Wired
Gadget Lab Podcast: All the News From Apple's Big PartyThis week, it's all about Apple.
49min
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Glass Eels: See-Through, Slippery and Guided by Magnetism and TidesA study shows for the first time that European eels might link magnetic cues with the tides to navigate during a crucial stage of their life cycle.
52min
The Atlantic
Kansas Man Indicted for Hate Crime A federal grand jury has indicted Adam Purinton—the man who shot two Indian immigrants at a bar in Olathe, Kansas on February 22—for a hate crime, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday. Purinton, a 52-year-old resident of Olathe, was also accused of violating a federal firearms statute. He was previously charged with first-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder, and is current
17min

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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male farmers at highest risk of contracting 'monkey malaria' in MalaysiaAdult male farmers in Malaysia are more than twice as likely to contract Plasmodium knowlesi malaria -- an infection usually found only in monkeys -- than other people in their communities, according to a new study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Menzies School of Health Research.
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Live Science
Boy Dies Days After Swimming: What Is 'Dry Drowning'?A 4-year-old boy in Texas died recently, nearly a week after he went swimming, from what his parents were told was "dry drowning."
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic's Week in Culture Don’t Miss Bob Dylan’s Nobel Lecture Says the Unsayable — Spencer Kornhaber unpacks the musician’s powerful speech about great literature and the art of songwriting. Warner Bros. Film Your 2017 Summer Movie Preview — David Sims looks ahead to the most anticipated superhero films, indie hits, and auteur capers coming to screens over the next three months. The Disappointments of My Cousin Rachel —
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The Atlantic
Katy Perry Conquers the Early ’90s on Witness The gossipy morsel dominating conversation over Katy Perry’s Witness on the day of its release is about not Perry but Taylor Swift—as so many gossipy morsels in the contemporary music world are. Swift chose this day, of all days, to finally put her mega-smash 2014 album 1989 on non-Apple streaming services like Spotify. Perry and Swift’s rivalry is legend , and Swift’s move may draw not only publ
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: May Remains What We’re Following May’s Minority: Theresa May will stay on as prime minister of the U.K. with the help of the Northern Ireland’s Democratic Union Party, which agreed to join its 10 parliamentary seats with May’s ruling Conservatives to form a minority government. Though the coalition will have just a few seats more than the 326 needed to form a parliamentary majority, the results of the electi
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Here's What It's Like To Have Your Dad Drop By Your Remote Homestead #YukonMenTV | Fridays at 9/8c Chris' dad Stuart had promised that he'd visit Tanana once Chris and Jessi had made it past one year. Finally that day has arrived. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/yukon-men More Yukon: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/yukon-men/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.co
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Ars Technica
Air Force grounds F-35A operations at training base after pilots suffered hypoxia (credit: US Air Force) The US Air Force's 56 th Fighter Wing at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona today cancelled "local flying operations" for F-35A fighters after five incidents in which pilots "experienced hypoxia-like symptoms," an Air Force spokesperson said in a statement. Hypoxia is a deficiency in oxygen reaching the body through the circulatory system. "In order to synchronize operations an
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Gizmodo
Trump Accuses Comey of Perjury While Dodging Questions About Secret Tapes He Probably Made Up Photo: Getty At a White House press conference today, President Trump accused former FBI director James Comey of perjuring himself before the US Senate—a very serious charge—and further advanced the ridiculous charade that he can prove it all with secret “tapes” which almost certainly do not exist. After managing to stop tweeting for an entire day (hallelujah), the president let loose on Friday,
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: He Said, He Said Today in 5 Lines During a joint news conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis, President Trump said he’d be willing to testify under oath about his conversations with former FBI Director James Comey. Trump also called out Qatar for being a “funder of terrorism,” just hours after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged Saudi Arabia and other gulf countries to ease their blockade against Qa
2h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Spawning Time, When Sockeye Salmon Change From Blue to RedIn Alaska, tens of millions of the fish are returning to lakes where they hatched, undergoing a miraculous costume change in the process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A very rare discovery: Failed star orbits a dead star every 71 minutesAn international team of astronomers using data from the rejuvenated Kepler space telescope have discovered a rare gem: A binary system consisting of a failed star, also known as a brown dwarf, and the remnant of a dead star known as a white dwarf. And one of the properties that makes this binary so remarkable is that the orbital period of the two objects is only 71.2 minutes. This means that the
2h
Gizmodo
How to Disable the MacBook Pro Touch Bar Photo by Aaron Yoo Since last fall, new MacBook Pro models have replaced the function keys with the Touch Bar, a gimmicky touch-sensitive display along the top of the keyboard. It takes some getting used to, and you may find yourself groping for the delete key and cranking up your headphone volume, or idly resting your finger on the escape key and losing your work. OS X’s built-in keyboard settin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hawai'i researchers receive funds to forecast coral disease across Pacific OceanResearchers at University of Hawai'i at Manoa's Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) were recently awarded a $1.026 million grant from NASA to develop coral disease forecasting models for Hawai'i, U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands, and the Great Barrier Reef. Megan Donahue, principle investigator and HIMB researcher, and Jamie Caldwell, HIMB post-doctoral fellow on the project, will lead an in
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NASA mission tests ketogenic diet undersea, simulating life on MarsUniversity of South Florida associate professor Dominic D'Agostino, PhD, is one of four crew members selected for the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 22 expedition. He is the only member not affiliated with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) or European Space Agency (ESA).
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Gizmodo
These Female Crabs Store a Shitload of Sperm Purple stone crab (Photo; Nahuel Farias /Flickr) Lots of species do some wild sex stuff. The purple stone crab is no exception: Females have seminal receptacles, a special organ that just holds and stores sperm for later. Researchers studying the purple stone crab’s female parts wanted to get a better look at these sperm holders. But they’re not just any sperm-holders. The simple sacs are full of
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Science : NPR
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Reviews Bears Ears National Monument A Saturday deadline is approaching for Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to recommend whether the controversial new Bears Ears National Monument in Utah should be abolished or shrunk. It's the first of a larger review of national monuments stemming from an executive order by President Trump last month.
2h
New Scientist - News
Extreme plants thrive at 72°C in New Zealand’s hot volcanic soilMosses and liverworts have been found growing in hot geothermal fields in the highly active Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand
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The Atlantic
Trump's Mixed Messages Over Qatar President Trump assailed Qatar for funding terrorism “at a very high level” Friday, just hours after the U.S. State Department urged Arab states to ease their blockade against the Gulf country. “The nation of Qatar, unfortunately, has historically been a funder of terrorism at a very high level,” Trump said Friday during a joint news conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis, noting it wa
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The Atlantic
What Exactly Is the U.S. Policy on Qatar? This week six Arab countries—Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Libya, and Yemen—severed their relations with Qatar over its alleged support of terrorism. The action went further than any previous Arab response to Qatar’s alleged support: It included stopping all flights, preventing all travel, and the closure of all borders. The move, which came after President Trump visited
3h
The Atlantic
Trump Says He'd Testify Under Oath About Comey Updated on June 9 at 4:38 p.m. ET A defiant President Trump on Friday said he’d be willing to testify under oath about his conversations with the FBI director he fired, James Comey. “One hundred percent,” the president quickly replied at a Rose Garden press conference when Jonathan Karl of ABC News asked him whether he’d be willing to contradict Comey under oath. Trump specifically disputed Comey
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The Atlantic
Constructing India and Campaigning in the Banlieues: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing U rban Dreams Rollo Romig | California Sunday “The three titans of India at its mo­ment of independence had divergent visions of the country’s urban future. Mohandas Gandhi insisted that ‘the true Indian civilization is in the Indian villages.’ B. R. Ambedkar, champion of Dalits, the so-called untouchables, disdained the Indian village as ‘a sink of localism, a den of ignorance’ and urged lower-c
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Live Science
Do Fidget Spinners Contain Lead? What Parents Should KnowAn unofficial report may be stoking fears that fidget spinners, the hottest toy of the year, could contain dangerous amounts of lead.
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Ars Technica
North Korea hits imperialist aggressor barge in coastal cruise missile demo Today, the Korean Central News Agency (North Korea's state news organization) announced the successful test of a new coastal defense cruise missile system, inflicting pain and woe on a target barge designed to represent a US "battleship." The missile, a knockoff of the Kh-35 cruise missile Russia exported in the 1990s to India and Vietnam, is notable mostly for its new tracked launcher. That mean
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Gizmodo
Make Your Phone Float With This $8 Magnetic Desk Stand Bestek Magnetic Smartphone Stand , $8 with code MGYRKCFS If you already use a magnetic smartphone car mount , you can put that plate behind your phone to use at your desk with Bestek’s gorgeous stand . Normally $10-$12, you can get it for just $8 with promo code MGYRKCFS today. I have this sitting on my desk right now, and absolutely love it.
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This Man Is The Four-Wheel Drive King Of The World And His Collection Will Blow Your Mind In the crowded metropolis of Hong Kong lives a man who knows more about off-road vehicles than possibly anyone else on earth. He has raced the Dakar Rally, torn apart priceless vehicles just to see how they work, written a book called The 4x4 Bible , and taught off-roading skills to locals. His name is Victor Ma, and while you may not have heard of him before, he is the King of Off-Roaders. Type
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Release Report 6/9/2017 As detailed here , every few Fridays we’re sharing which bug fixes and tiny features our developers have released into the wild. Apart from bigger changes that have received their own posts, here are the releases on Eyewire since the last report. Eyewire now fully supports HTTPS for better protection of your data while you use our site. The “S” stands for “secure”; pages only using regular HTTP a
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Popular Science
IKEA engineers are pretending to live on Mars to help them design better furniture Space Really. Why did IKEA send its best and brightest to "Mars"? Read on.
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Ars Technica
Facebook can’t be sued for “jerkingman” revenge porn account Enlarge (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images) When Franco Caraccioli was a third-year law student in San Diego, someone apparently played a malicious prank on him. He got a Facebook friend request from an account called "Franco Caracciolijerkingman." Caraccioli describes what happens next in the lawsuit he filed against Facebook the following year: "The JERKINGMAN ACCOUNT included
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Gizmodo
Scientists Created Biodegradable Microbeads So Your Face Scrub Won't Pollute Our Oceans By now it’s well documented that those tiny plastic microbeads used in face scrubs and toothpastes are contaminating lakes and oceans at an alarming rate. Starting next month they’ll be officially banned in the US for personal care products, but oily faces rejoice, eco-friendly replacements are already in the works. A single bottle of Johnson & Johnson’s Clean & Clear has over 330,000 of the tiny
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Popular Science
This adorable lil baby bird was perfectly preserved in amber for 99 million years Animals A Cretaceous-era cutie. An ancient piece of amber is helping scientists figure out what birds look like back when other dinosaurs still roamed the Earth. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Are flying cars about to become a real thing? Starburst Accelerator thinks they are Enlarge / This is Lillium Aviation's proposed VTOL vehicle. (credit: Lillium) Could the time finally be right for the flying car to leave the drawing boards of futurists and take to our skies as a new form of transportation? According to Francois Chopard, Founder and CEO of investment firm Starburst Accelerator, the answer is yes. For decades, the idea of flying cars has been used as shorthand fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study design holds promise for drug safety researchAs the pace of drug approvals accelerates and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces potential budget cuts, a new research design offers a new way to successfully assess safety of newly approved drugs, as well as drugs that have been on the market for a long time and have had a marked rise in their use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cosmic inflation: Higgs says goodbye to his 'little brother'In the first moments after the Big Bang, the Universe was able to expand even billions of billions of billions of times faster than today. Such rapid expansion should be due to a primordial force field, acting with a new particle: inflaton. From the latest analysis of the decay of mesons, carried out in the LHCb experiment by physicists from Cracow and Zurich, it appears, however, that the most pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clemson graduate uncovers link between toxicants and lipid metabolismDoctoral graduate Namrata Sengupta's research on water fleas culminates in journal article that describes how certain toxicants can affect development and progression to reproductive maturity.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Therapy flags DNA typos to rev cancer-fighting T cellsGenetic tests help identify cancer patients who will benefit from immune therapy.
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Live Science
Heroin Vaccine Could Turn Body's Defenses Against the DrugResearchers say they are one step closer to developing a vaccine that could block heroin's addictive high.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiation therapy vital to treating brain tumors, but it exacts a tollRadiation therapy (RT) using high-energy particles is a common and critical component in successfully treating patients with brain tumors but it is also associated with significant adverse effects. In a new study, researchers report that irradiation can cause broader adverse effects, altering the structural network properties in impacted brains and perhaps contributing to delayed cognitive impairm
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain imaging reveals neural roots of caringWhen others suffer, we humans empathize. Our feelings of empathy take different forms, such as distress when we imagine and internalize someone's pain and compassion as we sympathize with their condition. These different feelings involve distinct patterns of brain activity, according to a study. Feelings of empathy may seem subtle and personal, but this study found that the brain patterns associat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers uncover new instruction manual to repair broken DNAResearchers have discovered how the Rad52 protein is a crucial player in RNA-dependent DNA repair. The results reveal an unexpected function of the homologous recombination protein Rad52 and may help to identify new therapeutic targets for cancer
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain's hippocampus can organize memories for events as well as placesThe hippocampus can generalize, putting not just places but also events into sequence by changing the neural code in the rat brain, new research demonstrates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Report looks at liver cancer, fastest-growing cause of cancer deaths in USA new report provides an overview of incidence, mortality, and survival rates and trends for liver cancer, a cancer for which death rates have doubled in the United States since the mid-1980s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overriding the urge to sleepThe discovery of neurons that control arousal has implications for insomnia and other sleep disorders, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The mysterious bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chainThe volcanic islands of Hawaii represent the youngest end of a 80 million years old and roughly 6,000 kilometers long mountain chain on the ground of the Pacific Ocean. The so-called Hawaiian-Emperor chain consisting of dozens of volcanoes is well known for its peculiar 60 degrees bend. The cause for this bend has been heavily debated for decades. Scientists now offer an explanation in a new study
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Gizmodo
If You Resurrect the Woolly Mammoth, Can You Still Call It a Woolly Mammoth? Image: AP In the early 20th century, seeking riches, fur and its medicinal qualities, the people of Europe hunted the Eurasian beaver to near extinction. Clever scientists, though, had an idea of how to atone for their sins. The North American beaver, at least from the outside, seemed nearly identical. They would introduce this far-flung cousin to Europe in hopes that it would breed and help rest
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Gizmodo
A Goldfish-Controlled Hammer Is Scarier Than Jaws GIF After turning a hamster into a self-portrait artist and a bunch of inanimate rocks into a band , Neil Mendoza has created a bizarre contraption that lets goldfish finally extract revenge on the humans that have imprisoned them in tiny bowls for decades. Sort of. In five years, when goldfish have successfully overthrown most of humanity’s rule over this planet, we’ll probably look back on Mend
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Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 14. Five rad and random things I found this week. The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 14. Read on.
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The Atlantic
Is It Time for the U.S. to Rein in the Presidency? The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists use numerical 'tweezers' to study nuclear interactionsResearchers have developed numerical 'tweezers' that can pin a nucleus in place, enabling them to study how interactions between protons and neutrons produce forces between nuclei.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Control of material crystallization by agitationOoscillation of materials at a specific frequency markedly accelerates their crystallization, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why the marijuana and tobacco policy camps are on very different pathsNew research looked at diverging trajectories of cannabis and tobacco policies in the US and attempts to explain some of the reasoning behind the different paths, while discussing possible implications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotechnology reveals hidden depths of bacterial 'machines'New research has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Student makes big discovery during anthropology dig on battle siteAn anthropology student working on an archaeological site near Arkansas City, Kansas, has discovered an artifact dating back to the 1600s.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electric vehicle rally sets off in Switzerland (Update)Drivers in scores of electric vehicles, some in superhero or other quirky get-ups, embarked Friday on a weeklong trek around Switzerland as part of a grassroots movement to fight global warming.
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Gizmodo
This Synthetic 'Tongue' Is an Insufferable Whiskey Snob Photo: Getty Whiskey tastes like warm poison. To be fair, if you add an ice cube to the mix, it tastes like chilly poison. Even my very nice mom, in her infinite wisdom, once described whiskey as “horrible shit.” Nevertheless, those who insist there is a difference between good and bad whiskey will be happy to know that a team of scientists has invented a clever way to determine the various quali
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Ars Technica
Intel fires warning shots at Microsoft, claims x86 emulation is a patent minefield Enlarge / Qualcomm's prototype of a Snapdragon 835 motherboard for an ARM PC has an area of 50.4 square centimetres. (credit: Qualcomm ) In celebrating the x86 architecture's 39th birthday yesterday—the 8086 processor first came to market on June 8, 1978—Intel took the rather uncelebratory step of threatening any company working on x86 emulator technology . Intel's blog post offers a rundown of a
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The Atlantic
British Voters: Trust Nobody It wasn’t supposed to be like this. Fortified by a 20-point lead in the opinion polls, Theresa May, the prime minister of the United Kingdom, called a general election in April assuming that, all things being equal, she couldn’t possibly lose. In 2015, David Cameron had won a small and fragile majority in the House of Commons, but this was Mrs. May’s opportunity to transform it into, as she said,
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Wired
Dropbox, iCloud, Amazon, and More: Cloud Storage Services ComparedAs Amazon ends its unlimited cloud storage policy, a look at how the competition compares.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Swift kick from a supernova could knock a black hole askewAn exploding star may have tilted the spin of one of LIGO’s black holes.
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Ars Technica
Banking trojan executes when targets hover over link in PowerPoint doc Enlarge (credit: Dodge This Security ) Criminal hackers have started using a novel malware attack that infects people when their mouse hovers over a link embedded in a malicious PowerPoint file. The method—which was used in a recent spam campaign that attempted to install a bank-fraud backdoor alternately known as Zusy, OTLARD, and Gootkit—is notable because it didn't rely on macros, visual basic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Honda to roll out all-new Accord with no V6 optionHonda said Friday that its Accord midsize car will be offered only with four-cylinder or gas-electric hybrid engines when an all-new version comes out later this year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parasitic nematodes that cause greatest agricultural damage abandoned sexThe nematode worms that cause the world's most devastating crop losses have given up on sexual reproduction and instead rely on their large, duplicated genomes to thrive in new environments, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Similar design, different genes: Miniature weapons in the animal kingdomResearchers describe the principle of convergence in unicellular organisms and cnidarians in a new scientific report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Review of appendix cancer cases finds over-diagnosisLesions of the appendix are being over diagnosed as invasive cancer, report researchers.
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Shipping Giants Are Looking to Self-Piloting Boats to Shift CargoMillions of containers could be hauled by robotic ships within the next decade.
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This Could Be the First Airbag of the Self-Driving Car EraZF's concept airbag could work in cars that can't put airbags in traditional places.
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Apple's Do Not Disturb While Driving Mode Is Good. Researchers Are Cooking Up Something BetterDistracted driving is a complex problem that may demand a more nuanced answer.
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Even If 'The Mummy' Is Not Your Thing, the Dark Universe Could Still Be OKEven if 'The Mummy' gets consigned to eternal rest, that shouldn't mean a wrap on the Dark Universe.
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Inside Ford's Top-Secret Campaign to Remake the Iconic GT Supercar50 years after dominating the 24 Hours of Le Mans, Ford returned to the game with an all-new GT.
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Self-Driving Car 'Guardian Angels' Will Protect You From YourselfMIT researchers argue that for now, robot copilots make more sense than autonomous taxis.
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Photo of the Week: China Builds a 20-Road Interchange from HellIt's 12 stories high with five levels and 20 highways. Just don't look down.
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Review: Cheese GrottoThe Cheese Grotto promises to extend the life of fine cheeses by creating the perfect storage conditions. But in reality, deli wrap just as well.
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How Russia Hacks Elections in the US and Around the WorldA brief history of Russia's digital meddling in foreign elections shows disturbing progress.
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Canada Is Using Genetics to Make Cows Less GassyBreeding—or someday even genetically engineering—a more efficient cow would make a dent in greenhouse gas emissions.
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HHS Head Tom Price Defends Trump's Budget Cuts to MedicaidWhile all eyes were on James Comey today, HHS secretary Tom Price's hearings passed by with little fanfare.
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How the Right and Left Saw James Comey's Senate Testimony TodayWhen former FBI director James Comey spoke, both sides of the political spectrum heard very different things.
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The Biggest Threats to Uber's Future, RankedLawsuits, criminal investigations, and a toxic corporate culture. Can the ride-hail giant survive?
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James Comey's Senate Testimony Raised as Many Questions as It AnsweredFormer FBI director James Comey's Senate testimony did not disappoint---and raised as many questions as it answered.
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To Stop Terrorists, Google Jigsaw’s Radical Strategy is Talking to ThemYasmin Green heads R&D at Jigsaw, a think tank at Google's parent company. Her radical strategy? Tackle the web's dark side by talking to its creators.
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Crispr May Cure All Genetic Disease—One DayBut first, it's going to deliver climate-resistant crops, better biofuels, and tomatoes that won't fall off the vine.
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Apple Architect Norman Foster Says the Future of Offices Must Be FlexibleNorman Foster has a qualm about Apple's new headquarters: What happens when people stop driving?
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Westworld's Creators Know Why Sci-Fi Is So DystopianAccording to co-creator Jonathan Nolan, with sci-fi "we're inventing cautionary tales for ourselves."
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Google’s AI Eye Doctor Gets Ready to Go to Work in IndiaAlgorithms that scrutinize retinal images for signs of disease could save people from blindness.
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Ai Weiwei Gets Artsy-Fartsy About SurveillanceA new exhibition in New York puts the surveillance state on display.
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With Breast Cancer, the Best Treatment May Be No TreatmentA new study shows that many small tumors—the ones that are easiest to catch with mammograms—are the least likely to turn into troublesome cancers.
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The Lamborghini Huracán Performante Wrangles the Wind for Supercar SuperstardomLamborghini's engineers use aerodynamic trickery and a pair of turbochargers to dominate the Nürburgring.
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Watch James Comey Testimony LiveA complete guide to James Comey's Thursday Senate testimony.
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SpaceX Wants to Launch Thousands of Satellites. What on Earth For?SpaceX plans to launch nearly 12,000 satellites to create fast internet access around the globe. But is that all it will do with its constellation?
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How Google Copes When Even It Can't Afford Enough Server PowerUrs Hölzle is the person Google's engineers turn to when all that computing power turns out not to be enough.
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The Day Will Come When Your Credit Card Will DisappearVisa tries to get out ahead of the day when physical forms of payment become as obsolete as barter.
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Imagining the Kinder, Gentler Future of SuperheroesThe new comic book superheroes are helpers, not saviors.
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'Handmaid’s Tale' Recap, Episode 9: It’s Time to Join the ResistanceJune finally learns how to fight back.
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What's Wrong with Apple's New HeadquartersThe architecture and design of the years-in-the-making Apple Park are brilliant. How it fits into the world around it? Not so much.
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Live Science
'There Is No Future': Brad Pitt Gives Doomsday Forecast in Comedy SkitBrad Pitt's latest role is a doomsday weatherman explaining climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble applauds waltzing dwarfsThis seemingly unspectacular series of dots with varying distances between them actually shows the slow waltz of two brown dwarfs. The image is a stack of 12 images made over the course of three years with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Using high-precision astrometry, an Italian-led team of astronomers tracked the two components of the system as they moved both across the sky and around eac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cancer drug tested in mice may benefit certain leukemia patientsScientists have found up to 30 percent of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia or ALL patients have Philadelphia chromosome, where two segments of chromosomes have aberrantly fused together. Adult ALL patients often see high relapse rates, and treatment-related deaths remain high. Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have discovered new science, published this wee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distance patients must travel illustrates growing inaccessibility of abortionAbortion fund recipients who have to travel out of state for an abortion travel roughly 10 times farther for their procedures than patients able to get care in their homes states.
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New form of carbon that's hard as a rock, yet elastic, like rubberCarbon is an element of seemingly infinite possibilities. This is because the configuration of its electrons allows for numerous self-bonding combinations that give rise to a range of materials with varying properties. A team including several Carnegie scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique
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The Atlantic
The Senate Republican Calling 'Nonsense' on President Trump Updated on June 9 at 4:24 p.m. ET One of the Senate’s longest-serving Republicans is calling out the Trump administration for adopting a policy that would allow the government to ignore most congressional demands for federal records. Senator Charles Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, on Friday sent a letter to President Trump in which he attacked as “nonsense” a formal leg
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The Atlantic
Is America Getting Sucked Into More War in Syria? While Washington was fixated this week by former FBI director James Comey’s testimony, on the other side of the planet, a major story was playing out that could have profound consequences for the United States. Three times in the last month, the U.S. military has come into direct conflict with the combined forces of the Assad regime, Iran-supported Shiite militias, Hezbollah, and possibly even Ir
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The Atlantic
Tillerson Calls on Arab States to 'Ease the Blockade Against Qatar' U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Friday on “Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Egypt to ease the blockade against Qatar” and urged Doha to be “responsive to the concerns of its neighbors.” The remarks follow a week of heightened diplomatic tensions in the Arab world that saw six Arab countries—the four Tillerson mentioned, along with Libya and Yemen—sever relations w
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The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘Beauty and the Shoe Sluts’ by Mary Karr Last year, Mary Karr criticized high heels in an acerbically funny New Yorker piece , concluding with an appeal to women to shed their uncomfortable shoes: Oh, womenfolk, as we once burned our bras could we not torch the footwear crucifying us? … Our feet and spines will unknot, and high heels will fade from consciousness along with foot-binding and rib removal to shrink your waist. The species m
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Gizmodo
Ravens Remember If You Were a Dick to Them Image: Tomas Quinones /Flickr You do not mess with ravens. Because if you dupe them, they’ll remember. Or so says a team of Austrian and Swedish scientists. In a small study on captive-bred ravens, they found that the birds remembered when scientists tricked them out of getting a good treat. Such a study has important implications for understanding the social dynamics of these birds, ones that we
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Ars Technica
Hands-on: Android O Preview 3 is 8.0, has a sweet colored media notification The third Android O Developer Preview hit the Internet yesterday, giving us just one more version before Android O hits final release. While Google's new OS seems to be mostly in a finished state, there are a few new additions to this third developer preview that are worth mentioning. Welcome Android 8.0! Android O Preview 3 identifies itself as "Android 8.0." Not that the version number of a rel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New form of carbon that's hard as a rock, yet elastic, like rubberA team including several Carnegie scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor.
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The Scientist RSS
Cholera Ripping Through YemenMore than 100,000 cases of the bacterial disease have been reported in the war torn country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble applauds waltzing dwarfsThis seemingly unspectacular series of dots with varying distances between them actually shows the slow waltz of two brown dwarfs. The image is a stack of 12 images made over the course of three years with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Using high-precision astrometry, an Italian-led team of astronomers tracked the two components of the system as they moved both across the sky and around eac
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Scientific American Content: Global
A New Theory of How the Moon FormedContrary to what we now think, it could be that it came from a violent impact that temporarily turned Earth into a "synestia" -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Finland Works, Quietly, to Bury Its Nuclear Reactor WasteA plan to build a repository in granite bedrock has progressed smoothly for years, in contrast to the United States’ experience with Yucca Mountain.
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The Atlantic
The House Takes Another Step Toward Repealing Dodd-Frank In the background of the hubbub surrounding the testimony of the former FBI Director James Comey, House Republicans voted on Thursday to repeal key provisions of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. The Financial CHOICE Act , which represents another step toward rolling back Obama-era regulations that the Republican Party sees as anathema to economic growth, passed
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The Atlantic
Federal Watchdog Agency: Tweets Can't Be Endorsements A top White House staffer broke a federal law that bars most government officials from engaging in political activities by calling for a member of Congress’s defeat on Twitter two months ago, a federal watchdog agency said Friday. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel said Dan Scavino, a White House communications official who oversees President Trump’s social-media accounts, violated the Hatch Act
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New Scientist - News
Police warned of drug so powerful it can kill in one breathUS law enforcement officials have been warned of the dangers of encountering fentanyl, following the collapse of a police officer who brushed some off his shirt
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New Scientist - News
Feeling uncertain? It’s the new normal in Theresa May’s BritainThe UK election has ushered in unpredictable times. Uncertainty was both cause and effect, says writer James Bloodworth
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Gizmodo
Today's Amazon Gold Box Is Overflowing With Dad Clothes Up to 60% Off Clothing, Accessories & More for Dad If you’ve been meaning to get your dad some new clothes for Father’s Day but didn’t know where to start, this one-day Amazon sale is the place . There are five pages of things to choose from, with brands like Izod, Dockers, Perry Ellis, Levis, Herschel Supply Co., and more . Maybe you can grab something for yourself while you’re looking, but thes
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Gizmodo
Chelsea Manning Talks About Her Decision to Leak in Upcoming 'Nightline' Interview Photo: xychelsea/Instragram Winter was setting in and some of Chelsea Manning’s most devoted followers began showing all the signs of doubt. Days before the 2016 election, the 28-year-old had tried for a second time in only a few months to end her own life. Manning’s supporters openly wondered whether she would survive the remainder of her sentence if Obama didn’t commute it prior to leaving offi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why microplastic debris may be the next big threat to our seasPlastic, metal, rubber and paper are some of the materials that pollute the world's oceans, often in the form of soda cans, cigarette butts, plastic bags and bottles, and fishing gear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Row, row, row your bots: But are they synchronized?To get maximum propulsion, should a boat's team of rowers set their strokes to the same rhythm? Or should the rowers stagger the dropping and pulling of the oars through the water? Athletes and scientists have looked at the question, offering illuminating but inconclusive observations. But this month's Physics Today features a special article by fluid mechanic researchers at the Paris École Polyte
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Popular Science
What parents need to know about "dry drowning" Health Secondary and dry drowning are rare, but extremely serious. This type of drowning is extremely rare. But knowing the causes and symptoms can allow parents to remain at ease—and know what to do when something isn’t right. Read…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple CEO to MIT grads: Tech without values is worthlessScience is worthless if it isn't motivated by basic human values and the desire to help people, Apple CEO Tim Cook told graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Friday, urging them to use their powers for good.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sirius XM buys stake in music streaming site PandoraPandora is raising cash to help it take on Spotify and other streaming music services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fractal planting patterns yeild optimal harvests, without central controlBali's famous rice terraces, when seen from above, look like colorful mosaics because some farmers plant synchronously, while others plant at different times. The resulting fractal patterns are rare for man-made systems and lead to optimal harvests without global planning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiences of African American christian counseling students with LGB clientsA new study looks at the experiences of African American Christian counseling students from the Black church as they seek to balance their faith and ethical responsibilities in working with lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) clients.
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Live Science
How Do Scientists 'Weigh' Stars?How do scientists "weigh" the mass of a gaseous sphere light-years away?
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fractal planting patterns yield optimal harvests, without central controlBali's famous rice terraces, when seen from above, look like colorful mosaics because some farmers plant synchronously, while others plant at different times. The resulting fractal patterns are rare for man-made systems and lead to optimal harvests without global planning, according to new research in PNAS.Recognizing this signature of emergent system-wide cooperation may help planners to avoid un
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soft shelled turtles, food in China, likely spread choleraThe pathogen, Vibrio cholerae can colonize the surfaces, as well as the intestines of soft shelled turtles. This finding is strong evidence that soft shelled turtles in China, where they are grown for human consumption, are spreading cholera. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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Gizmodo
California Vows 'Any and All Legal Action Necessary' to Stop Trump From Touching Its National Monuments Image: AP The Attorney General of California sent an 11-page letter to the Interior Department, vowing to fight an April executive order from Trump that could potentially resize or even revoke the protected status of six different monuments in the state. The executive order cleared Secretary of the Interior, Ryan Zinke, to review 26 national monuments across the country, potentially opening them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New report: Social, behavioral, and economic sciences contribute to advancing NSF missionThe social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences make significant contributions to the National Science Foundation's mission to advance health, prosperity and welfare, national defense, and progress in science, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. NSF should undertake a systematic and transparent strategic planning process that defines SBE resear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protective mother bear cuts off Dracula's castleWhile Dracula's legend usually fails to scare tourists away from the blood-sucking vampire's 15th century castle, a large, furry and protective mother bear has had more success.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasitic nematodes that cause greatest agricultural damage abandoned sexThe nematode worms that cause the world's most devastating crop losses have given up on sexual reproduction and instead rely on their large, duplicated genomes to thrive in new environments. A group led by Etienne G. J. Danchin of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) report these findings in a new study published June 8, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 6/3–6/9 An open-air hotel room in the Swiss Alps, a mass wedding in China, Comey testifies in Washington, D.C., Lord Buckethead and others vie for votes in the UK, storms and wildfires in South Africa, and much more
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The Atlantic
America and Iran Hurtle Toward Confrontation in Syria The assault on Raqqa, the capital of the Islamic State’s self-declared caliphate, is about to begin, and the end of ISIS is in sight. But so is the end of the tacit tactical alliance between Iran and the United States. For a time, the old adversaries cooperated against their common enemy. The United States provided the Iraqi government and Iranian-backed Shiite militias with air support to help t
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Live Science
After Life of Adventure, Attenborough Regrets Missed Family TimeSir David Attenborough has traveled around the world and back, but despite his countless wildlife adventures and exploits in the natural world, said he does have one major regret.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Editing Companies Hit Back at Paper That Criticized CRISPRReport that suggested CRISPR is too dangerous to use as a drug was wrong, say biotech companies.
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Live Science
Photos: Notoriously Dangerous Ocean Reef Holds Shipwreck SecretsAn Australian expedition to a remote ocean reef notorious for sinking ships in the 19th century has discovered several previously unidentified wrecks at the site.
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Gizmodo
Postal Apocalypse: Special Mostly Wonder Woman Edition Warner Bros. Bonjour, my beloved bubble-wrapped envelopes. Shockingly, the advent of the first good, feminist superhero movie inspired a lot of questions this week. Go figure! Plus: Should you wear Marvel merchandise with the Hydra logo? What should the next Matrix movies be about? And did I mention Wonder Woman ? Note: If you haven’t seen Wonder Woman , by the way, I very must suggest you pay at
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Gizmodo
Por qué no es una buena idea rapar a tu perro en verano para que no pase calor Por mucha gracia que te haga esta foto de un husky rapado , cortar el pelo de tu perro al cero es una idea terrible. Sí, el verano aprieta y se avecinan las primeras olas de calor, pero rapar a tu mascota puede producir el efecto contrario al que estás buscando: en realidad, el pelo lo protege del sol. Como explica IndiDogs , cada raza de perro tiene unas necesidades específicas propias de su pel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soft shelled turtles, food in China, likely spread choleraThe pathogen, Vibrio cholerae can colonize the surfaces, as well as the intestines of soft shelled turtles. This finding is strong evidence that soft shelled turtles in China, where they are grown for human consumption, are spreading cholera. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk for binge drinking differs by ethnicities, income and changes with age, study findsThere are differing risks for binge drinking based on race, income and age, say researchers. African-Americans are generally at low risk for binge drinking, but that risk increases disproportionately with age among African-Americans who are poor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study shows texting as good as medication at improving type 2 diabetes managementLow-income Hispanics with Type 2 diabetes who received health-related text messages every day for six months saw improvements in their blood sugar levels that equaled those resulting from some glucose-lowering medications, researchers report.
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Gizmodo
Appeals Court Says Chimps Are Not Legal Persons—Here's Why They're Wrong Image: William Warby/Flickr Yesterday, a New York state appeals court rejected an appeal filed by the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) seeking legal rights for a pair of captive chimpanzees. It’s a major setback for the group, but the battle to secure human-like legal protections for highly intelligent and self-aware animals is far from over. Tommy and Kiko will have to remain in their cages for th
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Ars Technica
FDA tells drug maker to pull powerful opioid off the market Enlarge / FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has made it clear he intends to crack down on opioid drugs. (credit: Getty | Zach Gibson ) The Food and Drug Administration requested Thursday that Endo Pharmaceuticals yank its powerful opioid drug, Opana ER (oxymorphone hydrochloride), from the market due to the “public health consequences of abuse.” If Endo fails to voluntarily comply, the FDA will for
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Blog » Languages » English
Spiders vs Scorpions: Scorpions win! It was a creepy crawly battle, but in the end the Scorpions stung their way to victory! Congrats to all who participated! Leaderboard:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiation therapy vital to treating brain tumors, but it exacts a tollRadiation therapy (RT) using high-energy particles is a common and critical component in successfully treating patients with brain tumors but it is also associated with significant adverse effects. In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that irradiation can cause broader adverse effects, altering the structural network properties in impacted
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The Atlantic
The Silent Power of Live-Streaming Politics For nearly three hours on Thursday, many Americans turned their attention to the engrossing, absorbing spectacle that was James Comey, the former FBI director, giving his first public remarks since President Donald Trump fired him one month ago. One of the nation’s top law-enforcement officials was poised to divulge damaging information about a president accused of trying to influence a federal i
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The Atlantic
It Comes at Night Is a Post-Apocalyptic Tale of the Unknown Over and over again in It Comes at Night , Trey Edward Shults’s bravura piece of psychological horror, the camera pans down a long, dark hallway, inching closer and closer to a locked red door. That door is the only way in and out of the boarded-up house in which the film is set; behind it lurks the unknown. It Comes at Night is set in a world gone to rot, where vague nightmares might be waiting
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The Atlantic
How Minor Probation Violations Can Lead to Major Jail Time PHILADELPHIA—In the early-morning hours one day last August, 25-year-old Giovanni Guzman-Vegas closed up his family’s bar and went to pick up his seven-months-pregnant girlfriend from a babysitting gig. There, he said he found her upset: A man in the house, who’d accompanied the child’s mother home, had groped her while she was asleep on a couch. A fight quickly ensued, with Guzman-Vegas punching
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Retina may be sensitive gauge of blast-wave pressure injuryAlthough traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-recognized consequence of extreme blast waves, it is less appreciated that over 80 percent of combat veterans with TBI also develop visual problems. A new study reports that blast exposure that does not cause detectable changes in the brain can result in long-term retinal injury. Researchers identified early indicators of retinal injury and inflammat
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Gizmodo
NASA Astronaut Explains How to Drink Space Coffee: 'Suck the Balls' GIF GIF: Twitter/NASA In space, it is crucial for even the most basic of human tasks to be carried out with a high degree of skill and for astronauts to remain alert. That is why Air Force Colonel and ISS crewmember Jack Fischer sucks the balls. “I love coffee on Earth, it’s pretty much my favorite thing,” explained Fischer in a video NASA shared on social media this morning. “But in space, I get
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Popular Science
The AirBeans X earbuds deliver cutting-edge wireless sound for under $55 Sponsored Post Cut the cord completely and enjoy hours of audio with the supplied charging case. The AirBeans X earbuds deliver cutting-edge wireless sound for under $55. Cut the cord completely and enjoy hours of audio with the supplied charging case. Read on.
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Popular Science
Glowing galaxies, marshmallow-like ceramics, and other amazing images of the week Science Newsworthy eyecandy. Our favorite images from this week in science, space, and health news. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parasitic nematodes that cause greatest agricultural damage abandoned sexThe nematode worms that cause the world's most devastating crop losses have given up on sexual reproduction and instead rely on their large, duplicated genomes to thrive in new environments. A group led by Etienne G. J. Danchin of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) report these findings in a new study published June 8, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST engineers robotic device helping stroke survivors recoverA research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has introduced a new robotic tool for assessments of muscle overactivity and movement dysfunction in stroke survivors. Their findings appeared in the the prestigious journal, IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report: Social, behavioral, and economic sciences contribute to advancing NSF missionThe social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences make significant contributions to the National Science Foundation's mission to advance health, prosperity and welfare, national defense, and progress in science, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. NSF should undertake a systematic and transparent strategic planning process that defines SBE resear
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The Atlantic
Teenagers Have Stopped Getting Summer Jobs—Why? The summer job is considered a rite of passage for the. American Teenager. It is a time when tossing newspaper bundles and bussing restaurant tables acts as a rehearsal for weightier adult responsibilities, like bundling investments and bussing dinner-party plates. But in the last few decades, the summer job has been disappearing. In the summer of 1978, 60 percent of teens were working or looking
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Batteries from scrap metalChinese scientists have made good use of waste while finding an innovative solution to a technical problem by transforming rusty stainless steel mesh into electrodes with outstanding electrochemical properties that make them ideal for potassium-ion batteries. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the rust is converted directly into a compact layer with a grid structure that can store potas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prednisone may improve effectiveness of AAV-based gene therapy by reducing immune responseA new study of gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene delivery into skeletal muscle of rhesus macaques showed that oral prednisone reduced immune responses to AAV that can weaken expression of the therapeutic transgene over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study design holds promise for drug safety researchAs the pace of drug approvals accelerates and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces potential budget cuts, a new research design from Perelman School of Medicine scientists offers a new way to successfully assess safety of newly approved drugs, as well as drugs that have been on the market for a long time and have had a marked rise in their use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood test uses nanotechnology to predict aggressive prostate cancer accuratelyA new diagnostic developed by Alberta scientists will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer. The test incorporates a unique nanotechnology platform to make the diagnostic using only a single drop of blood, and is significantly more accurate than current screening methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows Cesarean patients sent home with more narcotic pain medications than neededMost women who undergo a cesarean childbirth are prescribed more opioid (narcotic) pain medications than needed upon release from the hospital, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experiences of African American Christian counseling students with LGB clientsA new study looks at the experiences of African American Christian counseling students from the Black church as they seek to balance their faith and ethical responsibilities in working with lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) clients.
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Popular Science
Scientists want to know if your parents' divorce is making you sick Health But don't stay together for the kids' immune systems. Carnegie Mellon researchers found that adults with divorced parents who were on non-speaking terms during their childhood are three times as likely to catch a cold.
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The Atlantic
Japan's Parliament Clears the Way for Emperor's Abdication Japan’s Parliament on Friday passed a law that allows Emperor Akihito to become the first occupant of the chrysanthemum throne to abdicate since 1817. With Akihito stepping down, his son, Crown Prince Naruhito, will likely take over. The imperial family has just 19 living members, and only three males who could rule in the future, which is one reason why parliament also passed a law that proposes
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Ars Technica
So SpaceX is having quite a year Enlarge / Things are looking up for SpaceX in 2017. (credit: SpaceX) SpaceX had difficult years in 2015 and 2016, as two accidents with its Falcon 9 rocket hit the company's bottom line and raised some concerns about its reliability in the global launch market. But now the company seems to have bounced back nicely, and after a little more than five months the company is on pace to have an absolut
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mussels add muscle to biocompatible fibersChemists have used the sticky substance found in mussels to develop self-assembling, biocompatible macroscale fibers that can be used as scaffolds for directed cell growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wind turbines: The strength testWind turbines rise into the sky on enormous feet. To ensure these giants can reliably generate electricity for many years to come, the iron processing industry must manufacture their massive components in a stable, resource-saving and yet cost-effective way. However, material inclusions such as dross are often unavoidable while casting. Researchers are currently working to detect and analyze such
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experimental drug BIA 10-2474 deactivates proteins in human nerve cellsAt high doses, drug candidate BIA 10-2474 binds not only to the protein that it targets, but to other proteins as well. It thus deactivates proteins that are involved in the metabolism of nerve cells.
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New Scientist - News
Five things you need to know about DUP politicians and scienceDemocratic Unionist Party politicians have voiced controversial views on climate change, HIV and creationism. Here’s what they’ve said on some key issues
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Dad Clothes, Networking Gear, Horizon Zero Dawn, and More Amazon’s TP-Link networking sale , Father’s Day clothes , and a wood pellet grill lead off Friday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals TP-Link Gold Box If you still haven’t upgraded your home network to 802.11ac, or if you just want to fill in a few dead zones in the corners of your home, Amazon’s running a huge sale
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flaws in a tumor's genetic mending kit drive treatment response to immunotherapyIn an expanded, three-year clinical trial of 86 patients with colorectal and 11 other kinds of cancer that have so-called 'mismatch repair' genetic defects, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy have found that half of the patients respond to an immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab (Keytruda).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IUPUI study finds risk for binge drinking differs by race, income and changes with ageAn Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study finds differing risk for binge drinking based on race, income and age. African-Americans are generally at low risk for binge drinking, but that risk increases disproportionately with age among African-Americans who are poor.
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Viden
Motion kan få børn til at huske bedreLæringssessionen er afgørende, men bedre resultater gennem motion er krymmel på toppen, siger dansk forsker.
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Gizmodo
The Tech Industry's Rich Cowards Are Still Advising Trump Image: AP Once again, Silicon Valley’s oligarchs have been summoned to Donald Trump’s golden table, this time to assist the Jared Kushner-led American Technology Council in “modernizing” the government, a goal which is at once vague and arguably antithetical to every promise the president ran on. The guest list includes the top brass of Facebook, IBM, Google, Apple, Microsoft, and Amazon. The clo
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Gizmodo
Uber's CEO Wrote A Sex Guide For Employees And It's As Bad As You'd Think Photo: AP Here’s a line you’ve heard before: It hasn’t been a good week for Uber . And now Recode’s got a hold of an internal 2013 email penned by Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, in which he advised employees on how to have sex with colleagues. Guidance for this sort of thing can be good, as our friends have demonstrated wonderfully before , but Kalanick’s memo is as terrible as you’d expect. Recode sa
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Live Science
Hair Regrowth Products for Women & Men: Who Pays More?Products aimed at regrowing hair cost more when they are marketed to women than when they are marketed to men, a new study finds.
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Live Science
100-Million-Year-Old Amber Holds Tiny, Feathery ChickThe body of a tiny chick in a piece of Burmese amber from the Cretaceous period was preserved in incredible detail.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene enhancing our vision of the infinitely smallResearchers report using one-atom-thin graphene film to drastically enhance the quality of electron microscopy images.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mind the liquid gap: Liquids are capable of supporting waves with short wavelengths onlyFlowing particles in liquids act as a filter to suppress long-wavelength waves but allow short-wavelength ones to be supported, according to physicists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Space-traveling flatworms help scientists enhance understanding of regenerative healthFlatworms that spent five weeks aboard the International Space Station are helping researchers scientists study how an absence of normal gravity and geomagnetic fields can have anatomical, behavioral, and bacteriological consequences, according to a paper. The research has implications for human and animal space travelers and for regenerative and bioengineering science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why microplastic debris may be the next big threat to our seasMore than five trillion pieces of plastic debris are estimated to be in our oceans, though many are impossible to see with the naked eye.
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The Atlantic
The App That Does Nothing Binky is an app that does everything an app is expected to do. It’s got posts. It’s got likes. It’s got comments. It’s got the infinitely scrolling timeline found in all social apps, from Facebook to Twitter, Instagram to Snapchat. I open it and start scrolling. Images of people, foods, and objects appear on and then vanish off the screen. Solar cooker. B.F. Skinner. Shoes. Marmalade. Sports Bra.
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The Atlantic
Oil Is Flowing Through the Dakota Access Pipeline After months of protests, more than 750 arrests, and high-profile interventions by both the Obama and Trump administrations , the first part of the battle over the Dakota Access pipeline has ended. Oil is now flowing through the pipeline—and, crucially, beneath Lake Oahe in North Dakota, which is sacred to local Lakota and Dakota people and their only source of water. But the battle over the pipe
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New on MIT Technology Review
In Buying Boston Dynamics, SoftBank Is Betting Big on Walking RobotsCan the company make a go of the automatons that never did fit in at Google?
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Gizmodo
Scientists Think They've Solved the Mystery of Our Atmosphere's Missing Xenon Xenon is the periodic table’s Babadook (Image: Screenshot/ YouTube ) Xenon is a peculiar element. It certainly has one of the most mysterious names (from the Greek xenos , or “stranger”). As a noble gas, it refuses to bond with other elements except under exotic conditions. And its uses are all about as creepy as its name: Folks use it for its eerie glow, to detect radiation, or in its liquid for
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About Lord Buckethead, the Spacelord Star of the UK General Election Image: Still via Youtube The United Kingdom has woken up after going to the polls to a shocking upset for Prime Minister Theresa May , and a hung Parliament—an outcome where no party managed to achieve a singular majority. But if American audiences tuned in, they have been less perplexed by the electoral system than Lord Buckethead. My nation’s finest politician, Lord Buckethead—who, up until las
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows texting as good as medication at improving type 2 diabetes managementLow-income Hispanics with Type 2 diabetes who received health-related text messages every day for six months saw improvements in their blood sugar levels that equaled those resulting from some glucose-lowering medications, researchers with the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute reported today.
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Live Science
Hatchling Preserved in Amber (Photos)Scientists recently found the most complete fossil to date of a type of bird from the Cretaceous, trapped in a piece of amber.
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Inside Science
Diamonds Reveal Secrets of the Earth Diamonds Reveal Secrets of the Earth Teeny tiny minerals locked inside diamonds tell scientists about Earth’s early history. Diamonds Reveal Secrets of the Earth Video of Diamonds Reveal Secrets of the Earth Earth Friday, June 9, 2017 - 11:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- To many people, diamonds are a symbol of eternity, strength and everlasting love. No other gem expres
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Science | The Guardian
Einstein’s Greatest Mistake by David Bodanis review – the story of a fallible geniusStubbornness beset Einstein’s later years when he increasingly distrusted new experimental data In this very readable biography of one of the most famous scientists of all time, Bodanis tells “the story of a fallible genius but also the story of his mistakes”. Although he breezes through Einstein’s whole life, including his annus mirabilis, 1905, when aged 26 he wrote five papers that transformed
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Futurity.org
The chance to win cash may double weight loss Selling access to rewards programs that offer cash for meeting weight loss goals may incentivize program participants to lose more weight, new research suggests. The work has implications for insurance companies and employers looking for low-cost strategies to improve population health. Eric Finkelstein, a professor at the Duke-NUS Medical School, used insights from behavioral economics to develo
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Ars Technica
Air Force may retire a third of active A-10 “Warthogs” for want of replacement wings A US Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to the 354th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron flies during a "theater security package" deployment at Campia Turzii, Romania, April 1, 2015. The Air Force needs to fly the A-10 through 2022 because of F-35 delays, but it hasn't got enough orders for wing replacements to sustain all of them. (credit: US Air Force) The US Air Force's plans to operate the A-
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Live Science
Can World's Largest Atom Smasher Solve the Universe's Deepest Mysteries?The Large Hadron Collider has the potential to solve some of the universe's deepest mysteries, including what is dark matter and dark energy and how did the universe come to be.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Once Again, Climate Change Cited as Trigger for WarA new report identifies 12 "epicenters" worldwide where changing climate could spark conflict -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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TEDTalks (video)
12 truths I learned from life and writing | Anne LamottA few days before she turned 61, writer Anne Lamott decided to write down everything she knew for sure. She dives into the nuances of being a human who lives in a confusing, beautiful, emotional world, offering her characteristic life-affirming wisdom and humor on family, writing, the meaning of God, death and more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The way toward cleaner coal plantsIn an effort to design cleaner coal power plants, researchers have performed some of the most detailed multiphase turbulence simulations ever run.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could removal of aging cells extend human life?A research team has confirmed that targeting SnCs could treat age-related degenerative joint disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infants born preterm may lack key lung cells later in lifeMice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smiling during victory could hurt future chances of cooperationResearchers have studied how reacting with a smile affects game outcomes, hoping one day to empower virtual humans with this knowledge.
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Gizmodo
Why Did This Company Let Me Fly a $2 Million Aircraft? All photos: Adam Clark Estes Somewhere over the Hamptons, the pilot told me to take the controls. To my left, there was a joystick, roughly the same size and dimension as my favorite ‘90s arcade game, After Burner . I clutched it, pulled back, and felt the jet climb. “Now try to stay inside the boxes,” the pilot said, pointing at a touchscreen in the cockpit. “It’s a lot like Flight Simulator 200
8h
The Atlantic
Chelsea Manning's First Interview Since Her Prison Release Former Army analyst Chelsea Manning gave her first televised interview Friday since her release last month from prison, where she served seven years for her role in leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to WikiLeaks. When asked whether she felt she owed an apology to the American people for conducting what is considered the largest breach of classified data in U.S. history, Mannin
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The Atlantic
Orange Is the New Black Gambles Big In its first few years of existence, Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black evolved from a dramedy about an oblivious white woman enduring prison to a deft and richly textured portrait of injustice in America. This transformation culminated in the penultimate episode of Season 4, “The Animals,” in which a beloved character, Poussey Washington (Samira Wiley), was crushed to death by a prison guard—a he
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Shining a light on the dark corners of the web Cybercrime researcher Gianluca Stringhini explains how he studies hate speech and fake news on the underground network 4chan. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22128
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Ecologists warn of Japanese badger cull 'crisis' Population crash feared amid a fad for badger meat. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22131
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Scientific American Content: Global
What's Next for NASA's New Astronaut Class?A dozen new candidates were chosen from more than 18,000 applicants. Now the real work begins -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Why fleece jackets are bad news for the ocean Microfibers are one of the biggest contributors to ocean pollution. New research clarifies how washing fleece jackets contributes to the problem. A type of microplastic—similar to the vilified and widely banned microbeads—microfibers are potentially more problematic for the ocean and other waterways. They are not only denser, able to sink while microbeads and other plastics float, but also able t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Miniaturizing America's tallest damEngineers at Utah State University's Utah Water Research Laboratory have constructed a 1:50 scale model of the Oroville Dam spillway.
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Gizmodo
The Secret History of the Cat Who Authored a Physics Paper Regrettably, none of us will get to be cats. Most of us will never write a published physics paper either, let alone a highly respected one. But somehow, in the 1970s, a phenomenal feline named Chester managed to do all of this under the tutelage of his human, physicist Jack H. Hetherington. He even had a pawesome pen name —F.D.C. Willard. Yes, really. In November 1975, Hetherington, a physics pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists use numerical 'tweezers' to study nuclear interactionsResearchers from North Carolina State University and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed numerical "tweezers" that can pin a nucleus in place, enabling them to study how interactions between protons and neutrons produce forces between nuclei. They found that the strength of local interactions determines whether or not these nuclei attract or repel each other, shedding light on the parameter
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The largest virtual Universe ever simulatedResearchers have simulated the formation of our entire Universe with a large supercomputer. A gigantic catalogue of about 25 billion virtual galaxies has been generated from 2 trillion digital particles. This catalogue is being used to calibrate the experiments on board the Euclid satellite, that will be launched in 2020 with the objective of investigating the nature of dark matter and dark energy
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Ars Technica
The Internet needs paid fast lanes, anti-net neutrality senator says Enlarge / Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.). (credit: Getty Images | Bill Clark) This week, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and a Republican US senator each called net neutrality a "slogan" that solves no real problems, with the senator also arguing that the Internet should have paid fast lanes. "It’s a great slogan," FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said, when asked by a radio host what net neut
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Dana Foundation
New Method Reaches Deep in the Brain Without Surgery A team of neuroscientists and engineers are working to develop a new form of treatment for people who have Parkinson’s disease, depression, or obsessive-compulsive disorder. According to a recent New York Times article , the available methods for treating these conditions currently involve the risks of surgery and can have limited ability with directing electrical pulses to the right areas of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to weigh a white dwarf: Use Hubble Space TelescopeFor the first time, astronomers have used a novel method to determine the mass of a type of star known as a 'white dwarf' -- the shrunken corpse of a dead star that used to be like our sun. The achievement, made with the Hubble Space Telescope, is described as a wonderful confirmation of theoretical predictions, and a beautiful reprise of the Einstein solar eclipse observations of a century ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mussels add muscle to biocompatible fibersRice University chemists use the sticky substance found in mussels to develop self-assembling, biocompatible macroscale fibers that can be used as scaffolds for directed cell growth.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists use numerical 'tweezers' to study nuclear interactionsResearchers from North Carolina State University and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed numerical 'tweezers' that can pin a nucleus in place, enabling them to study how interactions between protons and neutrons produce forces between nuclei.
8h
The Atlantic
How Do You Conserve Art Made of Bologna, or Bubble Gum, or Soap? Art critics noted the stink as soon as the elevator opened. Indeed, the morning of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Biennial preview, Pope L.’s contribution smelled like rotten lunch. For good reason: Claim , on view through June 11, consists of 2,755 bologna slices nailed in grid formation on the walls of a small, freestanding room within the exhibition. Plastic basins catch the grease run-o
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Scientific American Content: Global
"A Feature, Not a Bug": George Church Ascribes His Visionary Ideas to NarcolepsyProjects at the famed biologist’s lab include DNA data storage and resurrecting the woolly mammoth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Gigantisk 'boblebad' skal blæse plastforurening op til havoverfladenSpecialselskab fra den norske olieindustri på banen med utraditionelt forslag i kampen mod plastforurening af verdenshavene. Forskere er positive over for ideen.
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Gizmodo
The First Black Panther Poster Is Appropriately Badass We’re still a few months out from Black Panther ’s release next February, but Marvel’s just dropped the first poster for the movie featuring something other than stylized text and it’s absolutely glorious. The poster doesn’t really give much detail about the movie itself, of course, but it does provide a sense of what we can expect to see of Wakanda’s royal architecture, which, interestingly, has
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The Stanley Cup Final Has Gotten Nasty | Jezebel Bill Cosby’s Insanely Fucked-Up Ideas Abou Deadspin The Stanley Cup Final Has Gotten Nasty | Jezebel Bill Cosby’s Insanely Fucked-Up Ideas About Consent And What Sex Is Are Read To Jurors | Fusion Donald Trump Finally Tweeted About James Comey’s Testimony | The Root Weis Supermarket Employee Goes on Shooting Rampage, Kills 3 and Himself |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid the rise of GPS, NOAA weighs a move away from paper chartingGrowing up boating in Annapolis, Jan Majer remembers his father marking up his nautical charts by hand each year with the latest information on buoy and shoal movements.
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Gizmodo
Alphabet Just Unloaded Its Crazy Robots on Japanese Telecom Softbank GIF Three years after acquiring the MIT robotics lab Boston Dynamics, makers of Atlas and other scary bots , Alphabet (Google’s parent company) is selling it off to Softbank , a Japanese telecommunications company already known for its less terrifying robots like Pepper that might soon be getting some impressive upgrades. It turns out that posting YouTube videos of nightmare-inducing robots isn’t
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Gizmodo
Keep Prying Eyes Out of Your Browsing History For About $0.11 Per Day 1 Year NordVPN , $48 with code VIP70 | 2 Year Plan , $72 with code 2YSpecial2017 VPNs are in the news these days , and with good reason. So if you’re curious to sign up and start protecting your browsing history and personal data (or, you know, getting around websites’ geoblocks), NordVPN charges less per month than a typical trip to Starbucks. NordVPN has long been one of the most popular and re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The first nanometrically-sized superelastic alloyNature Nanotechnology has published the results of a piece of research into alloys with shape memory conducted by the Department of Physics of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space-traveling flatworms help scientists enhance understanding of regenerative healthFlatworms that spent five weeks aboard the International Space Station are helping researchers led by Tufts University scientists to study how an absence of normal gravity and geomagnetic fields can have anatomical, behavioral, and bacteriological consequences, according to a paper to be published June 13 in Regeneration. The research has implications for human and animal space travelers and for r
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemists brought mixed folded proteins to lifeScientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them. Importantly, this technique works for multiprotein systems - nobody has been able to recover mixtures of enzymes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harnessing computational intelligence to improve the management of health emergenciesThe analysis of thousands of records of patients' physiological values has allowed a researcher in the UPV/EHU's Computational Research Group (GIC) to develop a system of algorithms to determine the degree of seriousness of the condition of the patients. A system of this type offers an improvement in spotting the more serious cases, and not only do the patients receive better attention, the resour
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mind the liquid gap: Liquids are capable of supporting waves with short wavelengths onlyFlowing particles in liquids act as a filter to suppress long-wavelength waves but allow short-wavelength ones to be supported, according to physicists at Queen Mary University of London.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removal of aging cells could extend human lifeA research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has confirmed that targeting SnCs could treat age-related degenerative joint disease. Their findings appeared in the world renowned medical journal, Nature Medicine.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemists brought mixed folded proteins to lifeScientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them. Importantly, this technique works for multiprotein systems -- nobody has been able to recover mixtures of enzyme
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unraveling the mysteries of NipponosaurusNipponosaurus sachalinensis—a controversial hadrosaurid dinosaur whose fossilized skeleton was unearthed in southern Sakhalin in 1934—is found to be a valid taxon and a juvenile that had not reached sexual maturity.
9h
Ars Technica
Google sells off Boston Dynamics to SoftBank Japanese tech company SoftBank will acquire Boston Dynamics, a high-profile robotics firm that was picked up by Google X in December 2013 and then moved under the Alphabet umbrella. Boston Dynamics is famous for creating a series of animal-like robots, including the original sounds-like-a-swarm-of-bees BigDog, robot-land-speed-record-holder Cheetah, the militarised AlphaDog, and a couple of biped
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team improves remote detection of hazardous radioactive substancesA recent study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a method for the remote detection of hazardous radioactive substances. With the help of this newly-developed detection device, the detection of various types of radioactive materials can be done from a remote distance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers compute their way toward cleaner coal plantsWhen you think of turbulence, you might think of a bumpy plane ride. Turbulence, however, is far more ubiquitous to our lives than just air travel. Ocean waves, smoke from fire, even noise coming from jet engines or wind turbines are all related to turbulence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructuresHeterogeneous nanostructured materials are widely used in various optoelectronic devices, including solar cells. However, the nano-interfaces contain structural defects that can affect performance. Calculations have helped researchers ID the root cause of the defects in two materials and provide design rules to avoid them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distinct wiring mode found in chandelier cellsFor the first time, researchers show that a unique type of inhibitory interneuron called chandelier cells -- which are implicated in several diseases affecting the brain such as schizophrenia and epilepsy -- seem to develop their connections differently than other types of neurons.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's first success in asymmetric borylation of ketonesA team of Hokkaido University researchers has developed the world's first method to achieve the catalytic asymmetric borylation of ketones, a breakthrough expected to facilitate the development of new medicines and functional chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lost ecosystem found buried in mud of southern California coastal watersPaleontologists investigating the sea bed off California have discovered a lost ecosystem that for thousands of years had nurtured communities of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods. They had died off by the early 20th century, replaced by the mud-dwellling burrowing clams that inhabit this seabed today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heroin's use rising, costing society more than $51 billionHeroin use in the United States was estimated to cost society more than $51 billion in 2015, according to new research.
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Dana Foundation
Sound Health: Music and the Mind The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Kennedy Center for the Arts have teamed up to explore the connections among music, the brain, and human wellness. The idea for the “Sound Health” partnership came up in conversations between NIH director Francis Collins and renowned soprano and Kennedy Center artistic advisor Renée Fleming. In March NIH hosted a science workshop, where researchers s
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Live Science
Comey 'Stunned' by Trump: Why We 'Freeze' in Uncomfortable SituationsHow could former FBI Director James Comey, a 6-foot-8 onetime prosecutor known to stand up to power — feel "stunned" and lapse into an "awkward" silence during a conversation with President Donald Trump?
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Science | The Guardian
Does the future hold the key to happiness? | Oliver Burkrman Old-school psychologists obsess over the past; modern, self-helpy ones focus on the present. But a new school of thought is hanging happiness on the future The standard knock against old-school approaches to psychology – Freud , Jung et al – is they’re obsessed with the past. Visit some crusty psychoanalyst and you’re sure to waste years picking through your childhood, concluding – surprise! – th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Being overweight linked to longer life in older diabeticsAmong older patients with diabetes, those who are overweight or obese may have a lower risk of dying prematurely than their normal weight counterparts. The finding comes from a recent analysis of published studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug combination benefits patients with tophaceous goutThe drug lesinurad in combination with febuxostat was better at lowering blood levels of urate than febuxostat alone in a phase III clinical trial of 324 patients with tophaceous gout.
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Ars Technica
Don’t change your plans to not see The Mummy Enlarge / More pupils means more evil. (credit: Universal Pictures) I'm surprised it has taken this long for Tom Cruise to tank an otherwise decent film. His Scientology-related controversies haven't been followed by any big film failures—far from it, considering that he has multiple decent Mission: Impossible and Jack Reacher films under his belt at this point. So I went into his reboot of The M
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's 'first named dinosaur' reveals new teeth with scanning techPioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world's first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil -- over 200 years after it was first discovered -- thanks to research.
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Gizmodo
Taylor Swift Returns to Spotify Because She's Rich Enough Now Photo: Getty What do you do when you finally have everything? If you’re Taylor Swift, you give a little something back. And take a swing at Katy Perry, of course. To celebrate her album 1989 selling over 10 million copies, the 27-year-old pop singer announced last nightthat she would let fans stream her old albums on apps like Spotify. Sure, Swift won’t make as much money doing this as she’d like
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Live Science
Groundswell of Local Support to Meet US Goals in Paris AccordAmerica's Pledge is part of a growing effort by local governments to meet the U.S. Paris Agreement goals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biodiversity is 3-DThe species-area relationship (SAC) is a long-time considered pattern in ecology and is discussed in most of academic Ecology books. Its implications are relevant for many ecological, evolutionary, conservation and biogeographic purposes. Conversely, the associated volume-species relation has been almost ignored.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers compute their way toward cleaner coal plantsIn an effort to design cleaner coal power plants, RWTH Aachen University researchers have been using High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart resources to perfrom some of the most detailed multiphase turbulence simulations ever run. The team recently released results in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics.
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Dagens Medicin
Otte ud af ti patienter får hurtig udredning Monitorering af udredningsretten viser, at for de fysiske sygdomme overholdes udredningsretten for ca. 80 procent af patientforløbene.
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Futurity.org
Brain ‘tunes in’ to rhythm in sign language and speech The way the brain locks into patterns of speech is not unique to understanding spoken language, a new study suggests. The process, called entrainment, is also part of understanding sign language. The human brain works in rhythms and cycles. These patterns occur at predictable frequencies that depend on what a person is doing and on what part of the brain is active during the behavior. Similarly,
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Ingeniøren
Nyt renseanlæg kan levere strøm til 1.600 husstandeBillund Biorefinery producerer 2,5 gange så meget strøm, som det forbruger. Det samlede renseanlæg og kraftværk, der har været på tegnebrættet siden 2013, blev endelig indviet i denne uge.
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Futurity.org
How vision stays steady as the world zooms by A new study says specialized cells in the retina detect their owner’s motion through the world by sensing radiating flow. To understand what that means, think of the way that a long flat highway seems to widen out around you from a single point on the horizon, while in the rear-view mirror everything narrows back to a single point behind you. Or think of the way that when a spaceship in a movie a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving systems of linear equations with quantum mechanics(Phys.org)—Physicists have experimentally demonstrated a purely quantum method for solving systems of linear equations that has the potential to work exponentially faster than the best classical methods. The results show that quantum computing may eventually have far-reaching practical applications, since solving linear systems is commonly done throughout science and engineering.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Mother Nature and a Pentagon Mathematician Created the World's Largest InstrumentThe Great Stalacpipe Organ operates by rhythmically striking 37 different stalactites scattered across the 3.5-acre cave -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST improves remote detection of hazardous radioactive substancesA research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has proposed a new method that might be used to detect nuclear hazards from up to a few hundred meters away.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The largest virtual Universe ever simulatedResearchers from the University of Zurich have simulated the formation of our entire Universe with a large supercomputer. A gigantic catalogue of about 25 billion virtual galaxies has been generated from 2 trillion digital particles. This catalogue is being used to calibrate the experiments on board the Euclid satellite, that will be launched in 2020 with the objective of investigating the nature
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Graphene enhancing our vision of the infinitely smallOIST researchers report using one-atom-thin graphene film to drastically enhance the quality of electron microscopy images.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unraveling the mysteries of NipponosaurusNipponosaurus sachalinensis -- a controversial hadrosaurid dinosaur whose fossilized skeleton was unearthed in southern Sakhalin in 1934 -- is found to be a valid taxon and a juvenile that had not reached sexual maturity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cash for weight lossA new study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, has shown that selling rewards programmes to participants entering a weight loss programme is a low cost strategy to increase both the magnitude and duration of weight loss. A team from the Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and Singapore General Hospital (SGH) led the research, which has implications for insurance companies and em
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH-led workshop addresses opioid misuse during pregnancyResearch is essential to determining how best to screen pregnant women for opioid use disorder, to treat pregnant women who have the disorder, and to care for infants as they experience withdrawal symptoms, according to experts convened for a National Institutes of Health workshop in April 2016. A summary of the workshop, co-sponsored by NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Hea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's first success in asymmetric borylation of ketonesA team of Hokkaido University researchers has developed the world's first method to achieve the catalytic asymmetric borylation of ketones, a breakthrough expected to facilitate the development of new medicines and functional chemicals.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Every drill bit countsCurrently, factories work on a principle of "one size fits all" when it comes to replacing or regrinding tools such as drill bits, milling machines or planes after a specified period of time – whether they need it or not. Not only does this unnecessarily increase the time spent on maintenance, it is expensive, too. In the "Cute Machining" project, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Micr
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The Atlantic
The Punishment of Theresa May Prime Minister Theresa May believed she had constructed an inescapable trap for British voters. Most observers and pundits, myself included, assumed it would work. Last night, the voters delivered a stunning surprise. Rather than walk into the trap, they knocked it over. Half of British society wished to stay in the EU. Forty-eight percent voted Remain in the June 2016 referendum, and they have n
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The Atlantic
Our Searches, Our Selves Perhaps the aphorism should be changed to “In Google, veritas.” Where do people go with their most intimate worries, thoughts, and fears? Not the nearest water cooler or humblebrag app. More likely, they’ll seek comfort in the relative privacy of a search box. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a former data scientist at Google, used his data-analysis skills to learn what was really on Americans’ minds. T
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The Atlantic
Tech Giants and Diplomatic Crises: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories Inside Refugee High Elly Fishman | Chicago Magazine If Sullivan High School had a motto, it would be “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Its immigrant population now numbers close to 300—45 percent of the school’s 641 students—and many are refugees new to this country. This academic year alone, the Rogers Park school has welcomed a staggering 89 refugees
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The Atlantic
The Warriors’ Perfect Basketball Any seasoned watcher of the NBA knows that stockpiled talent brings its own drawbacks. Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal won three consecutive titles together for Los Angeles in the 2000s, but they sniped at each other in the media and eventually presented an ultimatum to the front office: Choose one. LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, when they joined forces in Miami in 2010, found that giving up some
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructuresTo understand the nature of something extremely complex, you often have to study its smallest parts. In trying to decipher the universe, for example, we search for gravitational waves or faint waves of light from the Big Bang. And to comprehend the very essence of matter itself, we break it down to the subatomic level and use computer simulations to study particles like quarks and gluons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists discover mound next to Slough car park is 'prestigious' Anglo-Saxon monumentArchaeologists have found that a 20-foot high mound in Slough, thought to be a Norman castle motte and for centuries the centrepiece of a bizarre Eton College ceremony, is actually a rare Saxon monument, built 1,500 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Direct conversion of rusty stainless steel mesh into stable, low-cost electrodes for potassium-ion batteriesChinese scientists have made good use of waste while finding an innovative solution to a technical problem by transforming rusty stainless steel mesh into electrodes with outstanding electrochemical properties that make them ideal for potassium-ion batteries. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the rust is converted directly into a compact layer with a grid structure that can store potas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find biomarker in deciduous teeth for establishing the age of weaning(Phys.org)—The transition from breastfeeding to a nonmilk diet is a developmental milestone, influencing future health and survival of mammals, including humans. Breast milk is highly beneficial to infants, conferring easily digested nutrients and energy, while also strongly enhancing young immune systems. However, as infants grow, their metabolic needs outstrip the resources that mothers can prov
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pneumonia bacteria's 'evolutionary hotspot' helps it to evade the immune systemThe diverse 'coats' which protect a deadly microbe from our immune cells are generated by a 'hotspot' of rapidly evolving genes, a study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space-traveling flatworms help scientists enhance understanding of regenerative healthFlatworms that spent five weeks aboard the International Space Station are helping researchers led by Tufts University scientists to study how an absence of normal gravity and geomagnetic fields can have anatomical, behavioral, and bacteriological consequences, according to a paper to be published June 13 in Regeneration. The research has implications for human and animal space travelers and for r
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Gizmodo
More New Looks at Star Wars: The Last Jedi's First Order Armies Godzilla: King of the Monsters casts an important new role. The Snowpiercer TV show finds another lead star. Jared Leto discusses his Blade Runner 2049 character. Mary Poppins Returns reveals why Mary Poppins, err... returns. Plus new footage from Spider-Man: Homecoming and Transformers: The Last Knight . Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Star Wars News Net has leaked merchandise promo shots
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Ingeniøren
Danmark får sit første bofællesskab for kunstig intelligensAlexandra Instituttet indvier et nyt center for kunstig intelligens, hvor især små og mellemstore virksomheder kan sparre med hinanden og købe sig til de nødvendige kompetencer. Den første lejer flytter ind efter sommerferien.
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Futurity.org
Doctors flub the follow-up for H. pylori Adherence to the guidelines is low among US gastroenterologists treating patients with H. pylori , survey results show. Stress was once the assumed cause of gastric ulcers and other digestive maladies. But in 2005, Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for recognizing the role of Helicobacter pylori in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Now phys
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The future of the Orion constellationStars are not motionless in the sky: their positions change continuously as they move through our Galaxy, the Milky Way. These motions, too slow to be appreciated with the naked eye over a human lifetime, can be captured by high-precision observations like those performed by ESA's billion-star surveyor, Gaia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liquids are capable of supporting waves with short wavelengths onlyFlowing particles in liquids act as a filter to suppress long-wavelength waves but allow short-wavelength ones to be supported, according to physicists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Concept could sustainably meet human resource needs of 'full Earth'A new concept proposes to provide food, energy and water resources for the world's growing population by combining systems that simultaneously use different parts of sunlight's spectrum to produce crops, generate electricity, collect heat and purify water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A brief history of computer games in the classroomPlay has always been central to growing up, – whether it's in the street or on a playing field – or in the structured formality of teachers' quizzes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disorder during language lessons at ethnically diverse schoolsPupils at schools with greater ethnic diversity experience more disorder during language lessons. This is one of the outcomes of research conducted by Gert-Jan Veerman, Lecturer in Education Studies at the Christelijke Hogeschool Ede (CHE). He defended his PhD thesis at the University of Amsterdam on Thursday 1 June. His research was made possible by a Doctoral Grant for Teachers from NWO.
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Simpler Parkinson's Tests Probe Walking, Talking, TypingNew tests show promise for detecting the neurodegenerative condition earlier -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distinct wiring mode found in chandelier cellsResearchers from Hiroki Taniguchi's lab at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) published a study in eNeuro in May 2017 showing for the first time that a unique type of inhibitory interneuron called chandelier cells -- which are implicated in several diseases affecting the brain such as schizophrenia and epilepsy -- seem to develop their connections differently than other types
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The Scientist RSS
Molecule Similar to Peptides Detected in ProtostarsThe dust surrounding emerging, Sun-like stars contains methyl isocyanate, an organic molecule.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Sex Flip FlopThe bluebanded goby, Lythrypnus dalli, is capable of quickly changing sexes in either direction-a transition that typically takes two weeks.
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The Scientist RSS
Medical Devices Aspire to Ditch BatteriesScientists draw from wristwatches, wireless transmission technology, and patients' own heartbeats to design new power sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bilingualism among mediaeval Irish scholars was akin to bilingualism todayA mediaeval Irish monk was able to switch effortlessly between Irish and Latin when writing a book. This phenomenon of code switching is common to all eras; we switch effortlessly between Dutch and English nowadays too. Nike Stam researched this phenomenon by studying mediaeval calendar texts. She concluded that the way in which these monks switched languages in their writings was akin to the way
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligent crowd reviewing of scientific papers tested(Phys.org)—Online chemistry journal Synlett, which is published by Thieme, has tested the idea of intelligent crowd reviewing of scientific papers. The project was the brainchild of Benjamin List, a journal editor (and researcher with the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research), and his graduate assistant, Denis Höfler. They came up with the idea as an alternative to the traditional peer review pr
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.