EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crowdsourced data may inaccurately represent some population groupsWhile crowdsourcing, a practice that enables study participants to submit data electronically, has grown in use for health and medical research, a study led by UC San Francisco comparing the online approach to a standard telephone survey has found that certain crowdsourced groups are either over- or underrepresented by age, race/ethnicity, education and physical activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study uncovers link between male hormones and metabolic disease in polycystic ovary syndromeScientists from the University of Birmingham have discovered the link between increased male hormones and metabolic complications such as diabetes and fatty liver disease in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study debunks claim of greatly improved survival rate for gunshot victimsThe survival rate of US gunshot victims has not shown a marked improvement, as other recent studies have suggested, according to new research from Duke University and the University of California, Davis. The purported increase in survival rate had been credited to improvements in emergency treatment and medical care of critically injured patients. But on close analysis, researchers found problems
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Ars Technica

House lawmakers endorse reusable rockets for military purposes Enlarge / SpaceX launched its first military payload on May 1. Now the US House of Representatives said the military should consider reusable rockets. (credit: SpaceX ) The US Congress has begun the "markup" process to consider budget appropriations for fiscal year 2018, and on Thursday, the House subcommittee overseeing Strategic Forces held a hearing for the National Defense Authorization Act.
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Gizmodo

After Philando Castile's Death, Investigators Tried to Secretly Get Access to Diamond Reynolds' Facebook and Phone Records Diamond Reynolds, girlfriend of Philando Castile, speaks to a crowd outside of J. J. Hill Montessori School during a memorial on July 7, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Photo: Getty On July 7th, 2016, just one day after Diamond Reynolds streamed video of a police officer shooting and killing her boyfriend, Philando Castile, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension began working to obtain record
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New Scientist - News

Bird eggs may be shaped by the way their mother fliesHuge survey reveals that bird species spending more time on the wing tend to have long or pointy eggs
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Ars Technica

So far, Beyond Good and Evil 2 prototype looks like No Monkey’s Sky Enlarge / Fly, monkey, fly! (credit: Ubisoft ) Ubisoft Creative Director Michel Ansel took to YouTube on Thursday to finally show the world that, yes, Beyond Good & Evil 2 is more than an unplayable cinema sequence. However, anybody expecting to see gameplay that resembled the game's incredible E3 2017 reveal may be disappointed. Ansel spoke over a 15-minute prototype gameplay demo , and he descr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patient-inspired research uncovers new link to rare disorderPeroxisomal biogenesis disorder, which has been linked only to lipid metabolism, is also associated with sugar metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tourette Syndrome risk increases in people with genetic copy variationsAn international team that just conducted the largest study of Tourette Syndrome has identified genetic abnormalities that are the first definitive risk genes for the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover origins of the sun's swirling spiculesFor the first time, a computer simulation -- so detailed it took a full year to run -- shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun's surface and surge upward so quickly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists uncover origins of the Sun's swirling spiculesAt any given moment, as many as 10 million wild jets of solar material burst from the sun's surface. They erupt as fast as 60 miles per second, and can reach lengths of 6,000 miles before collapsing. These are spicules, and despite their grass-like abundance, scientists didn't understand how they form. Now, for the first time, a computer simulation—so detailed it took a full year to run—shows how
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Wired

Why Net Neutrality MattersHow Trump's decision on net neutrality impacts everyone
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop landmark achievement in walking technologyResearchers at the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a novel design approach for exoskeletons and prosthetic limbs that incorporates direct feedback from the human body. The findings were published this week in Science.
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The Scientist RSS

Study: Ribosomes are Functionally DiverseNew research suggests that the cells' protein factories have preferences for specific messenger RNAs they translate.
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Gizmodo

Because You Asked For It, Here Are Discounted USB Power Receptacles With USB-C and Quick Charge USB-C/QC 2.0 Power Receptacle , $27 with code C4XF8R4R | QC 2.0 Power Receptacle , $24 with code SXZO5973 Our readers have bought a lot of AC power receptacles with USB charging ports over the last few years, but if you were holding out for more future-proof options with USB-C and Quick Charge technology, TopGreener’s new, more powerful receptacles are cheaper than ever today. You get your choice
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NeuWrite San Diego

Psychopathy, qu’est-ce que c’estPsychopathy, qu’est-ce que c’est A thought experiment Imagine that you are a respected scientist trying to better understand psychopathy. What might be different in the brain of a psychopath? As you look through brain scan after brain scan of psychopathic individuals—many of them convicted killers—you see a pattern. In brain regions important for impulse control, […]
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Gizmodo

1,000 Sad Uber Employees Reportedly Sign Petition Demanding Terrible CEO Return Photo: AP Employees at Uber are apparently circulating a petition demanding that Travis Kalanick be reinstated as CEO of the company, despite how royally he fucked it all up this past year. Kalanick resigned this week after pressure from five major Uber investors following the release of a report on Uber’s internal culture and a seemingly endless series of scandals and fuck-ups . Despite the over
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Gizmodo

Here's What We Want From the CW's DC Superhero Shows Next Season Superhero TV season has come and gone, which means there’s yet another season under the belts of Supergirl , Flash , Arrow , and Legends of Tomorrow . Over the last year of TV some of these shows defied expectations, and some lost their way—but there’s always room for the things we want to see them do next. Supergirl Leave Kara’s love life alone for a while Mon-El ultimately ended up being one of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU leaders urge Internet giants to fight online extremismEU leaders on Thursday urged Internet firms to do their utmost to combat online extremism promoting attacks or face the possibility of legislation if the industry self-regulation fails.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snake fungal disease identified in wild British snakes for first timeEurope's wild snakes could face a growing threat from a fungal skin disease that has contributed to wild snake deaths in North America, according to an international collaborative study, led by conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) alongside partners including the U.S. Geological Survey. The new study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship The U.S. Supreme Court narrowed the scope under which the federal government can strip naturalized Americans of their citizenship on Thursday, ruling that false statements made during the naturalization process had to be relevant to gaining citizenship in order to justify revoking it later. Justice Elena Kagan, writing for a unanimous Court in Maslenjuk v. United States , said that using small om
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Ars Technica

Distilled entanglement brings long-distance quantum communication closer Enlarge / Atoms are always up to something. (credit: Jurgen Appelo / Flickr ) This seems to be a good week for talking about quantum memories and distributing qubits. The thing about working with quantum states, though, is that you don't have much room to avoid messing it up. And, afterwards, figuring out when you've made a mistake is difficult. Once you make a measurement on a quantum system, th
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The Atlantic

The Soccer Academies Preparing African Children for Division I Competition Ema Twumasi’s first ever collegiate goal was a spectacular bicycle kick against California Polytechnic State University in August 2016. The 19-year-old Ghanaian’s timely scoring during the remainder of the season propelled his team, Wake Forest University in North Carolina, to the NCAA championship game last December, where it lost to Stanford on penalty kicks. Twumasi probably wouldn’t have made
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Previously unknown pine marten diversity discoveredThe elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insightsA new study describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in order to adapt to new hosts, and proposes that co-option of single copy genes may be a common but relatively understudied mechanism of evolution for new gene functions, particularly under conditions of rapid evolutionary change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Switchable DNA mini-machines store informationBiomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes. The arrays' inventors say they could be harnessed to make nanotech sensors or amplifiers. Potentially, they could be combined to form logic gates, the parts of a molecular computer.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: High Above Mars, a NASA Orbiter Spies the Curiosity RoverThe Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been taking images of the rover about every three months to monitor the surrounding area for changes.
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Ars Technica

Trump plans to dismantle Obama-era “Startup Visa” Enlarge / US President Donald Trump during a visit to the Department of Homeland Security in January. (credit: Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images ) A regulation from the Obama administration that would have allowed foreign-born entrepreneurs who raise investor cash to build their startups in the US won't be allowed to go into effect. The Department of Homeland Security will file an official n
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Inside Science

When Driverless Cars Crash, Who Pays? When Driverless Cars Crash, Who Pays? A new model assesses the likelihood of a driverless car crash. Driverlesscars.jpg Image credits: Karsten Neglia, via shutterstock Technology Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 14:45 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It sounds like a philosophical riddle for actuaries: If there's a car accident, and no one is driving, who pays for the damages? But when driver
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Gizmodo

Facebook Unveils New Buzzwords Last night in an interview with CNN, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a major overhaul to the largest social media company on earth, one that might finally fix many of the lingering issues its leadership has been hesitant to address. I’m kidding, it’s a new mission statement. “To give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together,” will be the new defining principl
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Gizmodo

Which Creature Is Most Likely to Cause the Next Catastrophic Pandemic? Greater short-nosed fruit bat. (Image: Wikimedia) The vast majority of infectious human diseases come from animals, yet we know surprisingly little about which animals pose the greatest risk. A new study helps resolve this shortcoming, ranking the mammals that are most likely to spread infectious diseases to humans. Scientists call them zoonotic diseases—pathogens that can spread from one species
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Gizmodo

Your Email Font Choice Is Making You Look Like a Sociopath GIF Gif by Bobby Finger Would you like some advice? Probably not, but here goes. You should only use your email client’s default font. Even the most neutral emails sound menacing, unhinged, or inappropriately friendly in almost any font other than the default one. Since this is a guideline and not a rule, there is some wiggle room. People who run bead stores, pet trainers or groomers, and teacher
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seafood poisoning bug thwarts a key host defense by attacking the cell's cytoskeletonThe leading cause of acute gastroenteritis linked to eating raw seafood disarms a key host defense system in a novel way: It paralyzes a cell's skeleton, or cytoskeleton.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Snake fungal disease identified in wild British snakes for first timeEurope's wild snakes could face a growing threat from a fungal skin disease that has contributed to wild snake deaths in North America, according to an international collaborative study, led by conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) alongside partners including the US Geological Survey. The new study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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The Scientist RSS

Ribosomal DNA Copy Numbers Decrease in Some CancersAn analysis of human cancer genome projects uncovers a counterintuitive loss of ribosomal gene copies.
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The Scientist RSS

How Roundworms SleepWhen Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent.
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Big Think

Is a Leftie More Likely to Be a Math Genius? A comprehensive new study finds that lefties are, in fact, better at advanced math. Read More
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The Atlantic

Scenes From Hong Kong, 'Pearl of the Orient' Hong Kong—a former British colony, now an autonomous territory within China—is a vibrant city of nearly 7.5 million residents, all packed into an area smaller than 425 square miles (1,100 sq km.) About 40% of the land in Hong Kong is set aside as country parks and nature reserves. As architects and developers continue to maximize the use of buildable land, apartment blocks and office towers reach
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The Atlantic

Trump Starts Raising Money for His 2020 Campaign (and His Company) For President Donald Trump, the campaign never ended. Since filing paperwork within hours of his inauguration declaring eligibility for 2020, he’s been holding rallies in the states he won in November and constantly rehashing his Electoral College victory. In keeping with this theme, Trump will be officially kicking off his reelection bid with a major fundraiser next week, less than six months in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subsidizing electric vehicles inefficient way to reduce CO2 emissions: studySubsidizing the purchase of electric cars in Canada is an inefficient way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that is not cost effective, according to a Montreal Economic Institute study released Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests sexual appeals in ads don't sell brands, productsCould it be that sex actually does not sell? An analysis of nearly 80 advertising studies published over more than three decades suggests that's the case.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronicsIn a proof-of-concept study, North Carolina State University engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The curious case of the warped Kuiper BeltThe plane of the solar system is warped in the belt's outer reaches, signaling the presence of an unknown Mars-to-Earth-mass planetary object far beyond Pluto, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eating your feelings? The link between job stress, junk food and sleepStress during the workday can lead to overeating and unhealthy food choices at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern.
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Popular Science

To ease lower back pain, yoga might be just as good as physical therapy Health And a heck of a lot cheaper. Gentle yoga might be able to ease chronic lower back pain just as well as physical therapy.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

US court grants Elsevier millions in damages from Sci-Hub Some doubt that the publishing giant will see any money from the pirate site. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22196
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better use of current drugs to target cancerResearchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare cells are 'window into the gut' for the nervous systemSpecialized cells in the gut sense potentially noxious chemicals and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fibers, according to a new study, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High fat diet reduces gut bacteria, Crohn's disease symptomsA high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation -- a major discovery for patients suffering from Crohn's disease, research indicates. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel syndrome, causes debilitating intestinal swelling, cramping, and diarrhea. The disease affects half a million people in the United States, but its cause is yet unclear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elevated rate of autism symptoms found in children with Tourette syndromeAround one in five children with Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements and vocalizations, met criteria for autism, a study shows. But this prevalence may be more a reflection of similarity in symptoms than actual autism, according to the study's researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't breakThe anchors that hold Venus' flower basket sea sponges to the ocean floor have an internal architecture that increases their ability to bend, according to a new study. Understanding that natural architecture could inform future human-made materials.
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The Atlantic

The Lasting Damage of Trump's 'Tapes' Bluff This is a first for the Trump presidency: the first formal presidential retraction of a presidential untruth. President Trump tweeted a warning to James Comey: The fired FBI director had better hope that no “tapes” existed that could contradict his account of what happened between the two men. Trump has now confessed that he had no basis for this warning. There were no such tapes, and the preside
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Why Do Bird Eggs Have Different Shapes? Look to the WingsIn the most comprehensive study of egg shapes to date, scientists say that the best predictor of long or pointy eggs is a bird’s flying ability.
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NYT > Science

Yellowstone Grizzly Bear to Lose Endangered Species ProtectionInterior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced on Thursday that the bear, which has been on the endangered species list since 1975, was thriving in the region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zimbabwe begins mass transfer of animals to MozambiqueThe animals won't travel two-by-two, but thousands of safari stalwarts will soon begin their journeys from Zimbabwe to Mozambique in one of Africa's largest ever wildlife transfers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France marks hottest post-war June day as Europe sizzlesFrance marked its hottest June day since World War II on Wednesdayas overheated residents across swathes of Europe coped with another day of sizzling temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CIA penetrated by insider network of candy thievesThe Central Intelligence Agency admitted this week that it had been compromised for months in 2013 by a network of high-tech snack thieves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wasp venom holds clues on how genes get new jobsAmid the incredible diversity of living things on our planet, there is a common theme. Organisms need to acquire new genes, or change the functions of existing genes, in order to adapt and survive.
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Popular Science

Birds' ability to fly could determine the shape of their eggs Animals Not all eggs are created equal. A recent study has found that birds that can fly have more elliptical and asymmetric eggs. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacterial organizational complexities revealedFor the first time, scientists have visualized the fine details of bacterial microcompartment shells -- the organisms' submicroscopic nanoreactors, which are comprised completely of protein.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests sexual appeals in ads don't sell brands, productsAds with sexual appeals are more likely to be remembered but don't sell the brand or product, according to a meta-analysis of nearly 80 advertising studies, published online this week by the International Journal of Advertising. Researchers found no positive effect on study participants' ability to remember the brands featured in such ads or on their intention to buy the product. The research was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mouse study suggests how hearing a warning sound turns into fearing it over timeAn adult mouse model reveals that changes in lattice-like structures in the brain known as perineuronal nets are necessary to 'capture' an auditory fear association and 'haul' it in as a longer-term memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronicsIn a proof-of-concept study, North Carolina State University engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A rising starIt's a tiny marine invertebrate, no more than 3 millimeters in size. But closely related to humans, Botryllus schlosseri might hold the key to new treatments for cancer and a host of vascular diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How eggs got their shapesThe evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists took a quantitative approach to that question and found that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFLEPFL researchers have found a way around what was considered a fundamental limitation of physics for over 100 years. They were able to conceive resonant systems that can store electromagnetic waves over a long period of time while maintaining a broad bandwidth. Their study, which has just been published in Science, opens up a number of doors, particularly in telecommunications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Piling on pressure solves enduring mystery about metal's makeupExtreme pressure experiments and powerful supercomputing have enabled scientists to solve a decades-old puzzle about the fundamental properties of the widely used metal lithium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient Egyptians to modern humans: Coronary artery disease genes benefit reproductionResearchers have found that genes for coronary heart disease (CAD) also influence reproduction, so in order to reproduce successfully, the genes for heart disease will also be inherited.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switchable DNA mini-machines store informationBiomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes.The arrays' inventors say they could be harnessed to make nanotech sensors or amplifiers. Potentially, they could be combined to form logic gates, the parts of a molecular computer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assembleScientists at Berkeley Lab and Michigan State University are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work could benefit research in bioenergy and pathogenesis, and it could lead to new methods of bioengineering bacteria for beneficial purposes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using science to combat addictionIn this Policy Forum, Keith Humphreys and colleagues highlight the need for science, and particularly neuroscience, to inform policies that address addiction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finally, understanding how the sun's spicules are madeFor the first time, researchers have built a model that accurately explains the formation of abundant jets of plasma in the Sun's atmosphere, called spicules.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greater emphasis on preventing, treating heart disease in women neededWomen and physicians do not put enough emphasis on cardiovascular disease in women, and a social stigma regarding body weight may be a primary barrier to these important discussions, according to research publishing today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized exoskeletons are taking support one step fartherResearchers have developed an exoskeleton system that provides personalized support for its user. In healthy volunteers, the optimized exoskeleton reduced energy expenditure during walking by 24 percent, on average, compared to when the system was not providing personalized support.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flight ability of birds affects the shape of their eggsMany different theories exist as to why the shape of bird eggs varies so much across species, and now, new research yields evidence that variable egg shape is driven by unique flight adaptations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen productionScientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cracking the mystery of avian egg shapeAccording to new research, egg shape in birds is related to adaptations for efficient flight -- and a mechanistic model reveals how different egg shapes may be formed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Localized signaling islands in cells: New targets for precision drug designNew research overturns long-held views on a basic messaging system within living cells. Key cellular communication machinery is more regionally constrained within the cell than previously thought. The findings suggest new approaches to designing precision drugs. Localizing drug action at a specific 'address' within the cell could mean fewer side effects in treating cancer, diabetes, heart disease
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easilyResearch from the Stowers Institute provides evidence suggesting that cancer cells might streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily. The study, conducted in both human and mouse cells, shows that cancer genomes lose copies of repetitive sequences known as ribosomal DNA. While downsizing might enable these cells to replicate faster, it also seems to render them less able to withst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nearly half of US women don't know heart disease is their No. 1 killerWomen and their physicians are largely uneducated when it comes to females and heart disease, putting women's health and lives at greater risk, a new study out today shows. The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, shows that 45 percent of US women are not aware that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover potential mechanism for HPV-induced skin cancerScientists have identified a molecular pathway by which some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) might increase the risk of skin cancer, particularly in people with the rare genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The novel pathway is described in PLOS Pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New brain network model could explain differences in brain injuriesConsidering the brain's network of activity, rather than just individual regions, could help us understand why some brain injuries are much worse than others, according to a study published PLOS Computational Biology by Maxwell B. Wang, Julia Owen, and Pratik Mukherjee from University of California, San Francisco, and Ashish Raj from Weill Cornell Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parentsCoronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to greater numbers of children, reports Dr Sean Byars of The University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Michael Inouye of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia, in a study published June 22, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learningHoneybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitos found in BrazilWhile more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have identified a mosquito -- caught in the Brazilian city of Aracaju -- that's naturally infected with the East-Central-South-African (ECSA) genotype of Chiku
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Science : NPR

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It Eggs evolved over 300 million years ago and now come in all kinds of shapes, from Tic Tacs to teardrops to pingpong balls. After studying some 50,000 eggs, a team of researchers thinks it knows why. (Image credit: Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

Why Are Bird Eggs Egg-Shaped? An Eggsplainer When Mary Caswell Stoddard started measuring bird eggs from hundreds of species, she wasn’t expecting to learn that most eggs are not egg-shaped. Think about an egg and you’ll probably conjure up an ellipse that’s slightly fatter at one end—the classic chicken egg. But chickens are outliers. Hummingbirds lay eggs that look like Tic Tacs, owls lay nigh-perfect spheres, and sandpipers lay almost co
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New Scientist - News

If you want to be a mega philanthropist Jeff Bezos, take noteAmazon's founder, set to be the planet's richest person, wants to use his wealth for the greater good. It's harder than it sounds, warns David Auerbach
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Wired

Exoskeletons Don't Come One-Size-Fits-All ... YetResearchers are turning to algorithms to make exoskeletons more efficient.
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Science current issue

Anniversaries for particle physics
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

Drowned wildebeest provide ecological feast
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Science current issue

A division of labor in cells' protein factories
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Science current issue

Texas signals support for unproven stem cell therapies
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Science current issue

East Africa turmoil imperils giraffes
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Science current issue

New haul of distant worlds casts doubt on Planet Nine
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Science current issue

Tallying the tropical toll on trees from lightning
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Science current issue

A top mathematician joins the Macron revolution
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Science current issue

The footprints of giants
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Science current issue

Trial balloons
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Science current issue

Fast exoskeleton optimization
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Science current issue

Ambient quantum optomechanics
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Science current issue

Building chromosomes without bricks
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Science current issue

The most perfect thing, explained
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Science current issue

Locked and loaded for apoptosis
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Science current issue

Brains, environments, and policy responses to addiction
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Science current issue

Human nature
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Science current issue

Imagine this
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Science current issue

Benefits of trees in tropical cities
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Science current issue

Time to codify scientific integrity
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Science current issue

A nod to public open access infrastructures
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Science current issue

Understanding the formation of spicules
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Science current issue

Lnc-ing fibroblasts to cardiac fibrosis
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Science current issue

Quantum effects in ambient conditions
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Science current issue

How to make a protein-based nanocontainer
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Science current issue

The influence of flying
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Science current issue

Instant tough bonding of hydrogels
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Science current issue

PKA-activation mechanism revised
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Science current issue

Optimum human input
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Science current issue

One person's meat is another's poison
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Science current issue

Broadening the immune spectrum
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Science current issue

Neuronal basis of lethargy in worms
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Science current issue

Packaging without nucleosomes
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Science current issue

Resonant systems with high bandwidth
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Science current issue

Sulfur's balancing act in cytochrome c
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Science current issue

Lithium gets a new ground state
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Science current issue

Kiss-and-run or a full commitment?
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Science current issue

Of mice and men's microglia
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Science current issue

Trifluoromethylation via broken C-F bonds
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Science current issue

Timing the life cycle of molecular clouds
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Science current issue

How much does a virus cost?
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Science current issue

Balanced diets can prevent binge-like eating
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Science current issue

Monitoring inflammation from within
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Science current issue

Small RNA retunes photosynthesis
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Science current issue

Nailing down the elusive statistics
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Science current issue

Experimentation on the Tube
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Science current issue

Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution Avian egg shape is generally explained as an adaptation to life history, yet we currently lack a global synthesis of how egg-shape differences arise and evolve. Here, we apply morphometric, mechanistic, and macroevolutionary analyses to the egg shapes of 1400 bird species. We characterize egg-shape diversity in terms of two biologically relevant variables, asymmetry and ellipticity, allowing us t
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Science current issue

Quantum and isotope effects in lithium metal The crystal structure of elements at zero pressure and temperature is the most fundamental information in condensed matter physics. For decades it has been believed that lithium, the simplest metallic element, has a complicated ground-state crystal structure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells and multiscale simulations with density functional theory and molecular dynamics
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Science current issue

Breaking Lorentz reciprocity to overcome the time-bandwidth limit in physics and engineering A century-old tenet in physics and engineering asserts that any type of system, having bandwidth , can interact with a wave over only a constrained time period t inversely proportional to the bandwidth ( t · ~ 2). This law severely limits the generic capabilities of all types of resonant and wave-guiding systems in photonics, cavity quantum electrodynamics and optomechanics, acoustics, continuum
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Science current issue

Quantum correlations from a room-temperature optomechanical cavity The act of position measurement alters the motion of an object being measured. This quantum measurement backaction is typically much smaller than the thermal motion of a room-temperature object and thus difficult to observe. By shining laser light through a nanomechanical beam, we measure the beam’s thermally driven vibrations and perturb its motion with optical force fluctuations at a level dict
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Science current issue

On the generation of solar spicules and Alfvenic waves In the lower solar atmosphere, the chromosphere is permeated by jets known as spicules, in which plasma is propelled at speeds of 50 to 150 kilometers per second into the corona. The origin of the spicules is poorly understood, although they are expected to play a role in heating the million-degree corona and are associated with Alfvénic waves that help drive the solar wind. We compare magnetohyd
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Science current issue

A catalytic fluoride-rebound mechanism for C(sp3)-CF3 bond formation The biological properties of trifluoromethyl compounds have led to their ubiquity in pharmaceuticals, yet their chemical properties have made their preparation a substantial challenge, necessitating innovative chemical solutions. We report the serendipitous discovery of a borane-catalyzed formal C(sp 3 )-CF 3 reductive elimination from Au(III) that accesses these compounds by a distinct mechanism
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Science current issue

Metalloprotein entatic control of ligand-metal bonds quantified by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy The multifunctional protein cytochrome c (cyt c) plays key roles in electron transport and apoptosis, switching function by modulating bonding between a heme iron and the sulfur in a methionine residue. This Fe–S(Met) bond is too weak to persist in the absence of protein constraints. We ruptured the bond in ferrous cyt c using an optical laser pulse and monitored the bond reformation within the p
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Science current issue

Human-in-the-loop optimization of exoskeleton assistance during walking Exoskeletons and active prostheses promise to enhance human mobility, but few have succeeded. Optimizing device characteristics on the basis of measured human performance could lead to improved designs. We have developed a method for identifying the exoskeleton assistance that minimizes human energy cost during walking. Optimized torque patterns from an exoskeleton worn on one ankle reduced metab
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Science current issue

Mitotic chromosome assembly despite nucleosome depletion in Xenopus egg extracts The nucleosome is the fundamental structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. During mitosis, duplicated nucleosome fibers are organized into a pair of rod-shaped structures (chromatids) within a mitotic chromosome. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosome assembly is indeed an essential prerequisite for mitotic chromosome assembly. We combined mouse sperm nuclei and Xenopus cell-free egg extr
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Science current issue

Local protein kinase A action proceeds through intact holoenzymes Hormones can transmit signals through adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) to precise intracellular locations. The fidelity of these responses relies on the activation of localized protein kinase A (PKA) holoenzymes. Association of PKA regulatory type II (RII) subunits with A-kinase–anchoring proteins (AKAPs) confers location, and catalytic (C) subunits phosphorylate substrates. Single-particle e
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Science current issue

Assembly principles and structure of a 6.5-MDa bacterial microcompartment shell Many bacteria contain primitive organelles composed entirely of protein. These bacterial microcompartments share a common architecture of an enzymatic core encapsulated in a selectively permeable protein shell; prominent examples include the carboxysome for CO 2 fixation and catabolic microcompartments found in many pathogenic microbes. The shell sequesters enzymatic reactions from the cytosol, a
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Science current issue

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Science current issue

Webinar | Cell analysis: Time for a change?
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Science current issue

My lessons in mentorship
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Science current issue

Chemical transformation of xenobiotics by the human gut microbiota The human gut microbiota makes key contributions to the metabolism of ingested compounds (xenobiotics), transforming hundreds of dietary components, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals into metabolites with altered activities, toxicities, and lifetimes within the body. The chemistry of gut microbial xenobiotic metabolism is often distinct from that of host enzymes. Despite their important c
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Science current issue

An environment-dependent transcriptional network specifies human microglia identity Microglia play essential roles in central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and influence diverse aspects of neuronal function. However, the transcriptional mechanisms that specify human microglia phenotypes are largely unknown. We examined the transcriptomes and epigenetic landscapes of human microglia isolated from surgically resected brain tissue ex vivo and after transition to an in vitro envi
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Science current issue

A global brain state underlies C. elegans sleep behavior How the brain effectively switches between and maintains global states, such as sleep and wakefulness, is not yet understood. We used brainwide functional imaging at single-cell resolution to show that during the developmental stage of lethargus, the Caenorhabditis elegans brain is predisposed to global quiescence, characterized by systemic down-regulation of neuronal activity. Only a few specifi
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cognitive science

Logic and cognitive science podcast: Logically Speaking submitted by /u/LogicallySpeaking_pc [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica

Rhode Island bill sees highway surveillance cams ticketing uninsured motorists Enlarge (credit: Jef Nickerson ) A Rhode Island legislative committee has approved a bill that would greatly expand the surveillance state through the deployment of license plate readers. For the first time in the US, these devices would be attached along Rhode Island highways and roads for the stated purpose of catching uninsured motorists from any state. Jacquard. The House Corporations Committ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insightsIn a study published in Current Biology on June 22, the lab of Professor John Werren at the University of Rochester describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in order to adapt to new hosts, and proposes that co-option of single copy genes may be a common but relatively understudied mechanism of evolution for new gene functions, particularly under con
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Flight demands may have steered the evolution of bird egg shapeAn analysis of nearly 50,000 bird eggs finds a link between a species’ egg shape and flight ability.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteriaNew images reveal the inner workings of bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assembleScientists are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Switchable DNA mini-machines store informationBiomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Piling on pressure solves enduring mystery about metal's makeupScientists have solved a decades-old puzzle about a widely used metal, thanks to extreme pressure experiments and powerful supercomputing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them. Able to operate in ordinary, room-temperature environments, yet exploiting some of the deepest principles of quantum physics, these optomechanical systems can act as inherently accurate thermometers, or conversely, as a type of optical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How eggs got their shapes: Adaptations for flight may have driven egg-shape variety in birdsThe evolution of the amniotic egg—complete with membrane and shell—was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air. Now, 360 million years later, bird eggs come in all shapes and sizes, from the almost perfectly spherical eggs of brown hawk- owls to the tear-drop shape of sandpipers' eggs. The question is, how and why did this diversity in shape evolve?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen productionScientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery-described in a paper set to publish online in the journal Science on Thursday, June 22, 2017-could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learningHoneybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solvedAt EPFL, researchers challenge a fundamental law and discover that more electromagnetic energy can be stored in wave-guiding systems than previously thought. The discovery has implications in telecommunications. Working around the fundamental law, they conceived resonant and wave-guiding systems capable of storing energy over a prolonged period while keeping a broad bandwidth. Their trick was to c
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Gizmodo

The Shape of a Bird’s Egg Can Tell You Something Totally Unexpected Recently hatched gull chick and eggs (Image: Mary Stoddard) Some of life’s simplest questions get swept under the rug for a long time—after all, the most widespread phenomena often require the most data to understand. Take the shape of the boring egg, for example. You probably thought eggs are was shaped the way they are so they won’t roll out of the nest or something. But a huge analysis shows t
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

In Devil's Canyon, Unexpected Challenges Like This Require Thoughtful Patience Devil's Canyon | Tuesdays at 10/9c John attempts a heated DIY project, with no clue how it'll...pan out. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/devils-canyon More: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/devils-canyon/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DevilsCanyonTV/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery F
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The Atlantic

Trump: There Are (Probably) No Tapes President Trump said on Thursday that, despite his repeated teases about the existence of recordings of his conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey, he did not make any tapes. But he added a paranoid flourish, nodding toward frequent leaks from the government and his claims of persecution by the intelligence community, by suggesting that recordings might have been made without his knowl
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The Atlantic

Finding Mentorship Outside of Your Industry Georgia House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams wants to be her state’s first Democratic governor in over a decade. Thus far, the gubernatorial candidate, who moonlights as a romance novelist, has dedicated her time in political office to increasing voter turnout in the state. Abrams created the voter-registration nonprofit New Georgia Project . (In 2014, the organization faced allegations of voter f
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New Scientist - News

Trump’s wise monkey environment plan: See no evil, hear no evilIf you don't measure the bad stuff, you don't have to do anything about it. That looks like the Trump philosophy, say Gretchen Goldman and Andrew Rosenberg
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Ars Technica

Nintendo: Switch shortages are “definitely not intentional” Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Since the days of the NES , people have accused Nintendo of intentionally underproducing hardware in order to drive an artificial feeding frenzy of demand in the marketplace. With the Nintendo Switch remaining nearly impossible to find at retailers nationwide , those same accusations of "false scarcity" have been bubbling up in certain corners . Nintendo Senior Direc
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Gizmodo

Automakers Are Changing To Integrated Exhaust Manifolds Because The Benefits Are Staggering Photo: Engineering Explained/ YouTube (screengrab) An integrated Exhaust Manifold, or “headifold,” is an exhaust manifold cast into an engine’s cylinder head and cooled by antifreeze. This type of design, where the exhaust manifold is no longer a separate part, is becoming a lot more common in the auto industry (see 2017 Honda Civic Type R) . Here’s why. Let Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New biomarker assay detects neuroblastoma with greater sensitivityInvestigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have developed and tested a new biomarker assay for quantifying disease and detecting the presence of neuroblastoma even when standard evaluations yield negative results for the disease. Researchers provide the first systematic comparison of standard imaging evaluations versus the new assay that screens for five diffe
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Solar System survey casts doubt on mysterious 'Planet Nine' Orbits of four newfound objects show no signs of gravitational pull from proposed giant planet. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22177
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The Atlantic

Church of England 'Colluded' to Hide Sex Abuse, Leader Claims The Church of England “colluded and concealed rather than seeking to help those who were brave enough to come forward” when faced with allegations of longterm sexual abuse by one of its former bishops, the church’s leader said Thursday. “For the survivors who were brave enough to share their story and bring Peter Ball to justice, I once again offer an unreserved apology,” Archbishop of Canterbury
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The Atlantic

The Senate Puts Medicaid on the Chopping Block The new AHCA is a lot like the old AHCA. After weeks of secret gestation in back rooms, the Senate released a discussion draft of the chamber’s version of the American Health Care Act. Like the version passed through the House to cheers in May, it is likely to make health care less affordable for low-income, sick, and near-elderly people; it makes Obamacare tax credits for exchange coverage less
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook wants to nudge you into 'meaningful' online groupsAt Facebook, mere "sharing" is getting old. Finding deeper meaning in online communities is the next big thing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jerry Nelson, astronomer who built advanced telescopes, diesJerry Nelson, an astronomer who designed advanced telescopes that help scientists glimpse far reaches of the universe, has died in California. He was 73.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China tightens online video controls, jolting investorsThree popular Chinese internet services have been ordered to stop streaming video after censors complained it contained improper comments on sensitive issues. The move prompted a sell-off in the U.S.-traded shares of Sina Corp. and its microblog service, Sina Weibo.
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Live Science

Cold-Blooded Mummy: How India's Hot Weather Preserved a ReptileA thirsty chameleon that perished during its desperate search for water may no longer be of this world, but its mummy — naturally preserved by India's hot, tropical climate — has intrigued people the world over. That includes those who think it's a hoax.
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Popular Science

The lone star tick can make you allergic to meat, and that’s not even the worst of it Health The tick's territory is spreading. As if ticks weren't horrifying enough already, now they can give you allergies—or worse. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New orbiters for Europe's Galileo satnav systemThe European Space Agency signed a contract with a German-British consortium Thursday to build eight more satellites for its Galileo satnav system, an alternative to America's GPS, the agency said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla eyes manufacturing in ChinaTesla said Thursday it was considering the possibility of manufacturing in China as it ramps up for expansion of its line of electric-powered cars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Authenticity key to landing a new jobAt job interviews, relax and be yourself - if you're good, being yourself may be the best way to secure a job offer, according to a new study involving UCL researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines gun policy preferences across racial groupsIn the wake of recent mass shootings in Alexandria, Virginia, and elsewhere in the U.S., a new study from two University of Illinois at Chicago political scientists looks at factors that drive support for gun control among whites, Latinos and blacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research points to previously unknown pine marten diversityThe elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research published by a University of Montana professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting/treating disease new review of work on exosomesTiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease - new review
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New measures of aging may show 70 is the new 60A new study uses new measures of aging to scientifically illustrate that one’s actual age is not necessarily the best measure of human aging itself, particularly in relation to population aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feeling stressed? Bike to workCycling can help reduce stress and improve your work performance, new research confirms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New virtual approach to science in spaceA new approach to scientific exploration has been revealed by researchers, which they call exploration telepresence.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla Plans a Chinese FactoryBy setting up manufacturing facilities there, the firm will be able to dodge a weighty 25 percent import levy.
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Ars Technica

Comcast accused of cutting competitor’s wires to put it out of business Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | BackyardProduction) A tiny Internet service provider has sued Comcast, alleging that the cable giant and its hired contractors cut the smaller company's wires in order to take over its customer base. Telecom Cable LLC had "229 satisfied customers" in Weston Lakes and Corrigan, Texas when Comcast and its contractors sabotaged its network, the lawsuit filed last week
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The Atlantic

How Wheelchair Accessibility Ramped Up Stephanie Woodward just wanted to meet her friends for a drink. It was a bar she’d never visited, and she was excited. But going anywhere new for Woodward requires a vetting process. She uses a wheelchair, so building access is always a worry. Research on Google Street View proved promising in this case: A ramp led up into the entryway. That evening, Woodward entered the front door without troubl
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The Atlantic

A New, New Right Rises in Germany SCHNELLRODA, Germany—In the waning weeks of 2014, an astonishing right-wing fervor swept Germany. Tens of thousands of demonstrators, stirred by anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant sentiment, staged protests under the banner of the Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West, or Pegida. People streamed through the streets, waving German flags and chanting: “We are the people!” and “Resist
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Ingeniøren

LIGO's banebrydende opdagelser anfægtes af forskere på Niels Bohr InstitutetUgens anden store nyhed var, at den indefrosne koldkrigsbase ved Camp Century i Grønland nu skal overvåges, så man kan vurdere, hvornår basen med dens mange miljøskadelige stoffer eventuelt vil smelte ud af Indlandsisen.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is the Senate Health Care Plan "Mean"?Short answer: it depends -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your gutsWhen a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along
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New Scientist - News

Google on track for quantum computer breakthrough by end of 2017The search giant is testing a 20-qubit processor, its most powerful quantum chip yet, and says it will be able to outperform ordinary computers by the end of the year
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UM research points to previously unknown pine marten diversityThe elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research published by a University of Montana professor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines gun policy preferences across racial groupsSupport for all forms of gun control is stronger among Latinos and blacks than whites, according to researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Battling infectious diseases with 3-D protein structuresThe 3-D atomic structures of more than 1,000 proteins are potential targets for drugs and vaccines to combat some of the world’s most dangerous emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, an international team of scientists has determined.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paradox of pills: Tablet 'overload' may be causing harm and putting lives at risk, warn researchersAround three million people take multiple medicines, but no reliable systems exist to help patients and carers manage their pills. When medication management goes wrong, particularly with older people, the effect can be dreadful for everyone involved. A novel study linking the experiences of patients, carers and practitioners with a review of the scientific evidence, aims to find ways to improve m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

UV-sensing protein in brain of marine annelid zooplanktonLarvae of a marine ragworm Platynereis dumerilii have been studied as a zooplankton model, and possess photoreceptor cells in the brain to regulate circadian swimming behavior. This study revealed that a photoreceptive protein in the brain photoreceptor cells is UV (ultra-violet) sensitive. Since avoidance of UV irradiation is a major cause of a large-scale daily movement of zooplankton, the UV se
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cells in fish's spinal discs repair themselvesA unique repair mechanism has been discovered in the developing backbone of zebrafish that could give insight into why spinal discs of longer-lived organisms like humans degenerate with age. The repair mechanism protects fluid-filled cells of the notochord, the precursor of the spine, from mechanical stress. Notochord cells eventually form the gelatinous center of intervertebral discs, the structu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-read genome sequencing used for the first time in a patientResearchers have used a next-generation technology called long-read sequencing to diagnose a patient's rare genetic condition that current technology failed to diagnose.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Similarities between next-generation prostate cancer drugs discoveredFor the first time, researchers have shown how a class of advanced prostate cancer drugs are processed in the body and how their anti-tumor activity might change depending on how they are metabolized. Their pre-clinical findings may lay the foundation for improving therapies for treatment-resistant, aggressive prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Select memories can be erased, leaving others intactDifferent types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on EarthUsing a combination of satellite and ground data, a research team can map multiple indicators of monkey distribution, including human activity zones as inferred from roads and settlements, direct detections from mosquito-derived iDNA, animal sound recordings, plus detections of other species that are usually found when monkeys are present, such as other large vertebrates.
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Gizmodo

This Super Pretty Vibrator Is Basically a Stress Ball for My Vagina All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Staring at this squishy little vibrator, that looks more like something you’d find on the beach than in a sex store, two thoughts went through my mind. The first was that I now understood what the seashells in Demolition Man were for. The second thought was perhaps more relevant to Tenga’s $120 Iroha Kushi: It is the perfect example of the rising trend of sex toys a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Big Pacific: Photos from One of Earth's Great OceansA new book captures the shocking, surprising and stunning life within the Pacific -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Quanta Magazine

Moonlighting Genes Evolve for a Venomous Job Venoms are among nature’s fiercest adaptations. The geographer’s cone snail, for example, only injects about a tenth of a milligram of venom when it stings, and yet, this is more than enough to kill a person in under an hour. These chemical cocktails contain some of the most potent compounds known, and their fearsome power has awed people since the dawn of history. It wasn’t until modern advances
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The Scientist RSS

Gut FeelingSensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How pythons regenerate their organs and other secrets of the snake genomeSnakes exhibit incredible evolutionary adaptations, including the ability to rapidly regenerate their organs and produce venom. Scientists studied these adaptations using genetic sequencing and advanced computing. Supercomputers helped the team identify a number of genes associated with organ growth in Burmese pythons, study secondary contact in related rattlesnake species, and develop tools to re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at riskThere were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event, a study of historic whaling records has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unexpected rotation in a stone-dead galaxyA rotating stellar disk à la the Milky Way has been discovered in a stone-dead galaxy 10 billion light-years from Earth. This has never been shown before. The galaxy examined is an early version of elliptical-shaped galaxies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infantHIV-positive women with CMV in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit CMV to their infants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New spectral eye video database SPEED revolutionizes eye-trackingTechniques to acquire spectral data have been static for a long time - until now. Exciting and novel spectral video technologies are emerging, allowing us to extract increasingly dynamic knowledge from light. Using a spectral video device in eye-tracking, computational spectral imaging and eye-tracking researchers have created a novel - first of its kind - combined spectral video/spectral image da
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study answers why ketamine helps depression, offers target for safer therapyScientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.
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Ars Technica

Waymo tells judge: Uber’s ex-CEO knew about Google files Enlarge / Travis Kalanick, ex-CEO of Uber Technologies. (credit: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Uber's recently fired CEO, Travis Kalanick, knew that his top self-driving car engineer had Google files in his possession in March 2016, according to newly filed court documents. The admission was made by Uber lawyers as part of a response to Waymo discovery demands. Uber lawyers served the re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UK chemistry researchers develop catalyst that mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesisPublished in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, the study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrationsResearchers have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile blueprint for ultracoherent n
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncomfortable summer heat makes people moody and unhelpful, new research findsWhen when it's uncomfortably hot, we're less likely to be helpful or 'prosocial,' research concludes.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Whale body size warning for species collapsesThe shrinking size of whales over the 20th Century could help scientists detect when wildlife populations are in trouble, a study suggests.
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Live Science

In Photos: Take a Tour of Grand Teton National ParkThe Teton Mountain Range is one of the most dazzling, awe-inspiring natural places still found on the North American continent. Check out these incredible photos of Grand Teton National Park.
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New Scientist - News

Italy’s drying lakes imperil rare shrimp species found only hereThe survival of ancient and unique species thriving in mountain lakes in central Italy have been threatened by a double whammy of a quake and climate change
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New Scientist - News

Weird amphibians found at record depth in dark underground lakeA new sighting of the olm, an amphibious salamander, in a Croatian cave extends our knowledge of this mysterious and vulnerable animal
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Gizmodo

Amazon's Cheap 4K TVs Are Good Enough for Almost Anyone All images: Adam Clark Estes/Gizmodo Remember when 4Ks used to cost a damn fortune? Those days are quickly coming to an end, and if you need proof, look no further than Amazon’s new line of budget televisions, manufactured under the Westinghouse and Element brands. They come with all the smarts of Amazon’s excellent Fire TV set-top box as well as a price-to-quality ratio that makes them appealing
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Popular Science

Optimize your WiFi network with NetSpot Sponsored Post Fix dead zones and save 72 percent off this top-rated app. Optimize your WiFi network with NetSpot. Fix dead zones and save 72 percent off this top-rated app. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting/treating disease new review of work on exosomesExosomes - tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells - offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded. Areas which could benefit include cancer treatment and regenerative medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Authenticity key to landing a new jobAt job interviews, relax and be yourself -- if you're good, being yourself may be the best way to secure a job offer, according to a new study involving UCL researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How pheromones trigger female sexual behaviorA study by a group of Japanese scientists showed how a male pheromone in mice enhances sexual behaviors in females -- and how it may enhance a different behavior, aggression, in males -- by identifying distinct neural circuits and neurons that generate a particular behavioral response to specific chemical signals. The findings point to a model for further investigating how sex-specific innate beha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Select memories can be erased, leaving others intactDifferent types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find way to better use current drugs to target cancerThe drugs helped to understand the biology. The researchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cleveland Clinic discovers similarities between next-generation prostate cancer drugsCleveland Clinic researchers have shown for the first time how a class of advanced prostate cancer drugs are processed in the body and how their anti-tumor activity might change depending on how they are metabolized. Their pre-clinical findings, just published in Cell Chemical Biology, may lay the foundation for improving therapies for treatment-resistant, aggressive prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lab grown human colons change study of GI diseaseScientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to research published June 22 in Cell Stem Cell. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers who led the project.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare cells are 'window into the gut' for the nervous systemSpecialized cells in the gut sense potentially noxious chemicals and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fibers, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists. 'These cells are sensors, like a window looking into the contents of the gut,' said James Bayrer, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics at UCSF and one of the lead authors of the paper.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells in fish's spinal discs repair themselvesDuke researchers have discovered a unique repair mechanism in the developing backbone of zebrafish that could give insight into why spinal discs of longer-lived organisms like humans degenerate with age. The repair mechanism protects fluid-filled cells of the notochord, the precursor of the spine, from mechanical stress. Notochord cells eventually form the gelatinous center of intervertebral discs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The biology of uterine fluid: How it informs the fetus of mom's worldA developing fetus bathes in a mixture of cellular secretions and proteins unique to its mother's uterus. Before fertilization, the pH of uterine fluid helps create a conducive environment for sperm migration, and afterward, its volume supports the embryo as it implants onto the wall of the uterus. Recent evidence, presented in Trends in Molecular Medicine, suggests that uterine fluid may play ano
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at riskA study which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are more likely to develop poorer mental health, as rated by parents and teachers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anger in Nigeria's south over oil spill clean-up delayUnder a leaden sky in oil-rich southern Nigeria, young men hang around with nothing to do, covering their noses from the noxious fumes of the polluted swamp.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's infrared and radar eyes in space cast on Tropical Storm CindyNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Cindy in infrared light to identify areas of strongest storms and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite found locations of heaviest rainfall as Cindy was making landfall along the U.S. Gulf Coast states.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ecology insights improve plant biomass degradation by microorganismsMicrobes are widely used to break down plant biomass into sugars, which can be used as sustainable building blocks for novel biocompounds. Getting the right microbial community for this process is still a matter of trial and error. New insights by University of Groningen microbial ecologist Dr Diego Javier Jiménez and colleagues could make a rational design possible. They argue this point in an op
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Webb telescope gets freezing summertime lodging in HoustonNASA's James Webb Space Telescope was placed in Johnson Space Center's historic Chamber A on June 20, 2017, to prepare for its final three months of testing in a cryogenic vacuum that mimics temperatures in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't breakSea sponges known as Venus' flower baskets remain fixed to the sea floor with nothing more than an array of thin, hair-like anchors made essentially of glass. It's an important job, and new research suggests that it's the internal architecture of those anchors, known as basalia spicules, that helps them to do it.
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The Atlantic

Trump Is a Russian-Interference Truther Once More On Tuesday, a reporter asked White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer what should have been an easy question: Does the president believe that Russia interfered in the 2016 election? Related Story Trump's Self-Contradictory Defense Spicer demurred: “I have not sat down and talked to him about that specific thing.” That answer was incredible, in both the literal and figurative senses. It was hard to
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Live Science

3,000-Year-Old Wooden Toe Prosthetic Discovered on Egyptian MummyThe 3,000-year-old wooden toe was recently reexamined by researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use supercomputers to study snake evolution, unique traitsEvolution takes eons, but it leaves marks on the genomes of organisms that can be detected with DNA sequencing and analysis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France's Altice USA rallies in New York market debutAltice USA shares rallied Thursday in their New York market debut after the telecom group controlled by French billionaire Patrick Drahi raised some $1.9 billion in an initial public offering.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new platform for Whole Foods? How deal could upend grocerySeeing Whole Foods products first in Amazon searches? Breezing through the grocer's stores with an app that scans affordable fruits and seafood?
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Popular Science

You might not be allergic to penicillin anymore Health Reactions to the antibiotic can fade over time. Although penicillin allergies can resolve over time, many medical professionals do not know this, and few refer their patients to allergists for re-testing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How pythons regenerate their organs and other secrets of the snake genomeSnakes exhibit incredible evolutionary adaptations, including the ability to rapidly regenerate their organs and produce venom. The Castoe group at the University of Texas at Arlington studied these adaptations using genetic sequencing and advanced computing. Supercomputers of the Texas Advanced Computing Center helped the team identify a number of genes associated with organ growth in Burmese pyt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cells in fish's spinal discs repair themselvesDuke researchers have discovered a unique repair mechanism in the developing backbone of zebrafish that could give insight into why spinal discs of longer-lived organisms like humans degenerate with age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare cells are 'window into the gut' for the nervous systemSpecialized cells in the gut sense potentially noxious chemicals and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fibers, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists. "These cells are sensors, like a window looking into the contents of the gut," said James Bayrer, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at UCSF and one of the lead authors of the paper.
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Gizmodo

Garbage-Fed Seagulls Are Spoiling Our Lakes and Reservoirs With Their Poop Image: Scott Winton Where there are landfills there are seagulls. An estimated 1.4 million of these opportunistic feathered critters feed on these vast tracts of waste across North America. And as a new study from Duke University shows, the voluminous amounts of poop from these gulls is compromising the water-quality of nearby lakes and reservoirs. Landfills provide sustenance for seagulls, which
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The Atlantic

What's in the Senate Republican Health-Care Bill Updated on June 22 at 2:15 p.m. ET The Senate Republican health-care bill is finally out in the open. After weeks of secretive deliberations, party leaders on Thursday released a 142-page proposal that would slash taxes on the wealthy and businesses; reduce federal funding for Medicaid and phase out its expansion under the Affordable Care Act; and limit the tax credits available to help people pu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alzheimer's disease study links brain health, physical activityPeople at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewersNegative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Steam Summer Sale, TriggerPoint Grid, Nike Clearance, and More An air mattress that never goes flat , the Steam Link and Steam Controller , and an ergonomic vertical mouse lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse , $15 with code ANKERWVM Whether your current mouse is giving you chronic wrist pain, or you just want to try something diffe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proton pump inhibitors do not contribute to dementia or Alzheimer's diseaseNoting that the prescription of proton pump inhibitors is on the rise among middle-aged and older adults, a team of researchers designed a new study to examine PPIs and the risk of dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ecology insights improve plant biomass degradation by microorganismsMicrobes are widely used to break down plant biomass into sugars, which can be used as sustainable building blocks for novel biocompounds. Getting the right microbial community for this process is still a matter of trial and error. New insights by University of Groningen microbial ecologist Diego Javier Jiménez and colleagues could make a rational design possible. They argue this point in an opini
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Dagens Medicin

Region Sjælland går på jagt efter ny direktør Næste år stopper Lars Onsberg Henriksen som koncerndirektør i Region Sjælland.
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The Atlantic

Testing U.K.'s Tower Blocks After Grenfell Fire British authorities announced Thursday tests are being conducted on hundreds of tower blocks to determine if they have the same type of flammable cladding as used in Grenfell Tower. The tests come a week since the deadly blaze engulfed the 24-story building in west London, killing at least 79 people. “The estimate provided to us by councils is that there are approximately 600 high-rise buildings
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Gizmodo

Five Things You Might Not Know From 'The Secret History of the iPhone' Image: Getty In his new book The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone , Brian Merchant gives us a rare look inside Apple, chronicling the development of the iPhone with details about everything from the selection of raw materials to the product’s famous launch event. In the past, we’ve heard a few scraps of information from the development history of the iPhone. Like that it almost ran on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High fat diet reduces gut bacteria, Crohn's disease symptomsResearchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have shown a high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation -- a major discovery for patients suffering from Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel syndrome, causes debilitating intestinal swelling, cramping, and diarrhea. The disease affects half a million pe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HPV testing leads to earlier detection and treatment of cervical pre-cancerWomen who receive human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, in addition to a pap smear, receive a faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical precancer, according to a study of over 450,000 women by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on EarthUniversities of Leicester and East Anglia lead research to identify biodiversity through satellite data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For the first time in a patient, Stanford researchers use long-read genome sequencingResearchers at Stanford have used a next-generation technology called long-read sequencing to diagnose a patient's rare genetic condition that current technology failed to diagnose.
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Gizmodo

The Russia Hack Truther Has Logged On Photo: AP After weeks of working in secret, Senate Republicans finally unveiled their bill to repeal much of Obamacare on Thursday, legislation that would likely leave tens of millions of Americans uninsured. President Trump, however, attended to more pressing matters on Twitter —namely, his persistent, inexplicable belief that Russia’s interference with last year’s election is “a big Dem HOAX!”
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TEDTalks (video)

A celebration of natural hair | Cheyenne CochraneCheyenne Cochrane explores the role that hair texture has played in the history of being black in America -- from the heat straightening products of the post-Civil War era to the thousands of women today who have decided to stop chasing a conventional beauty standard and start embracing their natural hair. "This is about more than a hairstyle," Cochrane says. "It's about being brave enough not to
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Gizmodo

Guy Builds a Self-Powered Driving Potato That Turns Out to Be a Better Pet Than a Cat GIF We’ve all seen the grade school science experiment where sticking a couple of electrodes into a potato produces enough current to power a small light bulb. But engineer Marek Baczynski took that experiment several steps further, building what could be the world’s first autonomous potato —and the ultimate housepet. A single potato doesn’t generate a lot of electricity, but if you collect that
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Ars Technica

Charter promised more broadband but didn’t deliver, now must pay fine Enlarge / A Charter Spectrum vehicle. (credit: Charter ) Charter has agreed to pay $13 million to New York State after failing to complete broadband construction that was required as part of its purchase of Time Warner Cable. Charter can get $12 million of that back if it completes the buildout under a revised schedule. Charter was required to extend its network to 36,250 homes and businesses in
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Science : NPR

Moth Eyes Inspire Glare-Resistant Coating For Cellphone Screens The scientists who developed the anti-reflective film were inspired by tiny, light-trapping structures on moth eyes that help the insects avoid predators. (Image credit: Ullstein Bild/Getty Images)
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Scientific American Content: Global

Energy CEOs Tell EPA Chief They Want Carbon RegulationCompanies told Scott Pruitt that having a regulation on the books would help them plan for the future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Did Hulk Hogan Neuter the First Amendment? The most memorable moment in Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press , a new documentary dropping on Netflix Friday, comes in the very first scene, when the former Gawker editor A.J. Daulerio is shown explaining to the camera that there’s a hold on his personal bank account. For $230 million. It’s a moment that the director, Brian Knappenberger, uses to convey the scale of the imbalance he perceiv
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Popular Science

A hotter planet might make hurricanes more destructive Environment Here's how. In a warmer world, tropical cyclones may go from bad to worse. Read on.
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New Scientist - News

Oil-exploration airguns punch 2-kilometre-wide holes in planktonThe seismic airguns used to look for undersea oil don’t just disrupt marine mammals, their shock waves also kill and disperse the plankton population
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Wired

Gritty Photos of the News Crews That Never Stop RollingSatoshi Fujiwara documents the people documenting tragedy.
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Wired

The Woman Who Gave You the Video Game 'Journey' Returns With a VR Fairy TaleCreated by Robin Hunicke and her experimental game design company, Funomena, the VR game Luna is a parable about mistakes and redemption.
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Wired

Tech Metaphors Are Holding Back Brain ResearchIt’s easy to assume that the seat of human intelligence is similar to our increasingly smart devices. But that idea could be misdirecting neuroscience.
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Futurity.org

Ultra-thin camera design doesn’t need a lens Traditional cameras—even those on the thinnest of cell phones—cannot be truly flat due to their optics: lenses that require a certain shape and size in order to function. A new camera design replaces the lenses with an ultra-thin optical phased array (OPA) that does computationally what lenses do using large pieces of glass: it manipulates incoming light to capture an image. OPA on penny for scal
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Science : NPR

Forget Freud: Dreams Replay Our Everyday Lives Sigmund Freud thought dreams were all about wish fulfillment and repressed desire. But scientists now think they're linked to memory processing and consciousness. And they're often quite mundane. (Image credit: Jennifer Qian for NPR)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's infrared and radar eyes in space cast on Tropical Storm CindyNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Cindy in infrared light to identify areas of strongest storms and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite found locations of heaviest rainfall as Cindy was making landfall along the US Gulf Coast states.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Popular prostate drug linked to serious side effectsTreatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the commonly prescribed Avodart (Dutsteride) may put men at an increased risk for diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and worsening erectile dysfunction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on EarthA team of scientists led by the Universities of Leicester and East Anglia are leading research to protect wildlife by using satellite data to identify monkey populations that have declined through hunting.
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Futurity.org

You can’t tell if someone’s hot from photos People find their potential dates more attractive after they have a positive in-person interaction, research finds. Additionally, evaluating someone based on physical attractiveness alone tells you little about what you’ll think about them once you meet face to face. “Using physical attractiveness to sort people to date is a bad strategy.” In addition, rating someone’s attractiveness before meeti
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Futurity.org

Coffee farmers learn about bugs by playing ‘Azteca Chess’ A new board game helps teach small-scale Mexican coffee farmers about the complex interactions between the insects and fungi that live on their plants. The game also teaches farmers about how some insects help to control other pests. Instead of queens, knights, bishops, and pawns, the Azteca Chess board game uses tokens representing ants, ladybugs, wasps, and flies living on a shade-coffee bush.
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Ars Technica

Air Force clears F-35 to fly again—with caveats—after hypoxia scares Enlarge / An F-35 Lightning II performs a maneuver Sept. 12, 2016 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. After a temporary grounding, the F-35 has returned to the skies at the base, but with some restrictions on how pilots fly the aircraft. (credit: US Air Force) The F-35A has been cleared to operate once again from Luke Air Force Base, the primary pilot-training facility for the Air Force's newest fig
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Viden

Klimaforandringerne truer med at gøre din kaffe både dårlig og dyrI fremtiden kan det være helt slut med en god kop kaffe.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Air guns used in offshore oil exploration can kill tiny marine life Lethal effects from pulses of sound used to probe the sea floor can travel over a kilometre. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22167
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't breakThe anchors that hold Venus' flower basket sea sponges to the ocean floor have an internal architecture that increases their ability to bend, according to a new study. Understanding that natural architecture could inform future human-made materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Webb telescope gets freezing summertime lodging in HoustonNASA's James Webb Space Telescope was placed in Johnson Space Center's historic Chamber A on June 20, 2017, to prepare for its final three months of testing in a cryogenic vacuum that mimics temperatures in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at riskA study of historic whaling records has revealed there were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrationsResearchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New screen coating makes reading in sunlight a lot easier—the secret? Moth eyesScreens on even the newest phones and tablets can be hard to read outside in bright sunlight. Inspired by the nanostructures found on moth eyes, researchers have developed a new antireflection film that could keep people from having to run to the shade to look at their mobile devices.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Solve Ancient 'Bright Night' Mystery With Satellite Data Humans are pretty jaded these days. We can write most of the strange phenomena we see off as science (or we honestly don’t care). But when Roman philosophers like Pliny the Elder witnessed moonless nights glow bright like the day, it definitely made an impression. Others since then have been awestruck by these “bright nights,” too. Scientists from York University in Toronto have since observed wh
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The Atlantic

What Are Your Eclipse Plans? On August 21, a swath of the continental United States will experience one of the strangest and most wondrous phenomena it is possible to witness on Earth. A total solar eclipse will sweep the country from coast to coast. Along the eclipse’s curvaceous path from Oregon to South Carolina, the moon will momentarily block the face of the sun, obscuring all but its wispy, diaphanous atmosphere, and b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can animal diet mitigate greenhouse emissions?The inclusion of agroindustrial by-products in pig feed can reduce the nitrous oxide emissions (N2O) of the slurry used as manures up to 65%, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dogs to sniff out chemicals that identify human remainsNew research to help improve accuracy of criminal investigations involves a partnership between humans and their canine coworkers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flipping the switch to stop tumor developmentResearchers show how a protein prevents the uncontrolled expansion of immune cells, and have outlined their findings in a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Text messaging effective support in treatment of HIV and tuberculosisMobile phone text messaging is a powerful tool for improving quality of care, researchers show. A new study has developed and tested a method in Mozambique, helping patients with severe diseases to follow through with their treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radioactive elements in Cassiopeia A suggest a neutrino-driven explosionStars exploding as supernovae are the main sources of heavy chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, radioactive atomic nuclei are synthesized in the hot, innermost regions during the explosion and can thus serve as probes of the unobservable physical processes that initiate the blast. Using elaborate computer simulations, a team of researchers was able to explain the recently measured sp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors has declinedFrom 1999/2000 to 2011/2012, exposure to secondhand smoke among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors declined from 39.6 percent to 15.7 percent, but rates of exposure were higher among those with a history of a smoking-related cancer and those living below the federal poverty level compared with those with other types of cancer and those with the highest incomes, respectively.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algae: The final frontierAlgae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewersNegative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigating the influence of fungal rot on the aromas of must and wineYoghurt, beer, bread and specialities such as tasty blue cheeses or good wine—special microorganisms and refining processes first produce the pleasant flavours and enticing aromas of many foodstuffs. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now investigated the formation of rot in grapes and have shown that when this is caused by certain kinds of mould fungi, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic riskA tax on systemically risky transactions could reshape financial networks into a new structure that is less vulnerable to cascading financial system shocks such as the 2008 financial crisis, according to new IIASA research published in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Phil Jackson’s Favorite Stooge Tries To Sell A Kristaps Porzingis Trade | The Slot Donald T Deadspin Phil Jackson’s Favorite Stooge Tries To Sell A Kristaps Porzingis Trade | The Slot Donald Trump Doesn’t Want Poor People to Be in Charge of the Economy | The Root 9-Year-Old Girl Called ‘Nutella,’ ‘Servant’ by Racist Bullies At School; Posts Viral Video on Facebook to Bring Attention to Her Case | Fusion Posh Scum Complain That London Fire Survivors Will Bring Down Their Neighborhood |
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Gizmodo

Playing Super Mario Bros. in Real Life Is How Video Games Will Finally Get You Off Your Ass GIF If Microsoft wants a guaranteed way to sell a million Hololens augmented reality headsets, it should listen to Abhishek Singh and pitch the hardware as the ultimate way to get in shape by playing the first level of Super Mario Bros. in real life. Unlike the Wii’s balance board accessory, this might actually help you shed a few pounds. Singh re-created the classic 1-1 level from the NES versio
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Inside Science

Moths’ Eyes Inspire New Tech Moths’ Eyes Inspire New Tech Nanostructure similar to moth eyes could help cut reflections on smartphone screens. moth-eyes.jpg Close up photo of a southern armyworm -- a moth in North America Image credits: Composite image by Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer via USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab Technology Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 09:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Moths' eyes sport nan
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Scientific American Content: Global

Teen Pregnancies Down as More Adolescents Use ContraceptionMost American teens have still had sex by age 18 according to the CDC analysis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetic memories of a metal world4.5 billion years ago in the violent, high-speed environment of the early solar system, a protoplanet roughly the size of Mars was involved in a series of fierce collisions with other large planetary bodies.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

German-UK team maintains Galileo successOHB and SSTL will make the next eight, possibly even the next 14, satellites for Europe's GPS.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrationsResearchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

White people show race bias when judging deceptionWhen making judgments about who is lying and who is telling the truth, new research shows that White people are more likely to label a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, even though their spontaneous behavior indicates the reverse bias. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uncomfortable summer heat makes people moody and unhelpful, new research findsAssociate professor Liuba Belkin of Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and Maryam Kouchaki, assistant professor at Northwestern in Evanston, Illinois, conclude in a new study, that when when it's uncomfortably hot, we're less likely to be helpful or 'prosocial.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unexpected rotation in a stone-dead galaxyjoint European-US study led by experts from Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, reveals a rotating stellar disk à la the Milky Way in a stone-dead galaxy 10 billion light-years from Earth. This has never been shown before. The galaxy examined is an early version of elliptical-shaped galaxies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated rate of autism symptoms found in children with Tourette syndromeAround one in five children with Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements and vocalizations, met criteria for autism in a study headed by UC San Francisco. But this prevalence may be more a reflection of similarity in symptoms than actual autism, according to the study's researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occurToday Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University. The scientists call attention to a serious lack of data on the worldwide distribution of disease-causing organisms. Without this knowledge, predict
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at riskA study of historic whaling records has revealed there were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New screen coating makes reading in sunlight a lot easier -- the secret? Moth eyesScreens on even the newest phones and tablets can be hard to read outside in bright sunlight. Inspired by the nanostructures found on moth eyes, researchers have developed a new antireflection film that could keep people from having to run to the shade to look at their mobile devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pathogen that causes sleeping sickness: Promising new targetThe life-threatening African trypanosomiasis, also called sleeping sickness, is caused by protozoa of the species Trypanosoma brucei. A team of researchers has studied the pathogens and reported exciting news: The trypanosomes have a so far unknown enzyme which does not exist in humans and other vertebrates. This makes it a promising target for therapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studies of US Lassa fever patient offer clues about immune response, viral persistenceResearchers were able to closely study a Lassa fever patient's immune response over time after he was evacuated to the US for treatment. An experimental drug, favipiravir, was used in treating the US patient and an additional patient infected with Lassa virus in Germany. The drug appeared to have few serious side effects, but its efficacy is unknown. Individual patient reports cannot be generalize
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How serious is binge drinking among college students with disabilities?College students with disabilities binge drink more often than their non-disabled student peers, research concludes. The study provides the first picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biofilms: The eradication has begunBiofilms are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes in order to colonize surfaces. They protect microbes from the body's immune system and increase their resistance to antibiotics. Biofilms represent one of the biggest threats to patients in hospital settings. But there is good news: scientists have developed a novel enzyme technology that prevents the formation of biofilms and c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What percentage of ALS is genetic?Up to 90 percent of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) report that they have no family history of the disease. Now, new research has found approximately 17 percent of such ALS cases may be caused by a gene mutation, according to a study.
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The Atlantic

The Big Sick Is the Best Romantic Comedy in Years Watching The Big Sick is like fondly reconnecting with an old friend you didn’t know you missed. The general beats of the film are familiar and warm; I quickly realized it had been a long time since I’d seen a romantic comedy about people who are generally supportive of each other, one free of violent subplots about kidnapping or murder , or many of the stoned, bro-y digressions typical of the la
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The Atlantic

The Apple Pickers of the Yakima Valley Even after having worked as a farmworker for a few years, Eva Chavez still had trouble coping with how exhausted she was after a day of picking apples. “I’d barely make it home because I was so tired,” she remembers. “I’d just park the car outside my house and sleep in the car. I didn’t even want to go inside.” She saw her fellow farmworkers get similarly worn down. She said she worried when she
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Gizmodo

Ward off Wrist Pain With Anker's $15 Wireless Vertical Mouse Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse , $15 with code ANKERWVM Whether your current mouse is giving you chronic wrist pain, or you just want to try something different, this 4.3 star rated wireless ergonomic vertical mouse from Anker is only $15 today (with promo code ANKERWVM), or $5 less than usual. In addition to the clever design, it even comes with three adjustable DPI settings and forward/back butt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'Star dust' wasp is a new extinct species named after David Bowie's alter egoDuring her study on fossil insects of the order Hymenoptera at China's Capitol Normal University, student Longfeng Li visited the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, carrying two unidentified wasp specimens that were exceptionally well-preserved in Burmese amber. This type of fossilized tree resin is known for the quality of the fossil specimens which can be preserved insid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smooth propagation of spin waves using goldAssistant Professor Taichi Goto at Toyohashi University of Technology elucidated the noise generation mechanism of the spin wave (SW), the wave of a magnetic moment transmitted through magnetic oxide, and established a way to suppress it. The large noise generated by SWs traveling through magnetic oxides has presented a significant obstacle to its applications. However, it became clear that noise
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UV-sensing protein in the brain of a marine annelid zooplanktonResearchers at Institute for Molecular Sciences reported that a photoreceptive protein expressed in the brain a marine annelid zooplankton (Platynereis dumerilii) is UV-sensitive. This work was carried out as a collaborative work of Drs. Hisao Tsukamoto and Yuji Furutani (Institute for Molecular Science) with Drs. Yoshihiro Kubo and I-Shan Chen (National Institute for Physiological Sciences). This
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into a central biological dogma on ion transportNew research results from Aarhus University and New York University show how active transport of potassium can be achieved by a membrane protein complex that has roots in both ion pump and ion channel super-families. The results, which have just been published in Nature, shed new light on what define channels and pumps.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Preventing Dementia: New Report Says Not Much Is Proved to WorkNational Academies review says cognitive training evidence remains scant -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Uber’s Other Big Problem: Driverless Cars Aren’t Ready YetIts new CEO will inherit many problems, but a business plan based on the elusive dream of driverless cars is the largest.
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Gizmodo

The New Game Of Thrones Trailer Hints At One Very Cool Storyline HBO released a new Game Of Thrones trailer for Season 7, and fans around the world are asking themselves one question: “Where is the incest?” Alas, the trailer has none, but it does seem to confirm that one of the juicier potential storylines that was recently leaked will in fact come to life. A SPOILER WILL FOLLOW! A BIG ONE! OKAY? Advertisement SERIOUSLY! YOU CAN GO READ ABOUT POOP DOPING OR MA
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On polygamous females and single-parent malesOn polygamous females and single-parent males Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University are studying ploversMale plovers survive more successfully in the wild than females. Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University have studied how sex biases develop across the life span of the plover. They report on the consequences of the surplus of males for rearing chicks in the research journal 'Pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewersNegative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bug spray accumulation in the homeA newly published article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reports that pyrethroids, a common household pesticide known to cause skin irritation, headache, dizziness and nausea, persists in the home for up over one year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The two faces of rot fungiYogurt, beer, bread and specialties such as tasty blue cheeses or good wine -- special microorganisms and refining processes first produce the pleasant flavors and enticing aromas of many foodstuffs. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now investigated the formation of rot in grapes and have shown that when this is caused by certain kinds of mold fungi, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alzheimer's disease study links brain health and physical activityPeople at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new UW-Madison study. Results of the research were published today online in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes patients still produce insulinSome insulin is still produced in almost half of the patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than ten years. Patients with remaining insulin production had much higher levels in blood of interleukin-35, They also had much more immune cells that produce interleukin-35 and dampen immune attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clinics cut pregnancy risks for obese womenSpecialist antenatal clinics for severely obese mums-to-be can help cut rates of pregnancy complications, research has found. Women who received the specialist care were eight times less likely to have a stillbirth and health experts say the clinic helps them to spot signs of complications sooner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Video games can change your brainScientists have collected and summarized studies looking at how video games can shape our brains and behavior. Research to date suggests that playing video games can change the brain regions responsible for attention and visuospatial skills and make them more efficient. The researchers also looked at studies exploring brain regions associated with the reward system, and how these are related to vi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kids -- new researchPeople who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick.
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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Ars Technica

Apple may want to lower record label payout from Apple Music Apple Music on iOS 10, with Senior VP Eddy Cue. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Changes may be coming to Apple Music, but for record labels rather than subscribers. According to a Bloomberg report , Apple may be looking to reduce how much it pays to record labels whose music populates the company's music-streaming service. Labels' deals with Apple expire in the coming weeks, and Apple may be looking
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The Scientist RSS

European Court OKs Vaccine Lawsuits Lacking ProofThe European Union's highest court issued a ruling yesterday that allows plaintiffs to sue vaccine makers without providing scientific evidence of harm.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Call the Coral DoctorScientists surveyed coral colonies in Hawaii for disease after a mystery pathogen caused tissue from the common rice coral (Montipora capitata) to degenerate.
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Futurity.org

Are you ‘old’ yet? The cut-off has shifted Aging should be based on the number of years people are likely to live in a given country in the 21st century, say researchers. By that logic, 70 may be the new 60. The new study also predicts an end to population aging in the United States and other countries before the end of the century. Population aging—when the median age rises in a country because of increasing life expectancy and lower fer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New marine protected area designated in Costa RicaInternational days, such as World Oceans Day earlier this month, are vitally important for raising awareness of topics such as marine biodiversity. But in Costa Rica this year, not only was awareness raised but a key action was taken –the government announced the designation of the Área Marina de Manejo Cabo Blanco (Cabo Blanco Marine Management Area), as a new 831 km2 marine protected area (MPA).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Custom built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapyScientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How protons move through a fuel cellHydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals -- a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating your feelings? The link between job stress, junk food and sleepStress during the workday can lead to overeating and unhealthy food choices at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stereotypes still affect females' career aspirations in STEM topicsStudy investigates the impact of stereotypes and the role of family, school and society on the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects and found that these stereotypes do impact the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic riskA proposed tax on systemically risky financial transactions could reduce the risk of financial system crashes by spurring financial networks to reshape in more resilient ways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic memories of a metal worldResearch deciphering the hidden magnetic messages encoded in a rare group of meteorites has helped secure nearly half a billion dollars of NASA funding for a journey to their parent asteroid -- the only known place in the solar system where scientists can examine directly what is probably a metallic core.
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Dagens Medicin

Varslingssystem: Tusindvis af patientforløb har overskredet maksimale ventetider Et nyt varslingssystem, som Region Hovedstadens nye IT-system Sundhedsplatformen fodrer med data, advarer om, at tusindvis af patientforløb har overskredet maksimale ventetider. Region Hovedstaden vurderer at det skyldes manglende registreringer.
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Ingeniøren

Hård test sender 20 meter høje bølger mod flydende havmølleEn test af et nyt koncept for en flydende platform til havmøller giver ny viden forud for design af det endelige koncept, der skal muliggøre billig havvind på dybt vand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kidsPeople who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acetaminophen during pregnancy can inhibit masculinityParacetamol during pregnancy can inhibit the development of 'male behavior' in mice. New research shows that it can reduce sex drive and aggressive behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidationSome basic processes underlying memory consolidation have been discovered by researchers. The work identifies some of the electrical events responsible for specific neuronal activity in the hippocampus: a region of the brain with fundamental roles in episodic memory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn founder: US expansion might top $10 billionThe chairman of Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn said Thursday it may spend more than $10 billion to set up manufacturing in the United States, and will announce investment plans by early August for at least three states.
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Ars Technica

Heat can kill and we’re turning up the thermostat Enlarge (credit: Jorge Quinteros ) ‘Tis the season for heatwaves in the Northern Hemisphere, as folks across Europe and parts of the US west have been reminded this week. In addition to providing weather to complain about—seemingly a necessary component of human communication—heatwaves can be straight up deadly. The 2010 Moscow heatwave (combined with thick air pollution from associated wildfires
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The Atlantic

The Student Who Hated My Happiness This is the third installment in an audio series called What My Students Taught Me, which features teachers reflecting on one of their most challenging students—counterbalanced by the student’s version of the same events. Listen to the first two installments here and here . Ann Neary almost always speaks softly and wears a smile on her face. But for Monique Beckford and some of her classmates at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space tourism could boost science and health research—here's howThe announcement of the draft Spaceflight Bill in the Queen's Speech will allow the development of spaceports in the UK. This could see members of the paying public launched into space as tourists, or taking sub-orbital flights from London to New York in just 45 minutes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequent sexual activity can boost brain power in older adultsMore frequent sexual activity has been linked to improved brain function in older adults, according to a new study.
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Popular Science

In a Montana town, a record-breaking 103-degree swing in 24 hours Environment Loma's weather in January 1972 is a fascinating exemplar of sudden temperature spikes and drops. In many parts of the U.S., it’s not uncommon for a summery afternoon to transform into a below-zero night. But no place has felt a ­greater 24-hour change in the mercury…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't lose sleep over sharing your bed with your pet or kidsAbout half of all pet owners share their beds or bedrooms with their pets. Studies about co-sleeping are limited to the bedtime arrangements of adults, or parents and their children. In an article in Springer's journal Human Nature, the authors argue that society regards both human-animal and adult-child co-sleeping with apprehension. These concerns should be set aside because both practices have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'Star dust' wasp is a new extinct species named after David Bowie's alter egoDuring her study on fossil insects at China's Capitol Normal University, student Longfeng Li visited the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, USA, carrying two unidentified wasp specimens that were exceptionally well-preserved and 100 million years old. Close examination revealed that both were species new to science. Furthermore, one of them was found to belong to a genus of modern was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight into a central biological dogma on ion transportNew research results from Aarhus University and New York University show how active transport of potassium can be achieved by a membrane protein complex that has roots in both ion pump and ion channel super-families. The results, which have just been published in Nature, shed new light on what define channels and pumps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An integrated perspective on diabetic, alcoholic, and drug-induced neuropathyNeuropathic pain (NeuP) is a persistent, debilitating form of chronic pain that results from damaged nerves. It has multiple underlying etiologies, including diabetes, alcohol and chemotherapy, and is thought to affect 7-10% of the global population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

News from the pathogen that causes sleeping sicknessA team of researchers from the University of Würzburg has discovered an interesting enzyme in the pathogens responsible for African sleeping sickness: It could be a promising target for drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smooth propagation of spin waves using goldAssistant Professor Taichi Goto at Toyohashi University of Technology elucidated the noise generation mechanism of the spin wave (SW), the wave of a magnetic moment transmitted through magnetic oxide, and established a way to suppress it. The large noise generated by SWs traveling through magnetic oxides has presented a significant obstacle to its applications. However, it became clear that noise
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Australian origin likely for iconic New Zealand treeAncestors of the iconic New Zealand Christmas Tree, P?hutukawa, may have originated in Australia, new fossil research from the University of Adelaide suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Accentuate the positive to reduce risk of chronic diseasePeople who experience not just positive emotions but a diversity of positive emotions appear to have lower levels of systemic inflammation, which may reduce their risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radioactive elements in Cassiopeia A suggest a neutrino-driven explosionUsing elaborate computer simulations, a team of researchers from RIKEN in Japan and the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA) were able to explain the recently measured spatial distributions of radioactive titanium and nickel in Cassiopeia A, a roughly 340 year old gas remnant of a nearby supernova. The computer models yield strong support for the theoretical idea that such stellar death eve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UV-sensing protein in the brain of a marine annelid zooplanktonLarvae of a marine ragworm Platynereis dumerilii have been studied as a zooplankton model, and possess photoreceptor cells in the brain to regulate circadian swimming behavior. This study revealed that a photoreceptive protein in the brain photoreceptor cells is UV (ultra-violet) sensitive. Since avoidance of UV irradiation is a major cause of a large-scale daily movement of zooplankton, the UV se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Custom-built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapyScientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The world's first 3-D printed reinforced concrete bridge starts to take shapeToday the Built Environment department's concrete printer starts printing the world's first 3-D printed reinforced, pre-stressed concrete bridge. The cycle bridge will be part of a new section of ring road around Gemert in which the BAM Infra construction company is using innovative techniques.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multifunctional catalyst for poison-resistant hydrogen fuel cellsDemand for eco-friendly fuel sources is increasing as the goal of diminishing reliance on fossil fuels becomes commonly recognized. Hydrogen represents a possible sustainable fuel source when it is produced from water and burned with oxygen because only water is released as a by-product. The oxidation of hydrogen to release energy and water using fuel cells containing catalysts is being researched
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could asteroids bombard the Earth to cause a mass extinction in 10 million years?Scientists have spent decades debating whether asteroids and comets hit the Earth at regular intervals. At the same time, a few studies have found evidence that the large extinction events on Earth – such as the one that wiped out the dinosaurs 66m years ago – repeat themselves every 26m to 30m years. Given that there's good evidence that an asteroid triggered the dinosaur extinction, it makes sen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Texting-based surveys capture purchasing and behavior data from people living in remote areasWhile on location in remote areas of Kenya, researching automation and home manufacturing for his doctoral dissertation, Kenfield Griffith PhD '12 encountered a significant lack of data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prostheses with controlled degradation rateSince magnesium alloys are degradable, they could provide an alternative to the metals traditionally used as prostheses, connecting parts to heal bones or as stents for cardiovascular problems. A study by the UPV/EHU Faculty of Engineering in Bilbao has made progress on one of the weak points of the new material. Its degradation rate has been adjusted by applying a calcium phosphate coating to the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop catalyst that mimics the Z-scheme of photosynthesisA team of chemists from the University of Kentucky and the Institute of Physics Research of Mar del Plata in Argentina has just reported a way to trigger a fundamental step in the mechanism of photosynthesis, providing a process with great potential for developing new technology to reduce carbon dioxide levels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Line messaging digital theme park to open in Thai capitalThe text-messaging service Line plans to inaugurate an indoor digital theme park in Thailand's capital, seeking to squeeze maximum advantage from its popularity in the country, its second biggest market after Japan.
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Gizmodo

NASA Calls Bullshit on Goop's $120 'Bio-Frequency Healing' Sticker Packs [Updated] Image: Body Vibes There’s no shortage of things to be mad about in late capitalism. Pretty high on the list, though, is the Eat, Pray, Love brand of pseudoscience promoted by Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop. Somehow, Goop—which previously encouraged women to shove eggs up their vaginas —has out-Gooped itself: the brand is now promoting stickers called “Body Vibes.” The product, which I remind you, is lite
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The Atlantic

It's 'Highly Likely' ISIS's Baghdadi Is Dead, Russia Says Russia’s deputy foreign minister told state media Thursday that it is highly likely Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the ISIS leader, was killed in a Russian airstrike near Raqqa, Syria, on May 28. Oleg Syromolotov told Sputnik the “information is now verified through various channels.” The remarks are similar to those made June 16 by the Russian Defense Ministry, which said Baghdadi was among more than 300
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Wired

Punkt MP01 Review: You'll Love This Very Smart DumbphoneOf all the antidotes to always-on anxiety, the most intriguing is this handset that only offers calling and texting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook offers Indian women tools to protect privacyFacebook has introduced new security features for women using the social media platform in India, including the ability to prevent strangers from downloading their profile pictures, the company said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists may have unlocked the secret behind success in the NRLJCU's Dr Carl Woods and colleagues looked at the performance indicators of winning and losing NRL (National Rugby League) teams. He says a number of factors stood out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar tracking gives scientists tools to follow small animalsKeeping tabs on wild birds has long been a low-tech proposition. While radio collars and satellite tags became standard for tracking big mammals, binoculars and notebooks have remained critical for following most twittering, flittering birds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D virus cam catches germs red-handedBefore germs like viruses can make you sick, they first have to make a landing on one of your cells—Mars Rover style—and then punch their way inside.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NRL issued patent for solar microbial fuel cellThe U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering, has received a U.S. patent for a self-assembling, self-repairing, and self-contained microbial photoelectrochemical solar cell driven entirely by sunlight and microorganisms.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Paracetamol under graviditet hæmmer mandighedPanodil, Pinex og Pamol under graviditeten kan hæmme udvikling af ”mandlig adfærd”...
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Gizmodo

Why a Single Infinity War Set Picture Has Everyone Pondering Tony Stark's Future Ridley Scott is already teasing the next Alien movie. Get another look at that absurd Tom & Jerry/Willy Wonka mashup film. A new Last Jedi trailer is on the way. Plus, even more Spider-Man: Homecoming footage, and new Game of Thrones posters. Spoilers, assemble! Avengers: Infinity War Benedict Wong has joined the cast of Avengers: Infinity War , as revealed by a new tweet from Robert Downey Jr. B
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers design an enzyme to synthetize carbohydratesSugar or carbohydrate synthesis is important for the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines and new drugs. In a collaborative study, researchers have synthetized carbohydrates with enzymes through a reaction that was not much studied so far on these biomolecules and which creates few by-products.
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Live Science

Pew Pew Pew! Why Scientists Are Fired Up About Futuristic Space LasersLasers are helping scientists conduct highly precise measurements and observations on Earth, in orbit around our planet and in space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multifunctional catalyst for poison-resistant hydrogen fuel cellsA Kyushu University-led collaboration developed a catalyst that can oxidize both hydrogen and carbon monoxide in fuel cells. As a result, their catalyst is resistant to poisoning by the contaminant carbon monoxide in commercial hydrogen gas, which is a common limitation of current fuel cell catalysts. The action of the multifunctional catalyst resembled that of two enzymes: a hydrogenase and carbo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infantHIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists may have cracked rugby league's codeScientists from James Cook University and Victoria University may have unlocked the secret behind success in the National Rugby League (NRL) competition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultra-thin camera creates images without lensesCaltech engineers have built a camera that does not need lenses to focus light.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The curious case of the warped Kuiper BeltThe plane of the solar system is warped in the belt's outer reaches, signaling the presence of an unknown Mars-to-Earth-mass planetary object far beyond Pluto, according to UA research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are LGBT Americans actually reaping the benefits of marriage?For decades, researchers have studied the benefits of marriage, finding that married people are likely to be healthier, wealthier and wiser than their unmarried peers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How protons move through a fuel cellHydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Does Dancing Just Feel Good, or Did It Help Early Humans Survive?Do humans dance just for fun, or did it help our ancestors survive thousands of years ago? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unseen 'planetary mass object' signalled by warped Kuiper BeltAn unknown, unseen "planetary mass object" may lurk in the outer reaches of our solar system, according to new research on the orbits of minor planets to be published in the Astronomical Journal. This object would be different from—and much closer than—the so-called Planet Nine, a planet whose existence yet awaits confirmation.
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Gizmodo

Get Ready for the Summer Sale With Great Deals on the Steam Link and Controller Steam Link , $15 | Steam Controller , $35 If you want to pick up some Steam hardware before the Summer Sale kicks off, both the Steam Link and Steam controller are on sale today. The Link will only set you back $15, a new all-time low, while the controller is $15 less than usual, at $35.
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Ars Technica

Sand worms and lightning: Aven Colony takes city-building to exoplanets Enlarge (credit: NASA/Getty Images) Humans have consumed our world’s resources as if they were infinite. Earth remains, however, a finite planet. Without significant structural and behavioural change—the sort that is difficult to effect en masse— the long-term consequences of our self-sabotaging choices appear grave. In a forthcoming BBC documentary titled Expedition New Earth the English physici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

JPL scientists predict future space probes will have artificial intelligence to operate autonomously(Phys.org)—A pair of space scientists working at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology has written a Focus piece for the journal Science Robotics. Steve Chien and Kiri Wagstaff suggest that future space probes will be given enough intelligence to carry out much of their mission without prompts from people back on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinctionThe Earth is home to millions of species, but you wouldn't know it from the media's obsession with only a few dozen animals like tigers and gorillas.
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Gizmodo

I Can't Wait to Play This Nintendo Switch Battery The Nintendo Switch is a tiny console with tiny controllers all powered by tiny batteries with tiny capacities. Charging is just part of life with the Switch, which is why it’s spawned hundreds of power accessories, including this portable battery that looks like the most boring Switch game you can play. But while Bionik’s Power Plate looks like a smaller version of the console, with only half a
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Gizmodo

This Discounted Air Mattress Silently Reinflates Itself Throughout The Night Insta-Bed Never Flat Queen Air Mattress with Pillow Top Cover , $110 Nobody relishes the idea of sleeping on an air mattress, but they might not mind this discounted Insta-Bed . $110 is more than you’d spend on most other air mattresses, but this one includes a pillow top cover for extra softness, and most importantly, a built-in pump that silently trickles more air into the mattress overnight. J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Injector 2—a pre-accelerator for protonsAs fundamental building blocks of matter, protons are a part of all things that surround us. At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, however, they step out of their usual role and are deployed to generate other particles, namely neutrons and muons, which are subsequently used to study materials. With this aim, the protons have first to be accelerated. An important role in this is played by a three-sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously(Phys.org)—A team of researchers form the U.S., Denmark and France has created a report regarding the creation and use of software meant to give exploratory robots in space more autonomy. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the team describes the software, called Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science (AEGIS), and how well it performed on the Mars rover Curios
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Latest Headlines | Science News

When should babies sleep in their own rooms?A new study offers support to sleep-starved parents by suggesting that babies age 6 months and older sleep longer when in their own bedroom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student-built satellite aims to provide insight on effects of solar stormsThis summer, astronauts on the International Space Station will launch a Penn State student-built satellite into orbit that will help learn more about space weather.
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Ars Technica

The tragedy of FireWire: Collaborative tech torpedoed by corporations Enlarge / In retrospect, perhaps our favorite port logo. (credit: Flickr user jeremybrooks ) The rise and fall of FireWire— IEEE 1394 , an interface standard boasting high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data transfer—is one of the most tragic tales in the history of computer technology. The standard was forged in the fires of collaboration. A joint effort from several competitors
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify mammals that are most likely to harbor viruses risky to humans(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the EcoHealth Alliance has narrowed down the list of animal species that may harbor viruses likely to jump to humans. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group outlines the process they used to collect viral data on mammals around the globe, sorted them into groups and listed where they live. James Lloyd-Smith with the University of California
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber's problems highlight silicon valley's faltering vision for the futureIt would be nice to think that Uber's problems are going to be fixed with the resignation of its CEO Travis Kalanick. Of course, the shareholders who instigated the demand for his resignation were not necessarily expressing a view about what he had done but merely that the company was spending more time focusing on its internal toxic culture than its actual business of expanding its taxi and deliv
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultra-thin camera creates images without lensesTraditional cameras—even those on the thinnest of cell phones—cannot be truly flat due to their optics: lenses that require a certain shape and size in order to function. At Caltech, engineers have developed a new camera design that replaces the lenses with an ultra-thin optical phased array (OPA). The OPA does computationally what lenses do using large pieces of glass: it manipulates incoming lig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New spectral eye video database SPEED revolutionises eye-trackingTechniques to acquire spectral data have been static for a long time - until now. Exciting and novel spectral video technologies are emerging, allowing us to extract increasingly dynamic knowledge from light. Using a spectral video device in eye-tracking, computational spectral imaging and eye-tracking researchers from the University of Eastern Finland have created a novel - first of its kind - co
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Ingeniøren

Nye elbiler klarer amerikansk crashtest med bravourBåde Tesla Model X og Chevy Bolt EV klarer sig bemærkelsesværdigt godt i amerikansk crashtest. Noget tyder dog på, at de europæiske prøvelser er en del skrappere.
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Wired

The Top 10 Flying Car Designs, From Airbus to Larry PageThe long-promised age of the flying car is finally here (kinda). Here are 10 of the most promising designs.
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Futurity.org

Concealed gun law states have more violent crime States that have enacted right-to-carry (RTC) concealed handgun laws have higher rates of violent crime than states that didn’t adopt those laws, according to a new analysis of decades of crime data. A new working paper builds on a 2004 report from the National Academies’ National Research Council investigating guns and violence. While that report debunked claims that RTC laws had been shown to r
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Science | The Guardian

How sad that English-speaking parents are afraid of their children being taught in Welsh | Rhiannon Lucy CosslettThe English colonial legacy has left its mark in Wales, and it sticks in the craw that otherwise liberal people might criticise minority-language activists in the UK Tuesday’s Guardian article about Welsh language education caused huge controversy . In it, some parents protested about their village school switching to Welsh-language teaching. The print headline was: Welsh-only teaching – a politic
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Gizmodo

Robot Journalist Accidentally Reports on Earthquake from 1925 File photo of damage from an earthquake in Napa in 2014 (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Yesterday, the Los Angeles Times reported on a 6.8 earthquake that struck Santa Barbara at 4:51pm. Which might be surprising to the people of Santa Barbara who didn’t feel anything. The big problem with the story? The earthquake happened in 1925. How could reporters get something so wrong? Well, the “r
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Scientific American Content: Global

Brain-Invading Tapeworm That Eluded Doctors Spotted by New DNA TestGenetic sequencing of spinal fluid hailed as an advance over standard procedures for diagnosing brain infections -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

‘Coloring’ parasite genes shows malaria’s weak spot Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to tag specific parasite genes with fluorescent colors to better track them throughout the parasite’s complicated life cycle. “It opens up a whole range of new experiments…” Microbiologists will now be able to more easily identify malaria’s weak spots, providing drug developers with new targets for anti-malaria drugs and stay ahead of the pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light-scattering tool peers into pancreas to find cancerPancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early because the pancreas is deep inside the abdomen, making potentially cancerous cells hard to reach and identify without surgery.
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Science | The Guardian

Millions of mysterious 'sea pickles' swamp US west coast Huge and unexplained bloom has fishers racing to save their nets, and scientists hurrying to study the rare animal A rare, tiny marine creature known as the “unicorn of the sea” has swarmed in its millions on the west coast of America, ruining fishermen’s nets and baffling scientists who are scrambling to find out more about them. Fishers along the west coast have told researchers that in some pl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study demonstrates a better way to store renewable energyIn an effort to find better ways to store renewable energy, physicists at the University of Arkansas, in collaboration with a scientist at the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, have shown that antiferroelectrics can provide high energy density. The findings may lead to storage devices that improve the efficiency of wind and solar power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fears of inter-generational tension between young and old are unfounded, according to a new studyResearchers at the University of Birmingham say that social, economic and demographic factors are generally pushing UK families together, rather than driving them apart along generational lines.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Searching for Signs of the Next Catastrophic QuakeGeophysicists are ramping up their efforts to monitor major undersea faults for movement with sea-floor sensors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Therapy for Everybody JOHNSON CITY, Tennessee—The first patient of the morning had been working 119 hours a week. Greta (not her real name) had been coming home late at night, skipping dinner, and crashing into bed. One recent night, her college-aged daughter melted down, telling an exhausted Greta that her parents’ marital tensions were putting a strain on her. “She’s like, ‘Why don’t you just divorce him?’” Greta re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stereotypes still affect females' career aspirations in STEM topicsMasculine stereotypes of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects corrupt the self-concept of female students and their career aspirations in such areas.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sphere Made to Redefine Kilogram Has Purest Silicon Ever CreatedNew measure, to take effect in 2018, relies on crystal that is free of impurities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Syddanske sygehuse vil betale for lægers efteruddannelseHospitalsledelserne i Region Syddanmark har truffet en pricipiel beslutning om, at læger på regionens hospitaler skal betale for lægernes efteruddanelse, så der opstår habilitetsproblemer.
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Wired

Don't Fall for the 'Memory' Pills Targeting Baby BoomersPrevagen is just one of many nootropics on the market, each aimed at a different kind of audience. And none of them have much science behind them.
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Wired

Art Fight! The Pinkest Pink Versus the Blackest BlackNanotube-based Vantablack was aimed at engineers. Then a famous sculptor locked it up—and the artistic community found this unpalatable.
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Wired

Brendan Fraser's Facebook Fan Page Is the Last Pure Place OnlineAgainst all odds, tens of thousands of Brendan Fraser fans on Facebook have carved out a kind place on the internet.
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Gizmodo

Confederate Group Fights For Possession of Time Capsule Found in Monument to Losers Confederate time capsule currently being fought over between the city of Orlando, Florida and a local chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy (News 6/Screenshot) In 1911, a monument was erected in Orlando, Florida in honor of the Confederate traitors who fought to uphold slavery in the South. This week that monument was moved from its prominent position (despite protests from local losers) to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most drivers could go electric within 10 yearsElectric and hybrid electric vehicles are in the fast lane to wider adoption, according to a new study by University of Michigan researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Underprivileged teenagers more likely to give up their university ambitionsEarly intervention to maintain and raise expectations could increase the number of teenagers from less privileged backgrounds entering higher education, finds a new study by the UCL Institute of Education (IOE).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Visualization of the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipseOn August 21, 2017, the Earth will cross the shadow of the moon, creating a total solar eclipse. Eclipses happen about every six months, but this one is special. For the first time in almost 40 years, the path of the moon's shadow passes through the continental United States. This visualization shows the Earth, moon, and sun at 17:05:40 UTC during the eclipse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plasmapheresis a potentially life-saving approach to veterinary immunotherapyThe power of plasmapheresis lies in its unequivocal speed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is human hibernation possible? Going to sleep for long duration spaceflightWe've spent a few articles on Universe Today talking about just how difficult it's going to be to travel to other stars. Sending tiny unmanned probes across the vast gulfs between stars is still mostly science fiction. But to send humans on that journey? That's just a level of technology beyond comprehension.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Koalas 'facing extinction' in some Australian statesThe conservation group WWF is warning that koalas could be wiped out in some Australian states amid deforestation and increasing attacks by livestock.
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Science | The Guardian

That time I made my mom guess the meaning of English expressions After Uganda’s president said he and Queen Elizabeth were ‘friends with mutual benefits’, I was inspired to investigate some other confusing idioms Uganda’s president, Yoweri Museveni, recently tweeted that he and Queen Elizabeth II were “friends with mutual benefits”. I sympathize: English expressions are confusing, some of them feel almost deliberately obscure – designed to exclude non-native s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calves conceived in winter perform betterCows and humans have something in common: If you take better care of the mother during pregnancy, her children are likely to be healthier – and this impact should last a lifetime, a University of Florida scientist says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proba-V images Portuguese forest fireESA's Proba-V minisatellite has captured the forest fire raging in central Portugal, revealing blackened scars and columns of smoke as well as pinpointing active fire hotspots.
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Ars Technica

Citrix isn’t just for telecommuting, Red Bull Racing uses it at the track Enlarge / Daniel Ricciardo of Red Bull Racing prepares for the 2017 Australian Grand Prix. (credit: Mark Thompson/Getty Images for Red Bull ) "Big Data" has been all the rage for the last few years. But the sport of Formula 1 racing caught that bug a long time ago, certainly in the days predating that buzzword. In the past, we've taken a look at how teams like Williams Martini Racing , Renault Sp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The astronaut's extra noseHow do we prevent astronauts in space from inhaling hazardous gases? A German-Norwegian hi-tech optical gas sensor provides a solution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian origin likely for iconic New Zealand treeAncestors of the iconic New Zealand Christmas Tree, Pōhutukawa, may have originated in Australia, new fossil research from the University of Adelaide suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California named state with the worst air quality (again)High ozone levels and a quickly growing population are making it tough to implement regulations to reduce pollution, says a Cal State LA professor.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Quick-Thinking AI Camera Mimics the Human BrainThe device will use artificial neurons and synapses to improve self-driving vehicle and drone performance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

‘Skrævende bus’ står bomstille: Nu rives testbanen nedEn gigantisk bus, der kunne skræve over den øvrige trafik, skulle have løst trængselsproblemer i verdens storbyer. Men nu samler bussen støv, og testbanen er ved at blive fjernet.
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Ingeniøren

Vestas lancerer ny serie af højtydende lavvinds-vindmøllerVindmølleproducentens nye serie af store landvindmøller på 4 MW egner sig ifølge Vestas til alt fra mere vindstille områder til områder med tyfoner og storme.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study assesses risk in a changing insurance market for driverless vehiclesIn October 2015, tax giant KPMG published a report projecting a 60 percent reduction in the $135 billion auto insurance market by 2040 owing to the advent of driverless cars and the ensuing risk landscape. Despite projections, insurers will likely play a key role in supporting the safe deployment, adoption and sustainability of driverless cars. The relatively unknown nature, likelihood and extent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could a dedicated mission to Enceladus detect microbial life there?Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is best known for its numerous geysers ejecting plumes of water and ice. These eruptive fountains perplex researchers searching for signs of microbial life beyond Earth. A dedicated spacecraft designed to study the plume-like features spewing from Enceladus could definitely tell us whether or not they contain alien microorganisms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Camera captures microscopic holograms at femtosecond speedsResearchers from ITMO University have built a setup for recording holograms of tiny objects like living cells at femtosecond speeds. The new method reconstructs the phase topography of a sample according to deformations that emerge in a laser pulse when it passes through the specimen. In comparison to electron microscopes, the device can visualize transparent biological structures without introduc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Frequent hot summers in Europe/west Asia and northeast Asia after the mid-1990sAfter the mid-1990s, the global surface temperature presented a significant warming trend. According to the World Meteorological Organization, the global mean surface temperature of the period from 2011 to 2015 has increased by 0.57° over the period from 1961 to 1990. This warming trend provides favorable background for occurrence of hot summers, and exacerbates extreme heat events. Based on stati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers review the state-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistryIn a recent Chemical Reviews article, Spanish researchers have published the first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemical search engines, named entity recognition and text mining systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vegetation phenology variability based on Tibetan Plateau tree-ring dataIn recent years, researchers have focused on how vegetation phenology on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Earth's largest surface area above 4000 m ASL, responds to rising temperatures. An increase in growth activity of high-elevation vegetation on the TP may have a considerable impact on the regional carbon budget.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm leads to a dramatic improvement in drug discovery methodsAntibiotics for treating particularly resistant diseases, molecules that block immune system overreactions, molecules that inhibit the growth of cancer cells by removing excess iron, molecules that may increase the digestion of fats: all these and more have been discovered in recent years using a unique computerized approach to solving particularly complex problems.
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Gizmodo

Jack Ma Predicts People Will Work Just 16 Hours Per Week by 2047 Donald Trump and Jack Ma, Chairman of Alibaba Group, speak to reporters following their meeting at Trump Tower, January 9, 2017 in New York City (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Jack Ma, the billionaire businessman and chairman of the Alibaba Group, believes that automation will help workers of the future enjoy more leisure time. In fact, he sees a future where people will be working just 16
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Live Science

Even Ugly Animals Can Win Hearts and Dollars for ConservationMust the money raised to save wildlife always aid the most popular animals? New research suggests that marketing can persuade donors that northern hairy-nosed wombat lives matter too.
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Science | The Guardian

Manchester gets NHS's first high-energy proton beam cancer therapy machine Ninety-tonne cyclotron at Christie hospital will give NHS patients access to treatment that is currently only available abroad A 90-tonne machine that will allow cancer patients to receive state-of-the-art high-energy proton beam therapy on the NHS for the first time is to be installed at a hospital in Manchester. The cyclotron delivers a special type of radiotherapy currently only available over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How serious is binge drinking among college students with disabilities?A new study finds that college students with disabilities binge drink more often than their non-disabled student peers. The study, providing the first picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities, is out today in Public Health Reports, a SAGE Publishing journal and the official journal of the Office of the US Surgeon General and the US Public Health Service.
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Dagens Medicin

Unik samling af 9.479 hjerner afskaffesVerdens måske største hjernesamling vil ikke blive flyttet med, når Aarhus Universitetshospital forlader det psykiatriske hospital i Risskov.
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The Atlantic

Congress Heads for a Showdown on Obamacare Health care warriors, saddle up! This promises to be a wild weekend on Capitol Hill—and for anyone with skin in the repeal-and-replace-Obamacare game. After days and weeks of breathless anticipation, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is set to release a “discussion draft” of his chamber’s version of the wildly controversial (read: unpopular) AHCA. To clarify: What McConnell’s dropping is n
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The Atlantic

Trump’s Immigration Allies Are Growing Frustrated With Him Twenty-one days after Election Day last November, Dan Stein, the president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, a group that supports reduced immigration, introduced a transition document to provide the newly elected president with guidance on immigration policy. It was their moment. FAIR had condemned the Obama administration’s immigration policy, and pushed for heightened border s
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The Atlantic

'We're Amending Obamacare. We're Not Killing It' The health-care bill Senate Republicans plan to unveil on Thursday likely will make substantial changes to Medicaid and cut taxes for wealthy Americans and businesses. It will eliminate mandates and relax regulations on insurance plans, and it will reduce the federal government’s role in health care. What it won’t do, however, is actually repeal the Affordable Care Act. Lost in the roiling debate
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The Atlantic

The Underrated Humor of Radiohead's OK Computer In Rolling Stone ’s recent cover story on the 20th anniversary of Radiohead’s OK Computer , singer Thom Yorke says that if he could go back to 1997 he’d tell his younger self to “lighten the fuck up.” But I don’t know—to listen to the newly reissued OK Computer is to be struck by the one aspect of the album that’s still somehow underrated: its humor. Yes, Radiohead is perhaps the modern pop-rock
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Livslang læring er svaret på fremtidens udfordringer Arbejdsmarked Efteruddannelse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Main forest fires in Portugal under control: officialThe main forest fires raging in Portugal since the weekend, which have killed more than 60 people, were brought under control on Thursday, the civil protection agency said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Census: US growing older and more racially diverseThe United States is growing older and more ethnically diverse, a trend that could put strains on government programs from Medicare to education, the Census Bureau reported Thursday.
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Dagens Medicin

Akutmodtagelser er hjertet i vores sygehuseSundhedsministeren til ledende sygeplejersker: Det er en klar ambition for regeringen, at de akutte patienter skal opleve en god og sammenhængende indsats af høj kvalitet på akutmodtagelserne i hele landet.
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Dagens Medicin

Regionerne bør betale efteruddannelse af lægerDer må ikke kunne stilles spørgsmålstegn ved lægernes habilitet.
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Ingeniøren

Festival-urin skal oplade gæsternes mobilerMikrobielle brændselsceller skal gøre urin til en energikilde på Glastonbury - Englands pendant til Roskilde Festival.
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Live Science

Blooming Beasts: Dinosaurs Are Coming Up Roses in AI ArtworkA programmer used artificial intelligence to create images of dinosaurs that were constructed entirely out of flowers.
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Live Science

Dinosaurs That Once Roamed Antarctica 'Live' Again in Exhibits and FilmCollaborations among paleontologists, museum exhibit developers and artists offer a glimpse of how Antarctic dinosaurs might have appeared in life.
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New Scientist - News

Volunteers teach AI to spot slavery sites from satellite imagesA crowdsourcing project is helping train a machine learning algorithm to identify possible sites of forced labour in South Asia from space
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Science : NPR

Republicans' Proposed Medicaid Cuts Would Hit Rural Patients Hard Hundreds of rural hospitals are on the brink of closing. The House Republican health plan drastically reduces one of their key sources of funding and the Senate bill is expected to do the same. (Image credit: Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media)
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Tinkers at the Edges of the Machinery of Death The U.S. Supreme Court’s latest term, which ended this week as the justices began their summer recess, saw death-penalty opponents achieve some notable victories even as the Court moved further away from abolishing capital punishment. In one of those wins Monday, the justices vacated an Alabama death-row inmate’s sentence after ruling the state had not given him adequate professional assistance t
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Dagens Medicin

Ny test kan spare kvinder med brystkræft for kemobehandlingKvinder med visse typer brystkræft kan fremover nøjes med antihormonbehandling fremfor et langt og krævende behandlingsforløb med kemoterapi.
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Dagens Medicin

Prognose for 2017: Nordsjællands Hospital mister trecifret millionbeløb Nordsjællands Hospital kommer formentlig ud af 2017 med et underskud på over 200 mio. kr. i DRG-takster
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Dagens Medicin

Kræftpakker stiller nye krav til praktiserende lægerPraktiserende læger kan i dag drage nytte af kræftpakkerne, men får samtidig flere kræftpatienter i deres praksis.
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Ingeniøren

Fra den teknologiske frontlinje: Teknologi kan løse byernes trafikproblemerDer er ingen tvivl om, at de største trafikale udfordringer er i vore byer. Det er her vi har den største trafik, og det er samtidig her vi har meget få muligheder for at udbygge infrastrukturen. Derfor et der i byerne brug for en strategisk anvendelse af ITS for at optimere anvendelsen af infra...
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor er bunden af havet så koldt?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor bunden af verdenshavene er tæt på frysepunktet, når Jorden er så varm i dybden. Det svarer lektor i klima- og geofysik på.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paracetamol during pregnancy can inhibit masculinityParacetamol during pregnancy can inhibit masculinityParacetamol during pregnancy can inhibit the development of 'male behavior' in mice. New research from the University of Copenhagen shows that it can reduce sex drive and aggressive behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at riskA study led by the University of Exeter Medical School which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are more likely to develop poorer mental health, as rated by parents and teachers.
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Ingeniøren

Førende ingeniør inden for selvkørende biler forlader Tesla uden varselFor en måned siden var det Ubers førstemand, der røg ud gennem porten.
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New Scientist - News

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearablesA small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Starvation looms as food runs out in drought-hit EthiopiaThe Somali people of Ethiopia's southeast have a name for the drought that has killed livestock, dried up wells and forced hundreds of thousands into camps: sima, which means "equalised".
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Dagens Medicin

Hospitalsansatte ønsker bedre samarbejde i kræftpakkeforløb på tværs af matrikler Sygehusansatte bakker op om kræftpakker, men efterlyser bedre samarbejde på tværs af matrikler og regioner, viser ny undersøgelse af tre kræftpakkeforløb.
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Ingeniøren

Milliarddyrt salg af vaccineproduktion kulegraves af landets skrappeste revisorerRigsrevisionen har fundet tilstrækkeligt mange bemærkelsesværdige forhold om frasalget af Statens Serum Instituts vaccineproduktion til at opgradere sin undersøgelse af forløbet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pakistani citizens gasp for clean airFurhan Hussain moved to Islamabad seeking fresher air, only to find Pakistan's leafy capital in a semi-permanent haze. Frustrated, he joined a vanguard of citizens monitoring pollution themselves amid a void in government data.
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