Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The largest virtual universe ever simulatedResearchers from the University of Zurich have simulated the formation of our entire universe with a large supercomputer. A gigantic catalogue of about 25 billion virtual galaxies has been generated from 2 trillion digital particles. This catalogue is being used to calibrate the experiments on board the Euclid satellite, that will be launched in 2020 with the objective of investigating the nature
51min
New Scientist - News
Cystic fibrosis drug halts lung damage in young childrenOrkambi targets the most common mutation for cystic fibrosis, but is not available in the UK on the NHS. Now a trial has shown promising effects in children
2h
Ingeniøren
Pind: Flere penge til energiforskning i 2018På elsektorens brancheevent, Energiens Topmøde 2017, røbede forsknings- og undervisningsminister Søren Pind, at regeringen vil afsætte flere penge næste år til energiforskning og -udvikling. Beløbets størrelse forelå der dog intet om.
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LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructuresHeterogeneous nanostructured materials are widely used in various optoelectronic devices, including solar cells. However, the nano-interfaces contain structural defects that can affect performance. Calculations run at NERSC helped researchers ID the root cause of the defects in two materials and provide design rules to avoid them.
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your smile gives you awayResearchers from USC's Institute for Creative Technologies study how reacting with a smile affects game outcomes, hoping one day to empower virtual humans with this knowledge.
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists develop hydrogel strings using compound found in sea creaturesRice University chemists can thank the mussel for putting the muscle into their new macroscale scaffold fibers.
3min
Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Home Network On A Budget With Today's Amazon Gold Box If you still haven’t upgraded your home network to 802.11ac, or if you just want to fill in a few dead zones in the corners of your home, Amazons running a huge sale today on routers, range extenders and more from TP-Link. Inside, you’ll find routers starting at $45, modems, range extenders, smart switches, ethernet hubs, and more , most of which are marked down to all-time low prices. Hell, this
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's first success in asymmetric borylation of ketonesA team of Hokkaido University researchers has developed the world's first method to achieve the catalytic asymmetric borylation of ketones, a breakthrough expected to facilitate the development of new medicines and functional chemicals.
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Group suggests adding tag to resurrected extinct animal names(Phys.org)—A group of scientists from several institutions in Germany has suggested that extinct animals that are resurrected through scientific means be given a tag on their name to indicate their origins. In a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science, the group suggests adding the tag "recr" to scientific names given to resurrected creatures to make sure they are not confused with the original.
9min
Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: ignore politics - we’ve got some strong and stable science for you It’s been a week for overturning certainties, and the latest discovery of 300,000-year-old remains in Moroccan mine is no exception. Scientists believe that these are the oldest Homo sapiens bones ever found and they challenge the very foundations of our understanding of human evolution. Put that alongside the discovery of Kelt-9b, the hottest known giant planet (found using Kilodegree Extremely
15min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene specimen support technique for low voltage STEM imagingDeveloping new scientific devices pushing the limits of what we can observe and measure does not occur overnight. There are typically baby steps involved, small and continuous improvements to counter the numerous technical hurdles arising on the way. The new state-of-the-art electron microscope developed by Prof. Tsumoru Shintake at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate Universi
15min
Scientific American Content: Global
What Animals Know about Where Babies Come FromNonhuman species can seem to comprehend procreation, but even apes lack the cognitive traits to truly understand -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computing system takes its cues from human brainSome problems are so challenging to solve that even the most advanced computers need weeks, not seconds, to process them.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique hoard of gold casts new light on final stages of Roman rule in the NetherlandsArchaeologists of VU Amsterdam and the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands unveiled a fascinating hoard of gold coins in Het Valkhof Museum in Nijmegen last week. The treasure must have been buried around AD 460, not long before the final fall of the West Roman Empire in 476. 'The find adds a key element to our knowledge of the final stages of Roman rule in the Netherlands and the transiti
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers design rare-earth extractants with the help of new softwareThe U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute has developed a computer program, called ParFit, that can vastly reduce the amount of time spent identifying promising chemical compounds used in rare-earth processing methods.
21min
New Scientist - News
How YouGov’s experimental poll correctly called the UK electionA new approach from the pollsters that dumped old-fashioned representative surveys in favour of big data and fancy statistics got it right
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to help animals? Don't forget the chickensSummertime is "kitten season" – unspayed female cats go into heat and give birth to more adorable kittens than animal shelters can give away.
27min
The Atlantic
The Ice Guru in Brooklyn The Cortex Is the Enemy Greenpoint is a historically working-class Brooklyn neighborhood full of industrial buildings. In the last two decades these have been turned into lofts with skyline views, and skyscrapers are going up, and there are waterfront parks and coffee shops adjacent to other coffee shops. The old pencil factory is condos. The old rope factory is an event space. Along with adjacen
33min
Dagens Medicin
Kriseramt akutafdeling ansætter ny ledende oversygeplejerske Britt Holmgaard får ansvaret for sygepleje og plejepersonale på akutafdelingen på Nordsjællands Hospital.
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early modern traders circumvented rules of states and companiesIndividual traders should be at the forefront of the study of early modern world trade rather than institutions such as states and companies, argues Professor of Global Economic Networks Cátia Antunes. Inaugural lecture on 9 June.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wolf evolution and 'settled science'Are the red and eastern wolves separate species, or hybrids with coyotes? And what has that got to do with climate change? Actually a lot, in illustrating what scientific inquiry is and what it isn't.
39min
Ingeniøren
Solcellernes skæbne: Når støtte bliver en dræberSolceller får indirekte støtte i form af fritagelse for energi­afgift. Her er historien om, hvordan det system lagde gift for en stabil udvikling af en lovende teknologi for vedvarende energi.
42min
Popular Science
GIFs made easy DIY 3 ways to make your own memes. Here are the easiest ways to go from beginner to GIF kween.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: What leaving the Paris climate deal means for businessThe impact of President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement will differ for companies depending on what they produce and whether they have sales overseas.
51min
Futurity.org
Do missing cells leave preemies prone to flu? Due to an absence of certain lung cells, mice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown. This discovery may explain preterm infants’ added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives. The research, published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology , focuses on alveolar type II cells, which help to rebuild
1h
The Atlantic
The Scientist and the Fascist In September 1930, Germany held its first national elections since the Great Crash of 1929, and the National Socialists won a stunning tally: 6,400,000 votes—10 times their total just two years before—and 107 seats. They were now the second largest party in the Reichstag. The word “Nazi” no longer evoked images of the madhouse, as one commentator wrote. Suddenly the party was almost respectable.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fiendishly complexWorld Land Speed record holder Andy Green examines how the extremes of speed and acceleration will affect the airflow around the Bloodhound supersonic car.
1h
WIRED
Review: Cheese Grotto The Cheese Grotto promises to extend the life of fine cheeses by creating the perfect storage conditions. But in reality, deli wrap just as well. The post Review: Cheese Grotto appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
These neurons let us wake up in the middle of the night Researchers have identified a group of neurons that may keep us awake even when we want to sleep. The findings, from research with mice, have implications for treating insomnia, oversleeping, and sleep disturbances that accompany other neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Biologist Viviana Gradinaru and her team wanted to know: How do we overcome tiredness in the face of a looming deadl
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Scientific American Content: Global
Quirky Quarks Could Reveal Details of the Big BangScientists flag unexpected behavior by “charm” quarks produced at Brookhaven National Laboratory -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
UK scientists hope for softened Brexit after shock election result Conservative party loses majority but aims to form government. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22138
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New Scientist - News
Fungus creates zombie beetles that crave flowers before deathThe infected beetles seek out flowers, stick their heads in and bite for their life. Then, hours after dying, their wings mysteriously spring into action
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Ars Technica
Monitoring your blood pressure? Careful, 70% of home devices may be inaccurate Enlarge / Woman measuring her blood pressure. (credit: Getty | BSIP ) Millions of people stand to benefit from closely monitoring their blood pressure—those suffering with heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and pregnancy-induced hypertension, for instance, plus those who just stress in doctors’ offices and can’t get accurate readings. Yet the gadgets available for home use may not be up to
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Ars Technica
Wibbly-wobbly magnetic fusion stuff: The return of the stellarator Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics Fusion powers the Sun, where hydrogen ions are forced together by the high pressure and temperature. The nuclei join to create helium and release a lot of energy in the process. Doing the same thing on Earth means creating the same conditions that drive hydrogen nuclei together, which is easier said than done. Humans are very clever, but achieving fusion in
1h
Live Science
NYC's Hidden Marine Wonderland Revealed in New MapThe sea near New York City is teeming with life.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
For First Time, Einstein's Relativity Used to Weigh a StarScientists employ ‘gravitational lensing’ to measure the mass of a white dwarf -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A day in the life of a smart-city commuter — and why it's not so far from realityThe alarm on your smart phone went off 10 minutes earlier than usual this morning. Parts of the city are closed off in preparation for a popular end of summer event, so congestion is expected to be worse than usual. You'll need to catch an earlier bus to make it to work on time.
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Science | The Guardian
Robot hearts: medicine’s new frontier - podcast From bovine valves to electrical motors and 3-D printed hearts, cardiologists are forging ahead with technologies once dismissed as ‘crazy ideas’ • Read the text version here Subscribe via Audioboom , iTunes , Soundcloud , Mixcloud , Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China cracks down on online peddlers of celebrity gossipOnline peddlers of celebrity gossip have fallen foul of China's new cybersecurity law, with officials ordering internet companies to stop "catering to the public's vulgar taste".
1h
Live Science
Pretty Volcanic Plume Seen in Space ImageA seaborne sediment plume turns the Bering Sea green.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Welcome to the New Scientific American Mind -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite data finds peak in a daily lightning cycleNo matter where you are on middle Earth (from about 38° S to 38° N), there is a daily cycle to both the frequency and the power of lightning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery opens for 3-D measurements of magnetismA team of researchers from Uppsala University, China and Germany have substantially extended the possibilities of an experimental technique called EMCD, that is used for measuring magnetism in materials. The results were published in Nature Communications on May 15 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity increases risk of complications after shoulder joint replacement surgeryFor patients undergoing shoulder joint replacement surgery (arthroplasty), higher body mass index is linked to increased complications -- including the need for 'revision' surgery, reports a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fatherhood factors influence how dads spend time with childrenA father's resources, relationships, and parenting beliefs affect how he spends time with his children and financially provides for his family, finds a study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Inside Australia's War on Invasive SpeciesThe island country has a long history of unique efforts to battle nonnative animals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop computer-guided strategy to accelerate materials discoveryResearchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a computer-guided strategy that led to the discovery of two new materials in the laboratory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alpine streams produce more CO2 after a warm winterAn EPFL study has for the first time measured the impact of climate change on alpine streams, and the results are quite worrying: after a low-snow winter, these streams release more carbon dioxide than they absorb.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Competing businesses cooperate to take empty trucks off our roadsLinking up empty trucks and competing businesses through trusted networks could mean less road traffic and pollution.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Floodplain farm fields benefit juvenile salmonA new study offers a beacon of hope for a cease-fire in the Golden State's persistent water wars.
2h
Ingeniøren
Seruminstituttet jubler: Ny aftale har sikret vores fremtidEn ny aftale mellem regeringen og regionerne slår fast, at Statens Serum Institut også fremover skal varetage det danske infektionsberedskab. Instituttet får færre penge, men mener alligevel, at fremtiden på Islands Brygge er sikret.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Competitive soccer players have superior vision, study suggestsThe visual abilities of competitive soccer players are substantially better than those of healthy non-athletes, according to the first-ever comprehensive assessment of visual function in English Premier League players.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How class of drugs blocks Hepatitis C virus replicationFor the first time, researchers show how the antiviral class of drugs called NS5A inhibitors interacts with the hepatitis C virus, and these findings show a difference between strains of HCV.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum nanoscope: Seeing electrons surfing the waves of light on grapheneResearchers have studied how light can be used to 'see' the quantum nature of an electronic material. They managed to do that by capturing light in a net of carbon atoms and slowing down light it down so that it moves almost as slow as the electrons in the graphene.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Culprit hidden in plain sight in Alzheimer disease developmentA new study heightens concerns over the detrimental short- and long-term impact of airborne iron-rich strongly magnetic combustion-derived nanoparticles present in young urbanites' brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mind changing can be riskyWhen leaders use a moral argument rather than a pragmatic one as the basis for a position, they may be judged harshly if they change that position later. They are perceived as hypocrites, less effective and less worthy of future support, according to research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The role of the protein Rrm3 in the repair of breaks in DNA during replicationResearchers have now gained a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms that prevent genetic instability. These findings have vital importance in the research against cancer, they say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sahara greening may intensify tropical cyclone activity worldwideFuture climate warming could lead to a re-greening of the southernmost Sahara (Sahel), with decreased dust emissions and changes in land cover. In a recent study, researchers have found that tropical cyclone activity may have increased during past warm climates in connection with a greening of the Sahara.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keeping kids academically engaged during the summer monthsIt was not unusual for Emily Hayden to spend the first three or four weeks of a new school year re-acquainting her students with material they had learned the previous year. That's typically how long it would take to overcome the learning students lost during three months of summer vacation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bullying in organizations begets equally disruptive responses, study saysIt has been said that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Now new research suggests that such a dynamic can play out in organizations, where bullying within decision-making groups appears to go hand in hand with whining.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmic inflation: Higgs says goodbye to his 'little brother'In the first moments after the Big Bang, the universe expanded many billions of times faster than today. Such rapid expansion is likely due to a primordial force field acting with a new particle, the inflaton. From the latest analysis of the decay of mesons carried out in the LHCb experiment by physicists from Cracow and Zurich, it appears, however, that the most probable light inflaton, a particl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to harness the power of the windThere might be a better way to use wind power, according to a recent paper in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS), a joint publication of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the Chinese Association of Automation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Observing electrons surfing waves of light on grapheneResearchers have studied how light can be used to observe the quantum nature of an electronic material. They captured light in graphene and slowed it down to the speed of the material's electrons. Then electrons and light started to move in concert, manifesting their quantum nature at such large scale that it could observed with a special type of microscope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New system learns how to grasp objectsResearchers at Bielefeld University have developed a grasp system with robot hands that autonomously familiarizes itself with novel objects. The new system works without previously knowing the characteristics of objects, such as pieces of fruit or tools. The study could contribute to future service robots that are able to independently adapt to working in new households.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Observation of skyrmion breathing motion with X-ray techniqueSkyrmions are swirling spin structures with spiral shapes described in 2009. They have attracted attention in academia as representing a possible basic unit of ultra-high-density next-generation memory devices due to their unique topological stability, small size, and efficient movement. Recently, Korean researchers have developed a technology that can be applied to communication devices using sky
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals how a hormone increases sucrose accumulation in sugarcaneChemical ripeners, also known as growth regulators, are widely used in Brazil's sugarcane industry to increase early sucrose content relative to total mass and to inhibit plant growth in order to prolong harvesting and milling, thereby increasing yields and profitability for plantation owners.
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Live Science
Take a Whiff of Cities' Unique Smells with 'Pollution Pods'A science/art installation for a Norwegian festival offers visitors the chance to sniff the polluted air from six different cities.
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Live Science
A Famous 19th-Century Shipwreck Has Vanished from the South PacificTime and the tides have washed away the last traces of a famous 19th-century shipwreck from a coral reef in the South Pacific.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Delayed food introduction increases risk of sensitization, study findsInfants who avoided cow's milk products in their first year were nearly four times as likely to be sensitized to cow's milk compared to infants who consumed cow's milk products before 12 months of age, scientists discovered from sing data from more than 2,100 children. Similarly, infants who avoided egg or peanut in their first year were nearly twice as likely to be sensitized to those foods compa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How plants prevent oxidative stressWhen excess light energy is absorbed by plants during photosynthesis, harmful reactive oxygen species are produced. These reactive oxygen species break down important structures such as proteins and membranes, preventing them from functioning properly. Researchers have discovered the system used by plants to prevent oxidative stress and to safely carry out photosynthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World first: Stem cell treatment for lethal STAT1 gene mutation shows 'disappointing,' but promising resultsThe first ever study assessing how patients with "gain of function" mutation of the STAT1 gene respond to stem cell transplantation has taken place, yielding disappointing results, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study disputes link between uterine fibroids and miscarriage riskA 10-year study disrupts conventional wisdom that uterine fibroids cause miscarriages, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study shows important economic contributions of H-1B visasThe US economy is strengthened by H-1B visa holders who fill key roles in enhancing organizations and supplementing the work of their US peers, research shows. This is particularly true for trades like the US audit industry that employ a large number of individuals who hold H-1B visas, and who recruit highly skilled foreign workers for specialty occupations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can routine hysterectomy lead to problems with constipation or bladder control?Hysterectomy has an increased negative impact on women, including constipation and incontinence, a controversial new study indicates. The question of whether hysterectomy does more harm than good is examined in a new paper.
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Dagens Medicin
Pensioneret overlæge er sigtet assistere ved selvmordDen pensionerede overlæge Svend Lings har fået ransaget sit hjem.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Strejke blandt portører brederOverenskomstridige arbejdsnedlæggelse i Region Sjælland har spredt sig til hospitaler i Hovedstaden.
2h
Ingeniøren
Ny coating beskytter mod kemiske våbenDet er lykkedes amerikanske forskere at finde en metode, der let kan påføre tøj en coating, der beskytter mod optag af nervegasser som sarin gennem huden.
2h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Decoding Octopus Species, One Wart at a TimeWorried about threats to ocean habitats, scientists studying octopuses devised a system to distinguish different species by their warts.
3h
The Atlantic
The Incompetence Defense During former FBI Director James Comey’s dramatic testimony before the Senate on Thursday, Republican senators settled on a pair of strange arguments for why President Trump hadn’t obstructed justice: He didn’t try very hard, or he was really bad at it. Comey testified that the president asked Comey to shut down the FBI investigation into former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn, who was ou
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The Atlantic
'This Is the Most D.C. Thing You Can Do' Forget holidays, elections, or even national tragedies. Nothing brings out Washingtonians’ civic spirit quite like a high-profile political probe. In honor of Comey Day—the June 8 appearance before the Senate Intelligence Committee of fired FBI Director James Comey—a smattering of downtown D.C. bars decided to do the patriotic thing by opening early and offering investigation-themed drink special
3h
The Atlantic
The Disappointments of My Cousin Rachel Did she? Didn’t she? Who’s to blame? These are the key questions animating director Roger Michell’s My Cousin Rachel , and they are, by design, nearly as opaque at the film’s conclusion as they are at the start. Based on the 1951 novel by Daphne du Maurier, the romantic thriller is a nicely crafted work. It features strong performances—in particular by Rachel Weisz—sumptuous cinematography, and s
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Ingeniøren
Derfor er der forskel på store og små bogstaver Forskellen på store og små bogstaver er gået fra at være ren dekoration til at være noget, som bruges til at hjælpe læseren, nøjagtigt lige som punktum og mellemrum gjorde det. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/derfor-forskel-paa-store-smaa-bogstaver-1077248 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Vil du være sikkerhedskonsulent på prisvindende team eller robotics udvikler i Skat? På ugens it-liste er der en bred vifte af muligheder. Eksempelvis jagter virksomheder som SecureDevice, Novozymes, Netcompany og Siemens udviklere, konsulenter, ledere og specialister. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-vil-du-vaere-sikkerhedskonsulent-paa-prisvindende-team-eller-robotics-udvikler Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
3h
Dagens Medicin
Bypass-opererede har øget dødelighed 8-10 år efter operationSandsynligheden for at leve videre efter en bypass-operation i hjertet er tæt på at være den samme som den almene befolkning, når man er ovre selve indgrebet. Men efter 8-10 år stiger dødeligheden, viser et registerstudie fra Klinisk Epidemiologisk Afdeling ved Aarhus Universitet.
4h
Ingeniøren
3 grunde til at flyselskaber rammes særlig hårdt af it-nedbrud Nedbruddet hos British Airways kan ende med at koste selskabet over en halv milliard kroner. Men årsagen til, at det hele fik lov til at gå ned, er meget dyrere at løse. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/3-grunde-at-flyselskaber-rammes-saerlig-haardt-it-nedbrud-1077395 Version2
4h
Ingeniøren
Klimafiasko: CO2-udledning stiger for andet år i trækMere transport på veje og i luften er skyld i, at den samlede CO2-udledning er steget med en halv procent fra 2014-2015.
4h
The Atlantic
Will Bears Ears Remain a National Monument? Jonah Yellowman lives in the north end of the Navajo Nation, between Monument Valley, the famous backdrop of many Western movies, and Mexican Hat, Utah, named for a nearby red-rock formation that looks like a sombrero. Yellowman is one of about 70,000 Navajo who live in homes without running water. His house also lacks electricity. Trees are sparse on the Navajo reservation, so to gather wood for
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dogs and wolves share sense of fair playAnimals take umbrage when they feel that others are getting greater rewards than they are.
4h
Ingeniøren
Nyt projekt skal hjælpe mindre virksomheder i gang med 3D-printTeknologisk Institut deltager sammen med 20 andre forskningsinstitutioner i et nyt EU-projekt, som skal lette indførelse af 3D-print-teknologi. Projektet går i gang til efteråret.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Google project digitizes world's top fashion archivesAnyone who has waited on a long, snaking line to get into a fashion exhibit at a top museum knows just how popular they've become - and more broadly, how fashion is increasingly seen as a form of artistic and cultural expression.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Primitive whales had mediocre hearingFossils suggest that early whale hearing was run-of-the-mill, along the same line as that of land mammals.
5h
Science-Based Medicine
Chiropractic Subluxation Theory: Legal Support for Inappropriate Use of Spinal ManipulationLegally licensed, unbridled subluxation-based chiropractors who offer unproven treatment for a broad scope of health problems endanger public health, stigmatize appropriate use of spinal manipulation, and deter development of chiropractic as a legitimate back-care specialty.
5h
Ingeniøren
Danskere skruer op for bredbåndet - men få udnytter de hurtigste hastighederSelv om flere skruer op for hastigheden på deres internetforbindelser er det stadig få, der udnytter muligheden for lynhurtigt internet. Alligevel opfordrer energiselskaber til at skrue hastighederne endnu højere op.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple CEO Tim Cook to address 2017 graduates at MITApple CEO Tim Cook is delivering the commencement address at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US bucks trend amid increases for clean energy researchEnergy ministers from around the world gathered in Beijing this week to report increased spending to help counter climate change. Yet one prominent voice, that of U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry, delivered a starkly countervailing message as the Trump administration seeks to roll back spending on clean energy and promote fossil fuels.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SoftBank buys robotics leader Boston Dynamics from AlphabetJapanese internet, solar and technology company SoftBank Group Corp. is buying robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics from Alphabet Inc., Google's parent.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar power price slump casts shadow on India's green futureSolar power prices in India have hit rock bottom, but it is not all good news for the electricity-starved country as the phenomenon has hit investor confidence and threatens the country's effort to push its green credentials.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China rolls out green carpet for California on climateChina treated a US state governor to a red carpet reception this week, while President Donald Trump's energy chief received a low-key greeting, a signal that Beijing is ready to go around the White House in the battle against climate change.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Today in 1922, Illinois professor showed how movies could talkToday in 1922, an Illinois professor showed how movies could talk.
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Dagens Medicin
Folketinget vil ændre regler for medicintilskudSundhedsudvalg vil have minister til at ændre regler for medicintilskud, så patienter undgår store udsving i tilskuddet.
6h
Ingeniøren
Følg et phishing-angreb trin for trin I dag byder Version2 velkommen til en ny blogger i vores stærke bloggerkorps, Morten Schenk Security Advisor hos Improsec ApS. I sit første blogindlæg demonstrerer han nogle af de angrebsvinkler som anvendes, og som han selv bruger, når han gennemfører penetrationstests. Derefter viser han en måde, hvorpå mange af disse angreb kan stoppes. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ny-blogger-se-de-amgrebsv
6h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Politisk makværk gør anerkendt seruminstitut til dårlig forretning
7h
The Atlantic
Reality Winner Pleads 'Not Guilty' to Leaking Classified Information Reality Winner, a 25-year-old NSA contractor, has pled “not guilty” to leaking classified information to an online news outlet widely believed to be the Intercept . Winner was previously indicted by a federal grand jury for “willful retention and transmission of national defense information.” She was arrested at her home in Augusta, Georgia on Saturday, and, two days later, federal prosecutors fi
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Iowa study examines link between obesity, food container chemical subsitutesA new study from the University of Iowa shows that a pair of common chemicals that manufacturers use to make plastic food containers, water bottles, and other consumer products do not contribute to obesity to the extent of the chemical it's replacing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New findings aim to improve global medical device standard on auditory alarmsParticipants recognized and remembered each of the four prototype alarm sets better than those designed under the current IEC standard, and could localize three of the four prototype alarms faster and more accurately.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infants born preterm may lack key lung cells later in lifeMice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's a breeze: How to harness the power of the windScientists from the University of Rhode Island, Florida Atlantic University, USA, and Wuhan University, China, teamed up to find a way to optimize wind power for use, even when it's not blowing. To tackle the problem of reliability and consistency in wind power, the researchers proposed a day-ahead economic dispatch model for wind-integrated power systems. It's an algorithm designed to consider bo
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retina may be sensitive gauge of blast-wave pressure injuryAlthough traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-recognized consequence of extreme blast waves, it is less appreciated that over 80 percent of combat veterans with TBI also develop visual problems. A new study reports that blast exposure that does not cause detectable changes in the brain can result in long-term retinal injury. Researchers identified early indicators of retinal injury and inflammat
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Octogenarians Who Love Amazon’s AlexaA community of San Diego retirees is using the personal-assistant gadget to listen to audiobooks, keep current with family news, and control home appliances.
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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Ingeniøren
Dansk virksomhed kåret til Europas sjoveste arbejdsplads It-firma fik i går en pris for at være den sjoveste arbejdsplads i Europa. Hemmeligheden bag er fridage til computerspil og fredage med fri leg. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/dansk-virksomhed-kaaret-europas-sjoveste-arbejdsplads-8539 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
Fagfolk til politikerne: Sådan skal I fremtidssikre solcellestøttenMed indirekte støtte til solcelleudbygningen vil politikerne hele tiden halse efter udviklingen. En lang række branchefolk opfordrer nu til en varig løsning.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tim Cook: Technology Should Serve Humanity, Not the Other Way AroundThe CEO of Apple spent a day at MIT learning about research into artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bacterially Boosted Mosquitoes Could Vex VirusesMosquitoes infected with Wolbachia bacteria are unable to transmit viruses to humans—and could curb the spread of viral disease. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Moto G5 Plus: An inexpensive Android phone with all the right featuresIf there's one thing I admire about Android phones, it's the variety of models available at all price points.
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The Atlantic
Trump’s Ignorance Won’t Save Him The president’s defenders have a simple explanation for the conduct James Comey described to Congress: Trump didn’t know what he was doing. Washington Bureau Chief Yoni Appelbaum argues that the president’s ignorance is no excuse. Trump is the commander-in-chief and is responsible for his actions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Samsung's VR exec persuades customers to 'strap a phone to their face'Nick DiCarlo began working at Samsung in 2007, when flip phones and swivel phones were all the rage. He helped Samsung develop and market its high-end Galaxy smartphones and tablets.
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Science : NPR
FDA Calls On Drugmaker To Pull A Powerful Opioid Off The Market The Food and Drug Administration says abuse of the painkiller Opana ER has fueled an outbreak of HIV, hepatitis C and a serious blood disorder, though it was reformulated to try to reduce abuse. (Image credit: Rich Pedroncelli/AP)
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The Atlantic
Al-Shabaab Carries Out Deadly Attack on Somali Troops An estimated 70 people, both soldiers and civilians, were killed Thursday after hundreds of fighters from al-Shabaab, an Islamist militant group affiliated with al-Qaida, attacked a military base in Somalia. A senior military official said the incident began with an explosion, after which fighters stormed the Somali base in Puntland, a semiautonomous state in the northeast, from three different d
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Competitive football players have superior vision, study suggestsThe visual abilities of competitive football players are substantially better than those of healthy non-athletes, according to the first-ever comprehensive assessment of visual function in English Premier League players, published in Science and Medicine in Football.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pet dogs could help older owners be more activeOwning a dog may help older adults to meet physical activity levels recommended by the World Health Organisation, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Health professionals could encourage dog ownership or shared care of a dog to motivate older adults to be more physically active, researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University and WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutriti
12h
Ars Technica
Sneaky hackers use Intel management tools to bypass Windows firewall Enlarge / Physical serial ports (the blue ones) are fortunately a relic of a lost era and are nowadays quite rare to find on PCs. But their virtual counterparts are alive and well, and they can be used for some exciting things. (credit: Ericf ) When you're a bad guy breaking into a network, the first problem you need to solve is, of course, getting into the remote system and running your malware
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The Atlantic
James Comey's 'Shock and Awe' Testimony Imagine that two years ago, you sequestered a jury of 12 Americans, kept them in a news-free zone, and brought them today to hear former FBI Director James Comey testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Chances are that all of them—no matter what their political beliefs—would be stunned and outraged. From the perspective of one of these Americans, Comey dropped bombshell after bombshell:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
You can't hold a bitcoin, but the web currency's value has skyrocketed. Why?Unlike gold or dollar bills, the digital currency known as bitcoin does not physically exist. There is no there there.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Comey Speaks What We’re Following The Comey Hearing: In his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, former FBI Director James Comey affirmed his belief that President Trump fired him “because of the Russia investigation.” He did not accuse the president of obstructing justice, leaving that question up to Robert Mueller, the appointed special counsel. In response, Trump’s personal lawyer accused Co
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The Atlantic
The FDA Just Asked to Pull an Opioid Painkiller Off the Market It’s a story of unintended consequences. In 2012, Endo Pharmaceuticals reformulated Opana ER, a potent opioid painkiller, to be harder to crush into powder and snort. But this did not stop people from abusing it. Instead, they started injecting the drug—sparking a number of disease outbreaks including the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana history. Now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has deem
13h
Big Think
Scientists Have Recorded the Sound of Two Black Holes Colliding, and You Can Hear It Too This was the first direct measurement of gravitational waves ever, as predicted by Einstein. Read More
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Big Think
Pets Are Shown to Relieve Anxiety and Anger The growing field of emotional contagions is helping us understand how pets help relieve anxiety and anger in their owners. Read More
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Gizmodo
Who Does This Self-Driving Cadillac CT6 Belong To? An anonymous tipster shared a photo of a Cadillac CT6, outfitted with autonomous driving sensors and scanners, which they spotted parked in Pittsburgh yesterday. Pittsburgh has become a hub of the self-driving tech scene because of its proximity to Carnegie Mellon University and its renowned robotics program, as well as the state’s relatively lax rules on autonomous vehicle testing. Uber and othe
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Live Science
FDA Asks Drug Company to Pull Painkiller in FirstThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today (June 8) that it has requested that Endo Pharmaceuticals, a drug company, remove the opioid painkiller Opana ER from the drug market.
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Popular Science
The Drone Federalism Act would shift regulation to state and local governments Military The FAA would serve as a liaison between local governments and the national drone air traffic management system. Drone Federalism Act would shift regulation to state and local governments. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Giant methane burps left scars at the bottom of the Barents Sea Enlarge / Craters and mounds on the floor of the Barents Sea. (credit: K. Andreassen/CAGE ) It’s not that hard to understand the changes that have controlled the levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere during past climate changes. But methane (a potent greenhouse gas itself) does some mysterious things. A lot of it is secreted away in seafloor mud in the form of an odd substance called "methan
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Live Science
Endangered Gorilla Gives Birth at Philadelphia ZooA healthy baby boy gorilla was born at the Philadelphia Zoo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to keep the pen mighty in the digital ageOf late, it has been looking as if the death of handwriting might be upon us, as a screen-obsessed society texts, tweets, and Instagrams its way through every situation. Old writing tools? Drying up in the pen-itentiary.
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Gizmodo
Jobs Site Accidentally Places Ad on White Nationalist Podcast Screenshot: ZipRecruiter If you did something silly today—like publicly revealing you were looking at hentai, for example—take comfort. You still did not fuck up as bad as the jobs website ZipRecruiter, which got ad time on an alt-right podcast this week, apparently by accident. As first noted on Reddit , the advertisement was read on Wednesday’s episode of The Daily Shoah, a podcast on the white
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Women Have A Plan to Catch A Caiman At Night | Naked and Afraid XL #NakedAndAfraidXL | Sundays at 11/10c While the men are hunting pigs, the women set out in search of caiman. At 16 feet long, and perfect night vision they are an especially dangerous predator. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid-xl More info: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid-xl/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscri
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Live Science
Deep-Brain Stimulation May Be Possible with Noninvasive Technique"Deep-brain stimulation" doesn't have to be so deep.
15h
The Atlantic
The U.K. Parliamentary Elections Theresa May will remain U.K.’s prime minister with the help of the Democratic Union Party (DUP), a Northern Irish political party that won 10 seats in Thursday’s parliamentary elections. The results are setback for May, who’d sought early elections in April to capitalize on a 21-point lead in the polls over Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour. But that was not to be: Britons worried about the approach May’s C
15h
The Atlantic
The Five Lines of Defense Against Comey—and Why They Failed Thursday was a bad, bad day for Team Trump. Things looked even worse at the end of the day than they did when the Senate Intelligence Committee adjourned midday. The first line of defense—revealed by the president’s own team yesterday—is that Comey somehow vindicated Trump by confirming that he told Trump in January that Trump was not personally a target of an investigation. But if that assurance
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: James and the Giant Speech Today in 5 Lines During his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee , former FBI Director James Comey told lawmakers that he believed President Trump fired him “because of the Russia investigation.” White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders disputed Comey’s claim that the administration had spread “lies” about his dismissal. The president’s personal lawyer responded to Comey’s tes
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Popular Science
Bosch plans to use radar sensors in millions of cars to make better maps Technology It would be a big help for autonomous vehicles. Maps of the future may get an accuracy boost, thanks to a new partnership between Bosch and mapping company TomTom. Read on.
15h
Ars Technica
With path cleared to close Yahoo deal, Verizon prepares the pink slip printer Enlarge / Photo by Silicon Valley Historical Association/Gado/Getty Images. (credit: SVHA/Gado/GettyImages ) Yahoo stockholders today approved the terms of the acquisition of the company's Internet business by Verizon for $4.48 billion. What once was Yahoo's primary business will be merged with Verizon's AOL unit to create a business to be called "Oath." With that deal on final approach, many Yah
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioids following cesarean delivery may be over-prescribedIn two papers, both published online June 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology, researchers quantified the number of pills that are typically prescribed following cesarean delivery and tested a shared decision making tool, in which patients select the amount of medication they are prescribed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calculator estimates success of kidney transplants with particular donor-recipient pairsA new calculator estimates the likelihood that a given patient who receives a kidney transplant from a particular living donor will maintain a functioning kidney. The calculator may be especially useful for kidney paired donation.
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Popular Science
China is building the world's fastest amphibious fighting vehicle From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal 30 miles per hour on water. The North China Institute of Vehicle Research has built an armored car that can swim at speeds of up to 50 kilometers per hour (faster than some warships).
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The Atlantic
Trey Gowdy Tapped to Take Over as House Oversight Chair Republican Representative Trey Gowdy, who is best known for leading a contentious congressional investigation into the 2012 Benghazi terror attack, is poised to become the new chair of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. House Republicans on the GOP Steering Committee tapped Gowdy on Thursday to take over as chairman of the panel, which serves as the primary investigative committ
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The Atlantic
U.K. Appears Headed for Hung Parliament The U.K. is headed for a hung parliament, according to exit-poll data, with no one party securing enough seats to win 326 seats in the 650-member House of Commons. The result is likely to lead to prolonged political and economic instability and could have profound consequences for the future of the U.K. as it prepares to begin talks with the EU over Brexit. UK #GE2017 exit poll projects: Conserva
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Gizmodo
How the MTA Got So Broke Image by Jim Cooke/ GMG; Photo via Getty Everyone who has ever sat on a stalled subway train knows that the MTA, the agency responsible for keeping New York City transportation running, is broken. Why? We asked MTA employees to tell us. We’re going to begin with some historical perspective on the big picture—how the MTA got so decrepit to begin with. The following is from a veteran of the New Yor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world's most powerful X-ray laser beam creates 'molecular black hole'With the most highly focused power of the world's most powerful X-ray laser, scientists from a number of institutions around the world -- including Argonne National Laboratory -- have conducted a new experiment that takes apart molecules electron by electron.
15h
Ars Technica
Al-Jazeera claims to be victim of cyber attack as Qatar crisis continues Enlarge / Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman bin Jassim Al-Thani delivers a speech during a press conference. (credit: Mohamed Farag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images ) Two weeks after an alleged cyber attack on Qatar's state news agency resulted in the publishing of a fake news story, the Qatari-funded broadcasting company Al-Jazeera claims that the company's "websites and digital
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The Atlantic
Yemen's 'Unprecedented' Cholera Epidemic The number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen has surpassed 100,000 people, the World Health Organization said Thursday, marking an outbreak that the United Nations has dubbed “unprecedented” in scale. Of the 101,820 reported cases, the WHO said there have been a total of 789 deaths associated with the disease in 19 Yemeni provinces since April 27. It’s an epidemic that Oxfam International estim
15h
New Scientist - News
The mystery xenon in Earth’s atmosphere came from icy cometsThe moon is younger than we thought according to data form the Rosetta spacecraft that shows 22 per cent of our atmospheric xenon came from comets
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft borrows from Amazon's philosophy as its cloud business grows, leader says at tech conferenceMicrosoft is learning from Amazon.com, borrowing some of the company's guiding principles in a competition to provide web-based technology services.
15h
Big Think
Are Friends More Likely to Make You Happy Than Family as You Age? New studies show that friendships more often lead to happiness in old age than family. Read More
15h
Live Science
Octopus FactsThese eight-armed, blue-blooded animals are quite intelligent. Sad about their sex lives, though.
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Live Science
2 Cases of Legionnaires' Disease in Newborns Linked to Water BirthsTwo Arizona babies who were born by "water births" developed Legionnaires' disease.
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Live Science
Should a 'Resurrected' Dodo or Mammoth Get a New Name?If scientists could resurrect extinct animals — such as the dodo, Columbian mammoth or Tasmanian tiger — should these animals have different names that distinguish them from the original species?
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
NIH scraps plans for cap on research grants Agency plans to set up a separate fund for early- to mid-career investigators to help lower average age of NIH grantees. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22136
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heroin's use rising, costing society more than $51 billionHeroin use in the United States was estimated to cost society more than $51 billion in 2015, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
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Science | The Guardian
India launches powerful new rocket Advanced satellite launch vehicle will free India from the need to buy launch slots from other countries in future India launched a new rocket this week, extending the country’s ability to place larger payloads into orbit. Until now, India had depended on buying launch slots from other countries and organisations, using the European Space Agency’s Ariane 5 rocket, for example. India’s 43m-tall Ge
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Gizmodo
Look at This Crazy Brain Cyst Image: Jennifer de Longpre A 27-year-old man had been suffering frequent headaches and had been falling over frequently for around three years. But when he had a seizure, he headed to the emergency department. They took an MRI and found THIS. Image: Jennifer de Longpre If you need to get your bearings, the squished brain looking stuff is a squished brain. The black horror is an arachnoid cyst. In
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NYT > Science
N.Y.C. Nature: Dog Ticks, the Zombies of the WoodsThe dog ticks’ never-ending quest for blood makes them akin to, and as likable as, the undead, but becoming familiar with them can be useful.
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The Scientist RSS
Proposed NIH Grant Cap CriticizedThe suggested limit on the number of research grants per investigator has drawn criticism from the research community.
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Science : NPR
CDC Reveals Sharper Numbers Of Zika Birth Defects From U.S. Territories About 5 percent of pregnant women infected with Zika in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories last year had babies with birth defects, says the federal health agency. And the risk isn't over. (Image credit: Carlos Giusti/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tidal reveals star-studded film, new streaming promotionStreaming service Tidal revealed an original movie starring recent Oscar winners Thursday as telecom giant and part-owner Sprint announced a new campaign to woo customers to the underdog music platform.
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Gizmodo
Pregnancy's Deadly Itch Illustration: Angelica Alzona / GMG Early in my third trimester of pregnancy, I had a few episodes of itching at night. It was winter in New York, with cold winds and radiators on overdrive, plus I was massively pregnant, so I didn’t think much about it—discomfort came with the territory. But one of the pregnancy sites I perused the next day raised a red flag. There is a serious late-pregnancy co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Snake venom might provide a safer antiplatelet drugIn preliminary research, an antiplatelet drug based on a snake venom protein prevented blood clotting without leading to excessive bleeding, a dangerous side effect of currently available antiplatelet drugs. The venom protein may be the template for a new class of antiplatelet drugs that offers fewer bleeding complications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UQ, partners taking computing out of this worldUniversity of Queensland researchers have partnered with global technology leader Lockheed Martin to develop next generation computers for aerospace applications.
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Big Think
Eating Late at Night Could Be More Dangerous Than You Think First of its kind study compares the effects of eating between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. and eating between noon and 11 p.m. Read More
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Big Think
Do Creative People Really See the World Differently? That's a big yes, as an incredible new study from University of Melbourne researchers found. Read More
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The Atlantic
Q of the Week: What Would You Ask James Comey? Former FBI Director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday, as part of the panel’s probe into possible collusion between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and Russian officials. It was the first time the public heard from Comey since Trump abruptly fired him on May 9. Ahead of the hearing, we asked our Politics & Policy Daily readers what they would ask Come
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moroccan fossil find rearranges Homo sapiens family treeThis week's unveiling of the oldest-known Homo sapiens remains has painted an excitingly chaotic picture of what Earth was like 300,000 years ago—bustling with hominin species that included a very early version of our own, experts say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Gifts for Dad—that he really wantsYou think you really know what your dad wants for Fathers Day but really, you don't. Let me fill you in on what he really wants; you can't go wrong with any of these.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify how class of drugs blocks Hepatitis C virus replicationFor the first time, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill show how the antiviral class of drugs called NS5A inhibitors interacts with the hepatitis C virus, and these findings show a difference between strains of HCV. These results were published in PLOS Pathogens.
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Gizmodo
Every Game In My Delta Airplane Seat, Reviewed Illustration: Sam Woolley To kill time on an airplane, I usually play games on my phone. I can usually squeeze a good five or six hours out of the battery. But last month when I flew from New York to Hawaii, the trip ended up taking a full 24 hours, and I was trapped on a plane for 18 of those. In an attempt to preserve my sanity, I decided to review the games in Delta’s seat-back entertainment s
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The Atlantic
Marc Kasowitz's Contradictory Defense of Donald Trump President Trump’s personal lawyer offered a contradictory and partially inaccurate defense of his client after James Comey’s testimony on Thursday, accusing the former FBI director of lying under oath before Congress and suggesting he should be criminally investigated for sharing memos he drafted about his private conversations with Trump. Marc Kasowitz, a Manhattan-based corporate attorney and l
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The Atlantic
CBS News’ John Dickerson to Contribute to The Atlantic Washington, D.C. (June 8, 2017)— Face the Nation moderator and CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent John Dickerson is now contributing to The Atlantic . As a contributing editor, Dickerson will write regularly for the print magazine and for TheAtlantic.com. His first piece for The Atlantic was published as James Comey began his testimony on Capitol Hill, and outlines the unpredictability of Pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The hottest products, iOS 11 features announced at Apple's big developer conferenceA new operating system, the "most powerful" Apple machine ever created and a totally redesigned App Store?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook Live adds closed captioning for deaf and hard of hearingFacebook says it's bringing closed captioning to Facebook Live to make at least some of the videos streamed live on the social network accessible to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.
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Gizmodo
Uber's Self-Driving Unit Gets New Head of Hardware After Levandowski Firing Photo: Getty Little more than a week after Uber dismissed the embattled engineer at the helm of its self-driving car project , the company is appointing a new head of hardware engineering to help lead its development of autonomous vehicles. Brian Zajac has worked at Uber since the early stages of its autonomous vehicle development in 2015, and previously developed robotic systems for the US Army
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Gizmodo
Host the Best (And Easiest) Summer Cookouts With This Discounted Electric Smoker Masterbuilt Electric Smoker , $195 This $195 Masterbuilt electric smoker makes cooking jerky, brisket, or (insert meat of your choice) as easy as dropping in some wood chips and hitting a few buttons. With precise temperature control from 100 to 275 degrees, you’ll have complete command over the finished product. Today’s price is within $5 of an all-time low , and about $45 less than usual. That’
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber woes mount ahead of workplace probe reportUber has parted ways with another top executive, in the latest dent to the reputation of the ridesharing giant as it prepares to release the results of a probe into workplace misconduct.
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Live Science
'Subway for the Street' Driverless Train UnveiledThe train system has no driver and no rails.
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Live Science
Despite Stigma, 'Electroshock' Therapy Gains Patient AppreciationMany patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) today have a positive view of it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the brain recognizes what the eye seesNew work outlining the brain's visual process could improve self-driving cars and point to therapies for sensory impairment, suggest investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Composition of Earth-size planets in TRAPPIST-1 systemAn astrophysics researcher has identified the possible compositions of the seven planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system. Using thousands of numerical simulations to identify the planets stable for millions of years, Quarles concluded that six of the seven planets are consistent with an Earth-like composition. The exception is TRAPPIST-1f, which has a mass of 25 percent water, suggesting that TRAPPIST-1e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular code for melanin-like materialsA new approach for producing materials that mimic the properties of melanin has now been developed. It also provides unprecedented control over expressing specific properties of the biopolymer, according to a paper. The discovery could enable the development of cosmetic and biomedical products.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not so elementary: Physicists review three experiments that hint at a phenomenon beyond the Standard Model of particle physicsScientists reviewed three experiments that hint at a phenomenon beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving adolescents' social and emotional lives must go beyond teaching them skillsSchool programs designed to educate children and adolescents on how to understand and manage emotions, relationships and academic goals must go beyond improving the skills of the individuals to create a respectful climate and allow adolescents more autonomy in decision making, according to psychology research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sensitivity to inequity is in wolves' and dogs' bloodNot only dogs but also wolves react to inequity -- similar to humans or primates, suggests new research. Wolves and dogs refused to cooperate in an experiment when only the partner got a treat or they themselves received a lower quality reward. The sensitivity to inequity is not likely to be an effect of domestication, as assumed so far. It is rather a behavior inherited from a common ancestor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny glow sticksOptical data transmission allows information to be transmitted as light by way of optical waveguides in fiber optic networks. Chinese researchers have now developed microscale optical waveguides. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, they have made microrods of lanthanide metal-organic frameworks. Their particular crystal structure ensures low-loss light conduction and the emission of pola
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Balance, gait negatively impacted after chemotherapy treatmentA single chemotherapy treatment can result in a significant negative impact on walking gait and balance, putting patients at an increasing risk for falls, according to a new study involving breast cancer patients conducted by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lost ecosystem found buried in mud of southern California coastal watersPaleontologists investigating the sea bed off California have discovered a lost ecosystem that for thousands of years had nurtured communities of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods. They had died off by the early 20th century, replaced by the mud-dwellling burrowing clams that inhabit this seabed today. Paleontologists Adam Tomašových of the Slovak Academy of Sciences and Sus
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Science : NPR
Aid-In-Dying Requires More Than Just A Law, Californians Find In the year since the state enacted a law allowing doctors to prescribe lethal drugs for terminal patients who request it, over 500 people have sought that help. But some doctors are still reluctant. (Image credit: Kimberly Sienkiewicz/Courtesy of the Minor family)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Honda plans mostly self-driving car, follows Waymo, othersHonda said Thursday that it will have highly automated personal cars on the road by 2025.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The art of exoplanetsThe moon hanging in the night sky sent Robert Hurt's mind into deep space—to a region some 40 light years away, in fact, where seven Earth-sized planets crowded close to a dim, red sun.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New leukemia treatment outperforms standard chemotherapiesResearchers are working on a new treatment for an aggressive type of leukemia that outperforms standard chemotherapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inherited, rare skin disease informs treatment of common hair disorders, study findsResearchers studying an inherited disorder of skin, hair follicles, nails, sweat glands, and teeth called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) have identified a mechanism that may also be disrupted in male pattern baldness, a more common condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New international guidelines issued on dementia with Lewy bodiesAccording to research reported online today in Neurology, the international Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium issued new guidelines about diagnosing and treating the disease and called for more clinical trials into the illness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human brain tunes into visual rhythms in sign languageIn a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Chicago scholars use sign language to understand whether neural entrainment is specialized for spoken language.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnitude-5.3 earthquake strikes Hawaii's Big IslandA magnitude-5.3 earthquake shook Hawaii's Big Island early Thursday, but no damage was reported.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet, social media back in Ethiopia after blockEthiopia re-activated cellphone data services and unexpectedly allowed access to social media sites that had been blocked since a wave of anti-government protests last year, a government spokesman told AFP on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qatar's Al-Jazeera says battling cyber attackQatar-based broadcaster Al-Jazeera said Thursday that it was under a widescale cyber attack which had targeted "all systems", according to a statement released on social media by the broadcaster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Verizon's first move with Yahoo is to ditch 2,100 jobs (Update)About 2,100 jobs are on the chopping block as Verizon prepares to combine Yahoo and AOL for a digital advertising offensive.
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Gizmodo
Newsweek Writer: I'm Not Horny, I'm Just Researching Tentacle Porn for My Wife Image: g-e hentai What we know to be true: Newsweek senior writer Kurt Eichenwald had a 212-page hentai comic called B-Chiku open on his computer. We know this because Eichenwald accidentally left the tab open while tweeting a photo of his computer screen in an unrelated attempt to bark down an anti-semitic troll. While enjoying such reading material is his right, what followed was an excellent d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research for an oil (palm) changeA new technique shows great promise for helping oil palm growers optimize production and reduce environmental impacts. The research focused on crop yield, nitrous oxide emissions and nitrogen leaching.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of sisters helps explain dad's influence on risky sexual behaviorResearchers have shown links between father involvement and daughters' sexual behavior, with the standard explanation attributing that influence to shared genes that impact both a father's behavior and relationships and his child's problem behavior, including engaging in risky sex and affiliating with delinquent peers. But a study suggests that even though genes likely play a part, they may not be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles and magnets offer new, efficient method of removing oil from waterEngineering researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet. The engineers believe their new technique could improve water treatment for oil and gas production, more efficiently clean up oil spills and potentially remove lead from drinking water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Developing fetuses react to face-like shapes from the wombIt's well known that young babies are more interested in faces than other objects. Now, researchers have the first evidence that this preference for faces develops in the womb. By projecting light through the uterine wall of pregnant mothers, they found that fetuses at 34 weeks gestation will turn their heads to look at face-like images over other shapes.
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NeuWrite San Diego
Apply now for ComSciCon at UCSD!Applications for ComSciCon-SD close in one week (on June 15th)! Apply today. A scientist and a non-scientist walk into a bar. As the night proceeds, the non-scientist asks the scientist the oft-dreaded question: “So, what do you do? What is your research about?” What likely follows is a confused and confusing garble of jargon and […]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Relation between comets and earth's atmosphere uncoveredThe difficult yet successful measurement of several isotopes of the noble gas xenon on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the Bernese instrument ROSINA on the Rosetta probe shows that materials arrived on Earth due to comet impacts. As proven by further Bern measurements of silicon isotopes, in the beginning our solar system was extremely heterogeneous. The high amount of so-called "heavy" wate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences advancing hope for reefs in the PhilippinesThe California Academy of Sciences' initiative continues to advance global understanding of coral reef science through a series of ambitious expeditions. The team most recently returned from the Verde Island Passage in the Philippines—a longtime regional focus of Academy research considered the "center of the center" of marine biodiversity. The Academy's science diving teams explored both deep and
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Text-mining tool seeks out ‘hidden data’ Wide-Open checks that the data sets underlying published studies are made freely available. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22132
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity increases risk of complications after shoulder joint replacement surgeryFor patients undergoing shoulder joint replacement surgery (arthroplasty), higher body mass index is linked to increased complications -- including the need for 'revision' surgery, reports a study in the June 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
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Live Science
Save $15 On This Easy-to-Fly Drone [Deal]The TobyRich Moskito was designed for first-time pilots who want a drone they can fly immediately after unboxing. Although it normally costs $60, it's on sale for $44.99.
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Live Science
California Prepares for Solar Power Loss During the Great EclipseA total solar eclipse that will sweep across the United States on Aug. 21 is expected to make a noticeable dent in solar-energy collection, prompting energy workers to concoct workarounds that will help them meet energy demands.
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Live Science
Mysterious Fire Monument in England Predates Stonehenge by 800 YearsA massive wooden circle that lies not far from Stonehenge may be even older than previously thought, new data suggests.
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Live Science
Surprising Find: Ancient Mummy DNA Sequenced in FirstFor the first time, researchers have successfully sequenced the DNA from Egyptian mummies.
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Live Science
Victorians Missed Key Dental Detail in 1st Dinosaur Ever NamedWhen William Buckland described the first-named dinosaur, Megalosaurus, in 1824, he missed teeth hidden in the dinosaur's jaw, researchers have uncovered.
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Live Science
The Long History of the Shia-Sunni DivideThe strike in Iran once again exposes the centuries-old sectarian Shia-Sunni divide. What is at the heart of this schism?
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Live Science
In First, Einstein Relativity Experiment Used to Measure a Star's MassA phenomenon first predicted by Albert Einstein has been used for the first time to measure the mass of an individual star. The finding has helped settled a century-old dispute.
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Live Science
Facts About PromethiumProperties, sources and uses of the element promethium.
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Live Science
Cracked Cellphone Screens Could Soon Be a Thing of the PastResearchers have developed a durable and energy-efficient material that could replace today's fragile screens — and might one day even charge your phone's battery.
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Live Science
Plant Seeds Use Mini 'Brains' to Decide When to SproutJust like animal brains, plant seeds use a system of two competing hormone-signaling systems to decide whether to sprout or stay dormant, new research shows.
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Live Science
Teen Pot Use Linked to Illegal Drug Use by Age 21, Study SuggestsA new study adds to evidence suggesting that marijuana really is a gateway drug for teens.
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Live Science
How Your Belly Fat Is Linked to Your Immune SystemYou may not love your belly fat, but the large sheet of fat that stretches across your abdomen serves a purpose.
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Live Science
Death by Vampire Bat: How Rabies KillsA man in Brazil died of rabies in May after being bitten by a vampire bat.
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Live Science
Hawaii Rebuffs Trump by Enacting Laws Supporting Paris AgreementHawaii became the first state to enact climate laws that follow the Paris accord.
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Live Science
Warts and All: Octopus' Skin Bumps Divide SpeciesTwo species of highly similar deep-sea octopus are hard to tell apart — unless you look closely at their "warts."
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Live Science
Overweight Kids More Likely to Be OstracizedNew research finds that overweight children may be actively ostracized by their peers.
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Live Science
AI Predicts Autism Based on Infant Brain ScansA new machine learning program can predict, in 6-month-old babies, which ones will go on to develop autism, researchers report.
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Live Science
World's Oldest Fossilized Mushroom Sprouted 115 Million Years AgoAbout 115 million years ago, when car-size pterosaurs flew overhead, a tiny mushroom no taller than a chess piece fell into a river and later fossilized — a feat that makes it the oldest-known fossilized mushroom on record, a new study finds.
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Live Science
In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever FoundScientists have discovered the remains of five Homo sapiens individuals in a cave in Morocco. The fossils date back about 300,000 years, pushing back the origin of humanity at least 100,000 years, they say.
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Live Science
Oldest Fossils of Our Species Push Back Origin of Modern HumansThe oldest known bones of our species, dating back around 300,000 years, have been discovered in a cave in Morocco.
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Ars Technica
Android O Developer Preview 3 launches, finalizes APIs Enlarge (credit: Google ) Less than a month after the release of the second Android O developer preview , Google is back dropping yet another version of the OS on us. The third developer preview should be rolling out to beta devices now, and along with an update to the Android Studio SDK, it finalizes the APIs for Android O. Android O brings a revamp of the notification panel with snoozable notif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrophysicists identify composition of earth-size planets in TRAPPIST-1 systemA University of Oklahoma post-doctoral astrophysics researcher, Billy Quarles, has identified the possible compositions of the seven planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system. Using thousands of numerical simulations to identify the planets stable for millions of years, Quarles concluded that six of the seven planets are consistent with an Earth-like composition. The exception is TRAPPIST-1f, which has a m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extinct early whales listened like their relatives on land, fossil evidence showsWhales show surprisingly vast differences in hearing ability. Baleen whales tune into infrasonic sounds to communicate over long distances. Toothed whales do just the opposite, relying on ultrasonic frequencies too high for humans to hear. Now researchers have fossil evidence from extinct early whale species to suggest that those differences in hearing arose only after whales evolved into the full
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does your name match your face?People tend to associate round names such as 'Bob' and 'Lou' with round-faced individuals, and they have an inherent preference for names and faces that go well together.
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The Atlantic
The Troubled History of Horse Meat in America President Donald Trump wants to cut a budget the Bureau of Land Management uses to care for wild horses. Instead of paying to feed them, he has proposed lifting restrictions preventing the sale of American mustangs to horse meat dealers who supply Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses. More From Our Partners Bathing in Controversy The Device That Democratized the Foot Race The Dangers of Reading i
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The Atlantic
How the Internet is Changing Friendship Wherever your friends are, you can always check up on them with social media. But does that mean that we’re keeping friendships alive past their natural expiration date, or are virtual connections actually making friendships stronger?
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The Scientist RSS
Making Public Data PublicComputational scientists develop a system for spotting data overdue for public release, and end up getting hundreds of open-access datasets corrected.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Climate change might help pests resist corn’s genetic weaponRising temperatures may allow pests to eat corn that is genetically modified to produce an insect-killing toxin.
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Gizmodo
Evidence of Pangea's Breakup Found in Our Evolutionary History Image: Massimo Pietrobon /Ivica Leutnic/Mariana Ruiz Villareal /Wikimedia Commons Continents’ constant shifting is one of the first things you learn when you study the geologic history of Earth. South America fits into Africa like a puzzle piece, after all. Back 200 million years ago, everything was combined in a supercontinent called Pangea. Rocks alone seem to show that the breakup happened 180
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
California Academy of Sciences advancing hope for reefs in the PhilippinesResearchers return from the Philippines with new species discoveries and deeper insights into threatened coral reef ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble astronomers use a century-old relativity experiment to measure a white dwarf's massAstronomers have used the sharp vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to repeat a century-old test of Einstein's general theory of relativity. The Hubble team measured the mass of a white dwarf, the burned-out remnant of a normal star, by seeing how much it deflects the light from a background star.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutrons zero in on the elusive magnetic Majorana fermionNeutron scattering has revealed in unprecedented detail new insights into the exotic magnetic behavior of a material that could pave the way for quantum calculations far beyond the limits of a computer's binary code. A research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has confirmed magnetic signatures likely related to Majorana fermions -- elusive particles that could b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum nanoscopeResearchers have studied how light can be used to 'see' the quantum nature of an electronic material. They managed to do that by capturing light in a net of carbon atoms and slowing down light it down so that it moves almost as slow as the electrons in the graphene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The road not taken: Do stress-specific mutations lead down different evolutionary paths?Evolutionary divergences, the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria or cancer in humans are all empowered by many types of mutational DNA change. We show for the first time that conditions common in nature strongly influence the pattern of genetic variation and consequently the evolvability of traits dependent on particular mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pigments by designResearchers have discovered how to tune the optical and electrical properties of a synthetic polymer similar to melanin, a natural pigment that's the primary factor affecting skin color.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comets may have delivered significant portions of Earth's xenonA new study suggests that roughly 22 percent of the element xenon found in Earth's atmosphere may have come from comets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic mutations predict patient response to immunotherapyResults of a new clinical study establish particular genetic defects in tumors as clinical indicators for successful response to a type of immunotherapy called PD-1 blockade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop molecular code for melanin-like materialsScientists across the City University of New York (CUNY) have developed a new approach for producing materials that mimic the properties of melanin, and also provide unprecedented control over expressing specific properties of the biopolymer, according to a paper published today in the journal Science. The discovery could enable the development of cosmetic and biomedical products.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New software tool could help doctors diagnose genetic diseasesAn open-source software tool called Mendel,MD could help doctors analyze patients' genetic data in order to diagnose diseases caused by mutations. Developed by Raony Cardenas and colleagues at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, the tool is presented in a new study in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sanitation access linked to children's growth and healthAn estimated 1 billion people in the world live without access to any type of sanitation facility, such as a toilet or latrine. Sanitation access is known to be associated with the risk of transmitting certain diseases, including parasitic worms. But the impacts don't stop there. For children, living in a community with poor levels of sanitation access increases their odds of stunted growth, anemi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wide-Open accelerates release of scientific data by identifying overdue datasetsAdvances in genetic sequencing and other technologies have led to an explosion of biological data, and decades of openness (both spontaneous and enforced) mean that scientists routinely deposit data in online repositories. But researchers are only human and may forget to tell a repository to release the data when a paper is published.
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Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Revives National Space Council after Quarter-Century AbsenceVice Pres. Mike Pence will helm the group overseeing U.S. civilian and military space activities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Qatar Vows to Keep 'Independence of Our Foreign Policy' Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani said Thursday his country is “not ready to surrender, and will never be ready to surrender, the independence of our foreign policy.” The remarks come three days after six Arab countries—Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Libya, Bahrain, Yemen, and Egypt—severed all diplomatic and transportation links with Qatar over its alleged
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Gizmodo
Pufferfish Have Some Very Intricate Sex Rituals GIF Image: PBS. Gif via Gizmodo Many animals’ mating rituals can be pretty elaborate, and some are borderline disturbing . For pufferfish, the lead up is so stupidly intricate that it’s exhausting and just kind of sad. But that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be appreciated, so today, in honor of World Oceans Day, we’re celebrating the indefatigable pufferfish and its bizarre sexual habits. Our source
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NYT > Science
Cancer Drug Proves to Be Effective Against Multiple TumorsThe drug, Keytruda, is the first approved for patients with tumors with a particular genetic signature, wherever they appear in the body.
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NYT > Science
In India, Slight Rise in Temperatures Is Tied to Heat Wave DeathsFuture increases could take a “relatively drastic human toll” in the country and elsewhere in the developing world, a new study says.
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Popular Science
How to binge-watch Netflix without ruining your sleep DIY Have your screen time and sleep time too. Watching too many Netflix episodes too late at night can seriously mess up your sleep patterns and your health—but it doesn't have to be that way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop molecular code for melanin-like materialsScientists have long known that melanin—the pigments that give color to skin, hair and eyes—has numerous useful qualities, including providing protection from cancer-causing UV radiation and free radicals, but also electronic conductance, adhesiveness and the capacity to store energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons zero in on the elusive magnetic Majorana fermionNeutron scattering has revealed in unprecedented detail new insights into the exotic magnetic behavior of a material that, with a fuller understanding, could pave the way for quantum calculations far beyond the limits of the ones and zeros of a computer's binary code.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The road not taken: Do stress-specific mutations lead down different evolutionary paths?Starvation for essential elements determines the pattern of genetic variation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wide-Open accelerates release of scientific data by identifying overdue datasetsAdvances in genetic sequencing and other technologies have led to an explosion of biological data, and decades of openness (both spontaneous and enforced) mean that scientists routinely deposit data in online repositories. But researchers are only human and may forget to tell a repository to release the data when a paper is published.
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Science current issue
Erratum for the Report "A nontoxic pain killer designed by modeling of pathological receptor conformations" by V. Spahn, G. Del Vecchio, D. Labuz, A. Rodriguez-Gaztelumendi, N. Massaly, J. Temp, V. Durmaz, P. Sabri, M. Reidelbach, H. Machelska, M. Weber, C. Stein
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Science current issue
Regenerating optic pathways from the eye to the brain Humans are highly visual. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the neurons that connect the eyes to the brain, fail to regenerate after damage, eventually leading to blindness. Here, we review research on regeneration and repair of the optic system. Intrinsic developmental growth programs can be reactivated in RGCs, neural activity can enhance RGC regeneration, and functional reformation of eye-to-brai
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Science current issue
Cardiac regeneration strategies: Staying young at heart The human heart is continually operating as a muscular pump, contracting, on average, 80 times per minute to propel 8000 liters of blood through body tissues each day. Whereas damaged skeletal muscle has a profound capacity to regenerate, heart muscle, at least in mammals, has poor regenerative potential. This deficiency is attributable to the lack of resident cardiac stem cells, combined with ro
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Science current issue
Why radiation causes dry mouth
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Science current issue
Sighting of magnetic Majorana fermions?
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Science current issue
Designing molecular disorder
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Science current issue
Teaching sulfur and phosphorus to share
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Science current issue
Comets contributed to Earth's atmosphere
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Science current issue
Local macrophage clean-up
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Science current issue
Polycomb steps to inactivate X
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Science current issue
A clue to a drug's neurotoxicity?
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Science current issue
Plasmodium leftovers cause bone loss
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Science current issue
Bacterial sensing mechanism revealed
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Science current issue
Tracing development of the dendritic cell lineage
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Science current issue
Swapping boron acids for carbon acids
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Science current issue
Selfish genetic interactions in nematodes
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Science current issue
General relativity weighs a white dwarf
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Science current issue
Moving beyond mice for vaccine studies
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Science current issue
From glassy carbon to mixed carbon
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Science current issue
DNA damage linked to fitness loss in aging
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Science current issue
HIV reprograms progenitor cells
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Science current issue
Down to the guts of climate change
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Science current issue
A learning environment designed for experts
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Science current issue
Wheels do more than go round and round
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Science current issue
Old cancer drugs with a modern mechanism
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Science current issue
A checkup on density functional theory
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Science current issue
Relativistic deflection of background starlight measures the mass of a nearby white dwarf star Gravitational deflection of starlight around the Sun during the 1919 total solar eclipse provided measurements that confirmed Einstein’s general theory of relativity. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to measure the analogous process of astrometric microlensing caused by a nearby star, the white dwarf Stein 2051 B. As Stein 2051 B passed closely in front of a background star, the background
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Science current issue
A maternal-effect selfish genetic element in Caenorhabditis elegans Selfish genetic elements spread in natural populations and have an important role in genome evolution. We discovered a selfish element causing embryonic lethality in crosses between wild strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans . The element is made up of sup-35 , a maternal-effect toxin that kills developing embryos, and pha-1 , its zygotically expressed antidote. pha-1 has long been consi
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Science current issue
Neutron scattering in the proximate quantum spin liquid {alpha}-RuCl3 The Kitaev quantum spin liquid (KQSL) is an exotic emergent state of matter exhibiting Majorana fermion and gauge flux excitations. The magnetic insulator α-RuCl 3 is thought to realize a proximate KQSL. We used neutron scattering on single crystals of α-RuCl 3 to reconstruct dynamical correlations in energy-momentum space. We discovered highly unusual signals, including a column of scattering ov
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Science current issue
Palladium-catalyzed carbon-sulfur or carbon-phosphorus bond metathesis by reversible arylation Compounds bearing aryl-sulfur and aryl-phosphorus bonds have found numerous applications in drug development, organic materials, polymer science, and homogeneous catalysis. We describe palladium-catalyzed metathesis reactions of both compound classes, each of which proceeds through a reversible arylation manifold. The synthetic power and immediate utility of this approach are demonstrated in seve
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Science current issue
Polymeric peptide pigments with sequence-encoded properties Melanins are a family of heterogeneous polymeric pigments that provide ultraviolet (UV) light protection, structural support, coloration, and free radical scavenging. Formed by oxidative oligomerization of catecholic small molecules, the physical properties of melanins are influenced by covalent and noncovalent disorder. We report the use of tyrosine-containing tripeptides as tunable precursors f
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Science current issue
Xenon isotopes in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko show that comets contributed to Earth's atmosphere The origin of cometary matter and the potential contribution of comets to inner-planet atmospheres are long-standing problems. During a series of dedicated low-altitude orbits, the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) on the Rosetta spacecraft analyzed the isotopes of xenon in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The xenon isotopic composition shows deficits
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Science current issue
Macrophage function in tissue repair and remodeling requires IL-4 or IL-13 with apoptotic cells Tissue repair is a subset of a broad repertoire of interleukin-4 (IL-4)– and IL-13–dependent host responses during helminth infection. Here we show that IL-4 or IL-13 alone was not sufficient, but IL-4 or IL-13 together with apoptotic cells induced the tissue repair program in macrophages. Genetic ablation of sensors of apoptotic cells impaired the proliferation of tissue-resident macrophages and
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Science current issue
Local amplifiers of IL-4R{alpha}-mediated macrophage activation promote repair in lung and liver The type 2 immune response controls helminth infection and maintains tissue homeostasis but can lead to allergy and fibrosis if not adequately regulated. We have discovered local tissue-specific amplifiers of type 2–mediated macrophage activation. In the lung, surfactant protein A (SP-A) enhanced interleukin-4 (IL-4)–dependent macrophage proliferation and activation, accelerating parasite clearan
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Science current issue
PCGF3/5-PRC1 initiates Polycomb recruitment in X chromosome inactivation Recruitment of the Polycomb repressive complexes PRC1 and PRC2 by Xist RNA is an important paradigm for chromatin regulation by long noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that the noncanonical Polycomb group RING finger 3/5 (PCGF3/5)–PRC1 complex initiates recruitment of both PRC1 and PRC2 in response to Xist RNA expression. PCGF3/5–PRC1–mediated ubiquitylation of histone H2A signals recruitment of other
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Science current issue
Activity-based protein profiling reveals off-target proteins of the FAAH inhibitor BIA 10-2474 A recent phase 1 trial of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor BIA 10-2474 led to the death of one volunteer and produced mild-to-severe neurological symptoms in four others. Although the cause of the clinical neurotoxicity is unknown, it has been postulated, given the clinical safety profile of other tested FAAH inhibitors, that off-target activities of BIA 10-2474 may have played a r
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Science current issue
New Products
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Science current issue
Research on a razor's edge
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Science current issue
Mapping the human DC lineage through the integration of high-dimensional techniques Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate immune responses. The human DC population comprises two main functionally specialized lineages, whose origins and differentiation pathways remain incompletely defined. Here, we combine two high-dimensional technologies—single-cell messenger RNA sequencing (scmRNAseq) and cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF)—to identify
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Science current issue
Mechanism of transmembrane signaling by sensor histidine kinases One of the major and essential classes of transmembrane (TM) receptors, present in all domains of life, is sensor histidine kinases, parts of two-component signaling systems (TCSs). The structural mechanisms of TM signaling by these sensors are poorly understood. We present crystal structures of the periplasmic sensor domain, the TM domain, and the cytoplasmic HAMP domain of the Escherichia coli
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Science current issue
Decarboxylative borylation The widespread use of alkyl boronic acids and esters is frequently hampered by the challenges associated with their preparation. We describe a simple and practical method to rapidly access densely functionalized alkyl boronate esters from abundant carboxylic substituents. This broad-scope nickel-catalyzed reaction uses the same activating principle as amide bond formation to replace a carboxylic
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Science current issue
The dishonest HONEST Act
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Science current issue
News at a glance
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Science current issue
Oldest members of our species discovered in Morocco
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Science current issue
Romanian researchers decry sudden power grab
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Science current issue
Circular DNA throws biologists for a loop
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Science current issue
Data Check: Critics challenge NIH finding that bigger labs aren't necessarily better
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Science current issue
Rethinking the dreaded r-word
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Science current issue
India resurrects forgotten leprosy vaccine
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Science current issue
Can U.S. states and cities overcome Paris exit?
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Science current issue
Saving the 'God of ugly things
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Science current issue
Science reads for the summer of '17
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Science current issue
Nanomaterials for stimulating nerve growth
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Science current issue
From sequence to color
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Science current issue
Poisons, antidotes, and selfish genes
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Science current issue
Specific repair by discerning macrophages
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Science current issue
A centennial gift from Einstein
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Science current issue
De-extinction, nomenclature, and the law
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Science current issue
Fund global health: Save lives and money
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Science current issue
Minority investigators lack NIH funding
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Science current issue
The limits of carbon reduction roadmaps
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Science current issue
Repair and Regeneration
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Science current issue
Self-repairing cells: How single cells heal membrane ruptures and restore lost structures Many organisms and tissues display the ability to heal and regenerate as needed for normal physiology and as a result of pathogenesis. However, these repair activities can also be observed at the single-cell level. The physical and molecular mechanisms by which a cell can heal membrane ruptures and rebuild damaged or missing cellular structures remain poorly understood. This Review presents curre
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Science current issue
Inflammation and metabolism in tissue repair and regeneration Tissue repair after injury is a complex, metabolically demanding process. Depending on the tissue’s regenerative capacity and the quality of the inflammatory response, the outcome is generally imperfect, with some degree of fibrosis, which is defined by aberrant accumulation of collagenous connective tissue. Inflammatory cells multitask at the wound site by facilitating wound debridement and prod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OU astrophysicist identifies composition of Earth-size planets in TRAPPIST-1 systemA University of Oklahoma post-doctoral astrophysics researcher, Billy Quarles, has identified the possible compositions of the seven planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system. Using thousands of numerical simulations to identify the planets stable for millions of years, Quarles concluded that six of the seven planets are consistent with an Earth-like composition. The exception is TRAPPIST-1f, which has a m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tackling infectious disease, one protein at a timeA team of scientists has solved the 3-D structure of 1,000 proteins from more than 70 organisms that cause infectious disease in people. The proteins come from microbes that cause several serious diseases, including tuberculosis, Listeria, Giardia, Ebola, anthrax, C. diff., Legionella, Lyme, chlamydia and the flu.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Where climate change is most likely to induce food violenceWhile climate change is expected to lead to more violence related to food scarcity, new research suggests that the strength of a country's government plays a vital role in preventing uprisings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monkey see, monkey do, depending on age, experience and efficiencyWild capuchin monkeys readily learn skills from each other -- but that social learning is driven home by the payoff of learning a useful new skill.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heatScientists have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cellular imaging paves way for cancer treatmentResearchers have pioneered a technique which uses florescent imaging to track the actions of key enzymes in cancer, genetic disorders and kidney disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the brain recognizes what the eye seesNew Salk Institute work outlining brain's visual process could improve self-driving cars and point to therapies for sensory impairment.
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Gizmodo
This 3,000-Year-Old Copper Mask Is Rewriting South American History Image: L. I. Cortés et al., 2017/Antiquity A square-shaped copper mask pulled from a tomb in the southern Andes is resetting our notions of where and when sophisticated metallurgy first appeared in pre-Hispanic South America. Archaeological evidence suggests that metallurgy in pre-Columbian America first appeared in the Andes, with Peru being the likely point of origin. But as a new study publish
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Gizmodo
Cook Breakfast Burritos In Minutes With This $14 Gadget Hamilton Beach Breakfast Burrito Maker , $14 Hamilton Beach’s breakfast burrito maker is a unitasker, no doubt, but it’s an awesome unitasker. You put a tortilla on the bottom to warm up, your egg and other ingredients in the top section, and remove a trap door once it’s all cooked to drop your fillings into the tortilla in one fell swoop. I would use this thing every day and gain a lot of weight
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Social Media Users Decoded a Simulated Message from ExtraterrestrialsHumanity won’t share a language with an alien civilization, so how can we decode a message from ET if we receive one? One astrophysicist says: crowdsource it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Setting stretch goals can undermine organizational performance, new study showsWhile the general consensus regarding stretch goals is that they boost drive, innovation, and improve organizational performance, new research shows that this is the exception, and not the rule. For many organizations, stretch goals can serve to undermine performance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electric car subsidies may do more harm than goodSubsidizing electric vehicles in the North American context will not reduce GHG emissions in the short-term, and may even increase them -- at a cost to taxpayers -- new research suggests.
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Popular Science
The oldest fossils of our species just got older Science These possible Homo sapiens help confirm humanity's history. New fossil findings may help write our species' origin story—if we can agree on what it means to be human. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Witcher developer: Thieves want ransom for leaked Cyberpunk 2077 docs Enlarge CD Projekt Red, best known as the developer of the Witcher franchise, is publicizing an unknown group's attempt to extract ransom over apparently leaked internal files describing the company's upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 , an open-world role-playing game based on the 1990 PC title Cyberpunk 2020. In a tweet this morning , the company warned that "unidentified individuals" are in possession of
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Ars Technica
AT&T uses forced arbitration to overcharge customers, senators say (credit: Aurich Lawson) Five Democratic US senators allege that AT&T's use of forced arbitration clauses has helped the company charge higher prices than the ones it advertises to customers. The senators pointed to a CBS News investigation that described "more than 4,000 complaints against AT&T and [subsidiary] DirecTV related to deals, promotions and overcharging in the past two years." But cust
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Gizmodo
This Beautiful Short Film Recreates the Moon Landing Using Thousands of NASA Photos GIF There’s no shortage of archival film footage of the moon landing—arguably one of humanity’s greatest achievements. But graphic designer Christian Stangl didn’t use any of it to create this short film. Instead, Lunar was created by animating thousands of still photos taken from NASA’s Apollo archives. The process involved assembling multiple photos to create wider panoramic vistas that could b
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Ars Technica
Journal tries crowdsourcing peer reviews, sees excellent results Enlarge (credit: Cecilia Gudín ) Peer review is supposed to act as a sanity check on science. A few learned scientists take a look at your work, and if it withstands their objective and entirely neutral scrutiny , a journal will happily publish your work. As those links indicate, however, there are some issues with peer review as it is currently practiced. Recently, Benjamin List, a researcher an
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New Scientist - News
Fetuses turn to follow face-like shapes while in the wombNewborn babies preferentially look at faces. Now fetuses have been seen tracking a face-like pattern, suggesting this ability develops by the third trimester
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New Scientist - News
Artificial whisky taster has the palate of a connoisseurA technique involving fluorescent dyes can tell the age and origin of different spirits, and a fake from the genuine article – much like a whisky taster’s tongue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
S.Africa bans poultry imports from Zimbabwe after bird flu outbreakSouth Africa has halted poultry imports from Zimbabwe after a recent outbreak of highly contagious avian influenza at a farm in the neighbouring country, the government said Thursday.
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Live Science
Save $15 On This Easy-to-Fly Drone [Deal]The TobyRich Moskito was designed for first-time pilots who want a drone they can fly immediately after unboxing. Although it normally costs $60, it's on sale for $44.99.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple tasks don't test brain's true complexityNew research strategies are needed to find out how information flows through the brain's neural networks, according to neuroscientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine. In a new article in Neuron, the researchers suggest using complex experiments to test the most important properties of these networks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving adolescents' social and emotional lives must go beyond teaching them skillsSchool programs designed to educate children and adolescents on how to understand and manage emotions, relationships and academic goals must go beyond improving the skills of the individuals to create a respectful climate and allow adolescents more autonomy in decision making, according to psychology research at The University of Texas at Austin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not so elementaryA UCSB physicist and colleagues review three experiments that hint at a phenomenon beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists review three experiments that hint at a phenomenon beyond the Standard Model of particle physicsTo anyone but a physicist, it sounds like something out of "Star Trek." But lepton universality is a real thing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber exec fired over India rape probe: reportUber has fired a top executive who obtained medical records of a woman raped during a ride in India in 2014, media reports said, the latest in a series of efforts to stem misconduct at the ridesharing giant.
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Ingeniøren
Ny stjerneobservation viser, at Einstein havde ret og tog fejlDenne uges forskningsresultater viser også, at menneskeskabt luftforurening har eksisteret gennem 2000 år, at magnetisme findes i fladland, samt at en betydelig del af Jordens xenon stammer fra kometer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yahoo-Verizon deal set to close June 13Yahoo shareholders voted Thursday to back the sale of the company's internet business to Verizon, clearing the way for the deal to close June 13.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research targets PFOA threat to drinking waterA highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of U.S. communities to close their drinking water supplies. Because of its historical use in Teflon production and other industrial processes as well as its environmental persistence, PFOA contamination is a pervasive problem worldwide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX Dragon to deliver research to Space StationSpaceX is scheduled to launch its Dragon spacecraft for its eleventh commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station June 1 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center's historic pad 39A. Dragon will lift into orbit atop the Falcon 9 rocket carrying crew supplies, equipment and scientific research to crewmembers living aboard the station.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fatherhood factors influence how dads spend time with childrenA father's resources, relationships, and parenting beliefs affect how he spends time with his children and financially provides for his family, finds a study led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Science | The Guardian
Ancient Aztec temple and ball court unearthed in heart of Mexico City Discoveries confirm accounts of first Spanish chroniclers to visit Aztec capital Archaeologists also uncovered 32 sets of human neck bones at the site The remains of a major Aztec temple and a ceremonial ball court have been discovered in downtown Mexico City, shedding new light on the sacred spaces of the metropolis that Spanish conquerors overran five centuries ago, archaeologists said on Wedne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where climate change is most likely to induce food violenceWhile climate change is expected to lead to more violence related to food scarcity, new research suggests that the strength of a country's government plays a vital role in preventing uprisings.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows setting stretch goals can undermine organizational performanceWhile the general consensus regarding stretch goals is that they boost drive, innovation, and improve organizational performance, new research in the INFORMS journal Organization Science shows that this is the exception, and not the rule. For many organizations, stretch goals can serve to undermine performance.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Male sexual behavior linked to elevated male sex hormone receptors in muscles of sex-changing fishSex-changing fish exhibit differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression in muscles that are highly sensitive to androgens (male sex hormones) and essential for male courtship behavior, according to a Georgia State University study.
19h
Popular Science
Dogs and wolves both get sad when you don’t treat them fairly Animals They’re all such good boys! What do you mean he gets meat and I get kibble? I'm done with this game.
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Ars Technica
Here’s what you can expect next from our partnership with GOG Enlarge A fine Thursday summer morning to you, fellow Arsians (or winter morning, if you’re south of the equator)! We’re ready to talk a little more about what’s next for Ars Technica and our partnership with GOG , and it should be pretty fun. Our kickoff giveaway was a little unconventional, but wildly successful by any measure: we gave away about 300,000 codes for The Witcher, with only a few m
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Dana Foundation
Exploring the Geography of the Brain Early world explorers worked with crude maps, painfully charting the geography of new locations for future generations. Today, anyone can log on to the internet for detailed descriptions of the countries, cities, and roads of our world. In comparison, the map of the brain still has a long way to go. In fact, a map of the brain made over 100 years ago is still being used by neuroscientists today.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research targets PFOA threat to drinking waterA highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of US communities to close their drinking water supplies. PFOA contamination also is a pervasive problem worldwide. A Northwestern University-led research team now reports an inexpensive and renewable material that rapidly removes PFOA from water. The novel treatment effectively eliminates the micropo
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds failure to sustain reductions in carcinogens in cigarettesTobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) are potent carcinogens formed predominantly during the cigarette manufacturing process. Despite initial success lowering TSNA levels in cigarettes sold in Canada, following subsidies by the Ontario government to manufacturers in 2000, a study published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research has found that the decrease in TSNAs have not been sustained
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Viden
Asiatiske nationer vil bekæmpe plastik i verdenshaveneDet er et skridt mod den tiltagende plastikforurening, der er til fare for bl.a. fugle og fisk.
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The Atlantic
The Vodka-Red-Bull Placebo Effect Mixing an energy drink with alcohol might seem fairly innocuous, but it has been linked with ugly tendencies. A 2013 study found that people were twice as likely to be involved in an alcohol-linked car wreck or a sexual assault if they consumed an energy-drink-and-alcohol cocktail, compared to those who drank just alcohol. In 2010, the FDA banned the sale of pre-packaged caffeine-and-alcohol drin
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The Atlantic
A Billionaire Defends Modern Philanthropy Reid Hoffman may be best known as the founder of the networking site LinkedIn, but these days he’s more of an investor than inventor. Hoffman, who is worth an estimated $3.2 billion , is a partner with the venture capital firm Greylock, which invests in companies such as Groupon and Airbnb. He also spends a lot of time and money on philanthropic causes, giving multimillion dollar gifts to nonprof
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Popular Science
This online course bundle helps you master JavaScript for under $40 Sponsored Post Learn the MEAN stack, Angularjs and more for just $38. This online course bundle helps you master JavaScript for under $40. Learn the MEAN stack, Angularjs and more for just $38. Read on.
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Quanta Magazine
Bongard Problems and Scientific Discovery Unlike most puzzles that are solved by applying rules, Bongard problems go to the heart of scientific discovery: They give you two sets of six related figures, the left-hand set consisting of examples that satisfy some unknown rule, and the right-hand set having items that break the rule. Your task, like that of a scientist faced with messy data from nature, is to figure out the rule. Can you sol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanotechnology reveals hidden depths of bacterial 'machines'New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous machines edge towards greater independenceCars that can drive autonomously have recently made headlines. In the near future, machines that can learn autonomously will become increasingly present in our lives. The secret to efficient learning for these machines is to define an iterative process to map out the evolution of how key aspects of these systems change over time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nitrades in transitionThe average, everyday person might not be familiar with gallium nitride, also known as GaN, but there is a good chance they've heard of silicon, a semiconductor that's been used for decades and found in every computer and most electronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cell cultures go for the goldA wide variety of research relies on growing cells in culture on Earth, but handling these cells is challenging. With better techniques, scientists hope to reduce loss of cells from culture media, create cultures in specific shapes, and improve retrieval of cells for analysis - all of which would improve experiment results. Handling cells in microgravity poses even greater challenges, and with ong
20h
Ingeniøren
Prisvindende ny ventilationsløsning giver både energibesparelser og bedre indeklimaTre danske produktionsvirksomheder og to universiteter har udviklet og dokumenteret en nyt ventilationskoncept til kontorer og institutioner. Det giver lavere energiforbrug og bedre indeklima og har indbragt dem årets Elforsk pris.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks at extreme Florida rainfall by satelliteExtremely heavy rain has recently fallen over Florida and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite looked at that some of that rainfall on June 7. Rainfall records were broken on that date as the GPM satellite passed overhead from space.
20h
Live Science
California Prepares for Solar Power Loss During the Great EclipseA total solar eclipse that will sweep across the United States on Aug. 21 is expected to make a noticeable dent in solar-energy collection, prompting energy workers to concoct workarounds that will help them meet energy demands.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows setting stretch goals can undermine organizational performanceWhile the general consensus regarding stretch goals is that they boost drive, innovation, and improve organizational performance, new research in the INFORMS journal Organization Science shows that this is the exception, and not the rule. For many organizations, stretch goals can serve to undermine performance.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male sexual behavior linked to elevated male sex hormone receptors in muscles of sex-changing fishSex-changing fish exhibit differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression in muscles that are highly sensitive to androgens (male sex hormones) and essential for male courtship behavior, according to a Georgia State University study.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where climate change is most likely to induce food violenceWhile climate change is expected to lead to more violence related to food scarcity, new research suggests that the strength of a country's government plays a vital role in preventing uprisings.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sensitivity to inequity is in wolves' and dogs' bloodNot only dogs but also wolves react to inequity -- similar to humans or primates. This confirms a new study by Vetmeduni Vienna. Wolves and dogs refused to cooperate in an experiment when only the partner got a treat or they themselves received a lower quality reward. The sensitivity to inequity is not likely to be an effect of domestication, as assumed so far. It is rather a behaviour inherited f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overriding the urge to sleepThe discovery of neurons that control arousal has implications for insomnia and other sleep disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain's hippocampus can organize memories for events as well as placesResearchers at Japan's RIKEN Brain Science Institute have found that the hippocampus can generalize, putting not just places but also events into sequence by changing the neural code in the rat brain.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers uncover new instruction manual to repair broken DNAResearchers have discovered how the Rad52 protein is a crucial player in RNA-dependent DNA repair.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extinct early whales listened like their relatives on land, fossil evidence showsWhales show surprisingly vast differences in hearing ability. Baleen whales tune into infrasonic sounds to communicate over long distances. Toothed whales do just the opposite, relying on ultrasonic frequencies too high for humans to hear. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 8 have fossil evidence from extinct early whale species to suggest that those differences in hearing arose
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain imaging reveals neural roots of caringWhen others suffer, we humans empathize. Our feelings of empathy take different forms, such as distress when we imagine and internalize someone's pain and compassion as we sympathize with their condition. These different feelings involve distinct patterns of brain activity, according to a study in Neuron. Feelings of empathy may seem subtle and personal, but this study found that the brain pattern
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use a synthetic 'tongue' to sort out whiskiesWhiskies may differ in taste and smell, but they are so similar in chemical composition that most analyses can't tell two closely related brews apart. In the journal Chem on June 8, researchers introduce an artificial sensor array or 'tongue' that can detect whether two nearly identical whisky samples are a match. The sensor arrays can also identify some of the whiskies' key qualities, such as mal
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Developing fetuses react to face-like shapes from the wombIt's well known that young babies are more interested in faces than other objects. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 8 have the first evidence that this preference for faces develops in the womb. By projecting light through the uterine wall of pregnant mothers, they found that fetuses at 34 weeks gestation will turn their heads to look at face-like images over other shapes.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Babies in the Womb Look at Faces BRIEF: Babies in the Womb Look at Faces Human fetuses turn toward face-like patterns of light projected through their mothers' abdomens. This-is-a-4-D-ultrasound-of-a-fetus-tracking-the-stimulus.-CREDIT-Kirsty-Dunn--Vincent-Reid_cropped.jpg Image credits: Kirsty Dunn and Vincent Reid Human Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 11:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Parents and researchers have lo
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The Atlantic
Fetuses Prefer Face-Like Images Even in the Womb It is dark in the womb—but not that dark. Human flesh isn’t fully opaque, so some measure of light will always pass through it. This means that even an enclosed space like a uterus can be surprisingly bright . “It’s analogous to being in a room where the lights are switched off and the curtains are drawn, but it’s bright outside,” says Vincent Reid from the University of Lancaster. “That’s still
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The Atlantic
ISIS's Mass Killings of Civilians in Mosul A UN report Thursday said more than 200 Iraqi civilians attempting to flee western Mosul have been killed by the Islamic State since the end of May, which the UN Human Rights Office called a “signifiant escalation.” The report noted three specific incidents of civilian killings in ISIS-controlled parts of western Mosul, during which the militant group reportedly shot and killed individuals attemp
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New Scientist - News
Fortified gas marbles are 10 times stronger than regular bubblesBubbles reinforced with an external layer of particles can hold their shape under pressure – which may help in making stronger foams and in drug delivery
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Popular Science
Scientists use glowing dyes to spot fake whiskey Science This technique can even identify the drink’s origin, blend, age, and taste. By adding whiskey to different vials of dyes that glow under black light, we can create unique patterns of fluorescence that identifies the whiskey by origin, blend,…
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use a synthetic 'tongue' to sort out whiskiesWhiskies may differ in taste and smell, but they are so similar in chemical composition that most analyses can't tell two closely related brews apart. In the journal Chem on June 8, researchers introduce an artificial sensor array or "tongue" that can detect whether two nearly identical whisky samples are a match. The sensor arrays can also identify some of the whiskies' key qualities, such as mal
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sensitivity to inequity is in wolves' and dogs' bloodNot only dogs but also wolves react to inequity - similar to humans or primates. This has been confirmed in a new study by comparative psychologists of the Messerli Research Institute of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna. Wolves and dogs refused to cooperate in an experiment when only the partner got a treat or they themselves received a lower quality reward. Since this behaviour is eq
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extinct early whales listened like their relatives on land, fossil evidence showsWhales rely on a keen sense of hearing for their underwater existence. But whales show surprisingly vast differences in hearing ability. Baleen whales tune into infrasonic sounds—at frequencies too low for humans to hear—to communicate over long distances. Toothed whales do just the opposite, relying on ultrasonic frequencies too high for humans to hear.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing fetuses react to face-like shapes from the wombIt's well known that young babies are more interested in faces than other objects. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 8 have the first evidence that this preference for faces develops in the womb. By projecting light through the uterine wall of pregnant mothers, they found that fetuses at 34 weeks gestation will turn their heads to look at face-like images over other shapes.
20h
Gizmodo
Can Fetuses Recognize Faces When They're Still in the Womb? Ultrasound of fetus (Image: Kirsty Dunn & Vincent Reid) We don’t remember what it was like to be a fetus. We don’t remember what we heard or smelled, and we certainly don’t remember what we saw. So fetuses, their development, and their experiences are a natural curiosity. When and how do fetuses start taking part in the human experience? Can they recognize faces from the womb? One team of British
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Gizmodo
We've Got More Details About Stranger Things' New Monster All images: Netflix The last few days have revealed a number of details about the monster we saw menacing Hawkins in the season two Stranger Things trailer—including what sounds like the ominous name the cast used for it on the set. This week has already had somewhat contradictory messages about how the monster will show up in season two. Co-showrunner Ross Duffer told Variety that “Hiding the mo
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Gizmodo
Humans Heading to Mars Could Face a Disturbingly High Cancer Risk Image: NASA Practically everyone who likes space and has lots of money is trying to get to Mars in the near future . But before anyone reaches the Red Planet, there are plenty of concerns to mull over, most notably that our bodies were not built to live in a barren litter box with a thin atmosphere. But the journey to Mars is an equal concern. An unnerving new study suggests that the trip to Mars
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Latest Headlines | Science News
For humans, the appeal of looking at faces starts before birthNew research suggests that 8-month-old fetuses, like newborns, are particularly interested in looking at faces.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA looks at extreme Florida rainfall by satelliteExtremely heavy rain has recently fallen over Florida and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite looked at that some of that rainfall on June 7. Rainfall records were broken on that date as the GPM satellite passed overhead from space.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nepal: 15 years after legalizing abortions, gaps in access, equity, quality continue to existNepal is often heralded as a model of successful implementation and rapid scale-up of safe abortion services. Yet despite the legalization of the procedure in 2002, challenges continue to exist for women who want to obtain a safe, legal abortion.In a new perspective piece in the Health and Human Rights Journal, researchers discuss where gaps in access, equity and quality of abortion services threa
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient Fossils from Morocco Mess Up Modern Human OriginsDated to more than 300,000 years ago, the finds raise key questions about the defining features of Homo sapiens and how our kind came to be -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Bacteria release aphrodisiacs that put others in mood for sexEros protein is the first evidence that bacteria regulate mating of other, non-bacterial creatures
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Futurity.org
To better test antibiotics, add baking soda A new antimicrobial susceptibility test could change the development, testing, and prescribing of antibiotics by correcting flaws in the current test for antibiotic effectiveness. The standard test specifies how well drugs kill bacteria on petri plates containing Mueller-Hinton Broth, a nutrient-rich laboratory medium that fails to reproduce most aspects of a natural infection. “These ‘wonder dru
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of sisters helps explain dad's influence on risky sexual behaviorResearchers have shown links between father involvement and daughters' sexual behavior, with the standard explanation attributing that influence to shared genes that impact both a father's behavior and relationships and his child's problem behavior, including engaging in risky sex and affiliating with delinquent peers. But a study led by a University of Utah researcher and published in Development
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific advances in thoracic oncology in 2016 highlighted by the IASLCCapturing and summarizing the remarkable progress in lung cancer prevention, diagnosis, staging and treatment in 2016, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) announces the second annual publication of 'Scientific Advances in Thoracic Oncology,' available online now and in the August 2017 issue of the IASLC's Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carotid artery gives away human biological ageBiological age is a concept which is used to describe the state of our organisms and it's determination is important when it comes to developing anti-aging medicines.The most accurate of the existing techniques for predicting biological age are based on DNA analysis and require expensive equipment and skilled laboratory personnel. The discovered method is based on a combination of carotid ultrasou
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Quack scienceThe biological trick that allows a female mandarin duck to become a male.
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NYT > Science
How Do You Make a Play About Water? Drop by DropThe immersive new eco-play “(Not) Water” has been in the making since Hurricane Katrina.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Father's Day Gifts, Anker PowerLine Cable, USB Power Receptacles, and More Father’s day watches , your favorite Lightning cable , and USB-equipped power receptacles lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker 10' PowerLine Lightning Cable , $12 Extra-long charging cables are perfect for running behind your couch or stretching to your nightstand from an inconvenient power out
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Scientific American Content: Global
India Faces Fatal Rise in Heat WavesAlready, a relatively minor temperature increase has had disastrous health consequences in the country -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Mr. President, Now Is the Time to Tweet Photo: AP Former FBI director James Comey has been testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee for over an hour. Twitter is aflame with reporters tweeting quotes and idiots telling jokes. It is hot, hot, hot. But it is not enough. Washington Post reporter Robert Costa reported on Tuesday that President Trump might “live tweet if he feels the need to respond” to Comey’s testimony. So far,
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Futurity.org
Greener way to refine metals needs a good shake Scientists have developed a new way to process metals that doesn’t use toxic solvents and reagents, consumes far less energy than current techniques, and could reduce the environmental impact of producing metals from raw materials or post-consumer electronics. “At a time when natural deposits of metals are on the decline, there is a great deal of interest in improving the efficiency of metal refi
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Ars Technica
NASA has a spiffy new class of astronauts, but where will they go? NASA The lights dimmed. The music swelled. And then, one by one, NASA’s 2017 class of astronauts walked triumphantly onto the stage Wednesday at Johnson Space Center. Wearing the agency’s iconic blue flight suits, they beamed and waved, enjoying a singular moment in their lives. Aged from 28 to 42 years, they had already accomplished much. Now they were ready for more: to serve their country, fly
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Scientific American Content: Global
Physicists Make a 2-D MagnetThe breakthrough could lead to better data-storage devices and quantum computers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify immune component up-regulated in brain after viral infectionA new study of infection by a virus that causes brain inflammation and seizures in a mouse model has shown increased levels of complement component C3. The C3 was produced by immune cells in the brain called microglia within the first few days after infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Culprit hidden in plain sight in Alzheimer disease developmentA new study by researchers at the University of Montana, Universidad del Valle de México, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Boise State, and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, heightens concerns over the detrimental short- and long-term impact of airborne iron-rich strongly magnetic combustion-derived nanoparticles present in young urbanites' brains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotechnology reveals hidden depths of bacterial 'machines'New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amygdala activity predicts posttraumatic stress disorderNeuroimaging measures of emotional brain function after acute trauma may help predict whether a person will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study. The study reports an association between the activity of two key brain regions involved in emotional regulation, the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), shortly after trauma and symptoms of PTSD that emerged wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spread of local taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages is likelySince 2014, seven U.S. municipal or county jurisdictions have adopted excise taxes to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, but no such taxes have been passed at the state or federal level. A new viewpoint evaluates reasons for success or failure and whether such local taxes are likely to spread.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein target to halt citrus tree diseaseResearchers may have come a step closer to finding a treatment for a disease called Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, that has been decimating citrus trees in the state.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning car plastics into foams with coconut oilEnd-of-life vehicles, with their plastic, metal and rubber components, are responsible for millions of tons of waste around the world each year. Now, a team reports that the plastic components in these vehicles can be recycled with coconut oil and re-used as foams for the construction, packaging and automotive industries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in patients with schizophreniaA new study examines the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for the prevention of psychiatric rehospitalization and treatment failure among a nationwide group of patients with schizophrenia in Sweden.
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Popular Science
Celebrate World Ocean's Day with these gorgeous photos of the sea Environment Darlin' its better down where it's wetter. Take a look at stunning pictures of the ocean in honor of World Ocean's Day.
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Gizmodo
Digital Footprints Paint an Eerily Accurate Picture of Europe's Refugees Photo: AP /Muhammed Muheisen Using search data collected by Google, researchers at the Pew Research Center have reconstructed the journeys taken by refugees flowing into Europe from the Middle East. It represents a new way of tracking migration patterns—but the technique could eventually lead to misuse. In 2015 and 2016, some 2.5 million refugees left Syria and Iraq in search of asylum in the Eur
21h
TEDTalks (video)
What happens in your brain when you pay attention? | Mehdi Ordikhani-SeyedlarAttention isn't just about what we focus on -- it's also about what our brains filter out. By investigating patterns in the brain as people try to focus, computational neuroscientist Mehdi Ordikhani-Seyedlar hopes to build computer models that can be used to treat ADHD and help those who have lost the ability to communicate. Hear more about this exciting science in this brief, fascinating talk.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Europe’s Blustery Weather Boosts Renewables to Record HighsThe U.K., Germany, and Denmark have seen clean energy blow past fossil fuels this month.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Therapy could stop superbugs on farmsResearchers show that it might be possible to develop an alternative to antibiotics for treating diseases in pigs and humans
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Science | The Guardian
Brain training could help the heartbroken, says neuropsychologist Computerised tests could train those suffering unrequited love to avoid actions they might later regret, says Cambridge University professor Barbara Sahakian The indignity of being dumped has rarely been helped by a clumsy poem or a drunken text sent after closing time, but there is at least hope for the heartbroken. Instead of making things worse with a helping of humiliation, the best response
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
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Gizmodo
You Probably Don’t Know All the Ways Facebook Tracks You Image: Facebook We’re all aware of the deal we make when we sign up with Facebook: we get somewhere to post vacation photos and stalk friends , and Mark Zuckerberg gets to sell your passion for fishing trips to fishing equipment retailers. What you might not realize is how deep or extensive the tracking goes—so let’s shed some light on it. All of this is well within Facebook’s remit. You’re using
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals sweetened drinks during pregnancy puts infants at higher risk for obesityA recent Danish study of children born to women with gestational diabetes, found that maternal daily consumption of artificially-sweetened beverages during pregnancy was associated with a higher body mass index score and increased risk of overweight/obesity at 7 years.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why the marijuana and tobacco policy camps are on very different pathsPaper looks at diverging trajectories of cannabis and tobacco policies in the US and attempts to explain some of the reasoning behind the different paths, while discussing possible implications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer risk reduced in women with diabetes who take low-dose aspirinA new study of nearly 149,000 women with diabetes over 14 years showed an overall 18 percent reduced breast cancer risk for women who used low-dose aspirin compared to those who did not.
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Ars Technica
Sonic Mania is already so good, I’d buy its incomplete version as-is LOS ANGELES— Sonic Mania is far from Sega's first stab at returning to the blue, spiky bomber's good ol' Genesis/Mega Drive days. Every time we've heard Sega's nostalgic promises, they've been followed by the series' handlers coming up high and dry. Over the past year, I've reluctantly enjoyed promising demos of the company's latest 16-bit Sonic homage. Everything has played smoothly so far, but
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Futurity.org
Researchers can’t just screen drugs for male bodies Many drugs in the past decade that have been pulled from the market due to toxicity were withdrawn because they affected women more than men. This highlights the fact that many studies use only male cells and male animal models. Now, a new study in the journal Cell Metabolism aims to help scientists who study obesity, diabetes, or other metabolic diseases better account for inherent sex differenc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metastasized breast cancer: Surgery prior to drug treatment not beneficialWomen suffering from metastasized breast cancer do not benefit from surgery performed prior to drug treatment, new research indicates. This could cause a paradigm shift in treatment of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synthetic nanochannels for iodide transportExchange of iodide (iodine ions) between bloodstream and cells is crucial for the health of several organs and its malfunctioning is linked to goiter, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, breast cancer, and gastric cancer. Researchers have devised nanostructures that function as channels for iodide transport in cell membranes. This study may lead to diagnosis and treatment of iodide transport disorders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microrods made of lanthanoid organic frameworks act as microscale optical waveguidesOptical data transmission allows information to be transmitted as light by way of optical waveguides in fiber optic networks. Chinese researchers have now developed microscale optical waveguides. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, they have made microrods of lanthanide metal–organic frameworks. Their particular crystal structure ensures low-loss light conduction and the emission of pola
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Ars Technica
The devil from the details: Proper interpretation of our Xbox usage data (credit: Aurich Lawson) When you try to extrapolate console usage patterns from randomly sampled server data, you're always looking for ways to test that data against reality. Microsoft shared a small slice of that reality this week, and it has us taking a second look at at least part of our recent, wide-ranging report on Xbox Live usage . On Wednesday evening, Xbox Chief Marketing Officer Mike N
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Live Science
Mysterious Fire Monument in England Predates Stonehenge by 800 YearsA massive wooden circle that lies not far from Stonehenge may be even older than previously thought, new data suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds delayed food introduction increases risk of sensitizationUsing data from more than 2,100 Canadian children, the researchers found that infants who avoided cow's milk products in their first year were nearly four times as likely to be sensitized to cow's milk compared to infants who consumed cow's milk products before 12 months of age. Similarly, infants who avoided egg or peanut in their first year were nearly twice as likely to be sensitized to those f
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autonomous machines edge towards greater independenceCars that can drive autonomously have made recently made headlines. The secret to efficient learning for these machines is to define an iterative process to map out the evolution of how key aspects of these systems change over time. In a study published in EPJ B, Agustín Bilen and Pablo Kaluza from Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina show that these smart systems can evolve autonomous
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cellular imaging paves way for cancer treatmentResearchers at the Universities of York and Leiden have pioneered a technique which uses florescent imaging to track the actions of key enzymes in cancer, genetic disorders and kidney disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fatherhood factors influence how dads spend time with childrenA father's resources, relationships, and parenting beliefs affect how he spends time with his children and financially provides for his family, finds a study led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New cellular imaging paves way for cancer treatmentResearchers at the Universities of York and Leiden have pioneered a technique which uses florescent imaging to track the actions of key enzymes in cancer, genetic disorders and kidney disease.
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Ars Technica
Patent-holding company can’t avoid paying attorneys’ fees, appeals court rules Enlarge The top US patent court has ordered a patent-holding company with a habit of dismissing cases rather than arguing its case in court to pay its opponent's attorneys' fees. A panel of three judges on the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overruled (PDF) a federal judge in the Eastern District of Texas who allowed Rothschild Connected Devices Innovations LLC (RCDI) to walk away wit
22h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump Is an Impossible Boss James Comey’s opening statement reads like the test answer you’re supposed to give at the end of the Human Resources training video. When your superior makes you uncomfortable should you a) explain your boundaries b) discuss the issue with your direct report c) make contemporaneous notes to lock in your recollection or d) all of the above. Comey picked D. The question of whether the president tri
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The Atlantic
The Iranian Response to Trump's Statement on the Tehran Attack Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif denounced Thursday President Trump’s comments about the terrorist attack this week in Tehran, for which the Islamic State claimed responsibility, as “repugnant.” Repugnant WH statement & Senate sanctions as Iranians counter terror backed by US clients.Iranian people reject such US claims of friendship — Javad Zarif (@JZarif) June 8, 2017 Zarif’s condemnation c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach in T-cell therapy to treat cancerScientists have armed immune cells with a new surface molecule. This causes the cells to respond particularly aggressively when they encounter a protein that tumors actually use to camouflage themselves from the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plus-size fashion models improve women's psychological health, researchers findWomen pay more attention and experience improved psychological health when they view average and plus-size models in the media, new research concludes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New waterproofing and antifouling materials developed'Green' project led by Swansea scientists could replace more expensive and hazardous materials used for waterproofing and antifouling/fogging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers explain the formation of seven exoplanets around Trappist-1Astronomers from the University of Amsterdam have offered an explanation for the formation of the Trappist-1 planetary system. The system has seven planets as big as the Earth that orbit close to their star. The crux, according to the researchers from the Netherlands, is the line where ice changes in water. Near that ice line, pebbles that drifted from outer regions to the star receive an addition
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Gizmodo
Breaking: Star Wars Rebels' Ahsoka Has Not Suddenly Transformed Into a Giant Wolf Image: Still via Youtube Yes, Rebels head honcho Dave Filoni has seemingly confirmed some very important news about Ahsoka Tano’s role in the fourth and final season of Star Wars Rebels . Mainly that for the love of god no, she’s not a wolf. Confused? You absolutely should be. Buut allow us to explain... Ever since Star Wars Celebration a few months ago, and Filoni’s confirmation that Ahsoka woul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snook survive cold spell in deeper waters of EvergladesRestoring freshwater flow to the Florida Everglades could help snook, one of the state's prized gaming fish, survive extreme climate events.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin LeBron Is Not Enough | Fusion We’re Live Blogging James Comey’s Senate Testimony: Only in D Deadspin LeBron Is Not Enough | Fusion We’re Live Blogging James Comey’s Senate Testimony: Only in Death Will We Know Peace | Jezebel Ariel Winter’s Mother Says Her Daughter Needs to Quit ‘Exposing Herself,’ Ariel Winter Says Shove Off | The Root ‘Shut Up, Slave!’: White Man Hurls Insults, Compares Black Man to Livestock During Altercation at Chicago Starbucks |
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inherited, rare skin disease informs treatment of common hair disorders, Penn study findsPenn researchers studying an inherited disorder of skin, hair follicles, nails, sweat glands, and teeth called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) have identified a mechanism that may also be disrupted in male pattern baldness, a more common condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The role of the protein Rrm3 in the repair of breaks in DNA during replicationA research group from the University of Seville has reached this result by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. This protein belongs to the human protein family PIF1, the mutations of which are known to be associated with a higher risk of tumorigenesis. This opens the possibility that the risk of suffering cancer might be due to the inability of the cell to repair correctl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heatScientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fat tissue may impede radiotherapy for breast cancer patientsAccording to research published online in The FASEB Journal, repeated irradiation of breast fat (also known as adipose tissue) produces an inflammatory response that ultimately reduces the efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. This research was based on a recent discovery that there is an inflammatory interaction between breast tumors and adipose tissue.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does your name match your face?People tend to associate round names such as 'Bob' and 'Lou' with round-faced individuals, and they have an inherent preference for names and faces that go well together. This is according to David Barton and Jamin Halberstadt of the University of Otago in New Zealand. In the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, published by Springer, they investigated the so-called 'bouba/kiki effect.'
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bitter taste receptors may hold the key to managing preterm laborThis could be good news for those trying to prevent preterm labor: New research published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that exposing bitter taste receptors in the uterus to certain substances can stop many unwanted contractions that occur during premature labor.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New waterproofing and antifouling materials developed by Swansea ScientistsNew materials have been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University which is nontoxic, economical and shows promise to replace more expensive and hazardous materials used for waterproofing and antifouling/fogging.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmic inflation: Higgs says goodbye to his 'little brother'In the first moments after the Big Bang, the Universe was able to expand even billions of billions of billions of times faster than today. Such rapid expansion should be due to a primordial force field, acting with a new particle: inflaton. From the latest analysis of the decay of mesons, carried out in the LHCb experiment by physicists from Cracow and Zurich, it appears, however, that the most pr
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report looks at liver cancer, fastest-growing cause of cancer deaths in USA new report provides an overview of incidence, mortality, and survival rates and trends for liver cancer, a cancer for which death rates have doubled in the United States since the mid-1980s
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moving towards better global foodborne disease surveillanceAlmost one in 10 people worldwide fall ill every year after eating contaminated food which commonly causes bacterial diarrhea, resulting in 230,000 deaths each year. In an article in Eurosurveillance (to be published June 8) PulseNet International advocates for public health institutes and laboratories around the world to move together towards the use of whole genome sequencing to improve detectio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lost your appetite? Try inviting yourself to dinnerEating in front of a mirror — or even with a picture of yourself eating — makes food more appealing, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Data from satellite imagery useful for malaria early warning systemsA new model has been created that uses seasonal weather data from satellite images to accurately predict outbreak of malaria with a one-month lead time. With a so-called GAMBOOST model, a host of weather information gathered from satellite images can be used as a cost-effective disease forecasting model, allowing health officials to get ahead of the malaria infection curve by allocating resources
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly discovered methane consumers in lakesWhen decaying organic matter sinks to the bottom of a lake or ocean, methane is produced as the biomass is broken down. Some of the methane is released from the surface into the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas, while some is broken down by microorganisms in the water column. In a new study, an international research group reports that, as well as the “classical” methane consum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plastic in rivers major source of ocean pollution: studyPlastic that is dumped in rivers and then ends up in the world's oceans is one of the major sources of marine pollution, a new study said this week, with Asian waterways the main culprits.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The mysterious bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chainThe volcanic islands of Hawaii represent the youngest end of a 80 million years old and roughly 6,000 kilometres long mountain chain on the ground of the Pacific Ocean. The so-called Hawaiian-Emperor chain consisting of dozens of volcanoes is well known for its peculiar 60 degrees bend. The cause for this bend has been heavily debated for decades. One explanation is an abrupt change in the motion
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research for an oil (palm) changeIn recent research, scientists have developed a technique that shows great promise for helping oil palm growers optimise production and reduce environmental impacts.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines adolescents' responses to racism in schoolWhen adolescents read a hypothetical scenario about verbal racism in school, age, ethnicity, cross-group friendships, and ethnic socialisation predicted their bystander responses.
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Science | The Guardian
Americans 'under siege' from climate disinformation – former Nasa chief scientist Fake news spread by those with a profit motive is leaving many people oblivious to the threat of climate change, says former head of US space agency Americans are “under siege” from disinformation designed to confuse the public about the threat of climate change, Nasa’s former chief scientist has said. Speaking to the Guardian, Ellen Stofan, who left the US space agency in December, said that a c
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Gizmodo
Don't Be Late To Amazon's One-Day Invicta Watch Father's Day Sale Invicta Gold Box In my opinion, a classic wristwatch still looks better than a smartwatch, any day. Today only, pick up the perfect last minute Father’s Day gift: an Invicta watch . Amazon’s Gold Box can get them to you by Sunday, since they all have Prime shipping, plus they’re all under $70. But time’s a-tickin’ on this deal and these prices only last until the end of the day. More Deals
22h
Live Science
Surprising Find: Ancient Mummy DNA Sequenced in FirstFor the first time, researchers have successfully sequenced the DNA from Egyptian mummies.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
See-through frog comes to light in EcuadorA previously unidentified species of see-through frog has come to light in Ecuador after sitting forgotten in a jar in a laboratory for 20 years, scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plants prevent oxidative stressWhen excess light energy is absorbed by plants during photosynthesis, harmful reactive oxygen species are produced. These reactive oxygen species break down important structures such as proteins and membranes, preventing them from functioning properly. Researchers have discovered the system used by plants to prevent oxidative stress and to safely carry out photosynthesis.
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Gizmodo
Apple Sure Has Some Weird New Hobbies That gorgeous new iMac Pro. (All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo) Forget the HomePod or the latest version of iOS . The big news out of WWDC was related to something that Apple, and most consumers, don’t really care about: Virtual Reality. In between Kaby Lake refreshes and Siri voice demos, Tim Cook announced a wide range of software and hardware changes that will finally bring VR to macOS, and that’
22h
Ars Technica
Fortnite’s years of delays end with not-free-to-play version coming in July Enlarge / The creature at the bottom-right is a "flinger." Here, you see it doing the flinging. This doesn't just look hilarious; it also will force anybody who has built a big sniper tower to feel less safe in their hidey-hole. (credit: Epic Games) LOS ANGELES—Remember Epic Games' Fortnite ? You've had ample opportunity to forget about this co-op tower-defense shooter, whether after its 2011 rev
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Growth mechanism of fungi decodedFungi grow with tubular cells extending by kilometers. Growth takes place exclusively at the tip. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now found out how this works: Construction materials are transported on rails through the fungal cells and used at their outermost tip. Calcium concentration at the end of the cell defines when this happens. This is reported by the scientists
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines adolescents' responses to racism in schoolWhen adolescents read a hypothetical scenario about verbal racism in school, age, ethnicity, cross-group friendships, and ethnic socialization predicted their bystander responses.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cost-effectiveness of HIV/AIDS interventions in South AfricaAn international African collaboration has turned to statistical analysis to determine the cost effectiveness of major HIV/AIDS interventions in South Africa with a view to advising policy makers on the optimal approach to managing the disease. Details are reported this month in the International Journal of Economics and Business Research.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How plants prevent oxidative stressWhen excess light energy is absorbed by plants during photosynthesis, harmful reactive oxygen species are produced. These reactive oxygen species break down important structures such as proteins and membranes, preventing them from functioning properly. Researchers have discovered the system used by plants to prevent oxidative stress and to safely carry out photosynthesis.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optical communication using solitons on a photonic chipResearchers from KIT and EPFL used optical silicon nitride micro-resonators on a photonic chip that can easily be integrated into compact communication systems. Their demonstration allows a transmission of data rate of 55 terabits per second over a distance of 75 kilometers.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Air Travel Exposes You to Radiation--How Much Health Risk Comes with It?This past April business traveler Tom Stuker became the world’s most frequent flyer, logging 18 million miles of air travel on United Airlines over the last 14 years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
The Atlantic
A Musical Voyage Through the Solar System, Darkly Space is a real place, but we Earthlings mostly experience it as a backdrop, a trivia trove, a fantasy landscape, and a metaphor. In the cultural imagination, space can seem like just a version of not-space—how many interstellar voyage movies are really about family issues on the third rock from the Sun? The new album Planetarium embraces the way that space serves as humankind’s depository for st
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Gizmodo
Fired FBI Director James Comey Reports to the Senate About Trump Photo: Getty Fired FBI Director James Comey arrived on Capitol Hill Thursday to deliver what’s been billed as the most highly anticipated congressional testimony in history and that’s hardly an embellishment. Much of what Comey has to say is described in his written testimony : President Trump urged him to kill an investigation into the conduct of former national security advisor Michael Flynn. T
22h
Futurity.org
Images capture half-light, half-matter quasiparticles Scientists have made the first real-space images of exciton-polaritons, which are a combination of light and matter. The nano-image, explains Zhe Fei, shows the waves associated with one of these quasiparticles moving inside a semiconductor. “These are waves just like water waves,” says Fei, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University and an associate of the US Departmen
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From the somatic cell to the germ cellA regulatory pathway that changes the way cells divide in plants has been discovered by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A fish of all flavorsReceptors are how the body senses its environment. Upon the binding of a ligand, a receptor will initiate a chain of events that elicits a response. Our olfactory system depends on approximately 400 receptors to give us our sense of smell. Taste, however, operates with a much smaller number: The combination of only three members of the taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family can detect a wide range of
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making vessels leaky on demand could aid drug deliveryScientists use magnets and nanoparticles to cause 'leaks' in blood vessels on demand. The technique could help in the delivery of therapeutics to targeted areas in the body, including deep tissues and organs.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do Americans own handguns? Fear of crime and a broader sense of dangerA new psychological theoretical framework suggests US handgun ownership is motivated by combination of fear of crime and a general sense that the world is an unpredictable dangerous place.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does consuming low-fat dairy increase the risk of Parkinson's disease?Consuming at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared to consuming less than one serving a day, according to a large study.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnancy diet high in refined grains could increase kids' obesity by age sevenChildren born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results of a new study.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The mysterious bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chainThe volcanic islands of Hawaii represent the youngest end of a 80 million years old and roughly 6,000 kilometers long mountain chain on the ground of the Pacific Ocean. The so-called Hawaiian-Emperor chain consisting of dozens of volcanoes is well known for its peculiar 60 degrees bend. The cause for this bend has been heavily debated for decades. Scientists from Norway, the Netherlands, and Germa
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New leukemia treatment outperforms standard chemotherapiesResearchers at The Australian National University (ANU) are working on a new treatment for an aggressive type of leukemia that outperforms standard chemotherapies.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World first: Stem cell treatment for lethal STAT1 gene mutation -- shows 'disappointing' but promising resultsFirst study assessing how patients with 'gain of function' mutation of STAT1 gene respond to stem cell transplantation has taken place. It involved 15 young, international, patients. Only six survived transplantation -- with five completely cured.Dr. Okada, who first discovered the mutation, says that, 'Overall, this result is disappointing -- but the fact five patients were cured proves that trea
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature: Optical communication at record-high speedResearchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have set a new record for optical data transmission: As reported in Nature, the team exploits optical solitons circulating in silicon nitride microresonators to generate broadband optical frequency combs. Two such superimposed frequency combs enable massive parallel data transmission on 179 w
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A fish of all flavorsJapanese researchers achieve atomic resolution images of taste receptors in fish. The structure explains why so few receptors are sufficient to sense a nearly limitless variety of sweet and savory flavors. Because these receptors are shared across vertebrate species, including humans, the findings are expected to provide new insights on how humans ascertain different tastes.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From the somatic cell to the germ cellResearchers discover a regulatory pathway that changes the way cells divide in plants.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lost your appetite? Try inviting yourself to dinnerResearchers at Nagoya University discovered that when study participants ate alone, the food tasted better and they ate more if they could see themselves reflected in a mirror. This was true of both elderly and young adult participants. Perhaps surprisingly, a similar increase in the appeal of food was seen among elderly participants when the mirror was replaced with a photo.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research for an oil (palm) changeIn recent research, scientists have developed a technique that shows great promise for helping oil palm growers optimize production and reduce environmental impacts.The research, carried out by doctoral candidate Lenaic Pardon, focused on crop yield, nitrous oxide emissions and nitrogen leaching.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Observation of skyrmion breathing motion with X-ray techniqueDGIST-KIST collaborative research team identified the breathing movement of skyrmion, which up to now had only been theoretical. The future development of next generation communication devices with ultra-low power and ultra-high frequency based on skyrmion are expected.
23h
Viden
Overvågning af sociale netværk kan lære os om vira og søvnmønstreForskere har overvåget 1.000 studerendes mobiler. Det kan give os unik viden.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiji's commitment to marine managed areasThe Government of Fiji has made a commitment to gazette two large Marine Managed Areas (MMAs) within Fiji's Vatu-i-Ra Seascape—a highly diverse and productive area vital to both people and wildlife alike.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Automatic braking to be standard on top-selling NissansNissan plans to make automatic emergency braking standard on seven of 18 U.S. models for the 2018 model year, putting the safety feature on most of its top sellers.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian booster rocket puts US satellite in orbitA Russian Proton-M booster rocket carrying a U.S. communications satellite has lifted off, a successful launch after a year-long break caused by manufacturing flaws.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companion robots featured at Shanghai electronics showMore than 50 companies are showcasing a new generation of robots at this week's Shanghai CES electronics show, built to serve as companions at home, attendants at shopping malls or just provide entertainment.
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Dagens Medicin
Hjerteforsker fra Aalborg får ærespris Årets ærespris fra General Ernst Carlsens Fond går til professor Erik Berg Schmidt fra Aalborg Universitetshospital.
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Dagens Medicin
Behandling af hjertebørn viser store fremskridtNyt dansk studie viser, at korttidsoverlevelsen efter operation for medfødt hjertesygdom i Danmark nærmer sig 100 pct.
23h
The Atlantic
Bernie Sanders's Religious Test for Christians in Public Office Updated on June 8 at 11:40 a.m. Article VI of the U.S. Constitution states that “no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.” On Wednesday, Senator Bernie Sanders flirted with the boundaries of this rule during a confirmation hearing for Russell Vought, President Trump’s nominee for deputy director of the Office of Management
23h
The Atlantic
Are We Living in a Giant Cosmic Void? Don’t panic. Cosmic voids are actually all around us. Imagine an especially hole-y block of Swiss cheese, and you have a pretty good visual for the leading theory for the structure of the universe. Voids, vast expanses of nearly empty space, account for about 80 percent of the observable universe. The other stuff, like dust and stars and galaxies like the Milky Way, exists in thread-like filament
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Activists block logging in Poland's ancient forestActivists chained themselves to logging equipment in Poland's ancient Bialowieza forest on Thursday to stop authorities from felling trees in the UNESCO World Heritage site that is Europe's last primeval woodland.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For storing energy from renewable sources, scientists turn to antiferroelectrics(Phys.org)—One of the greatest challenges in generating energy from renewable sources is finding a way to store the continuously fluctuating energy being produced. Batteries, supercapacitors, and most other energy-storage technologies typically can't respond quickly enough to the second-by-second fluctuations inherent in wind and solar energy sources. One device that does have a sufficiently fast
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Control of material crystallization by agitationThe transition of unstructured amorphous materials into structured crystalline materials is generally induced by heating materials above their transition temperature. Crystalline materials are important in technology like devices, so alternative ways to control their formation has attracted much interest from materials scientists. Researchers have found that crystallization can be facilitated at a
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles and magnets offer new, efficient method of removing oil from waterWhen oil mixes with or enters into water, conventional methods of cleaning the water and removing the oil can be challenging, expensive and environmentally risky. But researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin believe they may have developed a better method.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Behavioral 'nudges' offer a cost-effective policy toolGovernments around the world have increasingly turned to behavioral science to help address various policy problems -- new research shows that some of the best-known strategies derived from behavioral science, commonly referred to as 'nudges,' may be extremely cost effective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea urchin protein provides insights into self-assembly of skeletal structuresCalcium carbonate combined with sea urchin proteins form tiny stacks of 'bricks' that creates a structure which provides a tough, exoskeleton defense for the sea creature. Researchers studying the protein may enable the development of tunable fracture resistant materials that one day will find its use in developing lightweight 'armor' and 'sturdier' dental composites.
23h
Ingeniøren
Politiker: Regeringen har forsøgt at maskere, hvad salget af vaccineproduktion har kostetEnhedslistens sundhedsordfører finder det dybt problematisk, at det er så godt som umuligt at få indsigt i grundlaget for salget af dele af Statens Serum Institut.
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Ingeniøren
Kronik: Vi må teste ozonering og aktivt kul til rens af spildevand Spildevand Vandmiljø
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The Scientist RSS
Study: Infants Brain Activity Patterns Predict Autism RiskScientists provide evidence that blood-flow patterns in six-month-old babies' brains can accurately predict cognitive and behavioral markers of autism spectrum disorder two years later.
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Futurity.org
To keep bees from disappearing, listen to their buzz An inexpensive acoustic listening system can monitor bees in flight using data from small microphones in the field. New research shows how farmers could use the technology to monitor pollination and increase food production. According to recent studies, declines in wild and managed bee populations threaten the pollination of flowers in more than 85 percent of flowering plants and 75 percent of ag
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New Scientist - News
Crumb-free bread will mean ISS astronauts can now bake in spaceBread has been banned in space for 50 years thanks to the dangers of free-floating crumbs – but specially designed ovens mean astronauts could soon ditch tortillas
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Gizmodo
Brazen Thief Uses Backhoe in Attempted ATM Burglary GIF Here’s the thing about ATMs: The machines are designed to take a pretty severe beating and still leave the box of cash out of a would-be thief’s reach. A Maryland man recently learned this lesson the hard way when he stole a backhoe, drove it five miles, and then attempted to excavate some cash out of an ATM. It didn’t work out so well. Police in Prince George’s County just released surveilla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Window to a watery past on MarsThis 70 km-wide crater and its surrounds offer a window into the watery past of the Red Planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Myanmar designates first marine areas protected by local fishing communitiesMyanmar Department of Fisheries celebrates World Oceans Day by designating Myanmar's first Locally Managed Marine Areas (LMMAs).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where will the next food production problem occur?A new early warning system detecting agricultural production anomaly hotspots was launched at the European Development Days on the 8 June 2017 in Brussels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The role of the protein Rrm3 in the repair of breaks in DNA during replicationA research group from the University of Seville has revealed the role that the protein Rrm3 plays in the repair of breaks that occur during the replication of DNA, by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. This protein belongs to the human protein family PIF1, the mutations of which are known to be associated with a higher risk of tumorigenesis. This opens the possibility th
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growth mechanism of fungi decodedFungi grow with tubular cells extending by kilometers. Growth takes place exclusively at the tip. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now found out how this works: Construction materials are transported on rails through the fungal cells and used at their outermost tip. Calcium concentration at the end of the cell defines when this happens. This is reported by the scientists
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach in T-cell therapy to treat cancerScientists have armed immune cells with a new surface molecule. This causes the cells to respond particularly aggressively when they encounter a protein that tumors actually use to camouflage themselves from the immune system. Researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and various partners introduced the method in 'Cancer Research.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Control of material crystallization by agitationResearch team finds that oscillation of materials at a specific frequency markedly accelerates their crystallization.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthetic nanochannels for iodide transportIodide channels have the potential to treat thyroid diseases and some types of cancers.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kidney graft success -- does age and sex matter?A new study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre revealed that young women had poorer transplant outcomes compared to young men, whereas women of post-menopausal age had similar or slightly better outcomes than men of the same age. This finding opens the door to a new approach for organ transplantation, and could lead to personalized immunosuppression strategies bas
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mind changing can be riskyWhen leaders use a moral argument rather than a pragmatic one as the basis for a position, they may be judged harshly if they change that position later. They are perceived as hypocrites, less effective and less worthy of future support, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are wealthier people more likely to receive a diagnosis of cancer?Do wealthier people receive too much medical care? The Dartmouth Institute's H. Gilbert Welch, M.D., and Elliott Fisher, M.D., examined incidence and mortality trends for four types of cancers: breast cancer, prostate cancer, thyroid cancer and melanoma. They then compared incidence and mortality of the four cancers in high- vs. low-income counties and found that high-income counties have recorded
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineering a new cancer detection toolE. coli may have potentially harmful effects but scientists in Australia have discovered this bacterium produces a toxin which binds to an unusual sugar that is part of carbohydrate structures present on cells not usually produced by healthy cells. This structure is a known tumor antigen leading scientists to develop a new cancer detection tool.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monkey see, monkey do, depending on age, experience and efficiencyWild capuchin monkeys readily learn skills from each other -- but that social learning is driven home by the payoff of learning a useful new skill.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review of appendix cancer cases finds over diagnosisLesions of the appendix are being over diagnosed as invasive cancer, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers in a paper published June 7 in the journal PLOS ONE.
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The Atlantic
The Student Who Pushed Me to Anger—and Understanding This is the second installment in an audio series called What My Students Taught Me, which features teachers reflecting on one of their most challenging students—counterbalanced by the student’s version of the same events. Listen to the first installment here . CHICAGO—With 18 years of teaching under his belt, Ray Salazar thought he had mastered classroom management. But a boisterous high-school
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The Atlantic
U.K. Votes in Pivotal Elections Voters in the U.K. are deciding Thursday the composition of their Parliament, a pivotal choice that will determine who forms the next government. Most polls suggest the center-right Conservatives, headed by Prime Minister Theresa May, will emerge the biggest party, though its 21-point lead over the opposition center-left Labour Party has fallen in the run up to the June 8 vote. Still, the Tories,
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Popular Science
13 genius items for your next big road trip Gadgets Gear for the long haul. Road trip gear for the good kind of road rage. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why Do Allergies Make You Sneeze?Do you suffer from allergies? Follow the dendritic cell and the entire Scientific American Allergy Orchestra to discover how allergens from pollen to pet dander can change the body's tune. This... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chad is the country most vulnerable to climate change – here's whyOf the 186 countries assessed in a recent survey of climate vulnerability, Chad was rated most in peril. A combination of high poverty, frequent conflicts, and the risk of both droughts and floods means the central African nation is bottom of the list, just below Bangladesh and some way behind Norway, the country least vulnerable to climate change.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Renewables provide more than half UK electricity for first timeThe National Grid says alternative fuel generated more electricity than coal and gas in the UK on Wednesday.
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsstyrelsen anbefaler midler til hudlidelserNye anbefalinger for valg af lægemidler til behandling af børnesår og hudlidelsen aktinisk keratose skal støtte læger i almen praksis.
23h
Gizmodo
A Few Wonder Woman Favorites Will Return for Justice League Ant-Man and The Wasp casts a mysterious “key” role. Donald Glover discusses playing Lando in the Han Solo spinoff. Stranger Things reveals Sean Astin’s new character. Plus, even more Transformers footage, teases of a special regeneration on Doctor Who , and more! Spoilers get! Justice League Wonderful news! Robin Wright and Connie Nielsen have confirmed to the LA Times Hippolyta and Antiope will
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence's potential impacts raise promising possibilities, societal challengesInterest in artificial intelligence has exploded, with some predicting that machines will take over and others optimistically hoping that people will be freed up to explore creative pursuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two more satellites join Galileo working constellationTwo further satellites have formally become part of Europe's Galileo satnav system, broadcasting timing and navigation signals worldwide while also picking up distress calls across the planet.
23h
Ingeniøren
Ny hybridteknologi giver bedre saltkraftAmerikanske forskere har udviklet en ny hybridteknologi, der løser et af de store problemer, der har stået i vejen for udviklingen af saltkraft - 'den tredje vedvarende energiform'.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles and magnets offer new, efficient method of removing oil from waterIn a study published this spring in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, engineering researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet. The engineers believe their new technique could improve water treatment for oil and gas production, more efficiently clean up oil spills and potentially remove lead from dri
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how a hormone increases sucrose accumulation in sugarcaneA group of researchers at the University of Campinas's Biology Institute (IB-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, in collaboration with colleagues at the Agronomy Institute (IAC) and at the University of São Paulo's Chemistry Institute (IQ-USP), have discovered how chemical ripeners, which are analogous to plant hormones, act on the molecular level in sugarcane to increase sucrose storage in the plant.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
An AI That Knows the World Like Children DoArtificial intelligence has staged a revival by starting to incorporate what we know about how children learn -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ravens found able to remember people who tricked them up to two months later(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from Austria and Sweden has found that ravens are able to remember people who trick them for at least two months. In their paper published in the journal Animal Behavior, the group describes experiments they conducted with the birds and offer some suggestions regarding how the behavior they observed might be useful to the birds in the wild.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy leads to long-term benefits in dog model of devastating childhood diseaseResearchers who previously showed that a gene therapy treatment could save the lives of dogs with a deadly disease called myotubular myopathy -- a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the skeletal muscles -- have found that the therapy is long-lasting. The results support a clinical trial in patients.
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Science | The Guardian
#WorldOceansDay: vaquita porpoises are fast dying out - can a radical rescue plan save them? It’s World Ocean Day, so spare a thought for the vaquita – by the end of 2017, there could be just 15 of these small porpoises left In a few months, conservationists will converge on the Gulf of California in a last-ditch effort to save the vaquita from extinction, a species of tiny porpoise. The scientists face an unprecedented challenge: to bring as many vaquita into captivity as possible. When
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Gizmodo
Add Powerful USB Charging Ports To Your Wall Outlets For $16 Each TOPGREENER 15-Amp USB Charger Receptacle , $16 with code RLFQ6HCT These days, you probably charge as many things over USB as you do over standard AC outlets, so it only makes sense to add some semi-permanent USB ports to your home. Today on Amazon, you can get highly-rated duplex receptacles with a pair of USB ports for $16 each with promo code RLFQ6HCT. That’s one of the best prices we’ve ever s
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Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet har strengere regler for habilitet end NICE og EMA De nye strammere regler for at sidde med i Medicinrådet truer efteruddannelsen af læger herhjemme, advarer LIF. Medicinrådet afviser, at der er et problem.
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Science : NPR
315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens Scientists who found the fossils believe they are the remains of five people and far older than all previous finds. But how do the remains really fit into the bushy family tree of modern humans? (Image credit: Shannon McPherron/Nature)
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The Atlantic
Trump Needs an Intervention The District of Columbia—and much of the rest of America—will grind to a halt on Thursday when fired FBI director James Comey takes the stand to testify before the U.S. Senate. Comey’s testimony —and, more importantly, the investigation being led by special counsel Robert Mueller—will cast a shadow over this presidency and its prospects for success. But for me, this past fortnight has been the mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests mid-mantle holds as much water as Earth's oceans(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan and Germany has found evidence that suggests the middle of Earth's mantle holds as much water as the planet's oceans. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their theory and their experiments to try to prove them correct.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fabric phase sorptive extraction for cheaper, faster, and more sensitive biological and environmental samplingA new method developed at FIU makes toxicological, biological and environmental sampling and testing cheaper, faster, and more sensitive. The new technology, which has been independently validated, promises to disrupt a multi-billion-dollar industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists discovered how the viper venom worksRussian scientists report that the enzyme phospholipase A2 from the Vipera nikolskii venom is able to adhere to lipid membranes and cause their aggregation, even if the activity of the enzyme is specifically blocked. This is due to the presence of two binding sites in the enzyme structure. Published in the journal Toxicon, the results help to understand how multicomponent snake venoms work.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fishes Use Problem-Solving and Invent ToolsSome fish species turn out to be very good problem solvers. At times they even use tools -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:Pretty ProhormoneOnce it's cleaved, the protein precursor pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gives rise to hormones involved in appetite, arousal, pleasure, and more.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Motion efter indlæring får børn til at huske bedreEn ny undersøgelse fra Københavns Universitet viser, at motion, lige efter en læringssituation...
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The Atlantic
The Mummy Is a Monstrous Flop Nick Morton (Tom Cruise), the dashing hero of Alex Kurtzman’s preposterous extravaganza The Mummy , is a virile fortune hunter, the kind of roustabout who shoots first, asks questions later, and always gets the girl. He’s the kind of scoundrel who steals a treasure map from a winsome scientist (Jenny Halsey, played by Annabelle Wallis) after a passionate night together, which he uses to discover
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's holding up the blockchain?It's not technology or regulation holding back the blockchain—software that stores and transfers value or data across the internet—we just haven't figured out the next big use case. Two reports released this week by the CSIRO's Data61 not only inject some well-researched gravitas into the conversation, they also provide insight into why some of the major blockchain projects have stalled.
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Futurity.org
Breast cancer and drinking may be linked for black women Black women who drink more than 14 alcoholic drinks per week have a significantly higher risk of invasive breast cancer than those who drink less, a new study suggests. The findings confirmed the link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk, which has been seen in other studies drawn from majority white populations. And while some breast cancer risk factors—like age or genetics—aren’t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No, palm oil is not responsible for 40% of global deforestationA little over a month ago, Indonesia's Environment and Forestry Ministry sought to extend a moratorium on issuing new licenses for using forest and peatland in the country for two years.
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WIRED
Father’s Day Gift Ideas: Spoil Your Dad This Father’s Day With These 15 Great Gifts Father's Day is coming up on Sunday, June 18. The post Father's Day Gift Ideas: Spoil Your Dad This Father's Day With These 15 Great Gifts appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
Taking aspirin for your arteries might not work A new study shows that aspirin, used for decades to reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems, may provide little or no benefit for certain patients who have plaque buildup in their arteries. Researchers tracked the health histories of over 33,000 patients with atherosclerosis—narrowed, hardened arteries—and determined that aspirin is only marginally beneficial for those who have had a previous
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why is climate change such a hard sell in the US?President Donald Trump on June 1 took the dramatic step of removing the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement – the product of many years of diligent and difficult negotiation among 175 nations around the world. Recent polls reveal that six in 10 Americans oppose Trump's move. However, a significant portion of climate skeptics remain – especially among Trump's base and the Republican politicians w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ingredient of life found around infant Sun-like starsALMA has observed stars like the Sun at a very early stage in their formation and found traces of methyl isocyanate -- a chemical building block of life. This is the first ever detection of this prebiotic molecule towards solar-type protostars, the sort from which our Solar System evolved. The discovery could help astronomers understand how life arose on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Six things every consumer should know about the 'Internet of Things'At least 40% of Australian households now have at least one home "Internet of Things" device. These are fridges, window blinds, locks and other devices that are connected to the internet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is a 'low emissions target' and how would it work?The main job of the Finkel Review, to be released this week, is to set out ways to reform the National Electricity Market (NEM) to ensure it delivers reliable and affordable power in the transition to low-carbon energy. Yet most of the attention has been focused on what type of carbon-reduction scheme Australia's chief scientist, Alan Finkel, will recommend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel electrode materials have designed pathways for electrons and ions during the charge/discharge cycleElectrodes are critical parts of every battery architecture – charge too fast, and you can decrease the charge-discharge cycle life or damage the battery so it won't charge anymore. Scientists built a new design and chemistry for electrodes. Their design involves advanced, nanostructured electrodes containing molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanofibers. These composite materials have internal atomi
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Live Science
Victorians Missed Key Dental Detail in 1st Dinosaur Ever NamedWhen William Buckland described the first-named dinosaur, Megalosaurus, in 1824, he missed teeth hidden in the dinosaur's jaw, researchers have uncovered.
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The Atlantic
Comey: ‘I Was Fired Because of the Russia Investigation’ James Comey, the former FBI director whose sudden ouster last month by President Trump sparked a political crisis for his administration, testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. Senators questioned Comey about the circumstances surrounding his dismissal, his discussions with Trump about ongoing investigations, and about the FBI’s Russia probe. Here are some highlights from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Well-packed organic glass better resists changes when exposed to lightFor materials in solar cells, cell phones, and other devices, the material should not change in undesirable ways when exposed to sunlight. Scientists determined how two glasses with the same composition but different fabrication processes behaved when exposed to light. Each glass had a carbon-based chemical composition. Vapor-deposited organic glass, where constituents were vaporized and combined
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Support Renewable Energy (and Why You Really Should)How can you support renewable energy? Plus, why you should -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
The Long History of the Shia-Sunni DivideThe strike in Iran once again exposes the centuries-old sectarian Shia-Sunni divide. What is at the heart of this schism?
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Ars Technica
Task force tells Congress health IT security is in critical condition Health IT's security problems run deep. (credit: Sean Gallagher) A congressionally mandated healthcare industry task force has published the findings of its investigation into the state of health information systems security, and the diagnosis is dire. The Health Care Industry Cybersecurity Task Force report (PDF), published on June 1, warns that all aspects of health IT security are in critical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rough surfaces provide additional sites for energy-generating reactions in fuel cellsFuel cells make electricity through chemical reactions. A key reaction is combining oxygen with hydrogen to make water while releasing energy in the form of electrons. The rate of this conversion is typically slow. It requires the presence of a catalyst such as platinum. In this research, a team developed a leaching process to produce ultrafine jagged platinum nanowires. The wires have with extrao
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device design allows ten-fold increase in spin currentsAn electron carries electrical charge and spin that gives rise to a magnetic moment and can therefore interact with external magnetic fields. Conventional electronics are based on the charge of the electron. The emerging field of spintronics aims to exploit the spin of the electron. Using spins as elementary units in computing and highly efficient electronics is the ultimate goal of spintronic sci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A fish of all flavoursReceptors are how the body senses its environment. Upon the binding of a ligand, a receptor will initiate a chain of events that elicits a response. Our olfactory system depends on approximately 400 receptors to give us our sense of smell. Taste, however, operates with a much smaller number: The combination of only three members of the taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family can detect a wide range of
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Ars Technica
Einstein still annoyingly right as researchers weigh white dwarf Enlarge (credit: NASA ) A key feature of scientific theories is that they make successful predictions, which we can use to determine whether they're likely to be right. For general relativity, one of its key predictions had to wait for an eclipse of the Sun. Relativity predicted that the mass of the Sun should distort space enough to bend the light arriving from distant stars. We needed an eclips
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a regulatory pathway that changes the way cells divide in plantsAn international scientific consortium including the Freiburg plant biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux has discovered a regulatory pathway that turns plants' ordinary somatic cells into germ cells for sexual reproduction. The researchers recently published their findings in the scientific journal Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthetic nanochannels for iodide transportExchange of iodide (iodine ions) between bloodstream and cells is crucial for the health of several organs and its malfunctioning is linked to goiter, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, breast cancer, and gastric cancer. Researchers at the Center for Self-Assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have devised nanostructures that function as channels for iodide transport in cell
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
These rapidly reproducing critters offer evolutionary insightsIt may not be obvious on casual glance, but bugs – flies, beetles, roaches – are constantly changing. In fact, they are masters of adaptation, always modifying their genes to adapt to the changes that occur to the environments in which they live.
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Live Science
In First, Einstein Relativity Experiment Used to Measure a Star's MassA phenomenon first predicted by Albert Einstein has been used for the first time to measure the mass of an individual star. The finding has helped settled a century-old dispute.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Your own virtual heart for non-invasive heart diagnosticsEPFL mathematician Alfio Quarteroni and his team are building a virtual heart model based on personalized medical images that may one day help cardiologists and cardiac surgeons non-invasively diagnose pathological heart conditions. The team recently modeled and simulated the behavior of a patient's aortic valve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New driving-simulator lab accelerates research into driver behavior and vehicle technologyYou've driven a car a million times, so nothing here should be too different. Just climb into the Acura, buckle up, throw it in "drive" and stomp on the gas.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
It’s best if babies don’t drink their fruit as juiceNew guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend no fruit juice for babies younger than 1 year old.
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Ingeniøren
Say Cheese! Nasas nye kuld astronauter præsenteret med fælles tandpastasmilNasa henter astronaut-elever hos SpaceX, MIT, Caltech og militæret. Og de har mindst en anden ting til fælles - udover at være kommet gennem nåleøjet ...
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Ingeniøren
Klimaforandringer koster kassen: Varme-ø-effekt vil ramme storbyerne hårdere end forventetVores byer holder så godt på varmen, at konsekvenserne og omkostningerne ved klimaændringerne bliver endnu større end hidtil antaget, viser nye beregninger. Hvidmalede tage og varmereflekterende belægninger kan være en del af løsningen.
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Ingeniøren
Denne bus genopliver en næsten 120 år gammel teknologiFlydende nitrogen skal reducere udledning af CO2 fra bustrafikken.
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Scientific American Content: Global
California, Watch Out: The Invasive Coqui Frog Is ComingThe voracious, cacophonous amphibian has already disrupted the ecosystem of Hawaii's Big Island; now it's got a foothold in the Golden State -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
2017 Audi R8 V10 plus: The best junior supercar we’ve tested Jonathan Gitlin Back in 2015, we spent a few very memorable days with Audi's first-generation R8 V10 plus . Built on the bones of the Lamborghini Gallardo—Audi bought the company in 1998 for $110 million—it refined the lairy Italian wedge into something a little more German. In essence, the R8 was Audi's answer to cousin Porsche's 911 Turbo, a 200mph supercar you could drive every day. But that R
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Scientific American Content: Global
Plastic-Eating Worms Could Inspire Waste-Degrading ToolsWax moth larvae can consume and degrade polyethylene at an impressive rate -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
Studerende lader sig frivilligt overvåge1000 studerende har ladet sig overvåge i tre år. Det giver forskere unik viden om sociale netværk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teaming nature and technology for climate solutionsOne corner of the Omani desert is blanketed by a type of rock with an unquenchable thirst for a colorless and odorless gas vital to life on Earth. That gas is CO2, and when it reacts with peridotite, a rock abundant in the Earth's mantle, it's soaked up, forming a solid carbonate similar to limestone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern European genes may favor vegetarianismA Cornell study, published May 26 in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, describes how shifts in diets in Europeans after the introduction of farming 10,000 years ago led to genetic adaptations that favored the dietary trends of the time.
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Ars Technica
HTC U11 review: A fragile, squeezable flagship Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) HTC introduced the "U" smartphone line back in January with the U Ultra and U Play handsets, and those were just a taste of what the company had coming. The U11 is HTC's newest flagship and follow-up to last year's HTC 10, and it looks significantly different from last year's device. With an all-glass back and no headphone jack, the U11 chooses whi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lost ecosystem found buried in mud of southern California coastal watersPaleontologists investigating the sea bed off the coast of southern California have discovered a lost ecosystem that for thousands of years had nurtured communities of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monkey see, monkey do, depending on age, experience and efficiencyWild capuchin monkeys readily learn skills from each other—but that social learning is driven home by the payoff of learning a useful new skill. It's the first demonstration of "payoff bias" learning in a wild animal, and could inform whether and how animals can adapt to rapidly changing conditions, for example due to climate change or reintroduction of species from captive breeding.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Rover test in darknessESA's Rover Autonomy Testbed rover is being run in near darkness by Spain's GMV company to simulate the low Sun angles experienced at the Moon's poles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Similarities in human and pig embryos provide clues to early stages of developmentScientists have shown how the precursors of egg and sperm cells – the cells that are key to the preservation of a species – arise in the early embryo by studying pig embryos alongside human stem cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging technique shows molecular machinery at workNew imaging methods that allow researchers to track the individual protein molecules on the surface of cells have been developed by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. The results offer unprecedented insight into how cells sense and respond to their environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organic compound found in early stages of star formationScientists seeking to understand the origins of life have found a new organic compound in the material from which a star like the Sun is forming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALMA finds ingredient of life around infant Sun-like starsALMA has observed stars like the Sun at a very early stage in their formation and found traces of methyl isocyanate -- a chemical building block of life. This is the first ever detection of this prebiotic molecule towards solar-type protostars, the sort from which our Solar System evolved. The discovery could help astronomers understand how life arose on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SLAC particle physicist discusses the search for new physicsThe Standard Model of particle physics describes the properties and interactions of the constituents of matter. The development of this theory began in the early 1960s, and in 2012 the last piece of the puzzle was solved by the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland. Experiments have confirmed time and again the Standard Model's very accurate predict
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optical communication at record-high speed via soliton frequency combs generated in optical microresonatorsOptical solitons are special wave packages that propagate without changing their shape. In optical communications, solitons can be used for generating frequency combs with various spectral lines, which allow to realize particularly efficient and compact high-capacity optical communication systems. This was demonstrated recently by researchers from KIT's Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electroni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social support more important to mothersFor mothers who feel that they are not in control of certain aspects of life and who are struggling with their relationship to their teenage children, social support may make a great difference. But the same does not seem to apply to fathers in the same situation, a new study published in Family Process shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI gets so-so grade in Chinese university entrance examAn AI machine has taken the maths section of China's annual university entrance exam, finishing it faster than students but with a below average grade.
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The Atlantic
What Did Mike Pompeo Do? Mike Pompeo, the director of the Central Intelligence Agency, was in the room with Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats in March when President Trump complained about then-FBI Director James Comey’s handling of the investigation into Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser, The Washington Post reported Tuesday . Coats, the Post reported , later told subordinates that the pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI 'good for the world'... says ultra-lifelike robotSophia smiles mischievously, bats her eyelids and tells a joke. Without the mess of cables that make up the back of her head, you could almost mistake her for a human.
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Dagens Medicin
Portører nedlægger arbejdet200 portører har nedlagt arbejdet på Sjælland, fordi de føler sig pressede til at tage en serviceassistentuddannelse
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Gizmodo
How to Watch James Comey's Testimony About President Trump, No Cable Required (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) President Trump fired James Comey as FBI Director on May 9th. Ever since, the American people have been wondering what Comey knows about the Trump regime and its possible collusion with Russia. Today we finally get some answers. And thankfully there are a lot of ways to watch online. Comey’s testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee is scheduled to start
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ALMA finds ingredient of life around infant Sun-like starsTwo teams of astronomers have harnessed the power of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile to detect the prebiotic complex organic molecule methyl isocyanate in the multiple star system IRAS 16293-2422. One team was co-led by Rafael Martín-Doménech at the Centro de Astrobiología in Madrid, Spain, and Víctor M. Rivilla, at the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in Floren
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Ingeniøren
Ny it-fiasko hos Skat koster borgerne over 70 millioner Skats nye system eKapital giver så mange problemer, at det både kræver flere penge og mere tålmodighed fra borgerne. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ny-it-fiasko-hos-skat-koster-borgerne-70-millioner-1077383 Version2
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NYT > Science
Digging the Graveyard of Oil’s PastAs the energy industry evolves, production platforms in the North Sea, once a crucial source of crude oil, are being dismantled and sold for scrap.
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The Neurocritic
Terrorism and the Implicit Association Test Induced Stereotyping? Imagine that you're riding on a very crowded bus in a busy urban area in the US. You get on during a shift change, when a new driver takes over for the old one. The new driver appears to be Middle Eastern, and for a second you have a fleeting reaction that the situation might become dangerous. This is embarrassing and ridiculous, you think. You hate that the thought even cro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ballistic shockwave sensor is tool in fight against elephant poachers doing record-level damageKenyan elephants will get more protection from poachers thanks to new Vanderbilt University technology embedded in their tracking collars—ballistic shockwave sensors that send coordinates to authorities immediately after detecting gunshots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
App targets 'word gap' in Hispanic childrenBy age three, children from low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those from higher-income families. This "word gap" widens over time and can have serious consequences for a child's language proficiency, academic performance and, ultimately, career success.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facile decomposition of metal-NHC complexes under catalytic conditions and the key role of NHC-stabilized nanoparticlesMetal complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands (NHC ligands) have been successfully used in a number of catalytic reactions. High stability of metal-NHC complexes and convenient synthesis of well-defined catalyst precursors are valuable advantages for practical applications. Strong metal-ligand binding and high stability of metal-NHC complexes under catalytic conditions have been widely as
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The Atlantic
There's No Such Thing as 'Honest Loyalty' The way James Comey describes it in his statement to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, you can easily imagine the movie. On January 27, Donald Trump invites Comey over for dinner. Expecting there will be others, Comey is unnerved when he realizes that he and the new president are dining alone. Worried that Trump is trying to “create some sort of patronage relationship,” Comey makes a p
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Ingeniøren
Robot sorterer plastaffald i Holstebro - men olieprisen forhindrer dens succesAffaldsselskab i Holstebro har løst den svære opgave med at få robotter til at gribe og sortere det værdifulde plastaffald. Virksomhederne bag håber, at teknologien kan blive en forretnings­succes, men lige nu er den lave oliepris en forhindring.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making vessels leaky on demand could aid drug deliveryScientists use magnets and nanoparticles to cause 'leaks' in blood vessels on demand. The technique could help in the delivery of therapeutics to targeted areas in the body, including deep tissues and organs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigational vaccine protected monkeys from HIV-like virusBuilding on insights from an HIV vaccine regimen in humans that had partial success during a phase 3 clinical trial in Thailand, a Duke-led research team used a more-is-better approach in monkeys that appeared to improve vaccine protection from an HIV-like virus.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Monster' rocket 'selfie' delights IndiaOnboard footage from the Indian space agency's 640-tonne rocket has been widely shared on Twitter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coal waste fuel may reduce anthropogenic emissions, study revealsScientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a technology for obtaining liquid fuel from coal wastes for thermal power stations (TPSs). This fuel is 10 times more environmentally friendly and resolves two problems at once: reducing the amount of anthropogenic emissions of TPSs and efficiently disposing of wastes from coal processing and beneficiation. The research team of the Depart
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The Atlantic
The Scandal Is What's Already Known “Many secrets; no mysteries.” That phrase (coined by Luigi Barzini if you’re keeping score) has been the key to understanding the connection between President Trump and Russia from the start. It unlocks the matter even more crisply after today. Between former FBI Director James Comey’s advance-released testimony—and the agonizing non-testimony of the director of the National Security Agency and t
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Objective truth ‘only hope' of democracyNeil deGrasse Tyson challenges the treatment of science in the Trump administration
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BBC News - Science & Environment
British ice station on the moveThe Halley VI Research Station was moved more than 20km across the ice sheet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do Americans own handguns? Fear of crime and a broader sense of dangerThe motivation to own a handgun for self-protection is not just about fear of crime, according to the model proposed by Wolfgang Stroebe and Pontus Leander (University of Groningen, The Netherlands), and Arie W. Kruglanski (University of Maryland), it is also about a more general sense of threat emanating from "the belief that the world is an unpredictable and dangerous place and that society is a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making vessels leaky on demand could aid drug deliveryThe endothelial cells that line blood vessels are packed tightly to keep blood inside and flowing, but scientists at Rice University and their colleagues have discovered it may be possible to selectively open gaps in those barriers just enough to let large molecules through—and then close them again.
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Dagens Medicin
Watson gør det hurtigere at finde egnede deltagere til kliniske kræftstudier IBM’s kognitive computer Watson for Oncology, der bruges i forbindelse med kræftdiagnosticering og kræftforskning, optimerer kræftstudier, viser nye undersøgelser, der blev præsenteret på ASCO 2017.
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Dagens Medicin
12 læger er for første gang med i Blå Bog Kraks Blå Bog over prominente danskere er udkommet for 108. gang, og i år er der blandt andet blevet plads til 12 ekstra læger.
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Ingeniøren
Teleselskaber og politikere lægger arm om millioner over sommerenEt nyt teleforlig skal være med til at afgøre hvordan fremtidens bredbånd og mobildækning bliver i Danmark. Politikere og selskaber diskuterer først og fremmest, hvor pengene til bedre dækning og nye teknologier skal komme fra.
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Science : NPR
Invisibilia: Should Wild Bears Be Feared Or Befriended? A photographer who walks deep into the woods in search of a wild bear wonders if his curiosity will overcome his fear. Can bears and humans co-exist? (Image credit: Derek Montgomery for NPR)
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Science : NPR
Learn To Sniff Like A Dog And Experience The World In A New Way We humans think we don't have a very good sense of smell. But psychologist Alexandra Horowitz says dogs can show us how to train our noses so they give us a window into a secret world. (Image credit: Vegar Abelsnes/ Courtesy of Alexandra Horowitz)
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Wingsuit pilot Fraser Corsan 'breaks speed record'A British man is thought to have broken the World Record for greatest peak speed flown in a wingsuit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do Americans own handguns? Fear of crime and a broader sense of dangerNew psychological theoretical framework suggest US handgun ownership motivated by combination of fear of crime and a general sense that the world is an unpredictable dangerous place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some states review election systems for signs of intrusionOfficials in some states are trying to figure out whether local election offices were targeted in an apparent effort by Russian military intelligence to hack into election software last fall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Call of the wild: acoustic Localization of Bryde's whale calls yields insights into their behaviorResearchers at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) have recorded a Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) call for the first time from the Hawaiian Islands, which appears to be similar to a Bryde's whale call produced throughout the Pacific Ocean. The team was able to track the whales based on acoustic localization of their calls, and found that Bryde's whales travel faste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts, Microsoft push for global NGO to expose hackersAs cyberattacks sow ever greater chaos worldwide, IT titan Microsoft and independent experts are pushing for a new global NGO tasked with the tricky job of unmasking the hackers behind them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ailing white tiger put down in Singapore ZooA rare white tiger involved in the 2008 killing of a zoo worker has been put down after suffering from skin cancer and joint degeneration, the Singapore Zoo said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US official backs clean energy cooperation with ChinaUS Energy Secretary Rick Perry called for Sino-US cooperation on clean energy during a visit to Beijing Thursday, a week after President Donald Trump's much-criticised withdrawal from the Paris climate pact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian rocket returns to service with launch of US satelliteRussia on Thursday sent into space a Proton rocket carrying a US telecom satellite, Echostar-21, the first launch in a year after an engine glitch sparked a probe into manufacturing flaws.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
S. Korea's ex-health minister guilty of swaying Samsung voteSouth Korea's former health minister was convicted on Thursday of pressuring the country's pension fund to support a controversial Samsung merger, in one of the first rulings on key players in the corruption scandals that ensnared the country's ousted president and Samsung's heir.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese Apple staff suspected of selling private dataChinese authorities say they have uncovered a massive underground operation run by Apple employees selling computer and phone users' personal data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DiCaprio, Mexico in push to save vaquita porpoiseHollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto agreed Wednesday to increase efforts to save the vaquita marina porpoise, burying the hatchet in a Twitter feud over the endangered species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Aztec temple, ball court found in Mexico CityA giant temple to the Aztec god of the wind and a court where the Aztecs played a deadly ball game have been discovered in the heart of Mexico City.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unprofitable subsidiaries becoming new tax haven for multinational corporationsMultinational corporations are moving income from their profitable, high-tax subsidiaries into unprofitable ones to save money on taxes, a University of Waterloo study has found.
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The Atlantic
The Brexit Election That Wasn't At the heart of Britain’s election, there is an absence. In a campaign which has been knocked sideways by terrorist violence, cack-handed U.S. presidential interventions, and some extraordinary acts of political self-harm, it is the one true constant: No one says anything meaningful about Brexit. From outside the U.K., it seems absurd. In under two years’ time, unless the government can secure a
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Science | The Guardian
'Miracle' hepatitis C drugs costing £30k per patient 'may have no clinical effect' Review concludes drugs hailed as cure for potentially fatal liver disease may clear virus from blood, but there is no evidence they prevent harm or save lives Drugs that have been hailed as a cure for a debilitating and sometimes fatal liver disease – but have threatened to break the health budgets of most countries because of their cost – have not been proven to have any effect, according to a n
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Science-Based Medicine
What naturopaths really wantNaturopaths want the same scope of practice as MDs and DOs, allowing them to make important medico-legal judgments that put life, liberty and property at risk.
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Ingeniøren
McKinsey kulegraver, om flere dele af Statens Serum Institut skal nedlæggesRETTET: Finans- og Sundhedsministerierne har bestilt McKinsey-konsulenter til at endevende, hvilke opgaver Statens Serum Institut fremover skal have lov til at løse. Imens er der ansættelsstop og fyringsrunde.
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Ingeniøren
Nyt boligregister giver mere retfærdig ejendomsskat gennem bedre datatjek Første opdatering af Bygnings- og Boligregisteret siden 2009 giver højere datakvalitet ved hjælp af regelmotor. Det kan medvirke til mere retfærdig ejendomsskat. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyt-boligregister-skal-give-mere-retfaerdig-ejendomsskat-gennem-bedre-datatjek-1077360 Version2
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The Atlantic
North Korea Test-Fires Four New Missiles North Korea conducted yet another missile test on Thursday, this time firing four surface-to-ship cruise missiles into water near the Korean Peninsula, U.S. and South Korean military officials announced. Thursday’s launch marks the nation’s tenth missile test this year—including a failed, seconds-long launch in March—and the first since North Korea incurred a new round of sanctions last week from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavioral 'nudges' offer a cost-effective policy toolGovernments around the world have increasingly turned to behavioral science to help address various policy problems -- new research shows that some of the best-known strategies derived from behavioral science, commonly referred to as 'nudges,' may be extremely cost effective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unprofitable subsidiaries becoming new tax haven for multinational corporationsMultinational corporations are moving income from their profitable, high-tax subsidiaries into unprofitable ones to save money on taxes.
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Gizmodo
Apple's Upgrades to Location and Photo Privacy Features Are Pretty Great Photo: Getty Apple is making changes to the way apps get information about users’ location and photos, giving users more control over what data they share and when they share it. These are the changes that are coming in iOS 11: all apps that use location data will be required to offer an “only when using” option, instead of just “always” and “never.” (Uber was criticized last year for removing th
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The Scientist RSS
Scientists Uncover Oldest Homo sapiens Fossils to DateThe new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.
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Dagens Medicin
Kemoterapi direkte i maven forlænger livet for patienter med kræft i bughinden Kræftpatienter med spredt sygdom til bughinden har dårlig overlevelse, da behandling med konventionel kemoterapi har begrænset effekt. Men en ny teknik, hvor kemoterapien forstøves direkte ind i bughulen, har vist sig at forlænge patienternes liv betydeligt.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Blood from the Sky: Zipline’s Ambitious Medical Drone Delivery in AfricaIn Rwanda, an early commercial test of unmanned aerial vehicles cuts a medical facility’s time to procure blood from four hours to 15 minutes.
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Ingeniøren
Et hurtigt tip, der kan gøre en vigtig forskel i jobsøgningen Konkurrencen er benhård om de bedste job, så derfor gælder det om at levere på alle planer i forbindelse med jobsøgningen. Her er et hurtigt tip, der kan give dig en afgørende forskel. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/hurtigt-tip-kan-goere-vigtig-forskel-jobsoegningen-7648 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo
Russian Hackers Testing Malware With Britney Spears's Instagram Photo: Getty In an impressive bit of cyber-sleuthing, security researchers have discovered that a nasty piece of malware was being tested by a Russian-speaking hacker group and it was using the comment section of Britney Spears’s Instagram as a way to call home. Turla is a hacking group that specializes in using malware for the purposes of espionage. The fancy name for the collective is an advanc
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The Atlantic
Tensions Heat Up Ahead of U.K. General Election Candidates for Thursday’s general election in the U.K. made their final appeals to voters on Wednesday, emphasizing their varying approaches to the economy, Brexit, and national security. As of last month, current Prime Minister Theresa May was widely favored to win the snap election, which she commissioned three years ahead of schedule, hoping to ensure a conservative majority in parliament ahea
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Gizmodo
Why Kushner's Russian 'Back Channel' Looks Dirty As Hell Graphic credit Jason Torchinsky In the world of U.S. diplomacy, back channels of communication between governments exist for various reasons . But they are more regulated than you may think. Though, it appears that President Trump’s son-in-law ’s meeting with the Russian ambassador at Trump Tower was anything but regulated. And his actions weren’t just suspicious to the average person. Experts wh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small climb in mean temperatures linked to far higher chance of deadly heat wavesAn increase in mean temperature of 0.5 degrees Celsius over half a century may not seem all that serious, but it's enough to have more than doubled the probability of a heat wave killing in excess of 100 people in India, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bee buzzes could help determine how to save their decreasing populationWidespread and effective monitoring of bees could lead to better management of populations; however, tracking bees is tricky and costly. Now, a research team has developed an inexpensive acoustic listening system using data from small microphones in the field to monitor bees in flight. The study shows how farmers could use the technology to monitor pollination and increase food production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers identify gene that may play a central role in heart diseaseAlthough lifestyle contributes to heart disease, genetics play a major role. This genetic facet has remained largely mysterious. But new research has identified what may be a key player: a mutated gene that leads to irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a dangerously inefficient heart.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting autism: Study links infant brain connections to diagnoses at age twoIn previous studies, researchers linked infant brain anatomy differences to autism diagnoses at age two. Now they show differences in functional connections between brain regions at 6 months to predict autism at age two.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hospitals that carry out more research are more efficientPublic hospitals that generate more scientific publications are also more efficient at attending patients, according to a Spanish study. The study also analyzes the reduction in health care costs associated with scientific production in medicine and surgery.
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Gizmodo
Scott Pruitt Wants Some Kind of Strange Climate Change Showdown Photo: Getty EPA head Scott Pruitt has spent the last week insisting that the Trump administration never discussed climate change when debating the decision to withdraw from the Paris Accord on climate change. But now that we’ve withdrawn from that agreement, he thinks it’s a great time to have a public debate in what sounds like some sort of twisted game show from hell. Journalists asked Pruitt
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Gizmodo
Apple Rolls Out New Feature That Permanently Associates Devices with Apps, Even After Deletion Photo: Getty Tim Cook once scolded Travis Kalanick about Uber’s practice of tracking users even after they deleted the app from their iPhones. But in its newest operating system, iOS 11, Apple is rolling out a feature that will allow the same type of tracking—but with fewer privacy implications. Apple’s new feature is called DeviceCheck and, if developers choose to use it, it will allow them to f
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Oldest Homo sapiens' foundFossils of five early humans have been found in North Africa that show Homo sapiens emerged at least 100,000 years earlier than previously recognised.
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Gizmodo
These Are the Two Best USB Travel Chargers, According To Our Readers Anker PowerCore Fusion | Aukey USB Charger Two travel-friendly USB chargers stood out from the pack this week, and they couldn’t be more different. It’s the tiny Aukey dual-port charger vs. Anker’s much larger PowerCore Fusion , which justifies its size with a built-in battery pack. Which one belongs in your travel bag? See what our readers said below, and don’t forget to vote at the bottom of th
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Weigh a Star Using Gravitational LensingAstronomers recently tapped Einstein's concept of gravitational lensing to determine the weight of a distant star. Watch and learn how this concept came to be and how it works. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
These all-natural microbeads could replace your horrible face scrubs Science Bye, bye, plastic. Researchers have come up with a biodegradable alternative to plastic microbeads.
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Live Science
Teen Pot Use Linked to Illegal Drug Use by Age 21, Study SuggestsA new study adds to evidence suggesting that marijuana really is a gateway drug for teens.
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Gizmodo
I'm Pretty Sure Steve Trevor Lied About His Dick Size in Wonder Woman Image: WB/DC I have to get something off my chest—something that has bothered me ever since I saw Wonder Woman . And I believe, strongly, that Steve Trevor lied about the size of his penis to Diana. In Wonder Woman , there’s a scene at Themiscyra where Steve (Chris Pine) is relaxing naked in a lagoon. Diana (Gal Gadot) comes in and there Steve is, naked, covering the entirety of his manhood in on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from celluloseOn World Ocean Day (8 June), researchers from the University of Bath announce they have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's 'first named dinosaur' reveals new teeth with scanning techPioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world's first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil -- over 200 years after it was first discovered -- thanks to research by WMG at the University of Warwick and the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Asian nations make plastic oceans promiseChina, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines say they will act to stop plastic polluting the oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's 'first named dinosaur' reveals new teeth with scanning techPioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world's first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil - over 200 years after it was first discovered - thanks to research by WMG at the University of Warwick and the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from celluloseScientists and engineers from the University of Bath have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.
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The Atlantic
U.S. Calls Syria Airstrike Lawful—but Human Rights Groups Disagree A U.S. military investigation concluded Wednesday that an American airstrike targeting al-Qaeda members near Aleppo, Syria on March 16 was lawful and may have resulted in one civilian fatality—a claim disputed by human-rights groups, which said the strike killed dozens. The investigation found the strike complied with operational and legal requirements (2/3) — U.S. Central Command (@CENTCOM) June
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds link between teen cannabis use & illicit drug use in early adulthoodResearchers from the University of Bristol have found regular and occasional cannabis use as a teen is associated with a greater risk of other illicit drug taking in early adulthood.The study by Bristol's Population Health Science Institute, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, also found cannabis use was associated with harmful drinking and smoking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test can predict onset and track progression of Huntington's diseaseThe first blood test that can predict the onset and progression of Huntington's disease has been identified by a UCL-led study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular/occasional teen cannabis use linked to other drug taking in early adulthoodRegular and occasional cannabis use as a teen is linked to a heightened risk of other illicit drug taking in early adulthood, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
United States revives space-policy council after 24-year absence US vice-president to head group overseeing civilian and military space activities. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22130
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: 'Honest Loyalty' What We’re Following Comey’s Story: The Senate Intelligence Committee released the former FBI director’s prepared opening statement ahead of his much-anticipated hearing tomorrow. In it, Comey describes several conversations with President Trump leading up to his firing, and reports that the president told him “I need loyalty, I expect loyalty.”(Comey says when pressed, he offered Trump his “hone
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The Atlantic
Myanmar Plane With 120 Passengers Is Missing A military aircraft has gone missing off the coast of southern Myanmar, the nation’s military spokesman, General Myat Min Oo, announced Wednesday. The plane was reportedly carrying 120 passengers, the majority of whom were families of military personnel. According to the general, 106 passengers were either soldiers or their family members, and another 14 were crew members. Earlier reports claimed
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Gizmodo
Uber's CEO Searches for Enlightenment in Company Lactation Room Image: AP “Uber is going through a big transformation right now, and it has to start at the top,” Huffington Post founder member Arianna Huffington told CNBC. The change it needs is for founder and CEO Travis Kalanick to step away, briefly occupy a space reserved for nursing mothers, and reflect on himself for a little while. As Huffington put it: “He said, ‘I really need to go meditate in order
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WIRED
Westworld’s Creators Know Why Sci-Fi Is So Dystopian According to co-creator Jonathan Nolan, with sci-fi "we're inventing cautionary tales for ourselves." The post Westworld's Creators Know Why Sci-Fi Is So Dystopian appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Apple’s Architect Says the Future of Offices Must Be Flexible Norman Foster has a qualm about Apple's new headquarters: What happens when people stop driving? The post Apple's Architect Says the Future of Offices Must Be Flexible appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Andy Rubin Has a Plan to Smarten Up the Connected Home The longtime inventor, founder of Android, and current CEO of two companies believes strongly that the best way to invent the future is to do it together. The post Andy Rubin Has a Plan to Smarten Up the Connected Home appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica
Internet cameras have hard-coded password that can’t be changed Enlarge (credit: F-Secure ) Security cameras manufactured by China-based Foscam are vulnerable to remote take-over hacks that allow attackers to view video feeds, download stored files, and possibly compromise other devices connected to a local network. That's according to a 12-page report released Wednesday by security firm F-Secure. Researchers at F-Secure documented 18 vulnerabilities that the
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