The Atlantic
Donald Trump Reports He’s Getting Rich as President President Trump says he’s received tens of millions of dollars in income from the golf courses and resorts whose profile he boosted during frequent visits since taking office, according to filings released Friday by the U.S. Office of Government Ethics. The 98 pages of financial disclosures offer a partial snapshot of Trump’s income and assets from January 2016 to April this year, as well as indi
16h
Viden
Blodprøve kan afsløre den ideelle kurDanske forskere vil gøre det lettere at smide overflødige kilo med individuel behandling.
9h
Ingeniøren
Byggeboom æder verdens bedste landbrugsjordFrem mod 2030 vil verdens byer komme til at fylde omkring dobbelt så meget som i dag. Væksten vil dække noget af verdens mest frugtbare landbrugsjord og true fødevareforsyningen i de hårdest ramte lande.
5h

LATEST

Gizmodo
Tom Holland Shares His Weirdest Audition... and It Was for Andy Serkis Trust me, this will make more sense in a minute. Still: YouTube Tom Holland might be swinging into theaters as Marvel and Sony’s new Peter Parker in Spider-Man: Homecoming — but as a working actor, he’s still got other movies to make. Sadly, there’s one he won’t be a part of, and it could be because of this bizarre audition with Andy Serkis. “Often we do strange things for auditions, but I think
12min
Big Think
Where Is the Plastic in the Ocean Coming From? Try Asia. It turns out most of the ocean's plastic is coming from a single corner of the world. Read More
15min
Wired
Amazon Expanded Its Empire—And Its Place in SocietyAmazon's acquisition of Whole Foods begs the question: Is the shopping behemoth a force for good or a destroyer of traditional retail?
24min
Scientific American Content: Global
New Trove of Lichen Fossils Expands Total from 15 to 167Botanical bonanza is also a trove of eye candy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
30min
Ars Technica
The over-the-top sights of the E3 2017 show floor Sam Machkovech LOS ANGELES—The Electronic Entertainment Expo isn't just about new game announcements and a chance to try out early demos of upcoming titles. It's also a chance for the game industry to make a spectacle of itself; to throw together elaborate booths and promotional events that will leave images to stick with attendees all the way until the next E3. This was truer than ever at this y
33min
Gizmodo
Saturday's Best Deals: Beach Chairs, James Bond Novels, Breville Oven, and More Half-off Ian Fleming’s James Bond Novels , Tommy Bahama beach chairs , OxyLED motion-sensing lights , and more lead Saturday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals CyberPower 6-Outlet Swivel Surge Protector , $8 | With USB Ports , $15 Once you’ve use a CyberPower’s swiveling surge protectors, every other outlet solution will feel inferior.
1h
Popular Science
Nest Protect Smoke + CO Alarm review: Fewer false alarms and no more midnight battery chirps Gadgets Smarts make this connected detector worth the extra cost. App-based alerts, diligent monitoring, and pleasant sounds make this one of the best detectors around.
1h
Gizmodo
How to Browse the Web and Leave No Trace Image: NordVPN On today’s web it’s hard to set a (digital) foot online without it attracting dozens of trackers and log entries, as companies look to learn everything about you and sell that data on to advertisers. To hide you’ve got a few tools at your disposal, many of which we’ve talked about in the past, and all of which add up to a largely anonymous browsing experience. What we can’t do is p
1h
Ars Technica
The pitfalls and potential of inexpensive 3D scanning solutions The odd documentary, feature article, or typical marketing hype may make you think that today's 3D scanning can perfectly capture the real world, but that's only true with expensive, professional equipment (not to mention considerable editing and post-processing). Generally, current consumer versions of 3D scanners produce decidedly modest results. Still, personal 3D scanning has made great strid
1h
Gizmodo
Don't Miss Amazon's Extremely Rare Deal On Your Favorite Beach Chairs Tommy Bahama Beach Chair Sale Last year, our readers overwhelmingly said that Tommy Bahama makes the best beach chairs , but we’ve since learned that they never go on sale. Like, never. Until now that is. Choose from several different models today , all for roughly 20% off their usual prices. That’s money left over for fruity drinks.
1h
Wired
A Psychologist Created Wonder Woman to Institute Female RuleWilliam Moulton Marston created the heroine to acclimate boys to the idea of strong and powerful women.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
For World Tessellation Day, Remember to Look DownJune 17 is World Tessellation Day. Take a moment to look at the beautiful patterns under your feet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Gizmodo
Hearing Kylo Ren Do ASMR Is a Good Way to Scare the Crap Out of Yourself Kylo Ren does ASMR. Image: YouTube Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or ASMR, is one of the internet’s favorite things. So you’d think marrying it to another popular thing, Star Wars , would be a perfect match. Well, it’s something, that’s for sure. ASMR is a technique that uses audio to create a physical response in a person. What that physical response actually is can be very wide ranging a
2h
Live Science
Why Do Men Have Nipples?Men can't nurse babies, so why on Earth do they have nipples?
2h
Live Science
Why Do Cats and Dogs Love a Good Head Scratch?Why do some cats and dogs practically melt with joy when they get a good head scratch?
2h
Ingeniøren
Kineserne skal ikke udelukkes fra Grønlands råstofferFOLKEMØDE: Ideen om at holde udvindingen af Grønlands råstoffer som et rent europæisk foretagende kan være tillokkende. Men det kommer ikke til at ske, siger interessenterne.
3h
The Atlantic
The Normalization of Conspiracy Culture The catastrophe wasn’t what it seemed. It was an inside job, people whispered. Rome didn’t have to burn to the ground. Nearly 2,000 years ago, after the Great Fire of Rome leveled most of the city, Romans questioned whether the emperor Nero had ordered his guards to start the inferno so he could rebuild Rome the way he wanted. They said the emperor had watched the blaze from the the summit of Pal
3h
The Atlantic
Murakami and Flash Fiction: The Week in Pop-Culture Writing Haruki Murakami’s Lonely Men Jess Zimmerman | The New Republic “It’s only when surrounded by light surrealism that the characteristic Murakami detachment can achieve its ambition. When his writing is at its best, his characters act as a fisheye lens through which to scrutinize a slightly off-kilter world that surrounds them. The soft armor of their unknowability lets us examine their loneliness u
3h
The Atlantic
The Film That’s Missing From the ‘Century’s Greatest’ Lists As film critics at The New York Times weigh in on “The 25 Best Films of the 21st Century So Far,” inspiring rival choices from Hollywood directors and the cinephile Ross Douthat , an exceptional film that I hold in the highest esteem has gone unrecognized. Italian director Paolo Sorrentino begins The Great Beauty on the 65th birthday of its protagonist, Jep Gambardella, who published a critically
3h
The Atlantic
Arundhati Roy’s Fascinating Mess On the night she won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her novel, The God of Small Things , Arundhati Roy had a strange and frightening dream. She was a fish being ripped from the water by a bony emerald hand. A voice instructed her to make a wish. Put me back , she responded. She knew she was on the cusp of cataclysmic fame, she later said an interview. She knew her life would explode—“I’d pay a heav
3h
Big Think
The Sleeping Giant – Liza Jessie Peterson – Think Again Podcast #103 Spontaneous talk on surprise topics. Poet, playwright, and arts educator Liza Jessie Peterson on lessons learned teaching incarcerated youth on Rikers Island. Read More
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Do I Know If My Tap Water Is Safe?Everyday Einstein explains what contaminates our water, how it gets there, and what we can do to test it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Ingeniøren
Leg skal tiltrække fremtidens ingeniørerFOLKEMØDE: En robot og en dukke kan lære børn at programmere allerede fra børnehavealderen. Og det er nødvendigt, hvis Danmark skal følge med i den teknologiske udvikling, siger studieledere.
4h
Wired
Our 12 Favorite Laptops, From MacBooks to ChromebooksIf you're looking to buy a laptop, we're here to make your decision easier.
4h
Wired
Microsoft's Patching Windows XP Bugs, and More Security News This WeekMicrosoft's patching Windows XP, an anonymous tech company fought back against PRISM, and more of the week's most important security news.
4h
Wired
The Lone Star Tick That Gives People Meat Allergies May Be SpreadingA rare meat allergy used to be limited to places the lone star tick calls home. But recently it's started to spread.
4h
Wired
This Is the Coldest Object in the UniverseBe dazzled by a pair of dancing brown dwarf stars, an eerie shot of Titan, and the Earth's origins written in the sky.
4h
Wired
Facebook Details How It Fights Terrorism and ExtremistsAs extremists continue to flood social media, Facebook opens up about its efforts to stop them.
4h
Dagens Medicin
EAACI bruger chip til at spore lægernes kongress-aktivitet Europæiske allergilæger bruger EAACI aktivt i deres faglige efteruddannelse. Det viser forsøg fra EAACI i Wien, hvor deltagernes færden blev sporet med elektronisk chip.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Dansk professor i spidsen for EAACI-kongressens videnskabelige program Professor Susanne Halken, OUH, har stået i spidsen for udarbejdelsen af det videnskabelige program til dette års kongres - og er også langt på vej med forberedelserne til næste års kongres i München.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Allergilægernes formand fokuserer på immunterapi Allergen immunterapi fylder meget på årets EAACI-kongres, og i kalenderen hos formanden for Dansk Selskab for Allergologi, Lone Winthers.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Dansk taler på 50-års symposiumI 50-året for opdagelsen af allergiantistoffet IgE får laboratoriechef Lars K. Poulsen ordet på et stort symposium, som ærer én af de vigtigste arkitekter bag opdagelsen – svenskeren Gunnar Johansson, der for 17 år siden var bedømmer på Lars K. Poulsens doktordisputats.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Odense-forskere møder med et stærkt hold på EAACI Eliteforskningscentret ORCA på OUH har efter få års eksistens formået at markere sig internationalt inden for forskning i anafylaksier, og har også mange bidrag med til årets EAACI-kongres.
5h
The Atlantic
Virginia's Wake-up Call to the GOP Establishment Ever since Donald Trump became president, wary Republican elites have believed he was an anomaly—a unique candidate who owed his success to celebrity appeal and weak opposition, despite some noxious views and behavior. Take away Trump the person, they believed, and there would be no Trump phenomenon. That viewpoint got a rude wake-up call this week, in a Virginia Republican primary that wasn’t su
5h
The Atlantic
Vacation's All They Ever Wanted When Congress wants not to get something done—like, say, tackle hot button legislation that could prove awkward for certain members even to vote on—its favorite trick is to run out the clock. Shucks! We so desperately wanted to pass this high-profile tax reform/health care plan/appropriations bill/take your pick, but we simply ran out of time. How disappointing. You know they do this. I know they
5h
The Atlantic
How the AHCA Could Cause an Economic Downturn If there’s any single binding policy narrative for the first five months of Donald Trump’s presidency, it’s that the president is against regulations that kill jobs. In his June 1 Rose Garden speech announcing the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, Trump bemoaned it as a policy that “could cost Americans as much as 2.7 million lost jobs by 2025.” He’s touted his success in making d
5h
Dagens Medicin
For og imod lægemiddelprovokation uden hudtest Overlæge Lene Heise Garvey udfordrer sine europæiske kolleger, når hun søndag på EAACI stiller op til debat for- og imod lægemiddelprovokation med penicillin inde at lave hudtest først.
5h
The Atlantic
Does Bad Health Care Constitute Cruel and Unusual Punishment? CHICAGO—In 2010, the court of the Northern District of Illinois received a handwritten complaint from Don Lippert, a diabetic inmate at Stateville Correctional Center outside of this city, claiming he was being denied his twice-daily dose of insulin. In the roughly six years since, that case has snowballed into a lawsuit filed on behalf of every prisoner in Illinois. Lippert v. Baldwin argues tha
6h
The Atlantic
The Fate of French Populism At first glance, the wunderkind seemed to have done it again. June 11 marked an unambiguous triumph for Emmanuel Macron, France’s newly elected president. In the first round of the country’s legislative elections, the 39-year-old’s La République En Marche (LREM) coalition led all parties with a staggering 32 percent of the national vote. When voters cast ballots again for the second round tomorro
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending June 17, 2017)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
6h
Ingeniøren
Brancheorganisationer og forskere: Samarbejde skal sikre cirkulær økonomiFOLKEMØDE: Cirkulær økonomi fylder godt i samfundsdebatten og derfor også på årets Folkemøde. Ingeniøren har fulgt to forskellige debatter og fået forskernes og interesseorganisationernes syn på sagen.
6h
Viden
Nostalgien lever på verdens største computerspilsmesseE3 messen er også i år spækket med produkter, der rider med på retrobølgen.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach improves ability to predict metals' reactions with waterThe wide reach of corrosion, a multitrillion-dollar global problem, may someday be narrowed considerably thanks to a new, better approach to predict how metals react with water.
7h
Science | The Guardian
A Crack in Creation review – Jennifer Doudna, Crispr and a great scientific breakthrough This is an invaluable account, by Doudna and Samuel Sternberg, of their role in the revolution that is genome editing It began with the kind of research the Trump administration wants to unfund: fiddling about with tiny obscure creatures. And there had been US Republican hostility to science before Trump, of course, when Sarah Palin objected to federal funding of fruit fly research (“Fruit flies
8h
Ingeniøren
Karrierekonsulent: Opdater dit CV, selvom du ikke søger job Dit CV er et af din karrieres vigtigste elementer, uanset om du er jobsøgende eller ej. CV’et dokumenterer dine kompetencer, erfaring og potentielle værdi for fremtidige arbejdsgivere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/karrierekonsulent-opdater-dit-cv-selvom-du-ikke-soeger-job-8648 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
The Atlantic
Grenfell Tower Fire Incites Angry London Protests Hundreds of protesters gathered in the streets of London on Friday, demanding justice for victims of the Grenfell Tower fire, which, two days earlier, killed at least 30 people in the 24-story London apartment building. With 76 people, including the dead, still missing and 24 more in the hospital, the final death toll is expected to rise. In the wake of the fire, Londoners have criticized U.K. Pr
11h
Live Science
HPV (Human Papillomavirus): Symptoms & TreatmentHuman papillomavirus (HPV) infections are the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States.
12h
Live Science
C-Section: Procedure & RecoveryA Cesarean section is a type of surgery used to deliver a baby through an incision in the mother's abdomen.
12h
Live Science
Cavities (Tooth Decay): Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentCavities, also referred to tooth decay or caries, are holes in the teeth. Cavities are the second-most common health disorder in the United States.
12h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Black Sea Turned Turquoise, Thanks to a Phytoplankton BloomThe bloom appears every summer, but it’s so bright this year that it’s visible from satellites in space.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
My 25-year project to photograph the world's animalsWildlife photographer Joel Sartore has photographed more than 6,000 contained species so far. He explains why.
14h
Wired
A US Navy Destroyer Collided With a Container Ship in Japan—Here's What Likely HappenedThe USS Fitzgerald ran into the ACX Crystal off the coast of Japan, and human error is a likely culprit.
15h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Revealed in Israel, a 2,600-Year-Old Request for WineThe Hebrew words on a piece of pottery first found in 1965 were detected using multispectral imaging technology.
15h
Gizmodo
Shaving Will Never Be the Same: The Revelatory Philips OneBlade Is Back On Sale. Philips Norelco OneBlade , $31 The Philips Norelco OneBlade was the most exciting new shaving product of 2016 , and Amazon’s offering a rare deal on it today if you’re curious to try it out. Most of the people on our team (except Jillian) are converts to this thing, and Shane shared his thoughts about it on Lifehacker Gear : Advertisement I’m pretty blown away by the Philips OneBlade. I was expec
15h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Closing Time What We’re Following Reversing Course: President Trump announced his decision to roll back the Obama administration’s opening of relations with Cuba , calling the policy a “completely one-sided deal.” Yet restoring trade restrictions may not be good for American businesses any more than for Cuban ones—and Ben Rhodes, who led the negotiations with Cuba under Obama, argues that the new president’s
16h
The Atlantic
Suspect Identified in Bombing of Chinese Kindergarten Local police have identified the man responsible for a Thursday explosion near a kindergarten in the eastern Chinese city of Xuzhou, which killed eight people, including the bomber. On Friday, investigators released the suspect’s surname, Xu, but offered no details regarding his motive. “The explosion was caused by a homemade explosive device,” said Pei Jun, the deputy police chief of the Jiangsu
16h
Live Science
Rep. Scalise's Injuries: Why a Bullet in the Hip Can Be So DamagingCongressman Steve Scalise is still in critical condition. How does a bullet to the hip lead to life-threatening injuries?
16h
The Atlantic
U.S. Navy Destroyer Collides With Merchant Vessel in Japan Updated on Saturday at 12:25 a.m. ET A U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer known as the U.S.S. Fitzgerald has been considerably damaged following a collision with a Philippine-flagged merchant vessel on Friday at around 2:30 p.m. local time in Japan. At the time of the collision, the Fitzgerald was located 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka—a city near Tokyo that houses a U.S. naval base. CNN
16h
Live Science
Ebola Leaves Unique Scar Inside Survivors' EyesIn some Ebola survivors, the virus leaves a unique scar at the back of the eye.
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Havana Change of Heart Today in 5 Lines President Trump announced renewed restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba, which had been eased under the previous administration. In a reversal of his campaign pledge, Trump will leave in place the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program shielding undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children from deportation. Trump appeared to criticize Deputy Atto
17h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Why Has Wild Bill Invited This Fired Deckhand Back Aboard The Summer Bay? #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Summer Bay deck boss Nick McGlashan makes his triumphant return to Dutch Harbor after being let go by Wild Bill during king crab season. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subsc
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
First Large-Scale Analysis of the Ripple Cryptocurrency NetworkTransactions on the Ripple cryptocurrency network are entirely transparent. That clearly reveals the network’s strength—and its weaknesses.
17h
Popular Science
Spooky action at a record-breaking distance Science Entangled particles remain linked over 746 miles apart A Chinese satellite sent entangled photons to locations 746 miles apart—and the particles remained entangled over this record-breaking distance.
17h
Big Think
God in Wartime: How Religious Belief Affects Soldiers When Shoshana Johnson decided to join the military, her intention wasn’t to make history. Read More
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Genome pioneer John Sulston enters elite clubSir John Sulston is elevated to the Companion of Honour in the Queen’s birthday list.
17h
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 15. The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 15. Read on.
18h
Ars Technica
2017 Surface Pro least repairable ever; Surface Laptop is made of glue Enlarge / The only way into the Surface Laptop is through the fabric. There's no going back. (credit: iFixit ) While it's not a big surprise given the size and general trends when building these things, Microsoft's new Surface Laptop does not appear to be even remotely repairable , and the new Surface Pro isn't much better , according to iFixit. iFixit's pictures, as ever, give a great look at th
18h
Big Think
This New Study Shows Us the Surprising Difference between Ancient and Modern Egyptians Genetic changes in Egypt might have been caused by trade routes. Read More
18h
The Atlantic
Jury Acquits Officer Who Shot Philando Castile A Minnesota jury has acquitted a police officer accused of shooting and killing Philando Castile, whose death last summer was live-streamed by his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds. The video was shocking for several reasons, one of which was Reynolds’s calm tone as she spoke to the officer, Jeronimo Yanez, who himself was only beginning to realize he’d killed Castile. The verdict will likely infuriat
18h
Big Think
Could Legalizing Marijuana Eradicate Violent Crime in South America? There's a link between American marijuana use and violent crime south of the U.S. and Mexico border... and even a link with avocados. Read More
18h
Ars Technica
CenturyLink made millions by ripping off customers, lawsuit claims Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Gary Waters ) CenturyLink customers have paid "many millions" of dollars for services they didn't want because CenturyLink employees added services to their accounts without the customers' authorization, a former employee alleges in a lawsuit against the company. Heidi Heiser worked from home as a customer service and sales agent from August 2015 to October 2016. S
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic's Week in Culture Don’t Miss The Boldness of Roxane Gay’s Hunger —Adrienne Green unpacks the writer’s moving new memoir, which explores desire, denial, and life in an “unruly body.” Universal Film The Failed Launch of The Mummy and the Danger of Franchising Too Soon — David Sims analyzes Hollywood’s dispiriting trend of using multi-film sagas to attract audiences. Cars 3 : Is Pixar Running Out of Gas? — Christophe
18h
Gizmodo
Slowly Slicing Through a Log Reveals an Alien World GIF Animating anything by hand using stop-motion techniques, one frame at a time, is a time-consuming and mind-numbing process. But in order to create the surreal organic images for his WoodSwimmer video , Brett Foxwell had to slowly slice away at a log, sliver by sliver, while photographing the entire process. It sounds like a nightmarish, sliver-filled process, but the results seem to be very m
18h
Live Science
Ghostly Satellite Images Show Thick Fog Snaking into Strait of Juan de FucaA satellite spied fog filling the Strait of Juan de Fuca in western Washington.
18h
Wired
Texting Suicide Case Is an Old Crime By New MeansMichelle Carter has been charged with involuntary manslaughter for pressuring her boyfriend to kill himself via text. Here's what it means for free speech online and off.
18h
New Scientist - News
Bizarre new deep-sea creatures discovered off Australian coastFaceless fish, giant sea spiders, and other strange species have been found 4-km-deep off the east coast of Australia
19h
The Atlantic
When Does Amazon Become a Monopoly? On Friday morning, Amazon announced it was buying Whole Foods Market for more than $13 billion. About an hour later, Amazon’s stock had risen by about 3 percent, adding $14 billion to its value. Amazon basically bought the country’s sixth-largest grocery store for free. As the financial reporter Ben Walsh pointed out on Twitter , this is the opposite of what’s supposed to happen—normally, the acq
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach improves ability to predict metals' reactions with waterThe wide reach of corrosion, a multitrillion-dollar global problem, may someday be narrowed considerably thanks to a new, better approach to predict how metals react with water.
19h
Big Think
Why CO2 from Volcanoes Is Definitely Not the Issue Do volcanoes contribute a significant amount of CO2 to the atmosphere compared to humans? Read More
19h
Wired
The Grizzled, Stubborn Lawyers Protecting the Environment From TrumpEnvironmental groups have spent decades preparing for the likes of Trump.
19h
Gizmodo
This Study is Forcing Scientists to Rethink the Human Genome Image: Getty Images The more data, the better, right? When it comes to genetics, it turns out that might not be the case. As both genetic sequencing has gotten cheaper and computerized data analysis has gotten better, more and more researchers have turned to what are known as genome-wide association studies in hopes of sussing out which individual genes are associated with particular disorders. T
19h
Gizmodo
TSA Reminds Passengers That Ninja Stars Are Not Fidget Spinners Screengrab: Instagram/TSA What is a “weapon?” Technically, you can inflict harm on another person with just about anything, be it a projectile, blade, stone, or even just your own human hand. So where do you draw the line? The TSA’s verdict: Fidget spinners are toys and ninja stars are weapons. Ninja star fidget spinner? Weapon. The (actually sort of funny) TSA Instagram has a history of posting
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive behavior therapy significantly reduced depression and anxiety in chronic pain patientsAcceptance and Commitment Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy that focuses on psychological flexibility and behavior change, provided a significant reduction in self-reported depression and anxiety among patients participating in a pain rehabilitation program, new research has demonstrated.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New blood test detects stroke and heart attack risk in lupus patients with no CVD symptomsA specific biomarker detected in the blood of lupus patients with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thought to be at low risk of CVD based on traditional risk factors, is associated with the presence of atherosclerosis, new research indicates.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel approach may improve valve function in some patientsPulsed cavitation ultrasound can be used to remotely soften human degenerative calcified biosprosthetic valves and significantly improve the valve opening function, according to a new study. This new noninvasive approach has the potential to improve the outcome of patients with severe bioprosthesis stenosis.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meditation and yoga can 'reverse' DNA reactions which cause stress, new study suggestsMind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi don't simply relax us; they can 'reverse' the molecular reactions in our DNA which cause ill-health and depression, according to a study.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gender, race and class: Language change in post-apartheid South AfricaA new study of language and social change in post-apartheid South Africa demonstrates that gender is a more powerful determinant than class among black university students.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Holes drilled in shells point to bigger predators picking on small preyThe drill holes left in fossil shells by hunters such as snails and slugs show marine predators have grown steadily bigger and more powerful over time but stuck to picking off small prey, rather than using their added heft to pursue larger quarry, new research shows.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video imaging of single molecule DNA replicationAlmost all life on Earth is based on DNA being copied, or replicated. Now for the first time, scientists have been able to watch the replication of a single DNA molecule, with some surprising findings. For one thing, there's a lot more randomness at work than has been thought.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hi-res view of protein complex shows how it breaks up protein tanglesA new, high-resolution view of the structure of Hsp104 (heat shock protein 104), a natural yeast protein nanomachine with six subunits, may show news ways to dismantle harmful protein clumps in disease.
19h
Live Science
The Science of Sexism: Why Workplaces Are So Hard to ChangeThe recent case of man in a powerful position making a sexist comment — during a company meeting aimed partly at addressing discrimination against women — raises the question of why gender issues in the workplace are so difficult to quash.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New medication guidelines for rheumatic disease patients having joint replacementIn the first such collaboration of its kind, an expert panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons has developed guidelines for the perioperative management of anti-rheumatic medication in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement. The guidelines aim to reduce the risk of infection after joint replacement.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds common household chemicals lead to birth defects in miceA new study at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech has found a connection between common household chemicals and birth defects.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In Medicaid patients, fatal overdose risk rises with opioid dose and sedative-hypnotic useAmong Medicaid patients taking opioids for chronic pain, the risk of fatal overdose rises steadily with daily opioid dose, reports a study in the July issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
19h
Ars Technica
Google Play is fighting an uphill battle against Android adware Enlarge (credit: SophosLabs ) Google's official Play marketplace is waging an uphill battle against Android apps that display an unending stream of popup ads even when users try to force them to stop, researchers said Friday. The researchers, from UK-based SophosLabs, said they have found a total of 47 apps in the past week that collectively have racked up as many as 6 million downloads. They all
19h
Inside Science
BRIEF: Dressmakers See in Super 3-D BRIEF: Dressmakers See in Super 3-D Dressmakers are exceptional at judging distances, while dentists and surgeons are no better than the rest of us. top_dressmaker.jpg Image credits: amixstudio via shutterstock Culture Friday, June 16, 2017 - 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Who has the sharpest eyes for distance and depth? You may think it would be surgeons, with their need to
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noiseless river 'bubble' taxi sails through Paris testAn odd-looking electric boat taxi whose inventor believes it could be an eco-friendly transport solution for cities worldwide was put to the test in Paris for the first time Friday.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MAVEN's top 10 discoveries at MarsOn June 17, NASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) will celebrate 1,000 Earth days in orbit around the Red Planet. Since its launch in November 2013 and its orbit insertion in September 2014, MAVEN has been exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars. MAVEN is bringing insight to how the sun stripped Mars of most of its atmosphere, turning a planet once possibly habitable to micr
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU unveils plans to regulate drones by 2019The EU unveiled a blueprint to safely regulate drone traffic in Europe by 2019 in order to tap the growing commercial potential for unmanned aircraft technology.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivityA team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building a better alligator: Researchers develop advanced 3-D models of bite dataThe skulls of alligators protect their brains, eyes and sense organs while producing some of the most powerful bite forces in the animal kingdom. The ability to bite hard is critical for crocodilians to eat their food such as turtles, wildebeest and other large prey; therefore, their anatomy is closely studied by veterinarians and paleontologists who are interested in animal movements and anatomy.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bangladesh's heavy rainfall examined with NASA's IMERGAt least 156 people in Bangladesh were killed during the past week by landslides and floods caused by heavy rainfall. NASA calculated the amount of rain that has fallen using data from satellites.
20h
Gizmodo
Breathe Into a Paper Bag While This Real-Life Spider-Man Climbs a 29-Story Hotel GIF Thanks to an exterior clad in what look like reflective metal bars, Alain Robert , a professional urban climber, simply walked up to the Meliá Barcelona Sky hotel and started climbing , eventually scaling the 29-story structure in just 22 minutes, without the use of any safety gear. Robert is well known for his climbing stunts like this, having previously tackled some of the tallest buildings
20h
Ars Technica
Poll shows trust for NASA on climate, but some put Fox News in second Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock ) There are plenty of places where you can find dodgy information about climate change. If you’re the arguing (“debating”) type, you have likely, at some point, been exasperated by the obviously low quality of the sources cited by your opponent (or uncle). Setting aside the occasional conspiratorial mind who believes “those scientists” can’t be trusted, who do
20h
Wired
How Amazon Buying Whole Foods Could Transform Grocery ShoppingBy buying Whole Foods, Amazon can take its wild grocery store vision nationwide.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Apple Isn’t as Late to Automated Driving as You Might ThinkSeveral companies have a head start in building self-driving cars, but Apple has a surprising amount of relevant experience.
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Eclipse watchers catch part of the sun’s surface fleeing to spaceA serendipitous eruption during a solar eclipse showed relatively cool blobs of plasma, wrapped in a million-degree flame, streaming from the sun.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivityArgonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.
20h
Gizmodo
This is What Happens When You Teach an AI to Name Guinea Pigs This Guinea Pig is named “Hanger Dan.” (Image Courtesy of Portland Guinea Pig Rescue) As literally every sci-fi movie has predicted, we’re becoming increasingly reliant on artificial intelligence. AI can already compose music , play Ms. Pac-Man —like a pro, nonetheless—and even manage a hotel . But it’s never been used solely for the purpose of naming small, fluffy guinea pigs—until now. Earlier
20h
Gizmodo
I Squished A Bug Inside My Monitor's Screen And Now I Want To Die It all started when I thought I saw a bug crawling across my computer monitor. Huh, I thought, it’s a bug crawling across my computer monitor. I reached out to flick it off, and found that I could not. I stared at it, unsure of what I was seeing. The bug was there, but I could not touch it. Was I hacked? Was this some sort of malware? Eventually I concluded that no, it was a real bug, crawling ar
20h
Ars Technica
Mario’s new tricks make Super Mario Odyssey a joy Check out the infectious joy as Ars Technica's editors try Super Mario Odyssey for the first time. (video link) As the kind of Mario fan who created a successful Super Mario Bros. fan site at age 15 , I'm pretty familiar with how the series has slowly evolved over the years. It's striking, looking back, how Mario's standard repertoire of moves, abilities, and power-ups grows slowly with each new
20h
cognitive science
A new paper in PSPB explores how different types of moral beliefs affect your willingness to interact with others. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
20h
The Atlantic
Trump Breaks a Promise to his Voters on Immigration During and after the 2016 election, friends in the immigration restriction movement would remonstrate: "Donald Trump is the only hope we have, don’t you see that?” I’d answer, “He’s betrayed everyone else who ever trusted him. What makes you think you will be special?” And today, President Trump confirmed my dark view: He’s just inflicted near-lethal damage on any hope of enduring immigration ref
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obamacare key to improving access in Mexican-American patients with hypertensionThe Affordable Care Act, if embraced, can dramatically reduce disparities between Mexican-heritage people and white patients with hypertension, new research concludes.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New web calculator to more accurately predict bowel cancer survival'How long do I have, doctor?' For many cancer patients, following the initial shock of their diagnosis, thoughts quickly turn to estimating how much precious time they have left with family and friends or whether certain treatments could prolong their life.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mathematicians deliver formal proof of Kepler ConjectureA mathematical problem more than 300 years old gets a formal proof with the help of computer formal verification.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viral vectors for gene transfer travel longer distances in the brain than thoughtGene transfer with laboratory-produced viruses is seen as a hopeful therapy for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. A team or researchers investigated how far these viruses spread in the brain and which cells they infect. Some of these viruses traveled from injection site as far as the olfactory bulb or the cerebellum and infected neurons and other cells. This could improve selection of viral ve
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distant brain regions selectively recruit stem cellsStem cells persist in the adult mammalian brain and generate new neurons throughout life. A research group reports that long-distance brain connections can target discrete pools of stem cells in their niche and stimulate them to divide and produce specific subtypes of olfactory bulb neurons. This allows the 'on-demand' generation of particular types of neurons in the adult brain.
20h
Live Science
Has Everest's Iconic Hillary Step Really Collapsed? Here's the ScienceThe Hillary Step, a rocky outcrop just beneath the summit of Everest, has finally succumbed to gravity and partially collapsed.
21h
Popular Science
Buying Whole Foods could complete an Amazon ecosystem a decade in the making Technology Maybe the Dash Wand was a good idea after all A day after rolling out seemingly frivolous hardware, Amazon's impending Whole Foods purchase may have tipped its hand about why.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel approach may improve valve function in some patientsPulsed cavitation ultrasound can be used to remotely soften human degenerative calcified biosprosthetic valves and significantly improve the valve opening function, according to a novel study published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. This new noninvasive approach has the potential to improve the outcome of patients with severe bioprosthesis stenosis.
21h
Gizmodo
There's Something Weird About Cars 3 Lightning McQueen is chasing his future in Cars 3. All Images: Disney No matter how invested you are, or aren’t, in Pixar’s Cars films, the latest entry creates a weirdly interesting narrative around the franchise. Imagine if, after Blade Runner , Harrison Ford made a rom-com-dram sequel where Rick Deckard was suddenly running a hotel. And then he made Blade Runner 2049 , where he was suddenly a
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Volcanic crystals give a new view of magmaVolcanologists are gaining a new understanding of what's going on inside the magma reservoir that lies below an active volcano and they're finding a colder, more solid place than previously thought, according to new research.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A more safe and efficient means for drug manufacturingScientists have developed a system that uses continuous flow technology, instead of a batch-by-batch approach, to produce pharmaceutical compounds, and they used it to manufacture a chemotherapy drug that's currently under evaluation in clinical trials.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrolytes made from liquefied gas enable batteries to run at ultra-low temperaturesEngineers have developed new electrolytes that enable lithium batteries to run at temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with excellent performance -- in comparison, today's lithium-ion batteries stop working at -20 degrees Celsius. The new electrolytes also enable electrochemical capacitors to run as cold as -80 degrees Celsius -- their current limit is -40 degrees Celsius.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Japanese slow earthquakes could shed light on tsunami generationUnderstanding slow-slip earthquakes in subduction zone areas may help researchers understand large earthquakes and the creation of tsunamis, according to researchers who used data from instruments placed on the seafloor and in boreholes east of the Japanese coast.
21h
Live Science
New Biofuel Could Work in Regular Diesel EnginesA new way of refining biodiesel so that it works in standard diesel car engines could help broaden the use of renewable fuels, according to scientists.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Leddegigtpatienter med lungefibrose har ekstrem høj dødelighed Dødelighed hos leddegigtpatienter med lungefibrose er på niveau med mange kræftpatienter, viser registerundersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
21h
Ars Technica
How to write a meaningful FCC comment supporting net neutrality Enlarge / Protestors object to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to eliminate net neutrality rules before Pai's appearance at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC on May 5, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla ) If you're hoping to keep strong net neutrality rules on the books, a former Federal Communications Commission official has some advice for writing a great comment to t
21h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 6/10–6/16 Cosplay in Australia, the brutal Calcio Storico Fiorentino in Florence, a hyperrealistic animatronic baby in Spain, the Golden State Warriors win the NBA Finals in California, protests in Moscow, a terrible tower fire in England, and much more
21h
The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘Wants’ by Edith Wharton Before she was a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Edith Wharton was unpublished and unmarried Edith Jones, a young writer still developing the “sharp eye” that British novelist Margaret Drabble praised in her short stories and the “empathy and ambivalence” that our own Ta-Nehisi Coates found , and loved, in The Age of Innocence . Wharton’s transformation from teenage poet to acclaimed novelist can
21h
Live Science
Ancient Jerusalem Tower Is (Much) Younger Than ThoughtA stone tower that guarded a precious water supply for the ancient city of Jerusalem isn't quite as old as previously thought, according to new results from an extremely precise dating technique.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building a better alligator: Researchers develop advanced 3-D models of bite dataThe ability to bite hard is critical for crocodilians to eat their food such as turtles, wildebeest and other large prey; therefore, their anatomy is closely studied by veterinarians and paleontologists who are interested in animal movements and anatomy. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Southern Indiana have developed three-dimensional models of the skull of the
21h
Ars Technica
Kiss singer wants to trademark “devil horns” rock and roll sign Enlarge / Gene Simmons of KISS performing in 2015. (credit: Photo by Neil Lupin/Redferns via Getty Images ) Gene Simmons, longtime frontman for the rock band Kiss, wants a hand gesture that has been used by rock 'n' roll fans for decades to be his personal trademark. Simmons filed an application at the US Patent and Trademark Office, seeking to trademark his symbol, at right, for the commercial c
21h
NYT > Science
Matter: Scientists Discover a Key to a Longer Life in Male DNAResearchers have found a genetic mutation linked to longer life span — but only in men. It joins a very short list of gene variants with similar effects.
21h
Ars Technica
Mini-review: The 2017 MacBook could actually be your everyday laptop Andrew Cunningham The MacBook Air has been one of Apple's most popular, most enduring laptop designs, but that wasn't always the case. When the first version of the laptop was released back in 2008 , you had to pay too high a price for its thinness and lightness. And I'm not just talking about the literal price of the thing, either, although its $1,799 starting price was steep by any standard. No
21h
Gizmodo
Scientists Find Genetic Mutation That Could Increase the Male Lifespan Jiroemon Kimura, the oldest man ever (Image: YouTube /Screenshot) Professor S. Jay Olshansky once told Gizmodo, “In the world of aging sciences, if you want to live a long life, choose long-lived parents.” So genetic markers linked to longevity are interesting as hell. But if you’ve got the wrong genes, then the wrong moves might do you in. A team of researchers from universities in the United St
21h
Popular Science
American and Chinese aircraft could be flying 4,000 miles per hour by 2030 From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal How China and the United States compare in the hypersonic arms race By the 2030s, the high skies could be filled with American and Chinese hypersonic aircraft flying at over 4,000 miles per hour. Read on.
21h
Gizmodo
The New iPad Pro Is Incredible, But Not Worth the Upgrade Photos: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo The iPad has a problem that we should all wish to have: It’s too damn good . The battery life and standby battery life are superb, the screen is pretty, the apps are nice, and the thing is powerful enough it can last for years. That’s wonderful for all of us consumers, but it is not great for Apple or any other company building a tablet device. They want us on the same
21h
Gizmodo
Save a Few Bucks On Anker's Newest PowerCore Battery Pack Anker PowerCore II Slim 10000 , $28 with code SLIMQUIK Anker’s PowerCore line has long been our readers’ favorite brand of USB battery packs , and you can save a few bucks on the newest model , while supplies last. The PowerCore II Slim appears to be the first PowerCore battery pack to include Anker’s new chipset, which delivers the fastest possible charging speeds to every USB device you own, in
21h
Dagens Medicin
Skift fra original til biosimilær gigtmedicin påvirker ikke sygdomsaktivitet Sygdomsaktivitet blandt artritpatienter tre måneder før og efter skift fra original til biosimilær etanercept var uændret, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Aggressiv behandling af leddegigt giver gode langtidsresultater 11 års opfølgningsdata fra det danske CIMESTRA-studie viser god og høj sygdomskontrol efter tidlig behandling med methotrexat og binyrebarkhormon. Kun hver femte patient fik behov for biologisk behandling.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Biologisk behandling har reduceret leddegigtpatienters behov for knæ- eller hofteprotese Efter indførelse af retningslinjer for behandling med biologiske lægemidler til leddegigtpatienter i 2002, er disse patienters behov for knæ- og hoftealloplastik faldet drastisk, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Nye effektive behandlinger på vej til patienter med psoriasisgigtTo nye former for medicin mod psoriasisgigt viser lovende resultater i fase II- og fase III-forsøg.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Genvarianter øger risiko for hjerte-kar-sygdomme hos gigtramteGener er årsag til højere forekomst af hjerte-kar-sygdomme blandt personer med kroniske immunmedierede inflammatoriske sygdomme som leddegigt, psoriasisgigt og lupus, viser ny forskning.
21h
Dagens Medicin
Passiv rygning i barndommen øger risiko for leddegigt Nyt studie viser for første gang en sammenhæng mellem passiv rygning i barndommen og risikoen for at udvikle leddegigt som voksen. Rygning øger også sygdomsudvikling hos patienter med Bechterews sygdom.
21h
The Atlantic
Q of the Week: What Food Would You Request From the White House Chef? June is “National Soul Food Month.” The cuisine, writes soul-food historian Adrian Miller, “has long been the foundation for home cooking in the White House.” President Ronald Reagan was a big fan of fried chicken, President John Tyler apparently used to serve hog jowl and turnip greens to his friends, and former First Lady Michelle Obama planted soul-food greens in the White House garden to eat
21h
The Atlantic
The Disputed Death of an 8-Year-Old Whose Organs Were Donated This is the part everyone agrees on: A 8-year-old boy died at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in August 2013. His liver and kidneys were donated for transplant. The Los Angeles Times reports police are now investigating exactly how he died at the hospital. The boy—though not technically brain dead—had suffered so much brain damage after a near drowning that doctors determined he would never wak
21h
Ars Technica
Watchdog report finds alarming 20% of baby food tested contains lead Enlarge (credit: Getty | Media for Medical ) Twenty percent of 2,164 baby foods sampled between 2003 and 2013 by the Food and Drug Administration tested positive for lead, according to an analysis released Thursday by the nonprofit advocacy group, the Environmental Defense Fund. Lead is a neurotoxin. Exposure at a young age can permanently affect a developing brain, causing lifelong behavioral pr
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bangladesh's heavy rainfall examined with NASA's IMERGAt least 156 people in Bangladesh were killed during the past week by landslides and floods caused by heavy rainfall. NASA calculated the amount of rain that has fallen using data from satellites.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook Is Enlisting Human Experts and AI to Fight TerrorismTechnology alone won’t defeat the social network’s problems with extremist content.
22h
Futurity.org
Why so little grassroots action against climate change? While Americans support action on climate change, many don’t see the issue as an immediate threat and so the issue does not elicit the powerful responses necessary for Americans to mobilize, argues sociologist Doug McAdam. Despite widespread belief that climate change is a problem, an effective, sustained grassroots movement to influence climate change policy has not developed in the United State
22h
The Atlantic
Minitel, the Open Network Before the Internet In 1991, most Americans had not yet heard of the internet. But all of France was online, buying, selling, gaming, and chatting, thanks to a ubiquitous little box that connected to the telephone. It was called Minitel. Minitel was a computer terminal. It housed a screen, a keyboard, and a modem—but not a microprocessor. Instead of computing on its own, Minitel connected to remote services via upli
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
Meet the Chinese Finance Giant That’s Secretly an AI CompanyThe smartphone payments business Ant Financial is using computer vision, natural language processing, and mountains of data to reimagine banking, insurance, and more.
22h
Popular Science
A Texas-size chunk of Antarctica partially melted last year Environment It could be a sign of more damage to come. El Niño has given us a preview of West Antarctica’s future, and things do not look good.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigating emotional spillover in the brainWhen we let emotions from one event carry on to the next, such spillover can color our impressions and behavior in new situations - sometimes for the worse. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are discovering what happens in the brain when such emotional spillover occurs. Their findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics promote resistance on experimental croplandsCanadian researchers have generated both novel and existing antibiotic resistance mechanisms on experimental farmland, by exposing the soil to specific antibiotics. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes and the environment? Factors, patterns that lead to childhood obesity riskA factor that has been linked to childhood obesity is restrictive feeding practices by primary caregivers, the implication being that it may interfere with a child's ability to learn to self-regulate food intake. When a child is overweight, parents tend to use more controlling, restrictive feeding practices. A new study is showing that a child's genetics, related to emotion and cognition, may also
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On the road to creating an electrodeless spacecraft propulsion engineResearchers have been trying to find out how the plasma flow is influenced by its environment via laboratory experiments. And in doing so, have made headway on research towards creating an electrodeless plasma thruster used to propel spacecraft.
22h

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.