The Atlantic
A Resolution Condemning White Supremacy Causes Chaos at the Southern Baptist Convention Leaders from the Southern Baptist Convention were divided over a resolution affirming the denomination’s opposition to white supremacy and the alt-right during their annual meeting in Phoenix this week. On Tuesday, they initially declined to consider the proposal submitted by a prominent black pastor in Texas, Dwight McKissic, and only changed course after a significant backlash. The drama over t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-in-1 device offers alternative to Moore's lawIn the semiconductor industry, there is currently one main strategy for improving the speed and efficiency of devices: scale down the device dimensions in order to fit more transistors onto a computer chip, in accordance with Moore's law. However, the number of transistors on a computer chip cannot exponentially increase forever, and this is motivating researchers to look for other ways to improve
4h
Ingeniøren
Svenske forskere efter vild batteri-debat: Vi sammenligner ikke hele elbilen med en benzinbilDebatten har været ophedet, efter at svenske forskere konkluderede, at det 'kostede' 8,2 år at køre i en stor elbil, før den CO2, der kommer fra produktion af batteriet, er betalt tilbage i forhold til en benzinbil. Nu præciserer svenskerne beregningerne.
4h

LATEST

Ars Technica
Trump to nominate Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel for empty slot at FCC Enlarge / Jessica Rosenworcel speaks at INTX: The Internet & Television Expo in Chicago on Wednesday, May 6, 2015. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) President Donald Trump plans to nominate Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel for another term on the Federal Communications Commission. Rosenworcel had to leave the commission at the end of last year when the Republican-led US Senate refused to reconfirm h
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk's vision of a self-sustaining city on Mars published in New SpaceThe Commentary entitled "Making Humans a Multi-Planetary Species presents the vision of Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, for future manned trips to other planets and specifically what will be needed to create a self-sustaining city on Mars. The article, drawn from Mr. Musk's presentation at the 67th International Astronautical Congress, is published in New Space, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Lie
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First CRISPR crop could debut in 2020The gene-editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9 made a huge splash in the news when it was initially announced. But the first commercial product, expected around 2020, could make it to the market without much fanfare: It's a waxy corn destined to contribute to paper glue and food thickeners. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Soc
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make waves with black hole researchScientists at the University of Nottingham have made a significant leap forward in understanding the workings of one of the mysteries of the universe. They have successfully simulated the conditions around black holes using a specially designed water bath.
3min
New Scientist - News
To steal an advantage in the Brexit talks try a Superman poseIn Brexit negotiations, tricks of body and mind may boost the chances of David Davis and his team. They need all the help they can get, says William Lee Adams
6min
TEDTalks (video)
When I die, recompose me | Katrina SpadeWhat if instead of being embalmed and buried or burned to ash our bodies could help grow new life after we die? Join Katrina Spade as she discusses "recomposition" -- a system that uses the natural decomposition process to turn our deceased into life-giving soil, honoring both the earth and the departed.
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Purposeful leaders' are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study findsPeople are happier and more productive when their leaders show strong morals, a clear vision and commitment to stakeholders, a new study has found.
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecuCarbon is one of the most versatile elements: it forms the basis for an enormous number of chemical compounds, it has several allotropes of different dimensionality, and it exhibits many different bonding geometries. For this reason, carbon materials have had a special place in materials research for a long time. Although the three-dimensional forms of carbon—diamond and graphite—are known since a
9min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Juncker rejects US climate deal re-negotiationCommission President Jean-Claude Juncker says the EU will not re-negotiate the Paris climate agreement.
9min
Futurity.org
Test for new surgeons would measure their sweat Evaluating the sweatiness of a resident physician can provide an objective evaluation of their surgical skills, research shows. Post-graduate physician training, known as residency, develops skills and expertise within a medical specialty. During five to seven years of surgical training, medical school professors determine the level of clinical competency, confidence, and decision-making skills o
10min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new mutation in kidney diseaseResearchers find an unexpected mutation in proteins of the exosome could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing the risk of kidney disease.
11min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildfires pollute much more than previously thoughtSummer wildfires boost air pollution considerably more than previously believed.
15min
Blog » Languages » English
June promotions are coming! Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mods , and Mentors is approaching. Fill out the form here to be considered by HQ for promotion following our next major competition. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy overall, with some flexibility if you’re really close Partici
15min
Quanta Magazine
The Thorny Truth About Spine Evolution Why do roses have thorns? The answer seems self-evident: Thorns, spines and prickles are plants’ defensive weaponry, making their most precious parts unpalatable — even untouchable — to big plant-eaters, like deer and other mammals. For decades, this has been the working assumption of scientists who study ecological interactions between plants and animals. The overwhelming bulk of the scientific
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is effective for militaryThe University of North Texas study focused on soldiers at Fort Hood who had chronic insomnia. Some received therapy from clinicians for six weeks and some received online therapy for six weeks.
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gender dictates camouflage strategy in this newly identified praying mantis groupAdult females and males in a new genus of Latin American praying mantises have sharply different approaches to camouflage, according to a Cleveland Museum of Natural History-led study in the open access journal ZooKeys. Males retain the stick-like appearance they employ as nymphs, while females morph into a leaf's shape and color. This peculiarity prompted the researchers to name the mantises afte
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscle growth finding may assist with cancer treatmentMonash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have collaboratively developed a therapeutic approach that dramatically promotes the growth of muscle mass, which could potentially prevent muscle wasting in diseases including muscular dystrophy and cancer.
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Printed sensors monitor tire wear in real timeElectrical engineers have invented a printed sensor made of metallic carbon nanotubes that can monitor the tread of tires in real-time. In its first demonstration, the cheap, simple innovation shows it can measure tire thickness down to the millimeter while surviving the harsh conditions of the interior of a tire.
17min
Gizmodo
Amazon Erects 79-Foot Cylindrical Shaft in Times Square Image: Amazon Look, I’m a straight woman with the maturity level of a 13-year-old boy. I am willing to admit that maybe— maybe —I sometimes see phalluses where they don’t exist. But this thing totally looks like a dick, right? Amazon announced today that it had erected the “largest Times Square advertising installment ever,” which is actually a 79-foot-tall Echo replica. While it can’t listen to
18min
Gizmodo
Fancy Chair Maker Herman Miller Is Making Creepy Software Now Photo: Herman Miller Do you ever sit down at your desk and wonder why the elevated surface doesn’t have more sensors to record and analyze data about your movements and habits? Well, wonder no more, my ergonomically-minded friend. Herman Miller, the manufacturer behind the Aeron chair, has invented a solution to the problem you never knew existed. That solution is a new system called Live OS . Th
18min
The Atlantic
How Companies Actually Decide What to Pay CEOs In 2014, 500 of the highest-paid senior executives at U.S. companies made nearly 1,000 times as much money as the average American worker , after taking into account salary, bonuses, and stock-based compensation. That discrepancy is so enormous that it prompts a question: How exactly do companies come up with and calibrate the often-colossal pay packages they give to their leaders? Through the 19
18min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Launch your imagination with Science News storiesYou don’t need a novel or a movie to escape into what feels like another reality. Just flip through the pages of Science News. The stories will take you to other worlds, as well as inner, hidden ones.
19min
Ars Technica
Pirate Bay may finally be sunk after EU copyright ruling (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) Infamous BitTorrent tracker site The Pirate Bay can be found liable of copyright violations even if it doesn't host any infringing content, Europe's top court has ruled. "Making available and managing an online platform for sharing copyright-protected works, such as 'The Pirate Bay,' may constitute an infringement of copyright," the Court of Justice of the Eur
21min
Big Think
High School, College, Career. Simple, Right? Not Any More. Education executive Jeff Livingston makes the case that our old higher-educational model is obsolete for our current reality. Read More
23min
NYT > Science
Hong Kong Journal: Hong Kong Wants a 3rd Runway. Will Its Dolphins Pay the Price?Expanding the airport will add to the environmental damage of high-speed ferry traffic and other infrastructure projects, biologists say.
24min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers question climate’s freshwater effectsWarming lakes, windmills for the Arctic, mosquito control and more in reader feedback.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beetles spark development of color-changing nanoparticles for commercial useInspired by the varying colors that gleam off of beetle shells, scientists have developed color-shifting nanoparticles that can change hue even after being embedded into a material. A report on the new, inexpensive technique, which could lead to the production of easier-to-read sensors and anti-tampering tags, appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earning a living in a changing climate—the plant perspectiveThere are many ways to make a living in a suitable climate but far fewer in a less suitable one. That may seem obvious for people living under various socio-economic stresses, but new research shows it also applies to the world's plants—many of which are resorting to dramatic 'last-stand' strategies to survive in deteriorating environmental conditions.
27min
Futurity.org
For detecting stuff like blushing, our eyes beat cameras Our color vision is superior at spotting “social signaling,” such as blushing or other facial color changes—even compared to the type of color vision that we design for digital cameras and other photographic devices. “Our color vision is very strange,” says James Higham, an assistant professor in New York University’s anthropology department and one of the study’s coauthors. “Humans and many othe
31min
Futurity.org
Salamander tails inspire new way to regrow nerves Pro-healing macrophages may help to regrow damaged nerves, a new study with rats suggests. The approach, researchers say, comes close to equaling the current best treatment—a surgical transplant using a nerve stripped from another part of the patient’s body. Macrophages are known as the “Pac-Man” of the immune system and form the body’s first line of defense against invasion—they indiscriminately
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New face-aging technique could boost search for missing peopleThe method maps out the key features, such as the shape of the cheek, mouth and forehead, of a face at a certain age. This information is fed to a computer algorithm which then synthesises new features for the face to produce photographic quality images of the face at different ages.
33min
The Atlantic
'This Kind of Mindless Violence Must Stop' Congressional lawmakers expressed shock, grief, and horror after House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, a Louisiana Republican, was shot at a congressional baseball game practice Wednesday morning. The Majority Whip’s office said in a statement around 10 a.m. ET that Scalise was “shot in the hip,” and had been transported to a hospital where he is in “stable condition,” but undergoing surgery. A numb
38min
The Atlantic
When Prayer Alone Does Not Suffice The attack on members of Congress at baseball practice in Alexandria this morning is, by one count , the 195th mass shooting of the year. Thankfully, this time it appears that nobody was killed. The same can’t be said, alas, for the gun battle in a Fresno home on June 6, or the workplace eruption in Orlando on June 5, or the shooting in St. Louis on June 2. Mass-casualty gun violence, like all fo
38min
The Atlantic
Otto Warmbier's Condition The parents of Otto Warmbier, who was freed by North Korea on Tuesday, are expected to provide an update on the condition of the 22-year-old University of Virginia student who arrived in Ohio late last night. Fred and Cindy Warmbier told media on Tuesday that their son had been in a coma since he was convicted by a North Korean court in March 2016. “We want the world to know how we and our son ha
38min
The Atlantic
How a Philly Ob-Gyn Ended Up Delivering a Baby Gorilla Last Friday, at 10:30 a.m., ob-gyn Rebekah McCurdy was seeing patients in her office when she got the call. Hello, said the voice on the line. It’s us. We’re thinking of doing a C-section, and we’re ready to put her under anesthesia. Weird, thought McCurdy. She wasn’t covering deliveries that morning, and in any case, she didn’t have any C-sections scheduled. “Who is this?” she said. “It’s the zo
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer researchers look at resistance to targeted therapy in mantle cell lymphomaA team of cancer researchers at the George Washington University Cancer Center published research looking at the underlying mechanisms of resistance to the drug, Ibrutinib, which is used to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make waves with black hole researchScientists at the University of Nottingham have made a significant leap forward in understanding the workings of one of the mysteries of the universe. They have successfully simulated the conditions around black holes using a specially designed water bath.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Peer-led self-management programs may not help teenagers with asthmaA study from the University of Warwick suggests peer-led self-management programs have little impact on the quality of life or lung function of adolescents with asthma.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Previous bacterial infection increases risk of newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndromeThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 have shown a link between newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome and previous infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tools help early diagnosis of systemic sclerosisThe results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference highlight the use of two new tools, which can potentially play a pivotal role in the early diagnosis of Systemic Sclerosis.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New imaging technique may help identify joint inflammation in children earlierThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 have confirmed that Fluorescence Optical Imaging (FOI), a technique used to visualize inflammation in arthritic joints, is as effective as ultrasound with Power Doppler (US / PD) at monitoring response to treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). FOI was also found to be more effective than US / PD
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK's voluntary pledge to provide calorie content information for alcoholic drinks fails to make significant progressAccording to new research reported in Public Health, the voluntary pledge by the UK industry in 2011 to provide information on alcohol calories has not led to any significant provision of this information to consumers. The study found that calorie information only appeared on the labels of around 1 percent of products examined, it was not present in any of the supermarket branches visited in the s
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elon Musk's vision of a self-sustaining city on Mars published in New SpaceThe Commentary entitled 'Making Humans a Multi-Planetary Species' presents the vision of Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, for future manned trips to other planets and specifically what will be needed to create a self-sustaining city on Mars.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Body fat and waist size linked to increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in womenMadrid, Spain, June 14, 2017: The results of a population study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) 2017 showed that, in women, being overweight or obese, as defined by body mass index (BMI ), abdominal obesity and a higher body fat percentage was associated with a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D printed tensegrity objects capable of dramatic shape changeA team of researchers has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.
40min
Gizmodo
Microsoft's AI Just Shattered the Ms. Pac-Man High Score GIF According to Twin Galaxies , the official high score for the arcade version of Ms. Pac-Man belongs to Abdner Ashman , with 933,580 points. Or at least it did, before an artificial intelligence developed by Microsoft achieved the maximum possible score for the game, 999,990. Playing the Atari 2600 version of the game (which explains why the graphics look so crude), the AI, developed by a compa
48min
Ingeniøren
Dansk virksomhed står bag ny type solfangerNordsjællandske Heliac har udviklet en CSP-solfanger, der trods sin flade udformning fungerer som sine parabolske pendanter. Sammen med E.On håber Heliac at kunne rejse det første danske anlæg på Møn.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient otter tooth found in Mexico suggests mammals migrated across AmericaAn ancient otter tooth recently discovered in Mexico suggests certain mammals migrated across America during the Miocene geologic epoch, roughly 23 million to 5.3 million years ago. The new hypothesized route questions other theories such as migrations above Canada and through Panama, and has implications for a much larger biologic event -- the Great American Biotic Interchange, when land bridges
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extraction of phenols from grape skin, seeds, optimizedSqueezing grapes has to be sufficiently intense to be able to extract the phenols from the internal layer of the skin, report researchers.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuelA new material has been created based on gold and black phosphorus to produce clean hydrogen fuel using the full spectrum of sunlight.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-mass stars always born with a sibling: Many, like our sun, split upThough astronomers have long known that many if not most stars are binaries, the question has always been, Were they born that way, or did one star capture another? Astronomers teamed up to systematically study very young stars inside their nest eggs, called dense cores, in the Perseus molecular cloud and concluded that all sunlike stars are born as wide binaries. Most subsequently split up, while
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ultrasound 'drill' targets deep vein blood clotsResearchers have developed a new surgical tool that uses low-frequency intravascular ultrasound to break down blood clots that cause deep vein thrombosis. The tool is the first ultrasound 'drill' that can be aimed straight ahead, allowing doctors to better target clots -- which holds promise for significantly reducing treatment time. To date, the technology has been tested only in synthetic blood
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar paint offers endless energy from water vaporResearchers have developed a compound that draws moisture from the air and splits it into oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen can be captured as a clean fuel source.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cleaning and sterilization techniques leave ureteroscopes contaminatedThe techniques used to clean and sterilize flexible ureteroscopes leave behind contamination including debris, residue, and bacteria, according to a new study. Researchers concluded that these failures may result in the use of dirty scopes.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More than a third of heater-cooler devices used in open heart surgery may be contaminated with deadly bacteriaThirty-three of 89 (37 percent) heater-cooler units assessed between July 2015 and December 2016 tested positive for Mycobacterium chimaera (M. chimaera), a bacterium associated with fatal infections in open-heart surgery patients, according to new research.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough paves way for smaller electronic devicesA new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets has been discovered, which could revolutionize the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology, say investigators.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer treatment during childhood linked to cognitive problems later in lifeYoung adults who had chemotherapy as a child have decreased cognitive flexibility and a weaker short-term memory. Their ability to concentrate and long-term memory are largely unaffected.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting treatment effectiveness for adults with autismUsing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers have identified certain brain regions that significantly correlate with an increase in social abilities following a virtual environment based training program. Adults on the autism spectrum who showed greater activity in the social brain network prior to the training improved more in emotion recognition than those who showed less acti
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vesselsA research team is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia.
54min
Ars Technica
Fileless malware targeting US restaurants went undetected by most AV Enlarge (credit: Carol Von Canon ) Researchers have detected a brazen attack on restaurants across the United States that uses a relatively new technique to keep its malware undetected by virtually all antivirus products on the market. Malicious code used in so-called fileless attacks resides almost entirely in computer memory, a feat that prevents it from leaving the kinds of traces that are spo
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polar bears' declining mercury levels likely due to climate-related shiftsTo understand how human activities are affecting the planet, scientists often study the health of animals in the wild. Now a new study, appearing in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, finds that the levels of mercury in some polar bears are declining. But rather than heralding a drop in mercury in the environment, the decrease could indicate how climate change has led the animals to
57min
The Atlantic
The Injection That Melts a Double Chin I sat back, exposing the vulnerable area under my chin, bracing myself for the pinch of the needle. I clutched an ice pack, ready to apply it, and looked around as my heart raced. I was about to have vials of synthetic stomach acid shot into my double chin, erasing it, I hoped, forever. The drug designed to treat my “submental fat” (the fat pocket under the chin) is the new cosmetic injectable Ky
58min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New class drug significantly reduces spine fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosisThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference showed that, in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, 12 months treatment with romosozumab was associated with rapid and large reductions in their risk of a vertebral fracture compared to placebo.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early therapeutic intervention for pre-RA patients significantly reduces risk of RAThe results of a meta-analysis presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference has demonstrated that early therapeutic intervention in patients with so-called 'pre-rheumatoid arthritis' (pre-RA) significantly reduces the risk of the occurrence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in these patients at 52 weeks or more.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gluten-free beer from Witkop teff grainsFor celiac patients and others on gluten-free diets, it seems like gluten is everywhere -- cakes, cookies and breads. It's even in most beers. But now, one team reports in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that beers made with Witkop teff grains may be a good alternative to traditionally brewed barley beers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Continuing anti-TNF treatment with CZP for RA during pregnancy: No or negligible placental transferThe results of a pharmacokinetic study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 showed no or negligible placental transfer of the anti-TNF drug certolizumab pegol from mothers to infants during pregnancy.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding river thermal landscapesThe BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Purposeful leaders' are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study findsPeople are happier and more productive when their leaders show strong morals, a clear vision and commitment to stakeholders, a new study has found.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male infertility: Urogenital infection as a possible causeIn couples who have not been able to have children, male infertility is the cause in at least half of cases. In 6-10% the cause is a urogenital infection. The risk of irreversible infertility associated with urogenital infections in men should not be underestimated, say Hans-Christian Schuppe and coauthors in a review article in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arzteb
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low complication rates after screening colonoscopyDuring colonoscopy screening for bowel cancer and in the four weeks after the procedure, the risk for complications to develop is low. This is the finding of a prospective cohort study conducted in the Saarland region, whose results Nadine Zwink and coauthors report in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Aerztebl Int 2017; 114: 321-7). https://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beetles spark development of color-changing nanoparticles for commercial useInspired by the varying colors that gleam off of beetle shells, scientists have developed color-shifting nanoparticles that can change hue even after being embedded into a material. A report on the new, inexpensive technique, which could lead to the production of easier-to-read sensors and anti-tampering tags, appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study: Unsaturated fat associated with fatty liver diseaseAs the obesity epidemic continues, new data shed light on which nutrients and what quantity of those nutrients promote health or disease. In the American Gastroenterological Association journal, Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, scientists report on the role of macronutrients in the development of metabolically unhealthy obesity -- cases where patients have diseases with obes
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indoor tanning still accessible to young people -- despite bansDespite legislation prohibiting the use of ultraviolet (UV) indoor tanning facilities by minors, one in every five tanning salons in US states where such bans are in place stated over the phone that they would allow an underaged caller to do so. Many others provide inaccurate health information about indoor tanning, says Leah Ferrucci, of the Yale School of Public Health in the US. She led a study
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecuScientists at the University of Vienna have created a new structure by encapsulating a single layer of fullerene molecules between two graphene sheets. Buckyball sandwiches combine fullerenes and graphene. This structure allows to study the dynamics of the trapped molecules down to atomic resolution using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They report observing diffusion of individual mole
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wyss Institute's Organ Chips get smart and go electricDon Ingber's team at the Wyss Institute has collaborated with Wyss Core Faculty member Kit Parker and his group to bring new solutions to chip design by fitting Organ Chips with embedded electrodes that enable accurate and continuous monitoring of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a broadly used measure of tissue health and differentiation, and real-time assessment of electrical activ
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wildfires pollute much more than previously thoughtWildfires are major polluters. Their plumes are three times as dense with aerosol-forming fine particles as previously believed. For the first time, researchers have flown an orchestra of modern instruments through brutishly turbulent wildfire plumes to measure their emissions in real time. They have also exposed other never before measured toxins.
1h
Gizmodo
Flex Your Savings Muscles With Another Great Deal On Bowflex's SelectTech Dumbbells Bowflex SelectTech 552 Adjustable Dumbbells , $205 These uber-popular Bowflex adjustable dumbbells had a ton of fantastic (if short-lived) deals in April and May, but if you didn’t pull the trigger back then, they’re back down to $205 today, even if you aren’t a Prime member. Just keep the poor delivery drivers in your thoughts.
1h
Big Think
The Economic Glory That Was Greece What made the Golden Age of Greece, and Western Civilization, possible? One author says "free trade". Read More
1h
Futurity.org
A computer called ‘the Beast’ is untangling religion Researchers in religion studies are using computer simulations to help answer big questions about religion’s benefits (potentially better mental health) and its evils (violence in the name of God). “I don’t even like computers,” confesses Connor Wood, a doctoral student in religion studies. But the curved, intersecting, multicolored lines on his screen represent the new frontier of computer-simul
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Search for Earth-like planets: Try a statistical approachA team of astronomers seeks to change the way scientists approach the search for Earth-like planets orbiting stars other than the sun. They favor taking a statistical comparative approach in seeking habitable planets and life beyond the solar system.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular aging and cancer development: New insightMedical researchers have discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular aging. The results of the study will contribute to a better understanding of the human aging process as well as cancer development.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of human blood cell destinies revises knowledge of immune cell developmentMedical researchers have identified a human blood cell type that can only differentiate into monocytes, and is equivalent to mouse cells identified in earlier work. The cells can be recognized by their expression of particular membranous signaling proteins, and were shown to be part of a sequential differentiation process into monocytes. This alternative road map for immune cell development may le
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The cost of opioid use during pregnancyA new study reveals that the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome -- often caused by mothers using opioids during pregnancy -- is increasing in the United States, and carries an enormous burden in terms of hospital days and costs. The number of US hospital admissions involving neonatal abstinence syndrome increased more than fourfold between the years 2003 and 2012. In 2012, neonatal abstinen
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology will enable properties to share solar energyNew technology will enable properties to share solar energy and will mean low energy bills for consumers.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making hydrogen fuel from humid airOne of the biggest hurdles to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel is making hydrogen efficiently and cleanly. Now researchers report a new way to do just that. They incorporated a photocatalyst in a moisture-absorbing, semiconducting paint that can produce hydrogen from water in the air when exposed to sunlight. The development could enable hydrogen fuel production in almost any location.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polar bears' declining mercury levels likely due to climate-related shiftsTo understand how human activities are affecting the planet, scientists often study the health of animals in the wild. Now a new study finds that the levels of mercury in some polar bears are declining. But rather than heralding a drop in mercury in the environment, the decrease could indicate how climate change has led the animals to shift foraging habits, which has affected their diets and weigh
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Organic conditions boost flavonoids and antioxidant activity in onionsFive years ago, a highly publicized meta-analysis of more than 200 studies concluded that organic food was no more nutritious than conventionally grown food. Since then, however, additional work has suggested the organic foods contain more health-benefiting phytochemicals. Now, researchers have found that flavonoid levels and antioxidant activity in organic onions are higher than in conventional o
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visiting virtual beach improves patient experiences during dental proceduresImagine walking along a beach on a lovely day. As you turn to continue along the coast path feeling calm and relaxed you suddenly hear your dentist say 'Fine, all done, you can take the headset off now'. For patients at one dental practice in Devon, England, such Virtual Reality encounters are resulting in demonstrably better experiences in the dentist's chair.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loss of estrogen a risk factor for disc degeneration and lower back pain'Oh, my aching back!' It's not an uncommon complaint heard from both men and women as they age and experience lumbar disc degeneration. Now a new study suggests that menopause is associated with severity of disc degeneration in the lumbar spine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to feel stronger and thinner? Get some exerciseJust one 30-minute bout of exercise makes women feel stronger and thinner, according to a new study. And the positive effect lasts well beyond the activity itself, which may be good news for women concerned about their body image.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improved accuracy when testing cancer drugsA method to more accurately test anti-cancer drugs has now been developed, report scientists. The method paves the way to much earlier assessment of who benefits from a specific drug and who does not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rules of the neural roads: Traffic control in your synapsesIn brain cells, neurotransmitters are carried inside “cellular vehicles”. Scientists elucidate the mechanisms behind the motion of these vehicles in mammalian synapses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term daily aspirin use linked to higher than expected risk of bleeding in adults aged 75 or overIn people aged 75 or over, long-term daily aspirin use is linked to a higher than expected risk of disabling or fatal bleeding, according to a new study. Proton-pump inhibitors should be co-prescribed for adults in this age group to reduce the risk of bleeds, warn researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D facial recognition technology on brink of commercial breakthroughA 3-D facial recognition system could be used commercially in the UK for the first time as part of a Government-backed project.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The glue that keeps cells togetherControlled adhesion and division are crucial for our body's cells. This is the case, for instance, when the organs develop in an embryo or when broken skin is repaired during the healing process.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Life might have a shot on planets orbiting dim red starsThe number of planets in the habitable zone of dim red suns, known as M dwarfs, is growing. They’re a good place to look for life.
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Popular Science
Where in the United States is nature most likely to kill you? Environment Short answer: it’s complicated. Here’s how the country’s natural menaces differ by geography.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food or fraud?Is the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive. Now, in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Italian scientists have introduced a simplified assay coined NanoTracer. Combining DNA barcoding with nanotechnology, it requires neither expensive tools nor extremely skilled
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria from cystic fibrosis patient could help thwart antibiotic-resistant TBThe number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic -- produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient -- could help fight these infections. Lab testing reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Massey scientists may have found a new way to halt lung cancer growthFor the first time, scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a mechanism that makes lung cancer cells dependent on mutated versions of the gene p53, opening the potential for new, more effective treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian researchers developed a reliable forward error correction method for digital dataScientists of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University proposed a new channel coding method for the fifth generation of wireless systems (5G). Researchers generalized the construction of polar codes proposed by Turkish scientist Erdal Arikan and obtained polar subcodes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clean energy stored in electric vehicles to power buildingsStored energy from electric vehicles (EVs) can be used to power large buildings -- creating new possibilities for the future of smart, renewable energy -- thanks to ground-breaking battery research from WMG at the University of Warwick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Plankton explosion' turns Istanbul's Bosphorus turquoiseA sudden change in the colour of the Bosphorus Strait that divides the continents of Europe and Asia in Turkey's largest city Istanbul has surprised residents, with scientists putting it down to a surge in a species of plankton across the Black Sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autumn Eurasian snow variability in response to atmospheric circulationEurasian snow can influence the Indian summer monsoon and the East Asian climate. Variability of autumn Eurasian snow is a contributing factor in wintertime Artic Oscillation variation—an important climate system in the Northern Hemisphere. Studying the changes in autumn Eurasian snow and the factors involved is important for the understanding of the Eurasian climate variability in subsequent seas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar paint offers endless energy from water vaporResearchers have developed a solar paint that can absorb water vapour and split it to generate hydrogen - the cleanest source of energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New system to restore communications in the wake of a disasterA portable system which allows communications to be restored in the wake of a disaster and help direct survivors to safety is being devised by academics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special journal issue showcases Aalto University's materials researchThe 12 articles in the special issue of Advanced Electronic Materials investigate materials and devices that are being researched for their applications in micro-electronics, opto-electronics, thermo-electricity generation, photovoltaics and quantum technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earning a living in a changing climate -- the plant perspectiveSome of the world's plants are using 'last-stand' strategies to survive rather than thrive as global climate change gathers apace. Ecologists assessed plant strategies in less suitable climates by tapping into big data collated from 16 different countries in 3 different continents over the past 50 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New face-aging technique could boost search for missing peopleResearchers at the University of Bradford have developed a method of aging facial images that could enhance the search for long-term missing people worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New magnet technology creates easy blood access for hemodialysis patientsA new, minimally invasive system which uses radiofrequency energy instead of open surgery to create access for patients needing hemodialysis is reliable, with minimal complications, according to data published in the American Journal of Kidney Disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared lightChemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) in Berlin have developed a molecular thermometer. The gemstone ruby served as the source of inspiration. However, the thermometer developed by the team headed by Professor Katja Heinze at the JGU Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Replacing trees with bamboos halves the carbon storage capacity of forestsSubtropical forests are among the most important ecosystems in terms of carbon sinks, fixing carbon from the atmosphere. Recent evidence indicates that after selective logging, bamboos replace trees in subtropical forests, which leads to decreased carbon storage. This decrease is far from trivial. The amount of carbon that a forest loses due to tree replacement by bamboos equals the amount of carb
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology will enable properties to share solar energyIN the UK alone, some 1.5 million homes are equipped with solar panels, and it has been estimated that by 2020 the figure could soar to 10 million, with the prospect of lower energy bills for consumers and massive reductions in CO2 emissions. Now, a University of Huddersfield researcher is developing new technologies that could enable clusters of houses to share their solar energy, rather than sim
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The Atlantic
A Brief History of Violence Against Members of Congress Violence against federal legislators is less common than assassination attempts against presidents, but the deliberative branch has seen its share of tragedies and near-tragedies. The most recent shooting of a member of Congress took place only six years ago when the Arizona Democrat Gabby Giffords was shot in the head during a constituent event in Tucson in 2011. Giffords survived, but was force
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Futurity.org
To study real thinking, scientists shouldn’t give easy tasks Neuroscientists say a full understanding of the complexity of the human brain will require new research strategies that better simulate real-world conditions. The authors of a new article say the brain’s ability to perform “approximate probabilistic inference” cannot be truly studied with simple tasks that are “ill-suited to expose the inferential computations that make the brain special.” The ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern herbaria bring centuries-old science into the digital ageLast month, priceless botanical specimens were destroyed after an apparent miscommunication between scientists and Australian customs officials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Organic conditions boost flavonoids and antioxidant activity in onionsFive years ago, a highly publicized meta-analysis of more than 200 studies concluded that organic food was no more nutritious than conventionally grown food. Since then, however, additional work has suggested the organic foods contain more health-benefiting phytochemicals. Now, researchers have found that flavonoid levels and antioxidant activity in organic onions are higher than in conventional o
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Gizmodo
Director of Michigan's Health Department Faces Involuntary Manslaughter Charge Over Flint Water Crisis Image: AP On Wednesday, Michigan’s Attorney General announced it will charge Nick Lyon, the former Health and Human Services Director, with involuntary manslaughter for his role in the Flint water crisis. During the crisis, caused in part by substandard water treatment, 100,000 residents were exposed to elevated levels of lead, a dangerous neurotoxin, and were at elevated risk for legionnaire’s d
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Ingeniøren
Ingeniørforeningens hjemmeside hacket IDA.dk er blevet kompromitteret og brugt til at søgeoptimere for medicinske produkter. Angrebet er nu stoppet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/idadk-hacket-via-testbrugerkonto-1077543 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia launches space freighter to ISSRussia on Wednesday launched an unmanned Progress cargo ship carrying supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Bottled nature' helps ease dental painTaking a walk along a virtual-reality beach helps ease dental patients' discomfort, a study finds.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Plutonium accident, ancient amber and a call to climate scientists The week in science: 9–15 June 2017. Nature 546 332 doi: 10.1038/546332a
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Live Science
Climate Change Is Shrinking the Colorado RiverThe Colorado River supplies water to millions of people and irrigates thousands of miles of farmland. New research warns that climate change is likely to magnify droughts in the Colorado Basin.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The glue that keeps cells togetherStudies conducted by the Biocentre shed new light on cell-cell contacts: Physical effects play an important role in their generation and stability as the journal 'Nature Physics' reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuelOsaka University researchers create new material based on gold and black phosphorus to produce clean hydrogen fuel using the full spectrum of sunlight.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new test to detect reliably an autoimmune diseaseAPS is caused by antibodies circulating in the blood plasma that are directed against a protein, which increase the blood's tendency to form clots. The actual diagnostic test currently used has a number of problems in terms of variability, specificity and sensitivity. Researchers at UNIGE have succeeded in identifying the exact spot where the anti-phospholipid antibodies attach themselves. This me
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rules of the neural roads: Traffic control in your synapsesIn brain cells, neurotransmitters are carried inside 'cellular vehicles'. OIST scientists elucidate the mechanisms behind the motion of these vehicles in mammalian synapses.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared lightChemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) in Berlin have developed a molecular thermometer. The gemstone ruby served as the source of inspiration.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing the color of laser light on the femtosecond time scaleUsing femtosecond visible and terahertz (THz) pulses as external perturbations, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have investigated the second harmonic generation effect in photoexcited BiCoO3. Driven by the THz pulse, this research highlights the importance of orbital excitation in the Co3+ ion and provides c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new mutation in kidney diseaseOsaka University researchers find an unexpected mutation in proteins of the exosome could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing the risk of kidney disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery by NUS researchers improves understanding of cellular aging and cancer developmentA team of researchers led by Dr Dennis Kappei, a Special Fellow from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore, has discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular ageing. The results of the study will contribute to a better understanding of the human ageing process as well a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet-in-a-box—connectivity for the rest of the worldIn an era when, for most of us, an Internet connection is typically within a hand's reach to a smartphone, laptop or tablet, it can be hard to believe that 60 percent of the world's population lacks connectivity. The ubiquity of Internet – not just for recreation and communication, but as a requirement in most jobs – is easy to overlook. Hospitals store their records in the cloud, educators rely o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists are reconstructing the relationship between modern humans and NeanderthalsThe Neanderthals and modern humans must have co-existed in Europe for several thousand years. What happened when they encountered each other and how they influenced one another are riveting questions. Jean-Jacques Hublin and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig are searching for answers to them. In the process, they have found clues as to what the Neanderth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Regulatory protein ensures that egg precursor cells boost their numbers during embryonic developmentFemale babies are born with a full set of egg precursors in their ovaries, yet the molecular mechanism by which these cells proliferate during embryonic development was unclear. Now, using a mouse model created at A*STAR, an international team of researchers has pinpointed the regulatory factors needed for this rapid cell division to occur in the developing female gonad.
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The Atlantic
Who Is Steve Scalise? Updated at 10:19 a.m. ET Steve Scalise, a Republican congressman from Louisiana, was shot Wednesday morning at a GOP team practice for the annual congressional baseball game. In a statement released roughly two hours after the shooting, his congressional office wrote that he’d been hit in the hip and that his condition is stable. He’d been taken to MedStar Washington Hospital Center in the city’s
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Live Science
In Photos: A Rare Albino Risso's DolphinA whale-watching crew has spotted a rare albino Risso's dolphin off the California coast, likely the only such creature in the eastern Pacific. Here are photos of the cute juvenile dolphin.
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Live Science
Rare Albino Dolphin Spotted Off California CoastA 3-year-old albino dolphin was spotted swimming with its mom in California's Monterey Bay last week, and the little one appears healthy, scientists say.
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Gizmodo
House Majority Whip Steve Scalise Shot as Shooter Opened Fire at GOP Baseball Practice Five people, including House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (LA), were shot Wednesday morning during a Congressional baseball practice. According to reports, a gunman walked up to practice and opened fire on the baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia. According to Representative Mo Brooks (AL), Scalise, who was standing on second base, sustained a “hip wound.” Brooks also told the Associated Pres
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Popular Science
America's standard, bland beer is slowly being replaced by the weird stuff Entertainment One day, we may even have a "Dino-Brew" The following is an excerpt from Ancient Brews by Patrick McGovern.
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New Scientist - News
Fish recognise friends and foes through their unique facesA cichlid in Africa’s Lake Tanganyika uses patterns of facial stripes to distinguish individuals and keep tabs on them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tides could be source of heat on icy moonsThe icy moons in the outer solar system hold the potential for life, given that they may contain oceans of water. But life also needs a source of energy input to perform essential functions such as growth, reproduction and movement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A solid-state electrolyte that is able to compete with liquid electrolytes for rechargeable batteriesLiquid lithium-ion rechargeable batteries are dangerous. They can leak or ignite rapidly if they become overheated. So-called solid-state lithium-ion batteries are a way of reducing these risks. However, these batteries have not (yet) reached the performance level of their liquid counterparts. However, researchers at Empa have now developed a solid-state electrolyte that is able to compete with li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New route to molecular wires suitable for use in miniature electronicsConsumer demand continually pushes the electronics industry to design smaller devices. Now researchers at A*STAR have used a theoretical model to assess the potential of electric wires made from polymer chains that could help with miniaturization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean energy stored in electric vehicles to power buildingsStored energy from electric vehicles (EVs) can be used to power large buildings – creating new possibilities for the future of smart, renewable energy - thanks to ground-breaking battery research from WMG at the University of Warwick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An energy-efficient cleaning robotState-of-the-art solar cells are efficient – but are even more so when they are kept clean. A cleaning robot developed by Norwegian researchers enables solar panels to deliver at full capacity.
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The Scientist RSS
Number of Bacterial and Archaeal Reference Genomes DoubledScientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.
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Gizmodo
Good Looks at New Last Jedi Villains, From a Totally Ridiculous Source A surprising character is showing up in Justice League . A surprising character may show up in Wonder Woman 2 . Yet another good guy joins Avengers: Infinity War ’s insane cast list. Plus, new images from Game of Thrones , a pretty fantastic clip from this week’s Doctor Who , and much, much more! Spoilers for everybody! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Thanks to TheForce.net , we can now get a better loo
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Wired
Microsoft Masters *Ms. Pac-Man* With a Horde of AI AgentsMicrosoft claims beating a classic 1982 videogame could help it make better enterprise software.
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Wired
The Best Cycling Cities on the PlanetFrom Copenhagen and Amsterdam to Paris and Montreal.
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Wired
This New Atari-Playing AI Wants to Dethrone DeepMindSchema Networks' creators say it wins because it can think about the past, and plan for the future.
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Wired
Instagram Will Now Tell You Who's Getting Paid to PostNow you'll know who really loves that detox tea on Instagram and who's just shilling.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Top 10 discoveries about wavesAnother gravitational wave detection reaffirms the importance of waves for a vast spectrum of physical processes and technologies.
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Dagens Medicin
Dagens Medicin lægger op til debat om det danske sundhedsvæsen Med tre debatarrangementer på Folkemødet på Bornholm er Dagens Medicin med til at løfte den sundhedspolitiske dagsorden på sommerens store politiske event.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cars could soon negotiate smart intersections without ever having to stopSick of waiting at traffic lights? The semi-autonomous driving aids being fitted to many new cars could consign the red light to history, A*STAR researchers report. According to their modeling, a system in which each car crosses the intersection in its own virtual bubble of safe space, modulating its speed using adaptive cruise control, will result in smooth traffic flow in each direction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rural America's drinking water crisisOne winter morning C.H. Underwood looked up and down the street in his small town of O'Brien, Texas and realized something was wrong. The trash hadn't been picked up that week, or the week before, "and there was Christmas wrappings flying all over town." Underwood, coach of the high school debate and football teams, and part time rancher, made a series of phone calls to the members of the city cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds light on Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transitionArchaeologists at The Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Sydney have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history - the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report possible location of famed lost Pink and White Terraces of New ZealandA pair of researchers, one referring to himself as an independent researcher, the other with the National Library of New Zealand, has found the possible location of the famed lost Pink and White Terraces of New Zealand. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, Rex Bunn and Sascha Nolan describe their work examining a diary left by Ferdinand von Hochstetter, who deta
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Scientific American Content: Global
Revenge of the Super LiceOverexposure to insecticides has bred resistance in the parasites, making it harder than ever to treat infestation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want to feel stronger and thinner? Get some exerciseJust one 30-minute bout of exercise makes women feel stronger and thinner, according to a new UBC study. And the positive effect lasts well beyond the activity itself, which may be good news for women concerned about their body image.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds 1 in 5 hospitalized adults suffer side effects from prescribed antibioticsA study examining the impact of antibiotics prescribed for nearly 1,500 adult patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital found that adverse side effects occurred in one-fifth of them, and that nearly one-fifth of those side effects occurred in patients who didn't need antibiotics in the first place.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds way to predict treatment effectiveness for adults with autismUsing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas and the George Washington University identified certain brain regions that significantly correlate with an increase in social abilities following a virtual environment based training program. Adults on the autism spectrum who showed greater activity in the social bra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create 3-D printed tensegrity objects capable of dramatic shape changeA team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers advocate statistical approach to search for Earth-like planetsA team of astronomers at the University of Chicago and Grinnell College seeks to change the way scientists approach the search for Earth-like planets orbiting stars other than the sun. They favor taking a statistical comparative approach in seeking habitable planets and life beyond the solar system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of human blood cell destinies revises knowledge of immune cell developmentTokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) research has identified a human blood cell type that can only differentiate into monocytes, and is equivalent to mouse cells identified in earlier work. The cells can be recognized by their expression of particular membranous signaling proteins, and were shown to be part of a sequential differentiation process into monocytes. This alternative road map for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transitionArchaeologists at The Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Sydney have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history -- the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autumn Eurasian snow variability in response to atmospheric circulationinvestigate the autumn Eurasian snow variability, intending to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in Eurasian snow changes and their impacts on the wintertime Arctic Oscillation. The study concluded that atmospheric circulation and associated changes in the land-surface state are essential factors of influence for the autumn Eurasian snow variability. This complicates the predi
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The Atlantic
The Shlock and Gore of Blood Drive Blood Drive , SyFy’s new series, isn’t a television show so much as a mashup of everything that’s ever offended the Parents Television Council. Shocking violence? You got it. Graphic sex? Naturally. Car engines that grind up whimpering human victims into high-octane fuel for a demented car race? That’s a new one, but it’s fairly easy to predict that L. Brent Bozell wouldn’t love it. Created by Ja
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Gizmodo
Congressional Shooting and London Fire Trend on Twitter, Twitter Promotes #HappyDeathDay Image: Getty / Gizmodo The country woke up to scary news on Wednesday. A gunman had opened fire on a Congressional baseball practice, injuring House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and several others. A catastrophic fire in London had killed at least six people . And Twitter sponsored trending section had decided to promote a very unfortunate hashtag: #HappyDeathDay. Oh, there’s was a custom emoji th
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Ars Technica
Man who downloaded child porn from Tor-hidden Playpen sentenced to 6 months Enlarge (credit: carlosbezz / Getty Images News) On Tuesday, a federal judge in Tacoma, Washington, sentenced David Tippens to six months in prison for one remaining count of possession of child pornography that he obtained via the now-defunct, notorious Tor-hidden child porn website, Playpen. In a sentencing memorandum filed last month, prosecutors asked the judge to impose a much longer sentenc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Defrosting the world's freezer—thawing permafrostSnowy peaks rise up in one direction; boggy tundra spreads across the other. Fuzzy heads of long-stemmed plants sway in the wind, interspersed with bog blueberries. This is Alaska's Eight Mile Lake, where the nearest town has a population of just over a thousand people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbiologist discovers antibacterial properties of insect wingsWhen Elena Ivanova travelled from Russia to Australia in January 2001, she brought with her an international reputation, an impressive publishing record and her unique collection of marine bacteria, amassed over almost two decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuelOsaka University researchers create new material based on gold and black phosphorus to produce clean hydrogen fuel using the full spectrum of sunlight
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Priority partnerskab med University of SydneyKøbenhavns Universitet har indgået et treårigt priority partnerskab med University...
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Ars Technica
Firefox 54 finally goes multiprocess, eight years after work began Enlarge (credit: Mozilla) Firefox has finally been outfitted with simultaneous multiple content processes, a UI process, and a GPU acceleration process— eight years after the project, codenamed Electrolysis (E10S), began. Mozilla is calling Firefox 54 "the best Firefox ever," and they're probably not wrong (though Firefox 3.5 was pretty good, in my opinion). In theory, moving to multiple content
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology will enable properties to share solar energyNew technology will enable properties to share solar energy and will mean low energy bills for consumers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence that all stars are born in pairsThough astronomers have long known that many if not most stars are binaries, the question has always been, Were they born that way, or did one star capture another? UC Berkeley and Harvard astronomers teamed up to systematically study very young stars inside their nest eggs, called dense cores, in the Perseus molecular cloud and concluded that all sunlike stars are born as wide binaries. Most subs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fishery history highlights substantial declines for important speciesCatch rates of east coast Spanish mackerel have declined by 70 per cent over the past 80 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Universal stabilisationETH researchers led by Lucio Isa have developed microparticles with a rough, raspberry-like surface that stabilise emulsions following a new principle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough technology makes batteries safe and sustainableAs exploding batteries in mobile phones, computers and headphones continue to make headlines, researchers at Swinburne's Centre for Micro-Photonics are one step closer to producing commercially viable, chemical-free, long-lasting, safe batteries.
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Blowing Out a Ton of Dad Gifts Today, For All You Ungrateful Procrastinators Swiss Army Knife Gold Box | Father’s Day Gift Gold Box If you still haven’t gotten around to picking out a Father’s Day gift, Amazon’s here to bail you out with a pair of Gold Box deals full of popular, if a little cliché, ideas. First up, you can choose from four discounted Swiss Army knives for $22 or less . You won’t find any particularly unique models here—they’re all red and include a basic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robot uses deep learning and big data to write and play its own musicA marimba-playing robot with four arms and eight sticks is writing and playing its own compositions in a lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The pieces are generated using artificial intelligence and deep learning.
2h
Ingeniøren
Kæmpe indsprøjtning: 855 mia. kr skal booste Norges infrastrukturDen norske regering og dens støttepartier er blevet enige om blandt andet at bygge en skibstunnel og en ny - og omdiskuteret - vejtunnel under Oslofjorden.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mind over Meal: Does Weight-Loss Surgery Rewire Gut–Brain Connections?New evidence hints that bariatric surgery changes the dialogue between bowel and brain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Say-on-pay laws increase company valuations, study findsWhen shareholders have a say on executive pay, CEO salaries decline and company valuations rise, according to a University of Georgia study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SOFIA finds cool dust around energetic active black holesResearchers at the University of Texas San Antonio using observations from NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, found that the dust surrounding active, ravenous black holes is much more compact than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers advocate statistical approach to search for Earth-like planetsA team of astronomers at the University of Chicago and Grinnell College seeks to change the way scientists approach the search for Earth-like planets orbiting stars other than the sun. They favor taking a statistical comparative approach in seeking habitable planets and life beyond the solar system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weighing pig personality: Is one sow better than another in group housing?Is one sow better than another in group housing? Piglet #3 is not sure what to make of the empty kiddie pool where she finds herself standing at the UC Davis Swine Research and Teaching Facility. She grunts softly, sniffs at the ribbed-plastic floor, and glances at the humans watching her explore.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organic conditions boost flavonoids and antioxidant activity in onionsFive years ago, a highly publicized meta-analysis of more than 200 studies concluded that organic food was no more nutritious than conventionally grown food. Since then, however, additional work has suggested the organic foods contain more health-benefiting phytochemicals. Now, researchers have found that flavonoid levels and antioxidant activity in organic onions are higher than in conventional o
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polar bears' declining mercury levels likely due to climate-related shiftsTo understand how human activities are affecting the planet, scientists often study the health of animals in the wild. Now a new study, appearing in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, finds that the levels of mercury in some polar bears are declining. But rather than heralding a drop in mercury in the environment, the decrease could indicate how climate change has led the animals to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making hydrogen fuel from humid airOne of the biggest hurdles to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel is making hydrogen efficiently and cleanly. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new way to do just that. They incorporated a photocatalyst in a moisture-absorbing, semiconducting paint that can produce hydrogen from water in the air when exposed to sunlight. The development could enable hydrogen fuel production in almos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar paint offers endless energy from water vaporResearchers in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a compound that draws moisture from the air and splits it into oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen can be captured as a clean fuel source.
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Wired
Robert Mueller Chooses His Investigatory Dream TeamThey include top FBI agents, prosecutors, and people just as tenacious as Mueller himself.
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The Atlantic
Representative Steve Scalise Shot at a Baseball Practice Here’s what we know: —Shots were fired at the congressional baseball practice. —House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, a Louisiana Republican, has been shot. His office said he is in stable condition. President Donald Trump said in a statement that he and Vice President Mike Pence “are aware of the shooting incident in Virginia and are monitoring developments closely.” — Congressman Mo Brooks, an Ala
2h
Science-Based Medicine
BMI and the Obesity EpidemicObesity is a serious and growing health problem worldwide. Ditching BMI as a measure of obesity is not the solution.
3h
Futurity.org
Most premature babies go to kindergarten on time Two-thirds of babies born at only 23 or 24 weeks were ready for kindergarten on time, researchers found. Unexpectedly, nearly two percent of them even achieved gifted status in school. While these extremely premature babies often score low on standardized tests, preterm infants born 25 weeks or later performed only slightly lower than full-term infants. In fact, as the length of pregnancy increas
3h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: City SlickersIn recent years, New Yorkers have noted a drastic increase in the number of whale sightings within the city's waterways.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New evidence that all stars are born in pairsDid our sun have a twin when it was born 4.5 billion years ago?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers evaluate metrics for measuring schools and teachersIn recent years, 14 states in the U.S. have begun assessing teachers and schools using Value-Added Models, or VAMs. The idea is simple enough: A VAM looks at year-to-year changes in standardized test scores among students, and rates those students' teachers and schools accordingly. When students are found to improve or regress, teachers and schools get the credit or the blame.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use simple materials to create semi-soft robotsAt the beginning of the decade, George Whitesides helped rewrite the rules of what a machine could be with the development of biologically inspired "soft robots." Now he's poised to rewrite them again, with help from some plastic drinking straws.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA left by ocean animals provides rare glimpse of marine ecosystemsThe ocean might as well be Mars. Like astronomers grasping at ways to identify life on a distant planet, marine scientists have no easy method for detecting sea creatures' presence in the vast watery realm.
3h
Wired
Herman Miller, the Maker of the Most Iconic Chair, Wants You to Stand UpThe company's latest product, Live OS, tracks how people interact with their office furniture.
3h
Wired
Urban Heat Islands Can Be Deadly, and They're Only Getting HotterHow built-up cities and higher temperatures threaten human health.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water circling drain experiments offer insight into black holesA small international team of researchers has found that water waves created due to scattering from a spinning vortex can show rotational superradiance—an effect astrophysicists have predicted likely to occur in black holes, but which has never been replicated in a lab experiment. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group explains how they observed and measured waves propag
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Daring Apollo 8 Astronauts, Rediscovering a Forgotten Math Genius and Other New Science BooksJune book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
The Atlantic
Obama's Energy Secretary Defends His Legacy Against Trump Ernest Moniz is the antithesis of Donald Trump. As the head of the Department of Energy throughout much of President Obama’s second term, he was responsible for championing the Paris Climate Accord, negotiating the Iran nuclear deal with former Secretary of State John Kerry, and diligently pursuing a broad-based energy strategy often called the “ all of the above ” option. He is as comfortable te
3h
Science | The Guardian
Russian fake news is not new: Soviet Aids propaganda cost countless lives It’s easier than ever to spread myths and falsehoods, which shows how little we learned from one of the worst pieces of dezinformatsiya ever disseminated The 2016 US election and subsequent fallout seem certain to occupy a unique place in the history books. Donald Trump’s campaign against Hillary Clinton was marked by incredible events and statements, from racism to misogyny . But perhaps the mos
3h
New Scientist - News
Cool retreats are needed to save giant panda from warmer weatherChinese mountains where pandas live are become too warm for these animals to live in happily, and a network of new chill-out zones may be their only chance
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Landslide on the radarOn 20 May, over a million tonnes of dirt and rock buried part of California's Highway 1 along the Pacific coastline in the state's Big Sur region. In addition to cutting off the route, the landslide added some 5 hectares of land to the shoreline.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New open-source website features blueprints for lab-on-a-chip devicesA new MIT-designed open-source website might well be the Pinterest of microfluidics. The site, Metafluidics.org, is a free repository of designs for lab-on-a-chip devices, submitted by all sorts of inventors, including trained scientists and engineers, hobbyists, students, and amateur makers. Users can browse the site for devices ranging from simple cell sorters and fluid mixers, to more complex c
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simplified DNA barcoding technique enables food authentication with the naked eyeIs the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive. Now, in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Italian scientists have introduced a simplified assay coined NanoTracer. Combining DNA barcoding with nanotechnology, it requires neither expensive tools nor extremely skilled
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large Canadian Arctic climate change study cancelled due to climate changeThe Science Team of the Canadian Research Icebreaker CCGS Amundsen has cancelled the first leg of the 2017 Expedition due to complications associated with the southward motion of hazardous Arctic sea ice, caused by climate change.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manufacturing hybrid silicon lasers for mass-produced photonic devicesProducing semiconductor lasers on a silicon wafer is a long-held goal for the electronics industry, but their fabrication has proved challenging. Now, researchers at A*STAR have developed an innovative way to manufacture them that is cheap, simple and scalable.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Professor fra Rigshospitalet får AIDS-Fondets Forskningspris
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Where's My Elephant? High-Tech Collars Track Wildlife in Real TimeThe devices and accompanying software, now being tested in Kenya and beyond, could help conservationists outsmart poachers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Futurity.org
Wearable ‘lab on a chip’ could test blood, sweat, or salad Scientists have invented a new biosensor technology, also called a “lab on a chip,” that could monitor your health and exposure to bacteria, viruses, and pollutants. The technology is also small enough to fit into a hand-held or wearable device, the scientists share in a study based on their invention. “Imagine ordering a salad at a restaurant and testing it for E. coli or Salmonella bacteria.” “
3h
The Atlantic
A Deadly London Fire At least six people are dead after a fire engulfed the Grenfell Tower, an apartment building in west London, authorities said Wednesday, adding the number was expected to rise. #NorthKensington tower block fire declared major incident, crews working hard at scene © @Natalie_Oxford For updates: https://t.co/Gy6gUYc4ML pic.twitter.com/079acRjt7W — London Fire Brigade (@LondonFire) June 14, 2017 Mor
3h
Ars Technica
Last year, Joey Hand won Le Mans; he tells us about this year’s race prep Way back in 1966—after two unsuccessful attempts to beat Ferrari at its own game—the Ford Motor Company scored an impressive win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Last June, the Blue Oval returned to La Sarthe for a repeat performance, finishing first and third in class (bookending a Ferrari in the process). The company is hoping that was no one-off, and it will be back again this year with a four-car
4h
Wired
Physics Proves No One Can Safely Text and DriveWith iOS 11, Apple will introduce a feature to disable notifications while driving. Here's why I think that's a good idea.
4h
Dagens Medicin
Anbefalinger til det nære sundhedsvæsen kommer inden sommerferienUdvalget for det nære og sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen holder sidste møde mandag 19. juni. Derefter er det planlagt at offentliggøre anbefalingerne inden sommerferien.
4h
Dagens Medicin
Stor regional forskel på støtten til praksis Landets fem regioner har forskellige praksis i forhold til, om de må yde ekstra økonomiske støtte til de praktiserende læger. Reglerne på området er uklare, mener PLO.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Data Science Argues against a Muslim BanSome people have relied on "common sense" to brand an entire religion as dangerous—but rigorous analysis proves they're wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Live Science
Aztec Temple in Mexico City Contains the Remains of Sacrificed ChildrenAn ancient temple and ceremonial ball court dedicated to the Aztec wind god Ehécatl have been identified at a site in what is now a modern section of Mexico City.
4h
Live Science
Darwin's Tree of Life to Become Multi-DimensionalDarwin's tree of life, which was conceived more than 150 years ago, needs to be rethought to account for the symbiotic relationships among widely divergent species, research says.
4h
Live Science
This Terrifying, Toothy 'Monster' Is the World's Deepest Living PredatorIn the inky darkness of the ocean's abyss swims the world's deepest living superpredator: a fish with a long, eel-like body; the face of a lizard; and a mouth full of sharp teeth.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Calls Out Jeff Sessions on Medical Marijuana and the "Historic Drug Epidemic"Rolling back protections from federal interference in state legalization laws could worsen the opioid overdose crisis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Live Science
Polynesian Seafaring Canoe to Complete Globe-Circling VoyageThe Hōkūle'a vessel is set to finish its first circumnavigation later this week in Honolulu.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designating biosphere reserves improves the life quality of the citizensInitially, protected areas had a single, major aim which was to protect biodiversity; today, by contrast, the promotion human well-being is also an important aim. The relationship between the environmental conservation and its socioeconomic and cultural impact has been fiercely debated. Urdaibai in the Basque Country was designated a biosphere reserve in 1993, and certain activities were banned an
4h
Viden
5 ting du selv kan gøre for at blive en frisk 100-årigFlere danskere runder 100 år. Se, hvad du selv kan gøre for at blive ældre og stadig være lige så frisk som 'Matador'-skaber Lise Nørgaard.
4h
Viden
Flere danskere fylder 100 år: Ekstra år er præget af godt helbred og et kvikt hovedAntallet af danskere, der som Lise Nørgaard kan fejre fødselsdag med 100 lys i kagen, er tredoblet på 25 år. Og ligesom forfatteren er mange af dem fortsat kvikke i hovederne.
4h
Ingeniøren
Sådan beskytter du dit produktionsnetværk mod hackereUventede filopdateringer, usædvanlige firewall-logninger og brug af default-logins. Der er gode muligheder for at opdage anormaliteter i ens produktionsnetværk, hvis man ellers har værktøjerne til at lede efter dem. Open source-programmer er et godt sted at starte.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hong Kong launches ivory ban billHong Kong launched a landmark bill to ban its ivory trade Wednesday, describing it as an effort to "eradicate" the illegal poaching of elephants.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How gold binds to silicone rubberFlexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms do not easily bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now modified short-chain silicones to build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal Advanced Electronic Materials.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Old-school typewriters attract new generation of fansTypewriter enthusiasts gather at an Albuquerque restaurant to experiment with vintage Smith Coronas. Fans in Boston kneel in a city square and type stories about their lives during a pro-immigration demonstration. A new documentary on typewriters featuring Tom Hanks and musician John Mayer is set for release this summer.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists unravel the interdecadal variability of the Afro-Asian summer monsoon systemThe Afro-Asian monsoon is a belt-like system that extends from North Africa via South Asia to East Asia. Anomalies relating to its intensity and position can trigger widespread droughts and floods in different regions simultaneously. Therefore, investigating its interdecadal variability is of great scientific and societal importance.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding multi-decadal global warming rate changesDespite persistently increasing greenhouse gas emissions throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries, the globally averaged surface temperature has shown distinct multi-decadal fluctuations since 1900, including two weak global warming slowdowns in the mid-20th century and early 21st century and two strong global warming accelerations in the early and late 20th century. The multi-decadal global w
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marshall Islands leader appeals for help on climate changeThe president of the Marshall Islands is appealing for help to convince U.S. President Donald Trump of the need to fight global warming following his decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia builds huge cat-proof fence to save native animalsAustralia has begun constructing a huge cat-free zone in the desert so it can reintroduce native animals that have been pushed to the brink of extinction by the feral predator.
5h
Ingeniøren
Ny aftale: 53 mio. kr. skal hjælpe varmepumper ind på små kraftvarmeværkerBredt politisk flertal vil anvende penge fra grøn klimapulje til etableringsstøtte til varmepumper på små naturgasfyrede kraftvarmeværker i år og næste år. Kun nok til cirka 20 af de 160 små værker, vurderer Dansk Fjernvarme.
5h
Ingeniøren
Flere store firmaer efterlyser ingeniører i Jylland og på Fyn På dagens liste leverer Jobfinder stillingsopslag fra blandt andet MT Højgaard, Krüger, Energinet og Velux. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/stor-efterspoergsel-paa-ingenioerer-jylland-paa-fyn-8615 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
5h
Ingeniøren
IBM: Blockchain trækker tæppet væk under mæglere For IBM handler blockchain ikke om krypto-valuta. Det er derimod en teknologi, der kan gøre transaktioner mellem virksomheder billigere og hurtigere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ibm-blockchain-kan-daempe-svindel-spare-omkostninger-paa-servere-1077508 Version2
5h
The Atlantic
The Failed Launch of The Mummy and the Danger of Franchising Too Soon The box office success story of last weekend was Wonder Woman . Patty Jenkins’s well-received take on the superhero, the first DC Comics movie in Warner Bros.’ extended franchise to get good reviews, made $58.5 million to climb to a total of $206 million in nine days. After years of bad buzz for her fellow superheroes Superman and Batman, Wonder Woman is clearly the benefit of strong word of mout
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DRCongo seeks joint Chinese-Spanish offer to build damThe Democratic Republic of Congo said Tuesday it has asked Chinese and Spanish bidders of a colossal dam project to join forces and submit a joint bid.
5h
Science | The Guardian
The ancient mystery of St Hilda's 'snake stones': what do ammonites really look like? Despite being among the most recognisable, common fossils, not one has been found that gives us an accurate idea of how the animals looked in life Think of a generic fossil and – alongside dinosaur skeletons or trilobites – it’s likely that the coiled shells of ammonites spring to mind. Ammonites are an extinct group of cephalopods, the mollusc group that contains octopuses, vampire squid, ‘squid
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Major electronic entertainment show offers glimpse of futureE3, the annual Electronic Entertainment Expo, opened Tuesday in Los Angeles with thousands of video game enthusiasts, analysts and industry representatives in attendance to play and show off the latest technology that will soon be hitting store shelves.
5h
Ingeniøren
Internettet gør industrirobotter til mål for hackereSkiftet fra isolerede kontrolsystemer til en ny gene­ration baseret på internet­teknologier fører også sikkerhedstruslerne fra internettet med sig ind i industrisystemerne.
5h
New Scientist - News
Two-headed porpoise caught in fishing net is first ever foundFishers caught more than they bargained for when they pulled out the first known two-headed porpoise, one of only 10 recorded cases of cetacean conjoined twins
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ultrasound 'drill' targets deep vein blood clotsResearchers have developed a new surgical tool that uses low-frequency intravascular ultrasound to break down blood clots that cause deep vein thrombosis. The tool is the first ultrasound 'drill' that can be aimed straight ahead, allowing doctors to better target clots -- which holds promise for significantly reducing treatment time. To date, the technology has been tested only in synthetic blood
6h
Viden
Forsker til Brinkmann: Det fysiske møde er ikke gået af modeDigitale løsninger vil ikke afskaffe de fysiske rejser, men den hurtige udvikling påvirker os. Vi skal vænne os til byer med droner og flyvende biler, vurderer forsker i mobilitet.
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Let Trump claim a better deal on climate If we can stomach it, a ‘renegotiation’ of the Paris Agreement could help us all, says Elliot Diringer. Nature 546 329 doi: 10.1038/546329a
6h
Ingeniøren
Grise-celler indsættes i hjernen hos folk med ParkinsonsCellerne fra en af vores nærmeste artsfæller virker tilsyneladende som en slags neurokemisk fabrik, der stimulerer produktionen af de dopamin-celler, som personer med Parkinsons sygdom mangler.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer treatment during childhood linked to cognitive problems later in lifeYoung adults who had chemotherapy as a child have decreased cognitive flexibility and a weaker short-term memory. Their ability to concentrate and long-term memory are largely unaffected. Researchers from KU Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven present these findings in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant flying turkey once roamed AustraliaA giant, flying turkey as tall as a kangaroo once roamed Australia, palaeontologists said Wednesday, after an analysis of fossils and bones from around the country revealed five extinct bird species.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient otter tooth found in Mexico suggests mammals migrated across AmericaLate in the afternoon on a hot March day in central Mexico, a paleontologist uncovered a jaw bone and called over to Jack Tseng.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Muscle fibers alone can't explain sex differences in bird songMale birds tend to be better singers than females—but does the basis for this difference lie in the brain or in the syrinx, the bird equivalent of our larynx? The researchers behind a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances analyzed the muscle fibers in the syrinxes of male and female birds from a range of species and found, to their surprise, that the amount of "superfast" muscle wasn't t
7h
Ingeniøren
Blockchain kan blive en krumtap for IoT-infrastrukturenTilhængerne ser blockchain som et fremtidigt bindeled for hele IoT-infrastrukturen. Andre tvivler langt mere på teknologiens skalérbarhed. I kulissen er ­giganter som Toyota, Bosch og Mærsk begyndt at arbejde med blockchain, som de fleste indtil nu har forbundet med bitcoin.
7h
Ingeniøren
Opråb til industrivirksomhederne: Kom nu i gang med cybersikkerhedenBåde it-konsulent og Center for Cybersikkerhed var ude med riven efter fremstillingsvirksomhederne på konference om industriel it-sikkerhed. Stadigt mere avancerede cyberangreb kræver rettidig omhu, mener eksperterne.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visiting virtual beach improves patient experiences during dental proceduresImagine walking along a beach on a lovely day. As you turn to continue along the coast path feeling calm and relaxed you suddenly hear your dentist say 'Fine, all done, you can take the headset off now'. For patients at one dental practice in Devon, England, such Virtual Reality encounters are resulting in demonstrably better experiences in the dentist's chair.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cloudy with a chance of radiation: NASA studies simulated radiationIn each life a little rain must fall, but in space, one of the biggest risks to astronauts' health is radiation "rain". NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is simulating space radiation on Earth following upgrades to the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. These upgrades help researchers on Earth learn more about the effects of
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photopower for microlabsMiniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, Japanese scientists have now developed a fully integrated microfluidic device that produces hydrogen fuel and converts it into electrical energy based on photocatalysis. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it works fully autonomously and delivers e
7h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsvæsenets dygtigste: Inge Marie Svane er den nye pige i klassen Professor, overlæge og leder for Cancer Immunterapi på Herlev Hospital, Inge Marie Svane, er som helt ny på bruttomagtlisten strøget ind på top ti over de fagligt dygtigste sundhedsaktører i landet.
8h
Ingeniøren
Kommende iPhone-styresystem dæmper indsamling af lokations-data Med den næste udgave af styresystemet til iPhone, iOS 11, der kommer til efteråret, er det slut med inddirekte at tvinge brugere til at give apps konstant adgang til din placering. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/aendring-ios-11-saetter-stopper-konstant-app-adgang-lokation-1077486 Version2
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough by Queen's University paves way for smaller electronic devicesQueen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionize the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology.
9h
Gizmodo
Earnest, Emo-Inspired YouTube Star Arrested on Child Pornography Charges Austin Jones, a YouTube star styled as a combination of circa-2005 “Hey There Delilah” side-swept pixie cut and skinny jeans which scream “sensitive soul”–also famed for his YouTube acapella covers of awesome bands like My Chemical Romance, Panic! At the Disco, and Fall Out Boy–whose music is described on MySpace as “earnest, emo-influenced melodic pop music”–who is also a 24-year-old male–was ar
10h
Science | The Guardian
Risk of bleeds and death with daily aspirin use higher than thought Research suggests 3,000 people die a year in UK from long-term use of aspirin or similar drugs, but also taking heartburn medication could help reduce risk The risk of long-term aspirin use causing major bleeding and death is higher than previously thought, with over-75s particularly vulnerable, a study suggests. Around 40% of adults aged 75 or over in the UK take a daily aspirin and lifelong tre
10h
Science | The Guardian
Airport noise increases risk of heart disease, study suggests The highest noise levels, particularly at night, are associated with a greater risk of high blood pressure and heart flutter, say scientsts People who live close to an airport and are constantly barraged by the sound of planes taking off are at increased risk of heart disease, research suggests. A study found that people who were exposed to the highest noise levels, particularly at night, were at
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loss of estrogen a risk factor for disc degeneration and lower back pain'Oh, my aching back!' It's not an uncommon complaint heard from both men and women as they age and experience lumbar disc degeneration. Now a new study out of China suggests that menopause is associated with severity of disc degeneration in the lumbar spine. The study outcomes are being published in an article available online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The cost of opioid use during pregnancyA new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome -- often caused by mothers using opioids during pregnancy -- is increasing in the United States, and carries an enormous burden in terms of hospital days and costs. The number of US hospital admissions involving neonatal abstinence syndrome increased more than fourfold between
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Significant gaps in infection prevention impact long-term care residentsWhile nearly 400,000 residents of long-term care facilities die as a result of healthcare associated infections (HAIs), these facilities continue to lack the resources, including qualified personnel, necessary to implement adequate infection control programs, according to research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than a third of heater-cooler devices used in open heart surgery may be contaminated with deadly bacteriaThirty-three of 89 (37 percent) heater-cooler units assessed between July 2015 and December 2016 tested positive for Mycobacterium chimaera (M. chimaera), a bacterium associated with fatal infections in open-heart surgery patients, according to new research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cleaning and sterilization techniques leave ureteroscopes contaminatedThe techniques used to clean and sterilize flexible ureteroscopes leave behind contamination including debris, residue, and bacteria, according to a new study being presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. Researchers concluded that these failures may result in the use of dirty scopes.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscle fibers alone can't explain sex differences in bird songMale birds tend to be better singers than females -- but does the basis for this difference lie in the brain or in the syrinx, their equivalent of our larynx? The researchers behind a new study from The Auk analyzed the muscle fibers in the syrinxes of male and female birds from a range of species and found, to their surprise, that the amount of 'superfast' muscle didn't explain differences in voc
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study looks at needles in treatment for shoulder painAccording to a new study, the type of procedure used to treat shoulder calcifications should be tailored to the type of calcification. The results of the study will help interventional radiologists determine whether to use one or two needles for an ultrasound-guided treatment for a common condition called rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.
10h
The Atlantic
EU Takes Legal Action Against Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland The European Union has launched a formal “infringement procedure” against three of its member nations—the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland—for failing to comply with a 2015 agreement to harbor asylum-seekers. The procedure allows the EU to take legal action against the nations, which could ultimately result in financial penalties imposed by the Court of Justice. At the end of the process—which
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Virtual Reality’s Missing Element: Other PeopleVR can be the basis of a new communications industry if the technology becomes less insular and isolating.
11h
Ingeniøren
Er din chef en dårlig leder? Fem tegn på håbløs ledelse Dårlig ledelse får en stor del ingeniører til at skifte job. Fem kendetegn afslører, hvorvidt din leder er en ringe chef. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/din-chef-daarlig-leder-fem-tegn-paa-daarlig-ledelse-8599 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
11h
Ingeniøren
Danske indenrigsruter passer perfekt til elektriske flySERIE: Korte afstande gør Danmark til det ideelle sted for helt eller delvist elektriske fly. Dansk luftfartsdirektør håber, at det kommer til at ske inden for de næste 20 år.
11h
Gizmodo
US Considers Chinese Investment in Artificial Intelligence a National Security Threat Photo: Getty The US Department of Defense is struggling to get its arms around all of the new security issues that have come with our current technological explosion. One unexpected consideration on the table is placing stricter limitations on investment capital from China flowing into American companies that are working on artificial intelligence. Technology is the fastest growing industry in th
12h
Ars Technica
Video: Sony lets Ars loose on PlayStation’s E3 games and developers Ars plays games and talks to their devs at a PlayStation media mixer. Video shot by Anthony Falleroni. (video link) LOS ANGELES—Ahead of PlayStation's Monday press conference, Ars Technica attended a media-exclusive mixer full of playable new PS4 and PSVR video games. Since many of them had their developers standing nearby, we grabbed cameras and microphones to dig a little further into some inte
12h
The Atlantic
U.S.-Saudi Arms Deal Narrowly Escapes Bipartisan Opposition Following a bipartisan bid to prevent the sale of more than $500 million in precision-guided munitions to Saudi Arabia, the Senate voted Tuesday to uphold a previous deal struck by the Trump administration. During a May visit to Saudi Arabia, President Trump approved a $110 billion arms package to supply the nation with numerous defense items—including tanks, fighter planes, combat ships, and pre
13h
Gizmodo
Joel Schumacher Explains How Batman & Robin's Bat-Nipples Came To Be The infamous Bat-Nipples. Image: Warner Bros. There’s no shortage of topics when discussing Joel Schumacher’s 1997 film Batman & Robin: its over-the-top villains, pun-laden dialogue, Bat-credit card, casting, the list goes on and on. But 20 years later, the number one topic still has to be the Bat-Nipples. Or, more specifically, the choice by Schumacher to give star George Clooney a new Batsuit w
13h
Gizmodo
Sprint Is Secretly Offering Verizon Customers a Free Year of Service to Switch Sprint has lagged behind its competitors in a dismal fourth place for quite a while and it appears that it’s getting desperate. Though the company isn’t advertising the offer, Sprint is willing to give Verizon customers a free year of service for abandoning the network. According to Bloomberg , Sprint has been targeting Verizon customers through online promotions and emails rather than doing a me
14h
Gizmodo
These $78 Sony Bluetooth Headphones Run For Up to 30 Hours On a Charge Sony MDRXB650BT/B On-Ear Bluetooth Headphones , $78 If you want to cut the cord, but can’t abide earbuds, Sony’s popular on-ear MDRXB650BTs are on sale for $78 right now , within $10 of the all-time low we saw around Black Friday. These include NFC pairing, a built-in microphone, and 30 hours of battery life, and you even get your choice of three different colors. If you missed it yesterday, two
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient otter tooth found in Mexico suggests mammals migrated across AmericaAn ancient otter tooth recently discovered in Mexico suggests certain mammals migrated across America during the Miocene geologic epoch. The hypothesized route throws into doubt other theories such as migrations above Canada and through Panama.
14h
Wired
Jeff Sessions' War on Medical Marijuana Gets Public Health All WrongUsing the opioid crisis to justify cracking down on medical marijuana isn’t just disingenuous, it’s irresponsible. Because weed is actually pretty great at managing chronic pain.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shape, size of DNA lesions caused by toxic agents affects repair of DNAA team of researchers has identified and described how a major player in the repair process, called nucleotide excision repair or NER, works to recognize certain lesions for subsequent removal by the NER machinery.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single dual time-point PET scan identifies dual Alzheimer's biomarkersIdentifying Alzheimer's disease before major symptoms arise is critical to preserving brain function and helping patients maintain quality of life. A new study demonstrates that a single dual time-point PET scan could identify important biomarkers of the disease.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long term exposure to aircraft noise linked to high blood pressureLong term exposure to aircraft noise, particularly during the night, is linked to an increased risk of developing high blood pressure and possibly heart flutter and stroke as well, suggests research.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cloudy with a chance of radiation: NASA studies simulated radiationNASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is simulating space radiation on Earth following upgrades to the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. These upgrades help researchers on Earth learn more about the effects of ionizing space radiation to keep astronauts safe on a journey to Mars.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Concussion effects detailed on microscopic levelNew research has uncovered details about subcellular-level changes in the brain after concussion that could one day lead to improved treatment.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Overturning established fact' leads to new target in MLL-rearranged leukemiaA new article challenges existing understanding of potential therapeutic targets in MLL-translocation leukemia. Specifically, the study shows that within the family of MLL-related proteins, MLL2 and not MLL is the most appropriate target for drugs challenging the disease. In other words, drug developers aiming at MLL may have been missing slightly to one side of the real target.
15h
Gizmodo
Batman '66 Met The Legion of Super-Heroes and They Cramped Each Other's Style So Bad DC DC’s über-campy Batman ‘66 series is at its strongest when the Adam West-inspired Dark Knight and his Burt Ward Boy Wonder team up with other heroes from the silver and bronze ages of comics, like Wonder Woman and the Green Hornet. In this week’s crossover, though, the dynamic duo have an encounter with the Legion of Super-Heroes, a team of teens from the future, and things... don’t exactly go
15h
Live Science
Canker Sores: Causes & TreatmentsCanker sore causes & treatment
15h
Ars Technica
First impressions: Xbox One X doesn’t quite bring the “wow!” factor Ars Technica discusses the Xbox One X and goes hands-on with some upcoming Xbox software. Video shot by Andrew Falleroni, edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) LOS ANGELES—For a year now, we've been hearing about how Project Scorpio will bring "true 4K" gaming to the living-room masses with enhanced versions of the same software that runs on the Xbox One. Now, at E3 2017, we finally got a chance
15h
Ars Technica
Man who e-mailed bomb threats to frame former girlfriend pleads guilty Enlarge (credit: iPredator ) A former reporter for The Intercept apologized in a federal court Tuesday while pleading guilty to cyberstalking and other allegations connected to a string of bomb threats to Jewish organizations. Some of the threatening e-mails, which began in the wake of President Donald Trump's inauguration, were in his ex-girlfriend's name or sought to incriminate her as being re
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change risk for animals living in prime conditionsThe study examined whether birds might be able to evolve to adapt to changes to the natural environment within their range -- the geographical area where the birds nest, feed, migrate and hibernate over the course of their lifetimes.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers pinpoint how detecting social signals may have affected how we see colorsThe arrangement of the photoreceptors in our eyes allows us to detect socially significant color variation better than other types of color vision, a team of researchers has found.
15h
cognitive science
Exercise seems to have immediate cognitive benefits submitted by /u/dabrams13 [link] [comments]
16h
Inside Science
Contested National Monuments in Utah House Treasure Troves of Fossils Contested National Monuments in Utah House Treasure Troves of Fossils Paleontologists have found incredible dinosaur diversity at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. What could nearby Bears Ears hold? NationalMonuments-cropped-original-color.jpg Cedar Mesa in Bears Ears National Monument Image credits: Bureau of Land Management via flickr Rights information: CC BY-2.0 Earth Tuesday, June
16h
Ars Technica
Trump admin. delays Obama-era reboot of nutrition label amid industry pressure Enlarge / Former First Lady Michelle Obama unveiled the new, modernized Nutrition Facts Label at the Building a Healthier Future Summit. (credit: Getty | Nurphoto ) Following pressure from the food and beverage industry, the Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday that it would indefinitely delay the rollout of new nutrition labels that were designed to help consumers better evaluate the c
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers pinpoint how detecting social signals may have affected how we see colorsThe arrangement of the photoreceptors in our eyes allows us to detect socially significant color variation better than other types of color vision, a team of researchers has found. Specifically, our color vision is superior at spotting "social signaling," such as blushing or other facial color changes—even when compared to the type of color vision that we design for digital cameras and other photo
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change risk for animals living in prime conditionsAnimals living in areas where conditions are ideal for their species have less chance of evolving to cope with climate change, new research suggests.
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Popular Science
Our sun might have been born with an evil twin called 'Nemesis' Space The family isn't close. A new analysis suggests nearly all stars are probably born with a twin—including our own sun. Learn what might've happened to it.
16h
Live Science
Lonely? Take the Focus Off Yourself, Study SuggestsWhen people feel lonely, they may become more self-centered, which, in turn, can make them even lonelier, thus fueling a vicious cycle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genomic sequencing could become household term with new hand-held deviceWithin five years, consumers may begin using a device smaller than a flip phone to monitor the air, test their food or diagnose what germ caused an upset stomach. And the root of this capability points to what now is only for scientists — genome sequencing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Donor microbes persist two years after fecal transplant to treat C. difficile infectionResearchers have made the first direct demonstration that fecal donor microbes remained in recipients for months or years after a transplant to treat the diarrhea and colitis caused by recurrent Clostridium difficile infections -- a serious and stubborn cause of diarrhea after an antibiotic treatment for some other illness.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long term exposure to aircraft noise linked to high blood pressureLong term exposure to aircraft noise, particularly during the night, is linked to an increased risk of developing high blood pressure and possibly heart flutter and stroke as well, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.
16h
Ars Technica
Decrypted: American Gods just took a nosedive Enlarge / Oh look it's Essie, the 18th century version of Laura, who is stealing and sleeping around to get ahead in life. (credit: Starz) This week's American Gods was the penultimate episode of the season, and we were expecting a certain amount of closure. But no! Instead we got a bunch of filler that didn't advance the story. Author Claire Light joined us on Decrypted to talk about the structu
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Gizmodo
Report: Trump Tells Senators That Trumpcare Is Too 'Mean' GIF GIF Source: CNN When House Republicans passed a draconian healthcare plan back in May, Donald Trump rushed to the Rose Garden to celebrate this “ very, very incredibly well-crafted ” plan. But that was a long time ago. Today, Trump met with Senate Republicans about the new bill that they are attempting to put together, and he reportedly urged them to make this one less “mean.” The Associated
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Gizmodo
Senators Tear Into Jeff Sessions for Refusing to Explain Why He Won't Answer Questions About Trump Under Oath Photo: Getty Attorney General Jeff Sessions must be feeling like a tattered Keelber elf piñata after being smacked around so beautifully during his appearance Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Speaking loudly and sternly, Sessions denied ever personally colluding with any Russian officials during the 2016 campaign whilst serving as a surrogate to then-candidate Donald Trump. Obvio
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Gizmodo
Uber Can't Stop Tripping on Its Own Misogynistic Dick [Updated: He's Out] Screengrab: Youtube/ WebSummit Leaked audio from a Tuesday all-hands meeting shows that Uber, still struggling to win back the public’s goodwill since the company was accused of widespread misogyny and sexual harassment earlier this year, can’t help but continue on its path of self-destruction. The ostensible purpose of the long-awaited meeting was to announce CEO Travis Kalanick’s leave of absen
16h
Live Science
Poop Stains Help Scientists Track Antarctic Penguin ColoniesAdélie penguins in Antarctica nest in large colonies, and these groupings leave behind massive poop stains on the icy landscape — marks that are so large they can be tracked by satellites.
16h
The Atlantic
The Republican Establishment Narrowly Wins in Virginia Democratic primary results: Republican primary results: In a surprisingly close race, Republican Ed Gillespie barely secured the GOP nomination in the Virginia gubernatorial primary on Tuesday after fending off a stronger-than-anticipated challenge from Corey Stewart, a controversial conservative candidate who embraced President Trump and pitched himself as an immigration hardliner and defender o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a cancer gene protects genome organizationResearchers have cracked a long-standing mystery about an important enzyme found in virtually all organisms other than bacteria. The basic science finding may have implications for understanding cancer development and how to halt it.
17h
Gizmodo
The Six Biggest Announcements Of E3 2017 The major E3 press conferences are over, and the rain of game announcements has abated. EA , Microsoft , Bethesda , Ubisoft , Sony , and Nintendo all did their thing. It’s up to us to sort through the rubble. Among the dozens of hype reels, hardware breakdowns, marketing buzzwords and game announcements, a few things stood out. If you don’t have a lot of time and just want to know about the absol
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Ars Technica
Energy Dept. faces lawsuit after weeks of no movement on efficiency standards Enlarge / Portable air conditioners. (credit: Your Best Digs ) Nonprofit consumer and environmental groups as well as 11 states sued the Department of Energy (DOE) today for failing to enact energy efficiency standards (PDF) promulgated by the Obama administration. The standards apply to portable air conditioners, uninterruptible power supplies, air compressors, walk-in coolers and freezers, and
17h
Gizmodo
Adequate Man Should You Ask People Their Politics Before Dating Them? Adequate Man Should You Ask People Their Politics Before Dating Them? | Fusion I Bet the President Doesn’t Have the Balls to Fire Robert Mueller, He’s Probably Scared | The Slot Jeff Sessions, Before and After Stonewalling: ‘I Am Not Stonewalling’ | The Root Blame It on the … Quaaludes? Guilty or Not, Bill Cosby Still Preferred Sex With Intoxicated Women |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover new structures in bacteria, seek to determine functionUsing high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures in bacteria that represent molecular machinery.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar-light-driven fully integrated microfluidic device could serve as autonomous fuel-cell-based power source for microsensors or lab-on-a-chip applicationsMiniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, scientists have now developed a fully integrated microfluidic device that produces hydrogen fuel and converts it into electrical energy based on photocatalysis. It works fully autonomously and delivers enough hydrogen energy to power a microsensor for daily dat
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causesA huge study identified several new variants for lung cancer risk that will translate into improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in lung cancer risk.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic variants linked to higher BMI may be protective against Parkinson diseaseGenetic variants linked to higher body mass index (BMI) are associated with lower risk of Parkinson disease, according to a new study.
17h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Sessions Speaks What We’re Following Sessions’s Session: Attorney General Jeff Sessions reaffirmed that he did not collude with Russia to undermine the 2016 presidential election, dubbing the allegations an “ appalling and detestable lie .” The attorney general’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee comes less than a week after former FBI Director James Comey testified that he was fired by Presiden
17h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Open Sessions Today in 5 Lines During his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Attorney General Jeff Sessions denied “stonewalling” when senators accused him of not fully answering their questions, and vowed to defend himself “against scurrilous and false allegations” related to Russia. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told lawmakers that he has not seen any evidence of “good cause” to fir
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Opioids Still Needed by Some Pain PatientsThe "other victims" of the opioid epidemic are pain patients who need the drugs but cannot now get them because of fears related to their use -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The 504 Is Back! | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Returns Mon Jun 26 at 9/8c Street Outlaws: New Orleans | RETURNS Mon Jun 26 at 9/8c Your favorite New Orleans racers return to your TV this summer! Street Outlaws: New Orleans is back Monday June 26 at 9/8c on Discovery. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
17h
Wired
The Mad Opulence of Dubai, From Water Villas to Fake ForestsIt's like Disney World. But more ridiculous.
17h
The Atlantic
More Than 130 Dead in Bangladesh Landslide At least 134 people have been killed in a landslide caused by heavy rain in southeast Bangladesh, according to local officials. Five of the casualties were soldiers who were clearing a road in Rangamati, a hillside district near the Indian border. The district police chief, Sayed Tariqul Hasan, offered further detail, telling the AFP that landslides had buried homes in Rangamati while many reside
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single dual time-point PET scan identifies dual Alzheimer's biomarkersIdentifying Alzheimer's disease before major symptoms arise is critical to preserving brain function and helping patients maintain quality of life. A new study presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrates that a single dual time-point PET scan could identify important biomarkers of the disease.
17h
Gizmodo
Pigeons Are Misunderstood Mermaids Photo: AP Most city dwellers would agree that pigeons are sentient garbage. They eat pizza off the ground and defecate with abandon, sometimes on pedestrians’ heads. Worst of all, they don’t seem terribly bothered by humans—they’ll flap their filthy wings in our faces and move on as if nothing happened. But today just so happens to be Pigeon Appreciation Day (yes, really ) so we’re giving them a
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Gizmodo
The Dark, Painful Inspiration Behind the Horror Movie It Comes at Night GIF Three weeks ago, I got on a school bus just as the sun was setting and was driven into the woods 20 minutes south of one of Austin’s Alamo Drafthouse theaters. At a campsite tucked away off a walking trail, I saw one of the year’s most disturbing films projected onto an outdoor movie screen. The next day, I asked director Trey Shults where he found the inspiration for the harrowing It Comes a
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Gizmodo
Crash Tests Show How The Tesla Model X Got A 5-Star Safety Rating GIF After conducting independent testing, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gave the Tesla Model X five stars in its three crash test categories: frontal crash, side crash and rollover. And these crash test videos show just how well it can hold up. The agency simulated head-on collisions of vehicles moving at 35 mph. It also considered how much the crash test dummy’s head, neck,
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical study shows TempTraq detects fevers quicker than the current standard-of-care methodA University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center (UH) study shows TempTraq, a patented, wearable, Bluetooth continuous temperature monitor in the form of a soft, comfortable patch, can detect a rise in body temperature up to 180 minutes earlier, in a majority of patient cases, than the current standard-of-care (SOC) method. Earlier fever detection empowers clinicians to intervene faster. The promising
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Overturning established fact' leads to new new target in MLL-rearranged leukemiaA University of Colorado Cancer Center paper published today in the journal Cancer Cell challenges existing understanding of potential therapeutic targets in MLL-translocation leukemia. Specifically, the study shows that within the family of MLL-related proteins, MLL2 and not MLL is the most appropriate target for drugs challenging the disease. In other words, drug developers aiming at MLL may hav
18h
Gizmodo
US Blames North Korea for Series of DDoS Attacks Photo: Getty The Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation issued a rare cybersecurity bulletin linking North Korea to a series of attacks that have targeted US businesses and critical infrastructure since 2009. The alert focuses on a malware strain called DeltaCharlie, which DHS and FBI say was used by the North Korean government to launch distributed denial of serv
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Topical drug darkens human skin in a dish without UVResearchers in Boston have developed a class of small molecules that successfully penetrates and darkens human skin samples in the laboratory. The drug also generates protective tans in red-haired mice, which are more susceptible to skin cancer via ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The molecule works by stimulating cells to produce more UV-absorbing pigments, but more preclinical tests need to be done b
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canadian oil hike puts Trudeau climate action in doubtOil companies said Tuesday they planned to ramp up their output in Canada, throwing a wrench in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's efforts to slash greenhouse gas emissions.
18h
cognitive science
11 Dimensional structures discovered in the brain. What could this mean for our field? submitted by /u/thebakerbastard [link] [comments]
18h
The Atlantic
Puerto Rico's Plebiscite to Nowhere Don’t start stitching that 51st star on the American flag just yet. Although 97 percent of voters in a Puerto Rico referendum on June 11 voted to start down the path of statehood, the chance of the island becoming a state is still, at best, a long shot. Optimism was the word of the day among supporters of Puerto Rico statehood after this most recent victory, in this high-profile plebiscite. Among
18h
The Scientist RSS
Sylvy Kornberg: Biography of a BiochemistThe Scientist identifies a mystery woman in a historic photo as an accomplished researcher from a family of famous scientists whose experiments on DNA replication contributed to a Nobel prize.
18h
Ars Technica
Xerox Alto designer, co-inventor of Ethernet, dies at 74 Enlarge / Charles Thacker (left) as seen in 2008. (credit: Marcin Wichary ) Charles Thacker, one of the lead hardware designers on the Xerox Alto, the first modern personal computer, died of a brief illness on Monday. He was 74. The Alto, which was released in 1973 but was never a commercial success, was an incredibly influential machine. Ahead of its time, it boasted resizeable windows as part o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Garbage dumped in sea off Lebanon sparks outrageA "mountain of garbage" dumped at sea off Beirut under a deal between the government and a company has sparked outrage in Lebanon, two years after mass protests over a waste crisis.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Fintech' startup SoFi moving into traditional bankingOnline lender and financial startup SoFi has taken the first step toward competing with the nation's biggest banks on their home turf: the checking account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superconducting nanowire memory cell, miniaturized technologyDeveloping a superconducting computer that would perform computations at high speed without heat dissipation has been the goal of several research and development initiatives since the 1950s. Such a computer would require a fraction of the energy current supercomputers consume, and would be many times faster and more powerful. Despite promising advances in this direction over the last 65 years, su
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People 'phone snubbed' by others often turn to phones, social media for acceptancePeople who are phone snubbed - or "phubbed" - by others are, themselves, often turning to their smartphones and social media to find acceptance, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cloudy with a chance of radiation: NASA studies simulated radiationNASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is simulating space radiation on Earth following upgrades to the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. These upgrades help researchers on Earth learn more about the effects of ionizing space radiation to keep astronauts safe on a journey to Mars.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photopower for microlabsMiniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, Japanese scientists have now developed a fully integrated microfluidic device that produces hydrogen fuel and converts it into electrical energy based on photocatalysis. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it works fully autonomously and delivers e
18h
Quanta Magazine
How Superfluid Dark Matter Mimics an Old Idea About Gravity Two physicists have been developing a theory of superfluid dark matter, an idea that I explore at length in the article “ Dark Matter Recipe Calls for One Part Superfluid .” Perhaps most intriguing is that the new theory reproduces in many ways the predictions of a model called Modified Newtonian Dynamics, or MOND, which was first proposed in 1983. MOND abandons dark matter particles entirely. In
18h
Ars Technica
OneDrive done right is back, and now it works properly OneDrive placeholders are back. A new OneDrive client is available for the latest Windows 10 Insider build, and it brings back seamless integration with OneDrive cloud storage under the name "OneDrive Files On Demand." With cloud storage services, it's very easy to have large amounts of storage and data "in the cloud" that you don't necessarily have room for locally. The traditional solution has
18h
The Atlantic
How a Small Northern Ireland Party Became a U.K. Powerbroker A fiercely socially conservative party founded by a Protestant religious radical and sworn to defend Northern Ireland’s place in the United Kingdom has unexpectedly found itself holding the balance of power in Britain. This is the result of a snap election called by Prime Minister Theresa May in a botched attempt to increase her majority and strengthen her hand for looming Brexit talks with the E
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Gizmodo
Someone Please Tell Microsoft Why People Buy Gaming Consoles Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Even though E3 has only just gotten underway, most of the biggest companies have already made their biggest announcements, and amazingly, Microsoft’s offering already feels like a miss. I say “amazingly” because Microsoft was the only company to debut major hardware at the show. Normally when a company announces a brand new console and 22 exclusive titles, as Microsoft j
18h
Popular Science
Coral reefs show signs of climate stress, but there's still hope From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News They show signs of stress, but also resilience. The diverse ecosystems that comprise coral reefs are suffering worldwide as a result of climate change, overfishing and pollution. Read on.
18h
Ars Technica
Light-based neural network does simple speech recognition Optical units and control circuits can be etched onto a single chip. (credit: Glenn J. Asakawa/MIT ) While there are lots of things that artificial intelligence can't do yet—science being one of them —neural networks are proving themselves increasingly adept at a huge variety of pattern recognition tasks. These tasks can range anywhere from recognizing specific faces in photos to identifying spec
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concussion effects detailed on microscopic levelNew research has uncovered details about subcellular-level changes in the brain after concussion that could one day lead to improved treatment.
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Gizmodo
Want a Piece of History? People Are Selling Fyre Festival Merchandise on Ebay Images via Ebay. Fyre Festival attendees certainly suffered when they arrived in the Bahamas and found a dirty island filled with rabid dogs and no shelter in sight. And now some of those festival-goers are trying to make a little coin on Ebay with merchandise from an event that is going down as one of the most disastrous—if not the most disastrous—music festivals of all time. You can get this ho
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The Atlantic
The Uber Report Is a Very Basic Guide to Diversity and Inclusion On Tuesday, Uber announced a host of changes that it hopes will stem the ongoing public-relations crisis the company has found itself in for the past several months. The embattled CEO, Travis Kalanick, will step away from the company for an unspecified period of time. But that won’t likely change the day-to-day lives of the more than 5,000 Uber employees as much as the the changes the company is
19h
Science : NPR
Brain Cell Transplants Are Being Tested Once Again For Parkinson's In 2003, researchers declared a moratorium on the use of transplanted brain cells to treat Parkinson's disease. Now, armed with better cells, they're giving the approach another try. (Image credit: Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source)
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Ars Technica
Man found guilty under CFAA didn’t damage LA Times, lawyers say Matthew Keys talks to reporters after he was sentenced in April 2016 to two years in prison, surrounded by his lawyers, including Mark Jaffe (far left). (credit: Cyrus Farivar) SAN FRANCISCO—Defense attorneys forcefully argued Tuesday before the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals that their client—a journalist convicted under an anti-hacking law last year—did not actually damage a media website that
19h
Popular Science
Scientists may have found a way to tan skin without damaging it Health At least on skin samples in a lab. Researchers identified a small molecule that successfully darkens skin without exposure to UV radiation from the sun. Read on.
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Big Think
Is Our Galaxy in a Backwater of the Universe? This theory may square differing calculations in the universe’s expansion rate. Read More
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Quanta Magazine
Dark Matter Recipe Calls for One Part Superfluid For years, dark matter has been behaving badly. The term was first invoked nearly 80 years ago by the astronomer Fritz Zwicky, who realized that some unseen gravitational force was needed to stop individual galaxies from escaping giant galaxy clusters. Later, Vera Rubin and Kent Ford used unseen dark matter to explain why galaxies themselves don’t fly apart. Yet even though we use the term “dark
19h
Viden
Små robotter med stor personlighedNyt robotlegetøj fra Japan er ultranuttet og fyldt med teknologi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large Canadian Arctic climate change study cancelled due to climate changeThe Science Team of the Canadian Research Icebreaker CCGS Amundsen has cancelled the first leg of the 2017 Expedition due to complications associated with the southward motion of hazardous Arctic sea ice, caused by climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Major new appetite regulator successfully manipulated in miceA new link between certain brain receptors and obesity has been identified by researchers, giving a possible new drug target for appetite regulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Superconducting nanowire memory cell, miniaturized technologyResearchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new nanoscale memory cell that holds tremendous promise for successful integration with superconducting processors. The new technology, created by Professor of Physics Alexey Bezryadin and graduate student Andrew Murphy, in collaboration with Dmitri Averin, a professor of theoretical physics at State University of New Y
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causesA huge study identified several new variants for lung cancer risk that will translate into improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in lung cancer risk
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vesselsA research team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Christopher Chen is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia.
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Ars Technica
Win XP patched to avert new outbreaks spawned by NSA-leaking Shadow Brokers (credit: Microsoft ) On Tuesday, Microsoft took the highly unusual step of issuing security patches for XP and other unsupported versions of Windows. The company did this in a bid to protect the OSes against a series of "destructive" exploits developed by, and later stolen from, the National Security Agency. By Ars' count, Tuesday is only the third time in Microsoft history that the company has i
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New on MIT Technology Review
To Help Rural Kids Do Their Homework, a Virginia County Is Using Secret Wireless SpectrumWhen telecoms won’t fix up your students’ broadband, how about beaming your school’s to nearby homes?
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Ars Technica
Emergency drones rush life-saving help to simulated cardiac arrest cases Enlarge / An emergency medical drone coming to the rescue. (credit: JAMA ) Thanks to drones, condoms have rained down on villages in rural Africa. Remote islands have quickly received medical supplies , while researchers have winged biological specimens to distant pathology labs . Now, a research group in Sweden is buzzing about yet another type of life-saving flight for the unmanned aerial vehic
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The Scientist RSS
Distinguished Autism Researcher DiesA child neurologist, Isabelle Rapin popularized the notion that autism was part of a spectrum of disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Makeup of vaginal microbiome linked to preterm birthIn a study of predominantly African-American women -- who have a much higher rate of delivering babies early compared with other racial groups -- researchers showed that a decrease in the diversity of vaginal microbes of pregnant women between the first and second trimesters is associated with preterm birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US aid to combat malaria in Africa is associated with reduced risk of childhood mortalityScientists have shown that funding from the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) in 19 sub-Saharan African countries was associated with a 16 person reduction in the annual risk of under-five child mortality in the years following introduction of the Initiative.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into galaxy cluster's spectacular 'mini-halo'New images give an unprecedented view, revealing multitude of new substructures that shed light on mechanisms creating the massive radio-emitting structure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries needLithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnets, all the way down!If you can't move electrons around to study how factors like symmetry impact the larger-scale magnetic effects, what can you do instead? It turns out that assemblies of metallic nanoparticles, which can be carefully arranged at multiple length scales, behave like bulk magnets and display intriguing, shape-dependent behavior. The effects could help improve high-density information storage and spint
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
E. coli bacteria's defense secret revealedBy tagging a cell's proteins with fluorescent beacons, researchers have found out how E. coli bacteria defend themselves against antibiotics and other poisons. Probably not good news for the bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene transistor could mean computers that are 1,000 times fasterTransistors based on graphene ribbons could result in much faster, more efficient computers and other devices. Researchers use a magnetic field to control current flow.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emphasizing individual solutions to big issues can reduce support for government effortsExperiments suggest that making individuals aware of how they can help solve large-scale problems makes them less likely to support government-based solutions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology enables effective simultaneous testing for multiple blood-borne pathogensIdentification of new pathogens requires a rapid response from industry to develop new tests and the FDA to assess test safety and efficacy. A report evaluates the new OpenArray system that offers simultaneous detection of multiple viruses, bacteria, and protozoan pathogens in human blood samples. Investigators determined that this system is a promising tool for flexible, fast, and accurate blood
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Donor microbes persist 2 years after fecal transplant to treat C. difficile infectionUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have made the first direct demonstration that fecal donor microbes remained in recipients for months or years after a transplant to treat the diarrhea and colitis caused by recurrent Clostridium difficile infections -- a serious and stubborn cause of diarrhea after an antibiotic treatment for some other illness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People 'phone snubbed' by others often turn to phones, social media for acceptance, Baylor studyPeople who are phone snubbed -- or 'phubbed' -- by others are, themselves, often turning to their smartphones and social media to find acceptance, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business.
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Gizmodo
Save $10 On The Trimmer Designed Specifically For Self-Haircuts Remington Shortcut Pro Haircut Kit , $44. Discount shown at checkout. If you’re enough of a daredevil to give yourself a haircut, Remington’s Shortcut Pro makes the process as simple as possible. For $44 (after a $10 off $50 promotion Amazon’s running), the Shortcut Pro can run for 40 minutes on its built-in lithium-ion battery, and includes nine different length combs to customize your look. And
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Gizmodo
These Freaky Robots Were Built From Drinking Straws and Inspired by Spiders GIF Emulating spiders and bugs, and using drinking straws as basic building blocks, a research team from Harvard University has developed a type of semi-soft robot capable of standing, walking, and even striding across a liquid surface. Say hello to the “arthrobots.” “Once you have a Lego brick, what kind of castle can you build with it?” In an effort to create nimbler and more agile robots, Harv
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Ars Technica
When flatworms go to space, they grow two heads Tufts University Among the hundreds of scientific tests happening on the International Space Station, only one has yielded a result worthy of a B-movie starring Ice Cube . It turns out that flatworms undergo an odd and as-yet-unexplained transformation in space. When profoundly injured, they grow a second head. Scientists who study tissue regeneration have long been fascinated by flatworms becaus
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Wired
It Was Inevitable, Really: Netflix Is Turning Into HBONow that Netflix is looking out for its bottom line, its transition to "TV network" seems to be complete.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new structures in bacteria, seek to determine functionUsing high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures on bacteria that represent molecular machinery. The research is published this week in the Journal of Bacteriology, published by the American Society for Microbiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMD bioengineers develop new technologies to drive next-generation therapies for MSResearchers in the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots -- tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology -- to decipher the features needed to design specific and effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover new structures in bacteria, seek to determine functionUsing high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures on bacteria that represent molecular machinery. The research is published this week in the Journal of Bacteriology, published by the American Society for Microbiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pediatric nurses miss care more often in poor work environments, Penn study findsIn a new study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Center for Health Outcome and Policy Research and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia examined the factors influencing the likelihood of missed nursing care in a pediatric setting. Their findings indicate that pediatric nurses with poor work environments and higher patient loads are more likely to miss required c
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Science : NPR
What's The Difference Between Famine And Hunger? A Food FAQ We asked our readers what they wanted to know about world hunger? So many thoughtful questions came in that we did a roundup of queries about hunger and famine. (Image credit: Hanna Barczyk for NPR)
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Gizmodo
The Root Is Live-Blogging Jeff Sessions' Testimony to Congress Because We Hate Ourselves Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesEdit image caption (optional) Hello, y’all. I’m Michael Arceneaux, contributor to The Root and perpetual masochist. As the headline suggests, I’m here to live blog Attorney General Segregation Now, Segregation Forever Jeff Sessions’ testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee as part of its investigation into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election. I’m surprise
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient DNA shakes up the elephant family treeDNA from straight-tusked elephant fossils is forcing scientists to reconsider the history of elephant evolution.
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Gizmodo
I Played 30 Minutes Of Super Mario Odyssey And It Sure Is Impressive Super Mario Odyssey is a wild, ambitious game. It’s got secrets, dinosaurs, and the type of flawless jumping you’d expect from a new main Mario made by the design wizards at Nintendo. It’s less Super Mario 3D World , more Super Mario 64 . And it lets you throw around Mario’s hat, which I promise is more exciting than it sounds. In fact, hat-throwing is the core mechanic of Super Mario Odyssey , w
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Science | The Guardian
Antiviral therapy is effective in fighting hepatitis C | LettersThe Cochrane analysis casting doubt on this life-saving therapy is flawed and may deter patients from seeking it, say clinicians and scientists We are clinicians and scientists who have studied and treated patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection over many years and patient groups that represent those affected by hepatitis C. We write in response to your article on the effectiveness of an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Makeup of vaginal microbiome linked to preterm birthIn a study of predominantly African-American women -- who have a much higher rate of delivering babies early compared with other racial groups -- researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis showed that a decrease in the diversity of vaginal microbes of pregnant women between the first and second trimesters is associated with preterm birth.
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Gizmodo
This SNES-Style Nintendo Switch Controller Is Designed to Play 32 Years of Games Nintendo’s recently-announced classic games service will eventually bring your favorite 8-bit and 16-bit titles to the Switch . And when it finally launches, 8Bitdo’s new SNES30 Pro controller looks like it could be the perfect way to play everything from the original NES’ Super Mario Bros. , to the Switch’s Zelda: Breath of the Wild . Based on the curvy design of the Super Nintendo controller, t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Green police' to battle Tunisia trash scourgeTunisia on Tuesday launched a special "green police" unit aimed at dealing with the proliferation of waste, a scourge that has worsened dramatically since the 2011 revolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensorsResearchers have now managed to pinpoint what happens when light is absorbed by extremely small nanoclusters of silver atoms. The results may have useful application in the development of biosensors and in imaging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Media microaggressions against female Olympic athletes up 40 percentMicroaggressions against female athletes in the media increased by nearly 40 percent from the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Altered virus may expand patient recruitment in human gene therapy trialsFor many patients, participating in gene therapy clinical trials isn't an option because their immune system recognizes and fights the helpful virus used for treatment. Now, researchers have found a solution that may allow it to evade the body's normal immune response.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover more effective, and potentially safer, crystallized form of DDTA new crystal form of DDT that is more effective against insects than the existing one has been discovered by a team of scientists. Its research points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT -- a pesticide that has historically been linked to human-health afflictions and environmental degradation -- that can be administered in smaller amounts while reducing environmental impac
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uterine fibroid embolization helps restore fertilityA minimally invasive treatment can help restore fertility in women with uterine fibroids, according to a new study.
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Live Science
New Selfie Danger? Camera Flash May Trigger Seizure-Like ResponseSnapping a selfie may come with an unwanted side effect, at least for one teen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risky bingeing: Women in Appalachian Ohio report higher rates of alcohol misuseHow much alcohol women drink may depend on where they live. A new study finds one-fifth of women in Appalachian Ohio imbibe at alarming levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Charred flowers and the fossil recordOne of the main types of fossil used to understand the first flowering plants (angiosperms) are charred flowers. These charcoals were produced in ancient wildfires, and they provide some evidence for the types of plants that grew millions of years ago. However, when fires burn they not only produce charcoal, but they also destroy it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Further support for genetic factors underlying addictionsImpairment of a particular gene raises increases susceptibility to opioid addiction liability as well as vulnerability to binge eating according to a new study. Dysfunction of the gene, casein kinase1-epsilon (CSNK1E), increases opioid's euphoric response and produces a marked increase in sensitivity to binge eating in a female experimental model but not in the male.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New alloys, phase diagram created by researchersA multi-institutional team has discovered a way to create new alloys that could form the basis of next-generation semiconductors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Students print their way to new, powerful supercapacitorsSustainable chemistry students have tripled the specific capacitance of nitrogen-doped carbons: new materials with potential applications in fast energy storage (e.g. for regenerative breaking or fast charging of cellphones). Their experiments required new pieces of equipment which were designed and produced in the lab using 3D printing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New strategy to search for ancient black holesAn interdisciplinary team of physicists and astronomers has devised a new strategy to search for 'primordial' black holes produced in the early universe. Such black holes are possibly responsible for the gravitational wave events observed by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clinical trial evaluating potential treatment for postpartum depressionResearchers have announced the publication of results from a multi-site phase 2 clinical trial with brexanolone, an investigational medication, in the treatment of severe postpartum depression (PPD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hope for better lung cancer treatment on horizonThere is a better way to recruit the right participants for promising new anti-cancer drugs called FGFR (fibroblast growth factor receptor) inhibitors, which are being investigated for treating lung squamous cell carcinoma, outlines a new report.
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Ars Technica
Prisoners lose again as court wipes out inmate calling price caps Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Image Source ) A federal appeals court today struck down price caps on intrastate phone calls made by prisoners. Inmates will thus have to continue paying high prices to make phone calls to family members, friends, and lawyers. The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit sided with prison phone company Global Tel*Link in its lawsuit against the Fed
20h
The Atlantic
Finding the Emotional Truth in Horror Writing By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean Victor LaValle wants to scare you, let’s be clear. His books tend to feature characters in extreme, terrifying situations—stalked by a fanged monster ( The Devil in Silver ), caught up in a sini
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Gizmodo
How Much Lubricant Are These Amiibos Using? Image: Nintendo/Gizmodo Nintendo just announced a whole lot of cool news at its streaming-only press conference, but one image really seemed to pop. Poor Urbosa, the badass Gerudo warrior whose spirit currently inhabits a twenty-story tall camel (it’s a game thing) has been wrecked. The above are four toy figurines from Nintendo’s Amiibo line, based on characters from the excellent Zelda: Breath
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Historic shipwreck discovered off Southern California coastResearchers have discovered the underwater wreck of a U.S. Coast Guard ship that first set out to sea during the Spanish-American War and sunk off the coast of Southern California 100 years ago, officials said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor diet, plus Alzheimer's gene, may fuel diseaseMice carrying a genetic risk factor for the disease quickly developed brain plaques after 12 weeks on a poor diet, research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to destroying deadly brain tumorsA new strategy for treating brain tumors may extend or save the lives of patients diagnosed with one of the deadliest forms of cancer, according to a study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries needLithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnets, all the way down!In many ways, magnets are still mysterious. They get their (often powerful) effects from the microscopic interactions of individual electrons, and from the interplay between their collective behavior at different scales. But if you can't move these electrons around to study how factors like symmetry impact the larger-scale magnetic effects, what can you do instead?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New window improves the view of science on orbiting laboratoryOne of the busiest work stations on the International Space Station got a major upgrade recently, and it already has saved dozens of hours on a variety of experiments for crew members aboard the orbiting laboratory.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a Dell XPS 13 notebook with QHD+ touch display for just $1,259 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with a number of new deals ahead of Father's Day this weekend. Today, you can get a fully loaded Dell XPS 13 laptop—featuring a Core i7 processor, a 13-inch QHD+ touch display, 16GB of RAM, and a 512GB SSD—for $1,259.99. That saves you a ton off the list price of $1,800. If dad needs a new laptop, this is a great gift optio
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Graphene transistor could mean computers that are 1,000 times fasterTransistors based on graphene ribbons could result in much faster, more efficient computers and other devices. Researchers use a magnetic field to control current flow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
E. coli bacteria's defense secret revealedBy tagging a cell's proteins with fluorescent beacons, Cornell researchers have found out how E. coli bacteria defend themselves against antibiotics and other poisons. Probably not good news for the bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US aid to combat malaria in Africa is associated with reduced risk of childhood mortalityIn a study published in PLOS Medicine, Aleksandra Jakubowski of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US, and colleagues show that funding from the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) in 19 sub-Saharan African countries was associated with a 16 person reduction in the annual risk of under-five child mortality in the years following introduction of the Initiative.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic variants linked to higher BMI may be protective against Parkinson diseaseGenetic variants linked to higher body mass index (BMI) are associated with lower risk of Parkinson disease, according to a study published by Nicholas Wood and colleagues from the University College London, UK, in PLOS Medicine.
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Gizmodo
Watching a Daredevil Pilot Fly This Low Is Absolutely Terrifying GIF If you’re a nervous flyer, you’re probably going to want to skip this video, because after watching YouTube’s Linkerius fly so low to the ground that it looks like he’s perpetually going to crash , you’ll be terrified of ever stepping foot on a plane again. As dangerous as skimming the earth at hundreds of miles per hour seems, it’s an actual technique used by military aircraft to help avoid
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Ars Technica
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick says he’ll take a leave of absence Enlarge / Uber CEO Travis Kalanick at the World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China last year. (credit: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Uber's embattled CEO, Travis Kalanick, told employees today that he will take an indefinite leave of absence. The company's board of directors held a seven-hour meeting on Sunday to discuss the details of an internal investigation led by former Attorney Gener
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Gizmodo
Medical Drones Could Beat Ambulances At Saving Cardiac Arrest Patients While I wait for a picture of the drone, this is essentially what it looked like but with rotors (Image: Oxyman /Wikimedia Commons) After someone suffers from cardiac arrest, it’s like a time bomb starts ticking. The best way to increase survival rate is to get someone a defibrillator—and fast. Ambulances have to deal with red lights. Drones can fly. So some Swedish researchers ran some timed tri
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Gizmodo
At the End of the NSFW Fidget Spinner Rainbow: This Guy's Dick Image: Tumblr As fidget spinners make a career jump from anxiety reduction bauble to postmodern sex toy, one guy has us all beat. Back in January, no one even knew what a fidget spinner was. By March, they were being sold in every convenience store. We debated whether they were a harmless toy, or a virulent new strain of pseudoscience. We snagged photos of Barron Trump playing with one. And then,
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Gizmodo
Bike Showdown: Which Easy-to-Build, Low-Maintenance Bike Should You Buy? It’s finally summer, so it’s time to hop on a bike and riding around your neighborhood. One of the quickest (and cheapest) ways you can do this is to buy one of the many low-maintenance bikes you can find online for super cheap. There are a bunch to choose from, but we’ve decided to focus on two in particular that use belt drives—an extra durable component that replaces the standard metal chain a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive-related neural pattern to activate machinesA study has identified a functional brain pattern linked to cognitive behavior able to activate an iPad's touchscreen. Results may be useful in brain-machine interfaces, of particular interest for people with physical difficulties to communicate with the outside world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The role of vitamin A in diabetesThere has been no known link between diabetes and vitamin A -- until now. A new study suggests that the vitamin improves the insulin producing ?-cell's function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pharmacists know more about penicillin allergy than MDs, study showsMany physicians who treat patients with 'penicillin allergy' listed in their charts may not fully understand important facts about penicillin allergy, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Importance of taking diabetes medications as prescribed, exercising and managing weightPeople with diabetes who took their medications at least 80 percent of the time and people who exercised four or more times per week were at lower risk for poorly controlled blood sugar, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loneliness contributes to self-centeredness for sake of self-preservationLoneliness increases self-centeredness, research conducted over more than a decade indicates, and, to a lesser extent, self-centeredness also increases loneliness. The findings show such effects create a positive feedback loop between the two traits: As increased loneliness heightens self-centeredness, the latter then contributes further to enhance loneliness. The researchers write that targeting
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Big Food' companies have less power than you might think'Big Food' companies are striving to make food more sustainable from farm to factory but have less power than you might think. In fact, most Big Food companies have little knowledge about or control over the farmers who supply their raw materials, outlines a new article.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Argonne X-rays used to help identify a key Lassa virus structureResearch done at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source was vital to the process of identifying the structure, which provides a guide for designing a Lassa virus vaccine. Lassa virus is endemic to Africa and kills thousands of people a year; it is particularly deadly for pregnant women.
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Ars Technica
Play Store downloads show Google Pixel sales limited to 1 million units Enlarge / The Google Pixel XL. (credit: Ron Amadeo) The Google Pixel , Google's first totally self-branded phone, launched about eight months ago. Google declared itself a smartphone OEM and jumped into the world of manufacturing, but while the company's software and optimizations have made the phone a critical success, how have the sales numbers been? Unlike just about every hardware manufacture
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Top-Selling Electric Toothbrush Just Got a Massive Discount Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean , $110 after $30 coupon Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean is a bit of an indulgence, but it’s Amazon’s top-selling electric toothbrush for a reason, and you can get it for an all-time low price today. As the top-of-the-line Sonicare , you get basically every brushing feature you could possibly want, plus a USB travel charging case (meaning you don’t need to carry a pro
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman: Viral Systems in the Laboratory: Producing and PurifyingPure virus is an essential tool in today's laboratory
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The Scientist RSS
Bats a Major Global Reservoir of CoronavirusesUnderstanding the patterns of diversity in bat-hosted viruses may help researchers better predict when and where outbreaks may occur.
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Wired
Apple's New Transparency Is Huge for Podcasts EverywhereThanks to better analytics, producers will finally know how much you're listening—and when you're not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds of a featherBiologists have always been fascinated by the diversity and changeability of life on Earth and have attempted to answer a fundamental question: How do new species originate? A new study provides the first large-scale test of the link between population differentiation rates and speciation rates. The results confirm the evolutionary importance of population genetic differentiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study sheds light on determining surgical margins for feline tumorsResearchers are paving the way for more precision in determining surgical margins for an aggressive tumor common in cats by analyzing tissue contraction at various stages of the post-operative examination process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spying on fish love calls could help protect them from overfishingScientists have discovered a way to use the incredibly loud, distinctive sounds that fish make when they gather to spawn to protect them from overfishing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests seal oil could help people with type 1 diabetesA research team at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre in Toronto has published a paper that suggests seal oil has the potential to help promote nerve regeneration in patients with type 1 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnets, all the way down!If you can't move electrons around to study how factors like symmetry impact the larger-scale magnetic effects, what can you do instead? It turns out that assemblies of metallic nanoparticles, which can be carefully arranged at multiple length scales, behave like bulk magnets and display intriguing, shape-dependent behavior. The effects, reported this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, could
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries needLithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
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Science | The Guardian
Biology A-level students mark down exam board after yet another error OCR apologises again after third mistake in exam paper, with pupils uncertain they will reach grades needed for university places One of England’s main examination boards has been forced to issue an apology for the third time in a little over a fortnight after students and teachers spotted yet another error on one of its papers. The mistake occurred on OCR’s A-level biology paper, which was sat b
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Ars Technica
“Covfefe”—there’s a congressional act for that now Enlarge (credit: Boston Globe via Getty Images) It was just last week when Press Secretary Sean Spicer said President Donald Trump's tweets should be viewed as the president's official position. "The president is president of the United States, so they are considered official statements by the president of the United States," he said . That statement has prompted fresh debate about whether the pr
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The Atlantic
The Questions Sessions Left Unanswered Updated at 6:29 p.m. ET Attorney General Jeff Sessions offered an aggressive defense of his conduct surrounding the Russia investigation on Tuesday, but his repeated refusal to answer questions based on a vague reference to executive privilege will likely prolong the congressional effort to understand what preceded former FBI Director James Comey’s controversial ouster last month. The former Alab
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The Atlantic
The End of Yahoo After more than two decades, internet pioneer Yahoo’s days as an independent business are no more. Verizon announced Tuesday it completed its purchase of Yahoo’s internet business for $4.48 billion. The acquisition, which was first announced last July, aims to combine Yahoo’s operating business with AOL, which it purchased in 2015. The merger will form Oath, a division of Verizon that is expected
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Futurity.org
How to stop a slimy blight from killing fruit trees A new weapon may be an effective way to combat fire blight, a plant disease caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora that can be deadly to pear and apple trees. If a tree is affected, it usually has to be cleared and burned. The pathogen that causes fire blight is difficult to control. In exceptional cases, farmers can use the antibiotic streptomycin, but even this can’t prevent the pathogen fro
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Popular Science
2.2 billion people are overweight and sick, but we’re still measuring them by a terrible metric Health We could save lives by getting rid of BMI. We’re so used to thinking about obesity in terms of BMI that it’s difficult to view it any other way. But it's actually a terrible measure of health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Calvin soak MexicoTropical Depression 3E briefly strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Calvin before it made landfall in southwestern Mexico. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at the depression just prior to its classification as a tropical storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VLA gives new insight into galaxy cluster's spectacular 'mini-halo'New images give an unprecedented view, revealing multitude of new substructures that shed light on mechanisms creating the massive radio-emitting structure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From Genome Research: Environmental pressures on opportunistic fungal pathogenWith an estimated one million cases diagnosed worldwide each year, the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, which can cause life-threatening fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, is an important health concern. In a study published today in Genome Research, scientists identified natural genomic variation in C. neoformans that may influence prevalence and disease severity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tanning response replicated in cultured human skinInvestigators have developed a way of increasing pigmentation in human skin without the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making art activates brain's reward pathwayColoring, doodling and drawing all showed significant bloodflow in the section of the brain related to feeling rewarded, a new study by an art therapist found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helium droplets offer new precision to single-molecule laser measurementChemical reactions necessarily involve molecules coming together, and the way they interact can depend on how they are aligned relative to each other. By knowing and controlling the alignment of molecules, a great deal can be learned about how chemical reactions occur. Scientists now report a new technique for aligning molecules using lasers and very cold droplets of helium.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A SMARTer way to discover new stroke treatmentsResearchers examined if a particular trial type could be successfully applied to stroke patients -- and whether this approach may accelerate discovery of new treatments.
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Gizmodo
Embattled CEO Travis Kalanick Takes Leave of Absence in Wake of Uber's Sexual Harassment Investigation Photo: Getty Uber CEO Travis Kalanick will take a leave of absence from the company he founded and the company will make changes to its culture, following a highly-anticipated investigation into sexual harassment and toxic workplace culture at the ride-hailing startup. “The ultimate responsibility, for where we’ve gotten and how we’ve gotten here rests on my shoulders,” Kalanick wrote in a compan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VLA gives new insight into galaxy cluster's spectacular 'mini-halo'Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have discovered new details that are helping them decipher the mystery of how giant radio-emitting structures are formed at the center of a cluster of galaxies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher sheds light on life of lesbians in Nazi GermanyLesbians may have enjoyed limited toleration during the Nazi regime in Germany, according to new Stanford research.
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The Atlantic
The Boldness of Roxane Gay’s Hunger What is often deemed the most intoxicating part of weight-loss stories is the moment of triumph. Think, confetti showering the winning contestant on a reality show, a newly svelte celebrity swimming inside their “fat ” jeans, or Oprah underscoring in a Weight Watchers ad that she can, in fact, eat bread every day. At a time when there is no shortage of recommendations for women on how to discipli
22h
The Atlantic
A Fight Over Reporters' Access on Capitol Hill Bewilderment and alarm rippled across U.S. newsrooms on Tuesday afternoon as reporters tried to figure out what, exactly, the Senate Rules Committee was attempting to prevent them from doing on Capitol Hill. “Reporters at Capitol have been told they are not allow to film interviews with senators in hallways, contrary to years of precedent,” Kasie Hunt, a Capitol Hill correspondent for NBC News tw
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electron localization in rod-shaped triicosahedral gold nanocluster [Chemistry]Atomically precise gold nanocluster based on linear assembly of repeating icosahedrons (clusters of clusters) is a unique type of linear nanostructure, which exhibits strong near-infrared absorption as their free electrons are confined in a one-dimensional quantum box. Little is known about the carrier dynamics in these nanoclusters, which limit their...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hidden role of intermolecular proton transfer in the anomalously diffuse vibrational spectrum of a trapped hydronium ion [Chemistry]We report the vibrational spectra of the hydronium and methyl-ammonium ions captured in the C3v binding pocket of the 18-crown-6 ether ionophore. Although the NH stretching bands of the CH3NH3+ ion are consistent with harmonic expectations, the OH stretching bands of H3O+ are surprisingly broad, appearing as a diffuse background...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Myosin Va’s adaptor protein melanophilin enforces track selection on the microtubule and actin networks in vitro [Biochemistry]Pigment organelles, or melanosomes, are transported by kinesin, dynein, and myosin motors. As such, melanosome transport is an excellent model system to study the functional relationship between the microtubule- and actin-based transport systems. In mammalian melanocytes, it is well known that the Rab27a/melanophilin/myosin Va complex mediates actin-based transport in vivo....
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic insights on the reduction of glutathione disulfide by protein disulfide isomerase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We explore the enzymatic mechanism of the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) by the reduced a domain of human protein disulfide isomerase (hPDI) with atomistic resolution. We use classical molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations at the mPW1N/6–311+G(2d,2p):FF99SB//mPW1N/6–31G(d):FF99SB level. The reaction proceeds in two stages: (i) a thiol-disulfide
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Superresolution microscopy reveals the three-dimensional organization of meiotic chromosome axes in intact Caenorhabditis elegans tissue [Cell Biology]When cells enter meiosis, their chromosomes reorganize as linear arrays of chromatin loops anchored to a central axis. Meiotic chromosome axes form a platform for the assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and play central roles in other meiotic processes, including homologous pairing, recombination, and chromosome segregation. However, little is...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence for self-organization in determining spatial patterns of stream nutrients, despite primacy of the geomorphic template [Ecology]Nutrients in freshwater ecosystems are highly variable in space and time. Nevertheless, the variety of processes contributing to nutrient patchiness, and the wide range of spatial and temporal scales at which these processes operate, obfuscate how this spatial heterogeneity is generated. Here, we describe the spatial structure of stream nutrient...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
RNA-seq reveals conservation of function among the yolk sacs of human, mouse, and chicken [Evolution]The yolk sac is phylogenetically the oldest of the extraembryonic membranes. The human embryo retains a yolk sac, which goes through primary and secondary phases of development, but its importance is controversial. Although it is known to synthesize proteins, its transport functions are widely considered vestigial. Here, we report RNA-sequencing...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Estimating the parameters of background selection and selective sweeps in Drosophila in the presence of gene conversion [Evolution]We used whole-genome resequencing data from a population of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the causes of the negative correlation between the within-population synonymous nucleotide site diversity (πS) of a gene and its degree of divergence from related species at nonsynonymous nucleotide sites (KA). By using the estimated distributions of mutational...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Follistatin is critical for mouse uterine receptivity and decidualization [Genetics]Embryo implantation remains a significant challenge for assisted reproductive technology, with implantation failure occurring in ∼50% of in vitro fertilization attempts. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine receptivity will enable the development of new interventions and biomarkers. TGFβ family signaling in the uterus is critical for establishing and maintaining pregnancy....
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Manipulating DNA damage-response signaling for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]Antigen-activated lymphocytes undergo extraordinarily rapid cell division in the course of immune responses. We hypothesized that this unique aspect of lymphocyte biology leads to unusual genomic stress in recently antigen-activated lymphocytes and that targeted manipulation of DNA damage-response (DDR) signaling pathways would allow for selective therapeutic targeting of pathological T...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How an alloreactive T-cell receptor achieves peptide and MHC specificity [Immunology and Inflammation]T-cell receptor (TCR) allorecognition is often presumed to be relatively nonspecific, attributable to either a TCR focus on exposed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms or the degenerate recognition of allopeptides. However, paradoxically, alloreactivity can proceed with high peptide and MHC specificity. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, the existence of...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thermal combination therapies for local drug delivery by magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound [Medical Sciences]Several thermal-therapy strategies such as thermal ablation, hyperthermia-triggered drug delivery from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSLs), and combinations of the above were investigated in a rhabdomyosarcoma rat tumor model (n = 113). Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) was used as a noninvasive heating device with precise temperature control for image-guided
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure-guided evolution of antigenically distinct adeno-associated virus variants for immune evasion [Microbiology]Preexisting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) pose a major, unresolved challenge that restricts patient enrollment in gene therapy clinical trials using recombinant AAV vectors. Structural studies suggest that despite a high degree of sequence variability, antibody recognition sites or antigenic hotspots on AAVs and other related parvoviruses might...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
AraC-like transcriptional activator CuxR binds c-di-GMP by a PilZ-like mechanism to regulate extracellular polysaccharide production [Microbiology]Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has emerged as a key regulatory player in the transition between planktonic and sedentary biofilm-associated bacterial lifestyles. It controls a multitude of processes including production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The PilZ domain, consisting of an N-terminal “RxxxR” motif and a β-barrel domain, represents a prototype c-di-GMP...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rifamycin action on RNA polymerase in antibiotic-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in differentially detectable populations [Microbiology]Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encounters stresses during the pathogenesis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) that can suppress replication of the bacteria and render them phenotypically tolerant to most available drugs. Where studied, the majority of Mtb in the sputum of most untreated subjects with active TB have been found to be...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cortical neurons multiplex reward-related signals along with sensory and motor information [Neuroscience]Rewards are known to influence neural activity associated with both motor preparation and execution. This influence can be exerted directly upon the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) cortical areas via the projections from reward-sensitive dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain ventral tegmental areas. However, the neurophysiological manifestation of reward-related signals...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Input timing for spatial processing is precisely tuned via constant synaptic delays and myelination patterns in the auditory brainstem [Neuroscience]Precise timing of synaptic inputs is a fundamental principle of neural circuit processing. The temporal precision of postsynaptic input integration is known to vary with the computational requirements of a circuit, yet how the timing of action potentials is tuned presynaptically to match these processing demands is not well understood....
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum and other membranes in neurons [Neuroscience]Close appositions between the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other intracellular membranes have important functions in cell physiology. These include lipid homeostasis, regulation of Ca2+ dynamics, and control of organelle biogenesis and dynamics. Although these membrane contacts have previously been observed in neurons, their distribution and abundance have...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts [Plant Biology]Protein trafficking across membranes is an essential function in cells; however, the exact mechanism for how this occurs is not well understood. In the endosymbionts, mitochondria and chloroplasts, the vast majority of proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm as preproteins and then imported into the organelles via specialized machineries. In...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
AP1G mediates vacuolar acidification during synergid-controlled pollen tube reception [Plant Biology]Double fertilization in angiosperms requires the delivery of immotile sperm through pollen tubes, which enter embryo sacs to initiate synergid degeneration and to discharge. This fascinating process, called pollen tube reception, involves extensive communications between pollen tubes and synergids, within which few intracellular regulators involved have been revealed. Here, we...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Auxin steers root cell expansion via apoplastic pH regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]Plant cells are embedded within cell walls, which provide structural integrity, but also spatially constrain cells, and must therefore be modified to allow cellular expansion. The long-standing acid growth theory postulates that auxin triggers apoplast acidification, thereby activating cell wall-loosening enzymes that enable cell expansion in shoots. Interestingly, this model...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assessing human weaning practices with calcium isotopes in tooth enamel [Anthropology]Weaning practices differ among great apes and likely diverged during the course of human evolution, but behavioral inference from the fossil record is hampered by a lack of unambiguous biomarkers. Here, we show that early-life dietary transitions are recorded in human deciduous tooth enamel as marked variations in Ca isotope...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Characterization of the scrambling domain of the TMEM16 family [Biochemistry]The TMEM16 protein family has 10 members, each of which carries 10 transmembrane segments. TMEM16A and 16B are Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. Several other members, including TMEM16F, promote phospholipid scrambling between the inner and outer leaflets of a cell membrane in response to intracellular Ca2+. However, the mechanism by which TMEM16...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three classes of oxygen-dependent cyclase involved in chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis [Biochemistry]The biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll pigments is among the most productive biological pathways on Earth. Photosynthesis relies on these modified tetrapyrroles for the capture of solar radiation and its conversion to chemical energy. (Bacterio)chlorophylls have an isocyclic fifth ring, the formation of which has remained enigmatic for more than 60 y....
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Photoactivation mechanism of a carotenoid-based photoreceptor [Biochemistry]Photoprotection is essential for efficient photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria have evolved a unique photoprotective mechanism mediated by a water-soluble carotenoid-based photoreceptor known as orange carotenoid protein (OCP). OCP undergoes large conformational changes in response to intense blue light, and the photoactivated OCP facilitates dissipation of excess energy via direct interaction with allo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Zinc-binding structure of a catalytic amyloid from solid-state NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Throughout biology, amyloids are key structures in both functional proteins and the end product of pathologic protein misfolding. Amyloids might also represent an early precursor in the evolution of life because of their small molecular size and their ability to self-purify and catalyze chemical reactions. They also provide attractive backbones...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A mechanism for lipid binding to apoE and the role of intrinsically disordered regions coupled to domain-domain interactions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Relative to the apolipoprotein E (apoE) E3 allele of the APOE gene, apoE4 strongly increases the risk for the development of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. However, apoE4 differs from apoE3 by only a single amino acid at position 112, which is arginine in apoE4 and cysteine in apoE3. It remains unclear...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis for ligand binding to an enzyme by a conformational selection pathway [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Proteins can bind target molecules through either induced fit or conformational selection pathways. In the conformational selection model, a protein samples a scarcely populated high-energy state that resembles a target-bound conformation. In enzymatic catalysis, such high-energy states have been identified as crucial entities for activity and the dynamic interconversion between...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A helicase-independent activity of eIF4A in promoting mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In the scanning model of translation initiation, the decoding site and latch of the 40S subunit must open to allow the recruitment and migration of messenger RNA (mRNA); however, the precise molecular details for how initiation factors regulate mRNA accommodation into the decoding site have not yet been elucidated. Eukaryotic...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Viral and cellular mRNA-specific activators harness PABP and eIF4G to promote translation initiation downstream of cap binding [Cell Biology]Regulation of mRNA translation is a major control point for gene expression and is critical for life. Of central importance is the complex between cap-bound eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), eIF4G, and poly(A) tail-binding protein (PABP) that circularizes mRNAs, promoting translation and stability. This complex is often targeted to regulate...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unique aqueous Li-ion/sulfur chemistry with high energy density and reversibility [Chemistry]Leveraging the most recent success in expanding the electrochemical stability window of aqueous electrolytes, in this work we create a unique Li-ion/sulfur chemistry of both high energy density and safety. We show that in the superconcentrated aqueous electrolyte, lithiation of sulfur experiences phase change from a high-order polysulfide to low-order...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bam-dependent deubiquitinase complex can disrupt germ-line stem cell maintenance by targeting cyclin A [Developmental Biology]Drosophila germ-line stem cells (GSCs) provide an excellent model to study the regulatory mechanisms of stem cells in vivo. Bag of marbles (bam) has been demonstrated to be necessary and sufficient to promote GSC and cystoblast differentiation. Despite extensive investigation of its regulation and genetic functions, the biochemical nature of...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Summertime Arctic shipboard observations of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as organic acids, key precursors of climatically active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), are consistent with a novel source of OVOCs to the marine boundary layer via chemistry at the sea surface microlayer. Although this source has been studied in...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The impact of Last Glacial climate variability in west-European loess revealed by radiocarbon dating of fossil earthworm granules [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The characterization of Last Glacial millennial-timescale warming phases, known as interstadials or Dansgaard–Oeschger events, requires precise chronologies for the study of paleoclimate records. On the European continent, such chronologies are only available for several Last Glacial pollen and rare speleothem archives principally located in the Mediterranean domain. Farther north, in...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Postglacial response of Arctic Ocean gas hydrates to climatic amelioration [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Seafloor methane release due to the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates is pervasive across the continental margins of the Arctic Ocean. Furthermore, there is increasing awareness that shallow hydrate-related methane seeps have appeared due to enhanced warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water during the last century. Although it has been...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tropical cyclone activity enhanced by Sahara greening and reduced dust emissions during the African Humid Period [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have devastating socioeconomic impacts. Understanding the nature and causes of their variability is of paramount importance for society. However, historical records of TCs are too short to fully characterize such changes and paleo-sediment archives of Holocene TC activity are temporally and geographically sparse. Thus, it is...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early 20th-century Arctic warming intensified by Pacific and Atlantic multidecadal variability [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]With amplified warming and record sea ice loss, the Arctic is the canary of global warming. The historical Arctic warming is poorly understood, limiting our confidence in model projections. Specifically, Arctic surface air temperature increased rapidly over the early 20th century, at rates comparable to those of recent decades despite...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spontaneous formation of aligned DNA nanowires by capillarity-induced skin folding [Engineering]Although DNA nanowires have proven useful as a template for fabricating functional nanomaterials and a platform for genetic analysis, their widespread use is still hindered because of limited control over the size, geometry, and alignment of the nanowires. Here, we document the capillarity-induced folding of an initially wrinkled surface and...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Increased nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic peatlands after permafrost thaw [Environmental Sciences]Permafrost in the Arctic is thawing, exposing large carbon and nitrogen stocks for decomposition. Gaseous carbon release from Arctic soils due to permafrost thawing is known to be substantial, but growing evidence suggests that Arctic soils may also be relevant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we show that N2O...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Historical climate controls soil respiration responses to current soil moisture [Environmental Sciences]Ecosystem carbon losses from soil microbial respiration are a key component of global carbon cycling, resulting in the transfer of 40–70 Pg carbon from soil to the atmosphere each year. Because these microbial processes can feed back to climate change, understanding respiration responses to environmental factors is necessary for improved...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Positive association between population genetic differentiation and speciation rates in New World birds [Evolution]An implicit assumption of speciation biology is that population differentiation is an important stage of evolutionary diversification, but its significance as a rate-limiting control on phylogenetic speciation dynamics remains largely untested. If population differentiation within a species is related to its speciation rate over evolutionary time, the causes of differentiation...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Disparate foundations of scientists’ policy positions on contentious biomedical research [Immunology and Inflammation]What drives scientists’ position taking on matters where empirical answers are unavailable or contradictory? We examined the contentious debate on whether to limit experiments involving the creation of potentially pandemic pathogens. Hundreds of scientists, including Nobel laureates, have signed petitions on the debate, providing unique insights into how scientists take...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Simple nuclear C*-algebras not isomorphic to their opposites [Mathematics]We show that it is consistent with Zermelo–Fraenkel set theory with the axiom of choice (ZFC) that there is a simple nuclear nonseparable C∗-algebra, which is not isomorphic to its opposite algebra. We can furthermore guarantee that this example is an inductive limit of unital copies of the Cuntz algebra...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Deciphering the landscape of host barriers to Listeria monocytogenes infection [Microbiology]Listeria monocytogenes is a common food-borne pathogen that can disseminate from the intestine and infect multiple organs. Here, we used sequence tag-based analysis of microbial populations (STAMP) to investigate L. monocytogenes population dynamics during infection. We created a genetically barcoded library of murinized L. monocytogenes and then used deep sequencing...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bacteria exploit a polymorphic instability of the flagellar filament to escape from traps [Microbiology]Many bacterial species swim by rotating single polar helical flagella. Depending on the direction of rotation, they can swim forward or backward and change directions to move along chemical gradients but also to navigate their obstructed natural environment in soils, sediments, or mucus. When they get stuck, they naturally try...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphate is the third nutrient monitored by TOR in Candida albicans and provides a target for fungal-specific indirect TOR inhibition [Microbiology]The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway regulates morphogenesis and responses to host cells in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Eukaryotic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) induces growth and proliferation in response to nitrogen and carbon source availability. Our unbiased genetic approach seeking unknown components of TORC1 signaling in C....
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Astrocytic glycogen-derived lactate fuels the brain during exhaustive exercise to maintain endurance capacity [Neuroscience]Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes provides lactate as an energy source to neurons through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) to maintain neuronal functions such as hippocampus-regulated memory formation. Although prolonged exhaustive exercise decreases brain glycogen, the role of this decrease and lactate transport in the exercising brain remains less clear. Because muscle...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Positive impacts of early auditory training on cortical processing at an older age [Neuroscience]Progressive negative behavioral changes in normal aging are paralleled by a complex series of physical and functional declines expressed in the cerebral cortex. In studies conducted in the auditory domain, these degrading physical and functional cortical changes have been shown to be broadly reversed by intensive progressive training that improves...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Simultaneous analysis of the LFP and spiking activity reveals essential components of a visuomotor transformation in the frontal eye field [Neuroscience]The frontal eye field (FEF) is a key brain region to study visuomotor transformations because the primary input to FEF is visual in nature, whereas its output reflects the planning of behaviorally relevant saccadic eye movements. In this study, we used a memory-guided saccade task to temporally dissociate the visual...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
miR-183/96 plays a pivotal regulatory role in mouse photoreceptor maturation and maintenance [Neuroscience]MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to be essential for retinal maturation and functionality; however, the role of the most abundant miRNAs, the miR-183/96/182 cluster (miR-183 cluster), in photoreceptor cells remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that ablation of two components of the miR-183 cluster, miR-183 and miR-96, significantly affects photoreceptor maturation and...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quantum critical scaling and fluctuations in Kondo lattice materials [Physics]We propose a phenomenological framework for three classes of Kondo lattice materials that incorporates the interplay between the fluctuations associated with the antiferromagnetic quantum critical point and those produced by the hybridization quantum critical point that marks the end of local moment behavior. We show that these fluctuations give rise...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nontrivial Berry phase in magnetic BaMnSb2 semimetal [Physics]The subject of topological materials has attracted immense attention in condensed-matter physics because they host new quantum states of matter containing Dirac, Majorana, or Weyl fermions. Although Majorana fermions can only exist on the surface of topological superconductors, Dirac and Weyl fermions can be realized in both 2D and 3D...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metabolic basis to Sherpa altitude adaptation [Physiology]The Himalayan Sherpas, a human population of Tibetan descent, are highly adapted to life in the hypobaric hypoxia of high altitude. Mechanisms involving enhanced tissue oxygen delivery in comparison to Lowlander populations have been postulated to play a role in such adaptation. Whether differences in tissue oxygen utilization (i.e., metabolic...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Arabidopsis JASMONATE-INDUCED OXYGENASES down-regulate plant immunity by hydroxylation and inactivation of the hormone jasmonic acid [Plant Biology]The phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is vital in plant defense and development. Although biosynthesis of JA and activation of JA-responsive gene expression by the bioactive form JA-isoleucine have been well-studied, knowledge on JA metabolism is incomplete. In particular, the enzyme that hydroxylates JA to 12-OH-JA, an inactive form of JA...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Behavioral and neural correlates to multisensory detection of sick humans [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Throughout human evolution, infectious diseases have been a primary cause of death. Detection of subtle cues indicating sickness and avoidance of sick conspecifics would therefore be an adaptive way of coping with an environment fraught with pathogens. This study determines how humans perceive and integrate early cues of sickness in...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visual cortex entrains to sign language [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Despite immense variability across languages, people can learn to understand any human language, spoken or signed. What neural mechanisms allow people to comprehend language across sensory modalities? When people listen to speech, electrophysiological oscillations in auditory cortex entrain to slow (<8 Hz) fluctuations in the acoustic envelope. Entrainment to the...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Response time in economic games reflects different types of decision conflict for prosocial and proself individuals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Behavioral and neuroscientific studies explore two pathways through which internalized social norms promote prosocial behavior. One pathway involves internal control of impulsive selfishness, and the other involves emotion-based prosocial preferences that are translated into behavior when they evade cognitive control for pursuing self-interest. We measured 443 participants’ overall prosocial behav
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Altered interactions between unicellular and multicellular genes drive hallmarks of transformation in a diverse range of solid tumors [Systems Biology]Tumors of distinct tissues of origin and genetic makeup display common hallmark cellular phenotypes, including sustained proliferation, suppression of cell death, and altered metabolism. These phenotypic commonalities have been proposed to stem from disruption of conserved regulatory mechanisms evolved during the transition to multicellularity to control fundamental cellular processes such...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Ferrari et al., Hypoxia treatment reverses neurodegenerative disease in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Hypoxia treatment reverses neurodegenerative disease in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome,” by Michele Ferrari, Isha H. Jain, Olga Goldberger, Emanuele Rezoagli, Robrecht Thoonen, Kai-Hung Chen, David E. Sosnovik, Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, Vamsi K. Mootha, and Warren M. Zapol, which appeared in issue 21, May 23, 2017,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Ding et al., Hepatitis E virus ORF3 is a functional ion channel required for release of infectious particles [Correction]MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Hepatitis E virus ORF3 is a functional ion channel required for release of infectious particles,” by Qiang Ding, Brigitte Heller, Juan M. V. Capuccino, Bokai Song, Ila Nimgaonkar, Gabriela Hrebikova, Jorge E. Contreras, and Alexander Ploss, which appeared in issue 5, January 31, 2017, of Proc Natl...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Pearce et al., Variation in the {beta}-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine receptor genes is associated with different dimensions of human sociality [Correction]PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Variation in the β-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine receptor genes is associated with different dimensions of human sociality,” by Eiluned Pearce, Rafael Wlodarski, Anna Machin, and Robin I. M. Dunbar, which appeared in issue 20, May 16, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:5300–5305;...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Metabolic adaptations of Sherpas to high altitudes Sherpa mountaineers in the Himalayas. Image courtesy of iStock/fotoVoyager. Previous studies have suggested that enhanced mechanisms for tissue oxygen delivery in Sherpas of Tibetan descent might play a role in their ability to survive at high altitude. However, whether metabolic adaptations that alter...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of King-Wai Yau [Profiles]Neuroscientist King-Wai Yau of Johns Hopkins University has made fundamental discoveries concerning the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction. His research over the past four decades has focused primarily on vision. “Vision is one of our most precious senses from which come art, science, humanity, beauty, and practically all aspects of life,”...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bam and Otu can regulate stem cell fate by stabilizing cyclin A [Developmental Biology]Identifying factors that regulate the balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation into specialized cells is key to understanding tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Long before the identification of the four factors sufficient to define stemness, a single gene named bag of marbles (bam) was shown to be necessary and sufficient...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detection of sickness in conspecifics using olfactory and visual cues [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Social Communication in Humans Social communication in humans, although largely based on sophisticated language skills, is also substantially mediated by nonverbal cues that the receiver perceives through his/her senses. It is largely acknowledged that humans are highly visual organisms and that their perception of the social and physical environment is...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ancestral gene regulatory networks drive cancer [Systems Biology]Although cancer is one of the most intensively studied phenomena in biology and occurs in almost all multicellular species (1, 2), an explanation for its existence and properties within the context of evolutionary history has received comparatively little attention. However, it is widely recognized that progress in treatment and prevention...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Marine reserves can mitigate and promote adaptation to climate change [Environmental Sciences]Strong decreases in greenhouse gas emissions are required to meet the reduction trajectory resolved within the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, even these decreases will not avert serious stress and damage to life on Earth, and additional steps are needed to boost the resilience of ecosystems, safeguard their wildlife, and protect...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Deformable and conformal silk hydrogel inverse opal [Applied Physical Sciences]Photonic crystals (PhCs) efficiently manipulate photons at the nanoscale. Applying these crystals to biological tissue that has been subjected to large deformation and humid environments can lead to fascinating bioapplications such as in vivo biosensors and artificial ocular prostheses. These applications require that these PhCs have mechanical durability, deformability, and...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Economic development, flow of funds, and the equilibrium interaction of financial frictions [Economic Sciences]We use a variety of different datasets from Thailand to study not only the extremes of micro and macro variables but also within-country flow of funds and labor migration. We develop a general equilibrium model that encompasses regional variation in the type of financial friction and calibrate it to measured...
22h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Smart farming is key to developing sustainable agriculture [Sustainability Science]Agriculture has seen many revolutions, whether the domestication of animals and plants a few thousand years ago, the systematic use of crop rotations and other improvements in farming practice a few hundred years ago, or the “green revolution” with systematic breeding and the widespread use of man-made fertilizers and pesticides...
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
Scientific Panel Concludes ARPA-E Is Working. Will It Matter?As the White House aims to eliminate the moonshot energy research program, a two-year analysis from the National Academies finds it’s on track to achieve its aims.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Fertility Doctor Trying to Commercialize Three-Parent BabiesA startup called Darwin Life says it will use a controversial fertility technique to help forty-somethings get pregnant for $100,000.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small scale, big improvementsMethods to improve water purification or build better batteries are problems that have challenged scientists for decades. Advances have inched forward, but rising demand moves the finish line further and further away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What drives hacktivism? Weighing the payoffs against the risksA new study examining factors that contribute to the likelihood of a hacktivist carrying out an attack showed, unexpectedly, that the payoffs are the main predictor, not the risks involved. The study, which also considered the potential effects of sex differences and peer hacking activity on hacktivism, is published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from
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Gizmodo
How to Watch Jeff Sessions Testify, but Remember Not to Laugh At Him or You'll Literally Be Arrested Like That Woman Who Chuckled During His Confirmation Hearing Yeah Remember That Shit It Was Wild Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the White House in Washington on March 28, 2017 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) All the major TV networks are carrying today’s testimony of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to the Senate Intelligence Committee. But if you’re not in front of a TV, you may be looking for a way to watch it online for free. Well, we’ve got you covered. Just make sure not to laugh at Sessions. Be
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Popular Science
Travelers are terrified by bed bugs—but can’t spot one in a lineup Science You probably wouldn’t know one if you saw one. Study finds American travelers really don’t like bedbugs—but also don’t know what a bedbug looks like. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford researcher sheds light on life of lesbians in Nazi GermanyHistory doctoral student Samuel Clowes Huneke analyzed several police files from the 1940s that illuminate the limited toleration some lesbians found during the Nazi regime.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does access to quality playgrounds vary with a child's socioeconomic status & obesity risk?A study of all 3rd-5th grade youth in one US county examined differences in access to playgrounds and associations between youth weight and playground accessibility and quality.
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Viden
Ro på: Løse hjulbolte kan skyldes forkert monteringMens politiet advarer mod kriminelle, der løsner hjulbolte på biler med vilje, opfordrer mekanikere og FDM til at slå koldt vand i blodet. Vildfarne hjul hører nemlig årstiden til.
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The Atlantic
The Dangers of Arming Autocrats On June 8, while official Washington sat captivated by the testimony of former FBI Director James Comey, a small group of bipartisan senators planned to force a vote on a subject near to official Washington’s heart: arms sales to Saudi Arabia. At issue in the vote—which is expected to occur Tuesday afternoon—are precision U.S.-made air weapons systems, part of a basket of prospective deals worth
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The Atlantic
The Aftermath of a Deadly Mushroom Bloom in California It’s been a good year for rain in California, which means it's been a good year for mushrooms. Which also means it has not been a good year when it comes to mushroom poisonings. Over just two weeks in December, the California Poison Control System logged 14 cases of death-cap mushroom poisonings in the northern half of the state, according to a report this month. Previously, it’s gotten only a fe
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Gizmodo
Thai Click-Fraud Farm Busted Using Wall of iPhones Screenshot: Channel 9MCOT Three Chinese citizens were arrested in Thailand Sunday after a police raid uncovered a massive click-fraud operation of roughly 500 smartphones, mostly iPhones, and an estimated 350,000 SIM cards. The men reportedly admitted to using the phones to inflate the number of clicks on ads in WeChat, China’s largest messaging app. Responding to reports of illegal migrants, Tha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rare genetic disorders: New approach uses RNA in search for genetic triggersIn about half of all patients with rare hereditary disorders, it is still unclear what position of the genome is responsible for their condition. One reason for this is the quantity of information encoded in human genes. A team of researchers has developed a method that significantly increases the chances of a successful search. The new approach looks not only at DNA, but also at RNA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is Palmer amaranth developing traits that make it harder to control?'Life history' traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Palmer amaranth more aggressive and difficult to control, suggest researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut check: A molecule that balances the immune system in the gutResearchers have identified a fundamental way immune cells in the gut learn the difference between good and bad microbes. Professional antigen-presenting cells need a molecule called gp96 to prevent immune cells from attacking the gut and causing colitis.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When the rubber hits the road: Recycled tires create stronger concreteEngineers have developed a more resilient type of concrete using recycled tires that could be used for concrete structures like buildings, roads, dams and bridges while reducing landfill waste.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traditional treatment is better for iron-deficiency anemia, clinical trial showsA clinical trial compared new and traditional treatments for iron-deficiency anemia and determined that the traditional treatment, ferrous sulfate, can more effectively treat the anemia in young children.
22h
Ingeniøren
Branchefolk: Sådan halverer vi energiforbruget i danske bygningerHvis Danmark skal blive uafhængigt af fossile brændsler, skal energiforbruget i bygninger langt ned. Nu kommer bygge- og energibrancherne med et samlet bud på, hvordan det kan lade sig gøre i praksis.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New kind of ‘tan in a bottle’ may one day protect against skin cancerA drug for activating melanin production without using ultraviolet radiation works in human skin samples.
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Ars Technica
Super Mario Odyssey launches October 27, new gameplay revealed Mario Odyssey , the first 3D Mario game to hit Nintendo Switch, will be released on October 27, Nintendo announced today. Nintendo also unveiled a new Yoshi game simply titled Yoshi due out in 2018, a new four-player co-op Kirby game with the similarly simple (and possibly placeholder) title of Kirby also due out in 2018, and a port of the super-popular multiplayer game Rocket League coming "holi
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emphasizing individual solutions to big issues can reduce support for government effortsExperiments by political science graduate student Seth Werfel suggest that making individuals aware of how they can help solve large-scale problems makes them less likely to support government-based solutions.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small scale, big improvementsChemical reactions that make improvements in water purification and batteries possible occur at scales too small to see. A team including a UD researcher has developed a way to produce real-time observations documenting the reactions that happen between liquids and solids. The technique can be used to gauge effectiveness of water purification where ion exchange is critical to sanitization and teas
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Futurity.org
Safe spots protect creatures from acidic ocean Ocean acidification is pervasive along the West Coast of the United States and likely to spread, but persistent, less-acidic havens in some regions may be sheltering marine life from harsher conditions. With the first-ever dataset measuring pH in the very nearshore regions of the ocean, researchers find that the California current is more susceptible to ocean acidification than previously thought
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple sees autonomous cars as 'core' technologyApple views autonomous driving systems as a "core technology" for the future, chief executive Tim Cook said in an interview aired Tuesday.
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Gizmodo
Finally, a Dating App That Doesn't Allow Talking The thing that’s wrong with dating apps is the same thing that’s wrong with the rest of the internet: people. Or at least that’s the gamble of First, a new activity-based dating app where you’ll know next to nothing about who you’re meeting until you meet them. Does that appeal to anyone out there? I’m out of the dating game and not really into “doing things” to begin with, but what I remember be
22h
Gizmodo
Intel Chief Says He Cannot Reveal How Many Americans the NSA Spied On Because He Cannot Count Them All Photo: Getty America’s top intelligence official is reneging on a promise made under the Obama administration to estimate how many Americans have been spied on using a warrant-less surveillance law intended to target foreigners. The decision to abandon that commitment isn’t sitting well with civil liberties advocates who formed a coalition this week in protest. Director of National Intelligence D
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
6 Ways Drones Could Change Health CareCould condom drops and airbone meds become a reality? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Microsoft’s Spencer: Xbox One X is not the console “most people will buy” Xbox head Phil Spencer talks to Ars about the Xbox One X. Video shot/edited by Anthony Falleroni. (video link) Usually, when a gaming company releases a new console, it expects customers to quickly start clamoring for the latest and greatest and start ignoring its aging predecessor. With the November 7 launch of the $499 Xbox One X, though, Microsoft's Head of Xbox Phil Spencer says he doesn't ex
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Ars Technica
“Core” Pokemon RPG, Metroid Prime 4 coming to Nintendo Switch [Updated] LOS ANGELES—During a livestreamed presentation Tuesday morning, Nintendo announced a "core Pokemon RPG" title, as well as an in-development sequel to the Metroid Prime series, both for Nintendo Switch. The Game Freak-developed Pokemon RPG "may not release for more than a year, but we hope you look forward to it all the same," Pokemon Company's Tsunekazu Ishihara said on the stream. "What kind of
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When the rubber hits the road: Recycled tires create stronger concreteUBC engineers have developed a more resilient type of concrete using recycled tires that could be used for concrete structures like buildings, roads, dams and bridges while reducing landfill waste.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Charred flowers and the fossil recordOne of the main types of fossil used to understand the first flowering plants (angiosperms) are charred flowers. These charcoals were produced in ancient wildfires, and they provide some evidence for the types of plants that grew millions of years ago. However, when fires burn they not only produce charcoal, but they also destroy it.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shining light on low-energy electronsThe classic method for studying how electrons interact with matter is by analyzing their scattering through thin layers of a known substance. This happens by directing a stream of electrons at the layer and analyzing the subsequent deviations in the electrons' trajectories. Researchers have now devised a way to examine the movement of low-energy electrons that can adversely impact electronic syste
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Body contouring is only for the rich and insuredOnly a small percentage of obese patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to help them control their weight follow up this procedure with further plastic surgery to reshape their bodies and remove excess rolls of skin. Such body contouring surgery is generally only affordable to patients with adequate insurance and income.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking the guesswork out of forensic analysis of fingermarksScientists are using lasers to take the mystery out of the process of identifying the chemical compositions of fingermarks at a crime scene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
VST captures Eagle Nebula and close companionsTwo of the sky's more famous residents share the stage with a lesser-known neighbor in an enormous new three gigapixel image from ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST). On the right lies Sharpless 2-54, the iconic Eagle Nebula is in the center, and the Omega Nebula to the left. This cosmic trio makes up just a portion of a vast complex of gas and dust within which new stars are springing to life and il
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is Palmer amaranth developing traits that make it harder to control?Palmer amaranth is widely considered to be one of the most damaging and difficult to control agricultural weeds in North America. A lot of time and attention has been devoted to herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth and the significant yield losses it can produce. Research featured in the journal Weed Science, though, shows other "life history" traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Pal
22h
Popular Science
Discover the lucrative world of data science and analytics with 85 hours of training Sponsored Post Get ready for a rewarding new career and save over $600 on the instruction. Discover the lucrative world of data science and analytics with 85 hours of training. Get ready for a rewarding new career and save over $600 on the instruction. Read…
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NYT > Science
Scientists Praise Energy Innovation Office Trump Wants to Shut DownThe National Academy of Sciences said the Energy Department’s advanced research lab, known as ARPA-E, is making vital progress.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organizationUNC School of Medicine researchers have cracked a long-standing mystery about an important enzyme found in virtually all organisms other than bacteria. The basic science finding may have implications for understanding cancer development and how to halt it.
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New Scientist - News
Defibrillator drones could save lives before ambulance arrivesA trial in Sweden has found that drones carrying defibrillators can shave minutes off emergency response time, which could save hundreds of lives a year
22h
Gizmodo
Space Turned This Flatworm Into a Two-Headed Cutie HELLLLOOOOOOOO!!!! (Image: Junji Morokuma, Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University) While space can destroy us in myriad ways , it’s never been credited with making anything more adorable. That’s all changed now thanks to an experiment in which researchers at Tufts University sent flatworms to the International Space Station (ISS). Microgravity seems to have impacted the creepy-crawlies in som
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Calvin soak MexicoTropical Depression 3E briefly strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Calvin before it made landfall in southwestern Mexico. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at the depression just prior to its classification as a tropical storm.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What drives hacktivism? Weighing the payoffs against the risksA new study examining factors that contribute to the likelihood of a hacktivist carrying out an attack showed, unexpectedly, that the payoffs are the main predictor, not the risks involved.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organizationUNC School of Medicine researchers have cracked a long-standing mystery about an important enzyme found in virtually all organisms other than bacteria. The basic science finding may have implications for understanding cancer development and how to halt it.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on determining surgical margins for feline tumorsResearchers are paving the way for more precision in determining surgical margins for an aggressive tumor common in cats by analyzing tissue contraction at various stages of the post-operative examination process.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds of a featherBiologists have always been fascinated by the diversity and changeability of life on Earth and have attempted to answer a fundamental question: How do new species originate?A new study provides the first large-scale test of the link between population differentiation rates and speciation rates. The results confirm the evolutionary importance of population genetic differentiation.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Assembly failureThe most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia -- rare and related neurological disorders marked by progressive deterioration of motor or cognitive abilities -- may be due to errors in RNA splicing, an intermediary step for translating genetic instructions into functional proteins.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major new appetite regulator successfully manipulated in miceA study from Imperial has found new a link between certain brain receptors and obesity, giving a possible new drug target for appetite regulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular stress increases the probability of developing autoimmune diseasesResearchers found that cellular stress enhances the activation of certain type of immune cells with implications in many chronic inflammatory conditions.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass. General-led study replicates tanning response in cultured human skinInvestigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a way of increasing pigmentation in human skin without the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation.
22h
Ars Technica
Yahoo and AOL are now a Verizon subsidiary called “Oath” (credit: David Ramos/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Verizon today said it has completed its $4.48 billion acquisition of Yahoo's operating business and formed a new subsidiary called " Oath " that includes both Yahoo and AOL. Oath is "a diverse house of more than 50 media and technology brands that engages more than a billion people around the world," Verizon's announcement said. (Yahoo alone has pr
23h
Science | The Guardian
Suntans for all: chemical causes any skin to tan – and protects against cancer Scientists create chemical that causes release of dark pigment in skin, creating a real ‘fake’ tan without the need for sunbathing Scientists have created the ultimate fake tan: a chemical that triggers the release of dark pigment in the skin without the need for sunbathing or a genetic predisposition for tanning. The substance would induce a tan even in fair individuals with the kind of skin tha
23h
Ars Technica
Pixel 2 leaks show Google still moving between OEMs to make its phones Enlarge / The original Pixel was made by HTC and looked a lot like an LG phone, so maybe the Pixel 2 will look like this LG G6? Google's official bug tracker seems to have spilled the beans on the manufacturer of the next Pixel phone (or at least, one of the next Pixel phones). A post —which was first spotted by 9to5Google —indicates that the lucky manufacturer is none other than LG. When we last
23h
Wired
The Unknown Startups Fueling Aerospace With Fancy TechOne aerospace accelerator doesn’t necessarily think of Silicon Valley as its incubator for genius, and it's willing to take on eat-your-vegetables inventions that could make rocket companies rich.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ammonia on-demand? Alternative production method for a sustainable futureHighly efficient ammonia synthesis at room temperature, with the highest yield ever reported, was just achieved. The small-scale ammonia production under mild conditions was accomplished by applying a direct current electric field to the Ru-Cs catalyst. Collecting highly pure ammonia as compressed liquid becomes possible using this method, and this finding will lead to developing on-demand ammonia
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting fire blight and detecting SalmonellaResearchers have created an effective weapon against the plant disease fire blight and a new method for detection of Salmonella. Both are based on particular viruses that attack only one species of bacteria.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot rocks, not warm atmosphere, led to relatively recent water-carved valleys on MarsSome scientists have interpreted water-carved valleys on Mars formed within the last few billion years as a sign of either an active groundwater system or of transient warm periods in the atmosphere. But new research shows that snow and ice melted by hot impact ejecta could have produced enough water to carve those valleys with no groundwater or heat wave required.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The importance of time and space in brain development and diseaseNew research shows time and space during brain maturation are critical and better understanding of these physical changes could lead to new treatments and better diagnosis of a variety of conditions.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Galaxy alignments traced back 10 billion yearsThe most massive galaxies in the universe have been aligned with their surroundings for at least ten billion years. This discovery shows that galaxies, like people, are influenced by their environment from a young age.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plastic made from sugar and carbon dioxideSome biodegradable plastics could in the future be made using sugar and carbon dioxide, replacing unsustainable plastics made from crude oil.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecule may help maintain brain's synaptic balanceMany neurological diseases are malfunctions of synapses, or the points of contact between neurons that allow senses and other information to pass from finger to brain. When excitatory and inhibitory balance is off, the brain becomes unable to process information normally, leading to conditions like epilepsy. Now researchers have discovered a molecule that may play a role in helping maintain the ba
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Initial successes in treating a hitherto incurable liver disorderPrimary sclerosing cholangitis is a currently incurable liver disorder, primarily affecting younger adults aged between 30 and 40. A European multi-center Phase II study has now shown that this disease could be potentially be cured using a synthetically manufactured bile acid (active agent: nor-ursodeoxycholic acid/nor-urso).
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the rubber hits the road: Recycled tires create stronger concreteUBC engineers have developed a more resilient type of concrete using recycled tires that could be used for concrete structures like buildings, roads, dams and bridges while reducing landfill waste.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Charred flowers and the fossil recordOne of the main types of fossil used to understand the first flowering plants (angiosperms) are charred flowers. These charcoals were produced in ancient wildfires, and they provide some evidence for the types of plants that grew millions of years ago. However, when fires burn they not only produce charcoal, but they also destroy it.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risky bingeing: Women in Appalachian Ohio report higher rates of alcohol misuseHow much alcohol women drink may depend on where they live. A new study finds one-fifth of women in Appalachian Ohio imbibe at alarming levels.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut check: A molecule that balances the immune system in the gutIn the May 19, 2017 issue of Scientific Reports, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina identified a fundamental way immune cells in the gut learn the difference between good and bad microbes. Professional antigen-presenting cells need a molecule called gp96 to prevent immune cells from attacking the gut and causing colitis.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is Palmer amaranth developing traits that make it harder to control?New research featured in the journal Weed Science, shows 'life history' traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Palmer amaranth more aggressive and difficult to control.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare genetic disorders: New approach uses RNA in search for genetic triggersIn about half of all patients with rare hereditary disorders, it is still unclear what position of the genome is responsible for their condition. One reason for this is the quantity of information encoded in human genes. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München has developed a method that significantly increases the chances of a successful search. The new ap
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making art activates brain's reward pathway -- Drexel studyColoring, doodling and drawing all showed significant bloodflow in the section of the brain related to feeling rewarded, a new study by a Drexel University art therapist found.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Businesses Use Data to Outsmart Nature's WrathThe majority of disaster-related losses are actually preventable, if you have the right information -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
The Atlantic
Rod Rosenstein: I Have Not Seen 'Good Cause' to Fire Robert Mueller Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told lawmakers Tuesday he has not seen any evidence of “good cause” to fire the special counsel handling the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and Russian officials. Rosenstein was testifying before the Senate Appropriations Committee amid a flurry of questions abo
23h
The Atlantic
Hungary's Anti-Foreign NGO Law Hungary’s parliament passed Tuesday a law imposing strict restrictions on NGOs that receive foreign funding—a move that has been criticized by rights organizations as a crackdown on dissent. The law, approved 130-40, requires groups receiving more than 24,000 euros annually ($26,000) in overseas funding to register as “foreign-supported” and disclose their foreign donors, or face closure. The leg
23h
Gizmodo
Marissa Mayer Officially Rides Her Zamboni Off Into the Sunset GIF GIF It’s been a bumpy ride , but it’s finally over. Today, Verizon announced the completion of its Yahoo acquisition at roughly $4.5 billion, giving us all the gift of a fancy new subsidiary named Oath and officially ending former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s tenure. Tucked away in the very last paragraph of Verizon’s announcement was the following note: Given the inherent changes to Marissa May
23h
Ars Technica
Surprising no one, Tim Cook says Apple is “focusing” on auto autonomy Enlarge (credit: Simone Pittaluga ) Rumors have been traded for years now about Apple’s automotive ambitions. Would Apple try to compete with Tesla to build an electric vehicle? Would it go toe-to-toe with its old foe Google to offer self-driving cars? In recent months, however, a clearer picture of Apple’s automotive work has slowly been revealed, most recently with Apple CEO Tim Cook telling Bl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why does an anesthetic make us lose consciousness?Neuroscientists have now discovered that certain areas of the brain generate less information when under anesthesia.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive-related neural pattern to activate machinesA study conducted by the Spanish universities Pablo de Olavide in Sevilla and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona has identified a functional brain pattern linked to cognitive behavior able to activate an iPad's touchscreen. Results may be useful in brain-machine interfaces, of particular interest for people with physical difficulties to communicate with the outside world.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ARPA-E making progress toward achieving mission, says new assessmentThe Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) is making progress toward achieving its statutory mission and goals, says a new congressionally mandated report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. ARPA-E has funded research that no other funding source was supporting at the time, and the results of some of these projects have received follow-on funding from priva
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immuno-PET shows promise for detecting and treating pancreatic tumorsA first-in-human study presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the novel human monoclonal antibody HuMab-5B1 with highly specific targeting for the cancer antigen (CA) 19-9, which is expressed on pancreatic tumors and a variety of other malignancies, including small cell lung cancer and tumors
23h
Live Science
Apple CEO Reveals Tech Giant Is Working on AI for Self-Driving CarsTim Cook called it "the mother of all AI projects."
23h
Live Science
Sex in Space: The Final Frontier for Mars Colonization?We just don't know enough about how human reproduction and development work in the final frontier to confidently map out permanent, sustainable settlements on the Red Planet or anywhere else away from Earth, experts say.
23h
Live Science
Smoking Out Sleep Problems: Pot May Fight Restless Legs SyndromePeople who experience theu npleasant and often painful sensations of restless legs syndrome (RLS) may find relief in using the marijuana compound cannabidiol, a very small new study suggests.
23h
Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Swimwear, Morakniv Knives, Philips Hue, and More Amazon’s one-day swimwear sale , Philips Hue bulbs , and outdoor knives lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals iClever 24W USB Car Charger , $7 with code ICLEVER2 Aukey’s tiny USB car charger is a reader favorite , but this iClever model is the same size and puts out the same 4.8A of power over two ports, and it’s only $7
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yahoo signs off, completes sale to VerizonInternet pioneer Yahoo ended its two-decade run as an independent company on Tuesday, completing the sale of its core online assets to telecom giant Verizon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Romania to ban wild animals in circusesTigers, lions, bears and other wild animals will be banned from circuses in Romania after the country's parliament passed a bill on Tuesday in a move welcomed by animal rights groups.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DHS chief hints laptop ban may not be extended right nowIt may not be necessary to expand a ban on laptops and other large electronics in the cabins of many international flights into the United States right now, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Tuesday.
23h
The Atlantic
North Korea Frees a U.S. Detainee Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET Otto Warmbier, a University of Virginia student, who was sentenced last year by North Korea’s Supreme Court to 15 years of prison and hard labor for stealing a propaganda sign from his hotel, has been freed and is on his way to the U.S., Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Tuesday. Warmbier, 22, was medically evacuated from North Korea, his parents told The Washington P
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ladybugs fold their wings like origami mastersLadybug wings could lead to new foldable technologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking the guesswork out of forensic analysis of fingermarksResearchers in the Louisiana State University Department of Chemistry including postdoctoral researcher Fabrizio Donnarumma, former undergraduate researcher and current LSU alumus Eden E. Camp, graduate student Fan Cao and Roy Paul Daniels Professor of Chemistry Kermit K. Murray have developed an infrared laser ablation and vacuum capture system for fingermark sampling that takes the mystery out o
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover more effective, and potentially safer, crystallized form of DDTA team of scientists has discovered a new crystal form of DDT that is more effective against insects than the existing one. Its research, which appears in the journal Angewandte Chemie, points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT—a pesticide that has historically been linked to human-health afflictions and environmental degradation—that can be administered in smaller amounts
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research effort creates new alloys, phase diagramA multi-institutional team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a way to create new alloys that could form the basis of next-generation semiconductors.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists solve a mystery in cellular 'droplet' organellesScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved a cellular mystery that may have important implications for fundamental biology and diseases like ALS. Their new research suggests that RNA may be the secret ingredient that helps cells to assemble, organize internal architecture, and ultimately dissolve dynamic droplet-like compartments.
23h
TEDTalks (video)
How I built a jet suit | Richard BrowningWe've all dreamed of flying -- but for Richard Browning, flight is an obsession. He's built an Iron Man-like suit that leans on an elegant collaboration of mind, body and technology, bringing science fiction dreams a little closer to reality. Learn more about the trial and error process behind his invention and take flight with Browning in an unforgettable demo.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Resistance to Last-Ditch Antibiotic Has Spread Farther Than AnticipatedEmergence of colistin resistance in farm animals around the world takes researchers by surprise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides further support for genetic factors underlying addictionsImpairment of a particular gene raises increases susceptibility to opioid addiction liability as well as vulnerability to binge eating according to a new study.Dysfunction of the gene, casein kinase1-epsilon (CSNK1E), increases opioid's euphoric response and produces a marked increase in sensitivity to binge eating in a female experimental model but not in the male.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover more effective, and potentially safer, crystallized form of DDTA team of scientists has discovered a new crystal form of DDT that is more effective against insects than the existing one. Its research points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT -- a pesticide that has historically been linked to human-health afflictions and environmental degradation -- that can be administered in smaller amounts while reducing environmental impact.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL-led research effort creates new alloys, phase diagramA multi-institutional team led by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a way to create new alloys that could form the basis of next-generation semiconductors.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking the guesswork out of forensic analysis of fingermarksScientists are using lasers to take the mystery out of the process of identifying the chemical compositions of fingermarks at a crime scene. They've described the approach and instrumentation in a new paper published in the Journal of The American Society of Mass Spectrometry.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover what may be earliest stage of Alzheimer's diseaseOlder adults with elevated levels of brain-clogging plaques -- but otherwise normal cognition -- experience faster mental decline suggestive of Alzheimer's disease. This study presents the toxic, sticky amyloid protein as part of Alzheimer's disease -- the earliest precursor before symptoms arise. If Alzheimer's prevalence estimates were to include this "preclinical stage" before symptoms arise, t
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical trial shows traditional treatment is better for iron-deficiency anemiaA clinical trial compared new and traditional treatments for iron-deficiency anemia and determined that the traditional treatment, ferrous sulfate, can more effectively treat the anemia in young children.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers repurpose former experimental cancer therapy to treat muscular dystrophyResearchers at the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine (UNR Med) have demonstrated that a drug originally targeted unsuccessfully to treat cancer may have new life as a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reverse mechanism of fatty liver diseaseResearchers have identified the mechanism which causes a build-up of fat in the liver in a disease affecting one in five in the UK -- and were able to reverse it in a mouse model.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can use of a drone improve response times for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests compared to an ambulanceIn a study involving simulated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, drones carrying an automated external defibrillator arrived in less time than emergency medical services, with a reduction in response time of about 16 minutes, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treating nutritional iron-deficiency anemia in childrenIn a study published by JAMA, Jacquelyn M. Powers, M.D., M.S., of the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and colleagues compared two medications, ferrous sulfate and iron polysaccharide complex, for the treatment of nutritional iron-deficiency anemia in infants and children.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elevated brain amyloid level associated with increased likelihood of cognitive declineAmong a group of cognitively normal individuals, those who had elevated levels in the brain of the protein amyloid were more likely to experience cognitive decline in the following years, according to a study published by JAMA.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrasound for children with abdominal traumaDespite evidence showing that the routine use of sonography in hospital emergency departments can safely improve care for adults when evaluating for possible abdominal trauma injuries, researchers at UC Davis Medical Center could not identify any significant improvements in care for pediatric trauma patients.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shining light on low-energy electronsThe classic method for studying how electrons interact with matter is by analyzing their scattering through thin layers of a known substance. This happens by directing a stream of electrons at the layer and analyzing the subsequent deviations in the electrons' trajectories. But researchers in Switzerland have devised a way to examine the movement of low-energy electrons that can adversely impact e
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helium droplets offer new precision to single-molecule laser measurementChemical reactions necessarily involve molecules coming together, and the way they interact can depend on how they are aligned relative to each other. By knowing and controlling the alignment of molecules, a great deal can be learned about how chemical reactions occur. This week in The Journal of Chemical Physics, scientists from Denmark and Austria report a new technique for aligning molecules us
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Rare black-tailed godwits released into wild at WelneyThe 25 endangered black-tailed godwits were hand-reared to ensure their survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make first crystal model of under-diagnosed autoimmune diseaseDoctors are limited in how they can treat patients with myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease, to just treating its symptoms. The creation of a crystal model gives scientists new insight into a possible target for drug therapy development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New carbon nitride material coupled with ruthenium enhances visible-light CO2 reduction in waterA hybrid photocatalyst exhibits specifically high activity for the reductive conversion reaction of carbon dioxide to formic acid under visible light irradiation, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnancy problems not necessarily tied to Zika viral load or Dengue feverZika viral load and the degree of Zika symptoms during pregnancy were not necessarily associated with problems during pregnancy or fetal abnormalities at birth, researchers have found. They also found that the presence of antibodies to previously acquired dengue fever was not necessarily connected to abnormalities during pregnancy or at birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bed bug awareness poor among US travelers, but reactions are strongMost US travelers can't identify a bed bug, and yet the pest evokes a stronger response than any other potential hotel-room deficiency -- putting the hospitality industry in a difficult spot. In a new survey of US travelers, 60 percent said they would switch hotels if they found evidence of bed bugs in a guest room, but less than 35 percent could correctly identify a bed bug in a lineup of other c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female and male mice suffer, recover from TBI differentlyMale mice have much greater brain distress in the week following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than female mice, including skyrocketing inflammation and nerve cell death, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism risk linked to fever during pregnancyFever during pregnancy may raise the risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the child, according to a study. The effect was most pronounced in the second trimester, raising odds for ASD by 40 percent. Risk of an ASD was increased by over 300 percent for the children of women reporting three or more fevers after the twelfth week of pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Comparing student performance on paper-and-pencil and computer-based-testsBased on a study of more than 30,000 elementary, middle, and high school students conducted in winter 2015–16, researchers found that elementary and middle school students scored lower on a computer-based test that did not allow them to return to previous items than on two comparable tests—paper- or computer-based—that allowed them to skip, review, and change previous responses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Previously unpublished trial data explain effects and side effects of key MS drugAlemtuzumab is a highly effective drug for multiple sclerosis, approved in more than 60 countries and used by more than 12,000 patients worldwide. However, there is an almost 50 per cent risk of secondary autoimmune diseases, some of which are life-threatening, such as platelet and kidney diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
AI that can shoot down fighter planes helps treat bipolar disorderThe artificial intelligence that can blow human pilots out of the sky in air-to-air combat accurately predicted treatment outcomes for bipolar disorder, according to a new medical study. The findings open a world of possibility for using AI, or machine learning, to treat disease, researchers said.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Energy Secretary Perry Pulls a U-Turn on ClimateRick Perry reverses his support of the Paris accord, in the name of energy "leadership" -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
The best hidden Instagram tricks DIY Become a social media superstar. Use our Instagram tips to discover new friends, protect your privacy, change up your filters, keep a private collection of your favorite photos, and more.
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Gizmodo
How to Find Free and Safe Public Wi-Fi Image: Bonnie Kittle/Unsplash Venture out beyond the reach of your safe, familiar home wi-fi network and getting online can sometimes be a challenge. Here’s how to seek out the strongest and most well-protected wireless networks in the terrifying cold of the real world. Fortunately, a growing number of bars, restaurants, shops and cities now offer free wi-fi—though these tantalizing pools of conn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moment of truth at Uber as internal probe results to be releasedUber was to release results Tuesday of an internal investigation into misconduct and ethics, setting the stage for reforms at the ridesharing giant known for its no-holds-barred style of management.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Apple Finally Admits It Is Pursuing Technology for Self-Driving CarsTim Cook says the firm is “focusing on autonomous systems.”
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Science | The Guardian
Defibrillator-carrying drones could save lives, research suggests Drones were 16 minutes faster than the emergency services, increasing the chance of survival for people who suffer cardiac arrest, study shows Drones are already employed for anything from military to recreational use , from oil exploration to filmmaking , but they could also help save the lives of people who have suffered a cardiac arrest, research suggests. A simulated study found that drones c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Media Microaggressions against Female Olympic Athletes Up 40 percentFemale athletes long have experienced microaggressions from the media and the public, such as racism, sexism, the belittling of athletic accomplishments and being the brunt of sexual jokes. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism have found that microaggressions against female athletes in the media increased by nearly 40 percent from the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to the
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Gizmodo
E-Cigarettes Might Be as Bad as the Real Thing Image: Youtube Screenshot I hate that I have to do this. But here goes. Aside from bringing us vape tricks and vape cloud championships , e-cigarettes were supposed to be a good thing. You know, they weren’t supposed to kill us as much as real cigarettes. Not-so-fast, says a new study. You might be screwed either way. But the study was performed on a piece of resin, not a human, so it’s probably
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA eyed rainfall rates in Tropical Storm Merbok before landfallTropical Storm Merbok formed in the South China Sea west of the Philippines on June 11 and made landfall east of Hong Kong, China on June 12. NASA measured the rainfall rates within the tropical storm early in its short two day lifetime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensorsResearchers have now managed to pinpoint what happens when light is absorbed by extremely small nanoclusters of silver atoms. The results may have useful application in the development of biosensors and in imaging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot rocks, not warm atmosphere, led to relatively recent water-carved valleys on MarsPresent-day Mars is a frozen desert, colder and more arid than Antarctica, and scientists are fairly sure it's been that way for at least the last 3 billion years. That makes a vast network of water-carved valleys on the flanks of an impact crater called Lyot—which formed somewhere between 1.5 billion and 3 billion years ago—something of a Martian mystery. It's not clear where the water came from.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers devise a new way to examine the movement of low-energy electronsThe scientific community has known about the existence of electrons for over a hundred years, but there are important facets of their interaction with matter that remain shrouded in mystery. One particular area of interest is low-energy electrons or electrons that have kinetic energy levels of about 10 electronvolts (eV) or less. These electrons affect the functioning of insulators in electronic s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helium droplets offer new precision to single-molecule laser measurementChemical reactions necessarily involve molecules coming together, and the way they interact can depend on how they are aligned relative to each other. By knowing and controlling the alignment of molecules, a great deal can be learned about how chemical reactions occur. This week in The Journal of Chemical Physics, scientists from Aarhus University in Denmark and the Institute of Science and Techno
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Gizmodo
This Tiny Dock Finally Makes the Nintendo Switch Truly Portable The Nintendo Switch is the perfect console for taking your games on the road, but if you want to connect it to a hotel TV for big screen gaming while traveling, you’ll need to make room for its clunky dock in your suitcase. It’s arguably the worst-designed part of the Switch, but third-party companies like Nyko are finally fixing that. When the Switch first became available, many of us assumed we
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altered virus may expand patient recruitment in human gene therapy trialsFor many patients, participating in gene therapy clinical trials isn't an option because their immune system recognizes and fights the helpful virus used for treatment. Now, University of Florida Health and University of North Carolina researchers have found a solution that may allow it to evade the body's normal immune response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International study identifies new genetic risk factors for testicular cancerMoffitt researcherslaunched a large analysis of five major testicular cancer studies to investigate genetic risk factors linked to TGCT. Their results, which uncovered eight new genetic markers associated with TGCT, were published in the June 12 issue of Nature Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA eyed rainfall rates in Tropical Storm Merbok before landfallTropical Storm Merbok formed in the South China Sea west of the Philippines on June 11 and made landfall east of Hong Kong, China on June 12. NASA measured the rainfall rates within the tropical storm early in its short two day lifetime.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecule may help maintain brain's synaptic balanceMany neurological diseases are malfunctions of synapses, or the points of contact between neurons that allow senses and other information to pass from finger to brain. When excitatory and inhibitory balance is off, the brain becomes unable to process information normally, leading to conditions like epilepsy. Now researchers at Jefferson have discovered a molecule that may play a role in helping ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The importance of time and space in brain development and diseaseNew research shows time and space during brain maturation are critical and better understanding of these physical changes could lead to new treatments and better diagnosis of a variety of conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Media microaggressions against female olympic athletes up 40 percentResearchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism have found that microaggressions against female athletes in the media increased by nearly 40 percent from the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.
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Viden
5 grunde til at Danmark er verdens bedste til grøn energiVind, fjernvarme og verdens mest sikre energinet - Danmark er på førstepladsen i ny rapport om udvikling af energiteknologier.
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Wired
Hands-On With GoPro's New Fusion 360 CameraIt's a spherical world, after all.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Designing Antiviral Proteins Via Computer Could Help Halt the Next PandemicIf we want to be prepared for the worst, Bill Gates says, we have to build an arsenal of vaccines, drugs and diagnostics. Some scientists are now using computers to do just that -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hybrid membrane creates a stir on the global marketThe news story made a big splash: in January 2016 ETH researchers Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty published a study in the journal Nature Nanotechnology about an innovative type of membrane developed in their laboratory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mosquito-killing fungi engineered with spider and scorpion toxins could help fight malariaA mosquito-killing fungus genetically engineered to produce spider and scorpion toxins could serve as a highly effective biological control mechanism to fight malaria-carrying mosquitoes, scientists report. The fungus is specific to mosquitoes and does not pose a risk to humans. Further, the study results suggest that the fungus is also safe for honey bees and other insects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New light shed on inherited testicular cancer riskAn analysis of data from five major studies of testicular cancer has identified new genetic locations that could be susceptible to inherited testicular germ cell tumors. The findings, which researchers call a success story for genome mapping, could help doctors understand which men are at the highest risk of developing the disease and signal them to screen those patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A way to objectively measure residents' surgical skills? No sweatA recent study has shown that levels of perspiration can provide an objective evaluation of the surgical skills of resident physicians.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can a single exercise session benefit your brain?In a new review of the effects of acute exercise, researchers not only summarize the behavioral and cognitive effects of a single bout of exercise, but also summarize data from a large number of neurophysiological and neurochemical studies in both humans and animals showing the wide range of brain changes that result from a single session of physical exercise (i.e., acute exercise).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric diseaseThe study reveals a major physiological function for the CMG2 gene and demonstrates its interaction with collagen VI. This interaction explains how major Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome symptoms arise when mutation of the CMG2 gene disrupts the ability of the CMG2 protein to control the levels of collagen VI, which then over-accumulates and produces the painful and disfiguring symptoms of the diseas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Concentration spans drop when online ads pop upResearchers have shown that measurements of the brain's electrical activity can be used to test the influence of intrusive online advertisements on internet users' concentration and emotions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meditation could be a cheaper alternative to traditional pain medication, study suggestsJust ten minutes of mindfulness meditation could be used as an alternative to painkillers, according to new research.
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Futurity.org
Copper gets us closer to using CO2 pollution as fuel A new study describes the mechanics behind an early key step in artificially activating carbon dioxide so that it can rearrange itself to become the liquid fuel ethanol. Solving this chemical puzzle may one day lead to cleaner air and renewable fuel. The scientists’ ultimate goal is to convert harmful carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere into beneficial liquid fuel. Currently, it is possible
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Futurity.org
Did hot impact melt ice to make valleys on Mars? Hot debris from the impact that formed the Lyot crater on Mars may have melted snow and ice on the planet’s surface, forming the water-carved valleys near the crater, new research suggests. Present-day Mars is a frozen desert, colder and more arid than Antarctica, and scientists are fairly sure it’s been that way for at least the last 3 billion years. That’s made a vast network of water-carved va
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US mental-health agency’s push for basic research has slashed support for clinical trials Analysis reveals that the number of clinical trials funded by the National Institute of Mental Health has fallen by 45% since the agency began to focus on the biological roots of disease. Nature 546 339 doi: 10.1038/546338a
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Gizmodo
Russia's Attack on the US Election Was Apparently Much Worse Than We Thought Photo: Getty If you had any doubt that Russian hackers attempted to meddle with the United States electoral system, a new report from Bloomberg is here to scare the shit out of you. Not only did Russia go after a voting software supplier in one state (as previously reported by The Intercept), Putin’s cyber army reportedly targeted systems in 39 states. That’s four out of five, for those of you ke
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Live antibiotics use bacteria to kill bacteriaCertain bacteria will destroy other bacteria without harming humans. They may be an answer to antibiotic-resistant infections.
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Ars Technica
Russia struck at election systems and data of 39 US states Enlarge / President Barack Obama reportedly called Russian President Vladimir Putin in October 2016 on the "cyber hotline" to warn about the ongoing hacking of US election officials' systems. (credit: Presidential Press and Information Office ) Citing sources "with direct knowledge of the US investigation" into Russia's information operations campaign during the 2016 US presidential election camp
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Gizmodo
The Trailer for the Flatliners Remake Enters the World of Competitive Dying Still from trailer, Sony via YouTube If you know the 1990 film, the story of the new Flatliners should not be a huge shock. Five medical students start an “experiment” where they stop each other’s hearts and then restart them, allowing them to see what happens when they die. Then things go wrong. This version stars Ellen Page as Courtney, the ring leader who starts all of this off and who also, t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Galaxy alignments traced back 10 billion yearsA new study led by Michael West of Lowell Observatory and Roberto De Propris of the University of Turku, Finland, reveals that the most massive galaxies in the universe have been aligned with their surroundings for at least ten billion years. This discovery shows that galaxies, like people, are influenced by their environment from a young age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The role of vitamin A in diabetesThere has been no known link between diabetes and vitamin A -- until now. A new study suggests that the vitamin improves the insulin producing β-cell's function.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot rocks, not warm atmosphere, led to relatively recent water-carved valleys on MarsSome scientists have interpreted water-carved valleys on Mars formed within the last few billion years as a sign of either an active groundwater system or of transient warm periods in the atmosphere. But new research shows that snow and ice melted by hot impact ejecta could have produced enough water to carve those valleys with no groundwater or heat wave required.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting fire blight and detecting SalmonellaETH researchers have created an effective weapon against the plant disease fire blight and a new method for detection of Salmonella. Both are based on particular viruses that attack only one species of bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do anti-wrinkle creams work? (video)Skin can stay firm and stretchy thanks to protein fibers in the tissue beneath the surface. But smoking or ultraviolet rays from the sun can produce damage the body's ability to keep skin supported. Anti-wrinkle treatments claim they rejuvenate the cells, so we dive into the science to see if they work. To find out whether an over-the-counter jar of cream could make 40 the new 20, we dive into the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensorsResearchers have now managed to pinpoint what happens when light is absorbed by extremely small nanoclusters of silver atoms. The results may have useful application in the development of biosensors and in imaging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make plastic from sugar and carbon dioxideSome biodegradable plastics could in the future be made using sugar and carbon dioxide, replacing unsustainable plastics made from crude oil, following research by scientists from the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Body contouring is only for the rich and insuredOnly a small percentage of obese patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to help them control their weight follow up this procedure with further plastic surgery to reshape their bodies and remove excess rolls of skin. Such body contouring surgery is generally only affordable to patients with adequate insurance and income, says Maria Altieri of Stony Brook University Hospital in the US, lead
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid epidemic hits nearly all age groups in both rural and urban US areasFor this report, we took a regional approach, examining the data on opioid abuse and dependence, including cost information and respective treatment protocols, in five of the largest-populated cities and their respective states, and compared rural and urban areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Huddersfield collaborates with Australian firm for scientific researchDr. Jason Camp is working with Circa Group, who produce the solvent Cyrene, to investigate the potential of a non-toxic and more greener way to produce a wide range of medicines.
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The Atlantic
What Apple Thought the iPhone Might Look Like in 1995 A decade ago, for the most part, phones were phones. Computers were computers. Cameras were cameras. Portable music players were portable music players. The idea that the future of the computer would be a phone, or vice versa, wasn’t merely absurd. It just wasn’t how people thought about consumer technology. At all. So when the first iPhone was unveiled in 2007, plenty of people assumed it wouldn
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The Atlantic
U.S. Envoy to Qatar to Exit Updated at 12:13 p.m. ET Dana Shell Smith, the U.S. ambassador to Qatar who drew attention last month after posting a tweet that appeared to be critical of the Trump administration, announced Tuesday that her tenure in Doha will end later this month. 1/2 This month, I end my 3 years as U.S. Ambassador to #Qatar . It has been the greatest honor of my life and I'll miss this great country. — Dana S
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