Gizmodo
BBC News Program Experiences the Most Awkward Glitch GIF GIF Source: BBC Viewers of BBC’s News at Ten were entranced last night when a glitch in its system produced over four minutes of surreal beauty. As the program began, the usual opening rush of clips from around the world accompanied by dramatic music played. A breaking news graphic flew up onscreen and then there was silence. The host, Huw Edwards, sat at his desk, patiently awaiting his cue.
5h
Ingeniøren
Disse 15 virksomheder har flest ledige stillinger lige nu Listen giver dig en top 15 over de mest søgende virksomheder, hvor du fx finder Forsvaret, Siemens, Netcompany, Rambøll og MAN Diesel. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/disse-15-virksomheder-har-flest-ledige-stillinger-lige-nu-8741 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More frequent sexual activity can boost brain power in older adults, according to studyMore frequent sexual activity has been linked to improved brain function in older adults, according to a study by the universities of Coventry and Oxford.
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LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bolivian glacier samples ready for global ice archivesScientists studying global warming recently climbed Bolivia's towering Mount Illimani and extracted samples of glacier ice packed with thousands of years of climate data.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inflight internet ready to take offInflight internet access, a nascent market still hobbled by slow speeds, is set to take off as dedicated satellites make surfing in the skies a reality, experts say.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record UK rainfall in winter 2013-14 caused by tropics, stratosphere and climate warmingNew research has revealed the causes of the UK's record rainfall and subsequent flooding during the 2013-14 winter.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biofilms—the eradication has begunHave you ever heard of biofilms? They are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes, like bacteria and fungi, in order to colonize surfaces. They can grow on animal and plant tissues, and even inside the human body on medical devices such as catheters, heart valves, or artificial hips. Biofilms protect microbes from the body's immune system and increase their resistance to antibioti
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Viden
Gravides forbrug af Panodil kan ødelægge drenges seksualdrift i voksenlivetSådan lyder advarslen fra danske forskere, efter museforsøg har vist, at stoffet paracetamol halverer nervecellerne i det hjerneområde, som styrer seksualdriften hos mus.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taiwan's Foxconn says Toshiba deal 'not over'The head of Taiwan's tech giant Foxconn said Thursday its pursuit of Toshiba "is not yet over", a day after the Japanese firm announced it preferred another group of bidders to acquire its prized chip business.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN says world population will reach 9.8 billion in 2050India's population is expected to surpass China's in about seven years and Nigeria is projected to overtake the United States and become the third most populous country in the world shortly before 2050, a U.N. report said Wednesday.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake quake: Report of major California temblor a false alarmThe only tremors from a reported major earthquake off the California coast came on the internet.
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare US total solar eclipse excites Americans coast-to-coastFor the first time in almost a century the United States is preparing for a coast-to-coast solar eclipse, a rare celestial event millions of Americans, with caution, will be able to observe.
30min
Science | The Guardian
Cassava crisis: the deadly food that doubles as a vital Venezuelan crop It is a plant that millions depend on for survival. But another, identical variety can be lethal – and desperate people turning to the black market can’t tell them apart Venezuela has suffered food shortages for several years but things only seem to be getting worse. People are resorting to the black market for food, skipping meals and rummaging through garbage in search of sustenance. Last year
1h
Science | The Guardian
Vincent Fournier's best photograph: Boris the cosmonaut shows off his spacesuit ‘After two hours of drinking vodka, General Boris suggested we just do the shoot at his house’ Star City is a self-contained city for cosmonauts about an hour from Moscow. Astronauts still come from all over the world to get trained there. It might look dated but, underneath, the important stuff is all working. As well as a training centre, it has a launch site, a technical department, a school,
1h
NeuWrite West
The Best-Laid Schemes of Mice and Men. We’ve domesticated animals for as long as we can remember. When you think of domestication, you probably think of companion animals like dogs and cats, work animals like horses and oxen, and meat animals like chickens and cows. Each of these species can be found in many shapes and sizes, due to millennia of selective breeding that strengthened the traits we as humans found useful or desirable. To
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Live Science
How Many Teens Are Really Having Sex These Days?The percentage of teens in the U.S. who have had sex had ticked down since the 1980s, a new report finds.
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NYT > Science
Frédérick Leboyer, Who Saw Childbirth Through Baby’s Eyes, Dies at 98Mr. Leboyer, a French physician, advocated natural birth methods that focused on easing suffering for the baby.
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Science | The Guardian
Why I left physics for economics I recently decided to abandon the rules which govern nature for the rules which govern people and markets: economics. Why would I do such a thing? I love physics. Brick-by-brick, you can build new theories from established ones and know that they will apply not just on Earth but throughout the entire Universe. The up-sides are incredible: I worked on the theory and simulation of plasmas (the stuf
1h
Gizmodo
Hands-On With Sansar, The New Second Life In 2003, when Second Life launched, all it took was a few customization bars and the promise of infinite possibility to get users hooked on the idea of a virtual reality. Now, in 2017, our standards are a bit higher. “Immersion” isn’t as easy to sell with a microphone, an avatar and some content creation software. Sansar, made by Second Life creator Linden Lab, is striving to meet 2017’s standard
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studies of US Lassa fever patient offer clues about immune response, viral persistenceResearchers were able to closely study a Lassa fever patient's immune response over time after he was evacuated to the US for treatment.An experimental drug, favipiravir, was used in treating the US patient and an additional patient infected with Lassa virus in Germany. The drug appeared to have few serious side effects, but its efficacy is unknown.Individual patient reports cannot be generalized
2h
Science-Based Medicine
“Chronic Lyme” VIP Daniel Cameron disciplined by New York medical authorities"Chronic Lyme" guru Daniel Cameron, MD, has been put on 3-year probation by New York medical authorities. Will fellow "Lyme literate" doctors take note?
2h
Ingeniøren
Dansk klimastation skal kortlægge forholdene på Camp CenturyGeus overvåger de næste fire år den nedlagte amerikanske militærbase under isen i det nordvestlige Grønland.
2h
Ingeniøren
Statens digitaliseringschef: It-leverandører maler skønhedsmalerier af egne evner It-leverandørerne går for ofte efter at byde på et it-projekt til en skarp, lav pris, så de vinder en kontrakt. Det betyder mindre, om man kan levere den vare, som de offentlige institutioner efterspørger, mener styrelsesdirektør Lars Frelle-Petersen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/statens-digitaliseringsdirektoer-it-leverandoerer-maler-skoenhedsmalerier-egne-evner-1077743 Version2
2h
Gizmodo
Mylan Sells Asthma Treatments While It Quietly Invests in Coal Photo: Getty Mylan is one of the most loathsome companies on Earth. Usually, they are hated for charging people with life-threatening allergies extortionate amounts of money for the only drug on the market that can help them. But a new report points out that there are many other reasons hate the company. Namely contributing to air pollution while they sell drugs to help people with respiratory pr
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biofilms -- the eradication has begunBiofilms are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes in order to colonize surfaces. They protect microbes from the body's immune system and increase their resistance to antibiotics. Biofilms represent one of the biggest threats to patients in hospital settings. But there is good news -- Canadian scientists have developed a novel enzyme technology that prevents the formation of bio
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More guns now being purchased for self-defense than recreationIn a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers determined that there has been a shift towards more lethal weapons that appear to be designed primarily for self-defense, rather than recreational use, such as hunting, target shooting, or other forms of recreation.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors has declinedFrom 1999/2000 to 2011/2012, exposure to secondhand smoke among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors declined from 39.6 percent to 15.7 percent, but rates of exposure were higher among those with a history of a smoking-related cancer and those living below the federal poverty level compared with those with other types of cancer and those with the highest incomes, respectively.
3h
The Atlantic
Milwaukee Police Officer Found 'Not Guilty' in Death of Sylville Smith Dominique Heaggan-Brown, the Milwaukee police officer who fatally shot 23-year-old Sylville Smith in August 2016, was acquitted of all charges on Wednesday, including a charge of first-degree reckless homicide. Heaggan-Brown is the third law enforcement officer to be tried for a shooting in the U.S. in the last week, and the second to receive an acquittal. On Friday, former Minnesota police offic
3h
Live Science
What is Acupuncture?Treatment with acupuncture needles does work to alleviate pain and nausea, studies show.
3h
Live Science
Head Lice: Symptoms, Treatment and PreventionIt may take more than a month for symptoms of head lice to show.
3h
Gizmodo
With New Context, These Old Quotes About the Han Solo Movie Speak Volumes Happier times. Phil Lord and Chris Miller at Star Wars Celebration Europe in 2016. Image: Disney Even before co-directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were fired from the Han Solo movie , they didn’t talk about the film in public a lot. One place they did was at last year’s Star Wars Celebration, and reading the quotes now is very weird. For example, here’s a quote from Lord, when talking about the
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-line immunotherapy treatment can improve survival for subset of lung cancer patientsFindings from a phase III clinical trial for advanced lung cancer patients could help oncologists better predict which patients are likely to receive the most benefit from immunotherapy as a first-line treatment based on the unique molecular characteristics of their tumor, according to a new study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive catsThe elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networksThe absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show.
5h
The Atlantic
Russia Cancels Meeting With U.S. Over Increased Sanctions Russia has cancelled a planned meeting between its deputy foreign minister, Sergey Rybakov, and U.S. Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon in response to a new round of sanctions imposed by the U.S. The sanctions, which pertain to more than three dozen individuals and organizations involved in the Russian invasion of Ukraine, were announced Tuesday as President Trump welcomed Ukrainian President P
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSDSpecific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A simple solution to protect critical infrastructureExperts have provided a solution for stopping flooding in subway tunnels in the form of a giant inflatable plug that will seal them off and stop water from flowing throughout the subway system into stations and other subway lines.
5h
Gizmodo
The Predator Set Was a Bug-Filled Hell for the Naked Screencap from Predator (20th Century Fox) The Hollywood Reporter just posted a great, in-depth oral history of Predator . But what stuck out the most was just how bad things got for Richard Chaves, who played Poncho. Specifically, he spoke about his run-ins with nature, which he shared using perhaps too much detail. First up is a lesson to never, ever sit down. Ever. Anywhere. A lot of it was ra
6h
New Scientist - News
Private data of 198 million US voters accidentally leaked onlineThe data, collected on behalf of the Republican National Committee, included people's phone numbers and addresses as well as assumptions about their religion and ethnicity
6h
New Scientist - News
Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillersA new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity
6h
Ars Technica
“The enemy is real,” and the new Game of Thrones trailer is too It's the new trailer for Game of Thrones season 7! The second big trailer for Game of Thrones season 7 is here, and I'm starting to get pretty excited for the July 16 premiere. The cast and crew have promised that this penultimate season, only a measly seven episodes, will move at a faster pace than previous ones. Plus, all the characters will eventually find themselves in the same place at some
6h
The Atlantic
Populism Will Save the Democrats Democrats suffer from a painfully common misperception that cost them the 2016 presidential election: that they are the party of the economic elite. Franklin Foer argues that they need to craft their own version of populism – not Trump-style economic nationalism, but a program that rails against monopoly and crony capitalism.
7h
Gizmodo
It Looks Like the Senate's Health Bill Is Almost as Vile as the House Bill Photo: Getty Mitch McConnell and his tiny cabal of fellow senators are finally ready to unveil their plan to take away health insurance from millions of people. The official presentation of the new bill will happen tomorrow morning but some outlets received a preview of what it contains on Wednesday. It sounds ever so slightly less “mean” than the House bill. Senators will reportedly receive thei
7h
Futurity.org
Poll: Split on Trump, Americans agree on these issues Voters in swing districts may be moving away from supporting President Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans, but support for the president may be growing in Republican strongholds, new polling suggests. The poll also finds that many Americans agree on a few issues usually thought to be politically divisive. “A deeper analysis into five distinct locales across the country suggests areas that
7h
Futurity.org
Cave holds clues to stormy weather 8,200 years ago California had a 150-year stretch of unusually wet and stormy weather about 8,200 years ago, a study of stalagmites in White Moon Cave in the Santa Cruz Mountains suggests. The findings offer hints to what would happen if global warming reaches a point where glaciers in Greenland and other parts of the globe melt rapidly enough to dump large amounts of fresh water into the ocean. The wet weather
7h
cognitive science
X-post from /r/AskPhilosophy about the conflict between values and scientific research submitted by /u/MaxDemian_ [link] [comments]
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Keep Rolling Luggage Upright With PhysicsA team of physicists has revealed why rolling suitcases start rocking from wheel to wheel—and how to avoid that frustrating phenomenon. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
India genome plan could boost healthcareCould an effort to gather genetic data from its population of one billion people help India take the lead in advanced healthcare?
7h
NYT > Science
Dr. Lawrence Weed, Pioneer in Recording Patient Data, Dies at 93Dr. Weed created a system for organizing medical data that is used all over the world, and helped develop a computerized method for aiding diagnosis and treatment.
7h
Live Science
Pets Help in Hospitals, But Safety May Be LackingPolicies for pet therapy programs in health care facilities may fall short in protecting the people and pets involved.
7h
Gizmodo
No Games? No Problem. The Latest Humble Bundle Has a Ton of Great Software For Cheap. Humble Software Bundle Humble’s putting video games in the backseat this week with the launch of the Humble Software Bundle , which is focused solely on software to make you more productive, more creative, and more secure. Highlights here include a year of LastPass Premium, CloudApp Pro, and Corel Painter Essentials 5, but that’s just scratching the surface. You can get everything for as little a
7h
Futurity.org
Your popular online friends are probably happier New research finds that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This phenomenon may cause most people on sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends, but also less happy. “…it’s nearly impossible to escape negative comparisons to their friends’ popularity and happiness.” For the purposes of this study, whi
7h
Futurity.org
Do microbes cause babies to arrive too soon? Vaginal microbes during pregnancy play a role in preterm birth, research suggests. More than 10 percent of babies in the United States are born prematurely, yet very little is know about the underlying causes. Vaginal infections long have been thought to be related to preterm birth, prompting researchers to look at the mix of microbes in the vagina during pregnancy. In a study of predominantly Af
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto landThe fossil of an early snake-like animal -- called Lethiscus stocki -- has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years. Now, an international team of researchers has revealed new insights into the ancient Scottish fossil that dramatically challenge our understanding of the early evolution of tetrapods, or four-limbed animals with backbones.
7h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Disturbing Footage What We’re Following Video Evidence: Minnesota officials have released another video taken in the aftermath of the traffic stop where former police officer Jeronimo Yanez fatally shot Philando Castile. The footage shows Castile’s girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, with her 4-year-old daughter in the back of a squad car; Reynolds is handcuffed, and her daughter pleads, “I don’t want you to get shooted.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report on stillbirth and neonatal death rates across the UKStudy shows fall in stillbirth rate across the UK -- a step towards the government target.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Record UK rainfall in winter 2013-14 caused by tropics, stratosphere and climate warmingNew research has revealed the causes of the UK's record rainfall and subsequent flooding during the 2013-14 winter.Using carefully tailored atmosphere/ocean model experiments, the research team found that a combination of unusual tropical conditions, the stratospheric polar vortex, and climate warming were behind the extreme rainfall, which led to severe flooding across many parts of the UK.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmetic procedures practice and promotion 'cause for serious concern,' says ethics bodyNew developments and marketing have made an increasing range of surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures -- including botox, dermal fillers, implants, and skin lightening, as well as newer techniques such as 'fat freezing' and 'vampire' treatments -- big business and widely accessible. Today the Nuffield Council on Bioethics publishes a wide-ranging new report, 'Cosmetic procedures: ethical i
8h
Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Hero: Mystics Rising Daniela Gamba and Rob Hamill for Eyewire Mystics Rising Seung Lab has been working on something special for well over a year now and we’re stoked to finally share it with you. For the first time, we’ll teleport into a new dimension of brain and reconstruct the strange, wild neurons of zfish Mystic ! All Scythes who maintain at least 95% reaping accuracy and Scythe Complete 200 cubes per month are
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Science | The Guardian
Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas Scotland is home to majority of 4,000 sites on database – but many are not on hills and are not really forts, say researchers Some soar out of the landscape and have impressed tourists and inspired historians and artists for centuries, while others are tiny gems, tucked away on mountain or moor and are rarely visited. Related: First world war training tunnels and trenches discovered in Wiltshire
8h
The Atlantic
Officer Stabbed at Flint Airport in Possible Terrorist Attack The FBI is investigating a possible terrorist attack at Bishop International Airport in Flint, Michigan after a police officer was stabbed in the neck and back on Wednesday at around 9:40 a.m. local time. The officer, whom authorities identified as Lieutenant Jeff Neville, was originally in critical condition, but has since upgraded to stable condition after receiving surgery. NBC reports that Ne
8h
Big Think
Elon Musk Releases Detailed Plans for Colonizing Mars and Other Planets Elon Musk publishes a detailed paper on how he plans to colonize Mars and other planets in the solar system. Read More
8h
Live Science
Breastfeeding May Lower Women's Risk of Heart Attack, StrokeBreastfeeding may literally be good for the heart: A new study suggests that breastfeeding may lower women's risk of heart disease and stroke.
8h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Sun Showers and the Science Behind This Weather ParadoxLet’s take a moment to appreciate what causes the phenomenon of rain falling at the same time that the sun is shining.
8h
Popular Science
How a wildfire kicked up a 45,000-foot column of flames Environment In 2011, a New Mexico wildfire went from normal to nuclear. Three local scientists set out to learn why. In 2011, a New Mexico wildfire went from normal to nuclear. Three local scientists set out to why. Read on.
9h
Popular Science
Anatomy of a wildfire Environment The 2011 Las Conchas wildfire was big even before it blew up on June 27. The 2011 Las Conchas wildfire was big even before it blew up on June 27.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Race to the bottomThe obscure and difficult to reach tracts of the seabed being claimed in the hope they contain mineral riches.
9h
The Atlantic
The Fall of a Foreign-Affairs Reporter Journalism scandals are all too common: Reporters are as fallible as the practitioners of any other profession, and because the press loves to cover itself, such stories receive great attention. But typically they’re of the garden variety—plagiarism, dishonesty, fabrication. The story of Jay Solomon is in an entirely different league. Solomon, until Wednesday The Wall Street Journal ’s chief fore
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Now, Without Further AHCAdo Today in 5 Lines President Trump celebrated Republican candidate Karen Handel's win in Georgia's special election on Twitter. During his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said Russia organized cyberattacks against the United States to influence the presidential election. Senate Republicans are expected to unveil their health-care pro
9h
Big Think
How Smoking Reflects the Deep Divide in American Society There’s a tragic socioeconomic divide between cigarette smokers and non-smokers in the U.S. Read More
9h
Ars Technica
Obama’s Energy Secretary is starting a low-carbon energy think tank Enlarge / PARIS, FRANCE - 2015/12/08: US Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz talks during a panel at the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. (credit: Getty Images ) Former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced that he is establishing an energy-focused think tank to provide research and analysis for state and local governments, industry leaders, and NGOs. The organization, cal
9h
Gizmodo
Ultimates 2 Is Turning Galactus and Ego the Living Planet Into Cosmic Superheroes Marvel There are certain comic book characters whose characterizations are so canonically static that it becomes difficult to imagine them ever changing in a significant way. Take Galactus for example. Since he was first introduced in Fantastic Four #48, he’s has done little else than threaten to devour planets. Recently, that all changed. In issue #2 of Al Ewing and Kenneth Rocafort’s Ultimates
9h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Watch The Diesel Brothers Give MLB All-Star Carlos Peña A Lesson In Suspension #DieselBrothers | Mondays at 9/8c While in Lakeland for Spring Training, Heavy D and Diesel Dave borrow a massive mud truck to show Carlos what it means to have a proper lift kit and durable suspension. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Diesel! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/d
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Well-known names surface as possible Uber CEO candidatesUber seeks a strong manager who can repair a broken image, juggle multiple lawsuits and government investigations, develop and nurture a new corporate culture and lead a successful IPO.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Non-classical growth of crystals: Drip by dripHow do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface. Chemists have now observed a preliminary stage of this crystal growth in glutamic acid that contradicts this classical principal of growth. Not individual atoms settle on an existing crystal surface, but nano-drips that already contain building blocks for growth.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New inhibitor drug shows promise in relapsed leukemiaA new drug shows promise in its ability to target one of the most common and sinister mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to researchers. In a first-in-human study, researchers treated relapsed patients with gilteritinib, an FLT3 inhibitor, and found it was a well-tolerated drug that led to frequent and more-sustained-than-expected clinical responses, almost exclusively in patient
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scrutiny intensifies over safety at US nuclear weapons labThe safety record at the U.S. laboratory that created the atomic bomb is facing intensifying criticism as work ramps up to produce a key component for the nation's nuclear weapons cache.
9h
The Atlantic
Who Blew Up Mosul's Al-Nuri Mosque? The historic Grand Mosque of al-Nuri in Mosul was destroyed Wednesday by the Islamic State, according to the Iraqi military. ISIS, however, claims a U.S. airstrike was responsible. “The Daesh (Islamic State) terror gangs committed another historical crime by blowing up the al-Nuri mosque and its historical al-Hadba minaret,” the Iraqi military said in a statement. ISIS, however, claimed in a stat
9h
Live Science
Good-Luck Root? Actually, That's a Lizard PenisBuyers beware, the tantric Indian root you ordered online may actually be dried lizard penis.
9h
Big Think
Maybe Huge Philanthropic Gifts Aren't What the World Needs Unless we take a more scientific approach to philanthropy, we risk spending a lot of money doing some very backward, ineffective, and inefficient things. Read More
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
University of Michigan getting driverless shuttles this fallTwo driverless shuttles will begin operating at the University of Michigan this fall.
10h
Ars Technica
Utility that says Comcast didn’t pay bills threatens to pull wires off poles Enlarge / A Comcast service vehicle. (credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images ) An electric utility in Tennessee has accused Comcast of not paying its bills for three years. The utility says it will start removing Comcast wires from utility poles next week unless the cable company pays up. In a notice on its website , the electric co-op said: If Comcast does not pay the amounts owed to STEMC [Southw
10h
Wired
Jon Ossoff Was the Congressional Candidate Social Media BuiltThe Democrat's loss in Georgia's 6th District is what happens when a local political campaign goes viral.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive catsThe elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill.
10h
The Atlantic
Saudi Arabia's Aggressive New Heir to the Throne In December 2015, a remarkable memo from Germany’s foreign intelligence service was leaked to news outlets. It argued that Saudi Arabia’s new leaders were destabilizing the Middle East. The memo said King Salman and his advisers had replaced the kingdom’s decades-long, cautious foreign policy with “an impulsive policy of intervention.” The Germans singled out the king’s favored son, Mohammed bin
10h
The Atlantic
The U.S. Enters a New Phase in Syria Since it initiated air strikes against the Islamic State in Syria in 2014, the United States has tried to insulate its war against ISIS from the civil war among Bashar Assad’s regime, Syrian rebels, and the parties’ respective foreign allies. That effort always had its limits, but it formally came to an end in an unprecedented series of U.S. attacks on regime forces and their Iranian backers in r
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis indicates that insurance expansion improves access to care, health, and survivalThere is strong evidence that expanding health insurance increases access to care, improves health in a variety of ways, and reduces mortality, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers,
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSDSpecific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data published June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-line immunotherapy treatment can improve survival for subset of lung cancer patientsFindings from a phase III clinical trial for advanced lung cancer patients could help oncologists better predict which patients are likely to receive the most benefit from immunotherapy as a first-line treatment based on the unique molecular characteristics of their tumor, according to a new study reported by a global team led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer - Arthur G. James Can
10h
Gizmodo
You Need Food and Water in Order to Live Image: Screenshots A bunch of news outlets reported that a “ breatharian ” couple survives on air alone . I’m not wasting my time debunking this shit. [via CNN ]
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networksThe absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system—from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poland says primeval forest should not be UNESCO natural heritage sitePolish Environment Minister Jan Szyszko, whom green activists have criticised for allowing large-scale logging in the ancient Bialowieza forest, on Wednesday called for the vast woodland to be stripped of UNESCO's natural heritage status, which bans any human intervention.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil, gas giants could waste trillions in a 2C world: reportThirty percent of investments planned by oil and gas majors over the next decade could be wasted if the world economy retools to cap global warming at two degrees Celsius, researchers warned Wednesday.
10h
Gizmodo
Paragliding at the Bottom of a Narrow Canyon Is Scarier Than Any Roller Coaster on Earth GIF At some point in time humanity got its wires crossed and parachutes, an invention designed to save lives, became a tool for risking life and limb. Instead of gracefully floating down the side of a mountain, paraglider Joseph Innes skimmed along the bottom of a narrow canyon , just inches away from breaking an ankle, and possibly every bone in his body. Thankfully he brought a camera along for
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber CEO is pushed out as company tries to clean up its actUnder Travis Kalanick's leadership, Uber's "Animal House"-style business plan was to grow as quickly as possible, steamrolling regulators while flouting the rules of workplace conduct.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networksThe absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New femto-camera with quadrillion fractions of a second resolutionResearchers from ITMO University have built a setup for recording holograms of tiny objects like living cells with a femtosecond speed. The new method allows one to reconstruct phase topography of a studied sample according to deformations that emerge in a laser pulse when it passes through the specimen. In comparison to electron microscopes, the device can visualize transparent biological structu
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive catsThe elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sculpture to honor 'Beautiful Mind' mathematician Nash, wifeA sculpture honoring famed mathematician John Nash and his wife will be erected in the New Jersey town where they spent their last years.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AP Source: Sandberg has no plans to leave Facebook for UberAt least one well-known person has already taken her name out of the running to be Uber's next CEO.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds recognition technology a step closer to use in courtroomIn most crime scenes, there is some information that is known only by investigators and the actual perpetrator. Only the kidnapper knows what the abandoned shed where they kept a victim looks like, and only the true thief will know which house was burglarized. When confronted by investigators about this type of information, suspects uniformly answer: "I've never seen that before." Soon, however, n
10h
Live Science
How Much of the Ocean Is Whale Pee (and Worse)?For marine wildlife, the ocean isn't just their home. It's also their toilet.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algae: The final frontierAlgae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review co-authored by Carnegie's Arthur Grossman in Trends in Plant Science.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto land"It's like a snake on the outside, but a fish on the inside."
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
U study finds recognition technology a step closer to use in courtroomA report by University of Minnesota Law Professor Francis Shen, the study's lead author and director of the Neurolaw Lab, finds that brain-based memory recognition technology may be one step closer to court. The findings suggest American jurors can appropriately integrate the evidence in their evaluations of criminal defendants, which could ultimately lead to an additional expert witness on the st
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An end to population aging in China, Germany, USPopulation aging could peak by 2040 in Germany and by 2070 in China, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, which combines new measures of aging with probabilistic population projections from the UN. In the USA, the study shows very little population aging at all in the coming century.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trash-picking seagulls poop tons of nutrientsAt least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills across North America, which aside from the nuisance it might pose, is also a threat to the health of nearby waters, a new Duke University study finds.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
New Model of Evolution Finally Reveals How Cooperation EvolvesBy treating evolution like a thermodynamic process, theorists have solved one the great problems in biology.
10h
Gizmodo
Physicists Think They Know How to Stop Your Rolly Suitcase From Tipping Over Image: AP Imagine: You’re at an airport with your fancy new bag rolling behind you. You have spent a little too much time deciding which plane snack will both taste good and doesn’t have too many calories, and now must sprint to catch your plane. You make a turn and suddenly, your bag begins to wobble. No time to fix it, you are now dragging your suitcase sideways to the gate. This is a problem f
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolutionBy combining the power of a "natural lens" in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery—the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research leverages big data to predict severe weatherEvery year, severe weather endangers millions of people and causes billions of dollars in damage worldwide. But new research from Penn State's College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) and AccuWeather has found a way to better predict some of these threats by harnessing the power of big data.
11h
Popular Science
What is sickle cell disease? Health The disease that primarily affects African Americans in the United States still has no cure. Sickle cell disease afflicts millions of people worldwide; in the United States alone, about 100,000 people live with the blood condition. Read on.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single fungus amplifies Crohn's disease symptomsA microscopic fungus called Candida tropicalis triggered gut inflammation and exacerbated symptoms of Crohn's disease, in a recent study conducted at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.
11h
NYT > Science
Jerry Nelson, Designer of the Segmented Telescope, Dies at 73Mr. Nelson’s design, made decades after the size limit was thought to have been reached, allowed scientists to peer farther into the universe than ever before.
11h
Ars Technica
Niantic to punish Pokémon Go cheaters with mark of shame Enlarge / Good grief. (credit: PopUpTee.com ) It has been just a month since Pokémon Go players began noticing that Niantic had started "shadowbanning" accounts that use third-party trackers and bot software, limiting them so they only see common Pokémon. Now, the company is going further to ensure ill-gotten beasts are publicly identified as such and don't negatively impact the multiplayer exper
11h
Ars Technica
How well have climate models done in the upper atmosphere? Enlarge (credit: NASA ) If people who reject climate science ever point to actual data, you can just about bet the farm it will be data from satellite measurements of upper-atmosphere temperatures. At least until the record-setting global heat in 2015 and 2016, some of the satellite data was amenable to the claim that global warming had magically ended in 1998. That was always nonsense, involving
11h
Gizmodo
This Snack Machine Conspiracy Is the Greatest Operation in CIA History Photo: Getty There’s more than one moment in the 2006 thriller The Good Shepherd , when any rational movie watcher thinks, “Shit, does Matt Damon know what he’s doing, setting up the CIA as the most powerful spy agency in the world?” Those doubts, however, seem quaint thanks to the recent revelation that a crew of CIA contractors crafted a scheme to steal thousands of dollars worth of snacks from
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto landThe fossil of an early snake-like animal -- called Lethiscus stocki -- has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years.Now, an international team of researchers, led by the University of Calgary, has revealed new insights into the ancient Scottish fossil that dramatically challenge our understanding of the early evolution of tetrapods, or four-limbed animals with backbones.
11h
Gizmodo
The Powerful Roomba 860 Has Never Been Cheaper iRobot Roomba 860 , $364 Even at an all-time low $364, the Roomba 860 is still quite a bit more expensive than, say, the Eufy RoboVac 11 . That said, it boasts up to five times the sucking power of the comparable Roomba 650, so if you have kids or pets that tend to track in a lot of dirt, it might be worth the premium.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists create 3-D printed graphene foamNanotechnologists have used 3-D laser printing to create centimeter-sized objects of graphene foam, a 3-D version of atomically thin graphene. The research could yield industrially useful quantities of bulk graphene.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trash-picking seagulls excrete tons of nutrientsAt least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills in North America. Aside from the nuisance they pose, a study finds their nutrient-rich feces may threaten the health of nearby waters. The study estimates North American gulls deposit 240 tons of nitrogen and 39 tons of phosphorus into nearby lakes and reservoirs each year, fertilizing algae and weeds and costing local governments about $100 million
11h
Popular Science
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover looks so small and alone in this amazing new photo Space Just a pale blue dot. NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught Curiosity hard at work.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study answers why ketamine helps depression, offers target for safer therapyUT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algae: The final frontierAlgae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review co-authored by Carnegie's Arthur Grossman.
11h
Gizmodo
Breaking Down All the Secrets and Surprises of the New Game of Thrones Trailer GIF It may be the first day of summer in the real world, but winter has come to Westeros in the form of a brand new trailer for Game of Thrones ’ penultimate season . It’s jam-packed with footage that lines up with all the rumors we’ve been hearing about the show over the last year, so let’s break it all down to see what secrets we can uncover. A reminder, while we’re dealing with a lot of specul
11h
Ars Technica
Democrats urge Trump administration to block AT&T/Time Warner merger Enlarge / AT&T will own a bunch of new media properties if it is allowed to buy Time Warner. (credit: Aurich Lawson ) A group of mostly Democratic senators led by Al Franken (D-Minn.) today urged the Department of Justice to block AT&T's proposed $85.4 billion acquisition of Time Warner Inc. The senators' letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions predicts that "the combined company's unmatched con
11h
Live Science
New High-Speed, Sustainable Helicopter Concept Whirls into Air ShowConstruction of a demonstrator craft is expected to begin in 2019, with initial flight tests the following year.
11h
Big Think
A Father’s Age at Conception Influences a Child’s Social Behavior Later on The children of very young and very old fathers were most affected. Read More
12h
Live Science
US National Parks Prepare for the 2017 Total Solar EclipseOn Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will cross the continental U.S. and briefly cast a shadow over 21 of the nation's national parks.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reconstruction of ancient chromosomes offers insight into mammalian evolutionResearchers have gone back in time, at least virtually, computationally recreating the chromosomes of the first eutherian mammal, the long-extinct, shrewlike ancestor of all placental mammals.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research leverages big data to predict severe weatherEvery year, severe weather endangers millions of people and causes billions of dollars in damage worldwide. But new research has found a way to better predict some of these threats by harnessing the power of big data.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An end to population aging in China, Germany, USANew measures of aging, combined with UN population projections, show that population aging is likely to end before 2100 in China, Germany, and the USA.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting cognitive deficits in people with Parkinson's diseaseParkinson's disease is commonly thought of as a movement disorder, but after years of living with the disease, approximately 25 percent of patients also experience deficits in cognition that impair function. A newly developed research tool may help predict a patient's risk for developing dementia and could enable clinical trials aimed at finding treatments to prevent the cognitive effects of the d
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Piglets prefer new toys, behavior study showsWe can't help but be tempted by new things. We see it in a child's eyes when she opens a new toy, and feel it every time a new version of the iPhone is released. It turns out our preference for shiny, new things is pretty universal throughout the animal kingdom. Yes, even piglets prefer new toys.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flooding risk: America's most vulnerable communitiesFloods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the US.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In organizations, bullying begets whining, study findsIn organizations, bullying within decision-making groups appears to go hand in hand with whining, according to a new study. 'In other words, when some people act dominant by bullying, others respond by being submissive and whining,' says the professor of communication who led the study. The researchers found that both reported bullying and whining behaviors negatively impacted group perceptions of
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple method measures how long bacteria can wait out antibioticsA simple test that measures how long it takes to kill bacteria could help doctors treat strains that are on their way to becoming resistant to antibiotics. If implemented in hospitals' microbiology labs, the test could help guide treatment decisions, and could ultimately reduce the ever-growing risk of bacterial resistance.
12h
The Atlantic
'I Don't Want You to Get Shooted' New footage from the fatal shooting of 32-year-old Philando Castile was released Wednesday, less than 24-hours after dash-cam video from the incident was made public. The video, which was released by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension under a public-records request, sheds more light on the moments immediately following the shooting. The footage was among thousands of pages of documents
12h
The Atlantic
What Democrats' Defeat in Georgia Means—and Doesn't Four recent special elections in Republican-held House districts, including Tuesday’s showdown in the northern Atlanta suburbs, have left both parties facing the same ambiguous equation they confronted as 2017 began. Significantly improved Democratic performance in all four contests has provided evidence that enough voters are uneasy about Donald Trump’s turbulent presidency to give Democrats a c
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Massive dead disk galaxy challenges theories of galaxy evolutionBy combining the power of a 'natural lens' in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery -- the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trends in emergency room visits and costs for patients with shinglesA new study suggests that while emergency room visits for shingles has decreased for those vaccinated against either the chicken pox (18 to 19 years old) or the shingles (60 years and older), the patient population in-between (ages 20-59 years old) has experienced increased visits for the disease.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?It's easy to make up a story to explain an evolved trait; proving that's what happened is much harder. Here scientists test ideas about cooperative breeding in birds and find a solution that resolves earlier disagreements.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Specific diabetes medications to protect bone health recommendedType 2 diabetes (T2D) and osteoporosis often coexist in patients, but managing both conditions can be a challenge. A comprehensive review highlights the most effective treatment options for treating these conditions together.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ultrasonic ZIP probe tests zinc thickness even while bathed in 450°C molten metalNew probe technology can conduct safety critical testing inside galvanizing kettles equipment while still holding molten zinc at 450°C.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleep-wake rhythms vary widely with age as well as amongst individuals of a given ageThe sleep rhythms that reflect circadian systems peak later in teenagers than in adults, and vary as much as 10 hours in individuals across at any ages, according to a new study.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prior knowledge may influence how adults view van GoghsAdults rely more on top-down processing than children when observing paintings by van Gogh, according to a new study.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yarraman flu or horse flu? Words and graphics influence willingness to vaccinate'Yarraman flu is a virus quickly infecting the US...' The mock announcement was enough to make readers worry. But when the name of the hypothetical illness was changed to 'horse flu', readers reported being less motivated to get a vaccine that would prevent them from contracting the illness. Based on a survey of 16,510 participants from 11 countries, the findings show that the way health informati
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New statistical method finds shared ancestral gene variants involved in autism's causeResearchers believe that theirs is the first rigorous statistical evidence that ancient variations in the human genome contribute to autism -- each, most likely, having a very small effect. The method investigatorss used in the new study was family-based and compared 'discordant sibilings,' one with and one without autism to a separate collection of affected individuals. The sample included over 1
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding how pain is bugging youGut bacteria play a key role in regulating abdominal pain and its associated changes in the brain and spinal cord, at least in mice, report scientists.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biological fingerprint of tuberculosis meningitis discovered in childrenChildren with tuberculosis meningitis have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments, report researchers.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warming temperatures threaten sea turtlesWarmer temperatures associated with climate change may lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure, suggests a new report.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Bones make hormones that communicate with the brain and other organsBones send out hormone signals that chat with other parts of the body, studies in mice show. What influence these hormones have in people, though, remain a mystery.
12h
Gizmodo
How Does X-Men's Charles Xavier Leave His Own House? Image: Ultimate X-Men #49 It’s not a trick question. Based on various depictions of the Xavier School for Gifted Youngsters, Professor X—a paraplegic mutant telepath with a supposedly genius-level intellect—somehow forgot to add wheelchair ramps to his own home. So we asked artists who have worked on X-Men titles over the years how the franchise’s patriarch leaves his own house. The mystery of an
12h
The Atlantic
Fixing Uber Will Require More Than Ousting Its Leader Few were surprised this morning to learn of the resignation of Travis Kalanick from being the CEO of Uber. The company has endured scandal after scandal, many of which trace back to Kalanick in one way or the other, whether directly as a result of his behavior or his business choices, or less directly as a result of the allegedly toxic and discriminatory culture he helped to create as Uber’s foun
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trash-picking seagulls poop tons of nutrientsAt least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills in North America. Aside from the nuisance they pose, a new Duke study finds their nutrient-rich feces may threaten the health of nearby waters. The study estimates North American gulls deposit 240 tons of nitrogen and 39 tons of phosphorus into nearby lakes and reservoirs each year, fertilizing algae and weeds and costing local governments about $100
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice U. chemists create 3-D printed graphene foamNanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to create centimeter-sized objects of graphene foam, a 3-D version of atomically thin graphene. The research could yield industrially useful quantities of bulk graphene.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perceptions about body image linked to increased alcohol, tobacco use for teensVirginia Ramseyer-Winter, assistant professor of social work, found negative body image is associated with increased tobacco and alcohol use, with implications for both young men and women.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting cognitive deficits in people with Parkinson's diseaseParkinson's disease is commonly thought of as a movement disorder, but after years of living with the disease, approximately 25 percent of patients also experience deficits in cognition that impair function. A newly developed research tool may help predict a patient's risk for developing dementia and could enable clinical trials aimed at finding treatments to prevent the cognitive effects of the d
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New IST research leverages big data to predict severe weatherEvery year, severe weather endangers millions of people and causes billions of dollars in damage worldwide. But new research from Penn State's College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) and AccuWeather has found a way to better predict some of these threats by harnessing the power of big data.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Serotonin improves sociability in mouse model of autismScientists have linked early serotonin deficiency to several symptoms that occur in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study examined serotonin levels, brain circuitry, and behavior in a mouse model of ASD. Experiments showed that increasing serotonergic activity in the brain during early development led to more balanced brain activity and improved the abnormal sociability of these mice.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Role aerosols play in climate change unlocked by spectacular Icelandic volcanic eruptionA spectacular six-month Icelandic lava field eruption could provide the crucial key for scientists to unlock the role aerosols play in climate change, through their interactions with clouds.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurons that regenerate, neurons that dieInvestigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique makes brain scans betterTo help scientists take advantage of huge numbers of low-quality patient brain scans, a team of researchers has devised a way to boost the quality of these MRI scans so that they can be used for large scale studies of how strokes affect different people.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When lovers touch, their breathing, heartbeat syncs, pain wanes, study showsWhen an empathetic partner holds a lover's hand, their heart rates and breathing rates sync and her pain subsides, new research shows. Authors say such 'interpersonal synchronization' could play a role in the analgesic impacts of touch.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Little brain' plays a major role in schizophreniaThe cerebellum is among the most affected brain regions in schizophrenia, new research has found. Compared to healthy individuals, cerebellar volume was smaller in patients with schizophrenia. The study is the largest brain imaging study to date on the cerebellum in schizophrenia, with important implications for our understanding of the disorder.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The (extra) eyes have it: Researchers investigate the wisdom of crowds in the realm of visual searchesYour doctor is an expert with many years of experience. So when s/he tells you, upon reviewing all the fancy tomographic imaging you had done, that the tenderness in your breast is just some minor irritation, you want to believe her/him and leave it at that.
12h
Wired
A Short History of the Many, Many Ways Uber Screwed UpUber's CEO resigned today. Here's a timeline of how the company got here.
12h
Gizmodo
Trump's Vote 'Rigging' Claims Delayed Warning of Russian Cyberattacks, Former DHS Chief Says Photo: Getty At a hearing before the House Intelligence Committee on Wednesday, former Department of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson testified that the Russia government launched an unprecedented attack on the US presidential election and that he had repeatedly warned state officials about the possibility of voting systems being targeted. Johnson and other Obama administration officials were wary a
12h
Ars Technica
ZeniMax to judge: Block Oculus sales or give us 20% Enlarge / An Oculus Rift photo montage from Oculus Connect (credit: Kyle Orland) Earlier this year, ZeniMax won a $500 million judgment against Facebook-owned Oculus and many of its executives for illegal use of ZeniMax's VR technology and copyrights. That wasn't the end of Oculus' legal trouble, though. The company is now fighting off a proposed injunction that is seeking to bar the sale of any
12h
Live Science
Insomnia: Symptoms, Treatment & PreventionInsomnia is a sleep disorder characterized by difficulties falling or staying asleep, even though people have the chance for adequate sleep.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Device helps ICU patients by filtering out noise from medical alarmsA team of investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) wants to improve patient outcomes in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) settings by silencing audible medical alarms in hospital rooms.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reconstruction of ancient chromosomes offers insight into mammalian evolutionResearchers have gone back in time, at least virtually, computationally recreating the chromosomes of the first eutherian mammal, the long-extinct, shrewlike ancestor of all placental mammals.
12h
New Scientist - News
Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and USNow only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws
12h
New Scientist - News
Weird orbits hint ‘Planet Ten’ might lurk at solar system edgeAstronomers studying icy objects in a distant region called the Kuiper belt say an unconfirmed planet with similar mass to Mars could be responsible for tugging them out of alignment
12h
New Scientist - News
Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune diseasePeople with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system
12h
Popular Science
The Curiosity rover and other spacecraft are learning to think for themselves Space Autonomous science-bots will make it easier to explore our solar system … and beyond. Smarter spacecraft can help us explore more efficiently. Read on.
12h
Gizmodo
Code To Hack Mazdas With A USB Drive Is Now Available To Anyone It’s been a sort of open secret for a few years now that you can hack the infotainment system on some 2014 and up Mazdas with the right software on a USB drive. What is new, though, is that now the software required to do this is freely available on GitHub . What’s also interesting is how this security flaw has been turned into a valuable customization tool for tech-saavy Mazda owners. The code i
13h
Popular Science
Why go to Mars when you can telecommute there instead? Space Skyping with Mars. Video calls with Mars? Read on.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feeling stressed? Bike to workNew research from Concordia's John Molson School of Business (JMSB) has found that cycling can help reduce stress and improve your work performance.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolutionBy combining the power of a 'natural lens' in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery -- the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trends in emergency room visits & costs for patients with shinglesTheir study suggests that while emergency room visits for shingles has decreased for those vaccinated against either the chicken pox (18 to 19 years old) or the shingles (60 years and older), the patient population in-between (ages 20-59 years old) has experienced increased visits for the disease.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers recommend specific diabetes medications to protect bone healthType 2 diabetes (T2D) and osteoporosis often coexist in patients, but managing both conditions can be a challenge. A comprehensive review published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism highlights the most effective treatment options for treating these conditions together.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An end to population aging in China, Germany, USANew measures of aging, combined with UN population projections, show that population aging is likely to end before 2100 in China, Germany, and the USA.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into exercise right ventricular pressure may help define a new 'normal'Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital recently reported an unexpected observation among patients experiencing unexplained shortness of breath. Their findings, reported in PLOS ONE, suggest that the RV-PA pressure difference may not always be a reflection of disease, but rather, may be a normal physiological response to exercise.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extremely colorful, incredibly bright and highly multiplexedA team from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the LMU Munich, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Germany, has engineered highly versatile metafluorophores by integrating commonly used small fluorescent probes into self-folding DNA structures where their colors and brightness can be digitally programmed. This nanotechnological approach offers a palette of
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new virtual approach to science in spaceASU professor and colleagues suggest a new approach to scientific exploration that they call exploration telepresence.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer-designed antibodies target toxins associated with Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers at the University of Cambridge have designed antibodies that target the protein deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, and stop their production.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parasite strain-specific factors determine malaria disease severityScientists have uncovered strain-specific differences between malaria parasites that are linked to their potential to cause illness in humans, which could have important implications for antimalarial vaccine trials currently underway.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?It's easy to make up a story to explain an evolved trait; proving that's what happened is much harder. Here scientists test ideas about cooperative breeding in birds and find a solution that resolves earlier disagreements.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Serotonin improves sociability in mouse model of autismScientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have linked early serotonin deficiency to several symptoms that occur in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published in Science Advances, the study examined serotonin levels, brain circuitry, and behavior in a mouse model of ASD. Experiments showed that increasing serotonergic activity in the brain during early development led to more balanced
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mystery of unexplained 'bright nights' solvedDating back to the first century, scientists, philosophers and reporters have noted the occasional occurrence of 'bright nights,' when an unexplained glow in the night sky lets observers see distant mountains, read a newspaper or check their watch. A new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, uses satellite data to present a pos
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three ways neuroscience can advance the concussion debateWhile concussion awareness has improved over the past decade, understanding the nuances of these sports injuries, their severity, symptoms, and treatment, is still a work in progress. Neurologists and neurotraumatologists have reviewed the science of concussions and outlined several areas where neuroscience and clinical research can help create consensus in the field: definitions of what acute and
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could flu during pregnancy raise risk for autism?Researchers found no evidence that laboratory-diagnosis alone of maternal influenza during pregnancy is associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring. They did, however, find a trend toward risk in mothers with a laboratory diagnosis of influenza and self-reported symptoms of severe illness. This trend did not achieve statistical significance.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forgetting can make you smarterA new review paper proposes that the goal of memory is not to transmit the most accurate information over time, but to guide and optimize intelligent decision making by only holding on to valuable information.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Rosetta Stone' to decode immune recognitionMedical researchers have developed an algorithm that predicts T cell recognition of antigens and sets the stage to more effectively harness the immune system.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The brain mechanism behind multitaskingScientists have identified a brain mechanism that enables more efficient multitasking.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish mercury levels after burns: Burn without concernForest services can continue to use controlled burns without worrying about fish health in associated watersheds, new research suggests.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is there an alternative to disposable diapers?A pediatric infectious disease specialist and a pathologist and medical microbiologist report on the age-old practice now known as elimination communication (EC).
13h
Wired
Mars Curiosity Rover Autonomously Samples Rocks With Incredible PrecisionThe Curiosity rover has gotten really good at automatically detecting rocks and blasting them with a laser.
13h
The Atlantic
When Squirrels Attack Summertime in Washington, D.C., sometimes seems like an exercise in survival. There are swampy heatwaves in a region where the standard dress-code includes a blazer. And a metro that always seems to be catching fire. But also: squirrel attacks. “I was attacked by a squirrel while running this morning so that’s a real thing that happens apparently,” my colleague Adam Serwer told me this morning. H
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-assembling reagents with tunable colors and brightness enable highly multiplexed tagging, microscopic imagingBiomedical researchers are understanding the functions of molecules within the body's cells in ever greater detail by increasing the resolution of their microscopes. However, what's lagging behind is their ability to simultaneously visualize the many different molecules that mediate complex molecular processes in a single snap-shot.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?The common understanding of evolution is that it is a battle for survival: one must either "scrunch or be scrunched," as Nicodemus Boffin, the Dickens' character, famously says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new virtual approach to science in spaceWhen Apollo astronauts on the Moon spoke with Mission Control on Earth, there was a noticeable time gap between a statement from Tranquility Base and its immediate acknowledgment from Houston. The gap lasted almost three seconds, or ten times longer than human reaction times would account for.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Deadliest Catch Crews Are Ready For Opilio Season #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c With the 2016 king crab season behind them, the Deadliest Catch captains discuss their hopes for opilio season. For Johnathan, making his final season a successful and fun one is top priority. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/dead
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New Scientist - News
This handy robot will iron your clothes so you don’t have toThe TEO robot uses a camera to detect creases and can then "iteratively reduce the wrinkleness" of garments using a standard household iron
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New Scientist - News
LA’s endangered pumas to be saved by a $60m bridge over highwayPumas in Santa Monica are trapped in small areas bisected by big roads, on which many die – but an ambitious wildlife crossing promises to change that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mechanism for genome regulation discoveredThe mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of a part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new study. Researchers found that liquid-liquid phase separation helps heterochromatin organize large parts of the genome into specific regions of the nucleus. The work addresses a long-standing question about how DNA functions are organized in space and
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parkinson's is partly an autoimmune disease, study findsResearchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson's disease, suggesting that immunosuppressants might play a role in treatment.
13h
Gizmodo
Life Comes At You Fast, So Be Prepared With This Shop-Vac For Under $50 Shop-Vac 5-Gallon , $49 You don’t need a Shop-Vac until you really, really need a Shop-Vac, so prepare for the leaks life throws your way with this 5-gallon model, marked down to an all-time low $49 today . You might not use this for your every day house cleaning, it’s one of those things that everyone should have in their garage.
13h
Ars Technica
Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks Enlarge (credit: S-8500 ) The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSA Center for Community and Business Research releases Eagle Ford Shale studyCommissioned by the South Texas Energy and Economic Roundtable (STEER), The University of Texas at San Antonio's (UTSA) Center for Community and Business Research (CCBR) completed the latest Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) study in June. The study titled, "Economic Impact of the Eagle Ford Shale, Business Opportunities and the New Normal" provides new trend data and updated economic impact analysis across
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Remarkable 2016 storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice lossWeekly AGU news from Geospace, The Landslide Blog, Eos.org and research spotlights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
529s make it easier to ask family, friends for college cashPeople have used crowdfunding sites to raise money for business ideas, help afford medical emergencies and even to pay for vacations. Now the concept is coming to college savings.
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Gizmodo
We Just Got a Rare Look at Our New Overlord, the Flapjack Octopus Image Courtesy of Rob Zugaro Octopuses are up to something . Cephalopods—the class of mollusks to which octopus, squid, and cuttlefish belong—are some of the most intelligent creatures on the planet, and they know it. These squishy geniuses are masterful escape artists and like to mess with humans by shooting water at aquarium light switches and even employees. Because their takeover is clearly i
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Ars Technica
Theranos reportedly settles $140M Walgreens suit for less than $30M Enlarge / Founder & CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: Getty | Gilbert Carrasquillo ) Theranos told its investors that it has reached a tentative settlement with former business partner Walgreens and will pay out less than $30 million in the agreement , The Wall Street Journal reports. The drugstore giant filed a searing lawsuit late last year against the beleaguered blood-testing compan
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Live Science
Hiking in Bear Country? How to Prevent an AttackBear attacks are rare, but when news of bear aggression hits the airwaves, even avid adventurers may wonder what's the best way to escape the long and curved claws of such a wild animal.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Protein in Parkinson’s provokes the immune systemThe immune system recognizes parts of a protein linked to Parkinson’s disease as foreign, triggering an autoimmune response.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parents of newborn daughters take fewer risks study suggestsA study has examined the effect of learning a child’s gender on parents’ attitudes towards risky behaviors. In this first of its kind study, the authors gathered prenatal and post-birth data from the pediatric wards of hospitals in both the United Kingdom and Ukraine, allowing for longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of those attitudes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Assessesing risk in a changing insurance market for driverless vehiclesDespite projections, insurers will likely play a key role in supporting the safe deployment, adoption and sustainability of driverless cars. The relatively unknown nature, likelihood and extent of driverless accidents presents risk management challenges to both the automotive and insurance industries. Future motor policies may require non-traditional risk management.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika: Studying the 'rebound virus'Scientists are investigating how the Zika virus is able to find a safe harbor in an infected host's tissue and stage a rebound weeks after the virus was seemingly cleared by the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic gains and losses in Tourette syndrome uncoveredResearchers have identified structural changes in two genes that increase the risk of developing Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Selfies: We love how we look and we're here to show youNearly 52 percent of all selfies fell into the appearance category: pictures of people showing off their make-up, clothes, lips, etc. Pics about looks were two times more popular than the other 14 categories combined, research found.
14h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Modified viruses deliver death to antibiotic-resistant bacteria Engineered microbes turn a bacterium's immune response against itself using CRISPR. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22173
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Ars Technica
American Gods may be the best show about religion on TV Starz The first season of American Gods ends with an image that compacts the many themes of the series into one odd moment. It's an aerial shot, slowly revealing a line of cars, buggies, and other vehicles crowding the tiny road to a neglected Wisconsin tourist trap called The House on the Rock. Without giving you any spoilers, I can say that this scene captures American Gods ' perspective on rel
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find new mechanism for genome regulationThe mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of a part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new Berkeley Lab study. Researchers found that liquid-liquid phase separation helps heterochromatin organize large parts of the genome into specific regions of the nucleus. The work addresses a long-standing question about how DNA functions are organized
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parkinson's is partly an autoimmune disease, study findsResearchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson's disease, suggesting that immunosuppressants might play a role in treatment.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create a 'Rosetta Stone' to decode immune recognitionSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed an algorithm that predicts T cell recognition of antigens and sets the stage to more effectively harness the immune system
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Role aerosols play in climate change unlocked by spectacular Icelandic volcanic eruptionA spectacular six-month Icelandic lava field eruption could provide the crucial key for scientists to unlock the role aerosols play in climate change, through their interactions with clouds.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is Nike joining the Amazon roster?Shares a several major sports chains are hitting 52-week lows on word that Nike may soon be selling its gear directly on Amazon.com.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small food makers wonder about Amazon-Whole Foods impactAmong the many questions being asked about Amazon's intended purchase of Whole Foods is one from small and medium-sized food manufacturers: How might this deal affect me?
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Gizmodo
This Stunning Medieval Longsword Was Just Pulled From a Polish Bog Image: PAP/ Wojciech Pacewicz Late last month, an excavator operator was working at a peat bog in the Polish municipality of Mircze when he accidentally stumbled upon this glorious specimen of 14th century craftsmanship. The remarkably well-preserved longsword is a unique find for the area, and its discovery has prompted an archaeological expedition. The discoverer of the long sword, Wojciech Kot
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Head impact exposure increases as youth football players get older, biggerYouth football players are exposed to more and more forceful head impacts as they move up in age- and weight-based levels of play, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Underused cancer test could improve treatment for thousandsA simple blood test could improve treatment for more than 1 in 6 stage 2 colon cancer patients, suggests new research. The researchers also discovered that many patients who could benefit from the test likely aren't receiving it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When estimating extinction risk, don't leave out the malesExtinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyze the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as 'noise'.
14h
Ars Technica
Jack the Autonomous Audi came to DC and drove us around Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Unless you've been living in a cave for the last few years, you're aware that autonomous cars are now a thing . The technology is still in relative infancy, but most of the major OEMs, Tier 1 automotive suppliers, and many of the big tech companies—not to mention plenty of startups—have been telling us that we should expect self-driving vehicle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kia tops new car quality survey for second straight yearKia has claimed the top spot in a survey of new vehicle quality for the second straight year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus and Boeing eye lucrative maintenance marketAirbus and Boeing wheeled out the usual round of order announcements at the Paris Air Show on Wednesday, but alongside the big ticket purchases, the aerospace rivals are also eyeing the lucrative maintenance and servicing market as they seek to boost growth.
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Gizmodo
Look At This Fucked Up Strawberry I Bought The berry is as big as my palm. But the berry is flat like a hockey puck. The berry has a stem on one side— —and on the other side, too. The berry looks like two to four berries that budded very close to one another and then fused together over time. I will eat the berry for lunch.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Cindy soaking the Gulf CoastNASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Cindy after it formed and was already affecting the U.S. Gulf Coast states. Cindy continues to crawl toward land and Tropical Storm warnings are in effect for June 21.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Behavior study shows piglets prefer new toysWe can't help but be tempted by new things. We see it in a child's eyes when she opens a new toy, and feel it every time a new version of the iPhone is released. It turns out our preference for shiny, new things is pretty universal throughout the animal kingdom. Yes, even piglets prefer new toys.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Role aerosols play in climate change unlocked by spectacular Icelandic volcanic eruptionA spectacular six-month Icelandic lava field eruption could provide the crucial key for scientists to unlock the role aerosols play in climate change, through their interactions with clouds.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find new mechanism for genome regulationThe same mechanisms that quickly separate mixtures of oil and water are at play when controlling the organization in an unusual part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new study by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
14h
Live Science
Watch: The Mysterious Graveyard Where Turtles Go to DieA mysterious turtle graveyard just off the island of Borneo has stymied experts for years, ever since Jacque Cousteau discovered it in 1998.
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Live Science
Kim & Kanye Plan Another Baby: 4 Reasons Why Couples Use SurrogatesKim Kardashian and Kanye West have reportedly hired a surrogate to carry their third child. Here are some reasons why couples choose surrogates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New statistical method finds shared ancestral gene variants involved in autism's causeA team led by geneticist Michal Wigler of CSHL has published what they believe is the first rigorous statistical evidence that ancient variations in the human genome contribute to autism -- each, most likely, having a very small effect. The method Wigler and colleagues used in the new study was family-based and compared 'discordant sibilings,' one with and one without autism to a separate collecti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When lovers touch, their breathing and heartbeat syncs, pain wanes, study showsA new study by pain researchers from University of Colorado and University of Haifa found that when an empathetic partner holds a lover's hand, their heart rates and breathing rates sync and her pain subsides. Authors say such 'interpersonal synchronization' could play a role in the analgesic impacts of touch.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common water treatments could damage DNAA water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it, warn scientists. Despite poor evidence of their effectiveness as a water disinfectant, colloidal silver and silver nanoparticles are increasingly being promoted for treating potentially contaminated drinking water in low income countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New antibody uses 1-2 punch to potentially treat blood cancersResearchers have developed a two-pronged approach to blood cancer treatment: 1) attacking cancer cells directly and/or 2) driving them from the nurturing bone marrow environment into the peripheral blood streams, where they are more vulnerable (for example, to chemotherapy).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Accelerating rate of temperature rise in the PyreneesThe Iberian Peninsula is undergoing climate change, with temperatures on the rise, and mountain ranges are not exempt from this trend. A team of scientists has analyzed regional climate series from the Central Pyrenees for 1910 to 2013 (the most extensive climate records to date for the area), concluding that temperatures have risen at an increasing rate since 1970, particularly in spring and summ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory, protects brain against Alzheimer'sThe Mediterranean diet is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower incidence of dementia. Now, researchers have identified a specific ingredient that protects against cognitive decline: extra-virgin olive oil. In a new study, the researchers show that consumption of extra-virgin olive oil protects memory and learning ability and reduces the formation of amyloid-beta plaques
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regional 'hot spot' of Borna disease discovered in upper AustriaBornaviruses cause a lethal form of encephalitis, Borna disease, among horses and sheep. To date only a few cases were reported in Austria. Recently, four horses were afflicted in the same area of Upper Austria within just two years. Tests on local shrews, the reservoir host, confirmed the suspicion of a local viral reservoir. The study documents a rare outbreak of Borna disease in a new endemic a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The world's largest canaryBiologists have now proven that the endangered São Tomé grosbeak is the world's largest canary -- 50 percent larger than the runner-up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The astronaut's extra noseHow do we prevent astronauts in space from inhaling hazardous gases? A hi-tech optical gas sensor provides a solution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming temperatures threaten sea turtlesThe study by Dr Jacques-Olivier Laloë of the University's College of Science and published in the Global Change Biology journal, argues that warmer temperatures associated with climate change could lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure, and could impact negatively on the turtle population in some areas of the world.
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Gizmodo
The Very Best Wireless Earbuds for Active People If you’d asked me three years ago which wireless earbuds to buy for the gym, I would’ve laughed and laughed and laughed. The entire category was so hilariously bad back then, how could I recommend anything? Well let me tell you friend: a lot has changed in the best of ways. Historically, the problem with wireless earbuds hasn’t been sound quality. It’s been comfort and convenience. The truly mini
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CPAP improves respiratory and survival rates in children in GhanaA new study found that applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a form of non-invasive ventilation, decreased mortality in children with respiratory distress. Findings from the trial in Ghana indicated that the procedure especially benefited children less than one year of age, confirmed that no serious adverse events were associated with the treatment, and is a step forward in treating
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is there an alternative to disposable diapers?Jeffrey M. Bender, MD, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Rosemary C. She, MD, a pathologist and medical microbiologist at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California published a perspective paper in Pediatrics, about an age-old practice now known as elimination communication (EC).
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavior study shows piglets prefer new toysWe can't help but be tempted by new things. We see it in a child's eyes when she opens a new toy, and feel it every time a new version of the iPhone is released. It turns out our preference for shiny, new things is pretty universal throughout the animal kingdom. Yes, even piglets prefer new toys.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Cindy soaking the Gulf CoastNASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Cindy after it formed and was already affecting the US Gulf Coast states. Cindy continues to crawl toward land and Tropical Storm warnings are in effect for June 21.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Selfies: We love how we look and we're here to show youWhen it comes to selfies, appearance is (almost) everything.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Burn without concern: Research investigates fish mercury levels after burnsThe USDA Forest Service in the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area (BWCWA) will continue to use controlled burns without worrying about fish health in associated watersheds, researchers say.
14h
The Atlantic
Do African Americans Have a Right to Bear Arms? Philando Castile’s shooting death, at the hands of a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, one year ago, was numbingly similar to a string of other killings of black men by police. But Castile’s shooting was notably different in one crucial respect: Castile was licensed to carry a gun. He carefully informed Officer Jeronimo Yanez—exceeding his legal requirements under Minnesota law, though
14h
The Atlantic
Deportation Is Going High-Tech Under Trump In a leafy Detroit suburb last March, federal authorities raided a one-story brick house. Their target: Rudy Carcamo-Carranza, a 23-year-old restaurant worker from El Salvador with two deportation orders, a DUI, and a hit-and-run. The incident would have seemed like a standard deportation case, except for a key detail unearthed by The Detroit News : The feds didn’t find Carcamo-Carranza through t
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Live Science
Shimmering Sea: Why a Beautiful Blue Glow Lit Up the Coast of WalesTiny plankton shimmer under a glowing Milky Way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storageChemists at Case Western Reserve University have found a way to possibly store digital data in half the space current systems require.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MUSES facility enables investigation opportunities for future usersThe Multiple User System for Earth Sensing Facility (MUSES) will inspire and enable numerous branches of research and science through its ability to support many different kinds of investigations and hardware aboard the International Space Station. Providing a platform for payloads such as high-resolution digital cameras and hyperspectral imagers, MUSES provides precision pointing and other accomm
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Ars Technica
California may restore broadband privacy rules killed by Congress and Trump Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) A proposed law in California would require Internet service providers to obtain customers' permission before they use, share, or sell the customers' Web browsing history. The California Broadband Internet Privacy Act, a bill introduced by Assembly member Ed Chau (D-Monterey Park) on Monday, is very similar to an Obama-era privacy rule that was scheduled to
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Gizmodo
The Hunt for Gravitational Waves Is Officially Headed to Space Artist rendering of LISA (Image: ESA-C Carreau) It took around a hundred years between Albert Einstein crafting his theory of general relativity and the confirmation of one of its wildest predictions , gravitational waves. So naturally, folks have been especially skeptical about funding expensive projects to look harder for them. But now that experiments are actually finding gravitational waves,
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Bret's finaleTropical Storm Bret was weakening with NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on June 20, and within three hours of the overpass, Bret degenerated into a tropical wave.
15h
Popular Science
Sing along with this Bluetooth shower speaker and save 80 percent off MSRP Sponsored Post Get the best possible backup to your amazing/terrible vocals. Bluetooth shower speaker and save 80 percent off MSRP. Get the best possible backup to your amazing/terrible vocals. Read on.
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Live Science
New Pollution Map Offers Unprecedented View of City's Air QualityThe new map for the city of Oakland, California, offers the highest-resolution view to date of air quality on a block-by-block basis.
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Gizmodo
The Newest Game of Thrones Trailer Suggests Our Hopes and Fears Are All True GIF HBO has just released its latest trailer for season seven of Game of Thrones , focusing on the war that is and the war to come. Winter is here, everyone, and while things aren’t looking great for the peoples of Westeros—particularly everyone who’s dumb enough to be fighting against Daenerys—season seven is looking utterly fantastic for us viewers. The trailer seems to confirms a great many ru
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique makes brain scans betterTo help scientists take advantage of huge numbers of low-quality patient brain scans, a team of MIT researchers has devised a way to boost the quality of these MRI scans so that they can be used for large scale studies of how strokes affect different people.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Selfies: We love how we look and we're here to show youNearly 52 percent of all selfies fell into the appearance category: pictures of people showing off their make-up, clothes, lips, etc. Pics about looks were two times more popular than the other 14 categories combined.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Burn without concernThe USDA Forest Service in the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area (BWCWA) will continue to use controlled burns without worrying about fish health in associated watersheds.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows Neuro Kinetics' I-Portal® devices objectively track concussion signsA new paper describes the objective and effective use of I-Portal® technology to test and monitor mTBI patients over time. The authors conclude the testing paradigm will allow investigators to institute better treatments and provide more accurate return to activity advice. Six measures from five tests were found to classify the control and mTBI patients with extremely high sensitivity and specific
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Bret's finaleTropical Storm Bret was weakening with NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on June 20, and within three hours of the overpass, Bret degenerated into a tropical wave.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain mechanism behind multitaskingNew Tel Aviv University research identifies a brain mechanism that enables more efficient multitasking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers uncover genetic gains and losses in Tourette syndromeResearchers have identified structural changes in two genes that increase the risk of developing Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics. The study, published in the journal Neuron, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidationA team belonging to the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have discovered some basic processes underlying memory consolidation. The work identifies some of the electrical events responsible for specific neuronal activity in the hippocampus: a region of the brain with fundamental roles in episodic memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurons that regenerate, neurons that dieIn a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forgetting can make you smarterA new review paper proposes that the goal of memory is not to transmit the most accurate information over time, but to guide and optimize intelligent decision making by only holding on to valuable information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yarraman flu or horse flu? Words and graphics influence willingness to vaccinate'Yarraman flu is a virus quickly infecting the US...' The mock announcement was enough to make readers worry. But when the name of the hypothetical illness was changed to 'horse flu', readers reported being less motivated to get a vaccine that would prevent them from contracting the illness. Based on a survey of 16,510 participants from 11 countries, the findings show that the way health informati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could flu during pregnancy raise risk for autism?Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found no evidence that laboratory-diagnosis alone of maternal influenza during pregnancy is associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring. They did, however, find a trend toward risk in mothers with a laboratory diagnosis of influenza and self-reported symptoms of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What strategies help ethnic minority adolescents cope with racism?A new study finds that maintaining a strong ethnic identity and high levels of social support can help Latino adolescents in the United States cope with racism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare genetic variants found to increase risk for Tourette syndromeAn international research team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of California at Los Angeles -- along with their facilitating partner the Tourette Association of America -- has identified rare mutations in two genes that markedly increase the risk for Tourette syndrome (TS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic involuntary motor and vocal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three ways neuroscience can advance the concussion debateWhile concussion awareness has improved over the past decade, understanding the nuances of these sports injuries, their severity, symptoms, and treatment, is still a work in progress. In the June 21 issue of Neuron, UCLA neurologists and neurotraumatologists review the science of concussions and outline several areas where neuroscience and clinical research can help create consensus in the field:
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Gizmodo
The Mighty Thor Just Introduced Yet Another New Thor Marvel The Thor Corps., a squad of Marvel heroes like Storm and Dazzler who all wielded different versions of Mjolnir, was one of the more novel ideas to come out of 2015's Secret Wars event. In this week’s The Mighty Thor , one of the Mjolnirs that went missing post- Secret Wars has suddenly shown up—with a brand new owner. The original Thor (now going by Odinson) has been moping and drinking hi
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Gizmodo
Uranus Might Finally Get a Visitor After All These Years Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Uranus is the loneliest thing in the solar system. It hasn’t had contact with anyone in over 30 years, since NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft whizzed by it on January 24th, 1986. Thankfully, some good folks at NASA and elsewhere are advocating for missions to Uranus and its Ice Giant companion, Neptune, which could take place at some point in the next few decades. The team’s 52
15h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
China’s genomics giant to make stock-market debut Once the world's biggest DNA sequencer for research, BGI is now looking to medical applications to boost profits. Nature 546 461 doi: 10.1038/546461
15h
Wired
To Whoever Replaces Travis Kalanick as Uber CEO, Some Unsolicited Advice!Imagining what kind of advice Uber’s board of directors might have for Travis Kalanick’s replacement.
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Popular Science
Climate change will make your coffee cost more and taste worse Environment Over half of Ethiopia’s crop is in peril, and the same goes for other coffee-producing countries. It's hard to notice gradually warmer winters—but you'll definitely notice when your coffee is twice as expensive and half as good. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Democrats Hold Alternative Hearing on Climate ChangeThe discussion was meant to show that lawmakers are not yielding the climate discussion to those who reject mainstream science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Swift creator leaves Tesla as a computer vision expert joins the company Enlarge (credit: Scott Olson | Getty Images) On Tuesday, Tesla’s vice president of Autopilot software Chris Lattner announced that he would be leaving Tesla just six months after he joined. Lattner wrote on Twitter : “Turns out that Tesla isn't a good fit for me after all. I'm interested to hear about interesting roles for a seasoned engineering leader! Lattner joined Tesla after leaving Apple in
15h
Gizmodo
Girl Scouts Can Soon Earn Cybersecurity Badges Because Girls Want to Hack Stuff, Not Get Bullied Online Photo: Getty Girl Scouts can start earning cybersecurity badges next year, thanks to an effort by the Girl Scouts of America and cybersecurity firm Palo Alto Networks. The youth organization came up with the idea simply by asking Scouts what they want. And the girls want to hack. “We surveyed a lot of girls,” Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo told Gizmodo. “In those evaluations, girls repeatedly sai
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Reverse Engineering Mysterious 500-Million-Year-Old Fossils That Confound Our Tree of LifeA new high-tech approach is helping paleontologists better understand the link between a set of ancient fossils and modern animals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Ars Technica
Google Glass is apparently back from the dead, starts getting software updates A man wearing Google Glass. (credit: Google ) Remember Google Glass—Google's ultra-dorky, poorly supported, $1,500 face computer? Conventional wisdom said that the product was dead: it's not sold anymore, the website was more or less shut down in 2015, its Twitter and Facebook were deleted, and the OS stopped receiving updates. But someone at Google apparently still cares about this clunky little
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Popular Science
Genetically engineered fungus knocks out deadly mosquitoes using scorpion toxins Health A single spore can do what insecticides can't. University of Maryland researchers developed a fungus genetically engineered to attack mosquitoes with the help of scorpion and spider toxin genes. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Anker DashCam, Camping Gear, Free Overwatch Loot, and More Anker’s smash-hit DashCam , an ultrawide IPS monitor , and inflatable camping gear lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals LG 29" IPS 21:9 Monitor , $227 There are widescreen monitors, and then there are widescreen monitors. This is the latter . This 29" LG Ultrawide features 2560x1080 resolution, and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The (extra) eyes have itYour doctor is an expert with many years of experience. So when she tells you, upon reviewing all the fancy tomographic imaging you had done, that the tenderness in your breast is just some minor irritation, you want to believe her and leave it at that.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Systems pharmacology modelers accelerate drug discovery in Alzheimer'sInSysBio scientific group led by Tatiana Karelina developed a quantitative system pharmacology model of Alzheimer's disease. First part published in CPT Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology shows how to design initial phases of clinical trials of new drugs and to interpret the data obtained.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New antibody uses 1-2 punch to potentially treat blood cancersResearchers have developed a two-pronged approach to blood cancer treatment: 1) attacking cancer cells directly and/or 2) driving them from the nurturing bone marrow environment into the peripheral blood streams, where they are more vulnerable (for example, to chemotherapy).
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Ars Technica
Sega Forever brings retro games to iOS and Android for free Enlarge (credit: Sega) Sega is bringing a collection of its finest retro video games to iOS and Android devices via a new service called Sega Forever. Unlike its past mobile releases—which include the likes of Sonic the Hedgehog and Football Manager Mobile —the entire Sega Forever line-up is free-to-play and supported by ads. Players can optionally remove the ads via an in-app purchase for £2. Th
15h
Live Science
Your Genes May Influence Your Risk of InsomniaIf you have insomnia, it may be in your genes.
15h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
New concerns raised over value of genome-wide disease studies Large analyses dredge up 'peripheral' genetic associations that offer little biological insight, researchers say. Nature 546 463 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22152
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Chimps Engage in Costly Quid pro QuoChimpanzees have been known to cooperate when there is no foreseeable personal cost. Watch and learn whether chimps are capable of riskier, more complex forms of collaboration. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Sony's Spider-Man Movie-verse Will Feature Carnage, and May Include Kraven and Mysterio Films Image: Spider-Man Battles the Sinister Six, by Alex Ross The still atrociously named “Sony’s Marvel Universe” is getting bigger. Sony has lifted the lid off the future of its Spider-Man movies after Homecoming , and it seems like Peter Parker is going to have a lot on his plate, with not just future MCU adventures, but some of his most iconic foes coming to the silver screen. A far reaching new s
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cognitive science
Brain's reward pathways become active during art-making activities like doodling, according to a new study. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution, diseasesWhen it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help. The challenges are that they often are bulky, expensive, non-intuitive and complicated. Now, one team reports that portable pressure-based detectors coupled with smartphone software could provide a simpler, more affordable alternative while still maintaining sensitivity.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New light shed on key player in brain developmentResearchers have shed light on how the developing brain ensures that connections between brain cells reach their intended destination but that they are also maintained during life-span.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular test for common causes of vaginitis receives FDA approvalA molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of vaginal tissue that researchers say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the US each year.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking membersChimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members, researchers have noted in a new report.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ocean predicts future northwestern European and Arctic climateThere is a clear potential for practical and useful predictions of northwestern European and Arctic climate based on the state of the ocean, new research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Principal pipelines' to develop leaders may be affordable way to improve schoolsImproving school leadership by better selecting, training and evaluating principals can be an affordable option for school districts that aim to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to a new report. The first-of-its kind study examined how six large urban school districts are investing in their leaders. Researchers found that improving school leadership has been affordable for the six di
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African plant extract offers new hope for Alzheimer'sA plant extract used for centuries in traditional medicine in Nigeria could form the basis of a new drug to treat Alzheimer's disease, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cow herd behavior is fodder for complex systems analysisWith closer inspection, researchers have recognized that what appears to be a randomly dispersed herd peacefully eating grass is in fact a complex system of individuals in a group facing differing tensions. A team of mathematicians and a biologist has now built a mathematical model that incorporates a cost function to behavior in such a herd to understand the dynamics of such systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Illuminating a better way to calculate excitation energyResearchers have demonstrated a new method to calculate excitation energies. They used a new approach based on density functional methods, which use an atom-by-atom approach to calculate electronic interactions. By analyzing a benchmark set of small molecules and oligomers, their functional produced more accurate estimates of excitation energy compared to other commonly used density functionals, w
15h
Ars Technica
With help of coal tax credits, Mylan had a negative 294-percent tax rate in 2016 Enlarge / Heather Bresch, chief executive officer of Mylan Inc, in 2015, the year the company underwent a tax inversion. (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) While reviewing Mylan’s tax filings, Reuters dug up an intriguing investment by the pharmaceutical company: refined coal. Since 2011, the company has purchased 99-percent stakes in five US companies that process coal to make it cleaner burning. Myla
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Gizmodo
The Chemistry of Olive Oil Will Make You an Instant Food Snob Image: CC0 Dipping bread in a bowl of fresh, extra virgin olive oil ranks as one of the most pleasurable gastronomic experiences possible. But as this new Reactions video explains, there’s more to this delicious and surprisingly healthy condiment than meets the eye. Olive oil is a staple in many kitchens, yet it’s a condiment many of us take for granted. This delicious oil, in addition to bringin
16h
TEDTalks (video)
Why design should include everyone | Sinéad BurkeSinéad Burke is acutely aware of details that are practically invisible to many of us. At 105 centimeters (or 3' 5") tall, the designed world -- from the height of a lock to the range of available shoe sizes -- often inhibits her ability to do things for herself. Here she tells us what it's like to navigate the world as a little person and asks: "Who are we not designing for?"
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The Atlantic
How Drug Prohibition Fuels American Carnage During President Ronald Reagan’s first inaugural address, he declared that “in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” The populist right would do well to apply that formulation to the street violence associated with the drug trade. The War on Drugs is a decades-old federal effort that has failed as consistently and completely as any governm
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The Atlantic
U.S. Wastes $28 Million on Afghan Soldiers's Uniforms, Watchdog Says The Pentagon wasted as much as $28 million over the last decade on camouflage uniforms for Afghan soldiers despite the fact forests make up only a small fraction of the country’s landscape, according to a report released Wednesday by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). The findings comes a decade after the Department of Defense moved to procure new uniforms for A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study examines relationship between emotion regulation and brain connectivity in ASDEmotional control varies among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for whole brain analysis identified relationships between emotional lability and neuronal activity in two brain regions.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common water treatments could damage DNAScientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it.Despite poor evidence of their effectiveness as a water disinfectant, colloidal silver and silver nanoparticles are increasingly being promoted for treating potentially contaminated drinking water in low income countries.A study led by the University of East Anglia has c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warming temperatures threaten sea turtlesThis research suggests that that warmer temperatures associated with climate change may lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In organizations, bullying begets whining, study findsIn organizations, bullying within decision-making groups appears to go hand in hand with whining, according to a new study. 'In other words, when some people act dominant by bullying, others respond by being submissive and whining,' says David Henningsen, a Northern Illinois University professor of communication who led the study. The researchers found that both reported bullying and whining behav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological fingerprint of tuberculosis meningitis discovered in childrenChildren with tuberculosis meningitis have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CAMH researchers discover brain inflammation in people with OCDA new brain imaging study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto shows for the first time that brain inflammation is significantly elevated -- more than 30 per cent higher -- in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than in people without the condition. Published today in JAMA Psychiatry, the study provides compelling evidence for a new potential direction for tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines use, outcomes of valve replacement procedure performed for off-label indicationsApproximately 1 in 10 transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures in the U.S. were for an off-label indication, with similar 1-year mortality rates compared to on-label use, suggesting that TAVR may be a possible procedure option for certain patients requiring a heart valve replacement, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What are trends in emergency department utilization, costs for shingles?A new article published by JAMA Dermatology uses a nationwide database of emergency department (ED) visits to examine herpes zoster (HZ, shingles)-related ED utilization and costs.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory for stimulus sequences distinguishes humans from other animalsHumans possess many cognitive abilities not seen in other animals, such as a full-blown language capacity as well as reasoning and planning abilities. Despite these differences, however, it has been difficult to identify specific mental capacities that distinguish humans from other animals. Researchers at the City University of New York (CUNY) and Stockholm University have now discovered that huma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All that's cool and quirky at the Paris Air ShowThere are flying cars and Concorde's would-be supersonic successor, a company offering to deliver cargo to the Moon—for a mere $1.2 million per kilogram—and the latest in funky futuristic aviation ideas, both big and small.
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Gizmodo
Driverless Bus Goes on Rolling Rampage in Brooklyn Screenshot: ABC 7 Everybody makes mistakes. Like, for instance, let’s say you drive a bus, and you just finished a night shift, and you stop, and you’re tired, and maybe you accidentally put the bus in neutral instead of park on top of a hill, and you hop off and start walking home. And, yes, maybe the bus starts rolling down the hill. It’s an honest mistake. Could happen to anyone. And happen it
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Ingeniøren
10 teknologiske tendenser, du bør kende: #9: Skaberen af 3D-print satser på metalTre prominente MIT-professorer falbyder billigere 3D-metalprint til masserne. Nja, dæmp forventningerne, siger danske eksperter.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clear view on stem cell developmentToday, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden development steps visible.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bat biodiversity is in danger on islands worldwideA new study investigates knowledge gaps among the largely unknown, but greatly threatened, group of island-restricted bats, and leads future research efforts to actual priorities.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New catalyst paves way for carbon neutral fuelScientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to teaching music improvisation enhances creativityNew research looks at developing processes for musical improvisation that enhance creativity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To work or not to work: Moms' well being rests on what she wantsThe center of a mother's life tends to be her children and her family, but if mom is unhappy about staying home with the kids or about working outside the home then she (and anyone close to her) may suffer, according to new research. The research showed that the best adjusted mothers were the ones who pursued the lifestyle they wanted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most people 'aren't as happy as their friends' on social mediaA study led by computer scientists has found that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This may cause most social media users to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends but also less happy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible link between type I interferons, natural improvement of rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy, pilot study findsA possible link between type I interferons and a natural improvement of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during pregnancy has been discovered by researchers. These findings could have significant implications in the development of safer therapies for RA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Calves conceived in winter perform betterCows and humans have something in common: If you take better care of the mother during pregnancy, her children are likely to be healthier – and this impact should last a lifetime, a scientist reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wild monkeys use loud calls to assess the relative strength of rivalsGelada males — a close relative to baboons — pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Family history and location of genetic fault affect risk for carriers of cancer genesA large scale study of women carrying faults in important cancer genes should enable doctors to provide better advice and counselling for treatments and lifestyle changes aimed at reducing this risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wave beams mix and stir the ocean to create climateWaves deep within the ocean play an important role in establishing ocean circulation, arising when tidal currents oscillate over an uneven ocean bottom. The internal waves generated by this process stir and mix the ocean, bringing cold, deep water to the surface to be warmed by the sun. Investigators now explain how to tell which way internal waves will go. The proposed theory unifies several prev
16h
Wired
Patients Are Experimenting With Ketamine to Treat DepressionDozens of clinics across the nation are using ketamine—also known as the club drug Special K—to treat depression.
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The Atlantic
Who Is Saudi Arabia's New Crown Prince? Saudi King Salman named his 31-year-old son, Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince, altering the line of succession by removing the previous crown prince, Mohammed bin Nayef, his nephew and counterterrorism chief, from all his posts. The king’s decision was endorsed by 31 out of 34 members of the Allegiance Council, a body comprising senior members of the ruling Al Saud family. The move, while no
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The Atlantic
Apple Is a Step Closer to Making Its Own TV Shows This year, Netflix will spend something in the realm of $6 billon on original programming, more than any media company apart from ESPN. Amazon is expected to spend $4.5 billion. Even Google, the owners of YouTube, are looking to spend hundreds of millions making TV shows this year. Streaming TV is no longer a fad—it’s a booming industry, one that’s competitive with cable and network television, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU migration to Britain falls sharply: studyThe number of people moving to Britain from Eastern Europe has fallen by around a third since the Brexit vote, according to a study released Wednesday that suggested the plunge in the pound could be to blame.
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Gizmodo
It's So Hot in Arizona Right Now, Puppy Feet Are Frying Photo: AP You know, in school and in newspapers, the experts warn you about all the dangers of global warming: melting ice caps, rising sea levels, more destructive hurricanes. All bad stuff! What they don’t tell you is that when it gets to be around 120-degrees, the sidewalk gets so hot, it can fry a puppy paw instantly. Can you imagine the horror these poor pups are facing?! They’re not the onl
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CWRU researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storageChemists at Case Western Reserve University found that commonly used polymer films containing two dyes can optically store data in a quaternary (four-symbol) code, potentially requiring about half as much space as binary code storage.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Underused cancer test could improve treatment for thousandsA simple blood test could improve treatment for more than 1 in 6 stage 2 colon cancer patients, suggests new Mayo Clinic research. The researchers also discovered that many patients who could benefit from the test likely aren't receiving it. The findings were published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Head impact exposure increases as youth football players get older, biggerYouth football players are exposed to more and more forceful head impacts as they move up in age- and weight-based levels of play, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One of Africa's largest wildlife relocations beginsConservationists have launched what they call one of Africa's biggest wildlife relocations—the transfer of 7,500 animals over three years to a Mozambican park whose wildlife was nearly wiped out by civil war.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel signs up as top Olympic sponsor through 2024The International Olympic Committee says it has signed a deal with technology provider Intel, one week after McDonald's ended its long-standing sponsorship three years early.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carnegie Mellon's RoboTutor advances to Global Learning XPRIZE semifinalsRoboTutor, educational technology developed at Carnegie Mellon University that teaches children basic math and reading skills, has been named a semifinalist in the $15 million Global Learning XPRIZE competition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists solve mystery of unexplained 'bright nights'Dating back to the first century, scientists, philosophers and reporters have noted the occasional occurrence of "bright nights," when an unexplained glow in the night sky lets observers see distant mountains, read a newspaper or check their watch.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communitiesFloods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists at LSU have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the U.S. They studied development trends from 2001 to 2011 and found that urban development has declined in coastal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating rate of temperature rise in the PyreneesThe Iberian Peninsula is undergoing climate change, with temperatures on the rise, and mountain ranges are not exempt from this trend. A team of scientists has analysed regional climate series from the Central Pyrenees for 1910 to 2013 (the most extensive climate records to date for the area), concluding that temperatures have risen at an increasing rate since 1970, particularly in spring and summ
16h
NYT > Science
Too Hot to Fly? Climate Change May Take a Toll on Air TravelExcess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.
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Gizmodo
Fusion “Bipartisanship” Means “I Don’t Understand What Politics Is” | Jezebel Kim and Kanye Have Re Fusion “Bipartisanship” Means “I Don’t Understand What Politics Is” | Jezebel Kim and Kanye Have Reportedly Hired a Surrogate to Have Their Third Child | Deadspin Marian Hossa May Be Done, And That’s Pretty Convenient For The Blackhawks | The Root The Cosby Trial Reminded Me Why I’ll Never Seek Justice |
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Gizmodo
New Blade Runner 2049 Footage Sees Rick Deckard Taken 'Home' Image: Still via EW This weekend makes the 35th anniversary of Blade Runner —and to mark the occasion, we’ve gotten an excellent new behind-the-scenes featurette about its sequel from the cast and crew, which sheds some light on the world of 2049 Los Angeles, as well as how Blade Runner 2049 is trying to set itself apart from the original. Although everyone involved —from Ford to co-star Ryan Gos
16h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Out with the old: new treatment on cell ageing process – Science Weekly podcastIan Sample explores research on cellular senescence and the role this therapeutic approach can play in age-related diseases and health issues
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Gizmodo
12 Tools and Apps That Make Working From Home Easier Image: RescueTime With around 34 percent of the US workforce now freelancing, more and more of us are ditching the traditional office environment for anywhere we can get wi-fi, and if you’re a resident of New York City you’re probably stuck working at home anyway, trapped by the crumbling infrastructure of the NYC subway system . Working away from an office presents it’s own unique set of challen
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Science | The Guardian
Out with the old: new treatment on cell ageing process – Science Weekly podcast Ian Sample explores research on cellular senescence and the role this therapeutic approach can play in age-related diseases and health issues Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 1965, Professor Leonard Hayflick published a landmark paper describing a process that limited the proliferation – or growth – of no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 3-D display takes the eye fatigue out of virtual realityThere is a great deal of excitement around virtual reality (VR) headsets that display a computer-simulated world and augmented reality (AR) glasses that overlay computer-generated elements with the real world. Although AR and VR devices are starting to hit the market, they remain mostly a novelty because eye fatigue makes them uncomfortable to use for extended periods. A new type of 3D display cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US textile industry returning to lifeAfter years of losing market share to overseas manufacturers, American textile and fiber makers say their industry is turning around. A story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores how advancing technology in the field is allowing the U.S. textile industry to gain new ground.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution and diseasesWhen it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help. The challenges are that they often are bulky, expensive, non-intuitive and complicated. Now, one team reports in ACS Sensors that portable pressure-based detectors coupled with smartphone software could provide a simpler, more affordable alternative while still maintaining sensitivity.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiment shows non-classical growth of crystalsThis might considerably speed up crystal growth that is of major importance in a number of materials and applications. The liquid state of the building blocks in the preliminary stage might also accelerate the effectiveness of medicines. The results have been published in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature Communications on 21 June 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Screen time or story time? E-books better for toddler learningA new study analyses toddler's reading and learning habits through electronic books compared to print books.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communitiesFloods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists at LSU have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the US
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists solve mystery of unexplained 'bright nights'Dating back to the first century, scientists, philosophers and reporters have noted the occasional occurrence of 'bright nights,' when an unexplained glow in the night sky lets observers see distant mountains, read a newspaper or check their watch. A new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, uses satellite data to present a pos
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bat biodiversity is in danger on islands worldwideA new study from the University of Helsinki investigates knowledge gaps among the largely unknown, but greatly threatened, group of island-restricted bats, and leads future research efforts to actual priorities. Island ecosystems, as a consequence of isolation from mainland, have evolved peculiar faunas with a great number of species found nowhere else. They are also some of the most vulnerable ha
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wild monkeys use loud calls to assess the relative strength of rivalsGelada males—a close relative to baboons—pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly identified protection mechanism serves as first responder to cellular stressResearchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a new type of rapid-response defense mechanism that helps protect cells from environmental stress while giving slower, well-known protection systems time to act.
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Dagens Medicin
Allergen immunterapi har en plads i forebyggelse Data for god korttidseffekt af forebyggende allergen immunterapibehandling til høfeberpatienter ventes at indgå i kommende guidelines på området, som professor Susanne Halken har fortalt om på EAACI.
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Dagens Medicin
Fødevareallergi har også vigtige etiske aspekter Bekymrede forældre til børn med svær peanutallergi og andre potentielt livstruende allergier skal mødes på deres bekymring – alt andet vil lægefagligt og etisk være forkert, mener professor Carsten Bindslev-Jensen, Syddansk Universitet, og centerleder for ORCA.
16h
The Atlantic
Is American Democracy Really Under Threat? The White House’s increasing inaccessibility to the press; the violence against lawmakers and journalists ; the apparent ease with which Russia preyed on Americans’ deep political divisions and distrust of government; and the president’s efforts to delegitimize the media , his opponents , unfavorable court rulings , and independent investigations into his campaign’s ties with Moscow, have all con
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Quanta Magazine
Researchers Check Space-Time to See if It’s Made of Quantum Bits Does space-time emerge from a network of quantum bits? That’s the theory behind emergent gravity , an idea most recently proposed by Erik Verlinde , a theoretical physicist at the University of Amsterdam. His theory does away with the need for dark matter — unseen particles that appear to affect the behavior of galaxies and other large-scale structures in the universe. But a recent test of emerge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking membersResearch by Dr Nicholas Newton-Fisher from the University of Kent has found chimpanzees modify their interactions with other chimpanzees if higher ranking members of their community are nearby.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clear view on stem cell developmentToday, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden dev
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metalThe design of new catalysts is essential for making new and useful organosilicon compounds, which are in high demand in fields ranging from the medical to the electronics industries. A crucial step in this process is hydrosilylation (the formation of carbon-silicon bonds), and much interest has focused on rhodium-based catalysts known to be effective in accelerating this reaction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Regional 'hot spot' of Borna disease discovered in upper AustriaBornaviruses cause a lethal form of encephalitis, called Borna disease, among horses and sheep. To date there have been only a few reported cases in Austria. Recently, however, four horses were afflicted in the same area of Upper Austria within just two years. Tests conducted on local shrews, the only known reservoir host for the virus, confirmed the suspicion of a local viral reservoir. A large p
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Futurity.org
Opioid prescription twice as likely for depressed patients Patients with lower back pain who are also depressed may be more likely to be prescribed opioids and receive higher doses than patients without depression, a new study suggests. Understanding these prescribing patterns sheds new light on the current opioid epidemic and may help determine whether efforts to control prescription opioid abuse are effective. “Our findings show that these drugs are mo
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
New journal blacklist, palm-oil ban and the world’s top supercomputers The week in science: 16–22 June 2017. Nature 546 456 doi: 10.1038/546456a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The fight to save thousands of lives with sea-floor sensors Geophysicists are ramping up their efforts to monitor major undersea faults for movement, and search for signs of the next catastrophic quake. Nature 546 466 doi: 10.1038/546466a
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Scientific American Content: Global
Should You Switch to Corn Oil to Lower Cholesterol?A newly published study shows that corn oil reduces cholesterol much more effectively than extra virgin olive oil. But before you make a switch, there are some other factors to consider -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Live Science
Solving the Riddle of Why Rolling Luggage WobblesResearch suggests that acceleration can stabilize shaky suitcases.
17h
Futurity.org
Wear a swim cap full of coffee grounds for surgery? A “granular jamming cap” filled with coffee grounds may improve the reliability of the sophisticated “GPS” system that surgeons use for nose and throat surgery, a new study suggests. The grounds form a thin layer inside a stretchy silicone headpiece, which looks something like a black latex swim cap decorated with reflective dots. After the cap is on the patient’s head, it’s attached to a vacuum
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTMB researchers shed new light on a key player in brain developmentResearchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shed light on how the developing brain ensures that connections between brain cells reach their intended destination but that they are also maintained during life-span.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US textile industry returning to lifeAfter years of losing market share to overseas manufacturers, American textile and fiber makers say their industry is turning around. A story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores how advancing technology in the field is allowing the US textile industry to gain new ground.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accelerating rate of temperature rise in the PyreneesThe Iberian Peninsula is undergoing climate change, with temperatures on the rise, and mountain ranges are not exempt from this trend. A team of scientists has analysed regional climate series from the Central Pyrenees for 1910 to 2013 (the most extensive climate records to date for the area), concluding that temperatures have risen at an increasing rate since 1970, particularly in spring and summ
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Late premature birth increases risk of recurrent hospitalization for respiratory illnessA new study of children up to 2 years of age showed that those born late preterm (34-36 weeks) had a significantly greater risk of recurrent hospitalization due to respiratory illness compared to those who were born full term (>37 weeks).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change label leads to climate science acceptanceA new Cornell University study finds that labels matter when it comes to acceptance of climate science.The US public doubts the existence of 'global warming' more than it doubts 'climate change' -
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple method measures how long bacteria can wait out antibioticsA simple test that measures how long it takes to kill bacteria could help doctors treat strains that are on their way to becoming resistant to antibiotics. If implemented in hospitals' microbiology labs, the test could help guide treatment decisions, and could ultimately reduce the ever-growing risk of bacterial resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drip by dripHow do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface. The research team Physical Chemistry at the University of Konstanz has now observed a preliminary stage of this crystal growth in glutamic acid that contradicts this classical principal of growth. Not individual atoms settle on an existing crystal surface, but na
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution and diseasesWhen it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help. The challenges are that they often are bulky, expensive, non-intuitive and complicated. Now, one team reports in ACS Sensors that portable pressure-based detectors coupled with smartphone software could provide a simpler, more affordable alternative while still maintaining sensitivity.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Provider's preference for pain therapy can affect patient's results, UF researchers findA health care provider's beliefs about a particular treatment may have a strong influence on the patient's outcome, according to a new University of Florida stuPdy that evaluated people undergoing treatment for short-term low back pain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 3-D display takes the eye fatigue out of virtual realityA new type of 3-D display could solve the long-standing problem eye fatigue when using VR and AR equipment by greatly improving the viewing comfort of these wearable devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bat biodiversity is in danger on islands worldwideA new study from the University of Helsinki investigates knowledge gaps among the largely unknown, but greatly threatened, group of island-restricted bats, and leads future research efforts to actual priorities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular test for common causes of vaginitis receives FDA approvalJohns Hopkins researchers report that a molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of vaginal tissue they say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the US each year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New inhibitor drug shows promise in relapsed leukemiaA new drug shows promise in its ability to target one of the most common and sinister mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's Abramson Cancer Center. In a first-in-human study, researchers treated relapsed patients with gilteritinib, an FLT3 inhibitor, and found it was a well-tolerated drug
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The Atlantic
The Eerie Alignment of Ancient Giant Galaxies The Hubble Space Telescope is the closest thing humanity has to a time machine. It captures light that left galaxies billions of years ago, photographing the cosmos as it was near the beginning of time. The light from the farthest galaxy Hubble has ever observed took 13.4 billion years to reach its mirrors. The galaxy may look like a tiny, red inkblot to us, but we’re seeing that inkblot as it wa
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Live Science
Vitamin B12: Deficiency & SupplementsVitamin B12 deficiency is a common problem. Supplements can treat a deficiency, but doctors recommended getting vitamin B12 from foods.
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Gizmodo
Don't Adjust Your Screen: This Monitor Really Is That Wide LG 29" IPS 21:9 Monitor , $227 There are widescreen monitors, and then there are widescreen monitors. This is the latter . This 29" LG Ultrawide features 2560x1080 resolution, and its IPS panel means that colors and viewing angles will both be stellar. $227's the best price Amazon’s listed, so close out all of your other windows and focus on buying it.
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Dagens Medicin
Betydelig komorbiditet blandt patienter med mastocytose Risikoen for osteoporose, hudkræft og hjertekarsygdomme er signifikant højere blandt personer med mastocytose, viser resultater af dansk kohortestudie, som overlæge Sigurd Broesby-Olsen har præsenteret på EAACI.
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Dagens Medicin
EAACI gennemfører lederskifte Antonella Muraro fratræder som præsident for EAACI på et tidspunkt, hvor organisationen aldrig har været større, og hvor årets kongres også når sit hidtil højeste deltagerantal.
17h
Wired
Airbus' A380plus Comes With Fuel-Saving Winglets and 80 More SeatsThe planemaker's latest effort to save the slow-selling super jumbo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis says social networking services may foster users' negative perceptions about their own popularity, happinessA study led by computer scientists at Indiana University has found that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This may cause most social media users to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends but also less happy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronicsVersatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report that mimicking the structure of the 'powdery alligator-flag' plant has enabled th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting the biggest bang out of plasma jetsCapillary discharge plasma jets are created by a large current that passes through a low-density gas in what is called a capillary chamber. The gas ionizes and turns into plasma. When plasma expands in the capillary chamber due to arc energy heating, plasma ejects from the capillary nozzle forming the plasma jet. A new study examines how the dimensions of the capillary producing the plasma affect
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People looking for prestige prefer 'big ponds' over small onesWhen looking at new opportunity, do you choose an average place where you are among the top performers or do you choose a prestigious place where you might be average and not particularly remarkable? In other words, do you want to be the big frog in a small pond or a little frog in a big pond? According to recent research your cultural upbringing ultimately affects your choice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar heating could cover over 80 percent of domestic heating requirements in Nordic countriesBy using suitable systems, more than 80 percent of heating energy for Finnish households could be produced using solar energy with competitive prices. This result is also valid for Sweden, Norway, Alaska, northern Canada and other locations at the same latitudes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic modifier for Huntington's disease progression identifiedResearchers have developed a novel measure of disease progression for Huntington's disease, which enabled them to identify a genetic modifier associated with how rapidly the disease progresses.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Desert Basins May Hold Missing Carbon SinksUnderstanding these sinks and how they function is critical for calculating the world’s carbon budget -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking membersChimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clear view on stem cell developmentToday, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden dev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Active 24/7 and doing greatCircadian clocks control the day-night cycle of many living beings. But what do the pacemakers do in animals whose activities do not follow this pattern? Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now looked into this question.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transportation noise increases risk for cardiovascular diseases and diabetesTransportation noise increases risk for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This is shown by the first results of the SiRENE study under the lead of Swiss TPH, which was presented on 20 June 2017 in the framework of the ICBEN Congress (International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise) in Zurich.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marriage makes men fatter, shows new researchBeing married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management.
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Ars Technica
Key US general embraces new space ethos of “go fast, test, and fail” Enlarge / General John Hyten speaks during the 32nd Space Symposium in 2016. (credit: Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images) In recent years, the traditional aerospace industry has faced disruption from new space companies—most notably SpaceX, but also other players such as Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic. These new companies have pushed hard to lower the cost of access to space through vario
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Gizmodo
This Is One of the Coolest Shots of the Mars Curiosity Rover We've Ever Seen Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona See that faint, blue dot in the middle of this NASA image? That’s the Curiosity rover making its way up the rocky slopes of Mount Sharp. The robotic lander, now approaching its fifth year of operation, has never looked so lonely. Zoomed in view. (Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona) The remarkable image was captured on June 5, 2017, by a camera aboard
17h
Wired
Star Wars' Han Solo Movie Don't Need No Stinkin' DirectorsWith Phil Lord and Christopher Miller leaving the young Han Solo movie, one thing is clear: Star Wars is officially too big to direct.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds' feathers reveal their winter dietInfluences outside the breeding season matter a lot for the population health of migratory birds, but it's tough to track what happens once species scatter for the winter. A study now tries a new approach for determining what birds called bobolinks eat after they head south for the winter -- analyzing the carbon compounds in their plumage, which are determined by the types of plants the birds cons
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast implants may impede ECG and lead to false heart attack diagnosisBreast implants may impede an electrocardiogram (ECG) and could result in a false heart attack diagnosis, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drowsy dormice doze into declineBritain's population of hazel dormice, famed for their sleepy lifestyle, has declined by more than 70 percent in just over two decades, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type fast if you want to be a virtual team leader: StudyA new study finds that to the fast typist go the leadership spoils. The study suggests that the fleet-fingered are more likely to emerge as the leaders of virtual work teams that have members scattered in multiple offices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experts set out plan to tackle 'questionable integrity' of medical evidenceA plan to tackle 'serious flaws in the creation, dissemination and implementation of medical evidence' is set out by experts in a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mountain lions fear humans, fleeing when they hear our voices, new study revealsNew research into the behavior of mountain lions indicates they don't like encountering humans any more than we like bumping into them on hiking trails. The findings are particularly valuable as human development encroaches on lion habitat and drives up the number of human-puma encounters.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightweight steel production breakthrough: Brittle phases controlledHigh-strength, lightweight steels can finally be processed on an industrial scale, thanks to a breakthrough in controlling undesired brittle stages from production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New findings reverse hypothesis of GABA neurodevelopment in schizophreniaNew research by provides an unprecedented level of resolution and insight into disturbances in cortical GABAergic microcircuits, which are thought to underlie cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. The study reveals new detailed understanding about alterations in neurocircuitry that point to abnormal neurodevelopment in the disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A unique data center for cosmological simulationsScientists have established 'Cosmowebportal', a unique data center for cosmological simulations. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blocking yeast-bacteria interaction may prevent severe biofilms that cause childhood tooth decayIn early childhood caries, a severe form of tooth decay that affects more than a third of toddlers in the US, yeast often partners with bacteria to form an intractable biofilm. New research reveals the mechanisms and suggests a way to block the interaction and reduce plaque.
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Futurity.org
Stronger, lighter steel could soon end up in cars A new method makes it possible to create high-strength, lightweight steel on an industrial scale, potentially making way for its use in vehicles. Researchers have developed a new processing route which allows low density steel-based alloys to be produced with maximum strength, while remaining durable and flexible—something that has been largely impossible until now. Vehicles made of stronger and
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Gizmodo
A $400 Smart Tea Machine Gave This Brit an Existential Crisis All images: Libby Watson/Gizmodo When Americans are trying to rib me for being British, they tend to go for at least one of three jokes. They act like I love or have an intimate knowledge of the royal family, which I don’t; they mention terrible British food, which is fair, (though y’all invented spray cheese); or they’ll bring up tea. Haha, uh, cup of tea much, you limey? Well played, Americans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to stop your dog getting heatstroke – according to scienceSummer is a great time to get out and about with your dog. But dogs don't tolerate the heat as well as their owners. When people get hot they start to sweat, but dogs are only able to do this through the pads on their paws. Dogs instead rely on panting as their main method of cooling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New clues in puzzle over pre-eclampsia and cholesterol regulationScientists studying a mystery link between the dangerous pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia and an increased risk of heart disease in later life for both mother and child have uncovered important new clues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
German cities traumatized in WWII show distinct psychological resilience todayGerman Angst is a term commonly used to characterize the perceived tendency of Germans to be pessimistic. But is there anything to it and what are potential historical sources? A team of psychologists led by Martin Obschonka have addressed the issue in a study. To the surprise of the researchers, the data showed that those German cities that had suffered from more severe strategic bombing than oth
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Domestication genetics: The career of the cosmopolitan catA new study shows that modern domestic cats are ultimately derived from the African wildcat, which was domesticated in two centers -- Egypt and the Middle East. Moreover, both lineages contributed to the genomes of European cats.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metalResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have reported a new catalyst composed of silica, a rhodium complex and tertiary amines(term1) that significantly boosts hydrosilylation reactions.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot summer frequents Europe-west Asia and northeast Asia after the mid-1990sA recent research identifies a nonuniform warming pattern in summer after the mid-1990s over the Eurasian continent, with a predominant amplified warming over Europe-West Asia and Northeast Asia but much weaker warming over Central Asia. The study also implies that there will still be a strong warming over Europe-West Asia and Northeast Asia in the coming decade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach to teaching music improvisation enhances creativityNew research looks at developing processes for musical improvisation that enhance creativity.
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cognitive science
A new paper in PSPB examines the types of humor that do and don't help people deal with stressful situations. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global
Karen Handel: New Georgia Congresswoman's Views on Health CareHandel, a Republican, wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act but protect preexisting conditions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research collaboration brings new concepts for potassium-ion batteriesResearchers are making progress in developing rechargeable batteries based on potassium, a potential alternative to lithium that's less expensive and far more plentiful, and also have shown how to derive carbon for battery electrodes from old tires.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radioactive elements in Cassiopeia A suggest a neutrino-driven explosionStars exploding as supernovae are the main sources of heavy chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, radioactive atomic nuclei are synthesized in the hot, innermost regions during the explosion and can thus serve as probes of the unobservable physical processes that initiate the blast. Using elaborate computer simulations, a team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk releases details of plan to colonise Mars – here's what a planetary expert thinksElon Musk, the founder of SpaceX and Tesla, has released new details of his vision to colonise parts of the solar system, including Mars, Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus. His gung ho plans – designed to make humans a multi-planetary species in case civilisation collapses – include launching flights to Mars as early as 2023.
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Viden
Stephen Hawking opfordrer til bemandet mission til MånenVi bliver nødt til at sprede os til andre planeter for menneskehedens skyld, fortæller han.
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Ingeniøren
12 mulige årsager til at vi ikke har fundet rumvæsenerGalaksen er så stor og gammel, at det er usandsynligt, at kun Jorden rummer intelligent liv. Tjek listen, og kom med dit bud på en plausibel årsag til, at vi endnu ikke har opdaget aliens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depressed patients more likely to be prescribed opioidsPatients with low back pain who were depressed were more likely to be prescribed opioids and receive higher doses, research has found. Understanding these prescribing patterns sheds new light on the current opioid epidemic and may help determine whether efforts to control prescription opioid abuse are effective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New metrology technique measures electric fieldsIt is crucial that mobile phones and other wireless devices -- so prevalent today -- have accurate and traceable measurements for electric fields and radiated power. Until recently, however, it wasn't possible to build self-calibrating probes that could generate independent and absolute measurements of these. To address this, researchers have developed a method to measure electric fields and a pro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tennis cheats may be predicted by their moral standardsA new study examines the personal characteristics linked to observations of cheating during tennis matches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a girl is raised can influence her adult sporting successGirls who grow up exposed to traditionally more masculine interests and role models are more likely to have the aggressive desire to succeed at sport. A new study looks at the motivation level of successful female footballers and whether their upbringing influences this desire to succeed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
City rats: Why scientists are not hot on their tailsResearchers argue they need greater access to urban properties if they are to win the war against rats. People around the world denounce rats for fouling foods, spreading disease, starting fires, and even disabling motor vehicles. One might assume because of the threat city rats pose to health and safety, scientists would be hot on their tails--tracking every movement, monitoring each disease they
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain tumors: Still devastating, but treatment has come a long wayA neurosurgeon discusses advances in brain tumor diagnosis and treatment that are bringing renewed hope to the battle against brain cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Future trucks fueled by hydrogen created with solar power: Exhaust? Pure water vaporHeavy-duty trucks will soon be driving around in Trondheim, Norway, fueled by hydrogen created with solar power, and emitting only pure water vapor as “exhaust”. Not only will hydrogen technology revolutionize road transport, it will also enable ships and trains to run emission-free.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reverse engineering mysterious 500-million-year-old fossils that confound our tree of lifePaleontologists like us are used to working with fossils that would seem bizarre to many biologists accustomed to living creatures. And as we go farther back in Earth's history, the fossils start to look even weirder. They lack tails, legs, skeletons, eyes…any characteristics that would help us understand where these organisms fit in the tree of life. Under these circumstances, the science of pale
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Futurity.org
To support young Syrian refugees, measure resilience Measuring the resilience of Syrian children and adolescents displaced by conflict could help humanitarian organizations design programs for these young people and their families. Over 5 million people have been forced to flee the six-year-old conflict in Syria, and over 650,000 Syrians are now rebuilding their lives in neighboring Jordan. Building resilience in people affected by war is a priorit
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Scientific American Content: Global
Amazon Rain Forest May Have Once Been a Giant Marine LakeEvidence from sediment cores suggests this rich ecosystem was flooded at least twice in the past -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
1 in 3 humans harbors this sneaky parasite One in three people has a potentially nasty parasite hiding in the body—tucked away in tiny cysts that the immune system can’t eliminate and antibiotics can’t touch. But new research reveals clues about how to stop it: Interfere with its digestion during this stubborn dormant phase. If the discovery leads to new treatments, it could help prevent the parasitic disease toxoplasmosis, which sickens
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world's largest canaryBiologists at Lund University, together with their colleagues from Portugal and the UK, have now proven that the endangered São Tomé grosbeak is the world's largest canary -- 50 percent larger than the runner-up.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Screen time or story time?A new study analyses toddler's reading and learning habits through electronic books compared to print books.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regional 'hot spot' of Borna disease discovered in upper AustriaBornaviruses cause a lethal form of encephalitis, Borna disease, among horses and sheep. To date only a few cases were reported in Austria. Recently, four horses were afflicted in the same area of Upper Austria within just two years. Tests on local shrews, the reservoir host, confirmed the suspicion of a local viral reservoir. The study in Emerging Microbes & Infections documents a rare outbreak o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spanish researchers review the state-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistryIn a recent Chemical Reviews article, the Biological Text Mining Unit at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) together with with researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), of the University of Navarra, in Pamplona, and the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC-CNS) have published the first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A patent study on the great new hope emerging from marine derived anticancer drugsAnticancer agents targeting microtubule from marine sources hold great potential in the field of cancer therapeutics and are gradually advancing in the clinical setup.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wild monkeys use loud calls to assess the relative strength of rivalsGelada males -- a close relative to baboons -- pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly identified protection mechanism serves as first responder to cellular stressResearchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a new type of rapid-response defense mechanism that helps protect cells from environmental stress while giving slower, well-known protection systems time to act.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds most people aren't as happy as their friends on social mediaA study led by computer scientists at Indiana University has found that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This may cause most social media users to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends but also less happy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Political bots are poisoning democracy – so, off with their headsPropaganda bots posing as people are increasingly being used on social media to sway public opinion around the world. So says new research from the University of Oxford's Internet Institute, which found automated accounts and other forms of social media propaganda are rife in Russia, the US and Germany among other countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CASIS partnership brings 'organs-on-chips' research to space stationModels of human disease are beneficial for medical research, but have limitations in predicting the way a drug will behave within the human body using data from non-human models because of inherent differences between species. Many medications produce unexpected outcomes in the clinical trial stage using human subjects, despite success in animal models and even 2-D cell culture models using human
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Ars Technica
The Steam Summer Sale begins June 22 Enlarge Has it been a year already? That's right folks, it's time to fire up your gaming PC, pull out the credit card, and stock up your Steam library with dozens of games that will remain in your unplayed pile of shame. The annual Steam Summer Sale begins June 22 at 6pm UK time (1pm EDT, 10am PDT). Plus, UK users can get an additional £5 off a £20 spend until July 5 by paying with PayPal. The 20
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New Scientist - News
UK foxes thankfully spared the baying pack, unlike Theresa MayOne good outcome of the hung parliament chaos will be a Queen's speech devoid of an utterly unscientific vow to resume fox-hunting, says Stephen Harris
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists create 3-D printed graphene foamNanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to fabricate centimeter-sized objects of atomically thin graphene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understandingDespite decades of reform efforts, mathematics teaching in the U.S. has changed little in the last century. As a result, it seems, American students have been left behind, now ranking 40th in the world in math literacy.
18h
Ingeniøren
Danske studerende finder alvorlige sikkerhedshuller i Snowden-rost sky-storage Kryptering af filer var ikke lige så sikkert, som firmaet bag selv troede. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/studerende-finder-alvorlige-sikkerhedshuller-sky-storage-del-speciale-1077735 Version2
18h
Ingeniøren
Supercomputer fra Vestas er nu den kraftigste danske repræsentant på ny top-500-liste Den samlede regnekraft på verdens 500 kraftigste computere vokser langsommere end hidtil. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/schweizisk-supercomputere-vipper-amerikansk-3-pladsen-verdens-kraftigste-1077733 Version2
18h
Wired
How to Measure the Height of a Building With a ... Barometer?What is a barometer and how could you use it to measure the height of a building?
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Gizmodo
A Totally Wild Rumor About the Next Fantastic Four Film A former Game of Thrones alum has joined the Avatar movies in a major way. Geoff Johns promises big things for DC’s female heroes in their movie universe. Michael Bay teases how Transformers: The Last Knight sets up all those future spinoffs. Plus, American Horror Story recruits a former Arrow hero. Spoilers now! Fantastic Four Get those salt shakers at the ready, because there’s not just rumors
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The Atlantic
Transformers: The Last Knight Is More of the Same About Last Knight … Forgive me. I was thinking of a more innocent time, 30 years ago, when the most frightening image that mainstream cinema could conjure up was Demi Moore and Rob Lowe getting it on in the shower . Since those days, Hollywood has come up with so many more novel ways in which to disappoint and/or irritate us. And few have pushed the envelope as aggressively as Michael Bay’s Trans
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The Atlantic
What Will Uber Become Without Travis Kalanick as CEO? It came down to money, in the end. Investors backing Uber decided it wasn’t enough that Travis Kalanick announced last week he would take an indefinite leave from his position at the helm of the scandal-plagued company. He had to go. Now. This was an “outright rebellion” by shareholders, says Mike Isaac , The New York Times reporter who first reported Kalanick’s surprise ouster overnight. On one
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chatbots aren't Terminators—they're just trying to 'optimize outcomes'Yes, Facebook's chatbots have created their own, non-human language to communicate with each other. No, this doesn't mean they're planning to take over the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reconstructing chromosomal rearrangements of placental mammals over millions of years(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from South Korea, the U.K. and the U.S. has used computational methods to follow chromosomal rearrangements in seven genomes. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the two-step process they followed that allowed them to better understand changes to chromosomal arrangement in certain mammals over time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligent underground robot for urban environmentsResearchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are leading the implementation of a new kind of autonomous underground robot with intelligent navigation for urban environments. The system, developed within the framework of the European research project BADGER, aims to become a model for excavation technologies because of its high economic and social impact.
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Ars Technica
Star Wars Han Solo film directors leave, citing “creative differences” Enlarge (credit: Lucasfilm) The directors of the upcoming Star Wars Han Solo spin-off have abandoned the project halfway through production. Phil Lord and Christopher Miller—whose directorial credits include The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street —have cited "creative differences" for leaving the production, which stars Alden Ehrenreich as a young version of Han Solo. "Unfortunately, our vision and pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New catalyst paves way for carbon neutral fuelAustralian scientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme catalyzed decomposition of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamideOxazaphosphorine cytostatics (Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide) are often used and very effective anticancer agents; but so far little is known about the molecular basis for the antitumor effect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New perspective: Vegetation phenology variability based on tibetan plateau tree-ring dataRecently, a research group headed by Prof. YANG Bao from the Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with coauthors from Russia, Germany, Canada and Sweden, has reconciled these conflicting results based on a 55-year series of vegetation phenology for the TP derived from well-validated process-b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To work or not to work: Moms' well being rests on what she wantsThe center of a mother's life tends to be her children and her family, but if mom is unhappy about staying home with the kids or about working outside the home then she (and anyone close to her) may suffer, according to new research from Arizona State University. The research showed that the best adjusted mothers were the ones who pursued the lifestyle they wanted.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Watch the Human Brain Come to Life in This Stunning Piece of ArtDrawn and etched with algorithms, Greg Dunn’s masterpiece is unique in more ways than one -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing water use in agricultureA new LMU project explores ways of monitoring global water consumption. Its primary goals are to determine the total volume of water required for food production, and develop incentives to encourage the sustainable use of water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When do wisdom teeth have to be removed?Should you have a wisdom tooth removed if it is not causing you any pain? An oral and maxillofacial surgeon researched the risk of complications when removing these teeth. He summarized his conclusions in a pamphlet, which can be used to better evaluate the risks for each patient.
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Ars Technica
Sony’s PlayLink links your phone to your PS4 for multiplayer minigame madness Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) You'd be forgiven for wondering just what the heck Sony's PlayLink is. Rumoured to have been pulled from the publisher's E3 2017 press conference at the last-minute due to Wi-Fi issues (a problem that the poor souls trying to liveblog the event can attest to), PlayLink was instead pushed out via a press release, whereupon it was completely subsumed by the maelstrom o
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Gizmodo
This 3,000-Year-Old Prosthetic Wooden Toe is More Incredible Than We Thought Image: University of Basel, LHTT. Image: Matjaž Kačičnik An ongoing reexamination of an ancient Egyptian wooden toe is shedding new light on how the remarkable wooden prosthetic was manufactured, and whether it was used for cosmetic or functional purposes. It’s called the Greville Chester Great Toe, and it’s one of the earliest prosthetic devices known to scientists . The Iron Age prosthetic was
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe okays project to seek alien lifeEurope has approved the launch of a deep-space observatory to sniff out habitable planets in other star systems, along with any life forms they may host.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The world's largest canaryBiologists at Lund University, together with their colleagues from Portugal and the UK, have now proven that the endangered São Tomé grosbeak is the world's largest canary – 50 per cent larger than the runner-up.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Portugal forest fire smoulders as first victims buriedHundreds of firefighters battled blazes in central Portugal on Wednesday as the funerals of some of the 64 people killed in the inferno renewed anger over the emergency response to the disaster.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heatwave scorches Europe, from London to SiberiaEurope sizzled in a continent-wide heatwave on Wednesday, with London bracing for Britain's hottest June day since 1976 as Portugal battled to stamp out deadly forest fires.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temple study: Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory & protects brain against Alzheimer'sThe Mediterranean diet is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower incidence of dementia. Now, researchers at Temple's Lewis Katz School of Medicine have identified a specific ingredient that protects against cognitive decline: extra-virgin olive oil. In a new study, the researchers show that consumption of extra-virgin olive oil protects memory and learning ability and redu
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Science | The Guardian
Archaeologists unearth prehistoric ritual area around Bryn Celli Ddu Previously unknown Anglesey landscape possibly includes cairn cemetery in what experts described as ‘really exciting stuff’ Archaeologists have uncovered a prehistoric ritual landscape that possibly includes a cairn cemetery around a 5,000-year-old burial mound aligned with the summer solstice sun on Anglesey. Though far less famous than Stonehenge, the spectacle of sunlight shining down a long n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snake robots to assist astronautsNorwegian researchers are looking into how a snake robot might carry out maintenance work on the International Space Station (ISS), study comets, and explore the possibility of living and working in lava tunnels on the Moon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA completes study of future 'ice giant' mission conceptsA NASA-led and NASA-sponsored study of potential future missions to the mysterious "ice giant" planets Uranus and Neptune has been released—the first in a series of mission studies NASA will conduct in support of the next Planetary Science Decadal Survey. The results of this and future studies will be used as the Decadal Survey deliberates on NASA's planetary science priorities from 2022-2032. The
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The Atlantic
The Intriguing Chills of The Mist Early in Stephen King’s 1980 novella, The Mist , a character in the small town of Bridgton, Maine, details a local legend called the Black Spring, where winter lingers so long that the ice on a frozen lake becomes as dark “as a rotten tooth.” It’s a neat metaphor for much of King’s work, wherein unnatural conditions expose hidden decay. But in the new Spike adaptation of The Mist , created by Chr
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Ars Technica
Hour of Devastation spoiler: Sink your fangs into this new split card Wizards of the Coast Driven to Despair. Have fun trying to turn your head through 90 degrees. Magic 's new expansion Hour of Devastation is almost here, and we have a new split card to show you ahead of the set's release. Take a look at Driven to Despair . As an Aftermath card, Driven and Despair are played as separate spells—once from your hand, and then from your graveyard—but they can be chain
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Active 24/7 and doing greatCircadian clocks control the day-night cycle of many living beings. But what do the pacemakers do in animals whose activities do not follow this pattern? Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now looked into this question.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria samples collected in Antarctica a century ago nearly identical to present day samples(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the Natural History Museum of London and the University of Waikato have found that bacteria living in a part of Antarctica have not changed much over the past century. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Anne Jungblut and Ian Hawes describe how they compared the DNA of cynobacterial mats collected during Captain Robert Falcon Scott'
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Get in on the ground floor—how apartments can join the solar boomWhile there are now more solar panels in Australia than people, the many Australians who live in apartments have largely been locked out of this solar revolution by a minefield of red tape and potentially uninformed strata committees.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Propose a New Way to Test How Space Radiation Will Fry You A source of galactic cosmic rays (Image: NASA/U. Virginia/INAF, Bologna, Italy/USRA/Ames/STScI/AURA) You’re probably aware of some of the challenges of sending astronauts to space. Getting to space, that’s one for sure. But there’s another insidious effect you might not think of: Tissue damage from radiation. Space radiation comes from all over. There’s more potential harm from the Sun’s rays, un
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Dana Foundation
Summer 2017 Brainy Reading List Summer is finally here! We have eight brainy book suggestions, all written by members of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI) or prominent neuroscientists, to take to the pool, beach, or wherever you enjoy a little bit of sun: Neuroenology: How the Brain Creates the Taste of Wine by DABI member Gordon M. Shepherd, M.D., D.Phil, Columbia University Press Whereas most wine writers tend to
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Ars Technica
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns after pressure from investors Enlarge (credit: Money Sharma/AFP/Getty Images) Uber's CEO Travis Kalanick has resigned effective immediately, following an indefinite leave of absence that was announced just last week. Kalanick said that the leave of absence was to grieve for the recent death of his mother. The New York Times reported that five of Uber's major investors had called for Kalanick's resignation earlier on Tuesday,
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Do "Emotion" and "Mood" Actually Mean?We throw these terms around casually, but in a clinical setting they might be too vague to be useful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Magma under volcanoes is like a leaky snow cone Rather than bubbling lakes of molten rock, magma reservoirs under volcanoes are colder and more solid than previously thought, a new study suggests. The research gives a new view of how volcanoes work, and could eventually help volcanologists get a better idea of when a volcano poses the most risk. “Our concept of what a magma reservoir looks like has to change,” says Kari Cooper, professor of ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frog fossils tell us something new about rain patterns on South Africa's west coastAround 5.1 million years ago, fascinating and now extinct animals like sabre-toothed cats, wolverines and short-necked giraffe roamed the west coast of South Africa. The fossils of these species came to light after metres of concealing sand was removed during phosphate mining more than half a century ago. This took place in an area known as Langebaanweg, a region which lies on Africa's south west
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five ways virtual reality is improving healthcareVirtual reality is much more than just a new form of entertainment, it is increasingly being used in a wide range of medical applications, from treatments to training. Here are a few of them.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Selfish BehaviorWasps use figs as breeding safe havens, pollinating their fruit shelters in return. Some wasps, however, solipsistically use their figs without fertilizing any seeds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Urban agriculture only provides small environmental benefits in northeastern US'Buy local' sounds like a great environmental slogan, epitomized for city dwellers by urban agriculture. But when it comes to growing fruits and vegetables in vacant lots and on rooftops in cities, is the practice really better for the planet than conventional farming? A new analysis of urban agriculture in the northeastern US, reported in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, has found
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronicsVersatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that mimicking the structure of the 'powdery alligator-flag' plant ha
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Problem of wheeled suitcases wobbling explained(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Universite Paris-Diderot has uncovered the reason for wobbling of wheeled suitcases. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, the group explains the physics behind suitcase wobbling and offer some suggestions to overcome the problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fuel of the futureHeavy-duty trucks will soon be driving around in Trondheim, Norway, fuelled by hydrogen created with solar power, and emitting only pure water vapour as exhaust. Not only will hydrogen technology revolutionize road transport, it will also enable ships and trains to run emission-free.
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Popular Science
The world’s art is under attack—by microbes Science Bacteria and fungi are a menace to paintings, sculptures, and ancient artifacts. Cultural relics can be damaged by hordes of tiny invaders: bacteria, fungi, and algae.
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Gizmodo
It's Back! The Best Price Ever On Your Favorite Custom Suits. [Exclusive] Indochino Premium Suits , $350 + free shipping, use promo code KINJA You voted Indochino your favorite custom clothing company by a wide margin, and this week you can dress yourself in one of their premium suits for just $350 . Use promo code KINJA . You do not have to go through the measurement and customization process to lock in this discount. You can checkout now and submit later, which makes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The ocean predicts future northwestern European and Arctic climateA new study in the journal Nature Communications by researchers from the University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Norway, and University of Oxford, UK, demonstrates that there is a clear potential for practical and useful predictions of northwestern European and Arctic climate based on the state of the ocean.
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Wired
Get Your Kids Coding With Sony’s Clever Building BlocksLearning to code is as easy as playing with Koov, a set of programmable building blocks.
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Science-Based Medicine
Coconut Oil WarningCoconut oil is promoted as a health food, but a recent warning from the American Heart Association warns that coconut oil is very high in saturated fats and increases your risk for heart disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban agriculture only provides small environmental benefits in northeastern US"Buy local" sounds like a great environmental slogan, epitomized for city dwellers by urban agriculture. But when it comes to growing fruits and vegetables in vacant lots and on rooftops in cities, is the practice really better for the planet than conventional farming? A new analysis of urban agriculture in the northeastern U.S., reported in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, has fou
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronicsVersatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that mimicking the structure of the "powdery alligator-flag" plant ha
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Responses to terror attacks helping to fuel Islamophobia in societyThe recent string of terrorist attacks across Europe has led to a spike in Islamophobic acts, from daily harassment to the horrific event this week in Finsbury Park. Yet while extreme acts of Islamophobia are generally denounced by political actors and the media, a new study suggests that more insidious forms of Islamophobia, couched in liberal terms, are helping normalise such forms of racism in
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New prototypes for superconducting undulators show promise for more powerful, versatile X-ray beamsResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Argonne National Laboratory have collaborated to design, build and test two devices that utilize different superconducting materials and could make X-ray lasers more powerful, versatile, compact and durable.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new species of crab within the Qatar Marine ZoneA team at Qatar University has discovered a new species of crab during an exploration trip on the research vessel Janan. The trip aimed to investigate marine benthic biodiversity within the Qatar Marine Zone.
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The Atlantic
Uber's CEO Is Out Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has resigned reportedly following a shareholder revolt, capping a tumultuous few months of PR disasters of its own making. “I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight,” Kalanick said in a st
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The Atlantic
Why Ossoff Lost ATLANTA—Around midnight, hours after their candidate conceded he had lost the Most Important Special Election in History, the last remaining supporters of Jon Ossoff took over the stage where he had recently stood. One of them waved a bottle of vodka in the air. Together, they took up the time-honored leftist chant: “This is what democracy looks like!” Sometimes, this is indeed what democracy loo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New online system set to reduce hundreds of chemical tests on animalsScientists at the University of York and SimOmics Ltd have developed a new online data sharing system which could reduce the need for hundreds of laboratory tests on animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows prevalence of microplastics within the Gulf seawaterResearchers in Qatar have documented the first evidence for the prevalence of microplastics within the Gulf seawater, specifically in the marine waters of Qatar.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing the identity of cellular enzyme spawns new pathwayIntegral membrane proteins, or IMPs, are a major class of proteins that play crucial roles in many cellular processes, including the catalysis of disulfide bonds, which are essential for the function and stability of many proteins such as antibodies, which have significant therapeutic potential.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The social media economy benefits few, new book suggestsFashion bloggers and Instagrammers seem to enjoy a coveted lifestyle, with jet-setting to exotic locales, couture clothing furnished by designers and countless other caption-worthy experiences.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great opportunities for marine research with new underwater vehicleThe University of Gothenburg soon will have its first autonomous underwater vehicle for research use. This will make it possible to conduct detailed studies of the seabed at great depths and track the climate thousands of years back in time.
20h
Popular Science
This river ecosystem hinges on thousands of drowned, rotting wildebeest Animals It's the circle of life. In a classic circle of life situation, it turns out this river relies on an annual influx of dead wildebeest to keep everything else alive. Read on.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in 6 women with learning disabilities has attempted suicideA new study by the University of Toronto found that the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts was much higher for women who had been diagnosed with learning disabilities (16.6 percent) compared to women who had not (3.3 percent). Men with learning disabilities also were more likely to have attempted suicide compared to men without learning disorders (7.7 percent vs 2.1 percent).
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Still a Glaring Problem: How a Solar Eclipse Can Fry Your EyesFrom chemical changes to thermal burns, a rundown on exactly what staring at the sun can do -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helium balloons offer low-cost flights to the stratosphereUsing off-the-shelf technology and innovative economics, lightweight helium balloons have started carrying remote-controlled laboratories to the edge of space and back, offering the business case for new types of science missions.
20h
Viden
Solceller kan spærre for vindenergiFlere skal køre elbil, og el fra private solceller skal ud i elsystemet, hvis vi skal udnytte vindenergien bedst muligt.
20h
Wired
Congress Is Finally Working on National Self-Driving Car RegulationsThe House and Senate are crafting legislation to govern autonomous driving at a national level.
20h
Wired
A Diabolical Way of Hacking a Chip With a Wave of Your HandA new hands-off hack uses an EMP attack to overcome fundamental software protections.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A baby’s DNA may kick off mom’s preeclampsiaA large genetic analysis points to a protein made by the fetus that may trigger preeclampsia in the mom.
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The Atlantic
How the Liberal Arts Help Veterans Thrive Balanced on the edge of an armchair in the basement of Vassar College’s student center, Eduardo de la Torre is explaining his senior thesis: an exploration of the social construction of technology. The soon-to-be graduate, bouncing on the heels of his grey suede sneakers, looks ready to spring out of his seat as he articulates ideas with frenetic energy, barely able to express connections he’s ob
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Look inside your own pantry or fridge to find the top culprit of food wasteThere is a good chance there are fresh vegetables in your refrigerator that will end up in the garbage instead of on your dinner plate.
20h

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