling of lymphoid and myeloid cell specification and transdifferentiation [Colloquium Paper]Blood cells are derived from a common set of hematopoietic stem cells, which differentiate into more specific progenitors of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, ultimately leading to differentiated cells. This developmental process is controlled by a complex regulatory network involving cytokines and their receptors, transcription factors, and chromatin remodelers. Using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assessing regulatory information in developmental gene regulatory networks [Colloquium Paper]Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) provide a transformation function between the static genomic sequence and the primary spatial specification processes operating development. The regulatory information encompassed in developmental GRNs thus goes far beyond the control of individual genes. We here address regulatory information at different levels of network organization, from single...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies an enzyme inhibitor to treat Gulf War illness symptomsScientists shed light on the neurological consequences of exposure to low-levels of nerve agents and suggest a drug that could treat some of the toxins' effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meals on the go: The physics of whales' eating habitsIn a recent paper published in PLOS One, Saint Louis University professor of physics Jean Potvin, Ph.D., and biologist Alexander Werth, Ph.D. at Hampden-Sydney College, detail for the first time how baleen whales use crossflow filtration to separate prey from water without ever coming into contact with the baleen. Baleen are comb-like keratin plates that have replaced the teeth of the whale's ance
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meals on the go: The physics of baleen whales' eating habitsResearchers detail for the first time how baleen whales use crossflow filtration to separate prey from water without ever coming into contact with the baleen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viability of quantum satellite communicationsResearchers have taken a significant step towards enabling secure quantum communication via moving satellites, as announced by the Canadian Government in April 2017. Their study demonstrates the first quantum key distribution transmissions from a ground transmitter to a quantum payload on a moving aircraft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly discovered disease mechanism for type 2 diabetesA newly discovered mechanism behind reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetes has been identified by scientists. They describe how insulin-producing cells regress in their development, become immature, and do not work properly. A finding that opens the doors to new clinical treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A method to improve in vitro testsResearchers propose a new way of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles that could enhance a correlation to in vivo results. This involves reproducing in the lab the dynamic and fluidic variations that these particles experience in the human body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Copaiba: Silver bullet or snake oil?Sales of the essential oil copaiba [koh-pey-buh] are increasing, at least in part, because more than 54 million Americans suffer from arthritis. The traditional way to treat arthritis is using NSAIDs and COXIBs, which are not without adverse events. For arthritis sufferers, copaiba may turn out to be a silver bullet or, perhaps, snake oil.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Young at heart: Restoring cardiac function with a matrix moleculeResearch has uncovered a molecule in newborn hearts that appears to control the renewal process. When injected into adult mouse hearts injured by heart attacks, this molecule, called Agrin, seems to 'unlock' that renewal process and enable heart muscle repair.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Waist-to-height ratio more accurate than BMI in identifying obesity, new study showsCalculating a person's waist-to-height ratio is the most accurate and efficient way of identifying whether or not they are at risk of obesity in clinical practice, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing the forest and the trees to find parasitic reactions in batteriesA detailed view of the atomic scale and mesoscale changes in a troubling layer offers insights for a better battery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are friends better for us than family?The power of friendship gets stronger with age and may even be more important than family relationships, indicates new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes research and care model expandingBuilding on its pioneering work to better control type 1 diabetes, the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology is using new investment and four new team members to seek better treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased risk of ozone loss over the United States in summer, evidence showsThe protective stratospheric ozone layer above the central United States is vulnerable to erosion during the summer months from ozone-depleting chemical reactions, exposing people, livestock and crops to the harmful effects of UV radiation, research shows.
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The Atlantic
The White House Exaggerated the Growth of Coal Jobs by About 5,000 Percent On Sunday’s “Meet the Press,” Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, claimed that the U.S. has created 50,000 jobs in the coal sector since the fourth quarter of 2016. The statistic carries an important message for the White House. Trump has brought extraordinary attention to the decline of coal jobs, for which he’s blamed Obama-imposed regulations. Coal’s immediate bounce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How neurons use crowdsourcing to make decisionsWhen many individual neurons collect data, how do they reach a unanimous decision? New research from the Santa Fe Institute's collective computation group suggests a two-phase process.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TSRI anti-heroin vaccine found effective in non-human primatesThis is the first vaccine against an opioid to pass this stage of preclinical testing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research provides practical cooking tips for your red wine sauceWill you get intoxicated by pouring beer or wine into your sauce or stew? This question is important if you are pregnant, have to drive a car or want to track calories. New research from the University of Copenhagen and the Carlsberg Research Center creates a model for how alcohol disappears from a sauce or another liquid dish cooked in a saucepan. This model can thus be used to control the alcoho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drinking diet beverages during pregnancy linked to child obesity, NIH study suggestsChildren born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day during pregnancy were more likely to be overweight or obese at age 7, compared to children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank water instead of artificially sweetened beverages, according to a study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A star is born: Lesser-known brain cell takes center stageA new Salk method efficiently grows human astrocytes in a dish, advancing studies of stroke, Alzheimer's and depression.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study proves viability of quantum satellite communicationsResearchers in Canada have taken a significant step towards enabling secure quantum communication via moving satellites, as announced by the Canadian Government in April 2017.
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Ars Technica
Stepping on Neil Armstrong: Ars visits the Navy’s newest research vessel Enlarge (credit: John Timmer) Chief Engineer Gary McGrath made us an offer we couldn't refuse. Pulling aside a yellow cord that blocked off access to the lower reaches of the research vessel Neil Armstrong , he offered a look at the ship's engines and the very bottom of the ship, where sonar arrays are plugged in to the hull. It wasn't part of the planned tour, and it would require squeezing down
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The Scientist RSS
Mammals May Have a 12-hour ClockData point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New diode features optically controlled capacitanceResearchers have developed a capacitor with a metal-insulator-semiconductor diode structure that is tunable by illumination. The capacitor, which features embedded metal nanoparticles, is similar to a metal-insulator-metal diode, except the capacitance of the new device depends on illumination and exhibits a strong frequency dispersion, allowing for a high degree of tunability. This capacitor may
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Similar lipids cluster in soybean cell membrane modelResearchers have developed a detailed computational model of the soybean plasma membrane that provides new structural insight at the molecular level, which may have applications for studying membrane proteins and may be useful for engineering plants to produce biochemicals, biofuels, drugs and other compounds, and in understanding how plants sense and respond to stressful conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Open-source approach provides faster, better solubility predictionsDespite the importance of predicting solubility, it is not an easy matter. One approach, using 'brute force' simulations, requires long computing times. Other techniques, while faster, fail to predict accurate solubility values. This week researchers report a new type of software that enables convenient solubility estimations of essentially any molecular substance over wide temperature and pressur
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Gizmodo
British Cops Make First Arrest Using Facial Recognition Surveillance Vans Photo: Getty Science fiction authors have been writing about it for decades. Privacy activists have warned it’s just around the corner. Today, perfected facial recognition is one step closer to becoming a reality. UK authorities landed their first arrest last week relying on an automatic facial recognition (AFR) system, the South Wales Police confirmed to Ars Technica on Tuesday. Not much is know
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Live Science
Former 'Bachelorette' Star's Health Scare: What Causes Seizures?Trista Sutter, who starred in the first season of ABC's "The Bachelorette," recently suffered a seizure while on vacation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Standard dosage for one lung cancer treatment may be too highA new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that the customary pembrolizumab dose for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer may be higher than is needed for effective treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Copaiba: Silver bullet or snake oil?Sales of the essential oil copaiba are increasing, at least in part, because more than 54 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis. The conventional way to treat arthritis is using NSAIDs as well as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs), which are not without adverse events like gastrointestinal bleeding, heart attacks and stroke. For arthritis sufferers, copaiba may turn out to be a s
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 12-hour biological clock coordinates essential bodily functionsIn addition to 24-hour clocks, mammals and other organisms have 12-hour clocks that are autonomous, work independently from 24-hour clocks and can be modified by external factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a key controller of biological machinery in cell's 'antenna'St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery of a regulatory enzyme working at the primary cilium could lead to treatments for the brain tumor medulloblastoma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is white or whole wheat bread 'healthier?' Depends on the personDespite many studies looking at which bread is the healthiest, it is still not clear what effect bread and differences among bread types have on clinically relevant parameters and on the microbiome. In the journal Cell Metabolism on June 6, Weizmann Institute researchers report the results of a comprehensive, randomized trial in 20 healthy subjects comparing differences in how processed white brea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study could help explain link between seizures and psychiatric disordersIn a new study published in Cell Reports, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified different types of neurons in a brain region called the reticular thalamus. A better understanding of these cells could eventually help explain how both seizures and certain psychiatric disorders can occur at the same time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D skin made of stem cells treats backbone birth defect in rodentsMyelomeningocele is a severe congenital defect in which the backbone and spinal canal do not close before birth, putting those affected at risk of lifelong neurological problems. In a preclinical study published in Stem Cell Reports, researchers developed a stem cell-based therapy for generating skin grafts to cover myelomeningocele defects before birth. They first generated artificial skin from h
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Choosing white or whole-grain bread may depend on what lives in your gutGut microbes determine how people’s blood sugar levels respond to breads.
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Popular Science
Is whole wheat bread better than white? That may depend on your gut bacteria. Health There’s no such thing as one size fits all nutrition. There’s no such thing as one size fits all nutrition. Read on.
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Gizmodo
When Will the Great Human-Elephant War End? Image: Bernard Dupont /Flickr Humans are at war. They’re at war with each other, they’re at war with themselves, and some are at war with elephants. Researchers want to know how humans and the long-snooted aggressors can live in peace. Northern Botswana is a hotspot in the ongoing human-elephant conflict, with 16,000 people trying to coexist with 11,000 elephants. As humans take up more and more
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Gizmodo
American Gods’ Vulcan Is Everything That Scares Me About America Starz Despite the fact that this last weekend’s episode of American Gods (“A Murder of Gods”) featured a bloody massacre and multiple people falling into vats of molten steel, there was only one particular scene that truly scared me. While Shadow and Mr. Wednesday drive into the town of Vulcan, Virginia (which is a real place that you can apparently go to,) Wednesday explains how Vulcan, the Roma
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Ars Technica
Amazon and Reddit try to save net neutrality rules in “day of action” Enlarge / Proponents of net neutrality protest against Federal Communication Commission Chairman Ajit Pai outside the American Enterprise Institute on May 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla) Amazon, Reddit, Mozilla, and other Internet companies are joining net neutrality activists next month for an "Internet-wide day of action to save net neutrality." "The FCC wan
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The Atlantic
What the Backlash to ‘My Family’s Slave’ Obscured Randy Ribay writes: In what I believe is the first photograph of me that exists, there is a woman standing behind me who is neither my mother nor my lola (with whom I lived with for the first year of my life). Instead it was a woman casually referred to as the “maid.” In my visits to the Philippines over the years, I had noticed many such “maids.” These women were all but invisible. I was told th
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The Atlantic
Scientists Pit Sourdough Against White Bread—With Surprising Results Think about the taste of sourdough. That distinctive tang is the work of microbes used in baking the bread—a “starter culture” of wild yeast strains and bacteria that fill the loafs with sour acids. Unlike industrially-made white loaves, which are baked using yeasts that date back just 150 years, the microbes in sourdough cultures have been used since ancient times. That’s why the food journalist
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New sound diffuser is ten times thinner than existing designsThe new, 'ultra-thin' sound diffuser is 10 times thinner than the widely used diffusers found in recording studios, concert venues and movie theaters to reduce echoes and improve the quality of sound. The new design uses less material, which would reduce cost, as well as taking up far less space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Take a coffee or tea break to protect your liverResearchers found that drinking coffee and herbal tea may protect against liver fibrosis, estimated as the degree of liver stiffness, which is high in extensive scarring of the liver. Because these beverages are popular, widely available, and inexpensive, they could have the potential to become important in the prevention of advanced liver disease.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astonishingly speedy brain mechanism helps bats get louder when necessaryWhen trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. Researchers have now measured just how fast the response occurs in bats: 30 milliseconds. That's just a tenth of the time it takes to blink an eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to detect Palmer amaranth in contaminated seedlotsSome seed mixtures planted on Conservation Reserve Program acres have been contaminated with Palmer amaranth, an aggressive weed. Seed producers must choose between time-consuming or expensive options to certify that their products are free of Palmer amaranth. A new assay can quickly detect Palmer amaranth in mixed seed lots at a comparatively low cost.
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Science | The Guardian
Is white bread better for you than brown sourdough?​ It depends on your gut Results of a study comparing health impact of wholegrain sourdough and factory-made white bread found individual gut microbiomes are key What’s the background? Bread makes up about 10% of the daily calories consumed by adults. Now a study by researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel has delved into whether fresh wholegrain sourdough is better for you than industrially produced wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify a key controller of biological machinery in cell's 'antenna'St. Jude Children's Research Hospital molecular biologists have identified an enzyme that activates and "supercharges" cellular machinery that controls how cells become specialized cells in the body.
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Gizmodo
Watch 150 Movie Characters Remind You What Film You're Watching GIF You know that scene in a movie you can feel coming a mile away? Where a character ends up saying the name of the film? That happens a lot more often than you think, as Roman Holiday reveals in this epic supercut of 150 different actors saying the names of the movies they’re in. Most of the time the device comes across as cheesy (see all the times it’s used in James Bond films in this video) b
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Viden
Astronomer opdager dødsensfarlig helvedesplanetMed en overflade på 4300 grader celsius er den næsten så varm som vores Sol.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research study gives new insight into how cancer spreadsA research study led by University of Minnesota engineers gives new insight into how cancer cells move based on their ability to sense their environment. The discovery could have a major impact on therapies to prevent the spread of cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study proves viability of quantum satellite communicationsResearchers in Canada have taken a significant step towards enabling secure quantum communication via moving satellites, as announced by the Canadian Government in April 2017. Their study, published today in the new journal Quantum Science and Technology, demonstrates the first quantum key distribution transmissions from a ground transmitter to a quantum payload on a moving aircraft.
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Ars Technica
When it comes to Xbox, the X could probably stand for NetfliX Back when Microsoft first unveiled the Xbox One in May of 2013, the company took a lot of flak for focusing on TV and other media streaming uses for the box instead of talking primarily about games. An in-depth Ars Technica analysis of Xbox Live users , though, shows just how much time Xbox owners are spending watching video on their consoles, potentially explaining why Microsoft thought video wa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu shot less effective for obese adultsAlthough influenza vaccines are currently the best forms of protection to safeguard people against the flu, they are not effective in all cases. A study found that obese people -- despite getting their shots -- were still twice as likely to develop influenza or flu-like illnesses than others of healthy weight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic study shakes up the elephant family treeNew research reveals that a species of giant elephant that lived 1.5 million to 100,000 years ago -- ranging across Eurasia before it went extinct -- is more closely related to today's African forest elephant than the forest elephant is to its nearest living relative, the African savanna elephant. Understanding elephant evolution is key to protecting present-day elephants from extinction, research
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How killer cells take out tumorsThe use of immunotherapy to treat cancer is celebrating its first successes -- but there are still many knowledge gaps in the underlying mechanisms of action. In a study of mice with soft tissue tumors, researchers have now shown how endogenous killer cells track down the tumors with the help of dormant viruses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the Arctic Ocean became salineThe Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Starving prostate cancer with what you eat: Apple peels, red grapes, turmericWhen you dine on curry and baked apples, enjoy the fact that you are eating something that could play a role starving -- or even preventing -- cancer. New research identifies several natural compounds found in food, including turmeric, apple peels and red grapes, as key ingredients that could thwart the growth of prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells may be the key to staying strong in old ageA new study, performed in mice, could lead to new approaches to help people stay stronger in old age. The study challenges conventional wisdom with results suggesting that loss of muscle stem cells is the main driving force behind muscle decline in old age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Promising new treatment option for chronic plaque psoriasisA new study tested the efficacy of tildrakizumab, an antibody that targets only a very specific immune system pathway. More than 60 percent of all patients who received the active medication showed improvement, compared to less than 10 percent of patients who received placebos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic cross-talk key to cell balanceScientists provide evidence of direct cross-regulatory feedback, or cross-talk, between Nanog and Hox genes.
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Gizmodo
The Best Unannounced Feature on iOS 11 Is Screen Recording Image: Gizmodo / Alex Cranz Apple packed a bunch of cool new features into the new iOS 11 update coming later this year, but it’s possible none of those are cooler than a simple screen capturing tool that makes it easier than ever to record videos of your iPhone in use. Anyone who previously tried to record screen footage knows how incredibly cumbersome it used to be. You’d have to open QuickTime
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Ars Technica
Here’s hoping the iMac Pro learns from the Mac Pro’s mistakes Andrew Cunningham No one was allowed to touch the single iMac Pro that Apple had in its hands-on area following the WWDC keynote today. Big and dark and imposing, the computer is the first step toward making good on Apple's promises to recommit to its desktop users. It's not a new Mac Pro (a computer that's still coming, I've been assured), but it is a more concrete commitment to high-end desktop
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Anker SoundCore 2, Fitbit Father's Day Sale, Metal Lightning Cable, and More Anker’s newest Bluetooth speaker , Fitbit Father’s Day discounts , and Lodge’s essential cast iron skillet lead off Tuesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundCore 2 , $34 with code BESSPK77 With its 24 hour battery life, surprisingly good bass, and crystal clear sound quality, the Anker SoundCore has lon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France seeks to attract US-based climate scientistsFrance's government is encouraging U.S.-based scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs to move to France to work on climate change issues, following President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New low-cost material for lighting and diagnostics produces white luminescence comparable to sunlightA synthetic material has been created based on the natural hackmanite mineral which produces broad spectrum white light in lamps. The hackmanite created by the Inorganic Materials Chemistry research group is a low-cost material emitting luminescence closer to sunlight than that of the currently used lanthanides.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anxious people worry about risk, not lossLife is a series of choices. Every time you make a decision, there is a possibility that things won’t go as expected (risk) or that something bad will happen (loss). Aversion to risk and loss have powerful influences on how we make decisions. In a new paper researchers studied the influence of risk and loss aversion in people with anxiety, a disorder characterized by debilitating avoidance behavio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to combatting anxiety states, pain and inflammationEndogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) play an important role in the brain and immune system. Researchers have now found a new way to influence the endocannabinoid system. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic as well as anxiolytic effects could be achieved in an animal model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New data for old bones: How the famous Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur bone bed came to beThe Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleep disturbances predict substance use among college athletesPreliminary results of a new study show that sleep disturbance is strongly related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs among student athletes in college.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New possible target for cancer treatmentScientists report that cancer cells and normal cells use different 'gene switches' in order to regulate the expression of genes that control growth. In mice, the removal of a large regulatory region linked to different types of cancer caused a dramatic resistance to tumor formation, but did not affect normal cell growth. The findings highlight the possibility of developing highly specific cancer d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building a better blood-brain barrier modelInvestigators have developed an innovative but easily implemented approach that uses 'spheroids' to mimic the blood-brain barrier more accurately, and appears to overcome several challenges for discovering and advancing new drugs for treating brain conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aspirin does little or nothing for hard arteries, researchers findFor decades, aspirin has been widely used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems. Now, a team of researchers has found that aspirin may provide little or no benefit for certain patients who have plaque buildup in their arteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HUD housing assistance linked to improved health care accessA study examining the impact of access to affordable housing on health showed that people receiving housing assistance were more likely to have medical insurance and less likely to have unmet medical need than other low-income people who were on a US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) wait list. The findings suggest housing is an important social determinant of health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Domes of frozen methane may be warning signs for new blow-outsSeveral methane domes, some 500m wide, have been mapped on the Arctic Ocean floor. They may be signs of soon-to-happen methane expulsions that have previously created massive craters in a near-by area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meals on the go: The physics of whales' eating habitsSaint Louis University professor of physics Jean Potvin, Ph.D., and colleagues detail for the first time how baleen whales use crossflow filtration to separate prey from water without ever coming into contact with the baleen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astonishingly speedy brain mechanism helps bats get louder when necessaryWhen trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. It's a split-second feat, from ear to brain to vocalization, and Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to measure just how fast it happens in bats: 30 milliseconds. That's just a tenth of the time it takes to blink an eye, and a record for audio-vocal response.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New way to detect Palmer amaranth in contaminated seedlotsLast summer, farmers in the Midwest got an unwelcome surprise after planting native seed on Conservation Reserve Program acres. Palmer amaranth, the aggressive and hard-to-kill weed, had established in droves. As a possible solution, some states declared Palmer a noxious weed, which prohibits its sale and transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ambiguous pledges leave large uncertainty under Paris climate agreementUnder the pledges made by countries under the Paris Agreement on climate change, greenhouse gas emissions could range from 47 to 63 billion metric tons of CO2 equivalent (GtCO2e) per year in 2030, compared to about 52 GtCO2e in 2015, according to a new analysis. That range has critical consequences for the feasibility of achieving the goal of keeping warming "well below 2°C" over preindustrial lev
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination DebateAdvances in microbiome research are increasingly used in anti-vaccination arguments, yet the science actually undermines the premise of the argument.
7h
WIRED
Tesla Time, and How Elon Musk Measures Everything In Dog Years We've analyzed Elon Musk's deadlines, deliveries, and predictions, and concluded that one year him equals roughly eight years for the rest of us. The post Tesla Time, and How Elon Musk Measures Everything In Dog Years appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
NASA Lit a Fire in Space Again Because at This Point Sure Why Not Image: NASA The only thing better than lighting a fire in space is lighting a fire in space again—and again ! On Sunday, June 4th, the pyromaniacal hooligans at NASA successfully performed their third Spacecraft Fire Experiment ( SAFFIRE ) inside an Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft. Lighting up in space—which sounds wildly irresponsible—will actually help scientists prepare astronauts for deep space
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New on MIT Technology Review
First Quantum-Secured Blockchain Technology Tested in MoscowQuantum computers pose a significant security threat to cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Now a team of Russian scientists has worked out how to secure blockchains using quantum mechanics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A method to improve in vitro testsBefore new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans. But often the results obtained in vitro do not resemble what actually happens in the animal or human body. Thus, the researchers reconsidered the basis of the in vitro experimental design.
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The Atlantic
The Governor's Race on Track to Give Democrats a Decisive Victory While Democrats and Republicans have closely watched special elections in Kansas, Montana, and Georgia for signs of a liberal backlash in the Trump era, a governor’s race in New Jersey on track to give Democrats a decisive victory has flown largely under the radar. New Jersey voters head to the polls on Tuesday in the primary election for the race to determine a successor to the state’s Republica
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Futurity.org
Healthy stem cells may keep aging muscles young Loss of muscle stem cells is the main driving force behind muscle decline in old age, a new study with mice suggests. Researchers hope the findings—that challenge the prevailing theory that age-related muscle decline is primarily caused by loss of motor neurons—will help develop a drug or therapy that can slow muscle stem cell loss and muscle decline. “Even an elite trained athlete, who has high
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cognitive science
A paper in JPSP suggests that spatial perspective-taking can lead to cognitive and affective perspective-taking as well. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Popular Science
A quick note about our newsletter Science We're now sending two (2) newsletters a week. Happy reading!
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Ingeniøren
Kinesisk CO2-udledning er den store usikkerhedsfaktor for ParisaftalenOm udledningen af CO2 i 2030 bliver større, mindre eller det samme som i dag, står og falder stort set med usikkerheden i Kinas bidrag til Parisaftalen, viser ny analyse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to detect Palmer amaranth in contaminated seedlotsSome seed mixtures planted on Conservation Reserve Program acres have been contaminated with Palmer amaranth, an aggressive weed. Seed producers must choose between time-consuming or expensive options to certify that their products are free of Palmer amaranth. A new assay can quickly detect Palmer amaranth in mixed seed lots at a comparatively low cost.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trauma centers with American College of Surgeons verification have fewer complicationsMajor complications from injury -- and consequently a longer hospital stay -- are more likely for pediatric and elderly patients nationwide when treatment occurs at a trauma center not verified by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT), compared with an ACS-COT-verified center, according to new study findings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ambiguous pledges leave large uncertainty under Paris climate agreementEmission reduction pledges made by individual countries under the Paris Agreement leave a wide range of possible climate outcomes, according to new research. Without stronger pledges, the study shows, the climate goals may not be possible to achieve.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
El Niño and global warming combine to cause record-breaking heat in Southeast AsiaScientists at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) have found that a devastating combination of global warming and El Niño is responsible for causing extreme temperatures in April 2016 in Southeast Asia.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Open-source approach provides faster, better solubility predictionsDespite the importance of predicting solubility, it is not an easy matter. One approach, using 'brute force' simulations, requires long computing times. Other techniques, while faster, fail to predict accurate solubility values. This week in The Journal of Chemical Physics, researchers report a new type of software that enables convenient solubility estimations of essentially any molecular substan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Similar lipids cluster in soybean cell membrane modelResearchers have developed a detailed computational model of the soybean plasma membrane that provides new structural insight at the molecular level, which may have applications for studying membrane proteins and may be useful for engineering plants to produce biochemicals, biofuels, drugs and other compounds, and in understanding how plants sense and respond to stressful conditions. The group rep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New diode features optically controlled capacitanceResearchers have developed a capacitor with a metal-insulator-semiconductor diode structure that is tunable by illumination. The capacitor, which features embedded metal nanoparticles, is similar to a metal-insulator-metal diode, except the capacitance of the new device depends on illumination and exhibits a strong frequency dispersion, allowing for a high degree of tunability. This capacitor may
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Community-based testing and treatment program linked with improved viral suppression among HIV-positiveAmong individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in rural Kenya and Uganda, implementation of community-based testing and treatment was associated with an increased proportion of HIV-positive adults who achieved viral suppression, along with increased HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight gain greater, less than recommended during pregnancy linked with increased risk of adverse outcomesIn an analysis that included more than 1.3 million pregnancies, weight gain during pregnancy that was greater or less than guideline recommendations was associated with a higher risk of adverse outcomes for mothers and infants, compared with weight gain within recommended levels, according to a study published by JAMA.
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Science | The Guardian
Beryl Allan obituary My mother, Beryl Allan, who has died aged 94, was a keen scientist whose varied life included working in radar for the army and, later, bringing science to members of the Women’s Institute. Science, and its public understanding, was the field to which she dedicated much of her later life. Born in north London, to Elsie (nee Dawson), who worked for a milliner, and Colin Broadbent, a gentleman’s ta
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Ignites Climate Pledges with Paris WithdrawalThe president's move is galvanizing climate action and energizing states, localities and companies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
This tool lets you make your own robot ‘puppy’ Scientists have created a new interactive design tool that makes it possible for novices and experts to create custom robots with 3D-printed parts and consumer-level actuators. Using a familiar drag-and-drop interface, individuals can choose from a library of components and place them into the design. The tool suggests components that are compatible with each other, offers potential placements of
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TEDTalks (video)
Why shiny glass towers are bad for city life | Justin DavidsonThere's a creepy transformation taking over our cities, says architecture critic Justin Davidson. From Houston, Texas to Guangzhou, China, shiny towers of concrete and steel covered with glass are cropping up like an invasive species. Rethink your city's anatomy as Davidson explains how the exteriors of building shape the urban experience -- and what we lose when architects stop using the full ran
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
El Nino and global warming combine to cause record-breaking heat in Southeast AsiaScientists at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) have found that a devastating combination of global warming and El Niño is responsible for causing extreme temperatures in April 2016 in Southeast Asia.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New diode features optically controlled capacitanceA team of researchers at the Israel Institute of Technology has developed a new capacitor with a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) diode structure that is tunable by illumination. The capacitor, which features embedded metal nanoparticles, is similar to a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode, except that the capacitance of the new device depends on illumination and exhibits a strong frequency dispe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Open-source approach provides faster, better solubility predictionsThe solubility of any given substance—the measure of how well the substance dissolves into another substance referred to as the solvent—depends on basic properties like temperature and pressure, as well as the chemical identities of the dissolved substance (the solute) and the solvent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Similar lipids cluster in soybean cell membrane modelA cell's plasma membrane forms a protective barrier, separating its inner contents from the outside environment. There is a pressing need to better understand the complex lipid bilayer that makes up this membrane, which limits the molecules that can leave or enter the cell. Research into the plasma membrane structure and behavior can provide invaluable information about whether, and to what extent
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Futurity.org
‘Silent treatment’ divorce can get kids sick decades later Adults whose parents separated during their childhood have an increased risk for poorer health, but experts haven’t understood why. The findings of a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that adults whose parents separated and didn’t speak to each other during their childhoods were three times as likely to develop a cold when intentionally exposed to a common cold
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel approach to seeing dengue infection in the bodyPositron emission tomography (PET) paired with the glucose metabolism probe, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is considered 'old' technology in the field of cancer. A team found a new use for this 'old' technology in infectious diseases research. Using FDG-PET to image dengue infection in mice, the team has potentially uncovered a novel way to track the infection in real-time and more accurately assess t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Memory loss and other cognitive decline linked to blood vessel disease in the brainMemory loss, language problems and other symptoms of cognitive decline are strongly associated with diseases of the small blood vessels in the brain, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Officers on afternoon shift report being more fatiguedOfficers who work afternoons are twice as likely to report being tired, which puts them at greater risk for accidents, errors and stress, according to results of a new study.
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Blog » Languages » English
Arachnibattle: Spiders vs Scorpions It’s a battle of terrifying arachnids! Who would you rather face? Web-spinning spiders, or stinging scorpions? This battle’s a bit of a catch-22 for anyone who isn’t an arachnid enthusiast, but if you want to get those bonuses, you’ll have to choose one! Spiders All spiders have eight legs and have fancy jaws called chelicerae, which contain venom and fangs with which to deposit it Spiders rank s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A method to improve in vitro testsEPFL researchers propose a new way of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles that could enhance a correlation to in vivo results. This involves reproducing in the lab the dynamic and fluidic variations that these particles experience in the human body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can you hear me now?When trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. Researchers have now measured just how fast the response occurs in bats: 30 milliseconds. That's just a tenth of the time it takes to blink an eye.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Take a coffee or tea break to protect your liverAccording to a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology, researchers found that drinking coffee and herbal tea may protect against liver fibrosis, estimated as the degree of liver stiffness, which is high in extensive scarring of the liver. Because these beverages are popular, widely available, and inexpensive, they could have the potential to become important in the prevention of advanced
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer-aided imaging technique could reduce risk of second breast cancer surgeryChao Zhou, assistant professor of electrical engineering at Lehigh University and his Lehigh collaborator Sharon Xiaolei Huang, associate professor of computer science and engineering, working on a computer-aided diagnostic technique that marries cutting-edge imaging technology with the latest advances in artificial intelligence that could one day detect -- accurately and in 'real-time' -- the dif
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Ars Technica
How a few yellow dots burned the Intercept’s NSA leaker Enlarge (credit: Ars Technica) When reporters at The Intercept approached the National Security Agency on June 1 to confirm a document that had been anonymously leaked to the publication in May, they handed over a copy of the document to the NSA to verify its authenticity. When they did so, the Intercept team inadvertently exposed its source because the copy showed fold marks that indicated it ha
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA's Dark-Energy Probe Faces Cost CrisisSpace agency takes a hard look at plans for its next big space observatory -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
3 alternativer til plastik: Men dur de overhovedet?Plastik har så unikke egenskaber, at det er svært at udvikle alternativer, der for alvor holder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ohio Supercomputer Center runs largest scale calculation everThe Ohio Supercomputer Center recently displayed the power of its new Owens Cluster by running the single-largest scale calculation in the Center's history.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students launch green phone-charging firmAn eco-friendly phone charging network is being launched by three engineering students from the University of Exeter. The ambitious trio - Hugo Tilmouth, Hakeem Buge and Chris Aoun - have set up a business which will hire out battery packs to charge phones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the Arctic Ocean became salineThe Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic. With the help of a climate model, researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have demonstrated how this process took place, allowing us for the first time to understand more accurately how Atlantic c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton discoveredThe complete skeleton of an eight-meter-long dinosaur has been unearthed from marine deposits dating back 72 million years at Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, making it the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Japan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain damage can make sideways faces more memorable, and give us 'emotion blindness'People with damage to a crucial part of the brain fail to recognize facial emotions, but they unexpectedly find faces looking sideways more memorable researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do Antarctic krill stocks fluctuate?It is only six centimeters long, but it plays a major role in the Antarctic ecosystem: the small crustacean Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill). It's one of the world's most abundant species and the central diet of a number of animals in the Southern Ocean. For a long time, scientists have been puzzled why the size of krill stocks fluctuates so widely.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New surgical techniques help save patients from life-threatening heart conditionCardiac surgeons are successfully performing more extensive surgical repairs of type A aortic dissection -- one of the highest risk operations in cardiothoracic surgery. These new surgical techniques, along with improved postoperative care, are resulting in better long-term outcomes and lower rates of complications, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dogs help in breast carcinoma researchCancer of the mammary glands in dogs is very similar to human breast carcinoma. For this reason, treatment methods from human medicine are often used for dogs. Conversely, scientific knowledge gained from canine mammary tumors may also be important to human medicine. Researchers were able to show how similar these tumors are in both dogs and humans.
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The Atlantic
I Bought a Report on Everything That's Known About Me Online On a recent Thursday, I waited for an email that was supposed to contain every personal detail the internet knows about me. The message would be from an online data broker—a company that collects and sells information that many people would hope is private. This includes browsing history, online purchases, and any information about you that’s publicly available: property records, court cases, mar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Chemistry life hacks: Food editionReactions is back with another round of chemistry life hacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Follow the fantastic voyage of the ICARUS neutrino detectorIt's lived in two different countries, and it's about to make its way to a third. It's the largest machine of its kind, designed to find extremely elusive particles and tell us more about them. Its pioneering technology is the blueprint for some of the most advanced science experiments in the world. And this summer, it will travel across the Atlantic Ocean to its new home (and its new mission) at
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Gizmodo
Tim Cook Thinks Donald Trump Is 'Wrong' Photo: Getty Apple’s CEO has an opinion about Donald Trump. In fact, Tim Cook can sum up his views on the embattled president’s latest actions with one word: wrong . And that’s exactly what Tim did right after Monday’s big WWDC keynote address. “He didn’t decide what I wanted him to decide,” Cook told Bloomberg in a post-event interview . “He decided wrong. It’s not in the best interest of the Un
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Gizmodo
Cowboy Bebop Is Getting an American, Live-Action TV Series Funimation You like bounty hunters? You like space? Take a seat, friend, because I’ve got some good news for you. A live action adaptation of Sunrise’s Cowboy Bebop anime is in the works. Prepare yourself. According to Deadline , Marty Adelstein’s Tomorrow studios is partnering with Midnight radio to produce Cowboy Bebop for television with the blessing of Sunrise, the studio responsible for the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starving prostate cancer with what you eat for dinnerWhen you dine on curry and baked apples, enjoy the fact that you are eating something that could play a role starving -- or even preventing -- cancer. New research from The University of Texas at Austin identifies several natural compounds found in food, including turmeric, apple peels and red grapes, as key ingredients that could thwart the growth of prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells may be the key to staying strong in old ageA new URMC study, performed in mice, could lead to new approaches to help people stay stronger in old age. The study challenges conventional wisdom with results suggesting that loss of muscle stem cells is the main driving force behind muscle decline in old age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising new treatment option for chronic plaque psoriasisThe study tested the efficacy of tildrakizumab, an antibody that targets only a very specific immune system pathway. More than 60 percent of all patients who received the active medication showed improvement, compared to less than 10 percent of patients who received placebos.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
AI summit aims to help world’s poorest United Nations meeting hopes to focus artificial intelligence on sustainable development goals. Nature 546 196 doi: 10.1038/546196a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ultrathin material for splitting water could make hydrogen production cheaperChemists have invented a new, cheap catalyst for splitting water with an electrical current to efficiently produce clean hydrogen fuel. Splitting water usually requires two different catalysts, but this catalyst can drive both of the reactions required to separate water into oxygen and hydrogen. The technology is based on the creation of ultrathin slices of porous metal-organic complex materials c
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut bacteria could protect cancer patients and pregnant women from ListeriaResearchers have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutrino discovery: A step closer to finding CP violationThe different rates of neutrino and anti-neutrino oscillations recorded by an international collaboration of researchers is an important step in the search for a new source of asymmetry in the laws that govern matter and antimatter.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sound diffuser is ten times thinner than existing designsResearchers from North Carolina State University and Nanjing University have developed an "ultra-thin" sound diffuser that is 10 times thinner than the widely used diffusers found in recording studios, concert venues and movie theaters to reduce echoes and improve the quality of sound. The new design uses less material, which would reduce cost, as well as taking up far less space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic study shakes up the elephant family treeNew research reveals that a species of giant elephant that lived 1.5 million to 100,000 years ago - ranging across Eurasia before it went extinct - is more closely related to today's African forest elephant than the forest elephant is to its nearest living relative, the African savanna elephant.
8h
WIRED
The Physics of Bullets Vs. Wonder Woman’s Bracelets Wonder Woman can deflect bullets with her Bracelets of Submission. But what kind of recoil would she have? And how much power does it require? The post The Physics of Bullets Vs. Wonder Woman's Bracelets appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
This Toy-Stealing Jerk Robot Will Teach Other Bots How to Hold Things Photo: Carnegie Mellon University When picking an object up, it takes humans a mere instant to know if they’ve grasped it properly, or if they need to adjust their grip so it’s more secure. Teaching robots how to properly pick something is a monumental task that might actually get a little easier— by making it harder to do . The easiest way to teach a robot how to pick something is to simply let
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lyft to bring autonomous rides to Boston with partnershipUber rival Lyft said Tuesday it would begin testing autonomous ridesharing in Boston under a partnership with the technology startup nuTonomy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do Antarctic krill stocks fluctuate?It is only six centimetres long, but it plays a major role in the Antarctic ecosystem: the small crustacean Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill). It's one of the world's most abundant species and the central diet of a number of animals in the Southern Ocean. For a long time, scientists have been puzzled why the size of krill stocks fluctuates so widely.
8h
The Atlantic
Sadiq Khan Says U.K. Shouldn't 'Roll Out the Red Carpet' for Trump London Mayor Sadiq Khan escalated his feud with President Trump, reiterating his position that the U.K. government’s invitation to Trump to visit the country in the fall is a mistake. “I don’t think we should roll out the red carpet to the president of the USA in the circumstances where his policies go against everything we stand for,” Khan told Channel 4 News on Monday. “When you have a special
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The Atlantic
The Trouble With How Liberals Talk About Terrorism Shortly after three men with knives and a van spent eight minutes murdering and maiming people at random on London Bridge, one of the Democratic Party’s leading voices on national security responded on Twitter. Chris Murphy began by criticizing Donald Trump for sounding the alarms . “My god,” he wrote . “@POTUS has no idea that the goal of terrorists is to instill a level of fear in the public di
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The Atlantic
Why Wonder Woman Worked for DC This post contains spoilers about the ending of Wonder Woman. Zack Snyder had a difficult task on his hands when he was announced as the director of 2013’s Man of Steel . The last attempt at a cinematic Superman, Bryan Singer’s Superman Returns , had gotten a muted reception from critics and audiences in 2006 after it aimed to replicate the more stirring, old-fashioned valor of the hero’s earlier
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are friends better for us than family?The power of friendship gets stronger with age and may even be more important than family relationships, indicates new research by a Michigan State University scholar.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Warrantless Tracking of Cell Phone Location Data By the Police Could Get HarderA man found guilty of armed robbery claims that use of his telephone records violates the Fourth Amendment.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the Arctic Ocean became salineThe Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly discovered disease mechanism for type 2 diabetesA newly discovered mechanism behind reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetes is now being presented. In an article in Nature Communications, researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy describe how insulin-producing cells regress in their development, become immature, and do not work properly. A finding that opens the doors to new clinical treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How killer cells take out tumorsThe use of immunotherapy to treat cancer is celebrating its first successes -- but there are still many knowledge gaps in the underlying mechanisms of action. In a study of mice with soft tissue tumors, ETH researchers have now shown how endogenous killer cells track down the tumors with the help of dormant viruses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Looking to the future of organs-on-chipA new special issue from Future Science OA examines novel organ-on-a-chip research and provides expert insight into the future of the field.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New sound diffuser is 10 times thinner than existing designsThe new, 'ultra-thin' sound diffuser is 10 times thinner than the widely used diffusers found in recording studios, concert venues and movie theaters to reduce echoes and improve the quality of sound. The new design uses less material, which would reduce cost, as well as taking up far less space.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic study shakes up the elephant family treeNew research reveals that a species of giant elephant that lived 1.5 million to 100,000 years ago -- ranging across Eurasia before it went extinct -- is more closely related to today's African forest elephant than the forest elephant is to its nearest living relative, the African savanna elephant. Understanding elephant evolution is key to protecting present-day elephants from extinction, research
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flu shot less effective for obese adultsAlthough influenza vaccines are currently the best forms of protection to safeguard people against the flu, they are not effective in all cases. A study from Melinda Beck's research team at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US found that obese people -- despite getting their shots -- were still twice as likely to develop influenza or flu-like illnesses than others of healthy weight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemistry life hacks: Food edition (video)Reactions is back with another round of chemistry life hacks. Our latest episode brings chemistry to the kitchen, and features science-backed tips to cook rice with fewer calories, get extra juicy chicken (when you don't have time to marinate) and keep sliced fruit from browning too quickly. Watch the video and find out how to use chemistry to give your food a flavor boost: https://youtu.be/aTspr-
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safety of gene transfer to treat heart failure supports further clinical developmentBased on the encouraging safety data that has emerged from multiple clinical trials that used different gene transfer approaches to improve heart function in patients suffering from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, researchers conclude that this therapeutic strategy can be advanced with acceptable risk.
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Science | The Guardian
Climate change is real. So why won’t the right admit it? | Marcus NieldFrom hard Brexiters to Donald Trump, nationalists who deny the existence of manmade global warming will eventually have to face the facts Around 97% of climate scientists confirm the existence of manmade global warming, and public opinion is steadily catching up. In the UK, a recent poll suggested 84% of British people want Theresa May to “convince Trump not to quit” the Paris climate agreement. A
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Witness In Trial Describes How Bill Cosby Made Sure She Swallowed Pills He Gave Her | Deadsp Jezebel Witness In Trial Describes How Bill Cosby Made Sure She Swallowed Pills He Gave Her | Deadspin Real Madrid Won Everything And Don’t Have Much To Show For It | The Root 2 Teen Girls Sentenced for Their Role in School Bathroom Attack That Left 16-Year-Old Amy Joyner-Francis Dead | Fusion Donald Trump is Blaming All His Problems on Jeff Sessions Now |
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Gizmodo
Your Favorite Bluetooth Speaker Is Now Water-Resistant - Get the New Model For $34 Anker SoundCore 2 , $34 with code BESSPK77 With its 24 hour battery life, surprisingly good bass, and crystal clear sound quality, the Anker SoundCore has long been our readers’ favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker . But its run may be at an end, because Anker just upgraded it with IPX5 water resistance , and you can get the new model for $8 off today. The SoundCore 2 still includes dual drivers
8h
Ars Technica
Gearhead: Digital assistants, Nokia 3310, and superstar Mark Ronson Enlarge One of the big benefits of the Ars Technica UK office is that it's right next to Wired UK . It means that, aside from chastising Wired over its 9-out-of-10 LG G6 review, we can work together on projects that otherwise wouldn't be possible. The first of those projects, Kelly and Rowland's excellent political podcast UpVote , launched alongside Theresa May's call for a snap general election
8h
NYT > Science
Climate Science Meets a Stubborn Obstacle: StudentsA new teacher’s efforts to educate teenagers in Ohio coal country ran up against a cultural resistance to evidence of the human role in global warming.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coating of molybdenum improves the efficiency of catalysts for producing hydrogenA novel molybdenum-coated catalyst that can efficiently split water in acidic electrolytes is developed by researchers at KAUST and could help with efficient production of hydrogen.
8h
WIRED
Siri Finally Got Its Coming Out Party With iOS 11 and the new HomePod speaker, Apple's showing a lot more confidence in what its voice assistant can do. The post Siri Finally Got Its Coming Out Party appeared first on WIRED .
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Coral-Reef Fish Suck Up Meals with Slime-Covered LipsHighly folded mouthparts help tubelip wrasses dodge venom and create a seal to feed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive alien plant control assessed for the Kruger National Park in South AfricaAlong with urban and agricultural encroachment and pollution mitigation, managing invasive alien species is a key intervention needed to protect biodiversity. Unfortunately, on a global scale there are not enough funds to meet the requirements for effective conservation everywhere, which means that scarce funds need to be allocated where they can be used most efficiently.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How soil bacteria can protect against corrosion in steelA Swansea University researcher, Alex Harold, has beaten over 5000 applicants to win an international award for her work using proteins derived from soil bacteria to develop a new anti-corrosion coating for steel.
9h
Futurity.org
App could keep hackers from stealing your voice Using only tools already on smartphones, including the compass, engineers have created an app to stop voice hacking. While convenient, Siri, WeChat, and other voice-based smartphone apps can expose you to this growing security threat. With just a few minutes of audio samples, attackers can replay your voice convincingly enough to trick people as well as top digital security systems. The consequen
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Gizmodo
The Sunscreen Ratings That Scare People Every Year Are Bullshit When we head out in the sun, we just want a sunscreen that will protect our skin and not kill us. That’s not too much to ask, is it? But the Environmental Working Group (EWG) wants us to pick the best sunscreen, and nags us with true but not very useful facts: This one contains an ingredient that caused cancer in a mouse once. That one is labeled SPF 100 but is probably only like SPF 85. Back off
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Coral-reef fish suck up meals with slime-covered lips Highly folded mouthparts help tubelip wrasses dodge venom and create a seal to feed. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22097
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Farmer and Scientist's Take on Trump and the Paris Climate AgreementsMy heart sank when I heard the news because I know from my experience and my research how much climate change harms agriculture and the soil -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are friends better for us than family?The power of friendship gets stronger with age and may even be more important than family relationships, indicates new research by a Michigan State University scholar.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New low-cost material for lighting and diagnostics produces white light imitating sunlightResearchers at the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a synthetic material based on the natural hackmanite mineral which produces broad spectrum white light in lamps. The hackmanite created by the Inorganic Materials Chemistry research group is a low-cost material emitting luminescence closer to sunlight than that of the currently used lanthanides.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive alien plant control assessed for the Kruger National Park in South AfricaAlong with urban and agricultural encroachment and pollution mitigation, managing invasive alien species is a key intervention needed to protect biodiversity. In order to find out whether the historical measures undertaken at the Kruger National Park in South Africa have been effective, scientists assessed the invasive alien plant control operations at the protected area over several decades. Thei
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Keeping the hydrogen comingA coating of molybdenum improves the efficiency of catalysts for producing hydrogen.
9h
Futurity.org
New way to convert stem cells leaves no extra DNA A new system can convert stem cells to target cells and then remove the remnants of the conversion, leaving only the desired DNA behind to duplicate. “One difficulty with human pluripotent stem cells is that you can’t use them directly,” says Xiaojun Lian, assistant professor of biomechanical engineering and biology and a member of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences at Penn State. “They nee
9h
Ingeniøren
Her er topforskernes tips til at besidde den nyeste videnVi kæmper nok alle med at finde tid til at holde os opdaterede og undgå at blive overvældet over den nyeste faglitteratur. Det gør forskerne også.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The complete epigenomes of the most frequent tumors, unveiledAn IDIBELL research team manages to characterize the complete epigenomes of the most frequent tumors, including those of colon, lung and breast cancer. The study represents a big step in the study of origin and progression of these tumors.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dogs help in breast carcinoma researchCancer of the mammary glands in dogs is very similar to human breast carcinoma. For this reason, treatment methods from human medicine are often used for dogs. Conversely, scientific knowledge gained from canine mammary tumors may also be important to human medicine. Researchers from the University of Zurich were able to show how similar these tumors are in both dogs and humans.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New surgical techniques help save patients from life-threatening heart conditionCardiac surgeons are successfully performing more extensive surgical repairs of type A aortic dissection -- one of the highest risk operations in cardiothoracic surgery. These new surgical techniques, along with improved postoperative care, are resulting in better long-term outcomes and lower rates of complications, according to an article published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
9h
Gizmodo
I Can't Stop Watching This $35,000 RC Fighter Jet Crash and Burn GIF GIF: YouTube / Gizmodo “Oh, it’s so majestic! Watch it zoom around those trees! It gets so close to the grass! It goes upside down! It swoops over the crowd! It’s heading straight for the ground! It’s heading straight for the ground!! It’s heading straight for the ground!!! It’s hea——” That’s roughly what you’ll say to yourself as you watch the first 60 seconds of this RC fighter jet video. T
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Fight Scale with ScaleSamsung has rebounded from its battery-related challenges by expanding its fault resolution capabilities and is now positioned to revolutionize the manner in which the global smartphone industry mitigates future issues. Samsung’s solution could have massive ramifications for the industry, creating a quality control platform in which the entire industry may participate.
9h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt verdenskort viser, hvordan vi kan standse den sjette masseudryddelse af arter i verdenInternationalt studie fremlægger forslag til global aftale, der skal standse den sjette masseudryddelse...
9h
Viden
Ikke kun i Stillehavet: Masser af plastik i dansk jordFlere undersøgelser viser, at der er mikroplast i dansk jord, og at det kan være skidt for dyr, planter og landbrug.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Cracking the Popularity CodeDo you know the two types of popularity — and which is better for you? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young at heart: Restoring cardiac function with a matrix moleculeResearch at the Weizmann Institute of Science has uncovered a molecule in newborn hearts that appears to control the renewal process. When injected into adult mouse hearts injured by heart attacks, this molecule, called Agrin, seems to 'unlock' that renewal process and enable heart muscle repair.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do Antarctic krill stocks fluctuate?It is only six centimeters long, but it plays a major role in the Antarctic ecosystem: the small crustacean Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill). It's one of the world's most abundant species and the central diet of a number of animals in the Southern Ocean. For a long time, scientists have been puzzled why the size of krill stocks fluctuates so widely.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain damage can make sideways faces more memorable, and give us 'emotion blindness'People with damage to a crucial part of the brain fail to recognize facial emotions, but they unexpectedly find faces looking sideways more memorable researchers have found.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop new EcoCity model for mitigating urban heat islandsProf. KUANG Wenhui's group at the Key Laboratory of Land Surface Pattern and Simulation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, has developed the EcoCity model for regulating urban land cover structures and thermal environments, and has established eco-regulation thresholds for urban surface thermal environments.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton discoveredThe complete skeleton of an eight-meter-long dinosaur has been unearthed from marine deposits dating back 72 million years at Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, making it the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Japan, according to researchers.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop divide and conquer approach for more stable power generationWind is powerful, but it doesn't always blow where and when it's needed. To make it more reliable and widely available, scientists have developed a two-prong approach to ensure wind-generated power doesn't die down as a renewable resource. The collaborative team includes scientists from the University of Connecticut and ABB, Inc, published their proposed approach to better integrated wind generati
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutrino discovery: A step closer to finding CP violationLatest data by T2K Collaboration in their search to find evidence of CP violation has been published.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists model gene regulation with chromatin accessibilityResearchers from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have teamed up with Stanford University and Tsinghua University scientists to successfully model data on gene regulation with paired expression and chromatin accessibility (PECA) and have developed new tools to infer context-specific regulatory networks.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut bacteria could protect cancer patients and pregnant women from Listeria, study suggestsResearchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study, which will be published June 6 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ultrathin material for splitting water could make hydrogen production cheaperUNSW Sydney chemists have invented a new, cheap catalyst for splitting water with an electrical current to efficiently produce clean hydrogen fuel. Splitting water usually requires two different catalysts, but this catalyst can drive both of the reactions required to separate water into oxygen and hydrogen. The technology is based on the creation of ultrathin slices of porous metal-organic complex
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ultrathin material for splitting water could make hydrogen production cheaperUNSW Sydney chemists have invented a new, cheap catalyst for splitting water with an electrical current to efficiently produce clean hydrogen fuel.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Why U.S. companies will ignore Trump's withdrawal from the Paris climate agreementDonald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord has received widespread condemnation from political leaders, scientists, activists and climate experts. Perhaps surprisingly, a number of big businesses have also voiced their disagreement with the US president's move.
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
NASA’s dark-energy probe faces cost crisis Space agency takes a hard look at plans for its next big space observatory. Nature 546 195 doi: 10.1038/546195a
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Gizmodo
How Fake Science Saved Lives in Victorian London Fake health news can feel like an epidemic these days, but it was also rampant during the Victorian era, when bodily ailments were often a matter of life-or death. But unlike the questionable remedies you may be familiar with—vaginal steaming for your cramps, or a float tank to chill your anxiety out?—some of the bogus ideas about wellness cultivated in 19th century England actually helped save l
9h
WIRED
Wonder Woman and the Importance of the Female Hero Moment Patty Jenkins' superhero movie gives its lead more than a few slow-mo heroic moments. And she deserves every single one. The post Wonder Woman and the Importance of the Female Hero Moment appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Futurity.org
Does starting puberty change how girls learn? Puberty hormones might impede some aspects of flexible youthful learning, a study with female mice suggests. “We have found that the onset of puberty hits something like a ‘switch’ in the brain’s frontal cortex that can reduce flexibility in some forms of learning,” says study senior author Linda Wilbrecht, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of California, Berkel
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plastic 12-bit RFID tag and read-out system with screen-printed antennaQuad Industries, Agfa, imec and TNO announced today that they have demonstrated a plastic 12-bit RFID tag and read-out system with screen-printed circuitry. The system integrates, for the first time, a screen-printed antenna and printed touch-based user interface, allowing implementation of the reader on curved surfaces. The demonstrator has been designed for badge security applications, but holds
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The puffiest 'super-Neptune' has a cloud-free atmosphere, new study finds(Phys.org)—Astronomers have recently conducted spectroscopic observations of the exoplanet WASP-127b – the puffiest "super-Neptune" known to date. The new study, presented in a paper published May 25 on arXiv.org, reveals that this alien world has an atmosphere, which is either completely or partially cloud-free.
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Gizmodo
Another Star Wars Classic is Getting an Update For The Last Jedi Patty Jenkins teases some details about Wonder Woman 2 . Dan Harmon discusses Rick and Morty ’s return. The Rock has a few more peeks at the Rampage movie. Plus, new footage from Spider-Man: Homecoming and War for the Planet of the Apes , and the Ice Warriors return in new Doctor Who pictures. Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Making Star Wars has details—and a sketch—about a new kind of Roy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A novel approach to seeing dengue infection in the bodyPositron emission tomography (PET) paired with the glucose metabolism probe, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is considered 'old' technology in the field of cancer. A team from Duke-NUS Medical School and Singapore General Hospital found a new use for this 'old' technology in infectious diseases research. Using FDG-PET to image dengue infection in mice, the team has potentially uncovered a novel way to t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists propose new method to correct common power problem in microgridsScientists from the Northeastern University, China, have developed a new method to diagnosis a serious electrical problem in microgrids. They published their work in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica. They developed an algorithm to accurately identify multiple signals at multiple levels in the circuit, which can determine if there a switch fault exists. The combination of the algorithm and the
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory loss and other cognitive decline linked to blood vessel disease in the brainMemory loss, language problems and other symptoms of cognitive decline are strongly associated with diseases of the small blood vessels in the brain, according to a study published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is there a link between infertility and child educational outcomes?Findings from study co-authored by a University of Illinois at Chicago sociologist suggest that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement -- both test scores and grade point average -- at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Vacation Guide to the Solar SystemFive places to put on your lifetime space-vacation bucket list -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Ars Technica
Xbox One users largely ignore backward-compatible Xbox 360 games In an interview with Time earlier this week, Sony Head of Global Marketing and Sales Jim Ryan said that "when we've dabbled with backwards compatibility, I can say it is one of those features that is much requested, but not actually used much." An in-depth Ars Technica analysis of Xbox Live user data shows that sentiment is definitely true, at least when it comes to Microsoft's competing consoles
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia will finally ban cosmetic testing on animalsLast week, a bill was put before the House of Representatives that would ban animal testing of industrial chemicals intended solely for use in cosmetics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unfussy bottom feeders show resilience to climate changeA study by scientists at the University of Aberdeen has found that invertebrate life in the deep Arctic Ocean is more resilient to the effects of climate change than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can ocean science bring Cuba and the United States together?Cuba is the ecological crown jewel of the Caribbean. It harbors thousands of the region's endemic species and about half of its coastal ecosystems. It is rare to find comparable ecosystems or such rich biodiversity anywhere in the Caribbean, and perhaps in the Western Hemisphere.
10h
Ingeniøren
Energistyrelsen øger kravet til CO2-reduktion markantEnergistyrelsen har opjusteret behovet for at skære i Danmarks udledninger af drivhusgasser, hvis vi skal opfylde EU’s klimamål i 2030.
10h
Ars Technica
UK police arrest man via automatic face-recognition tech Enlarge Automatic facial recognition (AFR) technology has been used to arrest a man, the South Wales Police told Ars. While AFR tech has been trialled by a number of UK police forces, this appears to be the first time it has led to an arrest. South Wales Police didn't provide details about the nature of the arrest, presumably because it's an ongoing case. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
10h
New Scientist - News
Late nights and lie-ins at the weekend are bad for your healthSocial jetlag, caused by going to sleep and waking up later on weekends, has been linked to a greater risk of heart disease and other signs of poor health
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Science | The Guardian
Did children build the ancient Egyptian city of Amarna? New evidence from Akhenaten’s capital suggests that a ‘disposable’ workforce of children and teenagers provided much of the labour for the city’s construction There’s a whiff of magic about the site of Tell el-Amarna that makes the hair on the back of my neck stand on end. It’s partly down to the effort of imagination needed to conjure a great capital of ancient Egypt from the sea of low humps st
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The Atlantic
Who Is Reality Winner? Reality Winner, the 25-year-old Air Force veteran charged with mailing classified information to a news organization, believed to be the Intercept , is a contractor with Pluribus International Corporation, a defense and intelligence contractor for the U.S. government. Winner was arrested Saturday at her home in Augusta, Georgia, where, the FBI said in its affidavit, she “admitted intentionally id
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Gizmodo
Can You Make a Poster Worse Than the Ones for Spider-Man: Homecoming and Transformers: The Last Knight? mage: Paramount We’ve barely started the summer blockbuster season and already two movies are battling it out. Oh, not for box office supremacy. We’re talking about the worst poster of the year. First, Spider-Man: Homecoming served up this cluttered disaster: Image: Sony/Marvel Thank god for that random insert of the Washington Monument, otherwise this poster wouldn’t convey that part of this mov
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Science | The Guardian
Could Paris Syndrome explain Theresa May’s campaign meltdowns? | Dean Burnett Could a bizarre form of culture shock known as Paris Syndrome explain the Theresa May’s poor election campaign performance? What’s up with Theresa May? How did she go from being the epitome of confident, sensible leadership to someone so shambling and self-damaging they inspire their own memes ? With 20 years’ experience as an MP, including seven as home secretary and 11 months as Prime Minister,
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WIRED
With the iMac Pro, Apple Rediscovers the Creative Class At WWDC, Apple made clear why it needs developers to embrace its shiny new tools. The post With the iMac Pro, Apple Rediscovers the Creative Class appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
This Bot Turns Trump Tweets Into Official POTUS Pronouncements As many a movie trickster has learned, official-looking letterhead can make all the difference. The post This Bot Turns Trump Tweets Into Official POTUS Pronouncements appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
Opioid use creeps back after weight-loss surgery Research finds that the proportion of adults with severe obesity who use prescription opioid medications declines in the months after bariatric surgery, but then increases within a few years after the surgery, eventually surpassing the pre-surgery percentage of patients taking the drugs. Improvements in obesity-related pain gained through bariatric surgery aren’t enough to counter the need for pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research shows protective value of mangroves for coastlinesThe threat to coastal regions posed by climate change, overdevelopment and other human caused stressors is well-established. Among the most prized and valuable land throughout the world, shorelines everywhere are imperiled by sea level rise, beach erosion and flooding. But a recently published NASA-funded research study in which Villanova University Biology Professor Samantha Chapman played a key
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The conversation between plants and soilTo a child, soil is just dirt – a home for worms. To a gardener, soil is a collection of organic matter and nutrients. But to plants, soil is a hotbed of chemical activity. And plants don't just observe, they actively participate in this activity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists demonstrate microwave spectrometer tailored for the Majorana questThe quest for Majorana particles as building blocks for a future computer is on since the first observation of these particles in Delft in 2012. Due to their physical properties, a quantum bit based on them is protected from errors. Experimentally, however, the control and realization of Majorana states are very challenging. An international team of scientists, led by Attila Geresdi at QuTech has
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One step closer to the quantum internet by distillationScientists all over the world are working towards new methods to realize an unhackable internet, an internet based on quantum entanglement – an invisible quantum mechanical connection – as networking links. The greatest challenge is scaling to large networks that share entangled links with many particles and network nodes. Researchers in Delft and Oxford have now managed to distil a strong entangl
10h
Popular Science
Bonding with a partner could have unexpected rewards—in your brain, that is Animals Cuddling rodents might be the key to understanding this social behavior. You can't spell love without vole. These sort-of-monogamous rodents could help us understand why people pair up. Read on.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Pros and Cons of the Whole30 ChallengeThe Whole30 nutrition challenge is wildly popular. But can it really deliver on its promises? Nutrition Diva examines the pros, cons, and alternatives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Gizmodo
Lodge's Essential Cast Iron Pan is On Sale For Just $13 Lodge 10" Cast Iron Skillet , $13 The humble and inexpensive cast iron skillet is one of most important pieces of cooking gear you can own , and Lodge’s highly-rated 10” model is back down to $13 on Amazon. If you don’t own one, you shouldn’t hesitate. Cooking for one? The 8" model is a few bucks less . While you’re there, pick up some cast iron scrapers or a chainmail scrubber for cleaning, and
10h
Gizmodo
Would You Feel Safer If Your Self-Driving Car Could Explain Itself? Image: Hot Tub Time Machine 2 With each passing breakthrough in artificial intelligence, we’re asking our machines to make increasingly complex and weighty decisions. Trouble is, AIs are starting to act beyond our levels of comprehension. In high frequency stock trading, for example, this had led to so-called flash crashes , in which algorithms make lightning-quick decisions for reasons we can’t
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Bird, Plane, or Cyborg?Rather than attempting to recreate an insect's dynamic agility with robotics, scientists have created a hybrid that's part dragonfly, part robot.
10h
The Scientist RSS
Age-Related Bias in NIH AwardsThe number of young investigators with NIH grants has declined since 1982, but recent efforts by the agency to increase funding for early-stage investigators are working, a study finds.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Overcoming the trust barrier in nuclear weapons verification measurementsTrust but verify. The catchphrase for arms control popularized by President Ronald Reagan sounds simple. However, verification involving sensitive data is a very complex endeavor.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NIH initiatives to overcome age bias in grant offerings appear to be working(Phys.org)—A professor of structural biology and an informatics researcher have together written a paper outlining age bias in grant offerings by the National Institutes of Health over the past several decades. They show how older principal investigators (PIs) have traditionally been given more grants but note that new initiatives by NIH appear to be having a positive impact. Michael and Jonathan
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From brook trout to walleyes, warming waters to play havoc with fisheriesA few degrees, on average, can make a huge difference in lakes and streams as aquatic species struggle to compete and in some cases survive, and that's why a warming climate is of concern to fisheries managers.
10h
Gizmodo
President Trump is Still Mad Online, Vows to Keep Tweeting (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) President Donald Trump’s friends and advisors have reportedly told him to use social media less frequently. Even the Wall Street Journal has a new editorial out about how Trump has undermined his own presidency with Twitter. So let’s take a look at what’s going on in Trumpland this morning : Oh dear. First off, it’s hard to argue that the “FAKE MSM” (we’re goin
10h
Ingeniøren
Få en direkte linje til transportministerenIngeniøren får besøg af transportminister Ole Birk Olesen til en snak om planer og ambitioner for Danmarks infrastruktur. Det sker på Folkemødet i næste uge, og vi tager de bedste spørgsmål fra jer læsere med til Bornholm.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Naracoorte, where a half-million years of biodiversity and climate history are trapped in cavesIn 1857, guided by the flickering light of a candle deep in a cave at Naracoorte in South Australia, the Reverend Julian Tenison-Woods stumbled across thousands of tiny bones of rodents and small marsupials buried at the base of crystal columns.
10h
Futurity.org
Zippy exoplanet burns hotter than most stars Imagine a planet like Jupiter zipping around its host star every day and a half, superheated to temperatures hotter than most stars and sporting a giant, glowing gas tail like a comet. That’s what astronomers think they found orbiting a massive star called KELT-9, located 650 light years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. Artist’s impression shows KELT-9b orbiting its host star, KELT-9. (Cre
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seed conservation in the remote South AtlanticIslands have long held a fascination for scientists studying evolution and patterns of biodiversity, from Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace in the 19th century, to Robert MacArthur and E.O. Wilson in the 20th century, and continuing in the 21st century. Islands are often home to, for their size, a disproportionately large number of species with very narrow distributions, including single i
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Empower kids to solve community challenges and many will avoid troubleAn after-school program that empowers young people to be agents of change in their communities has helped 8th-grade students in one Michigan area develop more prosocial behaviors and avoid antisocial behaviors, say University of Michigan School of Public Health researchers.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop extremely sensitive hydrogen sensorHydrogen is a highly promising energy carrier. But it can also be dangerous, as it is combustible and difficult to detect. Using hydrogen safely requires sensors that can detect even the smallest of leaks. Researchers from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands), KU Leuven (Belgium) and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) have discovered that the metal hafnium is perfect for
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increased drone use creating safety concerns in Canadian airspaceCanadian airspace is adapting to the rise of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) or, drones, which now outnumber piloted aircraft in our skies, and a new study from the University of Calgary shows this has led to a growing number of incidents and safety concerns.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Stunning Photos of Earth from the International Space StationAstronaut Tim Peake captures images of volcanoes, cities, glaciers and aurora from 249 miles up -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin
Danmarks seks største kommuner vil have egne læger De seks største kommuner står bag et fælles udspil om fremtidens sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen, hvor samarbejdet med almen praksis bør spille en større rolle.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Talk to your children about their online lives every two weeks, urges charity Internet safety should be treated like road safety and caution with strangers as new figures show frequency of exposure to inappropriate content, says children’s charity A leading charity has urged parents to do more to keep their children safe online as new figures reveal how often young people are exposed to violence, hatred, sexual content, bullying and other inappropriate content when using t
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there a link between infertility and child educational outcomes?How does resolved parental infertility relate to children's performance in school?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How viruses hijack a host's energy supplyViruses occupy a strange no-man's-land between the living and the nonliving. In order to reproduce, they must infect a living host and hijack its resources. But while it is understood that this parasitic relationship can lead to disease and death, few quantitative studies have examined the energetic cost of viral infections relative to the host's energy economy.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprising stripes in a 'bad metal' offer clues to high-temperature superconductivityHigh-temperature superconductivity offers perfect conveyance of electricity, but it does so at the price of extreme cold and an ever-elusive mechanism. If understood, scientists might push superconductivity into warmer temperatures and radically enhance power grids, consumer electronics, and more—but the puzzle has persisted for more than 30 years.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton discoveredThe complete skeleton of an 8-meter-long dinosaur has been unearthed from marine deposits dating back 72 million years at Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, making it the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Japan, according to researchers.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alectinib potential new standard of care for ALK-positive non-small lung cancerResults of a 303-patient, multi-national phase III clinical trial known as ALEX published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented concurrently at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2017 argue for alectinib replacing crizotinib as first-line standard of care in advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.
11h
WIRED
The End of Net Neutrality Could Shackle the Internet of Things Fear the pay-per-device dystopia. The post The End of Net Neutrality Could Shackle the Internet of Things appeared first on WIRED .
11h
WIRED
Apple Just Joined Tech’s Great Race to Democratize AI Sensing a gold rush from apps enhanced with artificial intelligence, Apple offers some shovels to offer developers. The post Apple Just Joined Tech's Great Race to Democratize AI appeared first on WIRED .
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Videnskabens Verden
Hvorfor får nogle sange alle mennesker ud på dansegulvet, mens andre sange ikke rykker i dansemusklen på samme måde. Den undren satte gang i en undersøgelse af, hvordan synkoper giver os lyst til at danse. Forskere fra Center for Music in the Brain fra Aarhus Universitet satte forsøgspersoner til at danse til forskellige rytmer, for at se hvilke giver os størst danselyst. Medvirkende: Maria Witek,
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding why cellulose resists degradation could lead to cost-effective biofuelsA major bottleneck hindering cost-effective production of biofuels and many valuable chemicals is the difficulty of breaking down cellulose—an important structural component of plant cell walls. A recent study addressed this problem by characterizing molecular features that make cellulose resistant to degradation.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D modelling shows food residues in 230 million years old fossil faecesSynchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil faeces. That's the result of a new study, by palaeontologists from Uppsala University and from ESRF Grenoble, which is presented in a new article in Scientific Reports.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Making Flexible Electronics with Nanowire NetworksIf flexible smartphones, e-paper and a new generation of smart watches are to succeed, we’ll need to invent something new -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered Amargosa voles need more than a rainy dayDespite the welcome rains in California this year, the fate of endangered Amargosa voles that depend on rare marshes in the Mojave Desert remains dire, with only about 500 animals remaining in the wild and most of their habitat degraded or dying.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA selects three aeronautics teams to explore 'ambitious' ideasThree teams of NASA researchers who have dreamed up potential solutions for pieces of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) puzzle have received the nod to officially begin formal feasibility studies of their concepts.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient grain tells the tale of our ancestors' citiesArchaeological digs in the Middle East have revealed the remains of ancient harvests that record how some of the world's earliest cities grew and developed.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A genomic take on geobiologyScientists know that atmospheric oxygen irreversibly accumulated on Earth around 2.3 billion years ago, at a time known as the Great Oxidation Event, or GOE. Prior to that time all life was microbial, and most, if not all, environments were anoxic (that is, contained no oxygen). Oxygen was first produced some time before the GOE through the evolution of a group of photosynthetic bacteria known as
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantifying the effects of climate changeLast year was the hottest on record, Arctic sea ice is on the decline and sea levels continue to rise. In this context, satellites are providing us with an unbiased view of how our climate is changing and the effects it is having on our planet.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple genome sequence helpful to breeding of new varieties publishedA high quality genome sequence of apple is published in this week's Nature Genetics by an international team of scientists, among which researchers of Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands. The publication of the sequence facilitates faster and more targeted breeding of new apple varieties with increased disease resistance, improved production traits, and better fruit quality. With t
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
System for assessing psychoemotional states via eye movement analysisExisting psychological theories connect the movements of human eyes with their reactions to external changes—what people see, hear, and feel. Analysing the eye direction allows researchers to compare observable human behaviors and internal states.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Mimas over Saturn's north poleFrom high above Saturn's northern hemisphere, NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazes over the planet's north pole, with its intriguing hexagon and bullseye-like central vortex.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could acidifying oceans slow down coral disease?Coral reefs face intensifying struggles as greenhouse gases warm and acidify the ocean, but new research suggests a potential silver lining: Some coral diseases might also dwindle amid environmental change.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New data for old bones: How the famous Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur bone bed came to beThe Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to th
11h
Ars Technica
Amid coal plant closures, coal mines open (but not for electricity) Enlarge / Railroad tracks sit in front of mounds of coking coal piled behind a barbed wire fence at the AK Steel Holding Corp. mill in Middletown, Ohio, US, on Friday, September 23, 2016. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Getty Images ) On Friday, just a day after President Trump announced his intention to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement, Kansas City Power &
11h
The Atlantic
Can America's Farms Survive the Threat of Deportations? It was one in the morning in late March when Luis, a 43-year-old Mexican man, tiptoed across the floor in his socks. He had just been startled from sleep by the sound of violent knocking on the door of the double-wide trailer where he and a few other farmworkers live. He was terrified; he leaned against the wall and listened. Listen to the audio version of this article: Download the Audm app for
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dissolved barium as a new quantitative indicator for Kuroshio incursion into the East China SeaThe Kuroshio ocean current, originating in the Philippine Sea east of the Luzon Strait, enters the East China Sea (ECS) northeast of Taiwan Island, flowing along the outer edge of the ECS shelf, and turns eastward to the Pacific Ocean through the Tokara Strait (Figure 1). It directly affects hydrological conditions, the distribution of biota, and seabed sediments in the marginal seas of China, par
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrino discovery—a step closer to finding charge-parity violationThe different rates of neutrino and anti-neutrino oscillations recorded by an international collaboration of researchers in Japan—including from Kavli IPMU—is an important step in the search for a new source of asymmetry in the laws that govern matter and antimatter.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rat attack: Thousands of rodents swarm Myanmar villagesThousands of rats have descended on villages on an island in southern Myanmar, a local official said on Tuesday, in what some have taken to be an ill omen of impending disaster.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon offers Prime discount to those on government benefitsAmazon is offering a discount on its Prime membership for people who receive government assistance.
12h
Ars Technica
Xbox Unleashed: Our deep-dive study of how millions use Xbox Live Enlarge (credit: Aurich) For three years now, Ars’ Steam Gauge project and the public sampling projects it has inspired (such as Steam Spy ) have provided an important behind-the-scenes look at what kinds of games are popular on PC gaming’s most popular marketplace. Today, after years of work, we’re ready to unveil a new effort that similarly uncovers what’s popular among Xbox Live users on the X
12h
Gizmodo
Trump Regime Greeted by Middle Fingers in New Zealand After Dumping Climate Accord Two environmental activists scale a crane in Wellington and unfurl a banner to welcome Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in New Zealand (Photo courtesy of the New Zealand Green Party) Secretary of State Rex Tillerson landed in New Zealand today during his tour of countries in Asia and the South Pacific. And the people of New Zealand greeted him with a sea of middle fingers. Why did so many kiwis f
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Increasingly Acidic Oceans Are Causing Fish to Behave BadlyOcean acidification may alter the behaviors of underwater creatures in disastrous ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data for old bones: How the famous Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur bone bed came to beThe Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Unlike typical Jurassic bone beds, it is dominated by the famous predatory dinosaur Allosaurus.
12h
WIRED
Blaming the Internet For Terrorism Misses The Point Governments need to focus on real-world solutions to terrorism. The post Blaming the Internet For Terrorism Misses The Point appeared first on WIRED .
12h
Live Science
Charmed Existence: Mysterious Particles Could Reveal Mysteries of the Big BangSo-called charm quarks — ultraheavy particles that are formed in the fiery collision of gold particles at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider — interact more with other particles than scientists previously thought.
12h
Science : NPR
Researchers Ferret Out Information From White House Visitor Logs President Trump has decided to change President Obama's policy of making the White House visitor log public. A new study explores what kind of information is contained in the White House visitor log.
12h
Big Think
India to Iceland in a Mere Millennium: How Chess Went Global Fancy a game of Japanese chess? Read More
12h
Dagens Medicin
Kontorchef får europæisk post Anette Lykke Petri fra Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er nyt bestyrelsesmedlem i den europæiske tilsynssammenslutning EPSO.
12h
Ingeniøren
Nedsmeltning af vaccineproduktion: 152 milloner kr. brugt på bod og erstatningerNye opgørelser fra Statens Serum Institut viser, hvor galt det stod til med vaccineproduktionen, inden den blev solgt for en slik.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of pathways activation landscape in oral squamous cell carcinoma and pre-neoplastic lesionsOral dysplastic lesions are considered precursors of OSCC. However only a subset of such lesions progress to invasive cancer. There is an urgent need for biomarkers, which might assign a risk for cancer development in patients with premalignant lesions. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University alongside collaborators from Insilico Medicine, Inc, have applied iPANDA, a novel approach for analyzin
12h
Live Science
This Mask Is Among the Oldest Human-Made Metal Objects in South AmericaA rectangular copper mask recently found in the southern Andes in Argentina is 3,000 years old — one of the oldest human-made metal objects from South America.
12h
Live Science
Hottest Alien Planet Ever Discovered Is a Real ScorcherAstronomers have found the hottest known exoplanet, a world where temperatures exceed those on the surface of most stars.
13h
Live Science
Baby Volcanic Domes Pop Out in Space ImageIt's hard to believe this image was taken over Earth.
13h
Live Science
Marijuana for Menstrual Cramps? New York Considers Medical OptionWomen with menstrual cramps in New York State may soon have a new option for easing their monthly pains: medical marijuana.
13h
The Atlantic
States With Large Black Populations Are Stingier With Government Benefits When he launched his War on Poverty in 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Tom Fletcher, an unemployed white Appalachian coal miner who lived in Kentucky. The White House had chosen Fletcher , who had eight children, to become the face of American poverty, and an iconic Time magazine photo captured the president squatting next to Fletcher and three of his boys on the porch. Poverty, in the
13h
Science : NPR
VIDEO: Get To Know The Bloodthirsty (But Cuddly) Vampire Bat In Latin America, they drink the blood of big animals and can spread rabies. Livestock die. So do people. Ranchers want to wipe the bats out. Does anyone think that's a bad idea? (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR)
13h
Dagens Medicin
Første immunterapi mod lungehindekræftForskere har udviklet en ny form for immunterapi, der som den første af sin slags kan bremse udviklingen af lungehindekræft.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Immunterapi mod myelomatose virker overbevisende Ny form for immunterapi viser lovende resultater i patienter med myelomatose. 33 ud af 35 patienter havde gavn af behandlingen.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Alectinib bremser lungekræft bedre end Crizotinib Nye resultater peger på en mere effektiv førstebehandling af lungekræft. Lægemidlet alectinib bremser væksten af lungekræfttumorer et år længere end standardbehandlingen med crizotinib.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Ingen afklaring om adjuverende immunterapi til modermærkekræft Effekten af at behandle modermærkekræft-patienter med højrisiko sygdom med adjuverende Yervoy (ipilimumab) i henholdsvis høj og lav dosis, er sammenlignelig. Der mangler imidlertid stadig data, før behandlingen kan indføres i Europa, vurderer ekspert.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Restsygdom reducerer ikke effekten af PARP-hæmmere Opfølgende data fra NOVA-studiet viser, at kvinder med recidiv af æggestokkræft, som har restsygdom efter kemoterapi, har lige så stor effekt af vedligeholdelsesbehandling med PARP-hæmmeren niraparib som dem uden. Det bekræfter behandlingens rækkevidde, siger studiets førsteforfatter.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Middel reducerer risiko for invasiv sygdom hos HER2-patienter Adjuverende behandling med pertuzumab, trastuzumab og kemoterapi mindsker risikoen for tilbagefald med 19 pct. hos kvinder med HER2-positiv brystkræft sammenholdt med trastuzumab og kemoterapi alene. Umiddelbart er forskellen dog ikke store nok til at ændre praksis, vurderer dansk ekspert.
13h
WIRED
So What’s the Deal With Air Traffic Control Reform? Breaking down the White House's latest foray into infrastructure. The post So What's the Deal With Air Traffic Control Reform? appeared first on WIRED .
13h
Dagens Medicin
Langtidsdata bekræfter effekt af behandlinger til modermærkekræft På ASCO i år er der for første gang blevet vist solide data om langtidsoverlevelsen for patienter med modermærkekræft i behandling med BRAF- eller PD1-hæmmere. Det tegner lovende, og overraskende lader der også til at være langtidsoverlevere blandt patienterne i behandling med BRAF-hæmmere.
13h
Dagens Medicin
»SCOT-studiet er en once in a lifetime-oplevelse« På Plenary Session i går på ASCO kom det frem, at udvalgte tyktarmskræftpatienter med stadium 3-sygdom kan nøjes med en halv adjuverende kemo-kur. Et af de seks studier, SCOT-studiet, har inkluderet patienter fra 10 danske kræftafdelinger, og det er der grund til at være rigtig stolt over, fastslår dansk ekspert.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Asbest i nærmiljøet øger kvinders risiko for lungehindekræft Størstedelen af kvinder med asbestrelateret lungehindekræft, er ikke blevet syge efter at have arbejdet med asbestholdige materialer, men som følge af at have været eksponeret for det sundhedsskadelige stof i deres nærmiljø, viser nyt, dansk studie.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Regionsrådsformand retter hård kritik mod Herlev Hospital i meningitis-sag Herlev Hospital har ikke lavet en fyldestgørende analyse af sin egen rolle i en 16-årig drengs dødsfald januar sidste år, mener regionsrådsformand.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Flere hundrede patienters data lækket fra hospital Tidligere ansat læge på Glostrup Hospital anmeldt til politiet af Rigshospitalet.
13h
Ingeniøren
Norsk gas til Polen sendt i dansk udbudRegeringen har godkendt, at Energinet sender kapaciteten i gasrørledningen 'Baltic Pipe' i udbud. Tilslutningen får afgørende betydning for projektets realisering.
13h
Ingeniøren
Klimarådet: Sådan kan Danmark reducere drivhusgasserneVarmepumper, gaslastbiler, forsuring af gylle. Klimarådet er klar med sine 11 bud på indsatser, som skal reducere udledninger fra biler, boliger og landbrug.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building a better blood-brain barrier modelInvestigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed an innovative but easily implemented approach that uses 'spheroids' to mimic the blood-brain barrier more accurately, and appears to overcome several challenges for discovering and advancing new drugs for treating brain conditions.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What the hair of a fly tells us about cancerCells divide into two identical cells that then divide in turn, meaning that any tissue can grow exponentially. But the moment comes when some of them have to develop into specialized cells. On the back of a fly, for example, a cell must know that when it splits, it will give birth to two different cells: a hair and a neuron. How do these asymmetric divisions function? Researchers at UNIGE tried t
13h
The Atlantic
Lee's Reputation Can't Be Redeemed On Sunday, I published an essay on the myth of Robert E. Lee . The fascinating thing about Dan McLaughlin’s response to that essay in National Review is how little it takes issue with. McLaughlin does not dispute that Lee was a cruel slavemaster who engaged in dubious interpretation of his father-in-law’s will to maintain possession of his slaves until a court ruled against him; that Lee betrayed
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to teach school kids about online safety, etiquetteGoogle is spearheading an educational campaign to teach pre-teen children how to protect themselves from scams, predators and other trouble.
14h
Ars Technica
HP grows Omen line with new gaming laptops, VR backpack PC, and more Enlarge (credit: Hewlett-Packard ) HP is stepping up its Omen gaming line ahead of E3 next week with a slew of updates and additions. The company left no stone unturned this year, updating its 15- and 17-inch Omen laptops, introducing a new Omen desktop and updated peripherals, and debuting a new GPU accelerator and a ready-to-go model of its prototype VR backpack PC. All the new devices have a c
14h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Romania’s science reforms prompt boycott Researchers refuse to sit on evaluation panels after government bans international participation. Nature 546 197 doi: 10.1038/546197a
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Planet is 'hotter than most stars'Scientists spend decades hunting Earth's twin only to turn up the most inhospitable world imaginable.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Bredt flertal i Folketinget forlænger økonomiloft Folketinget har vedtaget et lovforslag, som forlænger den økonomiske ramme for almen praksis, indtil en ny overenskomst er plads.
14h
Ingeniøren
Lækket NSA-rapport: Rusland prøvede at hacke ansvarlige for det amerikanske valg De målrettede mails så ud til at komme fra en leverandør til valgsystemet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/laekket-nsa-rapport-rusland-proevede-at-hacke-ansvarlige-amerikanske-valg-1077305 Version2
14h
Ingeniøren
Dansk fysiker: Nasa oversælger undersøgelse om kosmisk stråling ved flyrejserEn Nasa-støttet undersøgelse foreslår at ændre flyruter for at undgå usædvanligt høje doser af kosmisk stråling. Dansk fysiker peger på en mere enkel løsning.
14h
The Atlantic
Trump’s Selective Responses to Terror It is no secret that the President of the United States is a quick draw when it comes to expressing indignation or anger in response to news of the day. This is especially true when it comes to certain acts of terror—in the immediate aftermath of the Paris, Manchester and London attacks, Trump expressed his feelings within hours. And indeed, the American public has seen its commander in chief at
15h
The Atlantic
Why Trump Wants to Privatize Air-Traffic Control The obvious way for President Trump to launch his push for a big, bipartisan infrastructure package would have been for the renowned developer to don a hard hat, motorcade to the nearest decaying bridge, antiquated airport, or traffic-clogged highway, and vow to rebuild America’s crumbling arteries. He did not do that. Instead, the president on Monday chose to kick off what the White House is cal
15h
The Atlantic
Will Texas's Crackdown on Sanctuary Cities Hurt Law Enforcement? The Trump administration’s plan to crack down on “sanctuary cities,” jurisdictions that limit cooperation with federal immigration agents, is exacerbating longstanding tensions with some local governments and the federal government over immigration enforcement, while also prompting others to alter their policies. In February, Miami-Dade County voted to end the county’s “sanctuary” status, thereby
15h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Ingeniører skal rådgive Mexico og forsvare elnet mod cybertrusler På listen finder du en lang række af virksomheder på ingeniørjagt. Eksempelvis Dong Energy, Gomspace, Energinet, Cowi og Udenrigsministeriet. Find dit drømmejob. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-ingenioerer-skal-raadgive-mexico-vietnam-forsvare-elnet-mod-cybertrusler-8479 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After London attacks, Facebook, Twitter pledge to continue anti-terror helpFacebook and Twitter vowed to continue policing their networks for terrorist elements after U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May's call for tougher Internet regulation in the wake of recent terror attacks in London.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's big wow moments: a voice speaker and augmented realityApple fans, don't fear. The iPhone maker has finally jumped into two of the hottest tech trends of the last two years—augmented reality and voice-activated speakers, with a promise to dominate these markets pioneered by its rivals.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change raises new risk: Are inland bridges too low?A century-old train trestle stands as one of the trophies of Des Moines' push to spruce up its downtown. Bicyclists and pedestrians pose for pictures beside the brightly painted beams of the Red Bridge and gather on viewing platforms overlooking the Des Moines River.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuclear-wary Japan restarts another atomic reactorA Japanese utility switched on another nuclear reactor Tuesday in a small victory for the government's pro-atomic push, despite strong public opposition after the 2011 Fukushima meltdown.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's Adani to start work on mine near Great Barrier ReefIndian mining giant Adani on Tuesday said it will start work on a huge US$16 billion coal project that environmentalists warn will damage Australia's Great Barrier Reef.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report suggests Russia hackers breached voting software firmRussian hackers attacked at least one U.S. voting software supplier days before last year's presidential election, according to a government intelligence report leaked Monday that suggests election-related hacking penetrated further into U.S. voting systems than previously known. A Kremlin spokesman denied the report.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New possible target for cancer treatmentScientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report that cancer cells and normal cells use different 'gene switches' in order to regulate the expression of genes that control growth. In mice, the removal of a large regulatory region linked to different types of cancer caused a dramatic resistance to tumour formation, but did not affect normal cell growth. The findings, published in eLife, highlig
15h
Dagens Medicin
Statiner forbedrer hjertets struktur og funktionPersoner har mindre risiko for at udvikle fortykninger af hjertemusklen, hvis de får statiner, viser britisk studie.
15h
Dagens Medicin
Idrætsforsker får prestigefyldt pris Professor og overlæge Martin Lind har fået pris på verdenskongres i Kina.
15h
Dagens Medicin
Xarelto medfører højere risiko for større blødninger end PradaxaStor meta-analyse, som sammenligner Pradaxa og Xarelto, finder signifikant højere risiko for større blødninger med Xarelto, men lige god effekt i forhold til at forebygge apoleksi og tromboembolier.
15h
Dagens Medicin
Kliniske farmaceuter kan reducere risikoen for hjerte-kar-sygdomCanadisk studie peger på, at intervention fra kliniske farmaceuter kan reducere risikopersoners risiko for hjertekarsygdom.
15h
Ingeniøren
Få dig en fængende LinkedIn-overskrift Hvis du ønsker at gøre dig selv interessant for de arbejdsgivere, der jagter nye medarbejdere på LinkedIn, skal du have en stærk overskrift på din profil, Sådan her gør du. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/faa-dig-faengende-linkedin-overskrift-7787 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
Ingeniøren
USA skyder første interkontinentale missil ned nogensindeDet amerikanske missilforsvar har præsteret at nedskyde en efterligning af Nordkoreas ballistiske missiler i en test til 244 millioner dollars.
15h
Science-Based Medicine
When Drugs Cost Too MuchOur ability to develop new drugs is fast outstripping our ability to pay for them; some are exorbitantly expensive and not very effective. Funds are limited, and as a society we need to have a serious discussion about how they are to be allocated.
15h
Ars Technica
DiRT 4 review: As engaging as DiRT Rally but without the punishing difficulty Codemasters Last year, UK studio Codemasters blew my nomex racing socks off with DiRT Rally . The achievement was all the more notable because—while I tend to stick almost exclusively to racing games—I haven't really enjoyed off-road or rally games very much in the past. Now, Paul Coleman and his team at Codemasters have a new game for us that builds on the success of DiRT Rally , but it should e
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could your car predict a cardiac event? Team explores heart monitoring in vehiclesA driver experiencing an unexpected cardiac event on the road isn't the only one at risk.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
iSeeFlood application now available on iPhonesA UTA civil engineer and hydrologist has expanded his weather-watching audience to iPhone users.
16h
Science | The Guardian
Why we can't trust academic journals to tell the scientific truth Academic journals don’t select the research they publish on scientific rigour alone. So why aren’t academics taking to the streets about this? Hundreds of thousands of scientists took to streets around the world in April. “We need science because science tells the truth. We are those who can fight the fake news,” a friend who participated in one of the March for Science rallies told me. I really
16h
The Atlantic
U.S. Approves $1.4 Billion Military Sale to Saudi Arabia The U.S. State Department approved the sale of $1.4 billion in military training and equipment to Saudi Arabia as part of a larger arms deal signed by President Trump in May, the Pentagon announced Monday. Prior to his two-day visit to Saudi Arabia last month, Trump sanctioned a deal spearheaded by his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, that would provide the nation with around $110 billion in defense it
17h
Gizmodo
Sigourney Weaver Pops Up in a Weird New Trailer for Neill Blomkamp's Short Film Project Sigourney Weaver in the trailer for Oats Studios Volume 1 by Neill Blomkamp. Image: YouTube It seems pretty unlikely that we’ll ever see Sigourney Weaver return to the Alien franchise with director Neill Blomkamp. But we now know she’ll return to an alien type film from the director as part of his new venture, Oats Studios. Oats Studios is headed up by Blomkamp (who is best known for directing Di
17h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens supernetværk kan bryde EU-reglerNogle af 5G-netværkets mest centrale funktioner er ikke nødvendigvis tilladte i Danmark på grund af EU-regler om netneutralitet. Branchen efterlyser klarhed om reglerne.
18h
Ingeniøren
1500 årlige hospitalsdødsfald kan nedbringes med dataanalyse Hospitalsinfektioner er kilde til gener og dødsfald. Ved at benytte dataanalyse kan læger nedbringe det dødelige problem. Det stiller også etiske og juridiske spørgsmål, når algoritmer bliver medicinske instrumenter. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/1500-aarlige-hospitalsdoedsfald-kan-nedbringes-med-dataanalyse-1077242 Version2
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Officers on afternoon shift report being more fatiguedOfficers who work afternoons are twice as likely to report being tired, which puts them at greater risk for accidents, errors and stress, according to results of UB-led study that won first place in national conference poster competition.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep disturbances predict substance use among college athletesPreliminary results of a new study show that sleep disturbance is strongly related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs among student athletes in college.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Promising New Cancer Drugs Won’t Go Far Unless Everyone Gets Genetic TestingLoxo Oncology is developing a so-called “tumor agnostic” drug that requires expensive genetic testing often not covered by insurance.
19h
Ingeniøren
Vær bevidst om dit kropssprog, når du giver kritik Når du skal give kritik til dine kolleger eller ansatte, kan dit kropssprog stå i vejen for, at kritikken bliver modtaget godt. Her er seks ting, du skal være opmærksom på - og en ting, der kan betyde, at du alligevel ikke skal følge nogen af de seks råd. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/vaer-bevidst-dit-kropssprog-naar-du-giver-kritik-7724 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
19h
WIRED
Feds Charge NSA Contractor Accused of Exposing Russian Hacking The arrest of an alleged source of a classified leak to the Intercept offers a lesson in the risks of spilling secrets. The post Feds Charge NSA Contractor Accused of Exposing Russian Hacking appeared first on WIRED .
21h
Gizmodo
If We Want Robots to Be Good, We May Need to Destroy Their Self-Confidence GIF GIF Source: Boston Dynamics We’ve all worried about artificial intelligence reaching a point in which its cognitive ability is so far beyond ours that it turns against us. But what if we just turned the AI into a spineless weenie that longs for our approval? Researchers are suggesting that could be a great step towards improving the algorithms, even if they aren’t out to murder us. In a new p
21h
The Atlantic
The Latest on the London Bridge Attack Police have released the names of two out of three suspects in Saturday’s deadly terrorist attack on the London Bridge. One of the attackers, 27-year-old Khuram Butt, was a supporter of al-Muhajiroun, an Islamist group banned by the United Kindgom that operates under multiple aliases. Before October of last year, Butt worked as a trainee customer services assistant for the London Underground. Alt
22h
Gizmodo
Here's How Safari Will Keep Ads From Stalking You Around the Internet Photo: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Safari is getting an update that will prevent those annoying ads that follow you from one website to the next as you browse the internet, encouraging you to hurry up and buy that one item you looked at on Amazon two weeks ago. Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, announced the tweak at Apple’s developer conference today—and the promise
22h
Gizmodo
The Man Who Played Legion's Devil With the Yellow Eyes Lived Every Nerd's Dream Image: FX Quinton Boisclair basically has the dream origin story: he was working in a comic book store when someone making a comic book TV show realized he had the perfect body shape for being a creature. And not only did he get the job, he got to use his knowledge to help teach the makeup artists about his character. In a fascinating interview with Deadline , Legion ’s special effects makeup sup
22h
The Atlantic
Two Candidates Declare Victory in Mexico State Election An election in Mexico widely seen a test of political sentiment for next year’s presidential run-off will likely head to the court. The race for governor in the State of Mexico was largely a contest between the leftist National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) and the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which has held on to its seat for about 90 years. While a count of nearly all the vo
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
Apple Is Countering Amazon and Google with a Siri-Enabled SpeakerOddly, though, Apple is emphasizing HomePod’s musical skills rather than all-around smarts.
22h
Ars Technica
Checking out the new iPad Pros and their fancy 120Hz screens Andrew Cunningham I have seen the new iPad Pros, and they are about what you'd expect, not that that's a bad thing. Since the "hands on" process is basically the same as handling any other iPad, let's focus on answering questions. The new 12.9-inch iPad Pro is the easiest to describe, since its physical design is the same as the original model. It's still a 0.27-inch (6.9mm) thick, 1.49 pound (67
23h
Gizmodo
This Rare Blunt Umbrella Discount Code Will Blow You Away You could buy a $5 umbrella every time you get caught in a storm, only to watch it disintegrate before you get to safety, or you could invest in a Blunt umbrella for 20% off. Blunt umbrellas feature rounded safety tips to avoid poking anyone in the eye, include a special pocket for a Tile device tracker, and most importantly, can withstand winds of up to 72 mph ( standard model ), or 55 mph (for
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adults under-referred for mental health therapiesA large research study from the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter (UK) has revealed that older people are not being referred for mental health support nearly as frequently as their younger counterparts despite achieving better outcomes when they are referred.
23h
Ars Technica
Linguistic analysis of body-cam footage shows police bias against black people Enlarge (credit: Chris Yarzab ) The first major US study of body-cam footage concluded that police, at least in Oakland, California, showed more respect to white people than to black people. The study from Stanford University researchers analyzed the transcribed text from 981 traffic stops caught on body cams by 245 Oakland Police Department officers in 2014. White people pulled over were more li
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After modernizing the doorbell, Ring inventor Jamie Siminoff went to war against crimeIf booming sales, expanding offices and a parade of TV commercials hadn't put Jamie Siminoff on the radar of the home security industry, an early March incident certainly did.
23h
The Atlantic
The Feds Arrest an Alleged Leaker Federal prosecutors filed a criminal complaint against a government contractor in Georgia for sharing classified information with a news outlet on Monday, a rare move despite the surge in leaks from within the federal government since President Trump took office. The Justice Department said FBI investigations arrested Reality Leigh Winner, a 25-year-old federal contractor from Atlanta, Georgia, f
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Science | The Guardian
New therapy offers hope against incurable form of breast cancer Though research is ‘in its infancy’, drug olaparib could slow cancer growth for with inherited BRCA-related breast cancer, which tends to affect younger women A type of inherited and incurable breast cancer that tends to affect younger women could be targeted by a new therapy, researchers have found. Related: Painless cancer detection could become routine thanks to 'liquid biopsies' Continue read
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Live Science
Herbal Tea Linked to Man's Psychosis in Unusual CaseAfter drinking herbal tea made with St. Johns's wort for several months, a man in Italy developed a serious mental health condition.
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The Atlantic
Qatar: The Gulf's Problem Child The rupturing of diplomatic relations between Qatar and five regional states—Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and the internationally recognized Yemeni government-in-exile—has brought to a head a long-simmering dispute about the country’s distinctive approach to regional affairs. Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, last cut ties with Qatar in 2014, withdrawing their a
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Gizmodo
Apple Busted Misleading Customers in Sting Operation, Lawsuit Claims Photo: Getty Apple really doesn’t like its customers having the right to repair their own devices, and while Apple fights it out in the US, it’s being accused of sneakily trying to get around Australian law. The Guardian has obtained court documents that detail a sting operation by Australia’s consumer watchdog that showed Apple willfully misled customers about their rights. You might remember “E
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Gizmodo
Federal Contractor Charged With Leaking Classified Documents, Reportedly to The Intercept [Updated] A federal contractor in Georgia has been charged with passing classified information to a news outlet. Reality Leigh Winner, 25, was arrested on Saturday and appeared in federal court on Monday. In a statement , the Justice Department said that Winner had admitted to removing classified intelligence from her workspace in Augusta, Georgia, the soon-to-be home of the US Army Cyber Command near Fort
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Gizmodo
The Root Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly Is What Happens When Mediocrity and Whiteness Come Together | The Root Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly Is What Happens When Mediocrity and Whiteness Come Together | Deadspin Alex Honnold’s Ropeless Ascent Of El Capitan Is Nerve-Wracking And Historic | Jezebel Just Give It 7 Seconds | Fusion Do You Work For the MTA? Tell Us Your Story |
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Gizmodo
The Wonder Woman Movie Understands Why Superheroes Exist I saw Wonder Woman over the weekend and, like my co-workers and millions of other people, thrilled to the sight of a well-realized DC Comics superhero. To me, the best part of Patty Jenkins’ movie was its deep understanding of Diana of Themyscira’s symbolic importance. Wonder Woman manages the very neat trick of grafting an origin story onto a compelling journey of belief. From the earliest scene
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Terror and Twitter What We’re Following Saturday’s Attack: ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack in Britain, in which a van drove into a crowd of pedestrians on London Bridge, killing seven and wounding more than 20. In the aftermath, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called for stronger counterterrorism measures , and London Mayor Sadiq Khan encouraged citizens to stay calm—prompting an angry response on Twitte
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WIRED
Everything Apple Announced Today at WWDC The most powerful Mac yet, a long-awaited Siri speaker, and tons of new software upgrades across all of the Apple platforms. The post Everything Apple Announced Today at WWDC appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effect of treatment trials on survival of patients with cancer in US populationJoseph M. Unger, Ph.D., M.S., of the SWOG Statistical Center and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Wash., and coauthors examined how the National Cancer Institute-sponsored network of cooperative cancer research groups has benefited patients with cancer in the general population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Embargoed analysis: SWOG clinical trials added more than 3 million years of life for cancer patientsFor an investment of $125 for each year of life gained since the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded SWOG clinical trials program has added 3.34 million years of life for cancer patients in the United States because of successful therapies that were proved through its trials. That is the conclusion of an analysis, led by a faculty member at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, of outcom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Publicly funded cancer trials save more than 3 million years of lifePeople diagnosed with cancer gained 3.34 million years of life thanks to cancer clinical trials run by SWOG and supported with public funds, according to new study results to be presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world's largest clinical cancer research meeting. The dollar return on investment from federal funding, the study showed, was es
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Ars Technica
Leaked NSA report says Russians tried to hack state election officials Enlarge / Eric Trump, son of then-presidential nominee Donald Trump, looks at wife Lara Yunaska's voting booth. An NSA report indicates Russia may have attempted to plant malware on the computers of election officials in the days before voting. (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News ) A Top Secret NSA analyst's report published by The Intercept suggests that, in August 2016, the Russian General M
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
See How An Undeground Gas Pipeline Made Its Way Into This Sweet Big Rig Build #VegasRatRods | Mondays at 10/9c After owning it for over 25 years, Steve says goodbye to his dad’s '79 Peterbilt used to deliver steel and turns it into a killer hot rod for a truck-driving client. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/vegas-rat-rods More Rat Rods: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/vegas-rat-rods/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscrib
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Big slimy lips are the secret to this fish’s coral dietA new imaging study reveals how tubelip wrasses manage to munch on stinging corals.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Wrath at Khan Today in 5 Lines In a series of morning tweets , President Trump said the Justice Department should seek a “much tougher version” of his revised travel ban, and criticized London Mayor Sadiq Khan for his remarks in the aftermath of Saturday’s London attack. George Conway, the husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway who was recently considered for solicitor general, said Trump’s tweets “ce
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Science : NPR
Trump Administration Seeking Permits For Seismic Air Gun Surveys In Atlantic The proposal would allow five energy companies to incidentally harass ocean wildlife by using seismic air guns for oil and gas exploration, much to the chagrin of environmental groups. (Image credit: Wayne Parry/AP)
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Racial 'disparity' in police respectScientists use body camera footage to study how US police officers engage with people while on patrol.
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Live Science
The Science of Jet Lag: 5 Surprising FindingsNothing can throw off the start of a fun vacation faster than jet lag.
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NYT > Science
Asia’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Makes Tigers a Farm-to-Table MealThroughout the region, endangered species like tigers are raised for their meat and bones, often in plain sight.
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Gizmodo
Uh, Apple, Did You Think This Through? Image: Apple / Gizmodo The crowd cheered in California on Monday, when Apple announced HomePod , a new smart speaker armed with Siri, the company’s virtual assistant. Minutes later, an image of the product appeared on Apple’s website and, well, holy shit, it looks just like HAL 9000! Is Apple fucking with us? The resemblance is almost too uncanny. Of course, the new HomePod doesn’t normally look
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The Atlantic
How Apple Sees the Near Future Without once saying the words “artificial intelligence,” a stream of Apple executives described a vision of the near future in which Siri, the company’s AI avatar, stitches together the company’s many hardware products. And they introduced a new—and widely anticipated—entry into their lineup: a $349 cylindrical voice-controlled speaker they call HomePod . After a strangely dystopian video in whic
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The Atlantic
President Trump Checks His Executive Privilege After a mildly suspenseful week of speculation, the White House announced Monday that President Trump won’t invoke executive privilege in a bid to stop his former FBI director from testifying before Congress this week. “The president’s power to assert executive privilege is well established,” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in a statement. “However, in order to facilitate a swift and
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Live Science
Inexpensive Kit Offers Augmented Reality Alternative to High-End HeadsetsThe $30 Aryzon AR kit costs far less than many wearable headsets, yet adds a 3D experience to your smartphone, which has been limited to 2D games like Pokémon Go.
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The Atlantic
Taking Trump's Tweets Seriously After Donald Trump’s election, many Americans wondered whether he’d stop tweeting from his personal account as he’d pledged during the campaign. He didn’t . In fact, in the first 100 days of his presidency, Trump sent more than 500 tweets from his @realDonaldTrump handle. According to an analysis done by The Washington Post ’s Philip Bump, those 500 tweets contained 18 explicit references to the
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Gizmodo
Here's What a 500-Pound Knife Does to a Used Toyota GIF GIF Sources: MegaBots Inc What’s a team of giant robot designers supposed to do between Maker Faires and mecha battles? Build giant knives and smash shit with them, of course. The people behind Megabots have been leading the drive to make giant fighting robots a thing for a while now, with the big USA vs. Japan battle finally going down in August. In the meantime, the group is most likely run
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Gizmodo
The Coolest Stuff Apple Announced Today at WWDC 2017 Image: AP Apple just kicked off its annual developer conference with a customary jumbo keynote, where it announced the next major updates for iOS and macOS. The company also launched a ton of new hardware, including upgraded MacBooks and a brand new smart speaker powered by Siri. There’s plenty of news to get into, so let’s go ahead and dive right in. Here is everything Apple announced at WWDC to
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Gizmodo
Change Your Screen to Grayscale to Combat Phone Addiction Image by Lifehacker. Former Design Ethicist at Google and founder of the non-profit Time Well Spent Tristan Harris has been making the rounds lately, talking about how technology is engineered to be addictive and hijack our attention. He’s pretty persuasive, comparing the lure of your phone to the that of a slot machine. Most of the time, you check your phone and there’s nothing interesting—no no
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The Atlantic
North Carolina's General Assembly Districts Are Unconstitutional Gerrymanders, Too North Carolina Republicans haven’t had much luck in the U.S. Supreme Court recently. Just a few weeks after the nation’s highest court denied them a chance to appeal a lower court’s rejection of their 2013 voter-ID law, and after it also struck down two of its 2011 federal legislative districts as unconstitutional racial gerrymanders , the Court today affirmed a district court’s ruling that nine
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Savvy sports audiences care about team sponsorship dealsCompanies and sports team owners should never underestimate the communication impact of the sponsorship deals they make. Consumers and fans notice the nature of such deals, and how they view them can influence loyalty or fuel distaste, researchers say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Savvy sports audiences care about team sponsorship dealsCompanies and sports team owners should never underestimate the communication impact of the sponsorship deals they make. Consumers and fans notice the nature of such deals, and how they view them can influence loyalty or fuel distaste, researchers say.
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Gizmodo
Apple's New HomePod Looks Fine as Hell Photo: Apple It’s game-time! Apple just announced its long-awaited take on a smart speaker, completing the smart speaker triumvirate along with Google and Amazon. The gadget itself isn’t particularly remarkable, but it is an Apple gadget. That’s a big deal for a lot of people. The new Apple HomePod is a lot like its competitors: Amazon Echo and Google Home. You can activate it with a wake word—“H
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WIRED
The 9 Key New Features Coming to iOS 11 Here's the stuff we're looking forward to the most. The post The 9 Key New Features Coming to iOS 11 appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Apple’s HomePod Puts Siri in a Speaker The round, mesh device is seven inches tall, and Apple says it sounds amazing. The post Apple's HomePod Puts Siri in a Speaker appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
The Leftovers Ended With the Perfect Balance of Answered and Unanswered Questions Photo: Ben King/HBO As expected, The Leftovers series finale didn’t offer any concrete answers about the Sudden Departure, but it did examine the mystery from a surprising angle, leading to a poignant, even heartwarming conclusion for characters who’ve basically been in agony for three seasons. The Leftovers ’ second and third seasons were heavily focused on Kevin (Justin Theroux), whose ability
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why rocks flow slowly in Earth's middle mantleUsing an anvil made of diamond, researchers discover an secret of Earth's lower mantle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Micro-gene protects brain from developing epilepsyIncreased levels of a micro-RNA could have a protective effect that explains why identical stressors trigger seizures in some people but not in others.
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The Atlantic
Environmental Racism Is the New Jim Crow African Americans face disproportionate rates of lead poisoning, asthma, and environmental harm. Staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II argues that discrimination in public planning is to blame. “Pollution and the risk of disaster are assigned to black and brown communities through generations of discrimination and political neglect,” says Newkirk II. The environment is a system controlled and designed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HUD housing assistance linked to improved health care accessA study examining the impact of access to affordable housing on health showed that people receiving housing assistance were more likely to have medical insurance and less likely to have unmet medical need than other low-income people who were on a US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) wait list. Led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researcher Dr. Andrew Fenelon, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aspirin does little or nothing for hard arteries, University of Florida researchers findFor decades, aspirin has been widely used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems. Now, a team led by a University of Florida Health researcher has found that aspirin may provide little or no benefit for certain patients who have plaque buildup in their arteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Jupiter-like world so hot it stretches definition of 'planet'A newly discovered Jupiter-like world is so hot it's stretching the definition of the word 'planet.' In an article in this week's issue of Nature, an international research team describes a planet with some very unusual features. The article is titled 'A giant planet undergoing extreme ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adding vemurafenib doubles progression-free survival in BRAF metastatic colorectal cancerClinical trial results presented in an oral abstract session 3:00pm Monday, June 5 at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2017 shows promising results for the addition of vemurafenib (anti-BRAF) to treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan (anti-EGFR) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that have a BRAF V600E mutation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCSF studies ambulance diversion by race, health care for released prisoners in journal issueBlack heart attack patients suffered higher mortality rates than white patients when ambulances are diverted because hospital emergency rooms are too busy to receive new patients, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco. In a separate study led by a UCSF researcher, the investigators found that better coordination between correctional and community health care systems can improve overall
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New allocation system reduces racial/ethnic disparities in kidney transplantA new kidney allocation system implemented in 2014 by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) led to a narrowing of the disparities in national kidney transplant rates among whites, blacks and Hispanics on the transplant waitlist, according to a new analysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amenable death in Europe: Health care expenditure decreases mortality ratesThe June issue of Health Affairs includes an analysis of amenable mortality rates -- rates of deaths that are potentially preventable with available health care treatment options -- in 17 European countries, which found that higher health care expenditure was associated with lower amenable mortality and with smaller absolute inequalities in amenable mortality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hubble's tale of two exoplanets: Nature vs. nurtureIs it a case of nature versus nurture when it comes to two 'cousin' exoplanets? In a unique experiment, scientists used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study two 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets. Because these planets are virtually the same size and temperature, and orbit around nearly identical stars at the same distance, the team hypothesized that their atmospheres should be alike. What they found surp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Revolutionary new materials for troubled carbon times: Super filters the world can affordResearchers develop a material that will potentially revolutionize carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time to initiating cancer therapy is increasing, associated with worsening survivalAfter reviewing nearly 3.7 million patient records, researchers have shown that newly diagnosed cancer patients are having to wait longer to begin treatment, a delay that is associated with a substantially increased risk of death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children of separated parents not on speaking terms more likely to develop colds as adultsA team of psychologists wanted to better understand if specific aspects of the family environment following a separation better predicted children's long-term health outcomes. They found that adults whose parents separated but did not speak to each other during individuals' childhoods were three times as likely to develop a cold when intentionally exposed to a common cold virus than adults whose p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes drug prevents stiffening of heart muscle in obese mouse modelOverconsumption of a Western diet high in fats and refined sugars has contributed to a global increase in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Obese and diabetic premenopausal women are more at risk of developing heart disease -- even more than men of similar age and with similar health issues. A new study has found that the diabetes medication linagliptin can protect against stiffening of the left ventri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Battery-less pacemaker: Researchers test microwave-powered deviceA new battery-less pacemaker can be implanted directly into a patient's heart.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in six taking blood-thinning drugs may not be getting right doseAlmost 1 in 6 of the millions of Americans on the new blood-thinning medications for atrial fibrillation, a common heart condition characterized by an irregular and often rapid heart rate, may not be receiving the recommended dose, new research finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-of-its-kind test for HDL cholesterol function could transform the way healthcare providers predict your risk for heart diseaseA new test could improve diagnosis and treatment of heart disease by measuring how effectively a patient’s high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) cleans up arterial cholesterol, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's asteroid-hunting spacecraft a discovery machineNASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission has released its third year of survey data, with the spacecraft discovering 97 previously unknown celestial objects in the last year. Of those, 28 were near-Earth objects, 64 were main belt asteroids and five were comets.
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The Atlantic
America's Health-Inequality Problem The U.S. has one of the largest income-based health disparities in the world, according to a new paper out in the journal Health Affairs . Among the poorest third of Americans studied, 38.2 percent report being in “fair or poor” health, compared with 12.3 percent of the richest third. Only Chile and Portugal have a larger income-based gap in the health status of their citizens. Most of the 32 nat
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The Atlantic
A Sunny, Funny View of Old Age Carl Reiner, the 95-year-old comedian, writer, actor, and director, has a running gag about life as a nonagenarian. “Every morning … I pick up my newspaper, get the obituary section, and see if I’m listed,” he explains. “If I’m not, I have my breakfast.” He stages a version of this routine for the new documentary If You’re Not In the Obit, Eat Breakfast , airing Monday night on HBO, in which Rein
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover why rocks flow slowly in Earth's middle mantleFor decades, researchers have studied the interior of the Earth using seismic waves from earthquakes. Now a recent study, led by Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration Associate Professor Dan Shim, has re-created in the laboratory the conditions found deep in the Earth, and used this to discover an important property of the dominant mineral in Earth's mantle, a region lyi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence shows increased risk of ozone loss over the US in summerA new study out of Harvard University reveals that the protective stratospheric ozone layer above the central United States is vulnerable to erosion during the summer months from ozone-depleting chemical reactions, exposing people, livestock and crops to the harmful effects of UV radiation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers debut battery-less pacemakerA wireless, battery-less pacemaker that can be implanted directly into a patient's heart is being introduced by researchers from Rice University and their colleagues at the Texas Heart Institute (THI) at the IEEE's International Microwave Symposium (IMS) in Honolulu June 4-9.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police officers speak less respectfully to black residents than to white residents: studyThe first systematic analysis of police body camera footage shows that officers consistently use less respectful language with black community members than with white community members, according to new Stanford research.
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Gizmodo
Supreme Court to Rule on Warrantless Access to Cellphone Location Data Photo: Getty In its next term, the US Supreme Court will take up a landmark case concerning law enforcement’s ability to track cellphones without a warrant. As it stands, police in some states are able to acquire a person’s cellphone location history without demonstrating probable cause, and they do so tens of thousands of times each year. But due to the amount of private information contained in
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Gizmodo
Trump's Plan To Privatize Air Traffic Control Explained Photo: AP President Donald Trump announced a plan today to privatize the U.S. air traffic control system, saying it “will you get you where you need to go more quickly.” Sounds great. But—surprise—the issue’s not as cut and dried as the president would make it out to be. Here’s what’s going on. What Trump Wants To Do If you have a pulse and previously spent more than a few moments in an airport,
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Ars Technica
Cable TV “failing” as a business, cable industry lobbyist says Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | DonNichols ) The cable TV business is in trouble—in fact, it is "failing" as a business due to rising programming costs and consumers switching from traditional TV subscriptions to online video streaming, according to a cable lobbyist group. "As a business, it is failing," said Matthew Polka, CEO of the American Cable Association (ACA). "It is very, very difficult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU-led scientists discover why rocks flow slowly in Earth's middle mantleUsing an anvil made of diamond, ASU researchers discover an secret of Earth's lower mantle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble's tale of two exoplanets: Nature vs. nurtureIs it a case of nature versus nurture when it comes to two "cousin" exoplanets? In a unique experiment, scientists used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study two "hot Jupiter" exoplanets. Because these planets are virtually the same size and temperature, and orbit around nearly identical stars at the same distance, the team hypothesized that their atmospheres should be alike. What they found surp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Domes of frozen methane may be warning signs for new blow-outsSeveral methane domes, some 500m wide, have been mapped on the Arctic Ocean floor. They may be signs of soon-to-happen methane expulsions that have previously created massive craters in a near-by area.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Theresa May Wants to End “Safe Spaces” for Terrorists on the Internet. What Does That Even Mean?In the wake of the U.K.’s most recent terrorist attacks, its prime minister is talking tough on Internet regulation, but what she’s suggesting is impractical.
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Gizmodo
This $13 Kit Makes Your Headlights Look Brand New Sylvania Headlight Restoration Kit , $13 after 20% coupon Once, when I was young and naive, I paid a dealership like $75 to clean my foggy headlights. Little did I know, this Sylvania headlight restoration kit does the same job for tiny fraction of the price. Just note that the 20% discount won’t show up until checkout.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple unveils 'HomePod' speaker, first new product in yearsApple nodded to several up-and-coming technology trends, unveiling a new "smart" home speaker and device features touching on virtual reality, online privacy and a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Collateral damage from cosmic rays increases cancer risks for Mars astronautsThe cancer risk for a human mission to Mars has effectively doubled following a UNLV study predicting a dramatic increase in the disease for astronauts traveling to the red planet or on long-term missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetic field.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How one man's shoes help NASA communicate water clarity issuesWearing white sneakers, a cowboy hat and overalls, Bernie Fowler walks into Maryland's Patuxent River every June to see how deep he can go and still see the tops of his shoes. As a young man he could see his feet on the river bottom as he stood chest-deep to net blue crabs. Now in his nineties, he ventures into the river to assess the water clarity. Fowler has been collecting this data point for t
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Gizmodo
iOS 11: All the Cool New Features Coming to Your iPhone and iPad Can you believe Apple’s iOS is 11 iterations old already? It seems like just yesterday we were excited about the prospect of an app store, or the ability to select and copy text. At today’s WWDC keynote, Apple revealed a host of updates and upgrades to iOS, including many long requested features. You’ll have to wait until the Fall to upgrade your iPhone or iPad with the official final version of
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Inside Science
Clothes That Know How You’re Feeling Clothes That Know How You’re Feeling New health-monitoring textiles and devices may help newborns and firefighters. fabric sensors top image.jpg Smart textiles have electronic fibers woven into the fabric, creating sensors that seamlessly blend into clothes. Image credits: Stepan Gorgutsa. Technology Monday, June 5, 2017 - 14:45 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Stepan Gorgutsa ha
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Ars Technica
Video gaming’s voice actor strike is ending in slow, small drips A promotional video produced by SAG-AFTRA in support of the strike. The video game voice actors in the SAG-AFTRA union have been holding a solid line since they started striking last October , demanding limitations to vocally stressful work sessions and bonus payments for work on top-selling games. But as the strike extends into its eighth month, plenty of games are still getting made with unioni
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The Atlantic
A Brief History of Trump's Feud With Sadiq Khan If it seemed strange for the president of the United States to engage in a Twitter spat with the mayor of London—a city that on Saturday night experienced the U.K.’s third terrorist attack this year—the feud did at least have a historical context. In fact, President Trump and London Mayor Sadiq Khan have been bickering in public since about a year and a half ago. Their feud can be traced to Trump
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine reserves help mitigate against climate change, say scientistsHighly protected marine reserves can help mitigate against the impacts of climate change, a study by a team of international scientists has concluded.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly identified gene helps time spring flowering in vital grass cropsA gene that keeps grasses from entering their flowering cycle until the season is right has been found by researchers, a discovery that may help plant breeders and engineers get more from food and energy crops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrocatalyst nanostructures key to improved fuel cells, electrolyzersScientists' simulations have unraveled the mystery of a new electrocatalyst that may solve a significant problem associated with fuel cells and electrolyzers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased number of female engineers in managerial roles brings unintended consequencesIncreased female representation in the managerial ranks of engineering organizations may add another layer of sex segregation on top of the one it's intended to mitigate, says a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tactile sensor gives robots new capabilitiesEight years ago, researchers unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3-D map of its surface. Now, by mounting GelSight sensors on the grippers of robotic arms, two teams have given robots greater sensitivity and dexterity.
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Gizmodo
Sony Exec's Slam On Old Games Misses The Appeal Of The Classics Parasite Eve. (Original image: VGMuseum ) How much effort should today’s console makers put into keeping the classics in print and playable on modern hardware? There’s a lot of room for debate, but one PlayStation exec just weighed in with what has to be the Worst Possible Take. The Take isn’t just about backward compatibility, or about what Sony plans to do with its library of classics. It cuts
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Live Science
Climber Becomes 1st to 'Free Solo' Yosemite's Most Challenging PeakAlex Honnold, a 31-year-old climber from Sacramento, California, has summited one of Yosemite's most difficult rock faces without any ropes or safety gear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evidence shows increased risk of ozone loss over the United States in summerA new study out of Harvard University reveals that the protective stratospheric ozone layer above the central United States is vulnerable to erosion during the summer months from ozone-depleting chemical reactions, exposing people, livestock and crops to the harmful effects of UV radiation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble's tale of 2 exoplanets: Nature vs. nurtureIs it a case of nature versus nurture when it comes to two 'cousin' exoplanets? In a unique experiment, scientists used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study two 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets. Because these planets are virtually the same size and temperature, and orbit around nearly identical stars at the same distance, the team hypothesized that their atmospheres should be alike. What they found surp
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WIRED
Apple’s Gorgeous New 10.5 Inch iPad Pro Is All Screen, no Bezel The tech industry is waging a war on bezels, and the iPad Pro is the first Apple product to benefit. The post Apple's Gorgeous New 10.5 Inch iPad Pro Is All Screen, no Bezel appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
Apple's New iPad Pro Takes a Stride Towards Killing Bezels Good The new 10.5-inch iPad Pro on the left and the smaller 9.7-inch iPad Pro on the right. (Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo) If you’re curious about what the 10th Anniversary iPhone might look like this fall, then there might be some hints in the new iPad Pro. The most enduring iPhone rumors suggest that Apple is coming for the bezel, and the new iPad might just be a precursor to that massacre. Apple’s kil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher gut bacteria diversity tied to slower metastatic melanoma progressionThe blend of bacteria in the digestive tract of metastatic melanoma patients is associated with disease progression or delay in patients treated with immunotherapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small group of cells within a plant embryo operate in similar way to the human brainA new study has revealed a group of cells that function as a ‘brain’ for plant embryos capable of assessing environmental conditions and dictating when seeds will germinate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
History of ancient geometry diagramsA Classics student is trying to reconstruct the history of geometrical and mathematical diagrams by examining copies and translations of Elements, the ancient work of Greek mathematician Euclid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing the invisible with a graphene-CMOS integrated deviceResearchers integrate graphene and quantum dots with CMOS technology to create an array of photodetectors, producing a high resolution image sensor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two-part system turns stem cells into whatever you wantWhether using embryonic or adult stem cells, coercing these master cells to convert to the desired target cell and reproduce flawlessly is difficult. Now an international team of researchers has a two-part system that can convert the cells to the targets and then remove the remnants of that conversion, leaving only the desired DNA behind to duplicate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?In spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. The bloom consisted of diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, but researchers couldn't tell why these algae had become so toxic. A new article shows that, at least in Monterey Bay, this bloom became particularly toxic because of an unusually low ratio of silicate to nitrate in the waters of th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How one man's shoes help NASA communicate water clarity issuesScientists make precise measurements of water clarity from satellite data, but the calculations can be hard to explain to the public. Now NASA is adopting a new way -- involving white sneakers -- to communicate water clarity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Collateral damage from cosmic rays increases cancer risks for Mars astronautsThe cancer risk for a human mission to Mars has effectively doubled following a study predicting a dramatic increase in the disease for astronauts traveling to the red planet or on long-term missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetic field. The new predictive model shows radiation from cosmic rays extends from damaged to otherwise healthy 'bystander' cells.
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The Atlantic
George Conway Cautions Trump About His Travel Ban Americans are used to hearing Kellyanne Conway, a senior White House official and frequent media surrogate for the Trump White House, publicly defend the president’s agenda. On Monday, however, another Conway weighed in on his policies, this time to offer criticism and caution. George Conway, Kellyanne’s husband and a Manhattan-based lawyer, dusted off his long-dormant Twitter account and sent a
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Popular Science
‘FDA approved’ medical devices don’t actually have to do what they promise Health Bracelets can’t protect you from electromagnetic radiation—and you don’t need protection anyway. 'FDA approval' has a certain glow of authority to it—but it's not always well-founded. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Here Are All of the New Upgrades to Siri Image: Apple If you’re someone who’s constantly talking to Siri on your phone, you might be shocked by some of the big changes coming to the digital assistant. Today at Apple’s annual developer conference, the company announced a bunch of upgrades and tweaks that will be coming to Siri later this year with the launch of iOS 11. There’s an assortment of big changes being made to the artificially i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Texas team debuts battery-less pacemakerA battery-less pacemaker that can be implanted directly into a patient's heart is being introduced by Rice University and Texas Heart Institute researchers at the IEEE's International Microwave Symposium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes drug prevents stiffening of heart muscle in obese mouse modelOverconsumption of a Western diet high in fats and refined sugars has contributed to a global increase in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Obese and diabetic premenopausal women are more at risk of developing heart disease -- even more than men of similar age and with similar health issues. A study by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that the diabetes medication linag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Police officers speak less respectfully to black residents than to white residentsProfessors Jennifer Eberhardt and Dan Jurafsky along with other Stanford researchers detected racial disparities in police officers' speech after analyzing hundreds of hours of body camera footage from Oakland Police.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Domes of frozen methane may be warning signs for new blow-outsSeveral methane domes, some 500m wide, have been mapped on the Arctic Ocean floor. They may be signs of soon-to-happen methane expulsions that have previously created massive craters in a near-by area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find micro-gene that protects the brain from developing epilepsyIncreased levels of a micro-RNA could have a protective effect that explains why identical stressors trigger seizures in some people but not in others.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International science team: Marine reserves can help mitigate climate changeAn international team of scientists has concluded that 'highly protected' marine reserves can help mitigate the effects of climate change and suggests that these areas be expanded and better managed throughout the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly identified gene helps time spring flowering in vital grass cropsResearchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a gene that keeps grasses from entering their flowering cycle until the season is right, a discovery that may help plant breeders and engineers get more from food and energy crops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine reserves help mitigate against climate change, say scientistsHighly protected marine reserves can help mitigate against the impacts of climate change, a study by a team of international scientists has concluded.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic cross-talk key to cell balanceIn a study published in the June 5, 2017, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Stowers scientists Bony De Kumar, Ph.D., and Robb Krumlauf, Ph.D., provide evidence of direct cross-regulatory feedback, or cross-talk, between Nanog and Hox genes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover plant 'brain' controlling seed developmentA new study by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a group of cells that function as a 'brain' for plant embryos, capable of assessing environmental conditions and dictating when seeds will germinate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children of separated parents not on speaking terms more likely to develop colds as adultsA team led by Carnegie Mellon University psychologists wanted to better understand if specific aspects of the family environment following a separation better predicted children's long-term health outcomes. They found that adults whose parents separated but did not speak to each other during individuals' childhoods were three times as likely to develop a cold when intentionally exposed to a common
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Ars Technica
Homepod is Apple’s first “breakthrough home speaker,” coming December for $349 Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) SAN JOSE, Calif.—Today at WWDC, we finally got a look at Apple's rumored smart home speaker, which has home-assistant features buried beneath a music-first sales pitch. "We want to reinvent home music," Tim Cook told the Monday WWDC keynote crowd before Apple's Phil Schiller revealed and named the new Apple Homepod. The product will cost $349 and launch in cert
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is cirrhosis associated with increased risk of stroke?Cirrhosis was associated with increased risk of stroke, especially hemorrhagic, in a study that included a representative sample of more than 1.6 million Medicare beneficiaries, according to an article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rate of mastectomies decreases with adoption of breast tumor margin guidelines, study findsIn a dramatic shift since the publication of margin guidelines for breast cancer surgery, lumpectomy rates have substantially increased and more-aggressive surgical options have been used less often, according to research findings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Splitting carbon dioxide using low-cost catalyst materialsA promising avenue for the future of clean energy is to store it in the form of carbon-based fuels produced from renewable sources, effectively enabling the clean use of liquid fuels such as gasoline. A first step is the electrolysis of carbon dioxide into oxygen and carbon monoxide. But current CO-forming catalysts are either not selective enough or too expensive to be industrially viable. Now sc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adding a second HER2 blocker may lower chance of invasive breast cancer for some womenA phase III clinical trial of 4,805 women with HER2-positive breast cancer suggests adding a second HER2 targeted medicine, pertuzumab (Perjeta), to standard of care trastuzumab (Herceptin) after surgery may help, although the benefit is modest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two-part system turns stem cells into whatever you wantWhether using embryonic or adult stem cells, coercing these master cells to convert to the desired target cell and reproduce flawlessly is difficult. Now an international team of researchers has a two-part system that can convert the cells to the targets and then remove the remnants of that conversion, leaving only the desired DNA behind to duplicate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increased number of female engineers in managerial roles brings unintended consequencesResearch from a University of Illinois expert who studies identity and meaning in occupations and organizations says a purposeful increase of female representation in the managerial ranks of the male-dominated profession of engineering may foster some unintended consequences, and may even add another layer of sex segregation on top of the one it's meant to mitigate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?In late spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. The bloom affected wildlife, including anchovies, sea birds, and sea lions, and led to the closure of commercial fisheries from California to Washington. Scientists quickly learned that the bloom consisted of diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, but they couldn't tell why these algae ha
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NYT > Science
A Dilemma for Diabetes Patients: How Low to Push Blood Sugar, and How to Do It?Some medications lower blood sugar yet increase the risk of heart attacks or strokes. Others have no effect. But researchers agree: Far too little is known.
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The Atlantic
‘If We Employ Somebody Who Wants to Leave, and Can’t ...’ In our ongoing series of responses to “My Family’s Slave,” we’ve heard from a number of readers who saw aspects of their own lives in Eudocia “Lola” Pulido’s situation, as well as some who recognized her story in arrangements made by their own families . Another reader, Dina, affirms: The kind of “slavery” the author narrated is not news to me. Even nowadays, if you are poor here in the Philippin
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Popular Science
Awe-inspiring photos of the Earth from space in honor of World Environment Day Environment Our swiftly tilting planet A gorgeous collection of pictures of the Earth and quotes from Astronauts on why the planet matters. Read on.
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Ars Technica
iOS 11 drops the iPhone 5 and 5C and the fourth-gen iPad Enlarge / The iPhone 5 running iOS 10. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) SAN JOSE, Calif.—When Apple releases the next version of iOS in the fall, it’s going to leave a handful of older iDevices behind. This year, two phones and one tablet are getting the axe: 2012’s iPhone 5 and fourth-generation iPad, and 2013’s iPhone 5C. These iPhones and iPads are definitely slower than their newer counterparts, b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate dealLed by former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg, nearly 1,000 business and government leaders declared Monday their intent to honor the Paris climate accord, days after US President Donald Trump announced a US exit from the 190-plus nation pact.
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Gizmodo
Apple Is Getting Serious About AR Way Sooner Than We Were Expecting GIF Apple is getting serious about augmented reality, the cool opposite end of the mixed reality spectrum from virtual reality. It’s doing it, at least in the carefully controlled on-stage demo, with really really good software-based AR that will, according to Apple, make its AR Kit the largest AR platform in the world. Apple isn’t the first phone company to invest in AR. Last summer you all play
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Gizmodo
Everything You've Ever Wanted to Know About Sex in Space Sex in microgravity, lol. (Image: SyFy) People have been boning on Earth since the dawn of time, literally everywhere they can. Folks bone on beaches, in airplanes, and even volcanoes —you name it, someone’s probably gotten off there. The only place humans have ( probably ) never banged in is space, which, to some, makes it the final frontier of sexual conquest. Microgravity sexing is an idea tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine reserves help mitigate against climate change, say scientistsAn international team of scientists has concluded that "highly protected" marine reserves can help mitigate the effects of climate change and suggests that these areas be expanded and better managed throughout the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover plant 'brain' controlling seed developmentA new study by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a group of cells that function as a 'brain' for plant embryos, capable of assessing environmental conditions and dictating when seeds will germinate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly identified gene helps time spring flowering in vital grass cropsWinter is no time to flower, which is why so many plants have evolved the ability to wait for the snow to melt before investing precious resources in blooms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic cross-talk key to cell balanceCompeting regulatory genes "talk" to each other to maintain balance of cell state, according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black, white men view impacts of prostate cancer treatment differently, study findsUNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers uncovered differences in the way black and white men rated prostate cancer treatment-related factors like recovery time or cost.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Collateral damage from cosmic rays increases cancer risks for Mars astronautsThe cancer risk for a human mission to Mars has effectively doubled following a UNLV study predicting a dramatic increase in the disease for astronauts traveling to the red planet or on long-term missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetic field. New predictive model, published in May issue of Scientific Reports shows radiation from cosmic rays extends from damaged to otherwise healthy 'by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How one man's shoes help NASA communicate water clarity issuesScientists make precise measurements of water clarity from satellite data, but the calculations can be hard to explain to the public. Now NASA is adopting a new way -- involving white sneakers -- to communicate water clarity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tactile sensor gives robots new capabilitiesEight years ago, Ted Adelson's research group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3-D map of its surface. Now, by mounting GelSight sensors on the grippers of robotic arms, two MIT teams have given robots greater sensitivity and dexterit
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?In spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. The bloom consisted of diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, but researchers couldn't tell why these algae had become so toxic. A new paper in Geophysical Research Letters shows that, at least in Monterey Bay, this bloom became particularly toxic because of an unusually low ratio of silicate
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WIRED
The Beloved Monument Valley Returns With an Amazing Sequel The sequel to the popular iOS game is even deeper and smarter than the original. The post The Beloved Monument Valley Returns With an Amazing Sequel appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The New iMac Pro Is Apple’s Most Bonkers Computer Ever The new iMac Pro is a ridiculously powerful, 5K, space gray all-in-one. The post The New iMac Pro Is Apple's Most Bonkers Computer Ever appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
American Nazis in the 1930s—The German American Bund In the years before the outbreak of World War II, people of German ancestry living abroad were encouraged to form citizens groups to both extol “German virtues,” around the world, and to lobby for causes helpful to Nazi Party goals. In the United States, the Amerikadeutscher Volksbund, or German American Bund, was formed in 1936 as “an organization of patriotic Americans of German stock,” operati
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Ars Technica
Apple introduces a redesigned 10.5-inch iPad Pro starting at $649.99 Enlarge / The ecosystem keeps growing. SAN JOSE, Calif.—Apple's WWDC isn't usually about hardware, but the company used its keynote today to introduce a fairly major new product: a fully redesigned iPad Pro, designed to replace the current 9.7-inch tablet that debuted back in March of 2016. The new tablet's defining feature is its new slim-bezeled design, which lets Apple fit a 10.5-inch screen i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased number of female engineers in managerial roles brings unintended consequencesIncreased female representation in the managerial ranks of engineering organizations may add another layer of sex segregation on top of the one it's intended to mitigate, says a new paper from U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electrocatalyst nanostructures key to improved fuel cells, electrolyzersPurdue University scientists' simulations have unraveled the mystery of a new electrocatalyst that may solve a significant problem associated with fuel cells and electrolyzers.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two-part system turns stem cells into whatever you wantWhether using embryonic or adult stem cells, coercing these master cells to convert to the desired target cell and reproduce flawlessly is difficult. Now an international team of researchers has a two-part system that can convert the cells to the targets and then remove the remnants of that conversion, leaving only the desired DNA behind to duplicate.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing the invisible with a graphene-CMOS integrated deviceFlagship researchers integrate graphene and quantum dots with CMOS technology to create an array of photodetectors, producing a high resolution image sensor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time to initiating cancer therapy is increasing, associated with worsening survivalAfter reviewing nearly 3.7 million patient records, Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown that newly diagnosed cancer patients are having to wait longer to begin treatment, a delay that is associated with a substantially increased risk of death.
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Live Science
Snowball 'Tumbleweeds' Blow Across AntarcticaAntarctica's "tumbleweeds" are wind-made snowballs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anticipation helps pathological gamblers hold out for larger-but-later rewardsTriggering pathological gamblers to envision a future personal experience reduces their preference for an immediate reward over a larger, delayed award, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeted therapies show initial effectiveness in subset of papillary thyroid cancerTwo immunotherapy drugs currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of melanoma also show promise for treating a rare but aggressive form of papillary thyroid cancer, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White noise after loud noise prevents hearing deficits in miceMild hearing loss from exposure to less than one hour of loud noise leads to a reorganization of circuits in a key midbrain structure of the auditory system in mice, finds new research. However, exposure to moderate white noise for seven days immediately following loud noise prevented the reorganization of these circuits and related hearing deficits in some mice.
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Futurity.org
‘Deep learning’ goes faster with organized data Researchers have found that a technique for speedy data lookup, called hashing, can dramatically reduce the amount of computation required for deep learning, a demanding form of machine learning. “This applies to any deep-learning architecture, and the technique scales sublinearly, which means that the larger the deep neural network to which this is applied, the more the savings in computations t
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Gizmodo
MacOS High Sierra: The New Features Coming to Your Computer Apple announced the brand new update to macOS (version 10.13), its desktop operating system today. Here are some of the exciting new features hitting Macs later this year. Safari is getting smarter and faster One of the most noticeable updates will undoubtedly be the performance upgrades made to Apple’s web browser Safari. Apple proudly showed off some efficiency and speed upgrades to the browser
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could acidifying oceans slow down coral disease?Black band disease is less deadly to mountainous star coral (Orbicella faveolata) as water acidified, or decreased in pH, a new study has demonstrated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two interventions help improve weight management in children with overweight or obesityTwo interventions that link clinical care with community resources helped improve key health measures in children with overweight or obesity at the outset of the study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft's weapon in high-stakes cloud-computing battle with Amazon? FreebiesDefinedCrowd, a Seattle software startup, had a choice to make when it was developing its first product last year: build on the cloud-computing foundation offered by the dominant Amazon, or Microsoft's upstart competitor?
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Ars Technica
iOS 11 will bring big updates to Siri, iMessages, Apple Pay, and more Enlarge SAN JOSE, Calif.—Apple announced iOS 11 at its annual developers conference today, revealing details on what changes will come to your iPhone or iPad in the near future. Some of the updates include a new app drawer for finding iMessage apps and stickers, new integrations for Apple Pay, a Siri translation beta, drag-and-drop for iPad, and more. iMessages Apple's Craig Federighi dove into t
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Live Science
'Twilight Zone' Horror Story: Lionfish Prey on Unknown Fish SpeciesFish unknown to science are being scarfed down by an invasive species.
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Live Science
Photos: Lionfish Invade the 'Twilight Zone'Video reveals the invasive lionfish has reached the ocean's twilight zone. There lionfish are threatening local fish species, including ones that science has yet to discover.
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Gizmodo
Apple Refreshes the Entire MacBook Lineup, and I'm Pissed Apple’s big developer conference, WWDC, is usually not the place for hardware updates, but as Tim Cook said at the beginning of WWDC 2017, “This is the biggest WWDC ever.” To that end Apple announced upgrades to nearly every single product in its computer line up, and thoroughly fucked over every single person who bought a MacBook Pro back in November. Things started off nicely enough. Apple anno
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Gizmodo
iMac Pro Is Apple's New Super-Powered Workhorse In addition to updated iMacs, MacBooks, and MacBook Pros , today at Apple’s WWDC conference, the company unveiled its new high-end workstation called the iMac Pro, featuring the same all-in-one design, but packed with enough power to make this the most powerful Mac computer to date. Well, according to Apple anyway. The most notable feature of the new iMac Pro is an 8-core Xeon processor which wil
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The Atlantic
How the Six-Day War Transformed Religion Fifty years ago this week, the Six-Day War dramatically altered geographic borders and political fortunes in the Middle East. For Israelis, the stunning 1967 victory meant an expanded country that suddenly included East Jerusalem, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights, and the Sinai Peninsula; for Palestinians, it meant occupation and more displacement; for surrounding Arab countries,
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The Atlantic
Bill Cosby's Day in Court Bill Cosby was in a Pittsburgh court Monday for the first day of his trial on charges of sexually assaulting a woman in 2004—the only criminal case to emerge from the dozens of similar allegations against the legendary comedian and actor. The Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, district attorney has charged Cosby with three counts of aggravated indecent sexual assault. If convicted, Cosby, 79, who i
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Ars Technica
Apple gives the MacBook and MacBook Pros a Kaby Lake refresh Enlarge / The one-ported MacBook. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) SAN JOSE, Calif.—Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference is usually all about software, but every once in a while it brings some hardware along with it, too. Today, Apple provided a minor but wide-ranging refresh to its modern MacBooks and MacBook Pros by adding new processors from Intel and making a handful of other tweaks. The new pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Attacking metastatic tumors in the brainRakesh Jain, Ph.D., Director of the Edwin L. Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and supported by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, has discovered a novel mechanism behind the resistance to HER2- or PI3K-targeted therapies, and a treatment strategy that may overcome treatment resistance. This significant finding was reported in the latest issue of t
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Women With Aggressive Breast Cancer Are Living LongerBetter treatment and aggressive imaging are credited with extending the lives of women with metastatic disease.
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Ars Technica
SteamVR is coming to Mac—and Apple says it will actually work Enlarge / First-ever HTC Vive demo from Apple on a Mac system. (credit: Apple) Apple's Monday WWDC keynote included a quick-fire presentation about gaming content on Macs—but the biggie was VR, along with a path for underpowered Mac systems to potentially get up to speed to running it. Senior Vice President Craig Federighi confirmed that "Valve is bringing SteamVR to Mac." Soon after, Industrial
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Ars Technica
New Kaby Lake iMacs arrive from Apple Enlarge At its WWDC keynote today, Apple announced that it is updating the iMac line with Intel's Kaby Lake processors and will provide upgrades to displays, memory, storage, and I/O ports. The new displays are 43 percent brighter than previous ones, with 500 nits and 10-bit dithering and the capability to reproduce 1 billion colors. New iMacs will be upgradeable to 64GB of RAM on 27-inch configu
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Gizmodo
AAA Raises Insurance Rates On Tesla Vehicles Because Repairs Are So Costly National insurer AAA said it’s raising rates for Tesla Model S and X vehicles, due to a high frequency of claims and costly repairs, according to Automotive News . Tesla decried the move in near Trumpian-fashion as being based on an analysis that’s “not reflective of reality.” AAA based its analysis off data from the Highway Loss Data Institute, Automotive News reports, and said premiums for some
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Gizmodo
The Tiniest Dual-Port Travel Charger Is Just $6 on Amazon Aukey USB Wall Charger , $6 with code AUKEYWC1 You know the little charging brick that came with your phone? Throw it out, and spend $6 on this replacement from Aukey (with code AUKEYWC1). It’s only slightly larger than Apple’s standard iPhone charger, but it includes two ports, folding prongs, and 2.4A of current (shared between the ports) to charge your devices faster.
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Popular Science
Grill gear to make your barbecue the best on the block Gadgets Patty stuffers, meat claws, grill robots, and more. It's time to upgrade your barbecue. Patty stuffers, meat claws, grill robots, and more. Read on.
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Ars Technica
macOS is now fully baked with macOS High Sierra Enlarge The next version of macOS will be named High Sierra, with Apple promising it to be a refined, polished update to Sierra. Apple's APFS file system will be the default in the new version, bringing its superior performance and robustness to the desktop Mac, months after Apple made the switch on the iPhone. Safari is adding a new intelligent tracking feature that will block trackers so that s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dying stars give newborn black holes a swift kick, study showsInvestigators reanalyzed the merging black holes detected by LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) on Dec. 26, 2016, and drew new insights about what happens when massive stars die and transform into black holes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A stream of superfluid lightScientists have known for centuries that light is composed of waves. The fact that light can also behave as a liquid, rippling and spiraling around obstacles like the current of a river, is a much more recent finding that is still a subject of active research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in five surgical weight-loss patients take prescription opioids seven years after surgeryWhile the proportion of adults with severe obesity using prescription opioids initially declines in the months after bariatric surgery, it increases within a matter of years, eventually surpassing pre-surgery rates of patients using the potentially addictive pain medications, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Generous health insurance plans encourage overtreatment, but may not improve healthOffering comprehensive health insurance plans with low deductibles and co-pay in exchange for higher annual premiums seems like a good value for the risk averse, and a profitable product for insurance companies. But according to a study, such plans can encourage individuals with chronic conditions to turn to needlessly expensive treatments that have little impact on their health outcomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bio-based p-xylene oxidation into terephthalic acid by engineered E. coliResearchers have established an efficient biocatalytic system to produce terephthalic acid (TPA) from p-xylene (pX). It will allow this industrially important bulk chemical to be made available in a more environmentally-friendly manner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Injectable solution may provide weeks of glucose controlBiomedical engineers have created a biopolymer that can provide weeks of glucose control with a single injection. The new tool has the potential to replace daily or weekly insulin shots with bi-weekly or once-a-month treatments of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) for type 2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decomposing leaves are a surprising source of greenhouse gasesScientists have pinpointed a new source of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that's more potent than carbon dioxide. The culprit? Tiny bits of decomposing leaves in soil.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is fertility preservation right for children with differences of sex development?Children with differences of sex development (DSD) are born with reproductive organs that are not typically male or female. They may face infertility from abnormal development of testes or ovaries, and in some patients these organs are surgically removed to prevent an increased risk of germ cell cancer. With advancing techniques, however, children with DSD may be able to preserve their fertility f
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Scientific American Content: Global
Feeling Hot, Hot, Hot: Astronomers Discover a Giant Planet Hotter Than Most StarsThe latest discovery is the fieriest one yet, and researchers can’t wait to investigate -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Anything that can run macOS Sierra can also run macOS High Sierra Enlarge / One of the 2016 MacBook Pros. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) SAN JOSE, Calif.—Apple has some good news for those of you who still use older Macs: the new release of macOS, macOS High Sierra, will run on any Mac hardware that currently runs Sierra. The full support list is as follows: MacBook (late 2009 and later) iMac (late 2009 and later) MacBook Air (2010 and later) MacBook Pro (2010 and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AACR pubs 1st set of screening recs from childhood cancer predisposition workshopThe American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has published its first set of consensus screening recommendations for children with common cancer predisposition syndromes in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the AACR. These recommendations emerged from the Childhood Cancer Predisposition Workshop held by the AACR Pediatric Cancer Working Group in October 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decomposing leaves are surprising source of greenhouse gasesScientists have pinpointed a new source of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that's more potent than carbon dioxide. The culprit? Tiny bits of decomposing leaves in soil. The new discovery, led by Michigan State University (MSU) researchers and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is featured in the current issue of the journal Nature Geoscience.
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Gizmodo
Amazon Prime Video Is Coming to Apple TV After Years of Delay After years of delay, Amazon and Apple have finally reached an agreement to bring the Amazon Prime video app to Apple TV set-top-boxes everywhere. Apple CEO Tim Cook made the announcement today at the company’s annual developer conference WWDC 2017 . The app will give Amazon Prime subscribers the ability to watch Prime video content like TV shows and movies while using an Apple TV. For the last f
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Popular Science
A common sunscreen could help make better solar panels From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Zinc oxide does it all. Many Americans know zinc oxide as the key ingredient sunscreen. But it’s also a semiconductor that can be used in new types of solar cells, optical gas sensors and…
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Popular Science
Highlights: Apple's 2017 WWDC Keynote Technology All the new stuff Tim Cook and the gang are cooking up. A running tally of all the best parts from Apple's annual Developer's Conference.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrocatalyst nanostructures key to improved fuel cells, electrolyzersPurdue University scientists' simulations have unraveled the mystery of a new electrocatalyst that may solve a significant problem associated with fuel cells and electrolyzers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Did amount of sodium households acquire in packaged food, beverages decrease?Excessive dietary sodium is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and the Institute of Medicine has said it is essential to reduce sodium in packaged foods. Yet, not much is known about whether sodium in packaged foods has changed over the past 15 years, report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research in bloodless worms reveals how organs communicate status of life-giving hemeFor the first time a signaling system by which organs within an animal can communicate their need for heme, an essential iron-containing ring required for oxygen transport and many other vital biological processes, has been identified by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mom and baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habitsRoom sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices.
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Ars Technica
Apple TV will receive Amazon Prime Video “later this year” Enlarge / Tim Cook confirms. (credit: Apple) Apple CEO Tim Cook began his Monday WWDC keynote by confirming a major app finally coming to Apple's TV line: Amazon Prime Video. "Amazon is coming to the TV app in all Apple TVs later this year with Amazon Prime Video," Cook told the WWDC keynote crowd. The announcement confirms rumors that began circulating in May about Amazon's video-streaming servi
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The Atlantic
Ariana Grande Returns to Manchester, With Allies In a white-feathered overcoat before an audience of about 50,000 on Sunday, Katy Perry asked attendees of the One Love Manchester concert to reach out and touch the person next to them. “It’s not easy to always choose love, is it? Especially in moments like these, right?” she said . “It can be the most difficult thing to do. But love conquers fear and love conquers hate. And this love that you ch
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The Atlantic
Acclimating to a New Country When Your Home Is a War Zone Aya Aljamili grew up in Aleppo, Syria. After participating in the first student protests at the University of Aleppo in 2011, she worked on Syrian aid for an international-development organization in Turkey. Last August, she moved to Washington, D.C., to pursue a master’s in international development management at American University. Aljamili spent most of the fall semester checking Facebook for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeted therapies show initial effectiveness in subset of papillary thyroid cancerTwo immunotherapy drugs currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of melanoma also show promise for treating a rare but aggressive form of papillary thyroid cancer, according to new research led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anticipation helps pathological gamblers hold out for larger-but-later rewardsTriggering pathological gamblers to envision a future personal experience reduces their preference for an immediate reward over a larger, delayed award, according to a study published in eNeuro.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White noise after loud noise prevents hearing deficits in miceMild hearing loss from exposure to less than one hour of loud noise leads to a reorganization of circuits in a key midbrain structure of the auditory system in mice, finds new research published in The Journal of Neuroscience. However, exposure to moderate white noise for seven days immediately following loud noise prevented the reorganization of these circuits and related hearing deficits in some
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New Scientist - News
Robots will be more useful if they are made to lack confidenceMaking computers less certain of their abilities might stop them filling Facebook with fake news and make machines safer to be around
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New Scientist - News
SpaceX launches first reused Dragon capsule full of researchThe recycled capsule contained the first Chinese experiment to join the US side of the International Space Station, plus neutron star observation equipment
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Ars Technica
Apple introduces watchOS 4 at WWDC with new Siri-powered watch face Enlarge SAN JOSE—Apple announced the next iteration of its wearable software at its annual developers conference today: watchOS 4. One of the new features will be a Siri-powered watch face with "proactive" information that changes using Siri's intelligence. It will also include updates to the Activity and Workout apps, new integrations for the Music app, as well as minor updates to the smartwatch
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Live Science
Preschoolers Happier When They Share Because They Want ToKids who share their stuff because they want to feel differently about sharing than kids who share because they have to.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Tweets May Have Sunk His Travel Ban It is more dangerous to be Donald Trump’s friend than his enemy. Monday, acting solicitor general Jeffrey B. Wall found this out the hard way, as he joined White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein under the Trump bus. On Thursday of last week, Wall had filed a petition for certiorari in International Refugee Assistance Program v. Trump . In that case, a d
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Popular Science
This distant planet is hotter than many stars Space So hot right now. A planet hotter than a lot of stars is hurtling around its sun, leaving a glowing trail of gas in its wake like a superheated comet. Read on.
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New on MIT Technology Review
We Need to Talk About the Power of AI to Manipulate HumansOur tendency to become emotionally attached to chatbots could be exploited by companies seeking a profit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The pros and cons of privatizing air traffic controlThe U.S. air traffic control system, the world's largest and most complex, is in the midst of an era of unsurpassed safety. There has not been a fatal crash of a domestic airliner in the U.S. in eight years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
App uses smartphone compass to stop voice hackingEngineers are creating an app to stop voice hacking. The app uses existing smartphone components, including the magnetometer for the phone's compass, to detect when someone's voice is being broadcast on a speaker.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metal-ion catalysts and hydrogen peroxide could green up plastics productionResearchers are contributing to the development of more environmentally friendly catalysts for the production of plastic and resin precursors that are often derived from fossil fuels. The key to their technique comes from recognizing the unique physical and chemical properties of certain metals and how they react with hydrogen peroxide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overall geriatric health during androgen deprivation therapy evaluatedAndrogen drives many prostate cancers. But the body uses androgen for muscle growth and maintenance, among other functions. An ongoing study evaluates the effects of androgen deprivation therapy not just on patients' physical function but on global geriatric health, including skills of daily living. Because the study is longitudinal, following individual patients from before treatment through the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells change type to help or hinder immunityIn news that may bring hope to asthma sufferers, scientists discover a mechanism that provides a possible new target for allergy treatments. By observing the allergic response in mice with asthma, scientists at the Francis Crick Institute found that white blood cells that normally reduce the symptoms of asthma convert into cells that make allergies worse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika virus successfully diagnosed from semenResearch shows a reliable clinical assay that can detect the Zika virus from semen samples.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Development of a novel vaccine for ZikaResearchers have developed a new Zika virus vaccine that gives 100 percent protection in mice. The vaccine is the first to be based on the Zika virus NS1 protein, and the first to show single-dose protection against Zika in an immunocompetent lethal mouse challenge model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
With specialized lips, these fish dine on razor-sharp, stinging coralsMore than 6,000 fish species that live on coral reefs, but only 128 are known to feed on corals. Now, researchers have discovered how at least one species of coral-feeding fish does it. They 'kiss' the flesh and mucus off the coral skeleton using protective, self-lubricating lips.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why the heart does not repair itself: New insightsResearchers have discovered a previously unknown connection between processes that keep the heart from repairing itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN chief warns oceans are 'under threat as never before' (Update)Secretary-General Antonio Guterres opened the first-ever U.N. conference on oceans Monday with a warning that the seas are "under threat as never before," with one recent study warning that discarded plastic garbage could outweigh fish by 2050 if nothing is done.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist: Baby lobster count drops off US coast, Canada (Update)The number of young lobsters is declining in the Gulf of Maine despite years of record-breaking harvests, a University of Maine marine scientist has warned.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery reveals planet almost as hot as the SunAn international team of scientists, including Justin R. Crepp, Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Notre Dame, say the planet is 2.8 times bigger than Jupiter and reaches temperatures over 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,600 Kelvin) during the day.
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Gizmodo
How Deep Was Mars' Ocean? Image: Luo, Northern Illinois University Our little red neighbor may be a rocky red wasteland now, but lots of people think it was once an ocean-covered world just like our own. After scientists found some evidence of flowing water back in 2015, folks started to take these claims even more seriously. Heck, maybe Mars even supported life. A team of American researchers have a guesstimate for the n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal-ion catalysts and hydrogen peroxide could green up plastics productionResearchers at the University of Illinois are contributing to the development of more environmentally friendly catalysts for the production of plastic and resin precursors that are often derived from fossil fuels. The key to their technique comes from recognizing the unique physical and chemical properties of certain metals and how they react with hydrogen peroxide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
App uses smartphone compass to stop voice hackingWhile convenient, Siri, WeChat and other voice-based smartphone apps can expose you to a growing security threat: voice hacking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly discovered DNA sequences can protect chromosomes in rotifersRotifers are tough, microscopic organisms highly resistant to radiation and repeated cycles of dehydration and rehydration. Now Irina Arkhipova, Irina Yushenova, and Fernando Rodriguez of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have discovered another protective mechanism of this hardy organism: the Terminons. Their findings, which can have implications for research on aging and genome evolution, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA gets a last look at remnants Tropical Depression Beatriz in GulfThe Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical storm weakened to a remnant low pressure area and moved into the Gulf of Mexico where it dissipated. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a last look at the warming cloud top temperatures in its weakening storms.
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cognitive science
Until now, researchers thought that the development of the human brain's visual-processing center stopped in the first few years of life. But a new study challenges this belief, instead suggesting that vision develops until midlife. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science
Q&A: How Does an (English) Garden Grow?How can English gardens grow so well in what seems to be such a cloudy part of the world?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineer unveils new spin on future of transistors with novel designAn engineer with the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Texas at Dallas has designed a novel computing system made solely from carbon that might one day replace the silicon transistors that power today's electronic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ALMA returns to boomerang nebula: Companion star provides chilling power of 'coldest object in the universe'An ancient, red giant star in the throes of a frigid death has produced the coldest known object in the cosmos—the Boomerang Nebula. How this star was able to create an environment strikingly colder than the natural background temperature of deep space has been a compelling mystery for more than two decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What motivates parents to protect children from cell phone addiction?A new study examined the role parental mediation can play in protecting children from the potential negative effects of smartphone use, comparing the perceived risk and different types of mediation and parenting styles. The study of parents of 4th-6th graders is published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests dying stars give newborn black holes a swift kickNew information gleaned from gravitational wave observations is helping scientists understand what happens when massive stars die and transform into black holes.
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The Atlantic
I Tried a Spa Treatment Designed to Produce the Tingly Feeling of ‘ASMR’ “We always begin with a candle contemplation.” I’m sitting on a futon in a stranger’s apartment with my friend Ashley. In front of us, Melinda Lauw—a slender, wide-eyed Singaporean woman—is crouched in a squat, holding a small flickering candle, and tapping lightly on its glass container. Behind her, a jury-rigged shower curtain doesn’t quite separate the nook we are in from the rest of the apart
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habitsThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends parents keep babies in the same room with them to sleep for the first year to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But room sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices that the AAP is hoping to prevent, according to Penn State College of Medicine re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells change type to help or hinder immunityIn news that may bring hope to asthma sufferers, scientists discover a mechanism that provides a possible new target for allergy treatments. By observing the allergic response in mice with asthma, scientists at the Francis Crick Institute found that white blood cells that normally reduce the symptoms of asthma convert into cells that make allergies worse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study evaluates overall geriatric health during androgen deprivation therapy'Oncologists use measures of a patient's functional status to inform fitness for treatment, but there may be nuances you're missing,' says Elizabeth Kessler, M.D., oncology fellow at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the paper's first author.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal-ion catalysts and hydrogen peroxide could green up plastics productionResearchers at the University of Illinois are contributing to the development of more environmentally friendly catalysts for the production of plastic and resin precursors that are often derived from fossil fuels. The key to their technique comes from recognizing the unique physical and chemical properties of certain metals and how they react with hydrogen peroxide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Latest: Apple's HomePod speaker coming this yearThe Latest on Apple's annual conference in California (all times local):
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
20-somethings managing millions: How venture capital is changingAt first glance, Clancey Stahr looks like any other 23-year-old eager to make his mark on Silicon Valley.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain development and agingThe brain is a complex organ -- a network of nerve cells, or neurons, producing thought, memory, action, and feeling. How does this complex system change from childhood to adulthood to late life in order to maintain optimal behavioral responses? These questions were put to the test by psychologists who studied hundreds of fMRI brain scans, from two separate datasets, to see how the variability of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PET/MR shows arterial CO2 as potent vasodilator for cardiac stress testingUsing PET/MR imaging, a new international study demonstrates that increases in partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) can safely and efficiently widen blood vessels of the heart during stress tests to help determine heart function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineer unveils new spin on future of transistors with novel designAn engineer has designed a novel computing system made solely from carbon that might one day replace the silicon transistors that power today's electronic devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly discovered DNA sequences can protect chromosomes in rotifersRotifers are tough, microscopic organisms highly resistant to radiation and repeated cycles of dehydration and rehydration. Now scientists have discovered another protective mechanism of this hardy organism: the Terminons. Their findings have implications for research on aging and genome evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emergency medicine in space: Normal rules don't applyScientists are considering the unusual and challenging problem of how to perform emergency medical procedures during space missions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increasing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in the United StatesFindings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in US hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare occurrence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ready-to-eat foodsResearch shows that antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present in many ready-to-eat foods such as fresh produce and dairy products and may serve as a source of human exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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Gizmodo
Doctor Who Tackles Fake News With a Disappointing Fake-Out of Its Own Image: BBC This week’s Doctor Who saw the Monk trilogy come to its end, as team TARDIS found themselves battling through a dystopian Britain literally being brainwashed by fake news. It’s a timely take on our modern world, but “The Lie of the Land” disappointingly threw out its most interesting premise by committing the exact same sin. The first 15 minutes or so of “The Lie of the Land” are hones
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Live Science
Mars Crater or Collapse? A Photo Mystery in Martian 'Swiss Cheese'Scientists aren't sure if a big dimple on Mars came from something smacking into the Red Planet's surface or if it was simply caused by a collapse.
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Popular Science
Vaccines of the future could be as contagious as viruses Science It’s time to go viral. Scientists are taking a leaf from the virus playbook and devising vaccines and antiviral therapies that can spread from host to host.
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Ars Technica
Supreme Court agrees to rule if cops need warrant for cell-site data Enlarge (credit: Daniel Arvesen ) The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide its biggest privacy dispute in years, a case that asks whether the authorities need a probable-cause court warrant to access people's mobile phone location history. "Because cell phone location records can reveal countless private details of our lives, police should only be able to access them by getting a warrant based o
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Gizmodo
Drug Company Chairman to America: Go Fuck Yourself (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) Back in August of 2016, the pharmaceutical company Mylan came under fire for jacking up prices of the EpiPen from $57 in 2007 to roughly $600 in 2016 . The public backlash has been significant. But the chairman of Mylan has a message for any critics: Go fuck yourself. Well, at least that’s what we think he said. The New York Times has a new article about the fa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two combination therapies shrink melanoma brain metastases in more than half of patientsA combination regimen of two immunotherapies and another of two targeted therapies each significantly shrank metastatic brain tumors in at least 50 percent of patients in separate multi-center clinical trials, report researchers.
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Live Science
Photos: Artistic Views of Earth from AboveRivers, lakes, volcanoes and even human development on Earth can take on an abstract aesthetic when viewed from space. Here's a look at our planet as seen from NASA's Earth-orbiting satellites
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Live Science
Why Are Atheists Generally Smarter Than Religious People?For more than a millennium, scholars have noticed a curious correlation: Atheists tend to be more intelligent than religious people.
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Science | The Guardian
The 35 words you’re (probably) getting wrong Have you made a flagrant error, in confusing your alternative choices? The legendary Fleet Street editor Harold Evans proscribes this glossary to solve your language dilemmas I freely acknowledge that, in a list of this sort, “glossary” is a fancy Latin word for a collection of pet peeves (noun, 1919), meaning an annoyance or irritation. One of my peeves is that, as a noun originating in America,
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Futurity.org
Ceramic ‘sponge’ can handle heat and never cracks Researchers have found a way to create a sponge-like material made from nanoscale ceramic fibers that is ultralight, deformable, and heat-resistant. The sponges could have numerous uses, from water purification devices to flexible insulating materials. “The basic science question we tried to answer is how can we make a material that’s highly deformable but resistant to high temperature,” says Hua
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
App uses smartphone compass to stop voice hackingA University at Buffalo-led team of engineers is creating an app to stop voice hacking. The app uses existing smartphone components, including the magnetometer for the phone's compass, to detect when someone's voice is being broadcast on a speaker.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RIT study suggests dying stars give newborn black holes a swift kickRochester Institute of Technology researcher Richard O'Shaughnessy and collaborators reanalyzed the merging black holes detected by LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) on Dec. 26, 2016, and drew new insights about what happens when massive stars die and transform into black holes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With specialized lips, these fish dine on razor-sharp, stinging coralsMore than 6,000 fish species that live on coral reefs, but only 128 are known to feed on corals. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 5 have discovered how at least one species of coral-feeding fish does it. They 'kiss' the flesh and mucus off the coral skeleton using protective, self-lubricating lips.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Slimy ‘Kiss’ Lets Reef Fish Feed on Stinging Corals BRIEF: Slimy ‘Kiss’ Lets Reef Fish Feed on Stinging Corals Tube-lipped wrasses overcome coral's defenses with bizarre puckered lips. 141687_cropped.jpg Image credits: Victor Huertas and David Bellwood Creature Monday, June 5, 2017 - 12:00 Nala Rogers, Contributor (Inside Science) -- With their sharp, stony skeletons and stinger-laden flesh, corals are well protected against most potential predato
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Desktop of the Future Is ComingAugmented-reality startup Meta’s vision for the future of work involves midair sticky notes and plenty of hand gestures.
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New Scientist - News
The hottest planet yet is twice Jupiter’s size and hot as a starAn exoplanet discovered orbiting a massive, scorching star 650 light years away is so hot that even its nightside hits temperatures higher than some stars
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New Scientist - News
Drinking small amounts while pregnant may affect the baby’s faceConsuming even low levels of alcohol while pregnant seems to affect the shape of a baby’s eyes and nose, although there is no evidence that this is harmful
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New Scientist - News
Accelerating Antarctic crack will hasten calving of huge icebergKink turns 200-kilometre fissure towards the sea and will seal fate of a future iceberg that is one quarter the area of Wales, possibly within weeks
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The Scientist RSS
More Than 1 Percent of Clinical Trial Reports Appear FlawedA new screening tool flags dozens of papers with potential errors.
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Ars Technica
Mylan chairman: Drug pricing critics ought to go copulate with themselves Enlarge / Mylan Chairman Robert J. Coury had some spicy responses for critics. (credit: Getty | : Jamie McCarthy ) Some pharmaceutical companies are troubled by stratospheric drug prices. Several have vowed to limit price hikes, for instance. And the powerful drug lobbying group PhRMA is at least trying to distract consumers’ attention away from price gouging by dangling shiny advertisements abou
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Gizmodo
Freaky Fish Dines On Coral Snot With Sloppy Kiss of Death GIF A tubelip wrasse using its mucus-coated lips to feed on the surface of corals. Image: Victor Huertas and David Bellwood Tubelip wrasses live on coral reefs stretching from the eastern coast of Africa to far-flung atolls in the South Pacific. They get their name from their bizarre lips, which are conspicuously curled, making them look like someone glued a PVC pipe onto their face. It’s these l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA gets a last look at remnants Tropical Depression Beatriz in GulfThe Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical storm weakened to a remnant low pressure area and moved into the Gulf of Mexico where it dissipated. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a last look at the warming cloud top temperatures in its weakening storms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly discovered DNA sequences can protect chromosomes in rotifersRotifers are tough, microscopic organisms highly resistant to radiation and repeated cycles of dehydration and rehydration. Now Irina Arkhipova, Irina Yushenova, and Fernando Rodriguez of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have discovered another protective mechanism of this hardy organism: the Terminons. Their findings, which can have implications for research on aging and genome evolution, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Generous health insurance plans encourage overtreatment, but may not improve healthOffering comprehensive health insurance plans with low deductibles and co-pay in exchange for higher annual premiums seems like a good value for the risk averse, and a profitable product for insurance companies. But according to a study in a leading scholarly marketing journal, the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, such plans can encourage individuals with chronic conditions to turn to needlessly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With specialized lips, these fish dine on razor-sharp, stinging coralsOf all the things an animal could eat, corals are arguably one of the toughest, thanks to their thin, mucus-covered flesh packed with venomous stinging cells spread over a razor-sharp skeleton. Perhaps that explains why of the more than 6,000 fish species that live on the reef, only 128 are known to feed on corals. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 5 have discovered how at leas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CRISPR tech leads to new screening tool for Parkinson's diseaseA team of researchers is using breakthrough gene-editing technology to develop a new screening tool for Parkinson's disease, a debilitating degenerative disorder of the nervous system. The technology allows scientists in the lab to 'light up' and then monitor a brain protein called alpha-synuclein that has been associated with Parkinson's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CAR T-Cell therapy sends multiple myeloma into lasting remissionIn an early clinical trial, 33 out of 35 (94 percent) patients had clinical remission of multiple myeloma upon receiving a new type of immunotherapy -- chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting B-cell maturation protein or BCMA. Most patients had only mild side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First immunotherapy for mesothelioma on the horizon, early research suggestsMalignant pleural mesothelioma or MPM is a rare cancer, but its incidence has been rising. This cancer is usually associated with asbestos exposure, and patients have a median life expectancy of only 13-15 months. All patients relapse despite initial chemotherapy, more than 50% of them within six months after stopping treatment. There are currently no effective therapeutic options for patients wit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research suggests possible new treatment for EGFR-positive lung cancerFindings from a phase III clinical trial point to a potential new treatment for patients newly diagnosed with advanced, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Compared to the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib (Iressa), one of the standard targeted medicines for this disease, second-generation EGFR inhibitor dacomitinib delayed cancer growth by a median of 5.5 m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breeding pairs of birds cooperate to resist climate changeMost bird chicks need parental care to survive. In biparental species the chicks have greater chances of success if both parents participate in this task, especially under hostile situations. An international team of scientists has revealed that when temperatures rise, males and females in pairs of plovers shift incubation more frequently.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pictorial warning labels on tobacco products could help improve communication of risks to smokersHealth warning labels that include images or Pictorial Warning Labels (PWLs) are more effective in gaining and holding the attention of smokers when the image and the text convey similar risks, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First long-term study of Murray-Darling Basin wetlands reveals severe impact of damsA landmark 30-year-long study of wetlands in eastern Australia has found that construction of dams and diversion of water from the Murray-Darling Basin have led to a more than 70 per cent decline in waterbird numbers. The finding of severe degradation in the basin due to reduced water flow has significant implications for managing the development of other rivers in Australia and around the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Quantum leap' toward building a novel experiment to probe the 'dark contents' of the vacuumPhysicists have made a huge step forwards towards building a novel experiment to probe the 'dark contents' of the vacuum. What we see, normal matter and light, only accounts for a about 5 percent of the universe. Understanding the remaining 95 percent (the dark content) remains of the greatest challenges for fundamental physics in the 21st Century.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Cold revolutionInitially invented for the printing industry, the technology has transformed the way we live and work.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Poison pillA Canadian doctor says one short letter managed to convince doctors that opioids were safe.
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Ars Technica
Giant ringed planet may have been spotted as it eclipses its host star Enlarge (credit: Credit: Ron Miller ) Tabby's star, which undergoes a chaotic pattern of dimming, has attracted a lot of attention due to suggestions that it might host an orbiting megastructure constructed by aliens. But it's not the only star with an odd pattern of dimming. Astronomer