Ingeniøren
Politianmeldt af KMD for hacking: »Jeg er totalt uskyldig« Netcompany-ansat fandt grelt sikkerhedshul i kommunalt pladsanvisnings-system. Nu er han blevet politianmeldt for hacking. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/interview-hacker-tiltalt-jeg-totalt-uskyldig-1077581 Version2
1h
The Atlantic
The Standing Rock Sioux Claim ‘Victory and Vindication’ in Court A federal judge ruled in favor of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Wednesday, handing the tribe its first legal victory in its year-long battle against the Dakota Access pipeline. James Boasberg, who sits on D.C. district court, said that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to perform an adequate study of the pipeline’s environmental consequences when it first approved its construction. In a
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Animal evolution: Hot start, followed by cold shockThe initial phases of animal evolution proceeded faster than hitherto supposed: New analyses suggest that the first animal phyla emerged in rapid succession -- prior to the global Ice Age that set in around 700 million years ago.
5h

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New on MIT Technology Review
Clean Energy Is About to Become Cheaper Than CoalThe inflection point has already been reached in the West, and by 2021 solar will be cheaper than coal in China.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US is still first in science, but China rose fast as funding stalled here & elsewhereAmerican scientific teams still publish significantly more biomedical research discoveries than teams from any other country, a new study shows, and the U.S. still leads the world in research and development expenditures.
3min
The Atlantic
The Platinum Patients It’s one of the hardest figures to square in the American health care system: A small slice of patients, just 5 percent, account for over 50 percent of all medical expenditures for the entire United States. In other words, if the country’s population was just 20 people, it would spend the same amount on its sickest resident as it would for the next 19 combined. The Atlantic used survey data from
12min
The Atlantic
Death Toll in London's Grenfell Tower Blaze Rises to 17 The death toll from the blaze at London’s Grenfell Tower, which has now risen to 17, is expected to climb further, police said , and the fire service said there was no hope of finding more people who escaped Wednesday’s fire that engulfed the 24-story apartment building. Thirty-seven people are still in hospital, 17 of them in critical condition, Commander Stuart Cundy of the Metropolitan Police
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart materials used in ultrasound behave similar to water, Penn chemists reportResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania provided new insight into piezoelectrics materials, a smart material used in ultrasound technology. While forming the most thorough model to date of how these materials work, they found striking similarities with the behavior of water. A more complete understanding of why these materials behave the way they do can unlock new materials design, leading t
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science shows how faces guide, and reflect, our social livesA special issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, brings together innovative research and theory in psychological science, computer science, neuroscience, and related fields, illuminating the myriad ways in which face perception infuses how we think and behave.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Knowing HIV levels are 'undetectable' may affect sexual behaviorUnderstanding and responding to behavioral trends in groups that are at high risk for HIV infection is critical to the development of effective strategies that decrease HIV incidence and improve access to care. New research based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) system are presented in a special supplement to JAIDS: Journal o
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiac stem cells from heart disease patients may be harmfulA new Tel Aviv University study finds that stem cell therapy may harm heart disease patients.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More brain activity is not always better when it comes to memory and attentionPotential new ways of understanding the cause of cognitive impairments, such as problems with memory and attention, in brain disorders including schizophrenia and Alzheimer's are under the spotlight in a new research review.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilitiesCarbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of highly pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms, are endemic across Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities, with 5.2 percent of inpatients testing positive for the bacteria, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An alternative hypothesis on the faunal colonization of the Himalayas?Until now, the fauna of the Himalayas was considered to be an 'immigration fauna', with species that have immigrated primarily from neighboring regions to the west and east since the geological formation of this mountain range. Using molecular-genetic methods, a German-Chinese research team has now tested an alternative colonization hypothesis on lazy toads (Pelobatoidea).
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First few millimeters of the leaf margin identify palm species in a new key to SyagrusAn incredible amount of information is contained in the very first few millimeters of the leaflet margin of species in the Neotropical palm genus Syagrus. A new key to the genus, published in the open access journal PhytoKeys, proves that by using a simple technique to identify species.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inhibitor drug improves overall survival in older radioiodine resistant thyroid cancerThe drug lenvatinib can significantly improve overall survival rates in a group of thyroid cancer patients whose disease is resistant to standard radioiodine treatment, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, is the first to show lenvatinib has a definitive impact on overall su
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special efforts are needed to address trauma in refugee youthIn a study of children and adolescents referred for mental health services at US trauma treatment sites, there were important differences in the experiences of refugee youth who were displaced by war-related violence relative to immigrants and those born in the United States.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radio astronomers peer deep into the stellar nursery of the Orion NebulaAstronomers have released an image of a 50-light-year-long filament of star-forming gas, 1200 light-years away, in the stellar nursery of the Orion Nebula. The image combines ammonia molecule observations made with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and an infrared image of the Orion Nebula.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover shortcut to satellite-based quantum encryption networkIn a new study, researchers demonstrate ground-based measurements of quantum states sent by a laser aboard a satellite 38,000 kilometers above Earth.
12min
Gizmodo
How to Hack Your Car With a Nicer Horn That Won't Instigate Road Rage GIF Aside from turn signals, a car’s horn is really the only tool a driver has to communicate with other vehicles. (Besides gesticulating wildly out of the driver’s side window, of course.) It’s so loud and abrasive, however, that it always sounds like you’re screaming at other motorists, leading to middle fingers and other unwelcome responses. But what if your car’s horn was more polite ? Mark R
15min
Gizmodo
Amazon's New Dash Wand Is a Full Alexa Assistant, and It's Basically Free Right Now Amazon’s new Dash Wand has Alexa built right in, and lets you order groceries and other household goods just by scanning a barcode or using your voice. The best part though? It’s basically free. The Dash Wand will set you back $20 upfront (not bad considering it’s a full-featured Alexa voice assistant), but once you register it, you’ll get a $20 credit in your Amazon account automatically. It’s b
15min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From bleeps of 'Pong' and 'Mario,' game music comes of ageThe electronic bleeps and squawks of "Tetris," ''Donkey Kong" and other generation-shaping games that you may never have thought of as musical are increasingly likely to be playing at a philharmonic concert hall near you.
16min
Futurity.org
Crystal DDT could be a safer bug-killer Scientists have found a new crystal form of the pesticide DDT that is more effective against insects than the current form. Their research, which appears in the journal Angewandte Chemie , points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT that can be administered in smaller amounts while reducing environmental impact. The pesticide has historically been linked to human-health aff
18min
Wired
The Alaskan Harbor Where Bald Eagles Scavenge Like PigeonsThey pick through garbage and steal pizza from locals.
22min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One million sign petition for EU weedkiller banMore than one million people have signed a petition demanding the EU ban the Monsanto weedkiller glyphosate over fears it causes cancer, campaigners said Thursday.
22min
Ingeniøren
Højhusbrand i London: Fire centrale spørgsmål trænger sig påMindst 17 er døde, omkring 70 er indlagt på hospitaler og skæbnen for mindst 50 personer er endnu ikke fastslået, efter højhusbrand i London. Flere spørgsmål om bygningens brandsikkerhed presser sig på.
26min
The Atlantic
An Artificial Intelligence Developed Its Own Non-Human Language A buried line in a new Facebook report about chatbots’ conversations with one another offers a remarkable glimpse at the future of language. In the report , researchers at the Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research lab describe using machine learning to train their “dialog agents” to negotiate. (And it turns out bots are actually quite good at dealmaking.) At one point, the researchers write,
32min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water management interventions push scarcity downstreamHuman interventions to harness water resources, such as reservoirs, dams, and irrigation measures, have increased water availability for much of the global population, but at the same time, swept water scarcity problems downstream.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physical activity within physical education: Time for a rethink?Physical education (PE) in the United States may be failing both teachers and children, suggests new research.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study questions whether mistaken antibodies led cancer research down a 20-year dead endFor nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but a new article contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Widespread snowmelt in West Antarctica during unusually warm summerAn area of West Antarctica more than twice the size of California partially melted in 2016 when warm winds forced by an especially strong El Nino blew over the continent.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New chemical method could revolutionize grapheneScientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gap in health care for Alzheimer´s disease patients who live aloneThe patients who live alone do not receive the same extent of diagnostic investigations and anti-dementia treatment as those who are co-habiting. On the other hand, they were treated more frequently with antidepressants, antipsychotics and sedative drugs.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking circular economy to the next levelWhile principles of a circular economy have been adopted by businesses, governments and NGOs, leading researchers say it's time to take the discussion and analysis to the next level.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vaccination: Main prevention measure to address hepatitis A outbreaks among MSM1 173 confirmed hepatitis A cases have been reported across 15 EU countries since June 2016. Several countries have seen increases in hepatitis A cases in 2017 compared to previous years, and these are mainly affecting men who have sex with men. In light of these outbreaks and the beginning of Pride period, ECDC stresses the importance of hepatitis A vaccination and the delivery of prevention mess
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swimming robot to probe damage at Japan nuclear plantA Japanese industrial group unveiled Thursday a swimming robot designed for underwater probes of damage from meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.
34min
cognitive science
How Detecting Social Signals May Have Affected How We See Colors - "Our color vision is superior at spotting 'social signaling,' such as blushing or other facial color changes—even when compared to the type of color vision that we design for digital cameras and other photographic devices." submitted by /u/Lightfiend [link] [comments]
36min
Scientific American Content: Global
Maryland Island Denies Sea Level Rise Yet Wants to Stop ItScientists, skeptics, crabbers and pastors try to find common ground, offering a glimmer of hope for a divided country -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Ars Technica
Login-stealing phishing sites conceal their evil with lots of hyphens in URL Researchers at PhishLabs recently spotted a trend emerging in malicious web sites presented to customers: mobile-focused phishing attacks that attempt to conceal the true domain they were served from, by padding the subdomain address with enough hyphens to push the actual source of the page outside the address box on mobile browsers. "The tactic we're seeing is a tactic for phishing specifically
46min
Gizmodo
Head Transplant Scientists Re-Attach Rat Spines, Others Not Convinced Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum/ Brandonng06 /Wikimedia Commons Sergio Canavero wants to transplant a head, and we can’t look away. Despite our continued skepticism, he does seem to be making progress. “Seem” being the operative word here, because others still aren’t convinced by the evidence. Canavero and a team of Chinese doctors at Harbin Medical Center have announced that they’ve successfully sever
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water management interventions push scarcity downstreamLarge-scale interventions to water resources, such as irrigation, dams and reservoirs, and water withdrawals, have been essential to human development. But interventions tend to solve water scarcity problems at a local level, while aggravating water scarcity downstream.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distant fish relatives share looksJames Cook University scientists have found evidence that even distantly related Australian fish species have evolved to look and act like each other, which confirms a central tenet of evolutionary theory.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Persistent pain shows up inefficiency of current psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatmentThe results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference have highlighted limitations in the current treatment of patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA).
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The newly discovered Russian dinosaur named after Mongolian spiritBeing a member of the international scientific team, a student from the Faculty of Geology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University has taken part in study and description of a new genus and species of the ancient marine reptile, called pliosaur.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New screening tool helps ID heart surgery patients at risk of malnutritionPatients who are at risk for malnutrition when undergoing heart surgery now can be more quickly and easily identified, leading to intervention and potentially better surgical outcomes, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New flu test: One drop of blood could save your lifeDr Ben Tang and co-researchers have developed a world-first blood test to predict which flu patients will develop potentially life-threatening secondary infections that demand urgent medical treatment.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nurses crucial in improving uptake of potentially life-saving vaccine in vulnerable RMD patientsThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference showed that implementing a vaccination program run by nursing staff dramatically improves pneumococcal vaccination coverage among vulnerable patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood test detects stroke and heart attack risk in lupus patients with no CVD symptomsThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference have shown that a specific biomarker detected in the blood of lupus patients with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thought to be at low risk of CVD based on traditional risk factors, is associated with the presence of atherosclerosis.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-dose CT scanning improves assessment of ankylosing spondylitis patientsThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 showed that low dose computed tomography is more sensitive than conventional radiographs (X-rays) in the monitoring of disease progression in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS).
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive behavior therapy significantly reduced depression and anxiety in chronic pain patientsThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 has shown that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy that focuses on psychological flexibility and behavior change, provided a significant reduction in self-reported depression and anxiety among patients participating in a pain rehabilitation program.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological DMARD guidelines associated with a reduced need for knee and hip replacements in RAThe results of a Danish study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference showed that the incidence of total knee replacements carried out on patients with rheumatoid arthritis started to decrease after the introduction of biological Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) to national treatment guidelines.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool measures resilience in adolescent Syrian refugeesResearchers from Yale University, together with partners at universities in Canada, Jordan, and the United Kingdom, have developed a brief and reliable survey tool to measure resilience in children and adolescents who have been displaced by the brutal conflict in Syria.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New map highlights sinking Louisiana coastResearchers at Tulane University have developed a subsidence map of coastal Louisiana, putting the rate at which this region is sinking at just over one third of an inch per year.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New light shed on dynamics of type IV pili and twitching motilityNew light shed on dynamics of asymmetric type IV pili distribution and twitching motility triggered by directional light in cyanobacteria.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Influenza virus can overcome potentially crippling mutationsNew research could improve the effectiveness of flu vaccines and therapies.
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rest easy during EU holidays: no more phone roaming costsFrom now on, European Union holidaymakers should return home without that sense of high anxiety about their mobile phone bill: extra fees for using it abroad should have gone.
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elegant switch controls translation in transition from egg to embryoThe transition from an egg to a developing embryo is one of life's most remarkable transformations. Yet little is known about it. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have deciphered how one aspect—control of the all-important translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into proteins—switches as the egg becomes an embryo. That shift is controlled by a beautiful mechanism, which is triggered at a precise
52min
The Atlantic
Why Amazon Would Want to Buy Slack Amazon is rumored to be mulling a purchase of Slack, the fast-growing corporate chat platform. A deal could give Slack a valuation of $9 billion, according to a report from Bloomberg . It’s no surprise that tech giants have taken interest in Slack, with its elegant, user-friendly interface that keeps employees ever-connected to work via their smartphones. The startup has enjoyed extraordinary gro
53min
Ars Technica
EU mobile roaming charges end today, but beware of other costs (credit: Ron Amadeo) From today, mobile roaming charges in the European Union have officially been abolished—allowing travellers to make calls and send texts in other countries within the 28-member-state bloc without being saddled with exorbitant bills. It means that, while the UK is still part of the EU, Brits will also benefit from mobile roaming charges being dropped. Post-Brexit, the governme
54min
Live Science
Please and Thank You: How DARPA Is Teaching Robots MannersBy teaching robots social norms, researchers think the machines could more seamlessly interact with humans.
56min
The Scientist RSS
Authors Peeved by APAs Article Takedown PilotIn an effort to crack down on unauthorized postings of journal articles, the American Psychological Association is policing the Internet for scientists sharing their own work.
57min
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Burst Your BubbleIntracellular electrostatic exchanges between RNA and proteins create dynamic glob-like membraneless organelles.
57min
The Scientist RSS
Fetal Immune System Operational by Second TrimesterResearch shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.
57min
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Historien vil dømme de energipolitiske aftaler, der laves i 2017 Vindmøller
57min
Ingeniøren
DSB afliver timemodellen: Nye eltog bliver ikke højhastighedstogDSB har i sit oplæg til milliardindkøbet af nye eltog valgt at se bort fra højhastighedstog i forventning om, at timemodellen ikke overlever de politiske forhandlinger om Togfonden.
57min
Science | The Guardian
Long and complex forensic investigation ahead for Grenfell Tower Recovering victims’ remains a priority, with experts confident every person will be found. But establishing fire’s cause will take months, they say Forensic experts have spoken of the extraordinarily complex investigation that lies ahead at Grenfell Tower and predicted that establishing the causes of the devastating fire will take months. In the coming days, recovering victims’ remains would be a
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists report large-scale surface melting event in Antarctica during 2015-16 El NiñoThe West Antarctic Ice Sheet, a landbound mass of ice larger than Mexico, experienced substantial surface melt through the austral summer of 2015-2016 during one of the largest El Niño events of the past 50 years, according to scientists who had been conducting the first comprehensive atmospheric measurements in the region since the 1960s.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum dot transistor simulates functions of neuronsA transistor that simulates some of the functions of neurons has been invented based on experiments and models developed by researchers at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in São Paulo State, Brazil, Würzburg University in Germany, and the University of South Carolina in the United States.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Face recognition system 'K-Eye'Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the key emerging technologies. Global IT companies are competitively launching the newest technologies and competition is heating up more than ever. However, most AI technologies focus on software and their operating speeds are low, making them a poor fit for mobile devices. Therefore, many big companies are investing to develop semiconductor chips for runnin
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BfR Research: Proof of the transfer of aluminium from menu trays to foodFoods from uncoated aluminium trays can contain high levels of aluminium. This is the result of a BfR research project in which several foods prepared in line with the rules of the Cook&Chill process before being kept warm were examined in an exploratory investigation. The test results show that despite the limited number of samples examined, aluminium ions transfer to acidic foods, especially whi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When healthy cells stimulate the migration of tumor cellsEstrogens act as a driving force of both healthy and cancerous mammary cell growth by binding to receptors that include GPER, which is generally located in cell membranes. Studies have revealed the unusual presence of this receptor in the nuclei of fibroblasts surrounding mammary tumor cells. Researchers at UNIGE have discovered that this is in fact another version of GPER with different propertie
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Celebrating a high performing new journal in quantum informationUNSW Sydney is proud of the early publication performance, influence and reach of its Nature Partner Journal npj Quantum Information, from advancing discovery to affecting public discourse. At a time of the year when the Journal Citation ReportsTM are published, UNSW sees npj Quantum Information's inaugural Impact Factor in the context of a variety of journal-based metrics that provide a richer vi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diets rich in polyunsaturated fats may alter appetite hormones among millennialsNew published research shows millennials (ages 18-35) who regularly consume foods that contain polyunsaturated fats, such as walnuts, salmon and canola oil, may experience favorable changes in appetite hormones associated with hunger and satiety.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Induced Cell Turnover: A proposed modality for in situ tissue regeneration & repairScientists at the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and Swammerdam Institute of Life Sciences at the University of Amsterdam have published a paper on a proposed method of in situ tissue regeneration called Induced Cell Turnover in the journal Human Gene Therapy.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US is still first in science, but China rose fast as funding stalled here & elsewhereAmerican scientific teams still publish significantly more biomedical research discoveries than teams from any other country, a new study shows, and the US still leads the world in research and development expenditures. But American dominance is slowly shrinking, the analysis finds, as China's skyrocketing investing on science over the last two decades begins to pay off.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cellsDuke University researchers have identified a potential new mechanism in both mice and human endocrine cells that populate the small intestines. Inside these cells is a protein called alpha-synuclein, which is known to go awry and lead to damaging clumps in the brains of Parkinson's patients, as well as those with Alzheimer's disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds no gender difference in stress as a risk factor for coronary heart diseaseResearchers found that although women had higher average levels of urine stress hormones than men, the association between stress and having asymptomatic coronary heart disease as measured by coronary calcium was similar in both genders. In particular, urinary cortisol was a strong independent predictor of asymptomatic coronary heart disease.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene transfer keeps bacteria fitResearchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered that Bartonella bacteria exchange genes efficiently using a domesticated virus encoded in their genome. As the findings published in Cell Systems demonstrate, the exchange of genetic material only takes place between bacteria with a high level of fitness. The gene transfer between pathogens prevents the accumulation of genetic def
1h
Gizmodo
X-Men: Dark Phoenix Is Getting One Thing Extremely Right We have a cryptic look at Avengers: Infinity War . A Star Wars rumor is debunked. Daenerys explains one thing she won’t be doing in season seven of Game of Thrones. We know when a slew of Marvel movies will begin filming. Re-Animator may be returning but not in the U.S. Is there more? So much more! Spoilers, hiyah! X-Men: Dark Phoneix After yesterday’s announcement of the new (first-time) directo
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolutionary hot start, followed by cold shockThe initial phases of animal evolution proceeded faster than hitherto supposed: New analyses suggest that the first animal phyla emerged in rapid succession – prior to the global Ice Age that set in around 700 million years ago.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern computing power may help mitigate future flood disastersIn February 2017, California's Oroville Dam received national attention as a narrowly averted flood disaster. A decade earlier—in June 2008—it was Wisconsin's turn: Near the popular tourist destination city Wisconsin Dells, excessive rainfall eroded the highway that formed part of the Lake Delton Dam, resulting in a torrential washout into the Wisconsin River 40 feet below. It swept away three hom
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologist teams up with computer vision experts to match prehistoric potteryCutting-edge computer vision technology could help unlock the mystery of how people interacted and traveled in the Southeast more than 1,500 years ago.
1h
Wired
Twitter Redesigned Itself to Make the Tweet Supreme AgainMore than any single change, the new design refocuses Twitter as place you go to see what's going on.
1h
Dagens Medicin
Høst af gevinster ved sundhedsplatformen bekymrer politikereKarin Friis Bach, der sidder med i Region Hovedstadens Forretningsudvalg, savner dokumentation for, hvordan Region Hovedstaden når frem til, at den til næste år kan høste 102 mio. kr. som en følge af implementering af Sundhedsplatformen.
1h
Ars Technica
Sorry ma‘am, you didn’t win $43M—there was a slot machine “malfunction” Enlarge / Katrina Bookman takes a selfie showing she hit the big one. (credit: Alan Ripka ) Imagine, if you would, how absolutely giddy you'd be if you won a $43 million jackpot while playing a casino slot machine. You could burn a lot of bridges with that amount of cash. Then imagine the opposite feeling you'd get when the casino tells you there was a "malfunction" and, hence, you're not getting
1h
Ars Technica
Surface Pro review: Incremental improvement isn’t enough Enlarge / Surface Pro with a Cobalt Blue Type Cover. Every new Surface Pro has been the best Surface Pro yet. The new fifth-generation Surface Pro—unnumbered, Microsoft having dropped numeric suffixes—continues that trend. It is as good as or better than its predecessor, the Surface Pro 4, in every way. And yet, the new machine strikes me as unambitious in a way that older models weren't. The 201
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Face recognition system 'K-Eye' presented by KAISTA research team led by Professor Hoi-Jun Yoo of the Department of Electrical Engineering has developed a semiconductor chip, CNNP (CNN Processor), that runs AI algorithms with ultra-low power, and K-Eye, a face recognition system using CNNP.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reproducing a retinal disease on a chipGood news for the treatment of retinal diseases using the organ-on-a-chip approach.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distant fish relatives share looksJames Cook University scientists have found evidence that even distantly related Australian fish species have evolved to look and act like each other, which confirms a central tenet of evolutionary theory.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blocking gene expression to combat deadly fungal infectionDeadly fungal infections are becoming resistant to common treatments, but a team of researchers from USC and from France have found a potential new solution.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum dot transistor simulates functions of neuronsResearchers at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in São Paulo State, Brazil, Würzburg University in Germany, and the University of South Carolina in the United States developed a transistor that can lead to the development of new kinds of device and computer circuit in which memory units are combined with logical processing units, economizing space, time, and power consumption.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA surgeon: Physicians, patients must focus on remission of diabetic ulcersPhysicians and patients need to focus on remission of diabetic ulcers -- that is, extending the time between their formation, says Dr. David G. Armstrong, professor of surgery and director of the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson. Armstrong says extending patients' ulcer-free days using treatment and prevention is essential, according
1h
Gizmodo
This Is the Best Surface Ever Made, But It's Still No Laptop All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo True hubris is a person trying to use a Microsoft Surface Pro like a laptop. It takes Mr. Darcy levels of pride to believe you can trust so fully in a kickstand and flimsy keyboard. The Surface Pro is many things, including everything from Microsoft’s attempt to woo creative professionals to a beautifully engineered device that wants to be a fusion of tablet and lap
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cities fight climate change through ecosystem restorationFlooding and extreme heat are projected to increase over the next few decades and will be extremely costly for cities to manage. But a new study from Simon Fraser University shows how cities working together to restore and maintain ecosystems can be cheaper than building hard infrastructure to respond to climate change, and provides additional benefits such as buoyant property values and community
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Detecting Radiation Exposure with a Blood TestAn RNA-based assay recently shown to work in monkeys could help triage victims of nuclear disasters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
New Scientist - News
Watch how spiders use sticky silk to win deadly wrestling matchInstead of building webs, ground spiders ambush other spiders or insects that may be bigger than themselves, by tying them in super-sticky threads
1h
Ars Technica
Destiny 2 on PC: 4K, GTX 1080 Ti, all the eye-candy Destiny 2 gameplay in 4K, with the voice of Mark Walton. Make sure you click the cog and tell YouTube to give you the 4K stream. Even for a game focused on multiplayer—PvP, co-op, or otherwise—a good single-player campaign is often a great way to introduce the basic mechanics to newbies before throwing them to the online wolves. It's also a great way to set up a story. Technically, Activison's MM
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aalto-2 no longer responds to commandsAstronauts at the International Space Station released Aalto-2 into orbit on 25 May. The first satellite signal was detected from Japan on the same day, and later that evening the satellite had already made contact with the Otaniemi ground station.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Star Trek Legacy Lives On In Space Exploration [Video]A film director, a rocket scientist and two physicists discuss how the television series influenced culture and inspired a generation of scientists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Sphero's Adorable Spider-Man Toy Has AI Smarts (That Aren't Creepy) GIF Once known for its quirky remote-controlled robot balls, Sphero parlayed that technology into a massive consumer hit with its Star Wars: The Force Awakens BB-8 toy . As a result, the company has been able to expand beyond the sphere, first with a robotic version of Cars’ Lightning McQueen , and now with an interactive Spider-Man figure that chats with kids. Back in early 2015 Mattel revealed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elegant switch controls translation in transition from egg to embryoThe transition from an egg to a developing embryo is one of life's most remarkable transformations. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have used fruit flies to decipher how one aspect -- control of the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into proteins -- shifts as the egg becomes an the embryo. This type of switch could tell scientists more about how human cells work and embryos develop.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant compound more powerful than AZT against HIVA plant found throughout Southeast Asia traditionally used to treat arthritis and rheumatism contains a potent anti-HIV compound more powerful than the drug AZT, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Natural Compounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insight into complicated Arctic cloud processesThe Arctic has changed at a faster rate than the rest of the planet. Clouds impact the surface energy budget and, thus, the melting or growth of land- and ocean-based ice. Many Arctic clouds are "mixed phase," consisting of both ice and liquid particles simultaneously. Correctly predicting the partitioning of mass and transitions between these two phases is vital for understanding cloud impacts on
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Ars Technica
Life is Strange: Before the Storm: Life sucks when you’re a teenager, man Check out the full E3 demo of Life is Strange: Before the Storm . Following the surprise success of 2015's Life is Strange —Dontnod's episodic tale of teenage rebellion—we expected publisher Square Enix to return with a sequel. Less expected, though, was the E3 2017 reveal of Life is Strange: Before the Storm , a prequel that tells the story of series star Chloe Price during her formative years.
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Science | The Guardian
Alien megastructures – where we should look next Huge extraterrestrial construction projects should leave detectable traces that astronomers could see You remember the alien megastructure. No? Let me refresh your memory. Back in October 2015, the internet nearly broke when astronomers announced they had detected a strange signal that stood a remote chance of being a vast extraterrestrial construction - dubbed the alien megastructure. It was dis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New map highlights sinking Louisiana coastResearchers at Tulane University have developed a subsidence map of coastal Louisiana, putting the rate at which this region is sinking at just over one third of an inch per year.
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Futurity.org
7 facts about cicadas, which are ‘tiny violins’ Once the cicadas arrive, broadcasting their piercing buzz from invisible locations in the trees, you know summer has, too. Gene Hall, an entomologist at the University of Arizona, talks about the noisy insects and how (and why) they do what they do. 1. Cicadas are like tiny violins The body of a cicada is similar to that of a violin or a guitar, in that much of it consists of empty, air-filled sp
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Scientific American Content: Global
Robot Chef Learns to Twirl Pizza Like a ProA new bot uses feedback from sensors to stretch and fold dough -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Secret Empire Turned Ultron Into the Most Sensible Person in Marvel's Comics Marvel A number of writer Nick Spencer’s narrative choices (like turning Captain America into a literal fascist and supreme leader of Hydra) have made Marvel’s Secret Empire event difficult to stomach. In this week’s issue of the controversial series, though, a familiar face shows up to put all of Secret Empire’s messiness in perspective—and you know what? It’s pretty damned good. Following Hydra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Playing the numbers—a billion-dollar gamble on the European X-ray Laser"Big science" is a term originally coined by historians to describe the major scientific advancements made by industrial nations around the period of the Second World War.
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Viden
Vegetar eller ej: Dine gener afslører digI fremtiden vil en gentest måske kunne hjælpe dig med at finde ud af, hvilke fødevarer netop du har bedst af.
2h
Wired
Arctic Climate Change Study Canceled Due to Climate ChangeArctic sea ice is unexpectedly in motion, making the research trip far too dangerous for the ship and the scientists it would be carrying.
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Wired
'The Handmaid's Tale' Recap, Episode 10: Dystopia Ain't Good at Happy EndingsThe season finale of Hulu's show promises a story for Offred that Margaret Atwood's book never told.
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Science | The Guardian
Frédérick Leboyer obituaryObstetrician best known for his revolutionary 1974 book, Birth Without Violence “Do you think babies like being born?” So opened Birth Without Violence , a book that in 1974 was to change obstetrics. Its author was a French doctor who, having delivered thousands of babies, had come to a startling realisation – that while the requirements of the mother, the father and medical staff were all catered
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Propagating "charge density wave" fluctuations are seen in superconducting copper oxides for the first timeAn international team led by scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has detected new features in the electronic behavior of a copper oxide material that may help explain why it becomes a perfect electrical conductor – a superconductor – at relatively high temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High temperatures, not ocean acidification, is threatening the growth of coralThe Achilles' heel of coral growth is high temperatures, not ocean acidification, according to researchers from The University of Western Australia and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. The research will be presented tomorrow in Canberra at the Coral Reef Futures Symposium.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leaving school early means you're likely never to return to study and training in adult lifeOne in eight Australians will never get Year 12 qualifications. Some, but not all of these people, make up the one in eight Australians who will be disengaged from full-time work, study or training for most of their lives.
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Science-Based Medicine
A closer look at penicillin allergiesWhile many people believe they may be allergic to penicillin, few actually are. The consequences may be serious.
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Ingeniøren
Ekspertgruppe: Ufaglærte skal dele kursusmilliarder med akademikerneHidtil har de såkaldte VEU-midler været lukket land for højtuddannede, men det skal være slut, lyder det fra en ekspertgruppe, som vil have livslang uddannelse til alle. Forslaget glæder IDA og det rådgivende ingeniørfirma NNE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Consequences of gaps of uprooted or broken trees in AmazoniaGaps of uprooted or broken trees in Amazonia have cascading consequences, from local farm productivity to global carbon storage. Severe rain or thunderstorms with descending winds, expected to become more frequent with climate change, cause these gaps. For the first time, researchers show how the gaps vary across seasons and years in central Amazonia (Brazil). They found the trees break or fall mo
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The Atlantic
The Millennial Astronaut Who Wants to Go to Mars When Jessica Watkins was growing up, NASA was launching space shuttle missions into low-Earth orbit about every few months. But Watkins, one of NASA’s newest astronauts, doesn’t really remember watching the launches on television. Her first enduring memory of American space exploration came in 2004, when a pair of robotic rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, landed on the surface of Mars. “That was a
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The Atlantic
Evan McMullin’s War John Cuneo When Evan McMullin arrived at the Four Seasons in Washington, D.C., one afternoon in early April, he sensed right away that he was in enemy territory. After more than a decade in the CIA, he knows how to case a room, and the heightened security outside the building that day suggested to him the presence of someone from Donald Trump’s administration—a White House official, perhaps, or a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists call for consistent guidelines on social media use in researchScientists at the University of York have called for guidelines, informed by public opinion, to be made available to researchers who are considering using social media as a research tool.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Address the Epidemic of Lies in PoliticsThe "Pro-Truth Pledge," based on behavioral science research, could be part of the answer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Now the FTC wants a word with Uber Enlarge / An Uber car waiting for a rider in Manhattan. (credit: Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images ) Adding to the embattled ride-hailing company's troubles, Uber is now reportedly under investigation for privacy violations by the Federal Trade Commission. It isn't clear exactly what has the FTC investigators interested in Uber, which was reported earlier today by Recode . The site speculates t
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Live Science
Two-headed Conjoined Porpoises Hauled Up from the DeepFishermen near the Netherlands recently hauled up a two-headed conjoined porpoise carcass from the deep.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How does the Great Barrier Reef get its nitrogen fix?When Captain James Cook and the botanist Sir Joseph Banks navigated Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in the 1770s they described blooms of "sea sawdust" we now know to be the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. Similarly, in 2014, a UTS led research voyage found the species in abundance, but with the benefit of new molecular biological techniques they were also able to identify other important speci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use optogenetics and mathematical modelling to identify a central molecule in cell mechanicsAll cell types continually generate forces in the human body. An interdisciplinary cooperation of biologists and physicists including Heidelberg researcher Prof. Dr Ulrich Schwarz now succeeded in performing high-resolution measurements of cell forces using light to switch them on and off in a controlled manner. The scientists from the universities of Heidelberg and Chicago (USA) used optogenetics
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-created antibody could hold the secret to making stem cell therapy saferStem cells have paved the way for a new era in regenerative medicine, but their use is fraught with risk. Now, A*STAR scientists have developed an antibody that could make stem cell therapy safer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Game players face their demons in virtual realityZombies from the television series "The Walking Dead" and other demons are coming to life for video game players in virtual worlds.
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Running an Anker Gold Box Deal! I Repeat, Anker Gold Box Deal. Anker Gold Box Anker makes basically all of your favorite charging gear , and a bunch of it is on sale in today’s Amazon Gold Box . If you read Kinja Deals, you know that Anker runs its fair share of sales. But these discounts are uncommonly good , befitting their Gold Box status. For starters, you can pick up a pair of Quick Charge 3.0 chargers: One for your car , and one for the wall . If you d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher finds Georgia voter records exposed on internetA security researcher disclosed a gaping security hole at the outfit that manages Georgia's election technology, days before the state holds a closely watched congressional runoff vote on June 20.
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The Atlantic
What Do Spy Agencies Tell Foreign Governments About Americans? The United States collects vast troves of private information on American citizens and foreigners, much of it through covert surveillance by intelligence agencies. How much of that data should be shared with allied democracies like Canada or France? How about repressive, illiberal allies like Saudi Arabia? Or adversaries like Russia or Venezuela? Answers will vary depending on how respondents adj
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China launches its first X-ray space telescopeChina successfully launched on Thursday its first X-ray space telescope to study black holes, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts, state media reported.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kazakh man dies in fire following Russian rocket launch: govt.A Kazakh man died and another was hospitalised after they were caught in a fire on the steppes triggered by falling debris from a Russian space launch, emergency services said on Thursday.
3h
Live Science
Insect Walking Dead: How a Fungus Turns Beetles into Killer ZombiesA fungus worthy of its own horror film is on the loose, taking over the bodies of goldenrod soldier beetles and turning them into contagious zombies that can infect their beetle brethren, a new study finds.
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Live Science
Photos: Zombie Beetles Hang from FlowersJust before a deadly fungus kills the goldenrod soldier beetle, it instructs the beetle to climb a plant and clamp its mandibles around a flower.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Larger-than-average summer 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2017A University of Michigan ecologist and colleagues from several institutions are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2017.
3h
Wired
The Pharmacy of the Future Is Ready For Your Bathroom CounterThe online pharmacy PillPack is ready to change how you deal with your medications.
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Wired
The Georgia Runoff Election Doesn't Have a Paper Trail to Safeguard Against HacksWithout a paper trail, Georgia's elections don't have anything to fall back on in the case of outside interference.
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Dagens Medicin
Statsrevisorer: Regioner ødsler millioner væk på konsulenter Der skal strammes op i regionernes konsulentkøb. Statsrevisionen efterlyser en strategi for regionernes brug af konsulenter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China probes academic fraud by cancer researchersChina is investigating claims of academic fraud involving mostly Chinese cancer researchers after more than 100 articles were withdrawn from a foreign medical journal.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Quest for a Functional New Interface for the SmartphoneFingertips Lab’s iPhone-controlling gadget is a good idea that needs a lot of work.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Listen between the CriesResearchers try to decipher the hidden messages in babies’ wailing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Economic benefits of admitting refugees outweigh costsAlthough working-age adult refugees who enter the United States often initially rely on public assistance programs, a study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame indicates that the long-term economic benefit of admitting refugees outweighs the initial costs.
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New Scientist - News
DeepMind now learns from human preferences – just like a toddlerA new AI system can learn how to perform complex tasks with a little nudge here and there from a human onlooker
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orion frame workSet to be shipped to the USA around the New Year, ESA's contribution to NASA's Orion spacecraft is taking shape at Airbus in Bremen, Germany. This is no test article: the service module pictured here will fly into space by 2020, past the Moon and farther than any other human-rated spacecraft has ever flown before.
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA Hires New Astronauts--but Where Will They Go?The space agency awaits direction from the Trump administration, along with congressional funding to match its ambitions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Desert lizards use body oscillations to dive into sandIn the desert, the sand surface can become extremely hot during the day, up to 70ºC. In order to escape these temperatures, some desert lizards adopt a fascinating strategy: They dive a few centimeters under the sand surface where it's much cooler (around 40º C). This is also a good strategy to hide and to escape from predators. But diving into the sand is a difficult task which requires a large f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How indigo pigment can be used in electronicsSilicon still represents the most important material for the production of semiconductor elements such as transistors, diodes or solar cells. For a number of years, however, an interesting alternative has been available: certain hydrocarbons that also exhibit semiconductor properties are now the new standard in OLED displays of mobile phones and television sets. Moreover, these "organic" semicondu
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Dagens Medicin
Region og kommuner samarbejder om rehabilitering af kræftpatienterRanders, Norddjurs, Syddjurs og Favrskov kommuner har sammen med Regionshospitalet Randers ændret praksis for at få flere kræftpatienter i rehabilitering.
3h
Ingeniøren
Sønderborg-selskab vil bygge havmøllepark i LillebæltSønderborg Forsyning har netop fået tilladelse til at udføre forundersøgelser i et område mellem Als og Helnæs på Fyn, hvor man vil opstille mellem 20 og 44 vindmøller.
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Ingeniøren
Fra i dag kan du roame frit - men to teleselskaber vil allerede undtagesTo teleselskaber i Danmark vil gerne kræve ekstrabetaling fra deres EU-rejsende kunder, selv om det fra i dag ikke længere er tilladt.
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Ingeniøren
Transportministeren i den varme stol: Se Ingeniørens interview fra FolkemødetVi har netop afsluttet vores interview med Ole Birk Olesen fra Folkemødet på Bornholm, hvor ministeren blev spurgt til regeringens ambitioner på transportområdet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acoustic emissions from organic martensite analoguesSome organic crystals jump around when heated up. This happens because of an extremely fast change in their crystal structure. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now demonstrated that the crystals send out acoustic signals during this process, which may be useful in analyzing the characteristics of this phenomenon. The researchers demonstrated that this process is analogous to marte
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop a reliable forward error correction method for digital dataScientists of Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have proposed a new channel coding method for the fifth generation of wireless systems (5G).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forensic chemist can now predict age of bloodstains up to two yearsIgor Lednev is adding yet another capability to his patented laser technology, a development that could soon help law enforcement catch criminals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing the color of laser light on the femtosecond time scaleHow can the color of laser light be changed? One popular method to achieve this is the so-called second harmonic generation (SHG) effect, which doubles the frequency of light and hence changes its color. However, observing this nonlinear effect requires a polar crystal in which inversion symmetry is broken. For this reason, identifying crystals that can elicit strong SHG is an important research t
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Gizmodo
I Want This 1923 Prediction For the American City of the Future To Be Real Excerpt from a 1923 illustration showing the American city of the future (Science and Invention/Novak Archive) When the world is descending into chaos, it can be hard to believe that optimistic visions of the future are within our reach. But personally, I think I’ve hit that point where escapist fantasy worlds of tomorrow are the only thing that can ease the stresses of our modern world. This 192
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Dagens Medicin
Stærke kræfter bag ny cannabisforening Den nye forening Cannabis Danmark vil støtte forskning og levere information om cannabis til medicinsk brug.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: As Female Elk Age, They Learn to Evade HuntersOlder female elk are able to adjust their behavior and adopt more stealth strategies through life, scientists found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of human blood cell destinies revises knowledge of immune cell developmentImmune cells protect the host from infection by pathogens. They include monocytes, which are large white blood cells that can differentiate into scavenger cells macrophages and dendritic cells in response to inflammatory signals. Monocytes are derived from blood stem cells in the bone marrow via an intermediate cell type, the progenitor cell, which is slightly more differentiated than stem cells.
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The Atlantic
Republicans Are a Majority Without a Mandate Step back from the daily headlines of the Trump administration. After almost 6 months under President Trump and the 115th Congress, the United States is in a strange position: Republicans enjoy a decisive partisan advantage, controlling the White House, the Senate, and the House of Representatives. Yet GOP officials have no mandate to govern. (And neither, of course, do Democrats.) The country is
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The Atlantic
What We Talk About When We Talk About ‘Unruly’ Women When Jeremy Bentham created the Panopticon, his prison of constant surveillance, in the late 18th century, he envisioned his design to be a building: circular in shape, layered like an especially unsavory cake, a structure that ensured that, at any moment, inmates could be observed—and could be, as well, observers. Bentham named his design after Panoptes, the Greek giant who had 100 eyes. Related
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The Atlantic
The End of Diesel Once upon a time, diesel fuel was going to be the future. It was seen as more efficient, on a mileage-per-gallon basis, than other fossil fuels, and for that reason was also thought to be less polluting. About two decades ago, acting on those beliefs, policy makers in Europe—where high energy prices already made mileage a more-pressing issue than in the U.S.—made a number of rules that incentiviz
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CTA prototype telescope, ASTRI, achieves first lightDuring the nights of 25 and 26 May, the camera of the ASTRI telescope prototype recorded its first ever Cherenkov light while undergoing testing at the astronomical site of Serra La Nave (Mount Etna) in Sicily managed by INAF-Catania. This comes not long after its optical validation was achieved in November 2016. This accomplishment was the first optical demonstration for astronomical telescopes u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Octopus inspired adhesive patch works under waterA team of researchers at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea has developed a type of adhesive patch that works under a variety of conditions including underwater. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they studied octopus suction cups to design a better patch for human applications.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Air pollution plan 'unfair' on local authoritiesSolving air pollution is a national not a local issue, says the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health.
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Dagens Medicin
Erfaren læge bliver ny enhedschef i Sundhedsstyrelsen Ledende overlæge Henrik Stig Jørgensen bliver ny enhedschef i Sundhedsstyrelsens enhed for evidens, uddannelse og beredskab (EUB).
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Ingeniøren
Sundhedsplatformen: Indkøringsbøvl smuldrer milliongevinst væk Omfanget af patientbehandlinger i Region H falder som følge af en omstændelig indførelse af Sundhedsplatformen. Faldet spiser nu af de økonomiske gevinster, som var forventet med det nye it-system. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsplatformen-forventet-milliongevinst-smuldrer-vaek-1077542 Version2
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Widespread snowmelt in West Antarctica during unusually warm summerAn area of West Antarctica more than twice the size of California partially melted in 2016 when warm winds forced by an especially strong El Nino blew over the continent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists report large-scale surface melting event in Antarctica during 2015-16 El NiñoThe West Antarctic Ice Sheet, a landbound mass of ice larger than Mexico, experienced substantial surface melt through the austral summer of 2015-2016 during one of the largest El Niño events of the past 50 years, according to scientists who had been conducting the first comprehensive atmospheric measurements in the region since the 1960s.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water management interventions push scarcity downstreamHuman interventions to harness water resources, such as reservoirs, dams, and irrigation measures, have increased water availability for much of the global population, but at the same time, swept water scarcity problems downstream.
5h
Viden
Overgangsalderen giver kvinder større risiko for slidgigtHormonbehandling kan være løsningen, når kvinder får slidgigt og lændesmerter i overgangsalderen.
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Dagens Medicin
Hjemmeside skal hjælpe kræftpatienter til at mestre livetHospitaler i Region Midt udvikler med hjælp fra patienter og pårørende et nyt redskab til kræftpatienter.
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Ingeniøren
Plast i kosmetik kan erstattes af mikroperler af celluloseBionedbrydelige mikrokugler produceret af restprodukter fra f.eks. papirindustrien kan være et alternativ til at undgå plastforurening fra sæbeprodukter.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In 1967, researchers saw the light in jaundice treatmentResearchers discovered how to use light to treat babies with jaundice 50 years ago. But questions remain about the technique’s effectiveness in some cases.
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The Atlantic
The GOP's Risky Calculation for 2018 Scandals have typically operated as a cloud over a president’s agenda. But the Russia-related legal challenges swirling around President Trump are functioning more like a cloak for his joint agenda with congressional Republicans. That difference captures the GOP’s decision to govern in a manner aimed almost entirely at stoking their hard-core base—a critical calculation that could determine their
5h
The Atlantic
Quit Social Media Every Other Day Okay, not quit . Go without. I’d say cleanse if the word hadn’t been corrupted by the less wholesome sides of the weight-loss and wellness industries. There are expensive multi-day digital detox programs that a person can go through, but I’m not sure they’re necessary, or likely to lead long-term results. I care about results. One of the few evidence-based, trendy approaches to losing weight righ
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks mest magtfulde læger: Rudkøbing ånder nu Brostrøm i nakken Lægeforeningens formand Andreas Rudkjøbing har nu mere magt end Region Hovedstadens koncerndirektør Svend Hartling, vurderer Dagens Medicins magtpanel og ligger lige under Sundhedsstyrelsens direktør Søren Brostrøm.
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Ingeniøren
Hollandsk flyekspert: Batterierne er stadig for tunge til rene elflySERIE: El er på vej ind i flyindustrien. Men før det virkelig rykker, skal batterikapaciteten tredobles. De første hybridfly til kommerciel luftfart vil sandsynligvis komme i luften i 2035.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gender, race & class: Language change in post-apartheid South AfricaA new study of language and social change in post-apartheid South Africa demonstrates that gender is a more powerful determinant than class among black university students. The study "Class, gender, and substrate erasure in sociolinguistic change: A sociophonetic study of schwa in deracializing South African English", by Rajend Mesthrie (University of Cape Town) will be published in the June, 2017
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chemical method could revolutionize grapheneUniversity of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics.
6h
Ingeniøren
Siemens vil kopiere Apple med IoT-cloudMed cloud-løsningen Mind­sphere tager Siemens endnu et skridt mod at blive leverandør af digitale tjenester. Virksomheden er ligesom resten af industrien midt i en gevaldig ­migrationsfase, lyder det fra den danske salgsdirektør.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapyCells in nearly any part of the body can become cancerous and transform into tumors. Some, like skin cancer, are relatively accessible to treatment via surgery or radiation, which minimizes damage to healthy cells; others, like pancreatic cancer, are deep in the body and can only be reached by flooding the bloodstream with cell-killing chemotherapies that, ideally, shrink tumors by accumulating in
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers call for better quality and consistency of electronic health record studiesWe need improved quality of recording asthma diagnosis and events if the UK is to effectively use the very considerable potential locked within electronic health records to promote improvements in asthma care and catalyze research.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Airlander 10: World's longest aircraft hits highest altitudeThe world's longest aircraft reached its highest altitude on its fourth test flight.
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Dagens Medicin
Danske patienter afprøver ny vaccine mod knoglemarvskræftHerlev Hospital har indrulleret de første 10 patienter, der skal afprøve en vaccine mod knoglemarvskræft.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sex-specific cardiovascular drug dosages needed to reduce adverse reactions in womenSex-specific cardiovascular drug dosages are needed to reduce adverse reactions in women, according to a position paper from the European Society of Cardiology published today in the June issue of European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy.
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Science | The Guardian
Obese women more likely to have babies with serious birth defects, says study Increased risk of health problems including heart defects, digestive anomalies and malformations of genitals or limbs revealed by major study Women who are obese when they conceive are more likely to have a baby with serious birth defects, a major study has found. The research revealed a sliding scale of risk for health problems including congenital heart defects, anomalies of the digestive syste
9h
Gizmodo
The Xbox Has Brand New Avatars GIF Remember Microsoft’s Avatars, those wobbly caricatures that danced around the Xbox 360's dashboard? They’ve been sidelined ever since the release of the Xbox One, but that doesn’t mean the company has given up on them. They’re being overhauled in the Fall, given not just a new look, but loads of new features as well, from the ability to ride vehicles to colour wheels that let you customise yo
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapyCell-killing chemotherapies are designed to shrink cancerous tumors by accumulating in their ill-formed blood and lymph vessels, delivering a toxic dose to the cancer cells. A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute has developed a new drug delivery platform that uses safe, low-energy ultrasound waves to trigger aggregates of chemotherapy-containing nanoparticles to break apart precisely at tumo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transgender actors effective in teaching new doctors to provide respectful careBy acting out scenarios commonly seen in the clinic, real-life transgender actors can help residents learn to provide more sensitive care to people with a different gender identity than the one they were assigned at birth. This is the main finding of a study published online June 15 in the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumor PD-L2 expression may predict patient response to anti-PD-1 immunotherapyPD-L2 protein expression in human tumors was associated with clinical response to pembrolizumab (Keytruda), an anti-PD-1 immunotherapy, independent of PD-L1 expression, in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VHA initiative significantly reduces MRSA in veterans living centersAn initiative led by the Veterans Health Administration reduced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections by 89 percent over four years in a Veterans community living center in North Carolina, according to research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review: No definitive standard for identifying and treating veterans at risk for suicideA systematic review of basic and clinical science research has revealed no definitive standard for detecting military veterans at risk of suicidal behavior, nor is there a clear standard of treatment to prevent suicide among US veterans. The review comes at a time of increasing public attention to the high rate of suicide among veterans -- roughly 20 a day, according to the VA.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gender, race & class: Language change in post-apartheid South AfricaA new study of language and social change in post-apartheid South Africa demonstrates that gender is a more powerful determinant than class among black university students. The study 'Class, gender, and substrate erasure in sociolinguistic change: A sociophonetic study of schwa in deracializing South African English', by Rajend Mesthrie (University of Cape Town) will be published in the June, 2017
10h
Ingeniøren
Nu skal tyskerne åbne elkabler for dansk el-eksportDe danske og tyske energiministerier har aftalt, at elforbindelsen mellem Danmark og Tyskland gradvis skal åbnes for sydgående trafik. Det vil blandt andet mindske timerne med negative elpriser i Vestdanmark
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Baby Genome Sequencing for Sale in ChinaChinese parents can now decode the genomes of their healthy newborns, revealing disease risks as well as the likelihood of physical traits like male-pattern baldness.
10h
Live Science
Trying to Conceive: 12 Tips for WomenFor a woman trying to get pregnant, there are a number of ways to increase the chances and make it more likely that she will conceive a child.
10h
Live Science
Mesa Verde: Cliff Dwellings of the AnasaziA society of pueblo people built entire villages in the sides of cliffs in southwestern Colorado.
10h
Ingeniøren
Forfremmet: Tre fatale fejl mange begår Mange begår tre typiske fejl, når de stiger op ad karrierestigen. Sådan undgår du at falde i forfremmelsesfælden. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/forfremmet-tre-fatale-fejl-mange-begaar-8632 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
Gizmodo
The Pentagon's Silicon Valley Outpost Is Bringing "Robotic Wingmen" to the Battlefield Photo: Getty DIUx is an initiative by the Department of Defense that has set up in Silicon Valley to incubate special projects and it’s starting to roll out some fully formed concepts. The latest prototype the program has produced would allow Maverick to fly with a robotic Goose, and it’s totally okay if this wingman dies. The Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DUIx) was founded by former Secr
11h
Gizmodo
A Dating App Reveals Unexpected Cloning Capabilities in Funny Short Swiped Screen grab via YouTube Finding the perfect match should theoretically be easier with apps like Tinder—but there’s always the possibility that the person you see on the screen doesn’t measure up in real life. This gets very awkward in Swiped when one dude’s online match turns out to be someone he already knows. Like, really well. And then it gets even more surreal from there, in this clever look
11h
The Atlantic
Ireland's New Prime Minister Assumes Office Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s first openly gay prime minister and the EU’s youngest national leader, was formally instated on Wednesday, less than two weeks after his election on June 2. Varadkar’s predecessor, Enda Kenny, announced his resignation in May after a 15-year reign as party leader. Both Kenny and Varadkar are members of Fine Gael, a center-right party founded in 1933. Kenny previously nomin
11h
Futurity.org
Super strong 3D-printed structure unfolds when hot Researchers have developed a way to use 3D printers to create objects that expand when heated. They have potential uses in space exploration or medical devices. The new objects use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. The researchers fabricated the struts from shape memory polymers that unfold when heated. “Tensegrity structures are ext
12h
Gizmodo
These Are the Colors that Words Make When Used as Hex Code Image: Gizmodo Hexadecimal format allows us to instruct a computer to display a color using three or six characters. For example, #000 will produce black. But how many words can be created in Hex and what colors do they produce? One intrepid programmer has tackled this problem so that we don’t have to. On their site #COFFEE IS THE COLOR , an unidentified web designer has used an English dictionar
12h
Futurity.org
Dressmakers have way better 3D vision than other pros Dressmakers have better 3D or “stereoscopic” vision than non-dressmaking professionals, a new study suggests. Stereoscopic vision is the brain’s ability to decode the flat 2D optical information received by both eyes to give us the depth of perception needed to thread a needle, catch a ball, park a car, and generally navigate a 3D world. Using computerized perceptual tasks, researchers tested the
13h
Wired
The London Fire and the Enduring Problem of Fighting High-Rise InfernosAt Grenfell Tower in London, firefighters couldn't compartmentalize or suppress the fire. But it's evacuation that still bedevils fire researchers.
13h
Wired
'Elysium' Director Neill Blomkamp is Back, Doing What He Does Best: Being WeirdThe writer-director is launching a new film incubator, and there's plenty more genre oddness on deck.
13h
Ars Technica
Georgia’s lax voting security exposed just in time for crucial special election (credit: Verified Voting ) To understand why many computer scientists and voting rights advocates don't trust the security of many US election systems, consider the experience of Georgia-based researcher Logan Lamb. Last August, after the FBI reported hackers were probing voter registration systems in more than a dozen states, Lamb decided to assess the security of voting systems in his state. Ac
13h
Gizmodo
Batman and Spider-Man Composer Danny Elfman Will Now Score Justice League (UPDATED) The Justice League. Image: Warner Bros. Did you like the superhero music in films like Batman, Batman Returns, Spider-Man, and Spider-Man 2 ? Well, that composer, Danny Elfman, has taken over the duties writing music for Zack Snyder’s Justice League . Elfman came aboard the project just as Joss Whedon began reshoots for the highly anticipated superhero team up film, according to the Hollywood Rep
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood cell discovery identifies patients with aggressive prostate cancerPatients who have aggressive prostate cancer could be identified by a highly accurate and simple blood test, according to an early study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
14h
Wired
Travis Kalanick and the Last Gasp of Tech's Alpha CEOUber's CEO sees a moment of reckoning.
14h
The Atlantic
Senate Approves Russia Sanctions, Limiting Trump's Oversight In an overwhelming vote of 97-2, the U.S. Senate approved a new round of sanctions on Russia in response to the nation’s likely interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as its involvement in the Syrian civil war. The deal also prevents President Trump from loosening or rolling back restrictions on Russia without Congress’s approval, representing one of the most significant GOP
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could broccoli be a secret weapon against diabetes?Concentrated broccoli sprout extract may help type 2 diabetes patients manage their blood sugar, according to a new study.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anti-malaria drugs: Potential new target identifiedA newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug-resistant malaria parasites. The protein regulates a number of genes involved with a critical part of the parasite's complex life cycle -- its invasion of a person's red blood cells. Now that the researchers know the protein's role in this invasion process, they have a completely new angle for developing new antimalarial dr
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Promising peas' potential in big sky countryChanging over from all wheat to wheat-pea rotations can be uncertain. To help, researchers have been studying how pea genetics interact with the environment to affect crop yields, pea protein and starch content for market demands.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of diffusion and rotation of fullerene moleculeScientists have created a new structure by encapsulating a single layer of fullerene molecules between two graphene sheets. Buckyball sandwiches combine fullerenes and graphene. This structure allows to study the dynamics of the trapped molecules down to atomic resolution using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They report observing diffusion of individual molecules confined in the two-di
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gender dictates camouflage strategy in this newly identified praying mantis groupAdult females and males in a new genus of Latin American praying mantises have sharply different approaches to camouflage. Males retain the stick-like appearance they employ as nymphs, while females morph into a leaf's shape and color.
14h
Gizmodo
Is It Really Time for Apple to Add Wireless Charging to the iPhone? GIF GIF: Gizmodo Wireless charging has struggled for years to gain ground in consumer electronics. For one hot second, it looked like the option would be available in every smartphone, then manufacturers started to bail out, then it started to come back. And now, we have the biggest confirmation yet that Apple is jumping into the game. Has the time finally come? Today, the CEO of Wistron which ha
14h
Gizmodo
The Best USB Travel Charger Is Anker's PowerCore Fusion, According To Our Readers Anker PowerCore Fusion The ability to act as a wall charger and a USB battery pack powered the Anker PowerCore Fusion to a comfortable victory in this week’s travel charger Co-Op . The Fusion is already part of our bestsellers club , and is my personal favorite Anker product ever . If you value size over features, you won’t find many chargers that are smaller than the runner-up Aukey , which garn
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Music sessions can help millions who struggle to speak to lead a richer lifeMusic could be used to transform the lives of millions of people with learning difficulties, dementia, strokes, brain damage and autism and their families, according to a research project from the University of Plymouth and Plymouth Music Zone.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temperature changes make it easier for malaria to climb the Ethiopian highlandsThe highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country's population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas.
15h
The Atlantic
Report: Trump Is Under Investigation for Obstruction of Justice By firing James Comey, President Trump has now provoked the criminal investigation he insisted didn’t exist when he fired him. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is reportedly investigating whether Trump tried to obstruct justice by firing the former FBI director last month, placing the Trump administration in a legally perilous situation less than six months into office. The Washington Post reported
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drop in violence associated with smoke-free policy at psychiatric hospitalNew King's College London research reveals a 39 percent drop in physical assaults -- both between patients and towards staff -- following the introduction of a smoke-free policy at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM).
15h
Gizmodo
An Unknown Tech Company Tried (and Failed) to Stop the NSA's Warrantless Spying Photo: Getty In 2014, a tech company stood up to a National Security Agency demand for user data and challenged the legality of a controversial surveillance law that’s currently being debated in Congress. The anonymous company’s challenge was revealed in new documents released today by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in response to lawsuits by the ACLU and EFF. Although the id
16h
The Scientist RSS
Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing FacesThe brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.
16h
Big Think
This May Be the Oldest Homo Sapiens Ever Found, In a Surprising Place Researchers may have discovered the oldest homo sapiens yet, in Morocco. Read More
16h
The Atlantic
A Deadly Car Bombing in Somalia At least 17 people have been killed and 20 held hostage Wednesday in an attack claimed by Islamist militant group al-Shabaab on a popular restaurant in Mogadishu. The attack began Wednesday evening local time after a car bomb was detonated outside Pizza House, a popular restaurant in the Somali capital. At least nine people were killed and several others wounded in the explosion. The Associated P
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: 'An Injury in the Family' What We’re Following Shots Fired: House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was among five people shot during a Republican congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, marking the first shooting that’s targeted a federal legislator in six years . President Trump praised Capitol Police officers for intervening in the attack and confirmed that the gunman, who law enforcement identified as 66-ye
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘An Attack on One of Us Is an Attack on All of Us’ Today in 5 Lines President Trump called for national unity after a gunman attacked a GOP congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia. The gunman, identified as James Hodgkinson , shot five people, including Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who hospital officials said remains in critical condition . Members of Congress convened on the House floor, where Speaker Paul Ryan condemned the shoo
16h
Live Science
Demi Moore's Missing Teeth: Can Stress Really Make Teeth Fall Out?Actress Demi Moore's smile looked a little different recently — she lost her two front teeth, a problem she says was the result of stress.
16h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Will His Son Make Keith Colburn A Proud Captain? | Deadliest Catch #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Caelan Colburn steps up his greenhorn duties on the Wizard as his proud while his dad the cautious captain watches. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Step ab
16h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Facial recognition changes a wasp’s brainA new study maps genes at play in a paper wasp’s brain during facial recognition.
16h
Wired
Sony, Microsoft, Nintendo, Listen: It's Time For the E3 Press Conference to DieThe tradeshow might still have value, but the publishers' dog and pony shows do more harm than good.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key to muscle regeneration discoveredThe nuclear receptor REV-ERB plays a key role in muscle regeneration, suggesting the receptor may be a good target for new drugs to treat a variety of muscle disorders and injuries.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana use among college students on rise following Oregon legalization, study findsCollege students attending an Oregon university are using more marijuana now that the drug is legal for recreational use, but the increase is largely among students who also report recent heavy use of alcohol, a new study has found.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Indoor tanning still accessible to young people -- despite bansDespite legislation prohibiting the use of ultraviolet (UV) indoor tanning facilities by minors, one in every five tanning salons in US states where such bans are in place stated over the phone that they would allow an underaged caller to do so. Many others provide inaccurate health information about indoor tanning.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resistance to targeted therapy in mantle cell lymphomaA team of cancer researchers have published research looking at the underlying mechanisms of resistance to the drug, Ibrutinib, which is used to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
16h
Big Think
The Human Brain Can Think in 11 Dimensions, Discover Scientists Groundbreaking research finds that the human brain creates multiverse-like neural structures. Read More
16h
Ars Technica
Michigan health director, 4 others charged with manslaughter over Flint water Enlarge / Posters above water fountains warn against drinking the water at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Michigan. (credit: Getty | JIM WATSON ) Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette charged five public officials with involuntary manslaughter on Wednesday in connection to the ongoing Flint water crisis. Those charged include the state’s director of Health and Human Services, Nick Lyo
17h
The Scientist RSS
Flycatchers Song Preference Linked to GenesThe birds learn the songs of their conspecifics even when raised by another species.
17h
Wired
2017 Has Been Terrible for Uber—and Great for LyftWhile Uber fights fires and loses CEO Travis Kalanick, Lyft is picking up riders and getting ready for the age of autonomous driving.
17h
Gizmodo
118-Year-Old Painting Found in Antarctica Was Hidden By Penguin Shit Image: Antarctic Heritage Fund Fantastic news: the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust has recovered a 118-year-old watercolor painting from famed polar explorer, Dr. Edward Wilson. The painting was almost perfectly preserved, but hidden among dust, mold, and penguin shit. Apparently, penguins can’t be bothered with fine art. Antarctic Heritage Trust paper conservator Josefin Bergmark-Jimenez fo
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brazilian carnivorous mammal-like reptile fossil may be new Aleodon speciesSome Late Triassic Brazilian fossils of mammal-like reptiles, previously identified as Chiniquodon, may in fact be the first Aleodon specimens found outside Africa.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein network signals found to drive myeloid leukemiasResearchers have uncovered how mutations in a protein network drive several high-risk leukemias, offering new prospects for novel therapies. An existing drug might be repurposed to treat these leukemias, and the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms at work may offer clues to other drugs yet to be developed.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New face-aging technique could boost search for missing peopleResearchers have developed a method of aging facial images that could enhance the search for long-term missing people worldwide.
17h
Gizmodo
Disarm All Domestic Abusers Now Image: AP The man who used a military-style rifle to shoot and injure a sitting member of Congress, two police officers, a congressional aide, and a lobbyist on Wednesday morning was named James T. Hodgkinson. Soon after this information was made public, journalists began the familiar task of puzzling out who he was and how he could do what he did. We learned that Hodgkinson was 66 years old. He
17h
Ars Technica
Who had the best E3 press conference? Ars decides (video link) Before E3 even got started yesterday, we felt like we had already been through an entire show in and of itself. Press conferences and livestreams from the console makers at Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo set the agenda for what we'll see on the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Switch in the coming year. Splashy events from publishers like EA, Bethesda, Ubisoft, and Devolver Digital highli
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chemical method could revolutionize grapheneUniversity of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA researchers find physicians' adherence to H. pylori guidelines lowIt was long thought that gastric ulcers and other digestive woes were brought about by stress. But in 2005, clinical fellow Barry J. Marshall and pathologist J. Robin Warren were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for recognizing the role of Helicobacter pylori in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Now physicians can point their collective fingers at H. pylori when it comes to a ho
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amazonia's future will be jeopardized by damsThe hundreds of hydroelectric dams proposed for the Amazon River Basin will cause massive environmental damage all the way from the eastern slopes of the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean. About one-third of the 428 dams are built or are under construction. The environmental effects will ramify throughout the river system and beyond. The largest river system on Earth, the Amazon River and its watershed
17h
Gizmodo
Why Do Sick Bodies Turn Poop Into Diarrhea? Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum/ Pogrebnoj-Alexandroff / katoisi /Wikimedia Commons Despite thousands of years of pant-crapping history, there’s a surprising amount we don’t know about diarrhea. There’s a couple ways we’ve figured out how to treat the symptom. But lots of scientists’ understanding of diarrhea—from illnesses like traveler’s diarrhea—is more based on intuition than data. An international
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots roll out to help stop oil spillsIt's a dirty job, but somebody's got to do it. And when it comes to the expensive, claustrophobic and sometimes dangerous work of inspecting natural gas and oil pipelines, that somebody might be a robot.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Tim Cook: Apple Isn’t Falling Behind, It’s Just Not Ready to Talk About the FutureThe Apple CEO tells us what he thinks about Silicon Valley’s gender problems, President Trump’s policies on the environment and immigration, and why his company gets a bad rap on AI.
17h
Ars Technica
Mini-review: How much faster have high-end iMacs gotten in the last 5 years? Andrew Cunningham Apple seems committed to the Mac Pro and iMac Pro for now, but the company says that its most popular desktops with pro users remains the 27-inch iMac. Unlike phones and tablets, which can still post big performance gains from year to year , desktops age more slowly and gracefully. A typical replacement cycle in many businesses and schools is three or four years, and, as long as
17h
Science : NPR
With Business Argument, Climate Activist Lures Hill Republicans To The Cause With quiet persistence and an eye on economic solutions, businessman turned activist Jay Butera has ushered in a small but truly bipartisan climate caucus on Capitol Hill.
17h
Popular Science
A new wave of gadgets is setting out to secure your smart home Technology But it's not your fault you have to worry about it in the first place Stepping into the fray are companies that sell security products straight to consumers who may want to batten down the hatches on their assortment of internet-connected…
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More amyloid in the brain, more cognitive declineA new study from the Center for Vital Longevity at The University of Texas at Dallas has found that the amount of amyloid plaques in a person's brain predicts the rate at which his or her cognition will decline in the next four years.
17h
Live Science
100-Year-Old Shipwreck Discovered Off California CoastThe U.S. Coast Guard discovered one of its lost ships 100 years after the vessel sank off the coast of California.
17h
Live Science
In Photos: Century-Old Sunken Ship FoundDuring an underwater search off the coast of California, researchers found the wreck a U.S. Coast Guard ship that sank 100 years ago.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US blames North Korea for series of cyberattacksU.S. officials are blaming the North Korean government for a series of cyberattacks dating to 2009 against media, aerospace, financial sectors and infrastructure in the United States and around the world.
17h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Live Q&A: Developing a Research Question Developing a scientific question is an essential first step in doing research. A well-formulated question focuses your research and guides your experimental approach. Join for this live Q&A where panelists will offer practical strategies and advice on developing a research question that is specific, meaningful, and feasible. Panelists will discuss some fundamental characteristics of a good scient
17h
Gizmodo
The Coolest Gaming Gear Shown Off at E3 2017 E3 is here and that means it’s crazy gaming gear time! From Microsoft’s latest Xbox to a tiny Atari 2600, here’s the coolest stuff we saw this week. Microsoft Xbox One X The name reveals someone’s love of the letter X, but the console itself is pretty cool. Six months after Sony launched its 4K UHD console, Microsoft is back with its own. It’s only a minor upgrade on last year’s Xbox One S, but t
18h
Gizmodo
The Coolest New Gaming Gear Of E3 2017 E3 isn’t just about new games. It’s also about new headsets, keyboards, mice, controllers, speakers and storage solutions. Let’s take a look at some of the coolest new hardware announced during the show. LucidSound — LS15X Xbox One In-Ear Contour Gaming Headset The LucidSound folks have a bunch of new headsets for E3 , including a couple that work directly with the Xbox One’s wireless technology.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SNMMI Image of the Year: PET and optical imaging for prostate cancer diagnosis and therapyThe winning image, presented by German researchers at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), clearly demonstrates how combining the advantages of 68Ga-PSMA PET and intraoperative gamma and fluorescence imaging results in better tumor identification before and during surgery.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For headache, telemedicine may be as effective as in-person visitFor people with headache, seeing the neurologist by video for treatment may be as effective as an in-person visit, according to a study published in the June 14, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
18h
Popular Science
Lettuce tell you why sexy produce sells better Health Get your chard on. Want people to eat their veggies? Don't make them sound like health food.
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New Scientist - News
5 kilograms of broccoli in a pill slashes diabetics’ blood sugarA concentrated broccoli extract taken daily helps people with type-2 diabetes reduce blood glucose by 10 per cent – lowering their risk of other complications
18h
Live Science
Mom with Rare Blood Disorder Adopts 3 Kids with Same ConditionA Massachusetts mom recently spoke to People magazine about the rare genetic disease that she shares with the three daughters who she adopted from China.
18h
Gizmodo
How Rich Neighbors May Have Factored Into London's Deadly Tower Fire [UPDATED] Photo: Getty Experts and politicians are pointing fingers in an effort to explain what caused the devastating Grenfell Tower fire in London that killed at least 12 and injured dozens more on Wednesday morning. Quite unfortunately, all fingers appear to be pointing in the same direction, at a new aluminum rainscreen cladding installed, in part, to make the building more attractive to wealthy neigh
18h
Gizmodo
X-Men: Dark Phoenix Sets Its Main Cast and Creative Team With One Big New Addition Dark Phoenix is rising in 2018. Image: Marvel Comics All the rumors you’ve heard in the past few months are true. Fox has set Simon Kinberg to make his directorial debut with 2018's X-Men: Dark Phoenix , which will return much of the cast from 2016's X-Men: Apocalypse— and possibly add an Oscar nominee too. The Hollywood Reporter says that Jessica Chastain is in talks to play the villainous Lilan
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Most Popular Miter Saw Is Under $100 Today (Kinja Deals Assumes No Liability) Hitachi 15-Amp 10" Miter Saw , $99 I freely admit that not everybody needs a miter saw. In fact, most people probably shouldn’t own one. But if you’re in the market, Amazon’s top seller is marked down to $99 today , within a few bucks of an all-time low. In addition to the #1 seller designation, the Hitachi C10FCE2 also carries a 4.5 star review average from nearly 1,500 customers, so there’s no
18h
Ars Technica
A spy satellite buzzed the space station this month, and no one knows why Enlarge / SpaceX launches a satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office on May 1. (credit: SpaceX ) About six weeks ago, SpaceX launched a spy satellite into low Earth orbit from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. As is normal for National Reconnaissance Office launches, not much information was divulged about the satellite's final orbit or its specific purpose in space. Howe
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Forget AlphaGo—DeepMind Has a More Interesting Step Toward General AIResearchers are testing algorithms that display human-like ingenuity in learning.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hidden immune cells cause lung transplant failureScientists have discovered that a subset of immune cells called nonclassical monocytes, previously unknown to reside in the lungs, play a key role in driving primary graft dysfunction (PGD), the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. The study demonstrates targeting these cells could lead to novel treatments for PGD, a complication that currently impacts more than half of transplant pa
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool helps pick puppies most suited to guide dog trainingAnimal behaviour experts at the University of Nottingham have developed a new tool which can be used to predict a young dog's likelihood of successfully completing guide dog training.
18h
Live Science
Broccoli Compound Could Help Treat Type 2 DiabetesA compound found in broccoli could hold the key to slowing type 2 diabetes, researchers say.
18h
The Atlantic
The Grenfell Tower Fire and London's Public-Housing Crisis A terrifying scene unfolded in London early Wednesday morning when a 24-floor public housing tower went up in flames. Home to around 600 people, West London’s Grenfell Tower was the site of a fire that spread quickly to other floors, causing at least six fatalities so far, with that number expected to rise. Twenty-four residents are also in critical condition, injured while struggling to protect
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Organ Chips get smart and go electricNew solutions to chip design have been introduced by fitting Organ Chips with embedded electrodes that enable accurate and continuous monitoring of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a broadly used measure of tissue health and differentiation, and real-time assessment of electrical activity of living cells, as demonstrated in a Heart Chip model.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study looks at needles in treatment for shoulder painAccording to a new study, the type of procedure used to treat shoulder calcifications should be tailored to the type of calcification. The results of the study will help interventional radiologists determine whether to use one or two needles for an ultrasound-guided treatment for a common condition called rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.
18h
Wired
Everyone Donald Trump Has Blocked on Twitter: A Running ListAs President Trump continues to tune out his constituents, we'll keep a running tally of who he blocks—and why.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multispectral imaging reveals ancient Hebrew inscription undetected for over 50 yearsUsing advanced imaging technology, Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered a hitherto invisible inscription on the back of a pottery shard that has been on display at The Israel Museum for more than 50 years.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular pilot light prepares body's heating system for the coldResearchers detail a molecule that acts as a molecular pilot light required to turn on the brown fat furnace. Brown fat burns sugar and fat to produce radiant heat in the body. These cells are of interest because some of the sugar and fat they burn is stored in the body and might otherwise lead to increases in white fat, the form that increases in obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydroelectric dams may jeopardize the Amazon's futureHundreds of built and proposed hydroelectric dams may significantly harm life in and around the Amazon by trapping the flow of rich nutrients and modifying the climate from Central America to the Gulf of Mexico, experts report.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
State medical licensing boards' practices may hurt physician mental healthState medical boards ask physicians much more extensive and intrusive questions about mental health conditions than for physical health conditions, suggests new research. Despite national concern about physician suicide and well-being, research shows that even if physicians struggle with depression, they are reluctant to disclose and seek treatment because it could have serious consequences when t
18h
Ars Technica
Konami reportedly blacklisting ex-employees across Japanese video game industry Enlarge / Video game designer Hideo Kojima (left) speaks at the Tribeca Games Festival during Tribeca Film Festival at Spring Studios on April 29, 2017 in New York City. (credit: Ben Gabbe / Getty Images News ) According to a Wednesday report in the Nikkei Asian Review newspaper, Konami is apparently blacklisting former employees in the Japanese video game industry. The company is particularly ta
18h
The Atlantic
The 'Staggering Loss of Life' in the Fight Against ISIS At least 300 people have been killed in the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, ISIS’s de-facto capital, since March in what UN war-crimes investigators have called a “staggering loss of civilian life.” The surge in fatalities coincides with intensified airstrikes by the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a group of U.S.-backed Arab and Kurdish fighters, against the Islamic State in Raqqa. The SDF launch
18h
cognitive science
Gut Brain Connection | Does Your Gut Hold the Key to Better Brain Health? submitted by /u/LizMeyers [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statins may not be used for protection against Parkinson's diseaseUse of statins may speed up the onset of Parkinson's disease symptoms in people who are susceptible to the disease, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The future of our cities: Engineers test resilient, intelligent infrastructureEngineers tested several advanced sensors that can collectively measure strain, temperature, movement and leakage – installed along a 40-foot section of a hazard-resilient pipeline being tested for earthquake fault-rupture performance. The results could have huge consequences for urban planners and municipal leaders.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria from cystic fibrosis patient could help thwart antibiotic-resistant TBThe number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic -- produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient -- could help fight these infections. Lab testing shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Purposeful leaders' are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study findsPeople are happier and more productive when their leaders show strong morals, a clear vision and commitment to stakeholders, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gluten-free beer from Witkop teff grainsFor celiac patients and others on gluten-free diets, it seems like gluten is everywhere -- cakes, cookies and breads. It's even in most beers. But now, a team reports that beers made with Witkop teff grains may be a good alternative to traditionally brewed barley beers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New class drug significantly reduces spine fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosisIn postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, 12 months treatment with romosozumab was associated with rapid and large reductions in their risk of a vertebral fracture compared to placebo, research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Previous bacterial infection increases risk of newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndromeA link between newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome and previous infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria has been identified by a team of researchers.
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Big Think
Decline in Teen Mental Health Contributed to Late Night Stimulation Over 1,100 teens in Australia exhibited low self-esteem and aggressive behavior linked to late-night phone and social media usage. Read More
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Facebook gives bots ability to negotiate, compromiseFacebook's artificial intelligence researchers announced Wednesday they had broken new ground by giving automated programs or "bots" the ability to negotiate, and make compromises.
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Brazilian carnivorous mammal-like reptile fossil may be new Aleodon speciesSome Late Triassic Brazilian fossils of mammal-like reptiles, previously identified as Chiniquodon, may in fact be the first Aleodon specimens found outside Africa, according to a study published June 14, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Agustín Martinelli from the Universidade Federal of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and colleagues.
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Gizmodo
Particle Physics Might Make Your Raw Milk Safer to Drink Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum/ US DOE / Renee Comet / Keith Weller /Wikimedia Commons There are a vocal minority of folks who simply don’t want to drink pasteurized milk. Maybe they’re worried about the nutritional content, or not getting the good bacteria they need. Sure, they’re potentially subjecting themselves to tuberculosis or a Listeria infection, but it’s still a vocal group. One team of rese
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The Atlantic
The Blurry Line Between Violent Talk and Violent Action Now it’s the GOP’s turn. “I can only hope that the Democrats do tone down the rhetoric,” said New York Republican Congressman Chris Collins after the shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and five others at an Alexandria, Virginia baseball field. “The rhetoric has been outrageous—the finger-pointing, just the tone and the angst and the anger directed at Donald Trump, his supporters. Reall
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Ars Technica
As Republicans push ringless voicemail spam, Democrats take consumers’ side Enlarge / Democrats vs. Republicans. (credit: Getty Images | Linda Braucht ) US Senate Democrats today asked the Federal Communications Commission to protect consumers from ringless voicemails, which let robocallers leave voicemails without ringing your phone. The Republican National Committee (RNC), which is already using ringless voicemails, recently asked the FCC to approve a petition filed by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Older and wiser: Female elk learn to avoid hunters as they ageFemale elk adapt their behaviour to avoid hunters as they get older, new UAlberta research reveals.
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Gizmodo
A 15-Piece Orchestra Played Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger Than Daft Punk Themselves GIF When you see a 15-piece orchestra full of trumpets, violins, and cellos, you’re probably expecting to hear a little Chopin, or Mozart. But the Rundfunk-Tanzorchester Ehrenfeld (or Radio Dance Orchestra of Ehrenfeld, in english) plays a near perfect rendition of Daft Punk’s Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger in this delightful clip. And if you’re wondering what that keyboard player was drinking
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Number of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains DoubledScientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.
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ProteinSimple: Protein Characterization Made EasyMeet Wes...
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Ars Technica
Quantum principle harnessed to create easier wireless charging Enlarge / The developers of a new wireless charging tech are thinking big—automobile battery big. (credit: Oak Ridge National Lab ) Anyone who has ever left the house without remembering to charge their cellphone can appreciate the concept of wireless power transfer. All you would have to do is remember to drop your phone on your desk, and a wireless charging mat would ensure that it has a full b
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Gizmodo
Everest's Most Iconic Pitch, The Hillary Step, Is Gone Photo: Tashi Sherpa/ AP Climbing Mt. Everest is an arduous grind that requires months of training and the ability to function at the most inhospitable elevations our planet has to offer, but the suite of technical challenges it presents are not as difficult as nearby peaks of comparable height. It’s not, well, a hike exactly, it just doesn’t require the sort of classical mountaineering skills tha
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Viden
100 mio. år gammel fugleunge fundet i ravklumpEt internationalt forskerhold opdagede den meget velbevarede fugl i en klump burmesisk rav.
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Marimba-Playing Robot Invents Surprisingly Nice TunesWith influences including Beethoven, the Beatles, Lady Gaga, and Miles Davis, its creations combine classical and jazz.
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Popular Science
How a female-only line of salamanders 'steals' genes from unsuspecting males Animals Kleptogenesis gets a little less mysterious in a new study. What the heck is kleptogenesis? Read on.
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Big Think
Certain Genes Drive Our Ability to Read Others Emotions by Looking into Their Eyes Staring into another person’s eyes for 4 minutes increases intimacy. Now we know which genes might play a role. Read More
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Antibiotic design strategy boosts odds against resistance developmentA new rational drug design technique that uses a powerful computer algorithm to identify molecules that target different receptor sites on key cellular proteins could provide a new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistance, potentially tipping the odds against the bugs.
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Older and wiser: Female elk can learn to avoid hunters with ageAs female elk get older, they adopt strategies for avoiding hunters in Canada, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experimental cancer drug shows promiseThe drug, geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor GGTI-2418 suppresses a new defective PTEN cancer pathway, researchers have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global health experts say elimination of hepatitis C in the US is possible: How do we make it happen?With a growing consensus in the global health community that Hepatitis C (HCV) could be eliminated, a new report highlights a key missing element needed to achieving complete elimination — adequate surveillance and monitoring — and explains how modest investments would improve lives and save money.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chaotically magnetized cloud is no place to build a star, or is it?Astronomers have discovered a surprisingly weak and wildly disorganized magnetic field very near a newly emerging protostar. These observations suggest that the impact of magnetic fields on star formation is more complex than previously thought.
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The Atlantic
Obama Conserved 1.3 Million Acres in Utah—Can Trump Undo That? In the final days of 2016, President Barack Obama made a final addition to the conserved lands of the United States. He brought Bears Ears National Monument into existence, designating a new federally protected area of more than 1.3 million acres in southeast Utah. The park, Obama said, was chosen not only for its beauty—his proclamation spoke of “deep sandstone canyons, desert mesas, and meadow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool helps pick puppies most suited to guide dog trainingAnimal behavior experts at the University of Nottingham have developed a new tool which can be used to predict a young dog's likelihood of successfully completing guide dog training.
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Multispectral imaging reveals ancient Hebrew inscription undetected for over 50 yearsUsing advanced imaging technology, Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered a hitherto invisible inscription on the back of a pottery shard dating from 600 BCE that has been on display at The Israel Museum for more than 50 years.
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Reckless behavior fuels ongoing stress for some with PTSDVeterans Affairs researchers found that for those with posttraumatic stress disorder, risky and harmful behaviors could lead to more trauma and, in turn, worse PSTD symptoms over time.
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Marijuana use among college students on rise following Oregon legalization, study findsCollege students attending an Oregon university are using more marijuana now that the drug is legal for recreational use, but the increase is largely among students who also report recent heavy use of alcohol, a new study has found.
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Physicists and medics discover new ability of immune cellsBeing able to quiet active neutrophils with a dual-beam laser could lead to new treatments for lung injury.
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SLU researchers find key to muscle regenerationThe nuclear receptor REV-ERB plays a key role in muscle regeneration, suggesting the receptor may be a good target for new drugs to treat a variety of muscle disorders and injuries.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Tour Venice with a Virtual Time MachineA thousand years of Venetian records, maps and images could digitally reconstruct this city's deep history, giving researchers insight into urban life, from disease patterns to trade... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EU's Juncker says no Paris climate deal renegotiationEuropean Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker on Wednesday rejected US President Donald Trump's suggestion that the Paris climate pact could be renegotiated.
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Live Science
'Wired' Roads Could Power Electric Cars As You DriveA new wireless power system could help people avoid the inevitable jumbled mess of tangled cords and offer a more efficient way to charge electric vehicles on the go.
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Futurity.org
Tiny teeth suggest ancient otters trekked cross country Discovery of an ancient jawbone on a dig in central Mexico suggests that otters began a migration across America around 6 million years ago. “I thought it was a badger,” says Jack Tseng, , assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences at the University at Buffalo, “but a colleague on the site had just finished a study of otters, and he said it was sea otter-like. But what would a sea o
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Statins may not be used for protection against Parkinson's diseaseUse of statins may speed up the onset of Parkinson's disease symptoms in people who are susceptible to the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
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Japan kicks off Pacific whaling campaignJapan on Wednesday kicked off a whaling campaign in the northwestern Pacific, in a move sure to anger animal rights activists and others calling for an end to the hunts.
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Eyes in the sky reveal extent of gray seal recoveryUsing research drones, thermal cameras and free images from Google Earth, two studies confirm that gray seals are making a comeback off the New England and eastern Canadian coasts. The findings help confirm that seal conservation efforts are working, and that these remote eye-in-the sky technologies make it easier and safer for scientists to study migratory wildlife in remote locations and estimat
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Dressmakers found to have needle-sharp 3-D visionHaute couture can be credited for enhancing more than catwalks and red carpets. New research suggests that the 3D or 'stereoscopic' vision of dressmakers is as sharp as their needles.
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Using light to reach higher precision in cell mechanic researchScientists use optogenetics and mathematical modelling to identify a central molecule in cell mechanics
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Researchers refine yardstick for measuring schoolsA new study has developed a novel way of evaluating and improving VAMs. By taking data from Boston schools with admissions lotteries, the scholars have used the random assignment of students to schools to see how similar groups of students fare in different classroom settings.
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The Atlantic
Bob Dylan Cheats Again? “Bob is not authentic at all,” Joni Mitchell told The Los Angeles Times in 2010, referring, of course, to Bob Dylan. “He’s a plagiarist, and his name and voice are fake. Everything about Bob is a deception.” Mitchell was giving a particularly acidic summary of what’s become conventional wisdom about the great boomer bard. A gentler term often used about Dylan’s relationship to originality is “mag
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The Atlantic
The Senate's Secrecy Over Health Care Was Decades in the Making Congress struggling to finish a huge budget reconciliation bill. A GOP president pushing a major overhaul of federal payments for health insurance that could transform the lives of sick patients. Sound familiar? The year was actually 1986. I was a rookie health reporter on Capitol Hill and watched a Medicare bill move from introduction, to hearings, to votes in subcommittees, to full committees,
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The Atlantic
Winners of the Red Bull Illume Photo Contest 2016 The winners have been announced in the 4th edition of the Red Bull Illume Image Quest photo competition. The contest invited photographers to submit images of the world of action and adventure sports in one of 10 categories, including Energy, Playground, Sequence, and Enhance (where digital manipulation is allowed). This year the competition received more than 34,500 entries by 5,646 photographer
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Science : NPR
Medicaid Cuts In Wisconsin Would Undermine Training For Adults With Disabilities Job-coaching and other support services that enable many adults to live in the community instead of institutions will likely be curtailed if the GOP plan to shrink Medicaid becomes law. (Image credit: Sara Stathas for NPR)
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Ars Technica
In March, wind and solar generated a record 10% of US electricity Enlarge / The large Barren Ridge solar panel array near Mojave, California. (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images ) According to the Energy Information Administration’s Electric Power Monthly , a bit more than 10 percent of all electricity generated in the US in March came from wind and solar power (including both distributed residential solar panels and utility-scale solar in
20h
Gizmodo
Here's What We Think James Gunn Wants to Retcon in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Guardians of the Galaxy auteur James Gunn is busy writing the third installment in his hit Marvel series, but he’s running into a bit of a roadblock. He’s thinking about retconning an established part of his universe for the next film. We’re pretty sure we know what he wants to change—and while it wouldn’t destroy the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it does raise the question of what it means for the
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Gizmodo
The Village Voice's Liberal Savior Owner Is Trying to Crush its Union Photo: AP When Peter Barbey, a member of one of America’s 50 richest families , bought the Village Voice in 2015 , hopes were high for a financial and cultural revival of the legendary paper. Today, the company’s union negotiations suggest those hopes may have been misplaced. The Voice , founded in 1955, was America’s first real alt-weekly. As alt-weeklies across the country have collapsed over t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canada to teach computer coding starting in kindergartenCanadian schoolchildren will soon start learning computer coding and other digital skills from kindergarten through to high school, the government announced Wednesday.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fetal Immune System Active by Second TrimesterNew understanding may help reveal some causes of miscarriage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wireless charging of moving electric vehicles overcomes major hurdleScientists have developed a way to wirelessly deliver electricity to moving objects, technology that could one day charge electric vehicles and personal devices like medical implants and cell phones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UTI treatment reduces E. coli, may offer alternative to antibioticsUrinary tract infections (UTIs) tend to come back, even when treated. Most UTIs are caused by E. coli that live in the gut and spread to the urinary tract. A new study has found that a molecular decoy can reduce the numbers of UTI-causing bacteria in the gut. With the pool of disease-causing bacteria smaller, the researchers say, the risk of developing a UTI goes down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising new link between inflammation and mental illnessUp to 75 percent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus -- an incurable autoimmune disease commonly known as lupus -- experience neuropsychiatric symptoms. But so far, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying lupus' effects on the brain has remained murky.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioengineered human livers mimic natural developmentResearchers bioengineering human liver tissues uncovered previously unknown networks of genetic-molecular crosstalk that control the organ's developmental processes -- greatly advancing efforts to generate healthy and usable human liver tissue from human pluripotent stem cells. The scientists report that their bioengineered human liver tissues still need additional rounds of molecular fine tuning
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foxconn, assembler of iPhones, eyes Wisconsin for plantA Taiwanese company that assembles Apple's iPhones and other electronics is considering building a plant in Wisconsin that could employ thousands of people and give Gov. Scott Walker a huge political boost as he prepares to run for re-election.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug design strategy boosts the odds against resistance developmentA new rational drug design technique that uses a powerful computer algorithm to identify molecules that target different receptor sites on key cellular proteins could provide a new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistance, potentially tipping the odds against the bugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older and wiser: Female elk learn to avoid hunters as they ageFemale elk adapt their behavior to avoid hunters as they get older, new UAlberta research reveals.'Elk learn to become shy as they get older,' said UAlberta conservation biologist Mark Boyce. 'The magic number is 10. After this age threshold, female elk become almost bulletproof, virtually invulnerable to hunting.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could broccoli be a secret weapon against diabetes?Concentrated broccoli sprout extract may help type 2 diabetes patients manage their blood sugar, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brazilian carnivorous mammal-like reptile fossil may be new Aleodon speciesSome Late Triassic Brazilian fossils of mammal-like reptiles, previously identified as Chiniquodon, may in fact be the first Aleodon specimens found outside Africa, according to a study published June 14, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Agustín Martinelli from the Universidade Federal of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Female elk can learn to avoid hunters with ageAs female elk get older, they adopt strategies for avoiding hunters in Canada, according to a study published June 14, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Henrik Thurfjell from University of Alberta, Canada, and colleagues.
20h
The Scientist RSS
Bright Lights and Bacteria Treat Rats Heart AttacksInjecting photosynthetic microbes into oxygen-starved heart tissue can improve cardiac function in rodents.
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New Scientist - News
Microdosers say tiny hits of LSD make your work and life betterPeople are increasingly taking daily, low doses of illegal psychedelic drugs to up their game at work and improve their mood. Will we all be doing it one day?
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New Scientist - News
WHO classes HIV drug as an essential medicinePre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP has been added to the WHO's list of essential medicines, highlighting England's failure to provide the drug to those most at risk
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New Scientist - News
‘Devil weeds’ threaten wildebeest migrations in SerengetiExotic plants escaping from tourist lodges are invading and displacing the grasses on which millions of large, wild animals depend for food in East Africa
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New Scientist - News
Police warned of drug so powerful it can kill in one breathUS law enforcement officials have been warned of the dangers of encountering fentanyl, following the collapse of a police officer who brushed the drug off his shirt
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New Scientist - News
Chatbots learn how to negotiate and drive a hard bargainBots may soon be able to book a holiday for you or help you buy or sell your house
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New Scientist - News
DeepMind’s neural network teaches AI to reason about the worldUnderstanding the relationship between previously unseen objects is a key part of human intelligence, but a new system from DeepMind attempts to give AI the skill
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New Scientist - News
What it’s like to take psychedelics in small doses at breakfastJanet Lai Chang is one of many people experimenting with taking small amounts of psychedelic drugs to improve her mood and performance. She told us about her experience
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New Scientist - News
Wireless charger uses quantum trick to power gadgets on the moveA self-adjusting system uses a concept called parity-time symmetry to still charge your gadget even when it’s moving around
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How bearded dragons switch their sexRNA editing might affect reptile sex determination at temperature extremes.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygenPhotosynthetic bacteria can produce oxygen to keep rat heart muscles healthy after a heart attack.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eyes in the sky reveal extent of gray seal recoveryUsing research drones, thermal cameras and free images from Google Earth, two Duke University-led studies confirm that gray seals are making a comeback off the New England and eastern Canadian coasts.
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Gizmodo
Two-Headed Porpoise Just Wants Love, Validation Last month, a group of Dutch fishermen discovered a double-headed harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) . The unusual little fellow was definitely DOA, and fearing that keeping it would get them in trouble, the fishermen took a few photos of the beast and threw it back in the ocean. What the crew didn’t realize was they’d found the first case of dicephalic parapagus—or partial twinning—in harbor po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental drug co-developed by Moffitt Cancer Center researcher shows promiseThe investigation found that the drug, geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor GGTI-2418 suppresses a new defective PTEN cancer pathway discovered by Pagano's group.
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Futurity.org
Watch: Robot composer performs its own work A four-armed, marimba-playing robot can now write and play its own compositions with aid from artificial intelligence and deep learning. Researchers fed the robot nearly 5,000 complete songs—from Beethoven to the Beatles to Lady Gaga to Miles Davis—and more than 2 million motifs, riffs, and licks of music. Aside from giving the machine a seed, or the first four measures to use as a starting point
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Promising peas' potential in big sky countryFarmers in Montana, and other parts of the Northern Great Plains, are shifting from cereal mono-cropping to a cereal-dry pea cropping system. This transition is not without its share of unknowns, however.
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The Atlantic
Modern Wars Are a Nightmare for the Army's Official Historians When Major Spencer Williams was ordered to “shut down shop and move out” of Afghanistan in 2005, he closed his final message from the field as he always did—quoting a long-dead historian. “Plant yourself not in Europe but in Iraq; it will become evident that half of the roads of the Old World lead to Aleppo, and half to Bagram.” Williams made up one-third of the U.S. Army’s historical field staff
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How brain circuits govern hunger and cravingsBy developing a new approach to imaging and manipulating particular groups of neurons in the mouse brain, scientists have identified a pathway by which neurons that drive hunger influence distant neurons involved in the decision of whether or not to react to food-related cues. Their findings could open the door to targeted therapies that dampen food cue-evoked cravings in people with obesity.
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About 4K Gaming Image: Microsoft You want the very best in 4K gaming, so how do you go about getting it? Unfortunately the answer is not quite as simple as it should be, and all the available choices can be tremendously confusing. So let’s try to cut through all the marketing terms, hype, and numbers to get at what “4K” gaming really means. 4K, which in consumer terms means a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels (
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Gizmodo
Don't Miss These Extremely Rare Deals On Audioengine Speakers Audioengine A2+ Pair , $199 | Audioengine A5+ Pair , $319 Audioengine makes some of the best speakers on the market , and both their A2+ and their larger, louder A5+ models have rare discounts on Amazon today. The A2+ checks in at $199 for a pair, which is about $50 less than usual, while the A5+ are priced at $319 , or $80 off. These would work great as home theater speakers, but the included DA
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Inside Science
Contested National Monuments in Utah House Treasure Troves of Fossils Earth Paleontologists have found incredible dinosaur diversity at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. What could nearby Bears Ears hold? 06/13/2017 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/contested-national-monuments-utah-house-treasure-troves-fossils
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of our cities: Engineers test resilient, intelligent infrastructureLike many of today's household devices, modern infrastructure is gaining the ability to collect and exchange valuable data using wireless devices that monitor the health of buildings and bridges, for example, in real time. But wireless systems for underground infrastructure, such as utility pipelines, are much more difficult to test in the field, especially during rare and extreme events such as e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clean energy stored in electric vehicles to power buildingsStored energy from electric vehicles (EVs) can be used to power large buildings -- creating new possibilities for the future of smart, renewable energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male infertility: Urogenital infection as a possible causeIn couples who have not been able to have children, male infertility is the cause in at least half of cases. In 6-10% the cause is a urogenital infection. The risk of irreversible infertility associated with urogenital infections in men should not be underestimated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Peer-led self-management programs may not help teenagers with asthmaA study suggests peer-led self-management programs have little impact on the quality of life or lung function of adolescents with asthma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make waves with black hole research: Water bath simulationScientists have made a significant leap forward in understanding the workings of one of the mysteries of the universe. They have successfully simulated the conditions around black holes using a specially designed water bath.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Printed sensors monitor tire wear in real timeElectrical engineers have invented a printed sensor made of metallic carbon nanotubes that can monitor the tread of tires in real-time. In its first demonstration, the cheap, simple innovation shows it can measure tire thickness down to the millimeter while surviving the harsh conditions of the interior of a tire.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Universal stabilizationResearchers have developed microparticles with a rough, raspberry-like surface that stabilize emulsions following a new principle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muscle growth finding may assist with cancer treatmentResearchers have developed a therapeutic approach that dramatically promotes the growth of muscle mass, which could potentially prevent muscle wasting in diseases including muscular dystrophy and cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anti-malaria drugs: Potential new target identifiedA newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug-resistant malaria parasites. The protein, the transcription factor PfAP2-I, regulates a number of genes involved with the parasite's invasion of red blood cells, a critical part of the parasite's complex life cycle that could be targeted by new antimalarial drugs. A paper describing the protein PfAP2-I and its role in the i
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Dagens Medicin
Tidlig indsats kan reducere risiko for leddegigt Meta-analyse peger på, at igangsætning af behandling allerede ved tidlige symptomer signifikant kan reducere risikoen for reumatoid artrit blandt præ-reumatoid artrit-patienter.
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Dagens Medicin
Biologisk behandling øger ikke leddegigtpatienters kræftrisiko Leddegigtpatienter med tidligere kræftsygdom, der er i behandling med biologiske lægemidler, har ikke større kræftrisiko end andre leddegigtpatienter, viser svensk studie præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny billedteknik er bedre til at finde tegn på børneleddegigtNy billedteknik er overlegen i forhold til at identificere gigtramte led hos børn med børneleddegigt, viser ny forskning.
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Dagens Medicin
Kvinder kan fortsætte med anti-TNF-medicin under graviditet Ny forskning viser, at anti-TNF-midlet Cimzia ikke kan komme fra moderkagen til fostret under graviditeten. Gigtramte kvinder kan fortsætte deres behandling, selvom de bliver gravide, siger forsker.
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Dagens Medicin
Atypiske mykobakterieinfektioner øger risiko for Sjögrens syndromNy forskning viser en sammenhæng mellem infektioner med atypisk mykobakterie og risikoen for at udvikle Sjögrens syndrom.
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Gizmodo
The Transformers Spinoffs Are Sending Bumblebee to the '80s and Other Robots to Ancient Rome Image: Paramount Yes. You read that right. A movie about Transformers in Ancient Rome. If they do not fight for the entertainment of the masses in the Coliseum, it will be a travesty. Empire has a story out about the writer’s room that has been assembled to keep Paramount in Transformers scripts for centuries to come. Via the Transformers fan site Transformer World 2005 , we now have this informa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why we get diarrheaInvestigators explore the immune mechanism that drives diarrhea, concluding that it plays a critical role in pathogen clearance in the early stages of infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in five hospitalized adults suffer side effects from prescribed antibioticsA study examining the impact of antibiotics prescribed for nearly 1,500 adult patients found that adverse side effects occurred in one-fifth of them, and that nearly one-fifth of those side effects occurred in patients who didn't need antibiotics in the first place.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changing the color of laser light on the femtosecond time scaleUsing femtosecond visible and terahertz (THz) pulses as external perturbations, scientists have investigated the second harmonic generation effect in photoexcited BiCoO3. Driven by the THz pulse, this research highlights the importance of orbital excitation in the Co3+ ion and provides clues for improving the performance of nonlinear optical phenomena in nonlinear crystals on the femtosecond time
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared lightChemists have developed a molecular thermometer. The gemstone ruby served as the source of inspiration.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Eye-opening picture of fetal immune system emerges Human fetuses have an immune system that acts differently from the adult version. Nature 546 335 doi: 10.1038/546335a
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Live Science
Long-Lost 'Faceless' Fish Shows Up Near AustraliaThe "faceless" fish had not been seen near Australia for more than a century.
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Science : NPR
Will Fish Get A Humanely Harvested Label? These Brothers Bet $40 Million On It Beef and poultry get labels designating humane treatment; seafood doesn't. Two fishermen want to change that. Their state-of-the-art ship makes fishing safer for crew and minimizes pain for fish. (Image credit: Courtesy of Blue North)
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Ars Technica
A judge is ordering drunken drivers to install Uber, Lyft Enlarge (credit: SPUR ) A local judge in Ohio is taking a novel approach when it comes to drunken drivers. Municipal Court Judge Michael Cicconetti of Painesville has been requiring motorists convicted of operating a vehicle under the influence (OVI) to download the ride-hailing apps Uber and Lyft, and they must set up the apps with their credit cards. "It’s just common sense. Now that we have th
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The Atlantic
Why Conservative Parties Are Central to Democracy Survey the conservative parties of the Western world these days, and you’ll come away confused. Are they on the rise or under siege? In the United States, a Republican Party that only months ago was imploding now controls the federal government. In the United Kingdom, the Conservative Party holds power, but just barely, after a poor showing at the polls. In France, the Republican Party is outperf
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The Atlantic
Reinforcing the Boundaries of Political Decency The Washington Post is now reporting that the Alexandria shooter likely had a political motivation: It has identified him as James T. Hodgkinson, a Bernie Sanders supporter. A Facebook page belonging to an individual by that name includes posts praising Sanders, and condemning President Donald Trump: “Trump is a Traitor. Trump Has Destroyed Our Democracy. It’s Time to Destroy Trump & Co.” Represe
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The Atlantic
Yoga Teachers, Mentors, Business Partners Early yoga masters relied on parampara , an oral tradition meant to pass teachings from teachers to students, to ensure that their practices endured. Today, there are tens of thousands of yoga teachers in North America, and many of them consider themselves to be mentors of a sort, providing physical, mental, and spiritual guidance for their students. For The Atlantic ’s series on mentorship, “ On
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dams could 'permanently damage Amazon'Scientists warn that hydroelectric dams in the Amazon could have a significant impact on the environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dressmakers found to have needle-sharp 3-D visionHaute couture can be credited for enhancing more than catwalks and red carpets. New research from the University of California, Berkeley suggests that the 3D or 'stereoscopic' vision of dressmakers is as sharp as their needles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A surprising new link between inflammation and mental illnessUp to 75 percent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus -- an incurable autoimmune disease commonly known as lupus -- experience neuropsychiatric symptoms. But so far, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying lupus' effects on the brain has remained murky.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dual-agent PET/MR with time of flight detects more cancerSimultaneous injections of the radiopharmaceuticals fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) followed by quantitative scanning significantly improves image quality and detection of bone metastases at a lower dose, according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular pilot light prepares body's heating system for the coldResearchers detail a molecule that acts as a molecular pilot light required to turn on the brown fat furnace. Brown fat burns sugar and fat to produce radiant heat in the body. These cells are of interest because some of the sugar and fat they burn is stored in the body and might otherwise lead to increases in white fat, the form that increases in obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTI treatment reduces E. coli, may offer alternative to antibioticsUrinary tract infections (UTIs) tend to come back, even when treated. Most UTIs are caused by E. coli that live in the gut and spread to the urinary tract. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a molecular decoy can reduce the numbers of UTI-causing bacteria in the gut. With the pool of disease-causing bacteria smaller, the researchers say, the risk
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal a key link between brain circuits governing hunger and cravingsBy developing a new approach to imaging and manipulating particular groups of neurons in the mouse brain, scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have identified a pathway by which neurons that drive hunger influence distant neurons involved in the decision of whether or not to react to food-related cues. Their findings could open the door to targeted therapies that dampen food
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydroelectric dams may jeopardize the Amazon's futureHundreds of built and proposed hydroelectric dams may significantly harm life in and around the Amazon by trapping the flow of rich nutrients and modifying the climate from Central America to the Gulf of Mexico. These findings, published in Nature, emerge from a multidisciplinary, international collaboration of researchers from 10 universities, led by scientists at The University of Texas at Austi
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioengineered human livers mimic natural developmentAn international team of researchers bioengineering human liver tissues uncovered previously unknown networks of genetic-molecular crosstalk that control the organ's developmental processes -- greatly advancing efforts to generate healthy and usable human liver tissue from human pluripotent stem cells. The scientists report online in Nature on June 14 that their bioengineered human liver tissues s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wireless charging of moving electric vehicles overcomes major hurdle in new Stanford studyStanford scientists have developed a way to wirelessly deliver electricity to moving objects, technology that could one day charge electric vehicles and personal devices like medical implants and cell phones. See video: https://youtu.be/7nkOgiTxfEs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eyes in the sky reveal extent of gray seal recoveryUsing research drones, thermal cameras and free images from Google Earth, two Duke University-led studies confirm that gray seals are making a comeback off the New England and eastern Canadian coasts. The findings help confirm that seal conservation efforts are working, and that these remote eye-in-the sky technologies make it easier and safer for scientists to study migratory wildlife in remote l
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Live Science
In Photos: 'Faceless' Fish Rediscovered After More Than a CenturyThe "faceless" fish had not been seen near Australia for more than a century.
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The Scientist RSS
Fetal Immune System Operational By Second TrimesterResearch shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.
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Popular Science
Gray seals are making a huge comeback Animals They're doing better than expected after being hunted nearly to extinction. There may be a lot more gray seals living along the East Coast than we thought. Read on.
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New Scientist - News
Mistaken brown dwarf is actually two planets orbiting each otherNew observations reveal a rare binary planet system made of two gas giants four times as massive as Jupiter that likely formed in the breakup of a protostar 10 million years ago
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydroelectric dams may jeopardize the Amazon's futureHundreds of built and proposed hydroelectric dams may significantly harm life in and around the Amazon by trapping the flow of rich nutrients and modifying the climate from Central America to the Gulf of Mexico. These findings, published in Nature, emerge from a multidisciplinary, international collaboration of researchers from 10 universities, led by scientists at The University of Texas at Austi
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wireless charging of moving electric vehicles overcomes major hurdleIf electric cars could recharge while driving down a highway, it would virtually eliminate concerns about their range and lower their cost, perhaps making electricity the standard fuel for vehicles.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny lægemiddeltype reducerer risiko for brud på rygsøjlen Romosozumab kan hurtigt og markant reducere risikoen for brud på rygsøjlen blandt kvinder, der efter overgangsalderen udvikler osteoporose, viser resultater præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt antistof viser god effekt til behandling af leddegigtData fra SIRROUND-T studierne præsenteret på den europæiske reumatologikongres EULAR peger på god effekt af lægemidlet sirukumab til patienter med reumatoid artrit, der ikke har haft tilstrækkelig effekt af tidligere biologisk behandlin
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Dagens Medicin
Kampagne for tidligere diagnose lanceret på EULAR I anledning af den europæiske reumatologisammenslutning EULAR’s 70 års jubilæum lancerer organisationen en kampagne for tidligere diagnose af gigt- og muskoskeletale sygdomme.
21h
Big Think
Pig Brain Cells May Reduce Parkinson's in Humans A new study suggests implanted pig cells may alleviate symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Read More
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Live Science
London Tower Disaster: How Did the Fire Spread So Quickly?Massive damage and suffering was caused when a London apartment building became an inferno; it apparently was lacking in modern fire safety features.
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Gizmodo
Octopus-Inspired Materials Could One Day Save Your Life Image: damn_unique/Flickr Evolution has already solved many of the challenges engineers are confronted with on a daily basis. Think about octopuses, for example. We frequently report on soft robotics here at Gizmodo. Octopuses are essentially brilliant, eight-armed soft robots. So when it comes to solving other underwater challenges, like adhesives staying sticky underwater, a team of researchers
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Gizmodo
The U.S. Will Expand The Laptop Ban To 71 More International Airports If They Don’t Beef Up Security Photo credit: John Moore/ Getty Images Maybe, just maybe, the U.S. government found its compassionate side and decided to think about our on-flight sanity before enforcing a sweeping laptop ban on incoming flights from other countries. According to reports, the U.S. could back off if international airports beef up security screening. Talks of electronics bans on incoming flights into the U.S. hav
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The Atlantic
When a Suspected Shooter’s Facebook Page Becomes a Circus In America, terrible acts of violence are often met with handmade signs, bunches of flowers, and teddy bears. Makeshift memorials to shooting victims are flooded with these sorts of objects, and they spring up reliably wherever a horrifying event has occurred. After the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, town officials had to rent a warehouse to house all of the gifts an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein network signals found to drive myeloid leukemiasResearchers have uncovered how mutations in a protein network drive several high-risk leukemias, offering new prospects for novel therapies. An existing drug might be repurposed to treat these leukemias, and the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms at work may offer clues to other drugs yet to be developed.
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Live Science
Images of the Eyeborg, the Man with the Camera EyeRob Spence lost his eye in a shooting accident as a child. Now he has replaced the older version with a camera-fitted prosthetic eye.
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Popular Science
An automatic home espresso machine 44 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets Lattes and cappuccinos at home—for $400 less. Lattes and cappuccinos at home—for $400 less. Read on.
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NYT > Science
How Pasteur’s Artistic Insight Changed ChemistryAt a young age, Louis Pasteur articulated the chemical property of chirality, which may not have happened had he not first pursued a career as an artist.
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Gizmodo
What We Learned From the Pizzagate Shooter’s Latest Court Docs Image: AP On Tuesday, prosecutors and defense lawyers submitted memoranda ahead of the June 22nd sentencing of Pizzagate gunman Edgar Welch, who pled guilty to weapons charges after firing a rifle inside a DC pizza restaurant last year. With fewer facts to work with, Welch was previously portrayed as either the manifestation of internet vigilantism, or a rube who had only recently gotten internet
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ancient bird like 'a kangaroo-sized flying turkey'New details on an early megapode bird that lived alongside Australia's extinct giant marsupials.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boston Medical Center, Head Start partner to prevent maternal depressionBoston Medical Center, in partnership with Action for Boston Community Development's Head Start program, has helped mothers experience a 40 percent reduction in the emergence of clinically significant depressive symptom episodes.
21h
Ars Technica
Bay Area: Join us 6/21 to discuss the US government’s scientific data purge Enlarge / UC Santa Cruz professor Lindsey Dillon will join us at Ars Live. After taking office in January, the Trump administration began systematically removing scientific and environmental data from government websites. Sociology professor Lindsey Dillon is helping to run a data-rescue project called the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI), whose aim is to preserve this data and
21h
Ars Technica
Sony continues to lock PS4 players out of cross-console play Enlarge / They need to add a tiny "not on PlayStation 4" disclaimer in tiny blocks... This E3 has been a good one for many who are fans of playing online games with friends and strangers across different console and PC platforms. Psyonix announced that a newly announced Switch version of Rocket League would be able to interact with existing versions on the Xbox One and PC. And Microsoft announced
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earning a living in a changing climate: The plant perspectiveSome of the world's plants are using 'last-stand' strategies to survive rather than thrive as global climate change gathers apace. Ecologists assessed plant strategies in less suitable climates by tapping into big data collated from 16 different countries in 3 different continents over the past 50 years.
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Gizmodo
Giant Flying Turkeys Once Roamed Australia Because of Course They Did Image: Flinders University; By Elen Shute, from photos by Kim Benson, Tony Rodd and Aaron Camens Bird enthusiasts will be disappointed to know they were born millions of years too late. Paleontologists from Flinders University in Australia have discovered five extinct megapode birds —among them, a giant brush-turkey called Progura gallinacea . The big bird was roughly the size of a kangaroo and w
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Viden
Satellitter kan hjælpe med at bekæmpe græshoppesværmeVed at observere forholdene kan satellitter advare berørte nationer på forhånd.
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Popular Science
The WiFi endoscopic camera lets you fix life's tiniest problems and spy on wildlife Sponsored Post This tiny waterproof camera helps you see clogged drains and fiddly electronics. The WiFi endoscopic camera lets you fix life's tiniest problems and spy on wildlife. Read on.
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Live Science
Meet the 'Eyeborg': The Man with a Camera EyeRob Spence, a documentary filmmaker in Canada, has a prosthetic eye fitted with a camera, and calls himself the Eyeborg.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The glue that keeps cells togetherStudies shed new light on cell-cell contacts: Physical effects play an important role in their generation and stability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food or fraud?Is the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive. Now scientists have introduced a simplified assay coined NanoTracer. Combining DNA barcoding with nanotechnology, it requires neither expensive tools nor extremely skilled personnel, but just the naked eye to identi
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why we get diarrheaIn a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, investigators explore the immune mechanism that drives diarrhea, concluding that it plays a critical role in pathogen clearance in the early stages of infection
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-malaria drugs: Potential new target identifiedA newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug-resistant malaria parasites. The protein regulates a number of genes involved with a critical part of the parasite's complex life cycle -- its invasion of a person's red blood cells. Now that the researchers know the protein's role in this invasion process, they have a completely new angle for developing new antimalarial dr
22h
Popular Science
Eating potatoes won't actually kill you Health The latest “news” on fries is total garbage. The next time you eat some delicious, oil-crisped taters and someone blurts out that “hey you know fries double your risk of mortality” because they read a clicky…
22h
The Atlantic
The Uber Pattern Continues With a Sexist Comment at a Board Meeting It didn’t take long for Uber to jeopardize whatever goodwill the company had earned by announcing a series of new initiatives aimed at increasing the hiring and retention of women and minorities. On Tuesday afternoon, the company published a series of initiatives it would be implementing to make the company’s culture more welcoming. By early Tuesday evening, audio had leaked of a board member, Da
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The Atlantic
The Qatar Crisis Is Pushing Hamas Back to Iran BEIRUT — Three years after the last war in Gaza, the leaders of Israel and Palestine seem to be lurching toward another round of fighting—although not for the reasons you may think. On Sunday, the Israeli security cabinet agreed , at the request of the Palestinian president, to reduce the amount of electricity it supplies to the blockaded territory by 40 percent. The officials came to the decisio
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Live Science
Science Calls Out Jeff Sessions on Medical MarijuanaRolling back protections from federal interference in state legalization laws could worsen the opioid overdose crisis.
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Scientific American Content: Global
5 Tips to Cope with Chronic PainSavvy Psychologist Ellen Hendriksen offers five tips to deal with the common challenge of chronic pain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
New Scientist - News
Phone metadata reveals where city migrants go and who they callAn analysis of a month’s worth of telecoms metadata from Shanghai has given insights into how people adjust when they first arrive in a new city
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dawn of humanity: Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transitionArchaeologists have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history -- the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wildfires pollute much more than previously thoughtWildfires are major polluters. Their plumes are three times as dense with aerosol-forming fine particles as previously believed. For the first time, researchers have flown an orchestra of modern instruments through brutishly turbulent wildfire plumes to measure their emissions in real time. They have also exposed other never before measured toxins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes drug trial needs to widen participants to understand full impact of drugsMore work needs to be done to examine the real world effects of the commonly prescribed diabetes drug empagliflozin, new research finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People who are 'phone snubbed' by others often turn to their own phones, social media for acceptance, study findsPeople who are phone snubbed – or “phubbed” – by others are, themselves, often turning to their smartphones and social media to find acceptance, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seal oil could help people with type 1 diabetes, research suggestsSeal oil has the potential to help promote nerve regeneration in patients with Type 1 diabetes, new research indicates.
22h
Live Science
A Politician's Name & Face: Why a Good Match May Win VotesWe associate people's first names with certain stereotypes, a new study suggests.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Some Hotel Bed Bug Sightings May Be BogusOnly a third of travelers could correctly identify a bed bug—suggesting that some bug sightings in online reviews could be cases of mistaken identity. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Who Is James T. Hodgkinson? Updated at 4:01 p.m. ET The FBI identified the gunman who opened fire this morning during a congressional congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, as James T. Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville, Illinois. The bureau said Hodgkinson was taken to the hospital, where he died. A Facebook page belonging to a person with that name from the Belleville area contains several posts critical of P
22h
Live Science
We Live in a Cosmic Void, Another Study ConfirmsEarth and its parent galaxy, the Milky Way, exist in a cosmic desert — a region of space largely lacking other galaxies, stars and planets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIT researchers refine yardstick for measuring schoolsA new study by an MIT-based team of economists has developed a novel way of evaluating and improving VAMs. By taking data from Boston schools with admissions lotteries, the scholars have used the random assignment of students to schools to see how similar groups of students fare in different classroom settings.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Dad Gifts, Audioengine Speakers, Star Wars, and More A $118 Android phone , gifts for Dad , and uber-popular dumbbells lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Nextbit Robin , $118 The Nextbit Robin is an Android phone that aims to assuage your storage fears . If its 32GB of flash memory fill up, it’ll start uploading your apps and photos to a 100GB cloud
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Popular Science
How to stay safe on public Wi-Fi DIY 5 tips for roaming without fear. Wi-fi hotspots let you work, play, and keep in touch on the go—but they can also be vulnerable to security threats. Here's how to protect yourself.
22h
Ars Technica
Navy chief: It may be time to bring back retired warships Enlarge / The Oliver Hazard Perry-class fast frigate USS Ford (FFG 54) departs Pearl Harbor in this 2010 photo. The Navy is looking at bringing back a handful of the decommissioned ships. (credit: US Navy) In a speech before the Naval War College yesterday, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson said that the Navy is looking at "every trick" to grow the fleet more quickly toward the Na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising peas' potential in big sky countryChanging over from all wheat to wheat-pea rotations can be uncertain. To help, researchers have been studying how pea genetics interact with the environment to affect crop yields, pea protein and starch content for market demands.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State medical licensing boards' practices may hurt physician mental healthA new study found state medical boards ask physicians much more extensive and intrusive questions about mental health conditions than for physical health conditions. Despite national concern about physician suicide and well-being, research shows that even if physicians struggle with depression, they are reluctant to disclose and seek treatment because it could have serious consequences when they a
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prostate PET/CT targets more cancer and improves patient careA new study that includes data from four Australian medical centers shows that Ga-68 Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) PET/CT detects prostate cancer not caught by more conventional imaging, thus affecting treatment plans. The research was presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
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Futurity.org
Feeling lonely can make us self-centered, and vice-versa Feeling lonely can make us self-centered, research shows, and the reverse is also true, though to a less extent. “If you get more self-centered, you run the risk of staying locked in to feeling socially isolated…” The findings suggest a positive feedback loop between the two traits: As increased loneliness heightens self-centeredness, the latter then contributes further to enhanced loneliness. “I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy-efficient cleaning robotState-of-the-art solar cells are efficient -- but are even more so when they are kept clean. A cleaning robot enables solar panels to deliver at full capacity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small scale, big improvementsChemical reactions that make improvements in water purification and batteries possible occur at scales too small to see. A team of researchers has developed a way to produce real-time observations documenting the reactions that happen between liquids and solids. The technique can be used to gauge effectiveness of water purification where ion exchange is critical to sanitization and tease out limit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An hour per week at the gym lowers the risk of metabolic syndromeLess than one hour of resistance exercise training per week lowers the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (cardiovascular risk factors such as overweight, high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar), research concludes. The beneficial effects of resistance exercise were independent from the amount of aerobic exercise, such as running or cycling.
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Gizmodo
On The Handmaid's Tale Finale, the Fall of Gilead Begins With a Dropped Stone All Photos Courtesy Hulu The first season of The Handmaid’s Tale has come to a close, and I feel like the latest episode (and what it promises for the future) can be summed up by none other than T.S. Eliot: “This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang but a whimper.” “Night” opens on a flashback to when June (Elisabeth Moss) was first brought to the Red Center and tagged, before she became Of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chaotically magnetized cloud is no place to build a star, or is it?For decades, scientists thought that the magnetic field lines coursing around newly forming stars were both powerful and unyielding, working like jail bars to corral star-forming material. More recently, astronomers have found tantalizing evidence that large-scale turbulence far from a nascent star can drag magnetic fields around at will.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Speed limit study set to reveal if twenty is plenty on city streetsThe impact of 20mph speed limits is to be evaluated in a major study in two British cities.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Fake News Is Unbelievably Cheap to ProduceFor $55,000 you could discredit a journalist; for $200,000 you might instigate a street protest.
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Live Science
Man's 29 Lbs. of Poop Removed: What Is Hirschsprung's Disease?When doctors in China removed 30 inches of a young man's colon, they also removed nearly 29 lbs. (13 kilograms) of his feces.
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Popular Science
Michigan health director charged with involuntary manslaughter due to Flint water woes Health Courts allege he concealed info on a deadly Legionnaires' outbreak. Courts allege that Nick Lyon, Michigan health director, concealed information about Legionnaires' outbreak that lead to the death of 12 people.
23h
Ingeniøren
Stabler af nano-ark skal gøre processorer 40 pct hurtigereIBM har udviklet en ny metode til at producere computerchips. Ved at stable nanoark mener selskabet at kunne fremstille ombejlede 5-nanometer-chips der kan spare energi og arbejde væsentligt hurtigere end eksisterende chips.
23h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The ‘time machine’ reconstructing ancient Venice’s social networks Machine-learning project will analyse 1,000 years of maps and manuscripts from the floating city's golden age. Nature 546 341 doi: 10.1038/546341a
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Went Wrong with the F-35, Lockheed Martin's Joint Strike Fighter?The F-35 was billed as a fighter jet that could do almost everything the U.S. military desired but has turned out to be one of the greatest boondoggles in recent military purchasing history -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
This Artificially Intelligent Robot Composes and Performs Its Own Music GIF Shimon—a four-armed marimba playing robot—has been around for years, but its developers at Georgia Tech have recently taken this futuristic musical machine to the next level. Using deep learning, the robot can now study large datasets from well-known musicians, and then produce and perform its own original compositions. Shimon was originally developed by Gil Weinberg, director of Georgia Tech
23h
Wired
Meet the 89-Year-Old Reinventing the Train in His BackyardMax Schlienger wants to use vacuum power to get people where they're going—and it has nothing to do with the hyperloop.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chaotically magnetized cloud is no place to build a star, or is it?Astronomers using ALMA have discovered a surprisingly weak and wildly disorganized magnetic field very near a newly emerging protostar. These observations suggest that the impact of magnetic fields on star formation is more complex than previously thought.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Universal stabilizationETH researchers led by Lucio Isa have developed microparticles with a rough, raspberry-like surface that stabilise emulsions following a new principle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical trial examines maternal depression strategy at head startMaternal depression disproportionately affects low-income and minority women. So is a problem-solving intervention at Head Start efficacious at preventing depressive symptom episodes among at-risk, low-income mothers?
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality of psychiatric treatment -- not number of beds -- should be focus of suicide preventionHealth care providers should focus on the overall quality of psychiatric care, depression screening and outpatient services to prevent suicide, not the number of available inpatient psychiatric beds, argue researchers from the University of Chicago and Columbia University in a new statistical analysis.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gender dictates camouflage strategy in this newly identified praying mantis groupAdult females and males in a newly identified genus of Latin American praying mantises have evolved sharply different camouflage strategies, according to a Cleveland Museum of Natural History-led study published in the journal ZooKeys.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Printed sensors monitor tire wear in real timeElectrical engineers at Duke University have invented an inexpensive printed sensor that can monitor the tread of car tires in real time, warning drivers when the rubber meeting the road has grown dangerously thin.
23h
The Atlantic
Five Involuntary Manslaughter Charges in the Flint Water Crisis Updated on June 14 at 11:35 a.m. ET On Wednesday morning, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon became both the highest-ranking person charged in the ongoing Flint water-crisis investigation. He and four other Michigan officials received the first involuntary manslaughter charges in the investigation as well. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette’s office charged L

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gut bacteria might one day help slow down aging processSlowing down the aging process might be possible one day with supplements derived from gut bacteria. Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have identified bacterial genes and compounds that extend the life of and also slow down the progression of tumors and the accumulation of amyloid-beta, a compound associated with Alzheimer's disea
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Ars Technica

FCC makes net neutrality commenters’ e-mail addresses public through API Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Kheng ho Toh) If you’re one of the many people filing comments on the Federal Communications Commission plan to gut net neutrality rules , be aware that your e-mail address and any other information you submit could be made public. There’s nothing nefarious going on, but the FCC’s privacy policy could lead people to believe that e-mail addresses will be kept secret
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reckless behavior fuels ongoing stress for some with PTSDFor those with posttraumatic stress disorder, risky and harmful behaviors could lead to more trauma and, in turn, worse PSTD symptoms over time, research concludes.
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The Atlantic

Memo to Trump: This Is Why You're Losing It would be hard to fashion a more exquisite snare for a man like Donald Trump than the modern, institutional presidency. Just five months into his term, he appears trapped by its constraints—and the harder he tries to escape them, the more thoroughly entangled he becomes. On Thursday morning, President Trump again lashed out at the “bad and conflicted people” investigating him for obstructing ju
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The Atlantic

The Book of Henry Is a Warped Nightmare of a Movie The exact moment The Book of Henry lost me was when Naomi Watts reached for the ukulele. About 20 minutes into Colin Trevorrow’s new film, as Watts’s single mom character Susan tucks her kids Henry (Jaeden Lieberher) and Peter (Jacob Tremblay) into bed, she performs a cheerful goodnight song that pushes things into twee overdrive. The first half of The Book of Henry is a strange, saccharine famil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video imaging of single molecule DNA replicationAlmost all life on Earth is based on DNA being copied, or replicated. Now for the first time scientists have been able to watch the replication of a single DNA molecule, with some surprising findings. For one thing, there's a lot more randomness at work than has been thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dynamic DNA helps ward off gene damage, study revealsResearchers have identified properties in DNA's protective structure that could transform the way scientists think about the human genome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Judge orders environmental review of Dakota oil pipelineA federal judge ordered an environmental review of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline on Wednesday in a dramatic twist that opens the possibility that the project could be halted.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study confirms lightning more powerful over ocean than landPeople who live and work along coasts and coastlines everywhere may be more likely to experience a super-charged lightning strike, according to new research from Florida Institute of Technology that shows lightning can be much more powerful over the ocean than land.
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Gizmodo

A French Artist Says He Received a National ID Card Using a Computer-Generated Headshot Images: Raphaël Fabre With a stunt that will probably see France initiating changes to its National ID card program, an artist named Raphaël Fabre submitted a photorealistic computer-generated image of himself—and he says it was approved without question. To ensure his CG headshot was as artificial as possible, Fabre told Gizmodo that he modeled it by hand using 3D software, instead of digitizing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologiesJavier Vela, scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteriaScientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick, the biotechnology company NAICONS Srl., and elsewhere have discovered a new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria: pseudouridimycin. The new antibiotic is produced by a microbe found in a soil sample collected in Italy and was discovered by screening microbes from soil samples. The new antibiotic kills a broad spectrum of drug-sensit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sushi chef in a day: Japan food firms showcase tasty technologyFrom edible ink printers to chicken stick conveyor belts, Japan's food firms put it all on the menu at an industry show this week with one bold exhibitor claiming it could turn anyone into a top sushi chef.
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Popular Science

Get certified In Adobe's essential graphic design tools for under $40 Sponsored Post Learn the big three Adobe apps and become a CPD-certified designer. Get certified In Adobe's essential graphic design tools for under $40. Learn the big three Adobe apps and become a CPD-certified designer. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dynamic DNA helps ward off gene damage, study revealsResearchers have identified properties in DNA's protective structure that could transform the way scientists think about the human genome. Experts say the findings -- published in the journal Cell -- are crucial to understanding genome damage and could impact current thinking on DNA-linked diseases, including cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A rusty and sweet side of sepsisA research team led by Miguel Soares at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) in Portugal discovered an unsuspected mechanism that is protective against sepsis. This study that provides new avenues for therapeutic approaches against sepsis appears in the June 15 issue of the scientific journal Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Video imaging of single molecule DNA replicationAlmost all life on Earth is based on DNA being copied, or replicated. Now for the first time scientists have been able to watch the replication of a single DNA molecule, with some surprising findings. For one thing, there's a lot more randomness at work than has been thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly identified method of gene regulation challenges accepted science, researchers sayResearchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered an unexpected layer of the regulation of gene expression. The finding will likely disrupt scientists' understanding of how cells regulate their genes to develop, communicate and carry out specific tasks throughout the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut bacteria might one day help slow down aging processSlowing down the aging process might be possible one day with supplements derived from gut bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D images show how sperm binds to the egg surfaceResearchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have obtained the first 3-D snapshots of a sperm protein attached to a complementary egg coat protein at the beginning of fertilization. The study, which reveals a common egg protein architecture that is involved in the interaction with sperm in both mollusc and mammal, is published in the respected scientific journal Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteriaA team of Rutgers University-New Brunswick, NAICONS Srl., and other scientists has discovered a new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria: pseudouridimycin. The new antibiotic is produced by a microbe found in a soil sample collected in Italy and was discovered by screening microbes from soil samples. The new antibiotic kills a broad spectrum of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant bac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BA flight disruption cost estimated £80m: parent companyThree days of flight disruption at British Airways due to a massive computer crash last month will cost the airline an estimated £80 million (92 million euros, $102 million), its parent company said on Thursday.
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Live Science

Book Excerpt: 'Confessions of an Accidental Zoo Curator' (Tenth Planet Press, 2017)What goes on behind the scenes at a zoo? Author Annette Libeskind Berkovits, retired general curator at the Bronx Zoo, has plenty of stories to tell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

America’s still first in science, but China rose fast as funding stalled in U. S. and other countriesAmerican scientific teams still publish significantly more biomedical research discoveries than teams from any other country, a new study shows, and the U.S. still leads the world in research and development expenditures. But American dominance is slowly shrinking, the analysis finds, as China's skyrocketing investing on science over the last two decades begins to pay off.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Influenza virus can overcome potentially crippling mutationsThe effectiveness of flu vaccines and therapies could be improved thanks to new research, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hidden immune cells cause lung transplant failureA subset of immune cells called nonclassical monocytes, previously unknown to reside in the lungs, play a key role in driving primary graft dysfunction (PGD), the leading cause of death after lung transplantation, report researchers. The study demonstrates targeting these cells could lead to novel treatments for PGD, a complication that currently impacts more than half of transplant patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Missing piece to high-temperature superconductor mysteryNew features identified in the electronic behavior of a copper oxide material that may help explain why it becomes a perfect electrical conductor -- a superconductor -- at relatively high temperatures.
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Ars Technica

E3 by idiots, for idiots: Ars takes on expo’s weirdest games, dumbest ideas (video link) LOS ANGELES—Somebody thought adding 10,000 more people to E3's crowds was a good idea, and that somebody should be punished. Ars' recommendation: make them watch our resident yokels, Sam Machkovech and Lee Hutchinson, roam the overcrowded expo's halls in one of Ars' most ridiculous videos ever made. It's safe-for-work, we swear, but it may not be safe for the companies we put in the
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Viden

Fremtidens solcreme giver glød og beskytter mod kræftSart lys hud vil være bedre rustet mod sol, hvis et nyt stof lever op til forventningerne. Vanvittigt spændende, siger Kræftens Bekæmpelse.
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Wired

Outdoor Gear For Women Evolves Beyond 'Shrink It and Pink It'New outdoor and adventure gear considers women's physiology, not just a preference for pink.
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Dagens Medicin

Komorbiditet rammer patienter med psoriasisartrit hårdt Højere sygdomsaktivitet, ringere effekt af den medicinske behandling og større sandsynlighed for at stoppe behandlingen er direkte konsekvenser af komorbiditet blandt patienter med psoriasisartrit, viser undersøgelse fra Parker Instituttet præsenteret på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Effektiv billeddiagnostik afgørende for tidlig indsats Ultralydsundersøgelser og MR-scanninger er effektive til at finde tegn på tidlig sygdomsaktivitet i leddene hos psoriasispatienter, fortalte Mikkel Østergaard på et oversigtsforedrag på EULAR.
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Dagens Medicin

Høj fedtprocent øger kvinders risiko for leddegigt Overvægt defineret ved høj fedtprocent er forbundet med øget risiko for, at kvinder udvikler reumatoid artrit, viser dansk befolkningsundersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
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Ars Technica

According to statistics, programming with spaces instead of tabs makes you richer Enlarge (credit: Kai Hendry ) Stop the world, I want to get off. The annual Stack Overflow developer surveys often include lots of bad news. "People still use PHP," for example, is a recurring and distressing theme. "Perl exists" is another. But never before has the survey revealed something as devastatingly terrible as the 2017 survey. Using PHP and Perl are matters of taste. Extremely masochist
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Gizmodo

China Needs To Send A Woman To The Moon GIF China is planning to land people on the moon by 2036 . If China does this right, then at least one of those people will be a woman. Objectively, it seems absurd that this needs an explanation, but we know what the world is like. So here’s why. The simple fact is that if China sends an all-male crew on their first crewed lunar mission, they’re making a huge mistake. Not just because there’s ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood cell discovery identifies patients with aggressive prostate cancerPatients who have aggressive prostate cancer could be identified by a highly accurate and simple blood test, according to an early study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Music sessions can help millions who struggle to speak to lead a richer lifeMusic could be used to transform the lives of millions of people with learning difficulties, dementia, strokes, brain damage and autism and their families, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Temperature changes make it easier for malaria to climb the Ethiopian highlandsThe highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country's population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For headache, telemedicine may be as effective as in-personFor people with headache, seeing the neurologist by video for treatment may be as effective as an in-person visit, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Multispectral imaging reveals ancient Hebrew inscription undetected for over 50 yearsUsing advanced imaging technology, researchers have discovered a hitherto invisible inscription on the back of a pottery shard dating from 600 BCE that has been on display at The Israel Museum for more than 50 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn engineers show key feature for modeling how cells spread in fibrous environmentsMany studies have shown that stiffness of the extracellular matrix, the fibrous network of collagen that surrounds cells, promotes cellular mobility; cells can get a better grip on stiffer surfaces and thus invade neighboring tissue.New research by scientists in the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science is diving deeper into this relationship, showing that stiffness
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The Atlantic

A Tiny Tweak to Gut Bacteria Can Extend an Animal’s Life Most of the worms in Meng Wang ’s lab die on schedule. They live their brief lives on Petri dishes, and after two to three weeks, they die of old age. But some individuals beat the odds, surviving for several days longer than usual.These wormy Methuselahs were all genetically identical, so it wasn’t their genes that explained their decelerated aging. Instead, the secret to their longevity lay in
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Popular Science

Good and nerdy books to give your dad this Father's Day Entertainment Pretty pictures, extra-terrestrials, and doomsday scenarios. On this Father's Day reading list: Pretty pictures, extra-terrestrials, and doomsday scenarios. Read on.
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Inside Science

Research Tracks Shifts in Canadians' Distinctive Accent Research Tracks Shifts in Canadians' Distinctive Accent Canadians are changing how they say words -- and so are many Americans. hockeyfans_top.jpg Image credits: Robert Scoble via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 11:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- You can always tell when you are speaking to a Canadian when they get to words like “about,” whi
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New Scientist - News

Billion-dollar dams are making water shortages, not solving themDams are mitigating climate change impacts for certain populations, but the overall effect of such interventions may be increased drought
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Orion blazing bright in radio lightAstronomers have created the largest image ever of the dense band of star-forming gas that weaves its way through the northern portion of the Orion Nebula.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More brain activity is not always better when it comes to memory, attentionPotential new ways of understanding the cause of cognitive impairments, such as problems with memory and attention, in brain disorders including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s are under the spotlight in a new research review.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alternative hypothesis on the faunal colonization of the Himalayas?Until now, the fauna of the Himalayas was considered to be an “immigration fauna," with species that have immigrated primarily from neighboring regions since the geological formation of this mountain range. Using molecular-genetic methods, a research team has now tested an alternative colonization hypothesis on lazy toads. The findings indicate that this group arose earlier than assumed in souther
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Face recognition system 'K-Eye'Scientists have developed a semiconductor chip, CNNP (CNN Processor), that runs AI algorithms with ultra-low power, and K-Eye, a face recognition system using CNNP.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicians, patients must focus on remission of diabetic ulcersPhysicians and patients need to focus on remission of diabetic ulcers -- that is, extending the time between their formation, experts say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapyCell-killing chemotherapies are designed to shrink cancerous tumors by accumulating in their ill-formed blood and lymph vessels, delivering a toxic dose to the cancer cells. Scientists have developed a new drug delivery platform that uses safe, low-energy ultrasound waves to trigger aggregates of chemotherapy-containing nanoparticles to break apart precisely at tumor sites, resulting in dramatical
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gap in health care for Alzheimer's disease patients who live alone46% of patients who are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in Sweden live alone in their homes, in particular older women, researchers report.
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Live Science

Parkinson's May Begin in Gut Before Affecting the BrainParkinson's disease ravages brain cells, but the condition may actually start out in the gut, and then spread through nerves to the brain, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo

Russian Rocket Launch Ignites Killer Grass Fire A large grass fire triggered by a Russian rocket launch on Wednesday has killed one Kazakh man and hospitalized another. According to the AFP , pieces of the rocket fell to Earth after it launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome —the site where Sputnik 1 took off in 1957. Incredibly, the debris set off a fire that spread about 9.5 miles (15 kilometers) across. Local authorities report the fire erupt
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Gizmodo

How to Find Almost Anything on YouTube Image: Gizmodo The number of views YouTube videos get in a single day is up to the billions now, with hundreds of hours of new content uploaded every minute, versus the month it would take twelve years ago when YouTube launched. Searching through that deluge of video can be harder than searching the entire web, so here’s a helpful guide to find that weird Wonder Woman video you found in 2007 that
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Anker Gold Box, Clear the Rack, Amazon Dash Wand, and More It’s a massive day of deals, highlighted by an Anker Gold Box , Amazon’s new Dash Wand , a YETI soft cooler , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker Gold Box Anker makes basically all of your favorite charging gear , and a bunch of it is on sale in today’s Amazon Gold Box . If you read Kinja Deals, you know that Anker runs its fair share
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimizing feeding is necessary to maintain milk production in organic herdsCurrently, agriculture accounts for approximately 9% of total US greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. By varying diet formulation and the associated crop production to supply the diet, farmers can affect the quantity of GHG emissions of various feeding systems. Therefore, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created a study to compare the effects of feeding strategies and the associated
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping project will open up new routes to uncharted territoryWhat if fictional places in books, such as Middlemarch, Treasure Island, Barsetshire and Gormenghast, could be generated as maps and even 3D visualisations out of the text itself?
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The Atlantic

Do the Two New Lawsuits Against Trump Have Any Shot at Success? Mere days after President Donald Trump took office, the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, or CREW, filed a suit alleging that the president is violating the Constitution’s Foreign Emoluments Clause, which bars elected officials from accepting “any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State,” by holding ont
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Dagens Medicin

Risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdom motiverer ikke alle artritpatienter Hver fjerde artritpatient med høj risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdom opsøger ikke egen læge, viser registerstudie fra Gigthospitalet i Gråsten.
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Dagens Medicin

Sygeplejersker kan sikre livsvigtig vaccinering af sårbare gigtpatienterSygeplejersker kan spille en vigtig rolle i at sikre, at patienter med gigtsygdomme får livreddende vaccinationer, viser ny forskning.
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Dagens Medicin

CT-scanninger med lav stråling forbedrer bedømmelse af Bechterews sygdomNy forskning viser, at læger ved hjælp af CT-scanninger med lav strålingsdosis kan holde øje med, hvordan Bechterews sygdom udvikler sig uden at udsætte patienter med sygdommen for høje doser røntgenstråling.
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Dagens Medicin

Blodprøve finder hjerterisiko hos patienter med lupusNy forskning viser, at en biomarkør kan bestemme risikoen for slagtilfælde og hjertestop blandt lupuspatienter, som ikke har andre symptomer på hjerte-kar-sygdomme.
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Dagens Medicin

Kognitiv adfærdsterapi kan lære gigtpatienter at acceptere deres kroniske smerterPatienter med gigtsmerter har i et rehabiliteringsprogram fået gavn af kognitiv adfærdsterapi til at reducere depression og angst som følge af deres sygdom.
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Live Science

New Weapon Against Desert Locust Plagues: Satellite ImagesPlagues of desert locusts can devastate crops, leading to famine. A new satellite method could give officials two to three months' notice so they can prepare for locust swarms.
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TEDTalks (video)

Science didn't understand my kids' rare disease until I decided to study it | Sharon TerryMeet Sharon Terry, a former college chaplain and stay-at-home mom who took the medical research world by storm when her two young children were diagnosed with a rare disease known as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). In this knockout talk, Terry explains how she and her husband became citizen scientists, working midnight shifts at the lab to find the gene behind PXE and establishing mandates that re
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Quanta Magazine

Roberto Peccei and Helen Quinn, Driving Around Stanford in a Clunky Jeep Four decades ago, Helen Quinn and Roberto Peccei took on one of the great problems in theoretical particle physics: the strong charge-parity (CP) problem . Why does the symmetry between matter and antimatter break in weak interactions, which are responsible for nuclear decay, but not in strong interactions, which hold matter together? “The academic year 1976-77 was particularly exciting for me be
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Quanta Magazine

Rainer Weiss, Remembering the Little Room in the Plywood Palace One summer circa 1970, Rainer Weiss holed up in a closet-size room in Building 20 — the infamously rickety, asbestos-coated, World War II-era makeshift wooden structure at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that hosted countless discoveries and nine eventual Nobel Prize winners before being torn down in 1998 — and developed the basic design for an experiment that, nearly half a century lat
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Quanta Magazine

Yitang Zhang’s Santa Barbara Beach Walk As an adolescent during the Cultural Revolution in China, Yitang Zhang wasn’t allowed to attend high school. Later, in his 30s, he worked odd jobs in the United States and sometimes slept in his car. But Zhang always believed he would solve a great math problem someday. Still, despite becoming one of China’s top math students and completing his doctorate at Purdue University in Indiana, for seven
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Gizmodo

The Completely Bananas History of Transformers on Earth, According to the Movies Image: Paramount The promise of Transformers: The Last Knight has been that it’s going to shed light on the secret history of Transformers. Seeing as most of the other films in Michael Bay’s franchise haven’t exactly overflowed with a fidelity to continuity, that’s going to be interesting. Has everything we’ve seen been massively confusing and contradictory? Yes. Yes it has. Have I tried to wrest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US-China collaboration makes excellent start in optimizing lithium to control plasmaFor fusion to generate substantial energy, the ultra-hot plasma that fuels fusion reactions must remain stable and kept from cooling. Researchers have recently shown lithium, a soft, silver-white metal, to be effective in both respects during path-setting U.S.-Chinese experiments on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, China. Leading the U.S. collaboration is the U.S.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Maths of Life and Death: Our Secret Weapon in the Fight against DiseaseMathematics is increasingly integral to biology as more detailed experiments in recent years have led to a huge influx in biological data -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Bethesda’s Tim Willits talks Quake’s past, present, and future (video link) "It's in my DNA, it's in my blood. If you cut me, I bleed Qs." If anyone deserves to have Qs coursing through his veins, it's Tim Willits. After uploading Doom maps to early BBS systems in the mid-'90s, id Software hired Willits to help design maps for a new, fully 3D shooter called Quake . Since then, Willits has risen to Studio Director at id, working on every game in the Quake ser
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The Atlantic

Will Online Democracy Fix the Grammys? Award shows for art always have their credibility in question, but the Grammys are the major ceremony most clearly experiencing a crisis of coolness. This year’s telecast was skipped by a number of stars, some of whom—Frank Ocean, Justin Bieber, Kanye West—indicated either explicitly or through leaks to the press that they were doing so out of a belief that the Grammys are out of touch. The night
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The Atlantic

Otto Warmbier's Father Says He's Proud of His Son, Praises Trump's Efforts Updated at 3:14 p.m. ET Otto Warmbier’s father said Thursday he does not believe North Korea’s explanation for why the 22-year-old University of Virginia student is in a coma, credited the Trump administration for freeing his son, and criticized the Obama administration’s advice to the family “to keep a low profile.” At a sometimes-emotional news conference at Wyoming High School in Wyoming, Ohio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologiesJavier Vela, scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research on crucial cutting enzyme maps sites of DNA damage in leukemias and other cancersResearchers studying a DNA-cutting enzyme with a crucial role in regulating the structure of genes have discovered a broad role for its cutting activity in driving abnormal genetic rearrangements called translocations that cause cancer, including leukemias and solid tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elder abuse research yields new evidence on incidence, risks, outcomesAs World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is observed on June 15, new study data from the Chinese community in Chicago is shedding light on the impact of elder abuse in America.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women who focus negatively, magnify chronic pain, more likely to be taking prescribed opioidsFemale chronic pain sufferers who catastrophize, a psychological condition in which pain is exaggerated or irrationally focused on, not only report greater pain intensity, but are more likely to be taking prescribed opioids than men with the same condition, according to a study published Online First in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program developed to provide free hearing aids to low-income adultsAn intervention at a free clinic that included comprehensive care for hearing was able to provide recycled, donated hearing aids to low-income adults, according to a study published by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines facial fractures from recreational activity in adults 55 and olderAerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities are encouraged for older adults but there are implications for injury patterns and prevention.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to educate future therapists more effectivelyIn the classroom, what's the line between education and personal experience?
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Popular Science

Dams on the Amazon River could have widespread, devastating impacts—and we keep building more of them Environment Dam crazy. A new study shows how the negative environmental impacts of dams built in Brazil's Amazon basin will extend far beyond the South American nation's borders.
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Ars Technica

In dying, blood-starved heart, bacteria injections offer cellular life support Enlarge / False-colored scanning electron micrograph of multiple S. elongatus cyanobacteria (green) with a single rat heart muscle cell (red). (credit: Cohen et al. ) For the faint of heart, a microbial flash mob might just do the trick. A direct injection of photosynthetic bacteria—plus a little light— provided cellular life-support to the weak, blood-starved hearts of rats suffering simulated h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Distant fish relatives share looksScientists have found evidence that even distantly related Australian fish species have evolved to look and act like each other, which confirms a central tenet of evolutionary theory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New light shed on dynamics of type IV pili and twitching motilityNew light has been shed on dynamics of asymmetric type IV pili distribution and twitching motility triggered by directional light in cyanobacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blocking gene expression to combat deadly fungal infectionDeadly fungal infections are becoming resistant to common treatments, but a team of researchers have found a potential new solution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reproducing a retinal disease on a chipGood news for the treatment of retinal diseases using the organ-on-a-chip approach.
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Futurity.org

With wireless charging, electric cars could drive forever Scientists have found a way to wirelessly transmit electricity to a nearby moving object. The method may have applications in transportation, medical devices, and more. If electric cars could recharge while driving down a highway, for example, it would virtually eliminate concerns about their range and lower their cost, perhaps making electricity the standard fuel for vehicles. “In addition to ad
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Wired

Humans Can’t Expect AI to Just Fight Fake News for ThemDon't expect algorithms to rescue us from misinformation.
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Gizmodo

So Uh, Is Tim Cook Running for President, Too? Image: AP A gloomy Tim Cook stalks Bloomberg Businessweek ’s cover today, and he has some thoughts. Some thoughts that sound suspiciously like a preamble to a “my fellow Americans” speech. Editor Megan Murphy’s conversation with the Apple CEO isn’t substantively different from the sprawling, 10,000-word interview he conducted with the Washington Post last year—whole paragraphs of boilerplate answ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Magic' alloy could spur next generation of solar cellsIn what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics," University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jerusalem tower younger than thoughtGihon Spring, just downhill from the ancient city of Jerusalem, was crucial to the survival of its inhabitants, and archaeologists had uncovered the remains of a massive stone tower built to guard this vital water supply. Based on pottery and other regional findings, the archaeologists had originally assigned it a date of 1,700 BCE. But new research conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science p
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Ingeniøren

Tab pusten fra toppen af en havmølle med fødderne plantet på jordenFOLKEMØDE 2017: De færreste får lov at betragte udsigten fra en 140 meter høj vindmølle. Men med Dong’s VR-oplevelse kan man få en fornemmelse af suset fra en ‘Havmøllesafari’.
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Live Science

Facial Fractures Increase: How Older Adults Hurt Themselves ExercisingFor older adults, it's important to stay active, but recreational activities come with a risk of injury: A new study finds that facial injuries are on the rise in adults ages 55 and up.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart materials used in ultrasound behave similar to water, chemists reportA team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is gaining new insight into the smart materials used in ultrasound technology. While forming the most thorough model to date of how these materials work, they have found striking similarities with the behavior of water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taking circular economy to the next levelWhile principles of a circular economy have been adopted by businesses, governments and NGOs, leading researchers say it's time to take the discussion and analysis to the next level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cellsA potential new mechanism has been identified in both mice and human endocrine cells that populate the small intestines. Inside these cells is a protein called alpha-synuclein, which is known to go awry and lead to damaging clumps in the brains of Parkinson's patients, as well as those with Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

All in the eyes: What the pupils tells us about languageThe meaning of a word is enough to trigger a reaction in our pupil: when we read or hear a word with a meaning associated with luminosity ("sun," "shine," etc.), our pupils contract as they would if they were actually exposed to greater luminosity. And the opposite occurs with a word associated with darkness ("night," "gloom," etc.). These results open up a new avenue for better understanding how
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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting immune cells that help tumors stay hidden could improve immunotherapyResearchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC have discovered a clue that could unlock the potential of immunotherapy drugs to successfully treat more cancers. The findings, published in the journal Cell, were made in mice and showed that targeting a sub-population of immune cells called regulatory T cells (T-regs) could make the drugs more effective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

FDA rule improves labeling of medications used during pregnancy and lactationThe new US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule should help healthcare providers better explain to pregnant and breastfeeding patients the benefits and risks of taking a specific medication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modeling the brain with 'Lego bricks'Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with the University of Strasbourg, have developed a computational method that could be used to guide surgeons during brain surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does a frog heal wounded skin without scarring?When a Xenopus frog is deeply wounded, its skin can regenerate without scarring. Researchers have found that cells under the skin contribute to this regeneration after an excision injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Raucous crystalsSome organic crystals jump around when heated up. This happens because of an extremely fast change in their crystal structure. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now demonstrated that the crystals send out acoustic signals during this process, which may be useful in analyzing the characteristics of this phenomenon. The researchers demonstrated that this process is analogous to marte
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NYT > Science

Energy Department Closes Office Working on Climate Change AbroadThe elimination of the Office of International Climate and Technology is another sign of the Trump administration’s retreat on global warming policy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking circular economy to the next levelIn recent years a growing number of businesses, governments and environmental advocates have embraced the concept of a "circular economy," which aims to achieve greater sustainability by keeping more resources and materials in use for as long as possible—through strategies such increased product durability, reuse and recycling.
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Futurity.org

Our sun likely had a twin called ‘Nemesis’ When our sun was born 4.5 billion years ago, it was almost certainly part of pair—but that’s true of every other sun-like star in the universe. Many stars have companions, including our nearest neighbor, Alpha Centauri, a triplet system. Astronomers have long sought an explanation. Are binary and triplet star systems born that way? Did one star capture another? Do binary stars sometimes split up
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New map highlights sinking Louisiana coastA subsidence map of coastal Louisiana has now been created, putting the rate at which this region is sinking at just over one third of an inch per year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New magnet technology creates easy blood access for hemodialysis patientsA new, minimally invasive system which uses radiofrequency energy instead of open surgery to create access for patients needing hemodialysis is reliable, with minimal complications, according to data.
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Big Think

Your Beliefs About How Your Memory Works Is a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Are we falling for illusions of memory? How often we forget something is influenced not only by our inability to recall it, but also our overestimation of remembering it in the future. These illusions may be making us overconfident about our memory recall. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to educate future therapists more effectivelyIn the classroom, what's the line between education and personal experience?This is a question addressed by Concordia alumnus Jason Butler in an article recently published by The Arts in Psychotherapy.In the course of a North American and UK study, he found that the conflicting demands of education and therapy within the classroom can cause emotional stress and confusion among students in drama th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Magic' alloy could spur next generation of solar cellsIn what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called 'concentrator photovoltaics,' University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giving children a voice in clinical trialsChildren as young as 8 years old with incurable cancer can reliably characterize the impact an experimental therapy has on their symptoms and quality of life -- even at the earliest stages of drug development -- making self-reported patient outcomes a potential new clinical trial endpoint.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Casualty care guidelines developed by the military are directly transferable to improve the practice of wilderness medicineMany of the lessons learned on the battlefield translate well to the austere conditions encountered every day in the wilderness. A lack of resources, extreme weather, and delayed transport to an established medical facility are just some of the common challenges practitioners and participants face. A special supplement to Wilderness & Environmental Medicine offers an in-depth examination of milita
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jerusalem tower younger than thoughtGihon Spring, was crucial to the survival of its inhabitants, and archaeologists had uncovered the remains of a massive stone tower built to guard this vital water supply. Based on pottery and other regional findings, the archaeologists had originally assigned it a date of 1,700 BCE. But new research conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science provides conclusive evidence that the stones at the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An alternative hypothesis on the faunal colonization of the Himalayas?Until now, the fauna of the Himalayas was considered to be an "immigration fauna", with species that have immigrated primarily from neighbouring regions to the west and east since the geological formation of this mountain range. Using molecular-genetic methods, a German-Chinese research team has now tested an alternative colonization hypothesis on lazy toads (Pelobatoidea). The findings indicate t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First few millimeters of the leaf margin identify palm species in a new key to SyagrusAn incredible amount of information is contained in the very first few millimeters of the leaflet margin of species in the Neotropical palm genus Syagrus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover shortcut to satellite-based quantum encryption networkIn a new study, researchers demonstrate ground-based measurements of quantum states sent by a laser aboard a satellite 38,000 kilometers above Earth. This is the first time that quantum states have been measured so carefully from so far away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radio astronomers peer deep into the stellar nursery of the Orion NebulaAstronomers have released an image of a vast filament of star-forming gas, 1200 light-years away, in the stellar nursery of the Orion Nebula.
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The Atlantic

How Democrats Would Fix Obamacare As Republicans have been casting about for legislation to eviscerate the Affordable Care Act, Democrats have offered a consistent message in public: If the GOP drops its demand for repeal, we’ll work with them to improve, or fix, the current law. Exactly how Democrats would change the bill they enacted seven years ago is less clear. Lawmakers have floated a range of options, from tackling the cos
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The Atlantic

How We Spend $3,400,000,000,000 Last year, America’s total medical costs hit a new record of $3.4 trillion, according to the federal government. That’s about 18 percent of the country’s total GDP, meaning that one out of every six dollars we spent in 2016 went to health care. The national doctor bill dwarfs anything else we spend money on, including food, clothing, housing, or even our mighty military. If that $3.4 trillion wer
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Futurity.org

Nazi police files suggest some tolerance for lesbians The Nazi regime in Germany may have been more tolerant of lesbians than might be expected, new research suggests. Discoveries from police investigation files from the 1940s involving alleged violations of same-sex relations laws and their analysis appear in the Journal of Contemporary History . “These files add a new level of nuance to existing scholarship,” says study author Samuel Clowes Huneke
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