Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wow! mystery signal from space finally explained(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Center of Planetary Science (CPS) has finally solved the mystery of the "Wow!" signal from 1977. It was a comet, they report, one that that was unknown at the time of the signal discovery. Lead researcher Antonio Paris describes their theory and how the team proved it in a paper published in the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences.
9h
Science | The Guardian
Oldest Homo sapiens bones ever found shake foundations of the human story Idea that modern humans evolved in East Africa 200,000 years ago challenged by extraordinary discovery of 300,000-year-old remains in Moroccan mine Fossils recovered from an old mine on a desolate mountain in Morocco have rocked one of the most enduring foundations of the human story: that Homo sapiens arose in a cradle of humankind in East Africa 200,000 years ago. Archaeologists unearthed the b
5h
Ingeniøren
Tidligere direktør står frem: Finansministeriet var advaret om katastrofalt vaccinesalgFor første gang siden sin pensionering taler den mangeårige direktør Nils Strandberg Pedersen ud om salget af vaccineproduktionen. Det blev gennemført uden almindelig, sund fornuft, siger han.
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Gizmodo
Inside The Mess At Faraday Future That Drove Out One Of The World's Top Auditors Photo: AP Startup automaker Faraday Future hired the best, as it often did, when it needed an audit of its finances to help secure vital fundraising and government loans. But what auditor KPMG—one of the world’s biggest and most well-regarded auditing firms—walked into when it agreed to look at Faraday’s books was a company with no coherent corporate structure, financial statements in complete di
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The NFL Machine Has Finally Beaten Colin Kaepernick | The Slot James Comey Statement Sugges Deadspin The NFL Machine Has Finally Beaten Colin Kaepernick | The Slot James Comey Statement Suggests Trump Repeatedly Tried to Coerce Him in Russia Probe | Fusion What the Bloody Hell Is Happening? The U.K. Election, Explained | The Root Delta Passenger Bitten by Veteran’s Emotional-Support Dog |
6min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Get An Exclusive Tour Of The Technology And Techniques Behind Deadliest Catch! #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Go behind-the-scenes with the Deadliest Catch producers and camera crew to see how they brought Season 13 to your TV screen! Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscover
12min
Live Science
How Your Belly Fat Is Linked to Your Immune SystemYou may not love your belly fat, but the large sheet of fat that stretches across your abdomen serves a purpose.
16min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Milky Way’s loner status is upheldGalaxy surveys show the Milky Way lives in a vast cosmic void, which could help ease tensions between ways of measuring how fast the universe is expanding.
20min
Ars Technica
Telemarketing etiquette leads to $280 million fine for Dish Network Enlarge / A field service specialist for Dish Network Corp. installs a satellite television system. Photographer: Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Getty Images ) On Tuesday, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the US Department of Justice (DOJ), as well as four US states, won a $280 million civil penalty in a case involving Dish Network. The federal government alleged that th
27min
Science : NPR
If You See Dirty Water, Don't Just Gripe. Talk To The Cloud! Scientists and activists in India are training citizens to collect information on water issues like contamination — and upload it so it can be used to push for change. (Image credit: Tom Baas)
30min
Science : NPR
U.S. Pays Farmers Billions To Save The Soil. But It's Blowing Away Right now, the government rents farmland to help protect soil and water. But once the land is farmed again, the benefits disappear. Environmentalists want to change that. (Image credit: United States Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia)
30min
WIRED
Crispr May Cure All Genetic Disease—One Day But first, it's going to deliver climate-resistant crops, better biofuels, and tomatoes that won't fall off the vine. The post Crispr May Cure All Genetic Disease—One Day appeared first on WIRED .
30min
The Atlantic
'Yet Another Improper Effort to Coerce the Intelligence Agencies' Democrats and Republicans reacted very differently to the Wednesday release of former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony detailing interactions with President Trump, including a meeting in which Comey claims Trump told him “I need loyalty, I expect loyalty,” with Democrats expressing alarm while Republicans rushing to the president’s defense. Comey, who was abruptly fired by Trump in May, is sc
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea urchin protein provides insights into self-assembly of skeletal structuresCalcium carbonate, or CaCO3, comprises more than 4% of the earth's crust. Its most common natural forms are chalk, limestone, and marble, produced by the sedimentation of the shells of small fossilized snails, shellfish, and coral over millions of years.
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Gizmodo
I Am Irrationally Mad About Wonder Woman's Android Tablet Wonder Woman had some great moments. Seeing a woman smash a soldier into mush with her shield, toss a tank over people’s heads, and commit willful acts of beautifully violent misandry was nice. But lurking below the shining feminist bastion of fists and charm lurks a very, very big problem. Wonder Woman uses an Android tablet. “No,” my colleague said when I slapped her during the movie and whispe
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnancy diet high in refined grains could increase kids' obesity by age 7Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Girls more likely to have sex, take sexual risks, and marry young if they menstruate earlyThe timing of a girl's first menstruation may affect her first sexual encounter, first pregnancy, and her vulnerability to some sexually transmitted infections. These patterns of sexual and reproductive health outcomes for girls in low- and middle-income countries who menstruated at an early age are similar to what has been observed in high-income countries such as the U.S. Until now, there was li
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea urchin protein provides insights into self-assembly of skeletal structuresCalcium carbonate combined with sea urchin proteins form tiny stacks of 'bricks' that creates a structure which provides a tough, exoskeleton defense for the sea creature. NYU Dentistry research studying the protein may enable the development of tunable fracture resistant materials that one day will find its use in developing lightweight 'armor' and 'sturdier' dental composites.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of cardiac malformations from lithium during pregnancy less significantNew research suggests there may be a more modest increased risk of cardiac defects when using lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Common surgical treatment for melanoma does not improve patients' overall survivalPatients who receive the standard surgical treatment for melanoma that has spread to one or more key lymph nodes do not live longer, a major new study shows.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mammograms: Are we overdiagnosing small tumors?An analysis of breast cancer data revealed that many small breast cancers have an excellent prognosis because they are inherently slow growing, according to Yale Cancer Center experts. Often, these cancers will not grow large enough to become significant within a patient's lifetime and subsequently early detection could lead to overdiagnosis, said the researchers.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recent presidential election could have negative impact on healthStress, increased risk for disease, babies born too early, and premature death are among the negative health impacts that could occur in the wake of the 2016 US presidential election, according to a new article from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital.
44min
Live Science
Death by Vampire Bat: How Rabies KillsA man in Brazil died of rabies in May after being bitten by a vampire bat.
45min
Gizmodo
Here's Everyone NASA Felt Was Better Than You NASA’s astronauts are American heroes and proxies for our hopes and dreams. The best part of each new astronaut class is that we get an entirely fresh crop of people we can live vicariously through, and this year is no exception. Today, NASA announced its 22nd space squad. Although over 18,000 applied, the space agency decided that just 12 had the right stuff. The dozen, disturbingly talented ast
54min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Spoiler Alert Today in 5 Lines In his opening statement before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday, former FBI Director James Comey is expected to say President Trump asked for his “loyalty.” A day ahead of his testimony, lawmakers on the Senate panel heard from intelligence officials who declined to divulge information about their interactions with the president regarding the Russia investigation. T
54min
The Atlantic
Is Trump’s Plan to Privatize Air-Traffic Control a Good Idea? “Broken,” “horrible,” “antiquated.” Those are some of the words President Trump recently used to describe the nation’s current air-traffic control system. That system is currently managed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a government agency that oversees all aspects of commercial aviation. Trump’s solution? Transfer some of the FAA’s responsibilities to a private nonprofit organizati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oyster shells inspire new method to make superstrong, flexible polymersEngineers have developed a method inspired by the nacre of oyster shells, a composite material with extraordinary mechanical properties, including great strength and resilience. By changing the crystallization speed of a polymer well-mixed with nanoparticles, the team controlled how the nanoparticles self-assemble into structures at three different length scales. This multiscale ordering makes the
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Excessive exercise may damage the gutA review of published studies has found that people who exercise excessively may be prone to acute or chronic gut issues.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can pain increase the risk of dying early?Pain that interferes with daily life, rather than pain per se, was associated with an increased risk of early death in a recent analysis.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain characteristics linked with ISIS anxietyA new study examines the characteristics of individuals who are most likely to have anxiety concerning threats posed by ISIS.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overcoming immune suppression to fight against bovine leukemiaA newly developed antibody drug reactivates suppressed immune cells, decreasing the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) counts in an infected cow. The antibody could be applied to treat a variety of intractable infectious diseases in cows.
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arrest in NSA news leak fuels debate on source protectionIt was a major scoop for The Intercept— documents suggesting a concerted Russian effort to hack US election systems—but the online news site is drawing fire in media circles following the arrest of the alleged source of the leak.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holistic management makes ecosystems healthier, people wealthierEconomists agree that natural ecosystems store large quantities of wealth, but the challenge of measuring that wealth has prevented it from being included in typical accounting systems.
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Popular Science
An astronaut shares his incredible perspective of our planet Entertainment Excerpt: Hello, is this planet Earth? The following images are excerpted from astronaut Tim Peake's book: 'Hello, is this planet Earth?'. Read on.
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Viden
Forskere: Historien skal skrives om efter fund af urtidsmennesker i MarokkoMennesket er mindst 100.000 år ældre end tidligere troet, mener forskere.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SLU researcher finds cause and possible relief of cancer bone painSaint Louis University scientist Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., reports discovering a key pathway that drives cancer-related bone pain while providing a potential solution with a drug that already is on the market.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Natural capital: Holistic management makes ecosystems healthier, people wealthierA Yale-led study puts a price on ecosystems by recognizing the value of a 'natural capital' asset -- in this case, fish in the Baltic Sea -- and connecting it with holistic ecosystem management to calculate asset values for the interacting parts of an ecosystem.
1h
WIRED
The Day Will Come When Your Credit Card Will Disappear Visa tries to get out ahead of the day when physical forms of payment become as obsolete as barter. The post The Day Will Come When Your Credit Card Will Disappear appeared first on WIRED .
1h
The Atlantic
The Potemkin Policies of Donald Trump It’s “Infrastructure Week” at the White House. Theoretically. On Monday, the administration announced a plan to spend $200 billion on infrastructure and overhaul U.S. air traffic control. There was a high-profile signing in the East Wing before dozens of cheering lawmakers and industry titans. It was supposed to be the beginning of a weeklong push to fix America’s roads, bridges, and airports. Bu
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Ars Technica
Judge orders Uber to hand over report on its acquisition of Levandowski startup Enlarge / A logo on the wall of an Uber Technologies office in Berlin, Germany. (credit: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) Uber has lost two key battles in its trade-secret litigation with Waymo, Google's self-driving car spinoff. First, a magistrate judge has ruled that Uber must hand over the due diligence report related to its $680 million acquisition of self-driving car startup Ott
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gustsOffshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, new research shows.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researchers find plus-size fashion models improve women's psychological healthFSU researchers Russell Clayton and Jessica Ridgway discover women pay more attention and experience improved psychological health when they view average and plus-size models in the media.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biology professor uses microphones to track pollinating bees in new studyWebster University Biology Professor Nicole Miller-Struttman led a team of researchers that used microphones and iPad Minis to accurately track pollinating bees in three Colorado fields. A computer algorithm also detected when the bees were pollinating.
1h
Ars Technica
FCC security denies that guards pinned journalist against a wall Enlarge / (Not actually the FCC's security guards.) (credit: Getty Images | Loungepark ) Federal Communications Commission security officers have "adamantly denied" an allegation that they pinned a journalist against a wall, according to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. The incident allegedly took place when the journalist tried to ask questions after last month's net neutrality vote. The chairman said the
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The 'obsession' that changed human historyAn "obsession" with the lower jaw of a long-dead human, unearthed in the 1960s at a prehistoric Moroccan campsite, led palaeoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin to the discovery of a lifetime.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Find 100 Million-Year-Old, Nearly Complete Baby Bird Trapped in Amber Image: Lida Xing This has been a huge year for finding specimens in amber, from bird wings to dinosaur feathers to this ugly-ass bug . But this new finding might be the best one yet: a nearly complete 99-million-year-old baby bird. Scientists found the specimen in Myanmar, where others have purchased or found plenty of other incredible amber samples in the amber mines. But this one is crazy: an a
1h
The Atlantic
The Death of Kansas's Conservative Experiment The nation’s most aggressive experiment in conservative economic policy is dead. Republican majorities in the Kansas legislature on Tuesday night voted to reverse the deep tax cuts engineered by Governor Sam Brownback five years ago, blaming them for blowing a hole in the state’s budget that threatened the viability of its schools and infrastructure. Brownback, a conservative first elected in 201
1h
WIRED
Everything You Need to Know About James Comey’s Senate Hearing When it starts, what he'll say, and more, all in one helpful primer. The post Everything You Need to Know About James Comey's Senate Hearing appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Google’s AI Eye Doctor Gets Ready to Go to Work in India Algorithms that scrutinize retinal images for signs of disease could save people from blindness. The post Google’s AI Eye Doctor Gets Ready to Go to Work in India appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The Physics of Nearly Killing Yourself on a Motorcycle This video shows a motorcycle traveling at a high speed narrowly avoiding a collision. Let's use video analysis to estimate the acceleration and coefficient of friction. The post The Physics of Nearly Killing Yourself on a Motorcycle appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA picks 12 new astronauts from crush of applicantsNASA chose 12 new astronauts Wednesday from its biggest pool of applicants ever, selecting seven men and five women who could one day fly aboard the nation's next generation of spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows important economic contributions of H-1B visasA new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science shows that the U.S. economy is strengthened by H-1B visa holders who fill key roles in enhancing organizations and supplementing the work of their U.S. peers. This is particularly true for trades like the U.S. audit industry that employ a large number of individuals who hold H-1B visas, and who recruit highly skilled foreign workers for special
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding new homes won't help Emperor penguins cope with climate changeIf projections for melting Antarctic sea ice through 2100 are correct, the vanishing landscape will strip Emperor penguins of their breeding and feeding grounds and put populations at risk. But like other species that migrate to escape the wrath of climate change, can these iconic animals be spared simply by moving to new locations?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising sea levels will boost moderate floods in some areas, severe floods in othersRising seas are making flooding more common in coastal areas around the country. Now, a new study finds that sea-level rise will boost the occurrence of moderate rather than severe flooding in some regions of the United States, while in other areas the reverse is true.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bee buzzes could help determine how to save their decreasing populationAccording to recent studies, declines in wild and managed bee populations threaten the pollination of flowers in more than 85 percent of flowering plants and 75 percent of agricultural crops worldwide. Widespread and effective monitoring of bee populations could lead to better management; however, tracking bees is tricky and costly. Now, a research team led by the University of Missouri has develo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Charliecloud' simplifies Big Data supercomputingAt Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved. In the case of a new product, dubbed "Charliecloud," a crisp 800-line code helps supercomputer users operate in the high-performance world of Big Data without burdening computer center staff with the peculiari
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New on MIT Technology Review
Alphabet’s New Air Traffic Control System Steers Drones Away From PerilA small trial has been able re-route drones to avoid collisions in real-time—now it needs to work on a much bigger scale.
1h
Popular Science
Slimy, fleshy lips dripping with snot help these fish eat stinging corals Animals Pucker up. Imagine having a mouth that constantly dripped with snot. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia makes its fishing fleet visible to the world through Global Fishing WatchThis week, at the United Nation's Ocean Conference, the Republic of Indonesia becomes the first nation ever to publish Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data revealing the location and activity of its commercial fishing fleet. The new data being made public on the Global Fishing Watch public mapping platform reveals commercial fishing in Indonesian waters and areas of the Indian Ocean where it had pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eck Industries exclusively licenses cerium-aluminum alloy co-developed by ORNLWisconsin's Eck Industries has signed an exclusive license for the commercialization of a cerium-aluminum (Ce-Al) alloy co-developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is ideal for creating lightweight, strong components for advanced vehicles and airplanes.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Easing family distress: New international guidelines to identify dementia with Lewy bodiesNew guidelines have been published on the clinical and physical indicators to help ensure patients with dementia with Lewy bodies get an accurate diagnosis and the best care possible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does consuming low-fat dairy increase the risk of Parkinson's disease?Consuming at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared to consuming less than one serving a day, according to a large study published in the June 7, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Science : NPR
315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens Scientists who found the fossils believe they are the remains of five people and far older than all previous finds. But how do the remains really fit into the bushy family tree of modern humans? (Image credit: Shannon McPherron/Nature)
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Ars Technica
Stuff to know about all the Macs Apple updated this week Enlarge / A MacBook Pro connected to one of Apple's external graphics devkits. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) I’ve had a new 15-inch MacBook Pro for about a day, and a 27-inch iMac is en route to my house as we speak. As such, I’m not currently in a position to post a “review” of either system. But I can tell you at least a few things about the surprisingly comprehensive Mac refresh that Apple dropp
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Inside Science
Ancient Practice of Eating Soil Might Pose Risks to Unborn Babies Ancient Practice of Eating Soil Might Pose Risks to Unborn Babies New findings suggest that a still-widespread tradition could cause increased lead levels in mothers and their children. HandwithClay-newCrop.jpg Image credits: Soil Science via Wikimedia Commons Culture Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 08:45 Teresa L. Carey, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Eating clay has a strong history among women in A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique enables 3-D printing with paste of silicone particles in waterUsing the principles behind the formation of sandcastles from wet sand, North Carolina State University researchers have achieved 3-D printing of flexible and porous silicone rubber structures through a new technique that combines water with solid and liquid forms of silicone into a pasty ink that can be fed through a 3-D printer. The finding could have biomedical applications and uses in soft rob
1h
The Atlantic
Canada Is Now Openly Questioning the Future of U.S. Leadership First European Council President Donald Tusk described Donald Trump as a threat to European unity. Next German Chancellor Angela Merkel declared that Germany could no longer “completely depend” on America, noting that “We Europeans truly have to take our fate into our own hands.” Then, in vowing to “make our planet great again,” French President Emmanuel Macron seized the leadership role on clima
1h
Big Think
What Happens If Hostile Aliens Attack? The US Military Has a Team in Place The Space Aggressor squadrons develop strategies to defend against space-oriented attacks. Read More
1h
The Scientist RSS
Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms Stock Warranted?A study of off-target effects that sparked fear among investors of genome-editing companies receives methodological criticisms.
2h
Live Science
Hawaii Rebuffs Trump by Enacting Laws Supporting Paris AgreementHawaii became the first state to enact climate laws that follow the Paris accord.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lowe's to lay off about 125 workers, move jobs to IndiaHome improvement retailer Lowe's says it's laying off approximately 125 information technology workers, the third round of job cuts this year.
2h
New Scientist - News
Baby brain scans can predict who is likely to develop autismA machine-learning program can tell from scans which high-risk infants will later show autism symptoms. This could, controversially, enable early intervention
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New Scientist - News
There’s as much water in Earth’s mantle as in all the oceansThe zone of mantle rock that sits 400 to 600 kilometres below our feet seems to be saturated with water
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Major flaws in US drugs with 'accelerated' approval, research suggestsMajor flaws have been identified in the fast tracking of some drugs available to the American public without any stringent clinical evidence of their benefits.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's oldest fossil mushroom foundRoughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey. Its ultimate fate as a mineralized fossil preserved in limestone in northeast Brazil makes it a scientific wonder, scientists report.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Kestrels' strategies for flight and hunting vary with the weatherKestrels adapt their flight and hunting strategies to weather conditions, including solar radiation, wind speed, and air temperature, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overweight children are being excluded from friendships, study findsOverweight children have more unreciprocated friendships and frenemies than their thinner counterparts, a new study has found. In a survey of 504 preteens in the Netherlands, researchers found that overweight children are excluded from friendships, call classmates friends when the feeling is not mutual and are disliked by peers. And overweight children dislike more classmates than their thinner pe
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How can you tell deep-sea octopuses apart? Check their wartsUntil now, there'd been no rigorous framework for telling apart two species of deep-sea octopuses -- they're both pink and warty. A new study, though, shows that the distribution of warts is an important means of telling the two species apart -- the octopuses from the Pacific are wartier than the ones from the Atlantic. That little piece of information could be a big help in ongoing deep-sea resea
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bee buzzes could help determine how to save their decreasing populationWidespread and effective monitoring of bees could lead to better management of populations; however, tracking bees is tricky and costly. Now, a research team led by the University of Missouri has developed an inexpensive acoustic listening system using data from small microphones in the field to monitor bees in flight. The study, published today in PLOS ONE, shows how farmers could use the technol
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vanderbilt-led study disputes link between uterine fibroids and miscarriage riskA 10-year study, led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Katherine Hartmann, M.D., Ph.D., disrupts conventional wisdom that uterine fibroids cause miscarriages.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gustsOffshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.Plus, more weekly news from GeoSpace and EOS.
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Gizmodo
The Story Behind Mass Effect: Andromeda's Troubled Five-Year Development In 2012, as work on Mass Effect 3 came to a close, a small group of top BioWare employees huddled to talk about the next entry in their epic sci-fi franchise. Their goal, they decided, was to make a game about exploration—one that would dig into the untapped potential of the first three games. Instead of visiting just a few planets, they said, what if you could explore hundreds? Five years later,
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Viden
Digitale spil hjælper syriske flygtningebørnSpil som Minecraft kan være med til at bekæmpe håbløshed i flygtningelejrene.
2h
The Atlantic
Comey's Duty to Correct Former FBI Director James Comey believes that when he offers Congress assurances about an ongoing investigation, and those claims cease to be true, he has a duty to correct the record. His willingness to act on that belief may well have tipped the 2016 election to Donald Trump. And, it turns out, that unwavering stand is also what led Donald Trump to fire him. Comey’s statement to the Senate Inte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rising sea levels will boost moderate floods in some areas, severe floods in othersSea-level rise over the next 50 to 100 years will lead to moderate coastal flooding in regions already prone to floods, but to more severe flooding in regions where such floods are currently rare, suggests new research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique enables 3-D printing with paste of silicone particles in waterUsing the principles behind the formation of sandcastles from wet sand, researchers have achieved 3-D printing of flexible and porous silicone rubber structures through a new technique that combines water with solid and liquid forms of silicone into a pasty ink that can be fed through a 3-D printer. The finding could have biomedical applications and uses in soft robotics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding new homes won't help emperor penguins cope with climate changeUnlike other species that migrate successfully to escape the wrath of climate change, a new study shows that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as sea ice conditions continue to deteriorate, the 54 colonies that exist today will face devastating declines by the end of this century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Century-old relativity experiment used to measure a white dwarf's massAstronomers have used the sharp vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to repeat a century-old test of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. The team measured the mass of white dwarf Stein 2051 B, the burned-out remnant of a normal star, by seeing how much it deflects the light from a background star. The gravitational microlensing method data provide a solid estimate of the white dwarf’s mass
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female Steller sea lions tend to breed near their birthplaceFemale Steller sea lions tend to breed at or near the rookery where they were born, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover a 2-D magnetFor the first time, scientists have discovered magnetism in the 2-D world of monolayers, or materials that are formed by a single atomic layer. The findings demonstrate that magnetic properties can exist even in the 2-D realm -- opening a world of potential applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative therapy strategy for pancreatic cancer uses engineered exosomes targeting mutated KRAS geneGenetic manipulation of exosomes, virus-sized particles released by all cells, may offer a new therapeutic approach to treating pancreatic cancer, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing inside coralNew technologies are making it possible to see inside coral, to examine the skeleton cores for devastation caused by humans. Scientists are racing the clock to assess the true extent of the damage before it becomes irreversible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanowires, the future of electronicsThe current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seismic CT scan points to rapid uplift of Southern TibetGeophysicists have conducted a three-year seismic CT scan of the upper mantle beneath the Tibetan Plateau and concluded that the southern half of the 'Roof of the World' formed within 10 million years, or less than one-quarter of the time since the beginning of the India-Eurasia continental collision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cope's gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problemOur auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with even in a noisy room full of people. The secret to rising above the noise -- a dilemma known in the world of sound science as 'the cocktail party problem' -- turns out to lie in its ability to discern patterns in the background noise and selectively ignore such patterns, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbiology: Many forks make light workNew insights into the control of DNA replication and cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a biotechnologically important microorganism, could help to optimize the industrial production of amino acids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software toolPeople who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes influence ability to read a person's mind from their eyesOur DNA influences our ability to read a person's thoughts and emotions from looking at their eyes, suggests a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Centenarians have lower incidence of chronic illnessResearchers studied the life and health span of a group of centenarian World War II veterans at the VA medical center in Washington, D.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small climb in mean temperatures linked to far higher chance of deadly heat wavesAn increase in mean temperature of 0.5 degrees Celsius over half a century may not seem all that serious, but it's enough to have more than doubled the probability of a heat wave killing in excess of 100 people in India, according to researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.
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Live Science
Overweight Kids More Likely to Be OstracizedNew research finds that overweight children may be actively ostracized by their peers.
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Ars Technica
Has Microsoft just secretly announced the Xbox One Scorpio release date? The Xbox One E3 Teaser Trailers Using the slogan "Feel The Power," Microsoft is teasing its E3 reveal of the next generation "Project Scorpio" Xbox in a set of videos. A Twitter user has gone through the videos frame by frame—because truly, there's no way you'll ever notice these things at full speed—and discovered that the videos do a bit more than merely whet our appetites for the hugely powerf
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Gizmodo
Wonder Woman in 4DX Was Worth It Wonder Woman , surprisingly, did not make me barf. Nor did it make my coworker, Ellie Shechet, barf, who may be the only person I know with a stomach more sensitive than mine. Wonder Woman did, however, beat us up, particularly in a scene early on when Antiope shoots three arrows into an opponent. We felt them in our own backs, three swift kicks landing in quick, startling succession. For awhile
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Popular Science
Sleeping in on the weekend won’t actually give you heart disease Health But there are other reasons not to give in to "social jet lag." If there’s one thing you should remember when reading any piece of science news, it’s this: correlation doesn’t imply causation. Read on.
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The Atlantic
Your Stories of Battling Unconscious Bias Is it possible to be prejudiced without realizing it? In “ Is This How Discrimination Ends? ,” the writer Jessica Nordell unpacked the complex and controversial science of implicit racial bias—the idea that people can act in biased ways even when they sincerely reject discriminatory ideas. Many readers responded with stories of their own experiences with bias, whether witnessing it, being the vic
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The Atlantic
James Comey's Opening Statement on Trump, Annotated Updated at 4:08 p.m. ET Less than 24 hours before former FBI Director James Comey is scheduled to testify on Capitol Hill, the Senate Intelligence Committee posted his prepared opening remarks on its website Wednesday. In them, Comey, who was fired by President Trump in May, describes in detail their various interactions and conversations—offering what appear to be direct quotes from the presiden
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Live Science
Warts and All: Octopus' Skin Bumps Divide SpeciesTwo species of highly similar deep-sea octopus are hard to tell apart — unless you look closely at their "warts."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Celestial Boondocks: Study Supports the Idea We Live in a VoidA new study not only firms up the idea that we exist in one of the holes of the Swiss cheese structure of the cosmos, but helps ease the apparent disagreement between different measurements of the Hubble Constant, the unit cosmologists use to describe the rate at which the universe is expanding today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Retinal cells 'go with the flow' to assess own motion through spaceA new study helps to explain how specialized retinal cells help stabilize vision by perceiving how their owner is moving.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to reduce shockwaves in quantum beam experimentsWhile skimmers have been a necessary component in atomic and molecular-beam experiments for decades, they were also known to impose a fundamental limit on the number of particles one could pack into the beam. However, researchers have now revealed a simple way to overcome this limit.
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Ars Technica
Some of the best art on Twitter comes from these strange little bots Michael Christophersson On Twitter, bad news comes at all hours, with the latest political scandal chasing the most recent military action. The site is an informational storm surge, and it's tempting to log off forever. But I’ve found another strategy for coping with the deluge: I follow a small army of artistically inclined Twitter bots, peculiar creations that intermittently populate my dispiri
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Futurity.org
New Homo sapiens fossil bones are the oldest yet Researchers have uncovered 300,000-year-old fossil bones of Homo sapiens —the oldest reliably dated fossil evidence of our species. The unearthing, reported in two papers in the journal Nature ( one , two ), significantly pushes back the origins of our species: the find is approximately 100,000 older than any other previously discovered Homo sapiens fossils. The discovery, which also included sto
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The Atlantic
James Comey Finally Tells His Side of the Story Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET “I need loyalty. I want loyalty.” Those are the words James Comey will testify President Trump said to him at a January dinner when the former FBI director appears before the Senate Intelligence Committee Thursday. In his prepared opening remarks , Comey describes multiple conversations he had at Trump’s initiative about the Russia investigation and whether its effect on h
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The Atlantic
The Best of Cassini—13 Years in Orbit Around Saturn This September, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will take its final measurements and images as it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere at 77,000 miles per hour, burning up high above the cloud tops. Launched in 1997, Cassini traveled 2.2 billion miles in seven years to reach Saturn and enter orbit. Over the past 13 years, Cassini’s instruments have returned countless priceless scientific observations and h
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The Atlantic
Trump Offers to Resolve Arab Dispute With Qatar President Trump offered Wednesday to resolve the breakdown in relations between six Arab nations, including Saudi Arabia, and Qatar. The offer, which came during a phone call between Trump and Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tameem Bin Hamad al-Thani came a day after the U.S. president appeared to suggest on Twitter that he had precipitated the decision this week by Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain, the United A
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Gizmodo
We Can Be Easily Tricked Into Liking Bad Wine Fact: All rosé is good. (Image: Getty) There are two time-honored truths about wine: all of it is good—even at its worst—and, when it comes to appreciating wine, nobody knows what the fuck they’re talking about. The latter truth reveals itself time and again, especially in studies about wine consumption. On that point, a team of scientists at the University of Adelaide proved just how easily we c
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WIRED
Amazon Imagines a Future of Infinite Computing Power Amazon's Alexa heads for a future that looks a lot like the Starship Enterprise. The post Amazon Imagines a Future of Infinite Computing Power appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
How Google Copes When Even It Can’t Afford Enough Gear Urs Hölzle is the person Google's engineers turn to when all that computing power turns out not to be enough. The post How Google Copes When Even It Can't Afford Enough Gear appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian
Fossil mushroom discovered from the era of the dinosaurs Scientists say the unique find, believed to be 115m years old, is similar to today’s fungi With a classic shape, gills and a sturdy stalk, it wouldn’t look out of place in a stir-fry but, in fact, it’s the fossilised remains of a mushroom thought to have sprouted about 115m years ago. It is the world’s oldest known fossil mushroom, and it is remarkable that it was preserved at all. “It is pretty
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Gizmodo
The Steamiest Details From James Comey's Prepared Trump Testimony Photo: AP James Comey, the former head of the FBI, will be testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday about his interactions with President Donald Trump. Ahead of that hearing, the committee has released his opening statement, which is full of saucy little details of illicit one-on-one conversations and flaunted protocol. The whole thing reads like a Victorian romance novel,
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NYT > Science
The U.S. Can’t Leave the Paris Climate Deal Just YetUnder the Paris rules, the United States will remain a party to the accord for nearly all of President Trump’s current term. So what comes next?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding new homes won't help Emperor penguins cope with climate changeUnlike other species that migrate successfully to escape the wrath of climate change, a new study shows that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as sea ice conditions continue to deteriorate, the 54 colonies that exist today will face devastating declines by the end of this century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique enables 3-D printing with paste of silicone particles in waterUsing the principles behind the formation of sandcastles from wet sand, North Carolina State University researchers have achieved 3-D printing of flexible and porous silicone rubber structures through a new technique that combines water with solid and liquid forms of silicone into a pasty ink that can be fed through a 3-D printer. The finding could have biomedical applications and uses in soft rob
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows important economic contributions of H-1B visasA new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science shows that the US economy is strengthened by H-1B visa holders who fill key roles in enhancing organizations and supplementing the work of their US peers. This is particularly true for trades like the US audit industry that employ a large number of individuals who hold H-1B visas, and who recruit highly skilled foreign workers for specialty occ
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Ars Technica
In shareholder meeting, Tesla CEO Elon Musk talks Model Y, new factories Enlarge / Elon Musk in front of a Tesla in China in 2015. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images ) In a shareholder meeting on Tuesday evening, Tesla CEO Elon Musk addressed a few questions from investors as his company gets ready to move into production on the Model 3 , the lower-priced electric vehicle that’s intended to become the company’s bread and butter. As always, Tesla
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The Atlantic
If Google Teaches an AI to Draw, Will That Help It Think? Imagine someone told you to draw a pig and a truck. Maybe you’d sketch this: ​ Easy enough. But then, imagine you were asked to draw a pig truck. You, a human, would intuitively understand how to mix the salient features of the two objects, and maybe you’d come up with something like this: ​ Note the little squiggly pig tail, the slight rounding of the window in the cab, which recalls an eye. The
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Gizmodo
Uber Exec Dismissed After Sharing Rape Victim's Medical Records Photo: AP After an Uber driver raped a customer in India, an Uber executive obtained the victim’s medical records and shared them with the company’s CEO, Travis Kalanick, and its senior vice president, Emil Michael. The executives then questioned the medical record and suggested that it was a sabotage attempt by a competitor, Recode reports . Eric Alexander, Uber’s president of business in the As
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Live Science
AI Predicts Autism Based on Infant Brain ScansA new machine learning program can predict, in 6-month-old babies, which ones will go on to develop autism, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prebiotics reduce body fat in overweight childrenThere may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity. Prebiotics reduce body fat in children who are overweight or obese by altering their gut microbiota, according to new research. Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients (such as fiber) that act as fertilizers to help stimulate the growth of good bacteria already in the gut, different from probiotics, which introduce new bac
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spin effects in solution-based nanocrystalsWet-chemically produced nanocrystals are becoming more and more powerful. Now a research group has succeeded in substantiating electronic spin effects in such nanoplatelets. In this way, more cost-effective and more powerful transistors and computer chips with lower power consumption are conceivable in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Component tracking solution via 'fingerprint'Highly interconnected manufacturing chains, cost issues and technical feasibility make it difficult to trace individual components in mass production. Efficient “track & trace“ solutions are, however, an important prerequisite for production and process optimization — especially in the context of digitized manufacturing. With its “Track & Trace Fingerprint“ solution, the researchers has developed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MIRPHAB: Sensor boutique for early adoptersEvery chemical substance absorbs a very individual fraction of infrared light. Like a human fingerprint, this absorption can be used with optical methods for identifying substances. Such methods are used in the chemical industry, for example, but also in the health sector or in criminal investigation. Researchers are now in the development of sensor technology and measurement technology in mid-inf
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: India's rising temperatures are already deadlyIndia is now two and a half times more likely to experience a deadly heat wave than a half century ago, and all it took was an increase in the average temperature of just 0.5 degrees Celsius (less than 1 degree Fahrenheit), according to a study published Wednesday.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Are Now Using AI to Predict Autism in Infants Image: NIH Despite all the headway that science has made in understanding autism in recent years, knowing which children will one day develop autism is still almost impossible to predict. Children diagnosed with autism appear to behave normally until around two, and until then there is often no indication that anything is wrong. But by scanning the brains of babies whose siblings have autism and
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Popular Science
Meet NASA's newest class of astronauts Space Their dream jobs just became a reality. Join us as we learn who will be the newest Americans in space, and what it took to get there. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising sea levels will boost moderate floods in some areas, severe floods in othersA new study by researchers at Princeton and Rutgers universities finds that sea-level rise over the next 50 to 100 years will lead to moderate coastal flooding in regions already prone to floods, but to more severe flooding in regions where such floods are currently rare.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Charliecloud' simplifies Big Data supercomputingAt Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved. In the case of a new product, dubbed 'Charliecloud,' a crisp 800-line code helps supercomputer users operate in the high-performance world of Big Data without burdening computer center staff with the peculiari
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify gene that may play a central role in heart diseaseAlthough lifestyle choices contribute to heart disease, genetics play a major role. This genetic facet has remained largely mysterious. But new research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified what may be a key player: a mutated gene that leads to irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a dangerously inefficient heart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find world's oldest fossil mushroomRoughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey. Its ultimate fate as a mineralized fossil preserved in limestone in northeast Brazil makes it a scientific wonder, scientists report in the journal PLOS ONE.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting autism: Study links infant brain connections to diagnoses at age 2In two previous studies, University of North Carolina researchers and colleagues linked infant brain anatomy differences to autism diagnoses at age two. Now they show differences in functional connections between brain regions at 6 months to predict autism at age two.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detecting autism in infants before symptoms emergeAccording to the results of a new study, a brain scan can detect functional changes in babies as young as six months of age that predicts later diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment hope for women with BRCA1 breast cancersResearchers have found a new way to use immunotherapy, a breakthrough mode of cancer treatment which harnesses the patient's immune system, to treat an aggressive form of breast cancer. The researchers at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre have shown, for the first time, that combining two immunotherapy drugs could be effective in treating triple negative
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study doesn't support theory red and eastern wolves are recent hybrids, researchers argueA University of Idaho-led research team is calling into question a 2016 study that concluded eastern and red wolves are not distinct species, but rather recent hybrids of gray wolves and coyotes. In a comment paper that will publish June 7 in Science Advances, the team argues the study's genomic data and analyses do not definitively prove recent hybridization -- but rather provide support for the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neuroimaging technique may help predict autism among high-risk infantsFunctional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may predict which high-risk, 6-month old infants will develop autism spectrum disorder by age 2 years, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), two components of the National Institutes of Health. The study
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The Atlantic
Trump’s Economic Gamble Donald Trump invariably presents his agenda as prioritizing the American economy over abstract ideals like global cooperation. But that’s not accurate. With decisions like last week’s blustery withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, Trump’s agenda prioritizes some segments of America’s economy over others. He’s attempting to restore the primacy of industries that powered the American economy in
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The Atlantic
Why Are So Many People Applying to Be Astronauts? More American workers than ever seem to want the world’s longest commute. NASA announced Wednesday its newest class of astronauts , five women and seven men, ranging in age from 29 to 42. They were selected from a pool of more than 18,300 applicants. That’s a record for the space agency, which received more than 6,300 during its last call for new hires , in late 2011. The previous record was 8,00
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New Scientist - News
NASA is right to pay homage to the living for the first timeNaming a solar probe after astrophysicist Eugene Parker breaks the space agency’s tradition of only honouring the dead. That’s a good thing, says Geraint Lewis
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New Scientist - News
Our species may be 150,000 years older than we thoughtNew fossil bones and tools from Morocco show that the familiar face of Homo sapiens was present in Africa as early as 350,000 years ago
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New Scientist - News
Google blocker to eliminate bad ads and let users go ad-freeThe tech giant will bring it own ad blocker to Chrome next year, in the hope that blocking the worst ads will encourage users to put up with the rest
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New Scientist - News
Robot dog has an artificial woof that sounds like the real thingThe robo-dog’s bark is generated by a mammalian voice synthesiser which could help create realistic robot animal companions for use with the elderly
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New Scientist - News
Bird caught in amber 100 million years ago is best ever foundA hatchling exquisitely preserved in amber is giving us the best glimpse yet of what an extinct group of birds was like
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small group of neurons modulates the amount of insulin that the pancreas must produceA new study emphasizes the importance of the neuronal mechanisms in the detection of nutrients and the control of glucose levels. The results help to understand diabetes in greater detail.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many good years after heart bypass surgery, but something happens after ten yearsThe prognosis following heart bypass surgery is both good and has improved over the past three decades. In fact, the survival rate for bypass patients who make it through the first month after the operation is close to that of the population in general. But 8-10 years after a heart bypass operation, mortality increases by 60-80 per cent. This is new and important knowledge for the doctors who moni
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social support more important to mothersFor mothers who feel that they are not in control of certain aspects of life and who are struggling with their relationship to their teenage children, social support may make a great difference. But the same does not seem to apply to fathers in the same situation, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnant women could get on their bikes and stay healthy with better supportMedical advice from risk-averse health professionals may contribute to some women's decisions to stop cycling to work during pregnancy, meaning they miss out on the potential benefits of the active commute. A recent study reveals the reasons why women decide to stop or continue cycling to work when they are pregnant, including often ambiguously worded or overly-cautious advice from medical guideli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single cells lined up like ducks in a rowThe higher the concentration of tumor cells in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of metastasis. The number of circulating tumor cells indicates how well a patient is responding to therapy. Researchers have developed a new microhole chip that enables cells to be identified and characterized reliably within minutes.
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Gizmodo
US Intelligence Chiefs Won't Say If Trump Asked Them to Interfere With FBI's Russia Probe Photo: Getty In the first half of a public hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday, the nation’s top intelligence officials refused to address allegations that President Donald Trump had asked them to publicly downplay the FBI’s investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia. Wednesday’s hearing was slated to discuss Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
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Science : NPR
How Alan Alda Makes Science Understandable How do you communicate complex ideas effectively? How do scientists and doctors get their findings across to a needing public? (Image credit: courtesy of Alan Alda)
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Live Science
World's Oldest Fossilized Mushroom Sprouted 115 Million Years AgoAbout 115 million years ago, when car-size pterosaurs flew overhead, a tiny mushroom no taller than a chess piece fell into a river and later fossilized — a feat that makes it the oldest-known fossilized mushroom on record, a new study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kestrels' strategies for flight and hunting vary with the weatherKestrels adapt their flight and hunting strategies to weather conditions, including solar radiation, wind speed, and air temperature, according to a study published June 7, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jesús Hernández-Pliego from Estación Biológica de Doñana, Spain, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find world's oldest fossil mushroomRoughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey. Its ultimate fate as a mineralized fossil preserved in limestone in northeast Brazil makes it a scientific wonder, scientists report in the journal PLOS ONE.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study doesn't support theory red and eastern wolves are recent hybrids, researchers argueA team led by University of Idaho researchers is calling into question a widely publicized 2016 study that concluded eastern and red wolves are not distinct species, but rather recent hybrids of gray wolves and coyotes. In a comment paper that will publish Wednesday, June 7, in the journal Science Advances, the team examines the previous study and argues that its genomic data and analyses do not d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female Steller sea lions tend to breed near their birthplaceFemale Steller sea lions tend to breed at or near the rookery where they were born, according to a study published June 7, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kelly Hastings from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, USA, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moroccan fossils show human ancestors' diet of gameNew fossil finds from Morocco do more than push back the origins of our species by 100,000 years. They also reveal what was on the menu for our oldest-known Homo sapiens ancestors 300,000 years ago: Plenty of gazelle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fabric coating could thwart chemical weapons, save livesChemical weapons are nightmarish. In a millisecond, they can kill hundreds, if not thousands. But, in a study, scientists report that they have developed a way to adhere a lightweight coating onto fabrics that is capable of neutralizing a subclass of these toxins -- those that are delivered through the skin. The life-saving technique could eventually be used to protect soldiers and emergency respo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Red onions pack a cancer-fighting punch, study revealsOntario-grown red onions are the most effective at killing colon and breast cancer cells compared to other types of onions, reports a new study. This is because of the onions' high levels of quercetin and anthocyanin. As part of this project, the researchers are also the first to develop a non-toxic way to extract quercetin from onions making it more suitable for consumption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change misconceptions common among teachers, study findsMny secondary school science teachers possess climate change misconceptions similar to average Americans, new research confirms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cells divide tasks and conquer workDespite advances in neuroscience, the brain is still very much a black box -- no one even knows how many different types of neurons exist. Now, a scientist has used a mathematical framework to better understand how different cell types divide work among themselves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential target for treatment of aggressive brain cancer identifiedResearchers have discovered that the BCL6 protein could potentially be used as a marker to predict clinical outcomes of patients suffering from Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most malignant cancer of the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer's defenses and attack tumorsCancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment. But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in one cancer group went into
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher alcohol consumption leads to greater loss of muscle tissue in postmenopausal womenBoth aging and menopause are known to affect sarcopenia, which is a loss of muscle mass and strength, which in turn affects balance, gait, and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living. A new study is one of the first to link alcohol consumption with a higher prevalence of sarcopenia in postmenopausal women.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Brain Scans May Forecast Autism in BabiesChecks on 6-month-old infants accurately predict which children will be diagnosed at age 2 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air traffic privatization plan hits turbulence in CongressPresident Donald Trump's plan to privatize the nation's air traffic control system is running into bipartisan opposition in Congress, where Republicans fret that it could raise costs for air travelers and hurt small airports.
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The Atlantic
What Trump's Qatar Tweets Revealed On Tuesday, President Donald Trump published a series of vehement statements on Twitter in response to the decision by seven Arab countries to abruptly cut off ties with Qatar. “During my recent trip to the Middle East I stated that there can no longer be funding of Radical Ideology. Leaders pointed to Qatar—look!” Trump tweeted . “So good to see the Saudi Arabia visit with the King and 50 countr
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The Atlantic
The Fitful Evolution of Wonder Woman’s Look In a scene in the newest film adaptation of Wonder Woman, the heroine (Gal Gadot), dressed as her alter ego Diana Prince, comes to the aid of a friend by destroying a gunman’s weapon. She hurls the bully across the pub, where he lands in a hard crash. Watching the scene, Sameer, an associate of Wonder Woman’s comrade Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) exclaims, “I’m both frightened and aroused.” Looking m
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The Atlantic
Why Adolescence Lasts Forever In August of 2001, Mitch Prinstein, a psychology professor who had just been hired at Yale University, offered his first class at the school: a course he had developed about popularity among children and adolescents. When Prinstein arrived at the small classroom the school had assigned him in the center of campus, he was greeted with a crowd outside the lecture hall—one so large that he figured t
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Quanta Magazine
Sylvia Earle Is Not Done Exploring “I can forgive them from 1,000 years ago, or 500 years ago, or even just 50 years ago. They did not understand the impact they were having on the ocean,” Sylvia Earle said to the crowd. “But there’s no excuse anymore. The knowledge is there.” Her audience hung on every word — partly in sympathy with her commitment to protecting the marine environment, but also undoubtedly out of admiration for Ea
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Gizmodo
Make Fresh Ground Coffee At Home With This $37 Burr Mill Cuisinart Supreme Grind Automatic Burr Mill , $37 It’s easy to see why Cuisinart’s DBM-8 electric burr coffee grinder is Amazon’s top seller in the category. It’s affordable, it’s dead simple to use, it includes 18 coarseness settings, and it looks great. Today’s $37 price tag is roughly $8 less than usual, so perk up, and lock in your order before it sells out.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Oldest Homo sapiens fossil claim rewrites our species' history Remains from Morocco dated to 315,000 years ago push back our species' origins by 100,000 years — and suggest we didn't evolve only in East Africa. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22114
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Physicists have finally created a 2D magnet Just one atom thick, the magnet will allow researchers to perform previously impossible experiments. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22115
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Gizmodo
Proposed Trump Budget Would Kill Program That Monitors Debilitating Solar Storms Image: Goddard Space Center, NASA The idea that a huge solar storm could wreak havoc here on Earth isn’t just a sci-fi plot, it’s a situation that countries and power grids around the world actively prepare for. But the Trump Administration’s latest 2017 budget proposal would completely eliminate the program that keeps the continental US under 24/7 protection from this potentially catastrophic ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals that green incentives could actually be increasing CO2 emissionsGlobally, from China and Germany to the United States, electric vehicle (EV) subsidies have been championed as an effective strategy to boost production of renewable technology and reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG).
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Popular Science
Hidden tricks you didn't know your Android phone could do DIY 10 tips to master your Google-powered device. Rocking an Android phone? We show you how to customize the interface, improve security, tweak app settings, make your handset easier to use, and more.
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Futurity.org
Heroin users want to avoid fentanyl but can’t Fentanyl, a highly potent prescription opioid, has Rhode Island drug users on high alert. But despite widespread aversion, the drug now causes the majority of the state’s drug overdose deaths. A pair of studies published in the International Journal of Drug Policy underscores the urgency of combatting the misuse of fentanyl and dispute a common perception that many users seek out the drug for its
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Can We Optimize AI for the Greatest Good, Instead of Profit?At a summit in Geneva, academics, policy makers, and humanitarians are plotting how AI could be used to transform the planet for the better.
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Gizmodo
The Best iOS 11 Features You Probably Haven't Heard of Yet Apps are now label free in the dock. (Image: Gizmodo) Earlier this week Apple showed off iOS 11 , the next iteration of the iPhone and iPad operating system that’s coming later this Fall, but lengthy as its WWDC keynote was, there was nowhere near enough time to mention all of the neat features coming down the iOS pipe. We’ve got the beta up and running—here are the best goodies heading your way
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Popular Science
How your iPhone could know when you’re in a moving car Technology A new iOS 11 feature aims to curb distracted driving On Monday, Apple announced a slew of news at its Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif., including a new safety feature coming to the next version of its…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Running multiple marathons does not increase risk of atherosclerosisThe health of blood vessels depends solely on age, suggests new research. The new study aimed to find out whether running itself could induce the early development of atherosclerosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Even moderate drinking linked to a decline in brain health, finds studyAlcohol consumption, even at moderate levels, is associated with increased risk of adverse brain outcomes and steeper decline in cognitive (mental) skills, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Motor-boat noise makes fish bad parents, leading to the death of their babiesThe sound of motorboat engines disturbed coral reef fish so acutely it changed the behavior of parents, and stopped male fish properly guarding their young, feeding and interacting with their offspring, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Culture affects how people deceive others, study showsPeople's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background, psychologists have discovered. Linguistic cues to deception do not appear consistently across all cultures. The differences are dictated by known cultural differences in cognition and social norms. This has implications for everything from forensic risk assessments, discrimination proceedings and the evaluation of asyl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impact of protective bacteria linked to infection route, study findsThe benefits of protective bacteria -- which safeguard organisms from further disease without causing harm -- depend on how subsequent infections enter the body, a study of fruit flies has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative therapy strategy for pancreatic cancer uses engineered exosomes targeting mutated KRAS geneGenetic manipulation of exosomes, virus-sized particles released by all cells, may offer a new therapeutic approach to treating pancreatic cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover a 2-D magnetA team led by the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has for the first time discovered magnetism in the 2-D world of monolayers, or materials that are formed by a single atomic layer. The findings, published June 8 in the journal Nature, demonstrate that magnetic properties can exist even in the 2-D realm -- opening a world of potential applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The first of our kindNew finds of fossils and stone tools from the archaeological site of Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, push back the origins of our species by one hundred thousand years and show that by about 300 thousand years ago important changes in our biology and behaviour had taken place across most of Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dating expert ages oldest modern humanA Griffith University geochronologist's state-of-the-art dating methods push back the origins of our species by an unprecedented 100,000 years, uncovering the oldest modern human and our deep biological history in Africa.Professor Rainer Grün, director of the leading Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution, was among an international research team that dated fossils discovered at the archae
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moroccan fossils show human ancestors' diet of gameNew fossil finds from the Jebel Irhoud archaeological site in Morocco do more than push back the origins of our species by 100,000 years. They also reveal what was on the menu for our oldest-known Homo sapiens ancestors 300,000 years ago: Plenty of gazelle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retinal cells 'go with the flow' to assess own motion through spaceA new study in Nature helps to explain how specialized retinal cells help stabilize vision by perceiving how their owner is moving.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Florida researchers identify protein target to halt citrus tree diseaseUniversity of Florida researchers may have come a step closer to finding a treatment for a disease called Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, that has been decimating citrus trees in the state.
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Ars Technica
The Twitter presidency is getting old, according to a new voter survey Enlarge (credit: Twitter ) There's at least one definition of President Donald Trump that we can all agree on—he's the tweeting president. Unlike his predecessor, Trump has provided the public with an unfiltered look at the chief executive's immediate thoughts, inventing a new word along the way. His volatile tweets have derided his own staff , the public, and even overseas political leaders . Tw
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Big Think
Bob Dylan Finally Delivers His Nobel Acceptance Speech Bob Dylan finally presents his Nobel prize acceptance speech. Read More
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Ars Technica
Drug coupons are costing us billions: Lawmakers seek end to slimy scheme Enlarge (credit: jridgewayphotography ) When Mylan’s CEO, Heather Bresch, appeared before lawmakers last September to explain the skyscraping price of life-saving EpiPens, she touted coupons that would cut out-of-pocket costs for customers rather than plans to lower prices. Executives for Turing Pharmaceuticals , Valeant , Marathon , Kaléo , and many others used the same strategy amid price-gougi
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Gizmodo
Watching Apple's New Shark Tank-Inspired TV Series Is Like Slowly Dying Image: Apple Music Last night, Apple premiered its first attempt at an original TV show, Planet of the Apps, a Shark Tank meets American Idol unscripted series where app developers appeal to a panel of celebrity judges for outside funding. The first episode is currently available for free on Apple Music. It is also very bad. In fact, so much can be said of the show’s inanity that the most challen
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Popular Science
Why whales are back in New York City Environment The Cetaceans are back in town. Cleaner water ways and more fish have once again made New York City appeal to humpback whales. Read on.
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The Atlantic
Scientists Have Found the Oldest Known Human Fossils Hundreds of thousands of years ago, around 62 miles west of what would eventually become Marrakesh, a group of people lived in a cave overlooking a lush Moroccan landscape. They rested there, building fires to keep themselves warm. They hunted there, sharpening stone tools to bring down animals. And they died there, leaving their bones behind in the dirt. At the time, there would have been nothin
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The Atlantic
How U.S. Immigration Law Enables Modern Slavery This article is part of a series of responses to Alex Tizon’s Atlantic article “ My Family’s Slave .” The full series can be found here . In “My Family’s Slave,” the devastating cover story in The Atlantic ’s June issue, the late, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Alex Tizon recounts the life of Eudocia “Lola” Pulido, a Filipino immigrant who worked for 56 years without pay for Tizon’s family. Re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New chemotherapy approach offers breast cancer patients a better quality of lifeThe chemotherapy drug capecitabine gives patients a better quality of life and is as effective at preventing breast cancer from returning as the alternative regimen called CMF, when given following epirubicin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D skin made of stem cells treats backbone birth defect in rodentsMyelomeningocele is a severe congenital defect in which the backbone and spinal canal do not close before birth, putting those affected at risk of lifelong neurological problems. In a preclinical study, researchers developed a stem cell-based therapy for generating skin grafts to cover myelomeningocele defects before birth. They first generated artificial skin from human induced pluripotent stem c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mini-flares potentially jeopardize habitability of planets circling red dwarf starsSolar flares and associated eruptions can trigger auroras on Earth or, more ominously, damage satellites and power grids. Could flares on cool, red dwarf stars cause even more havoc to orbiting planets, even rendering them uninhabitable? To help answer that question, astronomers sought to find out how many flares such stars typically unleash.
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NYT > Science
Matter: Oldest Fossils of Homo Sapiens Found in Morocco, Altering History of Our SpeciesNewly discovered fossils indicate Homo sapiens were present in Africa 300,000 years ago, scientists reported. Until now, the earliest evidence dated back just 195,000 years.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'First of our kind' found in MoroccoFossils of modern humans uncovered in north Africa are at least 300,000 years old.
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Viden
Tyrannosaurus Rex havde måske ikke fjer alligevelForskere har gennemgået fossiler og mener nu, at tordenøglen havde skæl.
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Live Science
In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever FoundScientists have discovered the remains of five Homo sapiens individuals in a cave in Morocco. The fossils date back about 300,000 years, pushing back the origin of humanity at least 100,000 years, they say.
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Live Science
Oldest Fossils of Our Species Push Back Origin of Modern HumansThe oldest known bones of our species, dating back around 300,000 years, have been discovered in a cave in Morocco.
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Gizmodo
Incredible Discovery Pushes Back Origin of Homo Sapiens By 100,000 Years Two views of a composite reconstruction of the earliest known Homo sapiens fossils from Jebel Irhoud (Morocco) based on micro computed tomographic scans of multiple original fossils. (Credit: Philipp Gunz, MPI EVA Leipzig) The remains of five early Homo sapiens have been unearthed at a site in northwest Africa. At around 300,000 years old, the fossils are a whopping 100,000 years older than the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover the oldest Homo sapiens fossils at Jebel Irhoud, MoroccoAn international research team led by Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig, Germany) and Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer of the National Institute for Archaeology and Heritage (INSAP, Rabat, Morocco) uncovered fossil bones of Homo sapiens along with stone tools and animal bones at Jebel Irhoud, Morocco. The finds are dated to about 300 thousand years ago and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify protein target to halt citrus tree diseaseUniversity of Florida researchers may have come a step closer to finding a treatment for a disease called Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, that has been decimating citrus trees in the state. In work published this week in mSphere, an open access journal from the American Society for Microbiology, the investigators describe identifying a small protein from one bacterium living in Asian citrus psy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover a 2-D magnetMagnetic materials form the basis of technologies that play increasingly pivotal roles in our lives today, including sensing and hard-disk data storage. But as our innovative dreams conjure wishes for ever-smaller and faster devices, researchers are seeking new magnetic materials that are more compact, more efficient and can be controlled using precise, reliable methods.
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Dana Foundation
World Science Festival: Computational Creativity Interest in artificial intelligence (AI) seems like it’s at an all-time high, with people both wary and intrigued about how machine learning systems will change, and hopefully improve, our lives. Past discussions we’ve covered have delved into the ethical sphere: Can autonomous robots that (currently) lack consciousness and emotions serve us well as future healthcare aides and soldiers ? Can robo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electric car subsidies may do more harm than goodA new study by Concordia economics professor Ian Irvine shows that subsidizing EVs in the North American context will not reduce GHG emissions in the short-term, and may even increase them -- at a cost to taxpayers.
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Science : NPR
Travel Through Time With A Whale Detective Join NPR's Madeline Sofia on a tour of the largest collection of whale bones in the world. Curator Nick Pyenson takes us backstage to see Smithsonian specimens that aren't on display in museums. (Image credit: Maia Stern/NPR)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Oldest known Homo sapiens fossils come from northern Africa, studies claimMoroccan fossils proposed as oldest known H. sapiens, from around 300,000 years ago.
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Ingeniøren
300.000 år gamle fossiler giver dødsstødet til Ud-af-Afrika hypotesenNydatering af fund fra 1960’erne i Marokko fastslår, at Homo sapiens ikke som tidligere antaget opstod i Østafrika for 200.000 år siden og herfra spredte sig til resten af verden. Homo sapiens er langt ældre.
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The Atlantic
James Clapper: Russia Investigation Worse Than Watergate James Clapper, the former Director of National Intelligence, said the Watergate scandal that brought down the Nixon presidency “pales” in comparison to allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election. “I lived through Watergate. I was on active duty then in the Air Force, I was a young officer. It was a scary time,” Clapper told reporters Wedne
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Gizmodo
A Gigantic Six-Foot-Wide Water Balloon Will Instantly Drown Your Victim GIF If the internet has taught us anything, it’s that everything is cooler in slow motion, and bigger is always better . So if you’re going to the trouble of making a monstrous water balloon measuring six feet across, you better make sure you get some awesome high-speed footage when the whole thing goes kaboom. Using a Phantom Flex 4K camera filming at 1,000 frames per second, The Slow Mo Guys on
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Futurity.org
Coding and Minecraft boost Syrian refugee kids Research with Syrian refugee children suggests that digital games can effectively teach refugee children much-needed skills—including a new language, cognitive skills, and coding—while also improving their mental health. “It is our hope that this study shows that even with limited resources, and even when there are language barriers, we can make a difference in the lives of children through lever
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The Atlantic
Four Global Scandals Fueled by Cold, Hard Cash For all the drama around the Trump administration’s response to Russia’s hacking of the U.S. election, a certain classic element of the spy drama is missing. Because all the action has been taken place online, there’s been no handover of suitcases full of cash. What fun is uncovering a ring of corruption if you can’t bust open a Walter White-style storage locker full of bills? Well, if American d
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Ingeniøren
Ny rapport om cirkulær økonomi: En rodebunke af stort og småt, siger ekspertDet regeringsnedsatte panel Advisory Board for cirkulær økonomi har i dag præsenteret 27 anbefalinger til, hvordan borgere, virksomheder og offentlige institutioner kan bidrage til et mere bæredygtigt samfund. Visionen er udmærket, men anbefalingerne er for slappe. Det mener ekspert i miljø- og k...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digital games improve mental health, educational outcomes of Syrian refugee childrenDigital games can effectively teach refugee children much-needed skills -- including a new language, cognitive skills, and coding -- while also improving their mental health, finds new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New target found to attack an incurable brain tumor in childrenA tumor suppressor gene p16 is turned off by a histone mutation (H3.3K27M), which is found in up to 70 percent of childhood brain tumors called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clinical benefit of clot retrieval now proven up to 24 hours after major ischemic strokeMechanical thrombectomy, which is an endovascular treatment to remove a stroke-causing blood clot in the brain, is effective in some patients even when performed within 6 to 24 hours after a stroke, results of an international, randomized controlled research study show.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MIT gets $140 million donation from anonymous alumnusThe Massachusetts Institute of Technology is getting a $140 million donation from a former student.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Altruism changing Western societyAltruism based on individual values is changing Western society. People in Western countries have seen a rise in individualism for quite some time, and this in turn helps to create generations of people with altruistic mindsets. Christian Welzel, Chief Research Fellow in the Laboratory for Comparative Social Research (HSE and Leuphana University of Lüneburg), teamed up with researchers from the Un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waste not, want not: Byproduct of ethanol industry makes suitable cattle feed supplementMaking a living raising cattle isn't as simple as just buying a herd and turning it out to pasture. Cattle require specific diets to maintain proper nutrition and weight gain. And how to do this in the most effective and efficient way possible has interested both ranchers and researchers for generations.
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Futurity.org
Eating late may wreak havoc on your body Eating late at night could be worse for your health than you might think. Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin, and cholesterol levels, and negatively affect fat metabolism, and hormonal markers implicated in heart disease, diabetes, and other health problems, according to new research. The findings offer the first experimental evidence on t
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New Scientist - News
Mass of a white dwarf star directly measured for the first timeEinstein said it couldn’t be done, but astrophysicists have used his prediction that gravity bends light to directly measure the mass of a dense stellar remnant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change misconceptions common among teachers, study findsRecent studies have shown that misconceptions about climate change and the scientific studies that have addressed climate change are pervasive among the U.S. public. Now, a new study by Benjamin Herman, assistant professor in the Department of Learning, Teaching and Curriculum in the University of Missouri College of Education, shows that many secondary school science teachers also possess several
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeing inside coralCoral reefs sustain marine life all over the world and protect its vulnerable coastlines. But the reefs are increasingly endangered, mainly because of pollution and rising ocean temperatures. Scientists, including American University's Kiho Kim are racing the clock to assess the true extent of the damage before it becomes irreversible. Today, new technologies are making it possible to see inside c
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Gizmodo
So Did T. Rex Have Feathers or Not? Image: calamity_sal /Flickr There’s something about dinosaurs that makes them strangely endearing, despite murdering humans in an umpteen number of films, having big teeth, and being related to one of the meanest types of living animal, birds. So lots of people ( us , mainly ) got excited about evidence showing that Tyrannosaurus rex might look more like an angry, feathered chicken. But a new stu
5h
WIRED
Hacking Online Hate Means Talking to the Humans Behind It Yasmin Green heads R&D at Jigsaw, a think tank at Google's parent company. Her radical strategy? Tackle the web's dark side by talking to its creators. The post Hacking Online Hate Means Talking to the Humans Behind It appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cells divide tasks and conquer workDespite advances in neuroscience, the brain is still very much a black box -- no one even knows how many different types of neurons exist. Now, a scientist from the Salk Institute has used a mathematical framework to better understand how different cell types divide work among themselves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Waste not, want notNutritious feed for cattle is complex. As the summer season progresses, grass can become harder to digest. However, researchers found by supplementing with dried distillers' grains, this effect can be minimized. Dried distillers' grains are left over after ethanol production. They are what remains of the ground corn used for fermentation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altruism changing Western societyAltruism based on individual values is changing Western society. People in Western countries have seen a rise in individualism for quite some time, and this in turn helps to create generations of people with altruistic mindsets. Christian Welzel, Chief Research Fellow in the Laboratory for Comparative Social Research (HSE and Leuphana University of Lüneburg), teamed up with researchers from the Un
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't rely on smartphone apps to treat back painUniversity of Sydney researchers have found that smartphone apps for treating back pain have questionable value as they are generally of poor quality, and have not been rigorously evaluated. Published in Best Practice & Research: Clinical Rheumatology, the study found there has not been thorough evaluation of apps for the self-management of back pain and there is no guidance for consumers on how t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reshaping Darwin's tree of lifeIn 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Now, scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and their international collaborators want to reshape Darwin's tree.
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The Atlantic
The Rich Men Who Drink Rhino Horns As I turned down Lãn Ông street, two things struck me. The first was how quiet it is compared to the rest of Hanoi’s Old Quarter: The flow of motorbikes is less incessant, the lights a notch dimmer. The second was the smell: somewhat musty, sometimes sweet, and unmistakably herbal. I was on Vietnam’s “traditional medicine street.” Shophouses all along the row were stacked with herbs and medicines
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The Atlantic
Trump's Solar-Powered Border Wall Is More Than a Troll On Tuesday afternoon, President Donald Trump shared a new idea with congressional Republicans : His vision was a [U.S.-Mexico border] wall 40 feet to 50 feet high and covered with solar panels so they’d be “beautiful structures,” the people said. The president said that most walls you hear about are 14 feet or 15 feet tall but this would be nothing like those walls. Trump told the lawmakers they
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Hubble sees light bending around nearby star Rare astronomical observation shows effects of relativity. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22108
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Gizmodo
The Mummy Is Monstrous, Just for All the Wrong Reasons Photo: Chiabella James The Mummy is the first movie in the “Dark Universe,” a planned series of films that will intertwine the ghoulish tales of the classic Universal Monsters. But it contains zero scares and is devoid of any sense of fun. What it does have is whole lot of Tom Cruise, and a Mummy whose motivation feels very , very problematic. Cruise is a movie star for a reason. Given the right
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Ars Technica
Frontier laid off state Senate president after broadband vote it didn’t like Enlarge / West Virginia State Senate President Mitch Carmichael, a former Frontier employee. (credit: Mitch Carmichael ) Broadband provider Frontier Communications recently laid off the West Virginia state Senate president after a vote the company didn't like—and yes, you read that correctly. West Virginia does not have a full-time legislature, and state lawmakers can supplement their part-time g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists propose a new paradigm that paints a more inclusive picture of the evolution of organisms and ecosystemsIn 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Now, scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and their international collaborators want to reshape Darwin's tree.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change misconceptions common among teachers, study findsA new study by Mizzou education researchers shows that many secondary school science teachers possess climate change misconceptions similar to average Americans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing inside coralNew technologies are making it possible to see inside coral, to examine the skeleton cores for devastation caused by humans. Scientists, including American University's Kiho Kim, are racing the clock to assess the true extent of the damage before it becomes irreversible.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Other Reason to Shift away from Coal: Air Pollution that Kills Thousands Every YearShifting coal-fired power plants in the U.S. to natural gas would have tremendous positive effects on human health in America -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
WIRED
What Christopher Wray Learned From the Last Two FBI Directors Christopher Wray, Trump's nominee for FBI Director, spent years working with---and learning from---James Comey and Robert Mueller. The post What Christopher Wray Learned From the Last Two FBI Directors appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
Why the US Air Force Is Teaming Up With SpaceX Image: SpaceX via Flickr Over the last several months, SpaceX has been seriously diversifying its clientele: in May, it flew a spy satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). On Tuesday, the U.S. Air Force announced that in August, it’ll be launching a reusable X-37B mini-space shuttle on board a Falcon 9 rocket. While some of the details are still shrouded in mystery (because the mil
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: SanDisk Flash Storage, Mechanics Tool Sets, Motion-Sensing Night Lights, and More A huge SanDisk flash storage sale , OxyLED’s newest night lights , and DEWALT mechanics tool sets lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals SanDisk Gold Box There’s no such thing as owning too much flash storage, and you can stock up on flash drives and SD cards in today’s Amazon Gold Box . Advertisement
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software toolPeople who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists.
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Futurity.org
How artificial intelligence can teach itself slang Christopher Manning specializes in natural language processing—designing computer algorithms that can understand meaning and sentiment in written and spoken language and respond intelligently. His work is closely tied to the sort of voice-activated systems found in smartphones and in online applications that translate text between human languages. He relies on an offshoot of artificial intelligen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GW researcher finds centenarians have lower incidence of chronic illnessGW researchers studied the life and health span of a group of centenarian World War II veterans at the VA medical center in Washington, D.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feared by drug users but hard to avoid, fentanyl takes a mounting tollIn a pair of studies of Rhode Island's opioid overdose epidemic, Brown University researchers show that while heroin users appear desperate to avoid fentanyl, it's killing more of them every year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes influence ability to read a person's mind from their eyesOur DNA influences our ability to read a person's thoughts and emotions from looking at their eyes, suggests a new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mining cancer data for treatment cluesGenomics -- the branch of molecular biology concerned with the structure, function, evolution, and mapping of genomes -- has proved successful in uncovering the complex nature of cancer. Researchers have used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to gain insights into the relationship between DNA sequences that fold into secondary structures and chromosomal rearrangements; identify
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software toolPeople who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical efficacy & future development of continuous glucose monitoring highlighted in DTTA growing body of data from clinical studies of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in type 1 diabetes supports the value of CGM for reducing variability in blood glucose levels and the risks of both hypo- and hyperglycemia, and for improving patient quality of life compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retailers charging women more than men for common hair loss medicationWomen pay an average of 40 percent more than men for minoxidil foams -- a hair loss remedy most commonly known as Rogaine -- according to a new analysis from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The price difference appears despite the fact that the men's and women's version of the products -- which are branded and marketed differently -- contain the sa
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Popular Science
Nightingale Review: This sleep aid creates virtual a blanket of white noise Gadgets This white noise solution from Cambridge Sound Management is a lot more advanced than a fan. The Nightingale offers a variety of different sounds that envelop you as you sleep from a pair of speakers.
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WIRED
My Creepy Quest to Save Humanity from Robocar Commuting I spend a day in my driveway looking for answers. The post My Creepy Quest to Save Humanity from Robocar Commuting appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Dazzling Photos Let You Orbit Earth Aboard the Space Station Astronaut Tim Peake traveled into space and got addicted to photography. The post Dazzling Photos Let You Orbit Earth Aboard the Space Station appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in patients with SchizophreniaA new study published by JAMA Psychiatry examines the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for the prevention of psychiatric rehospitalization and treatment failure among a nationwide group of patients with schizophrenia in Sweden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improvements in control of cardiovascular risk factors not seen at all socioeconomic levels in USBetween 1999 to 2014, there was a decline in average systolic blood pressure, smoking, and predicted cardiovascular risk of 20 percent or greater among high-income US adults, but these levels remained unchanged in adults with incomes at or below the federal poverty level, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Einstein's 'impossible hope' comes true: Weighing a star with gravityA little more than 100 years after Einstein developed his theory of general relativity, researchers have used its laws to observe something the iconic scientist claimed, in a 1936 Science paper, 'there [was] no hope of observing ... directly.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New confirmation of Einstein's General Theory of RelativityAlbert Einstein predicted that whenever light from a distant star passes by a closer object, gravity acts as a kind of magnifying lens, brightening and bending distant starlight. Yet, Einstein added, 'There is no hope of observing this phenomenon directly.' Now, Kailash C. Sahu and colleagues have done just that. Terry Oswalt of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University says the discovery opens a new w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Many forks make light workNew insights into the control of DNA replication and cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a biotechnologically important microorganism, could help to optimize the industrial production of amino acids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The hidden order in DNA diffusionA different approach to analyzing the motion of diffusing molecules has helped overturn the long-held assumption that DNA molecules move in a haphazard way. KAUST researchers reveal for the first time that DNA molecules move not by random Brownian motion but by a nonrandom walk related to polymer dynamics in a way that conserves overall Brownian characteristics.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Einstein’s light-bending by single far-off star detectedA measurement so precise Einstein thought it couldn't be done has demonstrated his most famous theory on a star outside the solar system for the first time.
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TEDTalks (video)
To understand autism, don't look away | Carina MorilloCarina Morillo knew almost nothing about autism when her son Ivan was diagnosed -- only that he didn't speak or respond to words, and that she had to find other ways to connect with him. She shares how she learned to help her son thrive by being curious along with him. (In Spanish with English subtitles)
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Science | The Guardian
Keep women in academia by providing childcare, historian urges universities Childcare is the single biggest problem for female academics, but too little is done to help, suggests Cambridge University historian Patricia Fara A leading British historian has called on universities to provide more support for childcare to reduce the number of women who leave academia before they reach the peak of their careers. Starting a family remains one of the greatest obstacles for wome
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Gizmodo
Scientists Weigh a Star Using Gravity, Proving Einstein Wrong by Proving Him Right Artist’s depiction of a white dwarf (right) in orbit around a white giant star. (Image: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)) Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, called general relativity, is probably the best physics theory ever formulated. It just keeps working, often for things Einstein himself didn’t believe, like the accelerating expansion of the universe. Scientists only just proved some of its
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Gizmodo
Offred Goes Mission: Impossible as The Handmaid's Tale Sets the Stage for a Revolution All Photos Courtesy Hulu This latest episode of The Handmaid’s Tale hit a lot of familiar notes. Offred and the Commander pay a visit to Jezebels? Ofwarren is acting paranoid and scared? Serena Joy is sad she doesn’t have a baby? Checks all around. On the surface, it felt a little repetitive—but it was also laying the foundation for next week’s season finale, and showing how much Offred has chang
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New Scientist - News
Artisan sourdough? You may as well eat mass-produced white breadFans of the #JERF (Just Eat Real Food) fad would reject a factory loaf and say an artisan crust is vastly better for us. They're wrong, says Anthony Warner
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cope's gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problemYou've been there: Trying to carry on a conversation in a room so noisy that the background chatter threatens to drown out the words you hear. Yet somehow your auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with. The secret to rising above the noise—a dilemma known in the world of sound science as "the cocktail party problem"—turns out to lie in its a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geology and biology agree on Pangaea supercontinent breakup datesScientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found that independent estimates from geology and biology agree on the timing of the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent into today's continents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists aim to stamp out new horticultural pestScientists will pursue cutting-edge microbiology and robotics research in a bid to stop a destructive and abundant pest which is now threatening fruit production around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging technique could be game changer for pharmaIn drug development, the body can be something of a black box. We take medicine and observe the overall effects, but what happens inside the body largely remains a mystery. To help clear up this picture, researchers are turning to imaging techniques in tissue and animal testing. The step has gained ground in the drug industry, according to a story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmag
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fabric coating could thwart chemical weapons, save livesChemical weapons are nightmarish. In a millisecond, they can kill hundreds, if not thousands. But, in a study published in the ACS journal Chemistry of Materials, scientists report that they have developed a way to adhere a lightweight coating onto fabrics that is capable of neutralizing a subclass of these toxins—those that are delivered through the skin. The life-saving technique could eventuall
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The Atlantic
The Surprisingly Subtle Art of Food Fraud Hamburgers that turn out to be horse, not beef. Honey sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup. Old, gray olives dipped in copper-sulfate solution to make them look fresh and green. Fraudulent foods such as these make up as much as 5 to 10 percent of the offerings on supermarket shelves, according to experts—but which food is most likely to be faked, and what does that tell us about our food syste
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The Atlantic
James Corden's Optimism Prevails in London “I’m so sad when I think about all the times since I took this job that I’ve had to open talking about atrocities,” James Corden said on Tuesday night, in the opening monologue to the first of three special episodes of the Late Late Show filmed in London. “Trying to find the right words to say is impossible, because there are none.” But it’s also a task that Corden, as a late-night host, has foun
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Macular degeneration: Drusen as promising biomarkers for progression of the diseaseAge-Related Macular Degeneration is a common disease of the center of the retina, primarily affecting seniors. The first signs of the disease are so-called drusen, which occur under the retina in the form of round, yellow deposits. However, in some way that has not yet been unexplained, these disappear over time, and this is a sign that there is a very high risk of developing advanced AMD and goin
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Gizmodo
Apple Just Made Its Top Secret iPhone Screen Repair Machine a Little Less Secret Photo: Flickr / Faris Algosaibi Have you ever been to the back room of an Apple Store? That’s a trick question, because the back room at the Apple Store is a mythical place , filled with elves, warlocks, and a magical machine that fixes iPhone screens. At least, it was until this week. Apple just revealed that it’s going to start shipping its magical iPhone-repair device—it’s called a “Horizon Ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A more sustainable way to refine metalsA team of chemists in Canada has developed a way to process metals without using toxic solvents and reagents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New confirmation of Einstein's General Theory of RelativityAlbert Einstein predicted that whenever light from a distant star passes by a closer object, gravity acts as a kind of magnifying lens, brightening and bending the distant starlight. Yet, in a 1936 article in the journal Science, he added that because stars are so far apart "there is no hope of observing this phenomenon directly."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seismic CT scan points to rapid uplift of Southern TibetUsing seismic data and supercomputers, Rice University geophysicists have conducted a massive seismic CT scan of the upper mantle beneath the Tibetan Plateau and concluded that the southern half of the "Roof of the World" formed in less than one-quarter of the time since the beginning of India-Eurasia continental collision.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
200 years of the bicycle—computer scientists electrify historic 'dandy horse'In honor of the inventor, their prototype is still made completely of wood, but it also contains an electric motor, battery, sensors and mini-computer. As soon as the rider pushes off from the ground, the motor starts and provides additional power during the entire ride. With their "Draisine 200.0" the computer scientists are testing the validity of mathematical proofs, among other things to impro
7h
Live Science
Cracked Cellphone Screens Could Soon Be a Thing of the PastResearchers have developed a durable and energy-efficient material that could replace today's fragile screens — and might one day even charge your phone's battery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Home blood pressure monitors inaccurate 70 percent of the time: StudySeventy percent of readings from home blood pressure monitors are unacceptably inaccurate, which could cause serious implications for people who rely on them to make informed health decisions, new UAlberta research reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The hidden order in DNA diffusionThe movement of DNA molecules seemingly explained by random motion conceals a more orderly march.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbiology: Many forks make light workNew insights into the control of DNA replication and cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a biotechnologically important microorganism, could help to optimize the industrial production of amino acids.
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Gizmodo
Count How Many Times You'd Break Your Ankle on This Crazy Steep Downhill Mountain Parkour Run GIF Unlike hurdles, parkour manages to make the idea of running and jumping over things actually look pretty cool. Unless you’re watching a parkour run from the perspective of someone racing over obstacles down the side of a steep mountain in China, that is—then it becomes absolutely terrifying. Meet Calen Chan, tackling the Skyladder parkour run on Tianman Mountain in China. It’s almost three fo
7h
Ars Technica
Android Auto finally gets Waze integration—in beta, at least Google owns Waze, a popular car navigation app with crowd-sourced traffic data. Google also owns Android Auto, an in-car Android interface that makes it safe and easy to use apps in the car. You would think Waze would have ended up on Android Auto pretty quickly. You'd be wrong. After showing off Waze Android Auto integration at Google I/O 2016 (yes, over a year ago), the integration has finally
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living long and living well: Is it possible to do both?Scientists are developing metrics to identify the health markers for old age in the roundworm, C. elegans, a popular model in aging research. Their research provides insight into the tradeoffs between lifespan and health span.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New evidence reveals source of 1586 Sanriku, Japan tsunamiA team of researchers re-examined historical evidence around the Pacific and discovered the origin of the tsunami that hit Sanriku, Japan in 1586 -- a mega-earthquake from the Aleutian Islands that broadly impacted the north Pacific. Until now, this was considered an orphan tsunami, a historical tsunami without an obvious local earthquake source, likely originating far away.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hiding in plain sight: New species of flying squirrel discoveredA new study describes a newly discovered third species of flying squirrel in North America -- now known as Humboldt's flying squirrel, or Glaucomys oregonensis. It inhabits the Pacific Coast region of North America, from southern British Columbia to the mountains of southern California.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Guts to glory? Newly discovered enzyme complexes in herbivore digestive tracts show promise for sustainable fuels, medicinesA newly discovered enzyme complexes in herbivore digestive tracts show promise for sustainable fuels and medicines, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Standard dosage for one lung cancer treatment may be too highThe customary pembrolizumab dose for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer may be higher than is needed for effective treatment, conclude researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
TSRI anti-heroin vaccine found effective in non-human primatesA new vaccine against an opioid is the first to pass this stage of preclinical testing, report scientists in a new report.
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The Atlantic
How the 'Tiger Mom' Convinced the Author of Hillbilly Elegy to Write His Story When J.D. Vance was a first year law student at Yale, his professor, Amy Chua, encouraged him to write a book about his life in rural Ohio. Six years later, in August of 2016, his book, Hillbilly Elegy , became a #1 New York Times bestseller. And since the election, Vance’s book has become one of the most talked-about books in America, as much of the country searches for a window into the lives o
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Dana Foundation
Matters of Life and Death What if life expectancy expanded and we could live into our nineties and beyond in relative good health? That was one of the crucial questions debated in “Engineering Immortality,” a panel discussion at last week’s World Science Festival in New York City. In introducing the sold-out program at NYU’s Global Center, host and ABC-TV news correspondent Bill Blakemore pointed out that American life ex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers image quasiparticles that could lead to faster circuits, higher bandwidthsZhe Fei pointed to the bright and dark vertical lines running across his computer screen. This nano-image, he explained, shows the waves associated with a half-light, half-matter quasiparticle moving inside a semiconductor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New-generation material removes iodine from waterResearchers at Dartmouth College have developed a new material that scrubs iodine from water for the first time. The breakthrough could hold the key to cleaning radioactive waste in nuclear reactors and after nuclear accidents like the 2011 Fukushima disaster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning car plastics into foams with coconut oilEnd-of-life vehicles, with their plastic, metal and rubber components, are responsible for millions of tons of waste around the world each year. Now, one team reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that the plastic components in these vehicles can be recycled with coconut oil and re-used as foams for the construction, packaging and automotive industries.
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Futurity.org
You don’t need hot water to wash your hands Water temperature doesn’t make any difference when it comes to removing harmful bacteria from your hands, a new study suggests. “People need to feel comfortable when they are washing their hands but as far as effectiveness, this study shows us that the temperature of the water used didn’t matter,” says Donald Schaffner, professor and extension specialist in food science at Rutgers University-New
7h
Live Science
Plant Seeds Use Mini 'Brains' to Decide When to SproutJust like animal brains, plant seeds use a system of two competing hormone-signaling systems to decide whether to sprout or stay dormant, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cope's gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problemOur auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with even in a noisy room full of people. The secret to rising above the noise -- a dilemma known in the world of sound science as 'the cocktail party problem' -- turns out to lie in its ability to discern patterns in the background noise and selectively ignore such patterns, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers image quasiparticles that could lead to faster circuits, higher bandwidthsA research team led by Iowa State University's Zhe Fei has made the first images of half-light, half-matter quasiparticles called exciton-polaritons. The discovery could be an early step to developing nanophotonic circuits that are up to 1 million times faster than current electrical circuits. The researchers report their finding in the scientific journal Nature Photonics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seismic CT scan points to rapid uplift of Southern TibetRice University geophysicists have conducted a three-year seismic CT scan of the upper mantle beneath the Tibetan Plateau and concluded that the southern half of the 'Roof of the World' formed within 10 million years, or less than one-quarter of the time since the beginning of the India-Eurasia continental collision.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU clinical study finds effective stability rate of over 80 percent in CM treatment of chronic renal failureA clinical study conducted by HKBU found that that the effective stability rate of the Chinese medicine treatment for chronic renal failure for periods of three months, half a year and one year is 96.3 percent, 88.89 percent and 83.95 percent respectively.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible explanation for unparalleled spread of Ebola virus discoveredThe world may be closer to knowing why Ebola spreads so easily thanks to a team of researchers who discovered a new biological activity in a small protein from the deadly virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recycling plant material into stock chemicals with electrochemistryWhile most people think of recycling in terms of the packaging for household products, the concept can extend to the chemistry to make them in the first place. Certain plant components are a promising renewable source for commodity chemicals. Today, researchers have revealed an easy new way to break down one of the most common plant compounds, called lignin, and recycle it into useful chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building 'OLEDs' from the ground up for better electronicsFrom smartphones to TVs and laptops, light emitting diode (LED) displays are ubiquitous. OLEDs (where the O denotes they are organic, or carbon-based) are among the most energy efficient of these devices, but they generally have higher production costs due to the laborious fabrication processes needed to arrange them properly. Today researchers introduce a new way to efficiently create patterns of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists improve people's creativity through electrical brain stimulationScientists have found a way to improve creativity through brain stimulation, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapyScientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty 'immunoswitch' found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in tes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type of sugar may treat atherosclerosis, mouse study showsStudying mice, researchers have shown that a natural sugar called trehalose revs up the immune system's cellular housekeeping abilities. These souped-up housecleaners then are able to reduce atherosclerotic plaque that has built up inside arteries. Such plaques are a hallmark of cardiovascular disease and lead to an increased risk of heart attack.
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Gizmodo
Washington DC Bar Will Give Everyone a Free Drink Every Time Trump Tweets About Comey (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Tomorrow morning, former FBI Director James Comey will testify to Congress about President Trump and his shenanigans with Russia. It’s going to be carried live on every TV station. But if you’re in Washington DC, you might think about swinging by the Union Pub. It’s opening early and they’re giving away a free drink to everyone in the bar every time President
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Scooter Gennett Is The Least Likely Player Ever To Hit Four Home Runs In A Game | Jezebel H Deadspin Scooter Gennett Is The Least Likely Player Ever To Hit Four Home Runs In A Game | Jezebel High School Girls Demand to Know Why Bra Straps Are Disrespectful | The Root #NeverForget: Bill Maher Once Questioned A Black Woman’s Blackness Over the N-Word | Fusion Eric Trump on White House Critics: ‘They’re Not Even People’ |
7h
WIRED
In a Fake Fact Era, Schools Teach the ABCs of News Literacy Schools across the country are educating students in how to sift through today's online avalanche of alternative facts. The post In a Fake Fact Era, Schools Teach the ABCs of News Literacy appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
These speed limit signs could make roads safer Using variable speed limits in construction zones may reduce the number of crashes, decrease traffic congestion, and make work zones safer for travelers and workers alike, new research suggests. With assistance from the Missouri Department of Transportation, researchers tested the use of variable advisory speed limit (VASL) systems and the effect they may have on lessening congestion and reducing
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous cars (no human backup) may hit the road next yearAutonomous vehicles with no human backup will be put to the test on publicly traveled roads as early as next year in what may be the first attempt at unassisted autonomous piloting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acacias are invading unaltered areas in the northwest of the peninsulaThe legume Acacia dealbata, also known as mimosa, is one of the most aggressive invasive tree species in the world. In the northwest of the peninsula its propagation is an increasingly serious problem since it is penetrating unaltered plant communities, according to a study by the University of Vigo and the University of Coimbra (Portugal). Scientists stress the important role of fires in their di
7h
Ars Technica
Arms review: Nintendo reinvents the fighting game and it’s brilliant Enlarge Like Splatoon and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild , Nintendo's Arms takes an established genre—in this case, the classic one-on-one fighting game—and turns it on its head. Gone are the side-on views, fast close-quarters combat, and complex combos adopted by almost every fighting game since the debut of Capcom's seminal Street Fighter II in 1991. In their place is a bold mix of lon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diagnostic radiation exposure safe for children, experts stateIn an article published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers assert that exposure to medical imaging radiation not only doesn't increase an adult person's risk of getting cancer, it doesn't increase a child's risk. They state that the long-held belief even low doses of radiation, such as those received in diagnostic imaging, increase cancer risk is based on an inaccura
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds youth football players have significant differences in head impact exposureA study of 97 youth football players ages 9-13 years who participated in different age- and weight- based levels over four seasons of play found that that youngsters experienced a total of 40,538 head impacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Red onions pack a cancer-fighting punch, study revealsA University of Guelph study is the first to reveal that Ontario-grown red onions are the most effective at killing colon and breast cancer cells compared to other types of onions. This is because of the onions' high levels of quercetin and anthocyanin. As part of this project, the researchers are also the first to develop a non-toxic way to extract quercetin from onions making it more suitable fo
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A more sustainable way to refine metalsA team of chemists in Canada has developed a way to process metals without using toxic solvents and reagents. The system, which also consumes far less energy than conventional techniques, could greatly shrink the environmental impact of producing metals from raw materials or from post-consumer electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dining hall intervention helped college students choose healthier optionsAs most college students' diets are low in fruits and vegetables and high in calories, sugar, fat, and sodium, researchers from the University of Toronto and Memorial University of Newfoundland created a cross-sectional study to examine whether messaging encouraging fruit, vegetable, and water intake could influence the habits of university students.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New-generation material removes iodine from waterMaterial developed at Dartmouth College scrubs iodine from water for the first time and could hold the key to cleaning nuclear accidents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many good years after heart bypass surgery -- but something happens after 10 yearsThe prognosis following heart bypass surgery is both good and has improved over the past three decades. In fact, the survival rate for bypass patients who make it through the first month after the operation is close to that of the population in general. But 8-10 years after a heart bypass operation, mortality increases by 60-80 percent. This is new and important knowledge for the doctors who monit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A small group of neurons modulates the amount of insulin that the pancreas must produceThe results published in Cell Metabolism help to understand diabetes in greater detail.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging technique could be game changer for pharmaIn drug development, the body can be something of a black box. We take medicine and observe the overall effects, but what happens inside the body largely remains a mystery. To help clear up this picture, researchers are turning to imaging techniques in tissue and animal testing. The step has gained ground in the drug industry, according to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fabric coating could thwart chemical weapons, save livesChemical weapons are nightmarish. In a millisecond, they can kill hundreds, if not thousands. But, in a study published in the ACS journal Chemistry of Materials, scientists report that they have developed a way to adhere a lightweight coating onto fabrics that is capable of neutralizing a subclass of these toxins -- those that are delivered through the skin. The life-saving technique could eventu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning car plastics into foams with coconut oilEnd-of-life vehicles, with their plastic, metal and rubber components, are responsible for millions of tons of waste around the world each year. Now, one team reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that the plastic components in these vehicles can be recycled with coconut oil and re-used as foams for the construction, packaging and automotive industries.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social experience tweaks genome function to modify future behaviorWhat changes in the brain of an animal when its behavior is altered by experience? Research at the University of Illinois led by Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology Lisa Stubbs is working toward an answer to this question by focusing on the collective actions of genes. In a recent Genome Research publication, Stubbs and her colleagues identified and documented the activity of networks of g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geology and biology agree on Pangaea supercontinent breakup datesScientists at The Australian National University have found that independent estimates from geology and biology agree on the timing of the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent into today's continents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate spin effects in solution-based nanocrystalsWet-chemically produced nanocrystals are becoming more and more powerful. They are already used in the background lighting of the latest generation of flat panel displays. In the future they will be used increasingly as active elements, which produce higher color brilliance. They are also used in other fields of application, e.g., for medical diagnosis and treatment. Now a research group around Dr
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Gizmodo
Here Are the First Ever Discounts On OxyLED's New Warm-Tinted Motion Lights OxyLED T-02 Plus Warm , $19 with code KINJA02P | OxyLED T-02 Warm , $9 with code KINJAT02 OxyLED saw our readers’ comments about the T-02 night light’s color temperature yesterday, so they’ve reached out with a pair of deals on their brand new warm models. These are exactly the same as the original T-02 and T-02 Plus ( check out our roundup to see the differences ), but with warmer bulbs that sho
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The Atlantic
Intel Chiefs Dodge Questions on Alleged Trump Interference in Russia Investigation Updated at 1:47 p.m. ET In a series of at times tense exchanges on Wednesday, top U.S. intelligence officials repeatedly declined or evaded questions from lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee about their interactions with President Trump and whether the administration ever directed them to intervene in the ongoing federal Russia investigations. Instead, senior administration officials o
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The Atlantic
Why Breitbart Fired an Editor for a Tweet The final straw was something that, at any news organization, would have gotten someone fired. "There would be no deadly terror attacks in the U.K. if Muslims didn't live there,” tweeted Breitbart News ’s Katie McHugh, in the wake of the London Bridge attack that killed eight and injured 48 people. McHugh then responded to a critical tweet from an Iranian American actor by telling him he was Indi
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The Atlantic
The Tough Little Drone Ship That Explores Acid Lakes The Poás Volcano in Costa Rica is home to two crater lakes, and they could not be more different. The first fills an inactive crater, its water is clear blue and its rim lush with vegetation. The other could be accurately described as a hell hole. Laguna Caliente—literally hot lagoon in Spanish—derives its hellish qualities from the churning of magma underneath the active crater. Sulfur-rich vapo
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The Atlantic
The Astonishing Israeli Concession of 1967 On June 6, 1967, Major Arik Achmon, chief intelligence officer for Brigade 55 of Israel’s paratrooper reservists, celebrated his 34th birthday while standing on a rooftop in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood that overlooked no-man’s-land, a strip of minefields and barbed wire and fortified bunkers separating Israeli-held West Jerusalem from Jordanian-held East Jerusalem. Raising binoculars, h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to reduce shockwaves in quantum beam experimentsThe tiny cone-shaped "skimmers" used in experiments looking for exotic chemical-quantum phenomena resemble the intake mechanisms of aircraft engines, and they perform similar functions: Each directs the flow of gas - the engine intake controls the supply of air for burning fuel, and the "skimmer" creates beams of cold flying atoms or molecules. While skimmers have been a necessary component in ato
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fungi awake bacteria from their slumberWhen a soil dries out, this has a negative impact on the activity of soil bacteria. Using an innovative combination of state-of-the-art analysis and imaging techniques, researchers have now discovered that fungi increase the activity of bacteria in dry and nutrient-poor habitats by supplying them with water and nutrients. The ability of fungi to regulate drought stress in soil and thus sustain eco
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The Scientist RSS
CAR T-Cell Trials Boast Promising ResultsThe results of two small clinical trials show that the immunotherapy is effective for multiple myeloma patients, at least in the near term.
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Gizmodo
Etsy's Vaginal Problem Illustration: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo Do you ever feel not so fresh , down there? Or do you worry about your flappy ol’ ham sandwich being a little too slack? After all, as thousands of years of misogynistic bullshit would tell us, Loose Lips Sink Relationships. Myths about how a vagina should be—tight, pink, hairless, smelling like roses and jasmine blossoms—are both widespread and a little difficult
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Ars Technica
Strong Arms: Brutally hard game feels more like the Nintendo I used to know Enlarge / This beatdown is about to get savage. (credit: Nintendo) Arms reminds me so much of the Nintendo that I used to know. The company's latest Nintendo Switch game contains no reboot of ancient characters; no tender hand-holding; no auto-steering assists if you're struggling; no "grab the green mushroom for help" option. Arms looks a lot more like the Nintendo that won me over in the late 1
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Live Science
Neil deGrasse Tyson Becomes 1st American to Receive Stephen Hawking MedalAstrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson received the Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication Tuesday (June 6), becoming the first American scientist to earn the prestigious award.
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Live Science
French Astronaut Throws Shade at Trump Over Withdrawal from Climate DealFrench astronaut Thomas Pesquet registered his objection to Trump's decision, throwing some shade via Twitter today (June 6) at Trump and the president's "Make America Great Again" tagline.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bread and health: A personal matterIn the past few decades, since white bread has acquired a bad name, bakeries have been going out of their way to produce high-quality whole grain breads. But a new study conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science and published recently in Cell Metabolism reveals that these 'wholesome' choices are not necessarily the healthiest for everyone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate spin effects in solution-based nanocrystalsWet-chemically produced nanocrystals are becoming more and more powerful. Now a research group around Dr. Christian Klinke from the University of Hamburg has succeeded in substantiating electronic spin effects in such nanoplatelets. In this way, more cost-effective and more powerful transistors and computer chips with lower power consumption are conceivable in the future.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanowires, the future of electronicsThe current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design. The research led by Aurelio Mateo-Alonso (Ikerbasque researcher at POLYMAT, the Basque Excellence Research Center (BERC), a partner of the UPV/EHU) into nanowires is being published today in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Michigan heart surgery outcomes improved after Medicaid expansion, study findsExpanding Medicaid coverage is associated with better outcomes for heart surgery patients, according to a study led by University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prebiotics reduce body fat in overweight childrenThere may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity. Prebiotics reduce body fat in children who are overweight or obese by altering their gut microbiota, according to new research published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients (such as fiber) that act as fertilizers to help st
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acacias are invading unaltered areas in the northwest of the peninsulaThe legume Acacia dealbata, also known as mimosa, is one of the most aggressive invasive tree species in the world. In the northwest of the peninsula its propagation is an increasingly serious problem since it is penetrating unaltered plant communities, according to a study by the University of Vigo and the University of Coimbra (Portugal). Scientists stress the important role of fires in their di
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers shed light on how our eyes process visual cuesThe mystery of how human eyes compute the direction of moving light has been made clearer by scientists at The University of Queensland.Using advanced electrical recording techniques, researchers from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) discovered how nerve cells in the eye's retina were integral to the process.
8h
Ingeniøren
Direktør for Serum Institut: Alle blev overraskede over, hvor komplekst det var at skille it-systemerne adIt-problemer var en af hovedårsagerne til, at salget af statens vacccineproduktion trak ud. Alle data fra Statens Serum Institut skulle nemlig skilles ad.
8h
The Atlantic
The London Attack's Rising Death Toll The number of victims from Saturday’s London attack rose to eight Wednesday after authorities recovered an unidentified body from the Thames, the Metropolitan Police said . British authorities said they were searching for Xavier Thomas, a 45-year-old French national who went missing Saturday night, when they discovered a body in the river Tuesday evening near the Limehouse district. Though Thomas
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Gizmodo
Your Car's Tires Could Soon Know When Roads Are Wet and Slippery Before You Do GIF GIF: YouTube Some road hazards are easy for drivers to spot and avoid, like a cavernous pothole, but others aren’t so easy to see. A wet road, or one covered in ice, can often be invisible to drivers, who don’t realize they need to slow down. But it turns out a car’s rubber tires provide all the clues necessary for a vehicle to automatically know when conditions get slippery. For the past 20
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Futurity.org
Search for anorexia in genes lands on chromosome 12 New research identifies the first genetic locus for anorexia nervosa and reveals that there may also be metabolic underpinnings to this potentially deadly illness. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry , is the most powerful genetic study of anorexia nervosa conducted to date. It includes genome-wide analysis of DNA from 3,495 individuals with anorexia nervosa and 10,982 unaf
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to reduce shockwaves in quantum beam experimentsWhile skimmers have been a necessary component in atomic and molecular-beam experiments for decades, they were also known to impose a fundamental limit on the number of particles one could pack into the beam. However, professor Edvardas Narevicius and his team in the Weizmann Institute of Science's Chemical Physics Department have now revealed a simple way to overcome this limit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospitals that carry out more research are more efficientPublic hospitals that generate more scientific publications are also more efficient at attending patients, according to a study by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the IE Business School. The study also analyzes the reduction in health care costs associated with scientific production in medicine and surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metabolism: Beta cells under fireType 2 diabetes causes pathological changes in the beta cells. Scientists have successfully depicted the processes on the basis of the metabolome and proteome for the first time. Their work has been published in Cell Metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wine descriptions make us more emotional about wineResearch by the University of Adelaide has shown that consumers are much more influenced by wine label descriptions than previously thought. A consumer study by wine researchers at the University's School of Agriculture, Food and Wine has shown that far more than just influencing consumer choice, wine descriptions can alter consumer emotions, increase their wine liking and encourage them to pay mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study on children shows fiber supplement changes gut bacteriaUniversity of Calgary research on children demonstrated that a prebiotic supplement changed their gut bacteria and after four months, the children in the study had a decrease in body fat and the fat around their abdomen. The boys and girls who were in the placebo group, who didn't get this fiber, continued to gain weight at a rate that was almost triple what normal weight gain should be for a chil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coal waste fuel may reduce anthropogenic emissions, TPU study revealsPower engineering scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have shown the combustion of fuel based on coal processing wastes produces much less contaminants than the use of traditional coals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mouse lemur could serve as ideal model for primate biology and human diseaseThe mouse lemur—the world's smallest primate—has the potential to transform the field of genetics and serve as an ideal model for a wide range of primate biology, behavior and medicine, including cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly safe biocontainment strategy hopes to encourage greater use of GMOsUse of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) - microorganisms not found in the natural world but developed in labs for their beneficial characteristics - is a contentious issue.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in CMOS-compatible ferroelectric memoryImec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technology, announced today at the 2017 Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits the world's first demonstration of a vertically stacked ferroelectric Al doped HfO2 device for NAND applications. Using a new material and a novel architecture, imec has created a non-volatile memory concept with attractive characterist
8h
The Atlantic
South Korea Puts U.S. Missile-Defense System on Hold South Korea’s government is suspending the deployment of the U.S.-backed Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system, the president’s office announced Tuesday, citing the need for an environmental review. Two THAAD launchers that have already been installed will remain; four that arrived recently won’t, an official from the presidential office said. THAAD, which is a missile-defense system
8h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US exits Paris, Jupiter’s new moons and the biggest prize in science The week in science: 2–8 June 2017. Nature 546 190 doi: 10.1038/546190a
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Dagens Medicin
Flere danskere overlever kræft Ny opgørelse viser, at flere danskere lever et og fem år efter, at de har fået en kræftdiagnose.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Ny ledende overlæge på psykiatrisk afdeling i Aabenraa Lene Høgh skal videreføre arbejdet med at gøre Psykiatrisk Afdeling Aabenraa bæltefri.
8h
Futurity.org
New pacemaker doesn’t need wires or a battery Researchers have created a wireless pacemaker that requires no battery and can be directly implanted into a patient’s heart. The pacemaker harvests energy wirelessly from radio frequency radiation transmitted by an external battery pack. In the prototype, the wireless power transmitter can be up to few centimeters away. Pacemakers use electrical signals to prompt the heart to keep a steady beat,
8h
WIRED
Apple’s HomePod Looks Beautiful But Doesn’t Think Different The speaker delivers impressive sound and gives Siri a new shell. But how, exactly, will Siri flex its increasingly capable skills in the HomePod? The post Apple's HomePod Looks Beautiful But Doesn't Think Different appeared first on WIRED .
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-pressure experiments solve meteorite mysteryWith high-pressure experiments at DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III and other facilities, a research team has solved a long standing riddle in the analysis of meteorites from Moon and Mars. The study can explain why different versions of silica can coexist in meteorites, although they normally require vastly different conditions to form. The results also mean that previous assessments of conditi
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutations unveiled that predispose lung cancers to refractory histologic transformationCancer pedigree analysis reveals the mutations in RB1 and TP53 genes play a key role in treatment-resistant, cancer cell-type transformation during EGFR inhibitor therapy for lung cancers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Data from satellite imagery useful for malaria early warning systemsResearchers in Sweden have developed a model that uses seasonal weather data from satellite images to accurately predict outbreak of malaria with a one-month lead time. With the model, a host of weather information gathered from satellite images can be used as a cost-effective disease forecasting model, allowing health officials to get ahead of the malaria infection curve by allocating resources a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly safe biocontainment strategy hopes to encourage greater use of GMOsAn extremely safe and practical biocontainment strategy has been born. It is cost and time effective. Additionally, its simplicity means it can be adapted for other microorganisms, making it highly versatile. It is hoped this new strategy will grab the attention of relevant government agencies, and convince them to bring 1980s laws in line with 21st Century advancements.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnant women could get on their bikes and stay healthy with better supportMedical advice from risk-averse health professionals may contribute to some women's decisions to stop cycling to work during pregnancy, meaning they miss out on the potential benefits of the active commute. A recent study in the Journal of Transport & Health reveals the reasons why women decide to stop or continue cycling to work when they are pregnant, including often ambiguously worded or overly
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-modeling of food residues in 230 million years old fossil fecesSynchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3-D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil feces. That's the result of a new study, by palaeontologists from Uppsala University and from ESRF Grenoble, which is presented in a new article in Scientific Reports.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women with past adverse childhood experiences more likely to have ovaries removed, study showsMayo Clinic researchers report that women who suffered adverse childhood experiences or abuse as an adult are 62 percent more likely to have their ovaries removed before age 46.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mouse lemur could serve as ideal model for primate biology and human diseaseThe mouse lemur -- the world's smallest primate -- has the potential to transform the field of genetics and serve as an ideal model for a wide range of primate biology, behavior and medicine, including cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers say.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aggressive flies: A powerful new model for neuropsychiatric disordersA new Drosophila model to study the role of schizophrenia-associated gene PRODH in behavioral disorders reveals that precise regulation of proline metabolism in the lateral neurons ventral region of the brain is crucial for maintaining normal behavior patterns.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gustsOffshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, new University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The dark side of mondegreens—how a simple mishearing can lead to wrongful convictionWe are all familiar with mondegreens. Even if you don't know the word, you'll have had the experience. Mondegreens are funny mishearings—famously of song lyrics (think: "there's a bad moon on the rise" misheard as "there's a bathroom on the right").
8h
Gizmodo
New Rumors About Those Justice League Reshoots Fantastic Beasts 2 is looking for some younger versions of its cast of characters. Legends of Tomorrow recruits a mystical new heroine. The brains behind Stranger Things discuss the role of the monsters in season two. Plus extensive new looks at The Mummy and Transformers: The Last Knight . Behold, Spoilers! Justice League The film’s reshoot period—being lead by Joss Whedon in the wake of Zack Sn
8h
Science : NPR
Total Failure: The Mountain That Got Away In 2014, Emily Harrington set out to climb the tallest peak in Southeast Asia. She had to turn back with the summit in sight. (Image credit: Isabel Seliger for NPR)
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do we know the universe is flat? Discovering the topology of the universeWhenever we talk about the expanding universe, everyone wants to know how this is going to end. Sure, they say, the fact that most of the galaxies we can see are speeding away from us in all directions is really interesting. Sure, they say, the Big Bang makes sense, in that everything was closer together billions of years ago.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Looking at terror attacks 'per capita' should make us rethink beliefs about levels of risk and MuslimsRecent events in London, Manchester and elsewhere highlight that Western societies are vulnerable to terrorist attacks – and political decision-makers need to find solutions.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly discovered methane consumers in lakesWhen decaying organic matter sinks to the bottom of a lake or ocean, methane is produced as the biomass is broken down. Some of the methane is released from the surface into the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas, while some is broken down by microorganisms in the water column. In a study just published in the ISME Journal, an international research group reports that, as well as
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gustsOffshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, new University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insomnia associated with increased risk of suicidalityPeople who suffer from insomnia are three times more likely to report thoughts of suicide and death during the past 30 days than those without the condition, reports a new meta-analysis from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain State Technologies: Successful clinical trial shows reduction of insomnia symptomsA clinical trial has found that HIRREM® closed-loop neurotechnology is more effective than placebo at reducing symptoms of insomnia, and has additional benefits for heart rate and blood pressure regulation. Findings are being presented in Boston at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 3-7, 2017.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes a reach movement effortful?Scientists from the German Primate Center have determined which characteristics of an arm movement influence the subjective effort associated with this movement. In a study they found that duration, biomechanics and force had an influence on the effort, while movement amplitudes had no effect. Their results argue against a minimization of pure energetic costs. They also shed light on a postulated
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Icebreaker Fleet Is Overdue for an UpgradeThe Coast Guard is testing models for new ships it hopes to begin building in 2020 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin
Jakob Kjellberg: Økonomiaftale så stram, at den næppe er realistisk Den vækstramme på 0,5 pct. som Danske Regioner har fået i sin nye økonomiaftale med regeringen, er lavere end det, som sundhedsvæsenet skal bruge til at dække stigende udgifter, siger professor i sundhedsøkonomi Jakob Kjellberg. Den kommende finanslov må spæde til.
9h
The Scientist RSS
NSF Cuts PhD Training GrantThe federal science agency discontinued a funding stream for graduate students in environmental science because of administrative workload.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Brain Barrier BallsIn a new and improved in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, scientists allow a milieu of cells to grow together and form multicellular structures.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Legionnaires Disease Bacteria Found in Flint Residents WaterThe data cannot confirm whether an outbreak of cases in recent years in Michigan was caused by contaminated drinking water.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Mammals May Have a 12-Hour ClockData point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.
9h
Ingeniøren
Malware brugte Britney Spears' Instagram-profil til at finde kontrolserveren I stedet for at skrive adressen til kontrolserveren i selve malware-koden, lå den gemt i en kommentar på Instagram. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/malware-brugte-britney-spears-instagram-profil-at-finde-kontrolserveren-1077366 Version2
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could climate change shut down the Gulf Stream?The 2004 disaster movie "The Day After Tomorrow" depicted the cataclysmic effects—superstorms, tornadoes and deep freezes— resulting from the impacts of climate change. In the movie, global warming had accelerated the melting of polar ice, which disrupted circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean, triggering violent changes in the weather. Scientists pooh-poohed the dire scenarios in the movie, but
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pollution from pharmaceutical manufacturing an unexpected source of superbugsThe emergence of bacterial strains that are immune to last-line antibiotics poses an increasing threat to global health. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that up to half a million people develop multidrug-resistant tuberculosis every year. And laboratory confirmed cases of particular resistant strains have increased 600-fold in the UK between 2003 and 2015.
9h
Ars Technica
OnePlus 5 launches on June 20 Enlarge (credit: Android Police) The OnePlus 5, the follow-up to the excellent OnePlus 3T Android smartphone, launches on June 20. In classic OnePlus style, the OnePlus 5 will debut via an online livestream that starts at 5pm UK time (12pm EDT), as well as at several pop-up events in London, New York, and other cities in Europe. Details on the OnePlus 5 other than its release date are thin on the
9h
Gizmodo
Six Things Apple's Trying to Kill This Year Image: Gizmodo As is tradition, Apple opened up this year’s WWDC with a broad proclamation: let’s kill some competitors. We go through this every damn year . The idea is simple. Apple makes some updates to its various software platforms as well as its hardware offerings, and by the sheer strength of being the world’s richest tech company, it crushes several smaller companies who do the same thing
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tulane researchers help find possible explanation for unparalleled spread of Ebola virusThe world may be closer to knowing why Ebola spreads so easily thanks to a team of researchers from Tulane University and other leading institutions who discovered a new biological activity in a small protein from the deadly virus. The team's findings were recently published in the Journal of Virology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How will climate change impact water resources?Access to adequate fresh water supplies is a critically important societal challenge posed by climate change. With rising heat and shifting rainfall patterns, and reduced water storage resilience, fresh water supplies are already diminishing in the western United States, Mexico, the Middle East, and Mediterranean. Water shortages have been implicated in recent international conflict, and a recent
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-pressure experiments solve meteorite mysteryWith high-pressure experiments at DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III and other facilities, a research team around Leonid Dubrovinsky from the University of Bayreuth has solved a long standing riddle in the analysis of meteorites from Moon and Mars. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, can explain why different versions of silica can coexist in meteorites, although they norma
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Old apple varieties could provide important health benefitsResearchers from Cranfield University and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew have constructed the metabolic fingerprint of British heritage apples and mainstream commercial varieties highlighting the extraordinary phytochemical content of some very old apples with dates of introduction spanning several centuries.
9h
Gizmodo
Trump Nominates New FBI Chief in a Tweet Because Our Reality Is a Pixelated Nightmare Photo: Getty If President Trump gets his way, Chris Christie’s personal lawyer will be the next director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Trump announced the nomination of this lawyer, a guy named Christopher Wray, in a tweet on Wednesday morning. Because, honestly, how else would Trump handle this? Look at it: No, seriously, that’s all America gets for now. The White House did not r
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Futurity.org
Bats can raise their voice in just 30 milliseconds Bats can raise their voices really quickly when background noise threatens to drown out the echoing chirps they use to locate their prey. From ear to brain to louder vocalization, it takes them just 30 milliseconds to amp up their own volume in response to sounds around them. That’s just a tenth of the time it takes a human to blink an eye and is the fastest audio-vocal response ever detected. It
9h
Gizmodo
Amazon's SanDisk Gold Box Has Flash Storage Solutions For All of Your Devices SanDisk Gold Box There’s no such thing as owning too much flash storage, and you can stock up on flash drives and SD cards in today’s Amazon Gold Box . In addition to the bog standard SD cards and USB 3.0 flash drives that you’d expect to find ( 256GB microSD card , anyone?), there are also some pretty clever products to be had in here . My personal favorite is a flash drive that includes both US
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combatting weeds with lasersA robot automatically identifies weeds in a field and combats them with a short laser pulse. Sustainable agriculture, which avoids the use of herbicides as far as possible, could benefit from this smart idea. Dr. Julio Pastrana and Tim Wigbels from the Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Bonn are convinced of this. With an EXIST Business Start-up Grant from the Federal Min
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Naturalist Trevor Goward Helps to Overturn a 150-Year-Old Truth of ScienceHow a self-taught naturalist unearthed hidden symbioses in the wilds of British Columbia—and helped to overturn 150 years of accepted scientific wisdom -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
How yoga could ease cancer patients' pain and fatigue Researchers in one study find patients who do yoga sleep less but are less tired, while another study sees mood benefits among those who add yoga to exercise Yoga may help ease the pain and fatigue of cancer treatment, according to new research. One study conducted at the University of Rochester used two surveys to interrogate why a group of about 300 mostly female cancer patients felt less fatig
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gas marbles able to roll around in the hand could be used to store gasses(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Université Paris-Est has discovered a new type of spherical bubble—called a gas marble, it is similar to bubbles made with soap, but has a coating of much smaller polystyrene microspheres. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes how their discovery came about, some of the properties of the spheres, and possible uses
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Widely used database of molecular 'fingerprints' upgradedWhen scientists need to identify an unknown compound, they do what a police detective might do. They get fingerprints—in this case, the "molecular fingerprints" of the unknown compound—and run them through a database of fingerprints from known suspects to look for a match.
9h
WIRED
These Powerful Photos Reveal the Faces and Places Behind Rape Stats By some estimates, one in five women in the United States has been sexually assaulted. Photographer Melissa Kreider documents what happens afterward. The post These Powerful Photos Reveal the Faces and Places Behind Rape Stats appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The other reason to shift away from coal: Air pollution that kills thousands every yearWhen President Donald Trump announced on June 1 that he had decided to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord, he asserted that staying in the pact would prevent our nation from further developing its fossil fuel reserves. Critics understandably have called this a setback for global efforts to curb greenhouse gas pollution.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diandongosuchus—the strange-faced transitional phytosaurThe Triassic Period was a time of fantastic reptilian experimentation. Among archosaurs, there were the armored aetosaurs, the predatory rauisuchians, an abundance of early dinosaurs and near-dinosaurs, the ancestors of crocodilians, and more. Amidst all of this diversity, one of the most famous and widespread groups were the phytosaurs.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heatScientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy. Controlling these vibrational waves in soft materials such as polymers or liquid crystal compounds could lead to a range of
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapyScientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty 'immunoswitch' found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in tes
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oyster shells inspire new method to make superstrong, flexible polymersColumbia Engineers developed a method inspired by the nacre of oyster shells, a composite material with extraordinary mechanical properties, including great strength and resilience. By changing the crystallization speed of a polymer well-mixed with nanoparticles, the team controlled how the nanoparticles self-assemble into structures at three different length scales. This multiscale ordering makes
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building 'OLEDs' from the ground up for better electronicsFrom smartphones to TVs and laptops, light emitting diode (LED) displays are ubiquitous. OLEDs (where the O denotes they are organic, or carbon-based) are among the most energy efficient of these devices, but they generally have higher production costs due to the laborious fabrication processes needed to arrange them properly. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers introduce a new way to effici
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recycling plant material into stock chemicals with electrochemistryWhile most people think of recycling in terms of the packaging for household products, the concept can extend to the chemistry to make them in the first place. Certain plant components are a promising renewable source for commodity chemicals. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal an easy new way to break down one of the most common plant compounds, called lignin, and recycle it into us
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer's defenses and attack tumorsCancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment. But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now, in the journal ACS Nano, scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in
9h
The Atlantic
Theresa May's Incredible Shrinking Poll Numbers When Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May stepped out onto Downing Street on April 18 to call a snap election for June 8, no one expected it. Since becoming prime minister in July 2016 after David Cameron’s sudden resignation, she had made clear, on six separate occasions , that she would not call one. It was obvious, she insisted, that Britain’s departure from the European Union required stabili
9h
The Atlantic
Trump Tweets His Choice for FBI Director In a surprise announcement on Twitter Wednesday morning, President Trump said he would name former federal prosecutor Christopher Wray to be the next director of the FBI. If confirmed, Wray would be the bureau’s eighth director. He would enter the position with significant experience in federal law enforcement. Wray previously served as as the head of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division fr
9h
The Atlantic
Your 2017 Summer Movie Preview The summer-movie season may feel like it starts earlier and earlier every year, but it is now truly upon us, which means franchise-starters, epic revivals, and superheroes galore almost every week. On top of the big-budget fare, there are plenty of indie sensations waiting to be discovered—read on for a comprehensive look at the most exciting projects coming over the next three months. Chiabella
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Retirement and regeneration—how robots and replicants experience deathIn the 2014 film Interstellar, Matt Damon's Dr Mann explains that "a machine doesn't improvise well because you cannot program a fear of death."
10h
Futurity.org
Telemedicine brings doctor to people with diabetic eye disease Telemedicine can increase the number of people with access to medical evaluation for diabetic retinopathy, particularly for minority, rural, and typically underserved populations, new research suggests. Seema Garg, a retina specialist and associate professor in the department of ophthalmology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been spearheading efforts since 2009 to implement
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science spins truth out of resilient wormsWorms, it appears, are good at keeping secrets.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LHC's objective—maximum intensityProtons are jostling for space in the Large Hadron Collider. Since the start of the physics run on 23 May, the operators of the huge accelerator have been increasing the intensity of the beams, injecting more and more protons in order to increase the number of collisions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare glass spearhead found on Rottnest IslandStaff and students from The University of Western Australia's School of Indigenous Studies have made an exciting discovery during a University excursion on Rottnest Island (Wadjemup).
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapyScientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty "immunoswitch" found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in tes
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oyster shells inspire new method to make superstrong, flexible polymersResearchers at Columbia Engineering have demonstrated for the first time a new technique that takes its inspiration from the nacre of oyster shells, a composite material that has extraordinary mechanical properties, including great strength and resilience. By changing the crystallization speed of a polymer initially well-mixed with nanoparticles, the team was able to control how the nanoparticles
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building 'OLEDs' from the ground up for better electronicsFrom smartphones to TVs and laptops, light emitting diode (LED) displays are ubiquitous. OLEDs (where the O denotes they are organic, or carbon-based) are among the most energy efficient of these devices, but they generally have higher production costs due to the laborious fabrication processes needed to arrange them properly. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers introduce a new way to effici
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recycling plant material into stock chemicals with electrochemistryWhile most people think of recycling in terms of the packaging for household products, the concept can extend to the chemistry to make them in the first place. Certain plant components are a promising renewable source for commodity chemicals. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal an easy new way to break down one of the most common plant compounds, called lignin, and recycle it into us
10h
Science-Based Medicine
Minnesota MeaslesThere is currently an outbreak of measles in the Somali population of Minnesota – an outbreak that can be directly linked to antivaccine propaganda.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Use Math to Fly Rockets to SpaceWhat does it really mean for a satellite to orbit the Earth? What’s the math behind it? And what’s the math behind the rockets that get those satellites into orbit? Keep on reading to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Dagens Medicin
Læger får 40 mio. kr. om året fra industrien Omkring 11.000 samarbejder mellem læger og industri er registreret de seneste tre år hos Lægemiddelindustrien. Ny analyse viser at det samlede honorar som læger får svarer til lidt over 40 mio. kr. i pr. år
10h
Ingeniøren
Havvind og batterier integreres i britisk mølleparkDong Energy præsenterer i dag en ny batteriløsning, som skal sikre stabil strømforsyning fra havmølleparken Burbo Bank via integreret frekvensrespons.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More concepts, fewer factsETH biology lecturers have tested secondary school leavers and students to determine their knowledge of biological concepts. And they have drawn some sobering conclusions: many misunderstand the concepts, such as the importance of chance in biology. Now, the lecturers are taking action.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disruptive forces in the food systemDigitalisation is drastically changing the agro-food sector. Though this is not the first time that we face technological disruption, the speed and scale of change is greater than ever before. How can we move forward responsibly?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach could transform semiconductor techRecent research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln may help future engineers of digital components get two (or more) for the space of one.
10h
Popular Science
An egg a day could help babies grow bigger and taller Health Gaston was right all along. Not every lad can eat four dozen eggs every morning to help him get large, but as it turns out just one will do the trick. If you're a baby, anyway. Read on.
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Science | The Guardian
Feather furore: T.rex may not have been fluffy after all, skin study suggests | Susannah Lydon Recent speculation that giant dinosaur predators were covered in downy feathers has been challenged by a new study of tyrannosaurid skin The evolution of feathers, and how this relates to bird evolution, is something that even people outside the world of palaeontology can get very agitated about. Just look at the recent debate around the lack of feathers on the GM theropods in Jurassic World . By
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Live Science
Rat Mob! Rodents Swarm in Myanmar VillagesVillages in a region of Myanmar were recently deluged with thousands of rats, according to local officials.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
In-Person Requests Are More Effective Than Electronic OnesPeople respond better to face-to-face requests than e-mails -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
WIRED
The Chatbot Therapist Will See You Now Meet your new therapist: a chatbot that runs inside Facebook Messenger. The post The Chatbot Therapist Will See You Now appeared first on WIRED .
10h
WIRED
The New Chrome and Safari Will Reshape the Web Apple and Google are cracking down on obnoxious online ads. And they just might change the way the web works in the process. The post The New Chrome and Safari Will Reshape the Web appeared first on WIRED .
10h
WIRED
Women Engineers On the Rampant Sexism of Silicon Valley Every industry face challenges when it comes to gender disparity. What do those challenges look like when 88 percent of your field looks nothing like you? The post Women Engineers On the Rampant Sexism of Silicon Valley appeared first on WIRED .
10h
Gizmodo
Here's the Pro-Trump Attack Ad That Will Air During James Comey's Testimony Image from an attack ad funded by the pro-Trump group Great America Alliance that will air during former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony (Screenshot/YouTube) Former FBI Director James Comey will testify in an open session at the US Senate tomorrow. And every single news network plans to air the hearing live. But viewers may notice a strange ad during breaks in the testimony. A shady pro-Tump
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Popular Science
You can tell these adorable octopuses apart by their warts Animals Scientists finally figure out how to tell some cute cousins apart. Deep beneath the ocean waves, many-tentacled creatures lurk. And they are adorable. Read on.
10h
Live Science
Earth Faces an Increased Risk of Being Hit by an Asteroid, Astronomers WarnLarge asteroids may be lurking undiscovered within a meteoroid stream whose particles are hitting Earth, and scientists are urging a concentrated search for them.
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The mathematicians who want to save democracy With algorithms in hand, scientists are looking to make elections in the United States more representative. Nature 546 200 doi: 10.1038/546200a
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Origami of Space ExplorationUndergrad Robert Salazar is using his expertise in paper-folding to help NASA create deployable solar reflectors for lunar outposts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin
Ét resultat fra ASCO vil ramme dansk kræftbehandling lige i hjertekulen For formanden og for den lægelige leder i SKA har årets absolut største ASCO-nyhed handlet om patientrapporterede data. På Plenary Session blev det slået fast, at effekten af en behandling afhænger af i hvor høj grad patienten inddrages i forløbet – og det vil tvinge læger fra alle grene af onkologien til at ændre tankemønster, vurderer de to garvede kongres-gængere.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Suppressing the reasoning part of the brain stimulates creativity, scientists find Using electrical currents to affect parts of the brain involved in planning and reasoning found to make people better at imaginative puzzle-solving If off-the-wall thinking gives you a headache, scientists might have the solution. Researchers have found that suppressing activity in part of the brain involved in planning and reasoning can boost an individual’s ability to think in creative ways and
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Paris pollution victim sues France for bad airParisian Clotilde Nonnez has lived in the capital for 30 years and has seen her health deteriorate.
11h
The Atlantic
Are Senate Republicans Really Doomed on Health Care? It’s no surprise to hear doom-and-gloom prognostications about the likelihood that Senate Republicans will pass legislation to replace the Affordable Care Act. Pessimism is the default mood in the Senate, a chamber that demands consensus even when none exists. What’s notable about the latest predictions of failure, however, is that most of them were coming from the Republicans themselves. “It’s u
11h
The Atlantic
The Man Behind Trump's Religious-Freedom Agenda for Health Care The offices inside the Department of Health and Human Services are aggressively tan. Roger Severino, the newly appointed head of its Office for Civil Rights, hasn’t done much by way of decoration. Aside from a few plaques and leftover exhibits from old cases, his Clarence Thomas bobblehead doll and crucifix are the only personal touches in his work space. The media spends a lot of time tracking D
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Living Large: How Whales Got to Be So EnormousA new theory traces their gargantuan size to changing food sources during ice ages -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increased sea ice drift puts polar bears on faster-moving treadmillA new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Wyoming found that increased westward ice drift in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas requires polar bears to expend more energy walking eastward on a faster-moving "treadmill" of sea ice.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: An astronaut's view from the 'corner office'NASA astronaut Jack Fischer tweeted this photograph from the International Space Station on June 3, 2017, writing, "Never had a corner office with a view, but I must admit, I like it… a lot! #SpaceRocks"
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists recommend drones for pipeline monitoringThe use of aerial drones to monitor oil and gas pipelines could bring significant benefits to operators, according to research carried out by scientists at the University of Aberdeen.
11h
Gizmodo
Watergate Pales in Comparison to Trump's Assault on American Institutions, Says Former Spy Chief President Trump speaks during a meeting with House and Senate Leadership in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on June 6, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) James Clapper, the former Director of National Intelligence, explained to an audience in Australia today precisely how quickly things are unraveling back home. How bad does Clapper think it’s getting? He called Trump’s current scanda
11h
Dagens Medicin
Jes Søgaard om økonomiaftale: Regeringen burde have råd til mere end 0,5 pct. Den nye økonomiaftale på sundhedsområdet tegner et billede af, at Danmark fortsat har lavvande i kassen efter finanskrisen. Men billedet er forkert, vurderer professor i sundhedsøkonomi, Jes Søgaard, der advarer om, at det er på høje tid at investere mere i sundhedsområdet.
11h
The Atlantic
What We Know About the Attacks in Iran Here’s what we know: —A team of two attackers—including a female suicide bomber—targeted the Imam Khomeini Mausoleum. Both attacker are dead. —Four attackers targeted the Majlis, Iran’s parliament, including a suicide bomber. All were killed. —Twelve people were killed and 42 wounded. The attack is over, Iranian authorities say. —ISIS claimed responsibility. It’s the group’s first attack inside I
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survival of the fittest—biology's role in sustainable power generationScientists from the University of Geneva are using the rules of genetics to better understand how to incorporate wind and solar power into the current electrical grid to produce a renewable power system. The researchers published their study in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS), a joint publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wine descriptions make people more emotional about wineResearch by the University of Adelaide has shown that consumers are much more influenced by wine label descriptions than previously thought.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device designed to exploit scattering of light by mechanical vibrationsResearchers at the University of Campinas's Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, have theorized a silicon photonic device that would enable optical and mechanical waves vibrating at tens of gigahertz (GHz) to interact. The proposed device is described in an article published in Scientific Reports.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists model gene regulation with chromatin accessibilityResearchers from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have teamed up with Stanford University and Tsinghua University scientists to successfully model data on gene regulation with paired expression and chromatin accessibility (PECA) and have developed new tools to infer context-specific regulatory networks.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Efterlyses: Systematisk dokumentationJeg har svært ved at forstå, hvorfor dokumentationskravet ikke skal gælde for indberetningssystemet for UTH.
12h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Er der jordskælv på måner, sole og andre planeter?En læser kunne godt tænke sig at vide, om Jorden er det eneste sted, der oplever jordskælv. Det svarer professor i fysik og astronomi på.
12h
Ingeniøren
Opstribningsrobot på banen igen efter ærgerlig GPS-skævertLokale investorer i Hjørring- området har omfavnet robotten, der kan tegne striber på alverdens idrætsbaner. Men der skulle en fejlslagen test til, før robotten fra Intelligent Marking var klar til det amerikanske marked.
12h
Ingeniøren
Praktik- og studiejoblisten: Siemens, Dong og Udenrigsministeriet jagter unge talenter Månedens liste for studerende tilbyder jobchancer til både kommende ingeniør og it-professionelle. Der er spændende studiejob, praktikpladser og graduate-programmer. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/praktik-studiejoblisten-siemens-dong-udenrigsministeriet-jagter-unge-talenter-8503 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
New Scientist - News
Energy security is possible without nuclear power or fracked gasThere is a mantra that nuclear and natural gas power stations are essential to keep the lights on in the UK. It's a myth, says Keith Barnham
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop divide and conquer approach for more stable power generationWind is a powerful but often unreliable energy source. To increase reliability and availability of wind-generated power, scientists have developed a two-pronged approach to ensure wind-generated power doesn't diminish as a renewable resource.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New low-cost material for lighting and diagnostics produces white light imitating sunlightResearchers at the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a synthetic material based on the natural hackmanite mineral, which produces broad spectrum white light in lamps. The low-cost hackmanite-based material created by the Inorganic Materials Chemistry research group emits luminescence closer to sunlight than currently used lanthanides.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new EcoCity model for mitigating urban heat islandsUrban land-use/cover changes and their effects on the eco-environment have long been an active research topic in the urbanization field. Prof. KUANG Wenhui's group at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed the EcoCity model for regulating urban land cover structures and thermal environments, and has established eco-regulation thresholds for urban surface thermal environments.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists propose new method to correct common power problem in microgridsScientists from the Northeastern University, China, have developed a new method to diagnose a serious electrical problem in microgrids. They have published their work in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS), a joint publication of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the Chinese Association of Automation.
12h
Ingeniøren
Ansat laver kæmpebrøler: Menneskelig fejl skyld i British Airways it-nedsmeltning Selv ikke firmaets backupsystemer kunne redde dets datacenter fra den ansattes kæmpefejl. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ansat-laver-kaempebroeler-menneskelig-fejl-skyld-britisk-aairways-it-nedsmeltning-1077334 Version2
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fungi awake bacteria from their slumberWhen a soil dries out, this has a negative impact on the activity of soil bacteria. Using an innovative combination of state-of-the-art analysis and imaging techniques, UFZ-researchers have now discovered that fungi increase the activity of bacteria in dry and nutrient-poor habitats by supplying them with water and nutrients. The ability of fungi to regulate drought stress in soil and thus sustain
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type of sugar may treat atherosclerosis, mouse study showsStudying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a natural sugar called trehalose revs up the immune system's cellular housekeeping abilities. These souped-up housecleaners then are able to reduce atherosclerotic plaque that has built up inside arteries. Such plaques are a hallmark of cardiovascular disease and lead to an increased risk of heart a
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists improve people's creativity through electrical brain stimulationScientists have found a way to improve creativity through brain stimulation, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Goldsmiths University of London.
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny forskning giver praktiske kogetips til rødvinssovsenBliver man beruset af at hælde øl eller vin i sovsen eller gryderetten? Det spørgsmål...
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Forskere: Spis ikke levende insekter samlet ind i naturenHvis du er frisk på at spise insekter, så skal du hellere købe dem i et supermarked...
12h
Viden
Brinkmann: Hvorfor tager folk sig ikke sammen på sociale medier?Selv om psykolog Svend Brinkmann selv er et hit på sociale medier, er han bekymret for deres effekt på vores kommunikation. Men sprogforsker tager de nye medier i forsvar.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fungi awake bacteria from their slumberWhen a soil dries out, this has a negative impact on the activity of soil bacteria. Using an innovative combination of state-of-the-art analysis and imaging techniques, researchers at UFZ have now discovered that fungi increase the activity of bacteria in dry and nutrient-poor habitats by supplying them with water and nutrients. The ability of fungi to regulate drought stress in soil and thus sust
13h
Science | The Guardian
Polygraph for pedophiles: how virtual reality is used to assess sex offenders A controversial lab in Montreal is developing virtual reality images that can help build a profile of a pedophile, and determine their risk to society In a maximum security mental health facility in Montreal is a “cave-like” virtual reality vault that’s used to show images of child sexual abuse to sex offenders. Patients sit inside the vault with devices placed around their penises to measure sig
13h
Ingeniøren
Vand er den sjette grundsmagVand har åbenbart en smag - og den er er tæt forbundet til ‘de sure’ smagsløg. Det viser ny forskning.
13h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Italy rebuked for failure to prevent olive-tree tragedy European Commission reveals widespread delays by the country’s authorities to halt spread of deadly plant disease. Nature 546 193 doi: 10.1038/546193a
13h
Dagens Medicin
Ny kampagne skal få færre til at ringe til lægevagtenRegion Syddanmark har igangsat en ny kampagne, der skal sørge for, at borgere bruger deres egen læge frem for vagtlægen i tilfælde, hvor det ikke er akut.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oregon city approves permit for US' first all-wood high-riseOfficials in Oregon have approved construction permits for the first all-wood high-rise building in the nation.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leaked NSA doc highlights deep flaws in US election systemA leaked intelligence document outlining alleged attempts by Russian military intelligence to hack into U.S. election systems is the latest evidence suggesting a broad and sophisticated foreign attack on the integrity of the nation's elections.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber moves to repair tainted image with 20 firings, 1 hiringUber, the world's leading ride-hailing company, has taken two big steps toward repairing its corporate image: It fired 20 employees for a host of harassment problems and hired an Apple marketing executive to rescue its tainted brand.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsstyrelsen genopslår tilbud om midler til medicinfrit psykiatrisk afsnitIngen ansøgere levede op til kravene, da Sundhedsstyrelsen i første omgang udloddede 10 mio. fra satspuljemidlerne til at etablere et medicinfrit psykiatrisk afsnit.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Czech 'GyroDrive' beats flying cars for hybrid licenceAs global automakers compete to bring the first flying car to market, Czech pilot Pavel Brezina is trying a different tack: instead of creating a car that flies, he has made a "GyroDrive"—a mini helicopter you can drive.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drivers bewildered by twisting Chinese interchangeFive suspended levels and cars going in all directions: a new highway interchange is driving motorists to tears, as they find themselves lost in a concrete maze resembling a plate of spaghetti.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Culls, poultry transport ban as S. Korea fights bird flu outbreakSouth Korea has imposed a temporary nationwide ban on poultry transportation as it struggles to contain a fresh outbreak of the highly pathogenic H5N6 virus, which has led to the slaughter of some 190,000 birds.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple wants to rock the market with HomePod, faces challengesApple's new HomePod speaker may be music to the ears of its loyal fans, but how much it can crank up volume in the smart speaker market remains to be heard.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
T. rex was not feathery, study saysTyrannosaurus rex had scales, not feathers, said a study Wednesday which rescues the giant lizard's reputation as a fearsome killer with a rough-and-tough hide.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five workers exposed to radiation at Japan nuclear labJapan's Atomic Energy Agency said Wednesday that five workers at a nuclear facility that handles plutonium have been exposed to high levels of radiation after a bag containing highly radioactive material apparently broke during equipment inspection.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctic base waits on 'Halloween' crackThe permanent reoccupation of the UK's Halley station depends on how an ice crack develops.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Økonomiaftale modtages surt Læger og andet sundhedspersonale på sygehusene kritiserer stram økonomiaftale mellem regering og regioner.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Running multiple marathons does not increase risk of atherosclerosisRunning multiple marathons does not increase the risk of atherosclerosis, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
15h
Gizmodo
Japan Creates Samurai Armor For Cats And Dogs [Image: Samurai Age ] It was only a matter of time, but a company in Fukuoka, Japan is now making samurai armor for pets. The company, known as “ Samurai Age ,” also crafts made-in-Japan miniature armor for dolls and bottles of sake. The pet armor appears to be a more recent—and fitting—addition. [Image: Samurai Age ] Each set is made one-by-one from a light foam resin and polyurethane so it won’
15h
Dagens Medicin
Dyr løsning på Ærø: Falck-klinik har kun 400 patienter Lægesituationen på Ærø tegnede sig kritisk sidste år, så regionen så sig nødsaget til at etablere en Falck-klinik, de nu er kontraktligt bundet til at have. Klinikken er i dag endt med kun at have 400 patienter. Klinikken møder kritik.
15h
Live Science
Many Women Experience Paralysis During Sexual AssaultMany people assume that during a sexual assault, the victim will fight back. But a new study from Sweden finds that, during an attack, it's common for victims to experience an innate, defensive reaction that renders them paralyzed.
15h
Gizmodo
Police Crowdsource the Hunt for Stolen Star Trek Trading Cards Exactly as You'd Expect Image: CBS Recently, 3,800 Star Trek trading cards were stolen and police in Northern Ireland are on the hunt for them. And because we live in a world where everything goes on social media, PSNI Foyle asked for information with a Facebook post that includes all the obvious Star Trek quotes you can think of. The cards were taken Monday and PSNI Foyle posted its call for help today. Here it is: No
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overcoming immune suppression to fight against bovine leukemiaA newly developed antibody drug reactivates suppressed immune cells, decreasing the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) counts in an infected cow. The antibody could be applied to treat a variety of intractable infectious diseases in cows.
16h
Ingeniøren
DK Hostmaster: URL-hijacking mod danske domæner stiger Mens der er fald i malware-domæner, lader typosquattede reklame-domæner til at være i stigning. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/b0rgerdk-buldrer-loes-med-typosquattede-dk-domaener-1077259 Version2
17h
Ingeniøren
Landbrug og transport er store klima-syndere, men det kan ikke betale sig at omstilleKo-bøvser og udstødningsgasser udgør 78 procent af udledningerne af drivhusgasser fra ikke-kvotesektoren. Men ifølge Klimarådet står økonomien i vejen for en gennemgribende omlægning af landbrugs- og transportsektoren i nærmeste fremtid.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survival of the fittest -- Biology's role in sustainable power generationScientists from the University of Geneva are using the rules of genetics to better understand how to incorporate wind and solar power into the current electrical grid to produce a renewable power system. The researchers published their study in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher alcohol consumption leads to greater loss of muscle tissue in postmenopausal womenBoth aging and menopause are known to affect sarcopenia, which is a loss of muscle mass and strength, which in turn affects balance, gait, and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living. A new study is one of the first to link alcohol consumption with a higher prevalence of sarcopenia in postmenopausal women. The study outcomes are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of Th
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many rape victims experience involuntary paralysis that prevents them from resistingActive resistance is often considered to be the 'normal' reaction during rape, but a new study found that most victims may experience a state of involuntary paralysis, called tonic immobility, during rape.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links certain characteristics with ISIS anxietyA new study examines the characteristics of individuals who are most likely to have anxiety concerning threats posed by ISIS.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep apnea and insomnia combination linked with depressionA new study found that men with sleep apnea and insomnia have a higher prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms than men with sleep apnea or insomnia alone.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals level of magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy in preterm infantsA new study suggests that to optimize neuroprotection and prevent cerebral palsy in extremely preterm infants, women should receive magnesium sulfate to obtain a blood level between 3.7 and 4.4 mg/dL at the time of delivery.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Religious coping may affect couples dealing with type 2 diabetesA new study indicates that spousal engagement in shared glycemic control activities -- such as planning a healthy diet -- may help patients with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Excessive exercise may damage the gutA review of published studies has found that people who exercise excessively may be prone to acute or chronic gut issues.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Particulate air pollution linked to poor survival in liver cancer patientsIn a recent study, exposure to particulate air pollution after being diagnosed with liver cancer was significantly associated with an increased risk of premature death.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines self-management intervention in patients with epilepsyA new study has found that a multi-component self-management intervention (MCI) for adults with epilepsy may be an important tool to increase efficiency in epilepsy care.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How have HPV vaccines affected cervical cancer screening?A new review looks at cervical cancer screening in the era of HPV vaccination. The review notes that trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of vaccines against HPV infection, but the complete effect of HPV vaccination as a cancer prevention strategy may not be fully evident for decades, given the slow progression from HPV infection to the development of cervical cancer.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise may help combat postpartum depressionAn analysis of published studies indicates that physical exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a safe way to achieve better psychological well-being and to reduce postpartum depressive symptoms.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Home-based HPV tests may help with cervical cancer screeningA new study found that for many women in rural El Salvador, home-based HPV self-sampling for women is an acceptable way to participate in a cervical cancer screening program.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain cardiovascular medications may increase risk of fallingA new analysis suggests that among older adults who take cardiovascular medications, those using non-selective beta-blockers may be at an increased of falling compared with those using selective beta-blockers.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can pain increase the risk of dying early?Pain that interferes with daily life, rather than pain per se, was associated with an increased risk of early death in a recent analysis.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How can you tell deep-sea octopuses apart? Check their wartsUntil now, there'd been no rigorous framework for telling apart two species of deep-sea octopuses -- they're both pink and warty. A new study, though, shows that the distribution of warts is an important means of telling the two species apart -- the octopuses from the Pacific are wartier than the ones from the Atlantic.That little piece of information could be a big help in ongoing deep-sea resear
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which extinct ducks could fly?We're all familiar with flightless birds: ostriches, emus, penguins--and ducks? Ducks and geese have been especially prone to becoming flightless over the course of evolutionary history, but it can be difficult to determine from fossils whether an extinct species could fly or not. A new study takes a fresh approach, classifying species as flightless or not based on their skeletons and offering a g
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eggs can significantly increase growth in young childrenEggs significantly increased growth and reduced stunting by 47 percent in young children, finds a new study from a leading expert on child nutrition at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. This was a much greater effect than had been shown in previous studies.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How can you tell deep-sea octopuses apart? Check their wartsIt's usually pretty easy for dedicated scientists with years of experience to tell two species of their favorite organism apart, be it squirrels or birds. The scientists have seen a lot of the animal they specialize in, and the important traits that separate species have been well-documented for centuries. But when it comes to rarely-seen animals in the deep sea, those fundamental assessments are
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which extinct ducks could fly?We're all familiar with flightless birds: ostriches, emus, penguins—and ducks? Ducks and geese, part of a bird family called the anatids, have been especially prone to becoming flightless over the course of evolutionary history. However, it can be difficult to determine from fossils whether an extinct anatid species could fly or not. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances takes a fresh
18h
Gizmodo
Subaru Dealer Holds BRZ Hostage After Facebook-Stalking The Owner's Track Day Photos You would think an owner like Natalie is exactly the sort of person Subaru would want for the BRZ. She clearly adores the car, and hers is modified, personalized and prominent on her social media accounts. Plus, it’s actually used in the way it was designed to be used. So why did her dealer attempt to hold her 2015 Subaru BRZ for ransom? The answer is actually pretty complicated, and I’m not sure
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Paris Isn’t the Only Clean Energy Pact the U.S. Is FleeingThe White House’s deep proposed cuts to energy R&D could cede leadership to China, and derail the international Mission Innovation partnership.
18h
Ingeniøren
To trin til at nå din to-do-liste To-do-lister laves for at være sikker på, at opgaverne bliver nået i en travl verden. Så hvorfor fungerer de dårligt for mange af os. Det har en tidligere partner i McKinsey et klart svar på - og en to-trins-løsning til at få to-do-listen til at fungere https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/to-trin-at-naa-din-to-do-liste-7730 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jackpot! Cosmic magnifying-glass effect captures universe's brightest galaxiesBoosted by natural magnifying lenses in space, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured unique close-up views of the universe's brightest infrared galaxies, which are as much as 10,000 times more luminous than our Milky Way.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sequential options prompt future thinking, boost patienceWhen faced with a tempting choice, it can be hard to stop and think through the potential consequences, but new research suggests that framing the choice as a sequence of events can help us exercise patience by prompting us to imagine the future.
18h
The Atlantic
Police Identify Third London Bridge Attacker Authorities have identified the third attacker responsible for Saturday’s terrorist incident on the London Bridge that killed seven people and injured 48. The names of the other two attackers, 27-year-old Khuram Butt and 30-year-old Rachid Redouane, were revealed Monday. The mother of the third attacker, 22-year-old Youssef Zaghba, said the three men were friends. Together, they carried out the U
19h
Live Science
Marijuana: Effects of Weed on Brain and BodyMarijuana produces a range of psychological and physical effects that can be unpredictable at times.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New pediatric protocol reduces missed sepsis diagnoses by 76 percentAn electronic sepsis alert using a combination of vital signs, risk factors and physician judgment to identify children in a pediatric emergency department with severe sepsis reduced missed diagnoses by 76 percent.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What makes a movement feel strenuous?Scientists have determined which characteristics of an arm movement influence the subjective effort associated with this movement. They found that duration, biomechanics and force had an influence on the effort, while movement amplitudes had no effect. Their results shed light on a postulated link between two important functions of the brain: optimizing action selection in decision-making and in m
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caregiving by family members, other unpaid individualsCaregiving is a significant public health topic because it affects the health and well-being of both the older adult and his or her caregivers. Recently, a team of researchers examined the various characteristics of people who serve as unpaid caregivers. They also estimated how many people serve in this capacity. The researchers took note of the health-related tasks the caregivers provided, as wel
19h
Live Science
Medical Marijuana: Benefits, Risks & State LawsMedical marijuana is legal in some states, but debate rages on about whether the health benefits outweigh the risks.
19h
Gizmodo
Couple Claims They Ordered Pizza on UberEats But Received... Oh My God What Is That?! Photo: Getty For all I know, Uber’s food delivery service UberEats is a perfectly fine method of ordering food. But the stomach-turning product that a Canadian couple claims showed up at their door instead of pizza ensures that I’ll be thinking twice about placing an order. Anna Kotlikova and her boyfriend, Blake Weinzettl, live in the suburbs of Toronto and they wanted to stay in on Sunday eveni
19h
Science | The Guardian
Caring about climate change: it's time to build a bridge between data and emotion | Ketan Joshi Seeing the span of our children’s lives laid over a climate projection graph slices through the boredom that comes with climate apathy Long after we each cease to exist, the physical outcomes of the choices we make today, and tomorrow, will linger. Shadows of our decisions on policy, energy and lifestyle will manifest as the consequence of our injection of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosp
20h
The Scientist RSS
ASM to Discontinue Small ConferencesNumerous scientists are disappointed with the American Society for Microbiology's decision, and some are hatching plans to keep the meetings alive.
20h
Ars Technica
USPTO Director Michelle Lee has resigned without warning Michelle Lee in 2014. (credit: whitehouse.gov ) Director of the US Patent and Trademark Office Michelle Lee resigned today, without explanation. Lee, who has been director of the office since 2014, was a favored candidate by the tech sector, who thought she brought a balanced approach to patents. She is a former Google lawyer and was one of the first corporate lawyers to speak out about the probl
20h
The Atlantic
Did Russian Hackers Target Qatar? Russian hackers may have planted a fake news story on the Qatar news agency’s website, CNN reported Tuesday evening. The hack may also have precipitated the crisis that saw six Arab countries sever their relations with Qatar. Here’s more from the CNN report, which cited U.S. officials briefed on the investigation: The FBI recently sent a team of investigators to Doha to help the Qatari government
21h
The Atlantic
Trump's Efforts to Curtail the FBI's Investigation Spill Into View Like movie trailers before a summer blockbuster, new reports are shedding more light on the increasingly toxic relationship between President Trump and top law-enforcement and intelligence officials ahead of former FBI Director James Comey’s heavily anticipated testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. In a rapid-fire series of stories on Tuesday evening, The New York Times
21h
Gizmodo
Tech Companies and Activists Set Date for Net Neutrality 'Day of Action' Photo: Getty The last time we had a major fight over net neutrality, the “ Internet Slowdown Day ” protests were credited with helping push the FCC to reclassify the internet as a Title II utility. Now that net neutrality is the closest it’s ever been to dead, activists and tech giants are rallying to mount a protest and we’re about to find out if it’s possible to save the internet one more time.
21h
Ars Technica
Citing costs, US Air Force turns to SpaceX for its next spy plane launch Enlarge / Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson shows a model of the X-37B during a Tuesday hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee. (credit: US Armed Service Committee ) The US Air Force has two X-37B space planes, and since 2010 each of them has flown two missions into outer space. Those flights have ranged in length from 224 to 717 days. The X-37B , which is autonomous and looks something
21h
Gizmodo
What's the Best USB Travel Charger? We recently asked you about your favorite USB charging hubs , but travel chargers are a different beast. Folding plugs, 100-240V support, and compact designs are of paramount importance here, so check out the rules below, and let us know what you keep in your travel bag. 1) Your nomination should contain the specific name of the product, why you think this item is the best, a link where the item
22h
Live Science
Tuna Steaks Recalled in 3 US States for Hepatitis ADozens of restaurants in California, Oklahoma and Texas received shipments of frozen tuna steaks that may be contaminated with hepatitis A, according to health officials.
22h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Leaks and Law Enforcement What We’re Following National-Security Leak: Reality Leigh Winner, a 25-year-old NSA contractor and Air Force veteran, was arrested and charged yesterday with leaking classified information to a news organization, within hours after The Intercept published an NSA document related to the investigation of Russian interference in the presidential election. One way investigators could have traced the
22h
Gizmodo
Sofia Boutella Had to Lick Tom Cruise Eight Times on the Set of The Mummy Image: Universal Pictures Sometimes people like to render metaphors literally, and in the case of The Mummy , the metaphor “take a licking” results in the Mummy (Sofia Boutella) laying her tongue on Nick Morton (Tom Cruise). Although, let’s be honest, Tom Cruise is always just playing Tom Cruise. A short USA Today article on Boutella’s turn as Ahmanet (whom Boutella describes as “the definition o
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Study casts doubt on the idea of 'big fluffy T. rex'Evidence suggests the dinosaur had scales rather than feathers or fluff, as some have speculated.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchersPsychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background.Linguistic cues to deception do not appear consistently across all cultures. The differences are dictated by known cultural differences in cognition and social normsThis has implications for everything from forensic risk assessments, discrimination proceedings and the evaluation of asy
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Motor-boat noise makes fish bad parents, leading to the death of their babiesThe sound of motorboat engines disturbed coral reef fish so acutely it changed the behavior of parents, and stopped male fish properly guarding their young, feeding and interacting with their offspring.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Impact of protective bacteria linked to infection route, study findsThe benefits of protective bacteria -- which safeguard organisms from further disease without causing harm -- depend on how subsequent infections enter the body, a study of fruit flies has shown.
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