Gizmodo
Super Nintendo Classic Edition Arrives September 29th With 21 Games [Updated] After the insanely successful NES Classic Edition completely sold out until Nintendo inexplicably stopped making it , the company is following up with a miniature version of the Super Nintendo that will come bundled with 21 classic 16-bit games including Super Mario World and F-Zero . The SNES Classic Edition will include two controllers According to a tweet on the official Nintendo of America Tw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water exists as two different liquidsWe normally consider liquid water as disordered with the molecules rearranging on a short time scale around some average structure. Now, however, scientists at Stockholm University have discovered two phases of the liquid with large differences in structure and density. The results are based on experimental studies using X-rays, which are now published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sci
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Ars Technica
Plug-and-play SNES Classic coming Sept. 29 for $80 with two controllers [Updated] Update: In a statement provided to Polygon , Nintendo said it is not "providing specific numbers, but we will produce significantly more units of Super NES Classic Edition than we did of NES Classic Edition." The company said the new hardware will be produced at least through the end of 2017 and said "at this time, we have nothing to announce regarding any possible shipments beyond this year." Or
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Gizmodo
Without Chrono Trigger, the SNES Classic Is Just a Fancy Brick On Monday, Nintendo formally announced the feverishly-anticipated Super Nintendo Classic Edition , a miniature version of the beloved 16-bit console coming to stores this September. 21 well-chosen titles will be cooked into the device—with one critical omission. Chrono Trigger . Chrono motherfucking Trigger . The greatest Super Nintendo game (and arguably the greatest video game of all time) will
15min
Live Science
Amazon's Delivery Drones Could Take Off from Beehive-Like 'Airport'If Amazon's package-carrying drones ever become a reality, they may one day pick up deliveries from beehive-shaped buildings strategically placed in cities around the world, according to a patent application filed by the company.
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Gizmodo
The Senate Health Bill Really Is as Bad as You Imagined Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill in Washington. Image: AP Images The Senate’s health care bill proposal would mean 22 million fewer people would have health insurance, according to estimates from the Congressional Budget Office delivered on Monday . That projection is just about one million fewer than an earlier version of the bill passed by the House, which the Senate initi
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Live Science
Who Would Win a Human-vs.-Chimp Wrestling Match?In the most detailed study to date comparing the muscles of chimps and humans, researchers found that chimps are 1.35 times more powerful than people.
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New on MIT Technology Review
DNA Testing Reveals the Chance of Bad News in Your GenesFor healthy people, the value of genome sequencing is still unclear.
32min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Catch-22 Million Today in 5 Lines The Senate Republican health-care bill would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Senate Republicans also proposed a provision to the bill that would punish individuals who go without coverage with a six-month waiting period before regaining coverage. The Supreme Court announced it will review President Trump’s travel ban i
33min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Brown Family Is Looking To Snowbird To Lead Them Through This Crisis #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c WIth Ami's diagnosis still unknown, eldest son Matt and eldest daughter Snowbird find strength in one another. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https
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The Consequences of Sequencing Healthy PeopleThe first randomized trial to examine whole-genome sequencing in healthy people uncovers disease-causing genetic variants, but the overall benefits to this population are ambiguous.
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The Scientist RSS
Supreme Court Reinstates Trump Travel BanThe judges' decision allows exceptions that may permit scientists' travel from the blocked countries.
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Gizmodo
How to Post Instagram Photos From Your Mac Image credit: Justin Sullivan/ Getty Mac: Some of the most popular apps on your phone most likely have a web-friendly version. Facebook and Twitter both started on the web, after all. But Instagram is different, and not exactly web-friendly, which makes it a hassle if you prefer to edit your photos on your desktop ( large screens are still cool! ) instead of your phone. There is an Instagram app
57min
Ars Technica
Potential jurors call Shkreli evil, snake—one blamed him for EpiPen price Enlarge / BROOKLYN, NY - Monday, June 26, 2017: Martin Shkreli arrives at Brooklyn Federal Court on the first day of his securities fraud trial. (credit: Getty | Kevin Hagen ) Martin Shkreli appeared in a New York federal court Monday for the start of his securities fraud trial—and was quickly declared guilty of price gouging by potential jurors. Shkreli is facing eight counts of securities and w
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Popular Science
Aura uses artificial intelligence to deliver personalized meditations Sponsored Post Get lifetime coaching via your smartphone for under $60. Aura uses artificial intelligence to deliver personalized meditations. Get lifetime coaching via your smartphone for under $60. Read on.
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Wired
Super NES Classic Edition Goes On Sale Sept 29 for $80, Includes 26 Classic Nintendo GamesPlay all your favorite classic games, from Super Mario World to Mega Man X.
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The Atlantic
‘We Have to Have a Massive Revolution in Public Education in the United States’ Over the last four decades, the percentage of Americans who are solidly in the middle class has shrunk, from 61 to 50 percent, according to the Pew Research Center . Some of those who have left the middle class are doing better, and others are doing worse. As the Washington Post columnist Robert Samuelson put it , “The extremes grow at the expense of the center.” The Harvard professor and filmmak
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Ars Technica
We desperately need a way to defend against online propaganda Enlarge / Would you get your Internet from this van? (credit: Bobotech - Know Your Meme ) We've learned something from the investigation into whether Russia meddled in the US election that has nothing to do with politics. Humans are more vulnerable than ever to propaganda, and we have no clue what to do about it. Social media as weapon A new report in The Washington Post reveals that the Obama ad
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Wired
You Can Get Your Whole Genome Sequenced. But Should You?Having a gene for a rare disease might not give you symptoms. But it could beef up your medical bills.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A skull with history: A fossil sheds light on the origin of the neocortexAccording to a recent study an early relative of mammals already possessed an extraordinarily expanded brain with a neocortex-like structure.
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Gizmodo
NASA: You Could Probably Make Wine In Space As humanity expands to become a multi-planetary species, some important questions must be considered: Can we bring cats? What about dogs? Also, can we make wine in space? Thankfully, some scientists are hard at work answering the first two questions—and now, a scientist from NASA’s Vegetable Production System called “Veggie” says space viticulture might be possible with the right technology and a
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Gizmodo
These Finches Have a Brilliant Strategy For Fighting Off Ticks Image: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren /Flickr/Ryan F. Mandelbaum Everyone is talking about ticks this year, for good reason: This year’s tick forecast is especially bad . But humans aren’t the only ones worried about the horrible little buggers. It seems like at least one bird species safeguards its nests against ticks with a surprising piece of litter. Cigarette butts. Scientists have long known
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Science : NPR
Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared A study of whole genome sequencing found that while many people discovered genetic variations linked to rare diseases, they didn't overreact to the news. (Image credit: Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive)
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The Atlantic
Were Seattle's Minimum-Wage Hikes Too Extreme or Just Right? Seattle’s decision to hike its minimum wage up to $13 an hour—on its way to $15—ended up costing its low-wage workers time on the job, hundreds of dollars of annual income, and a shot at a better livelihood. That is a reasonable conclusion one could draw from a blockbuster, if not yet peer-reviewed, new study on the city’s famed minimum-wage increases. The research, performed by a group of academ
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The Atlantic
The Highest Form of Disagreement For Joshua Johnson, the host of 1A, an NPR talk show inspired by the First Amendment, Americans can better thrive despite their differences and disagreements by taking inspiration from the courageous lead character in a modern classic. “In Westside story, our Romeo, Tony, intervenes in a fight between two gangs who are literally ready to rumble with an all out, knock down, drag out, winner-takes-
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Gizmodo
Goodbye Gchat, Hello Chaos A chat client, in my experience, needs to do one thing besides facilitate a text exchange between two or more parties: It needs to inform you whether someone is or is not available to send and receive such messages. Gchat used to do that fairly well—in a small box of frequent contacts, it displayed which of your past chat partners were available (with a green dot), inactive (with a yellow dot), b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin cell model advances study of genetic mutation linked to heart disease, stroke riskUsing a new skin cell model, researchers have overcome a barrier that previously prevented the study of living tissue from people at risk for early heart disease and stroke. This research could lead to a new understanding of disease progression in aortic aneurysm -- ballooning of the large artery in the chest that carries blood from the heart to the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene mutation linked to retinitis pigmentosa in Southwestern US Hispanic familiesThirty-six percent of Hispanic families in the U.S. with a common form of retinitis pigmentosa got the disease because they carry a mutation of the arrestin-1 gene, according to a new study from researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Characterizing the mouse genome reveals new gene functions and their role in human diseaseThe first results from a functional genetic catalogue of the laboratory mouse has been shared with the biomedical research community, revealing new insights into a range of rare diseases and the possibility of accelerating development of new treatments and precision medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
System of quadcopters that fly and drive suggest another approach to developing flying carsBeing able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature many birds, insects, and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: Imagine machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren't near roads and then squeeze through tight spaces on the ground to transport objects or rescue people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Panda love spreads to benefit the planetLoving pandas isn't just a feel-good activity. Recent work shows China's decades of defending panda turf have been good not just for the beloved bears, but also protects habitat for other valuable plants and animals, boosts biodiversity and fights climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moisture-responsive 'robots' crawl with no external power sourceUsing an off-the-shelf camera flash, researchers turned an ordinary sheet of graphene oxide into a material that bends when exposed to moisture. They then used this material to make a spider-like crawler and claw robot that move in response to changing humidity without the need for any external power.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rising seas could result in 2 billion refugees by 2100In the year 2100, 2 billion people -- about one-fifth of the world's population -- could become climate change refugees due to rising ocean levels. Those who once lived on coastlines will face displacement and resettlement bottlenecks as they seek habitable places inland, according to new research.
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The Atlantic
How CRISPR Yanked Jennifer Doudna Out of the Ivory Tower Jennifer Doudna remembers a moment when she realized how important CRIPSR—the gene-editing technique that she co-discovered—was going to be. It was in 2014, and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur had contacted Sam Sternberg, a biochemist who was then working in Doudna’s lab. Sternberg met with the entrepreneur in a Berkeley cafe, and she told him, with what he later described to Doudna as “a very brig
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The Atlantic
Senate Bill Would Leave 22 Million More Uninsured, CBO Finds Updated on June 26 at 6:03 p.m. ET The Senate Republican health-care bill would increase the ranks of the uninsured by 22 million over a decade, the Congressional Budget Office found on Monday in an analysis that could determine the proposal’s fate on Capitol Hill. The CBO’s highly-anticipated report projected just a slight difference in impact between the measure that GOP Senate leaders wrote in
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The Atlantic
Sasha Velour and Drag's Permanent Revolution If you’re ever in need of perspective on whether our society is in true upheaval or if we’re only experiencing the same cultural battles that have raged forever, old Geraldo clips on YouTube will always offer some clarity. Recently I found myself binging on the talk show’s coverage of “club kids,” a scene of 1990s New York City partiers who wore fantastical and frequently gender-bending outfits.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Limited Travel Ban Victory The Trump administration finally got some good news from a federal court Monday. In the twin cases challenging the president’s executive order barring entry into the U.S. by nationals of six majority Muslim countries, the Supreme Court handed the government a genuine but very partial victory, with a hint of more to come. But the victory was limited in a way that anyone who has ever been 12 years
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Gizmodo
How to Install the iOS 11 Public Beta (If You Dare) Image: Apple / Gizmodo Apple just launched the iOS 11 public beta for the whole world to try, and holy heck, don’t get too excited yet. Obviously, your iPhone or iPad will be cooler than all your friends’ are if you’re running the new software before any of them. There will be consequences, though. First off, not all Apple devices will run iOS 11. You’ll need an iPhone 5s or newer, a 5th generati
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Live Science
Babies Retain Their Early Exposure to Foreign LanguagesKorean adoptees to the Netherlands recalled the sounds of their native tongue.
1h
New Scientist - News
Chimps are not as superhumanly strong as we thought they wereWe sacrificed strength for endurance after our split from other apes, but it turns out our muscles are only a third weaker than those of our ape cousins
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early antiretroviral therapy linked with bone loss in patients with HIVCurrent HIV treatment guidelines now recommend initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the time of diagnosis. However, a new study has found that such early ART causes greater bone loss compared with deferring ART.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rapidly mapping the 'social networks' of proteinsScientists improved upon a classic approach to mapping the interactions between proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insomnia medication may wake up some patients from vegetative stateA systematic review of zolpidem for noninsomnia neurological disorders, including movement disorders and disorders of consciousness, finds reason for additional research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ten million tons of fish wasted every year despite declining fish stocksIndustrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tons of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool to identify and control neuronsOne of the big challenges in the neuroscience field is to understand how connections and communications trigger our behavior. Researchers have now developed a tool to identify and control neurons. The new technique, called Calcium and Light-Induced Gene Handling Toolkit or 'Cal-Light,' allows researchers to observe and manipulate the neural activities underlying behavior with never-before-seen spe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydraulic fracturing rarely linked to felt seismic tremorsHydraulic fracturing and saltwater disposal has limited impact on seismic events, research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting future outcomes in the natural worldWhen pesticides and intentional fires fail to eradicate an invasive plant species, declaring biological war may be the best option, say researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaosScientists have reconstructed in detail the collapse of the Eurasian ice sheet at the end of the last ice age. The big melt wreaked havoc across the European continent, driving home the original Brexit 10,000 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Septic systems are a major source of emerging contaminants in drinking waterA new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health concerns since many of these chemicals, once discharged, end up in groundw
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool offers snapshots of neuron activityA team of MIT and Stanford University researchers has developed a way to label neurons when they become active, essentially providing a snapshot of their activity at a moment in time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Septic systems are a major source of emerging contaminants in drinking waterA new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study, published June 15 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health conc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arp 299: Galactic GoulashWhat would happen if you took two galaxies and mixed them together over millions of years? A new image including data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory reveals the cosmic culinary outcome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California's giant water tunnels win first crucial approvalU.S. wildlife officials gave crucial first approval Monday to California Gov. Jerry Brown's decades-old ambitions to build two massive tunnels that would re-engineer the water system in the nation's most populous state.
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Wired
The Supreme Court Turns Trump's Travel Ban Into a Refugee BanThe Supreme Court partly lifted the injunction against President Trump's travel ban, leaving tech workers and academics largely in the clear.
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Wired
Social Networks May One Day Diagnose Disease - But at a CostOpinion: Posts on social media could indicate medical conditions before people know they're sick.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brains evolved to need exerciseMounting scientific evidence shows that exercise is good not only for our bodies, but for our brains. Yet, exactly why physical activity benefits the brain is not well understood. Researchers suggest that the link between exercise and the brain is a product of our evolutionary history and our past as hunter-gatherers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Where are the new therapies for heart disease?Despite dramatic reductions in the death rate from cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, it remains the leading causes of death, and experts have expressed concern that the number of new therapies coming to market has lagged.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A little place for my stuff: How big bacteria can grow depends on how much fat they can makeJust as people endlessly calculate how to upsize or downsize, bacteria continually adjust their volume (their stuff) to fit inside their membrane (their space). But what limits their expansion? The answer will surprise you.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pulling the tablecloth out from under essential metabolismMost organisms share the biosynthetic pathways for making crucial nutrients because it is is dangerous to tinker with them. But now a collaborative team of scientists has caught plants in the process of altering where and how cells make an essential amino acid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Premature infants at greater risk of SIDSPremature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home.
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Ars Technica
Turkey pulls evolution from its high school curriculum Enlarge / A young Charles Darwin, before evolution had caused any public controversy. (credit: National Library of Medicine ) In the US, opponents of evolution have tried to undercut instruction on the topic by suggesting schools should "teach the controversy." The national education authorities in Turkey, however, have decided that teachers should avoid any hint of controversy in the classroom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
French PM says ban on 'bee-killer' pesticide will go aheadFrench Prime Minister Edouard Philippe weighed in on a row between his environment and agriculture ministers on Monday to rule that a pesticide found harmful to bees would be banned in 2018 as scheduled.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US mayors back plan for cities to use only renewable energyA bipartisan group of mayors from across the country unanimously backed an ambitious commitment for U.S. cities to run entirely on renewable sources such as wind and solar in two decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greenland now a major driver of rising seas: studyOcean levels rose 50 percent faster in 2014 than in 1993, with meltwater from the Greenland ice sheet now supplying 25 percent of total sea level increase compared with just five percent 20 years earlier, researchers reported Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alaska Air offers charter flight for solar eclipse viewingAlaska Airlines said Monday it will charter a flight over the Pacific Ocean this Aug. 21 so select passengers can view the astronomical event from the sky.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to produce own TV series, gamesFacebook is starting production on high-quality television series and gaming shows to be broadcast on its platform, one of the social media giant's executives said on Monday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study links hot flashes with depressionWith age comes a greater risk of depression, especially in women. With 15% of the female population in the US being 65 or older, and the number expected to double in the next 50 years, there is a major focus on age-related disorders, including depression. A new study published in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), documents an association between hot flashes and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's disease risk linked to a network of genes associated with myeloid cellsMount Sinai researchers find this network central to Alzheimer's disease susceptibility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism shown to reverse disease in arteriesA certain immune reaction is the key, not to slowing atherosclerosis like cholesterol-lowering drugs do, but instead to reversing a disease that gradually blocks arteries to cause heart attacks and strokes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Belief in free will predicts criminal punishment support, disapproval of unethical actionsIn countries with transparent governments and low levels of corruption, the belief in free will—that is, believing that people's outcomes are tied to choices and personal responsibility—predicts someone's intolerance of unethical behavior along with a greater desire to see criminals harshly punished for their actions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimpanzee 'super strength' and what it might mean in human muscle evolutionSince at least the 1920s, anecdotes and some studies have suggested that chimpanzees are "super strong" compared to humans, implying that their muscle fibers, the cells that make up muscles, are superior to humans.
2h
Wired
iOS 11: Superhuman Siri, Drag and Drop, a Totally Remodeled App StoreAll the new features available on iOS 11 beta.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Live Q&A: How to Discuss Your Research Plan With a Mentor As a trainee in science, one of the most important areas on which to get feedback is on your research plan. (Here we mean your overall project plan, not the to-do list for the next couple of weeks of lab work.) No matter where you are in your project--just starting to design a research question, or already years into your project--getting constructive criticism from your mentor on your direction,
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NYT > Science
The Lab Says It’s Cancer. But Sometimes the Lab Is Wrong.Thousands of patients may receive incorrect cancer diagnoses each year because of biopsy mix-ups. New technology can help prevent the mistakes — if pathologists adopt it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team creates better 'fingerprints' to detect elusive, valuable chemical compoundsImagine being able to see the entire Statue of Liberty and a small ant on its nose simultaneously. The drastic difference in size between the two objects would seem to render this task impossible.
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The Atlantic
No Mixed-Gender Prayer Space at the Western Wall The Israeli government suspended its plans to create a space where men and women can pray together at the Western Wall, in a move critics say will deepen the divide between Jews in Israel and those in the diaspora. The decision marks a reversal of the government’s approval in 2016 of a plan to create a mixed-gender section where members of non-Orthodox traditions could hold egalitarian prayer ser
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Ars Technica
Regulators suggest $7.5 billion coal gasifier facility give up, burn natural gas Enlarge / Cranes stand at the construction site for Southern Co.’s Kemper County power plant near Meridian, Mississippi, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014. Photographer: Gary Tramontina/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Getty Images ) A coal gasification plant in development in Mississippi is more than $4 billion over budget and years past deadline—and now it may have to rethink plans to burn gas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repairWhile doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It's a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to see with the naked eye. And, to Tang's amazement, if cut in half it can heal itself into two healthy cells.
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Gizmodo
Tom Holland Confirms That Peter Parker Appeared in Iron Man 2 (UPDATED) This is Peter Parker in Iron Man 2. Image: Disney For years, it was one of the better fan theories out there, and now it’s confirmed to be true: Peter Parker was in Iron Man 2 . “It is Peter Parker,” Spider-Man: Homecoming star Tom Holland told The Huffington Post . He’s referring to a moment near the end of Iron Man 2 when a young boy wearing an Iron Man mask at the Stark Expo stands up to Hamme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air pollution casts shadow over solar energy productionGlobal solar energy production is taking a major hit due to air pollution and dust. The first study of its kind shows airborne particles and their accumulation on solar cells is cutting energy output by more than 25 percent in certain parts of the world. The regions hardest hit are also those investing the most in solar energy installations -- China, India and the Arabian Peninsula.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
2-D material's traits could send electronics R&D spinning in new directionsResearchers created an atomically thin material and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as 'spintronics.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biodiversity loss from deep-sea mining will be unavoidableBiodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of scientists, economists and lawyers argue. They say the International Seabed Authority, which is responsible for regulating undersea mining in areas outside national jurisdictions, must recognize the risk and communicate it clearly to member states and the public to spur discussions as to whe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A little place for my stuff: How big bacteria can grow depends on how much fat they can makeIn his classic comedy routine, "A Place for your Stuff," George Carlin argues that the whole point of life is to find an appropriately sized space for the things you own. What holds for people is also true for bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel platform uses nanoparticles to detect peanut allergiesResearchers have developed a novel platform to more accurately detect and identify the presence and severity of peanut allergies, without directly exposing patients to the allergen, according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glycans as biomarkers for cancer?Glycosylated proteins are often overexpressed in tumor cells and thus could serve as tumor markers, especially those with the interesting molecule sialic acid as their sugar moiety. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists now report on a bioorthogonal labeling test for sialylated glycoproteins based on a glycoproteomics approach. This assay not only assesses the level of sialylated g
2h
Live Science
Puppy Love! How Baby Animal Photos Could Help Your MarriagePhotos of cute animals or with other pleasant images may help people to see their partners in a more positive light.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Peanut family secret for making chemical building blocks revealedThe peanut and its kin -- legumes -- have not one, but two ways to make the amino acid tyrosine. That might seem small, but why this plant family has a unique way to make such an important chemical building block is a mystery that extends back to the 1960s.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vinegar: A cheap and simple way to help plants fight droughtResearchers have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. The study reports a newly discovered biological pathway that is activated in times of drought. By working out the details of this pathway, scientists were able to induce greater tolerance for drought-like conditions simply by growing plants in vinegar.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regular brisk walks and a daily longer one help lower office workers' blood lipidsTaking 2-minute brisk walks every 30 minutes and a half-hour walk each day reduces blood lipid levels when measured in response to a meal consumed around 24 hours after starting the activity, research shows for the first time.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzee 'super strength' and what it might mean in human muscle evolutionFor years, anecdotes and some studies have suggested that chimpanzees are 'super strong' compared to humans, implying that their muscle fibers are superior to humans'. Now a research team including a UMass Amherst kinesiologist reports that contrary to this belief, chimp muscles' maximum dynamic force and power output is just about 1.35 times higher than human muscle of similar size, a difference
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultra-compact phase modulators based on graphene plasmonsICFO researchers achieve light phase modulation with a footprint 30 times smaller than the light wavelength.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA researchers: Brains evolved to need exerciseMounting scientific evidence shows that exercise is good not only for our bodies, but for our brains. Yet, exactly why physical activity benefits the brain is not well understood. In a new article published in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, University of Arizona researchers suggest that the link between exercise and the brain is a product of our evolutionary history and our past as hunter-ga
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why social isolation can bring a greater risk of illnessSocial isolation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, leads to sleep loss, which in turn leads to cellular stress and the activation of a defense mechanism called the unfolded protein response.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
What happens when you're sleep deprived?A new study is looking at the impact of sleep on your brain power.
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Ars Technica
Skylake, Kaby Lake chips have a crash bug with hyperthreading enabled Enlarge / A Kaby Lake desktop CPU, not that you can tell the difference in a press shot. (credit: Intel ) Under certain conditions, systems with Skylake or Kaby Lake processors can crash due to a bug that occurs when hyperthreading is enabled. Intel has fixed the bug in a microcode update, but until and unless you install the update, the recommendation is that hyperthreading be disabled in the sy
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Live Science
A Bizarre New Form of Liquid Water Is DiscoveredLiquid water isn't just one simple form ― it's actually two forms that convert between each other, new X-ray images reveal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The beach time capsuleAnd to think it was all right there in her garage. A load of boxes pulled from a biologist's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Readily available drug cocktail can help prevent sepsis shock and deathEven in advanced medical settings, sepsis is still very dangerous and accounts for over 400,000 deaths annually in the US alone. While new drugs are in development, a group of researchers has determined that a combination of intravenous vitamin C, corticosteroids (a steroid), and thiamine (vitamin B) may be effective in preventing progressive organ dysfunction and reducing the number of deaths fro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shining light on brain cells that coordinate movementA technique for inserting a gene into specific cell types in the adult brain can be used to alter the function of brain circuits and change behaviors in an animal model. The method will allow scientists to better understand what roles certain cell types play in the brain's complex circuitry. Researchers hope the approach might someday lead to developing treatments for conditions like epilepsy that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Greater muscle strength, better cognitive function for older peopleGreater muscle strength is associated with better cognitive function in ageing men and women, according to a new study. The association of extensively measured upper and lower body muscle strength with cognitive function was observed, but handgrip strength was not associated with cognitive function.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repairIn an effort to understand how single cells heal, mechanical engineer Sindy Tang developed a microscopic guillotine that efficiently cuts cells in two. Learning more about single-cell wound repair could lead to self-healing materials and machines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glycans as biomarkers for cancer?Glycosylated proteins are often overexpressed in tumor cells and thus could serve as tumor markers, especially those with the interesting molecule sialic acid as their sugar moiety. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists now report on a bioorthogonal labeling test for sialylated glycoproteins based on a glycoproteomics approach. This assay not only assesses the level of sialylated g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research could help humans see what nature hidesThings are not always as they appear. New visual perception research at The University of Texas at Austin, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains the natural limits of what humans can see and how to find what nature hides.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Belief in free will predicts criminal punishment support, disapproval of unethical actionsIn countries with transparent governments and low levels of corruption, the belief in free will -- that is, believing that people's outcomes are tied to choices and personal responsibility -- predicts someone's intolerance of unethical behavior along with a greater desire to see criminals harshly punished for their actions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Exposure to light causes emotional and physical responses in migraine sufferersThis research found that light makes migraine headaches more painful and induces negative emotions and unpleasant physical sensations. Laboratory studies identify previously unknown connections between nerve cells in the eye and neurons in the brain that regulate physiological, autonomic, endocrine and emotional responses. These findings offer promising path forward for researchers in treatment of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer model simulates sense of touch from the entire handNeuroscientists from the University of Chicago have developed a computer model that can simulate the response of nerves in the hand to any pattern of touch stimulation on the skin. The tool reconstructs the response of more than 12,500 nerve fibers with millisecond precision, taking into account the mechanics of the skin as it presses up against and moves across objects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hunting microbes or smelling poison: A matter of evolutionMammals possess several lines of defense against microbes. One of them is activated when receptors called Fprs bind to specific molecules that are linked to pathogens. The same receptors are also present in the nose of mice, probably to detect contaminated food or sick conspecifics. Researchers from the University of Geneva describe in the journal PNAS how Fprs have acquired this olfactory role du
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Formation of artificial cells with a skeletal support reinforcement to withstand application realizedA research group of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Keio University and Tohoku University have successfully developed an artificial cytoskeletal structure for cell models (liposomes or artificial cells) using DNA nanotechnology, and demonstrated that liposomes with the cytoskeletal structure were almost as strong as living cells.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How AI helped auction off $19 billion worth of radio spectrumMobile phone carriers scooped up airwaves no longer needed by television broadcasters last March in a $19 billion auction designed by UBC and Stanford University researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could this strategy bring high-speed communications to the deep sea?A new strategy for sending acoustic waves through water could potentially open up the world of high-speed communications to divers, marine research vessels, remote ocean monitors, deep sea robots, and submarines. By taking advantage of the dynamic rotation generated as the acoustic wave travels, also known as its orbital angular momentum, Berkeley Lab researchers were able to pack more channels on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could humans ever regenerate a heart? A new study suggests the answer is 'yes'A new study's findings point to potential for tweaking communication between human genes and advancing our ability to treat heart conditions and stimulate regenerative healing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thwarting metastasis by breaking cancer's legs with gold rodsYour cancer has metastasized. No one wants to ever hear that. Now researchers have developed a method to thwart cell migration and thus halt metastasis in vitro. In past tests in vivo, the treatment has wiped out tumors with no observable signs of toxicity or recurrence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New class of 'soft' semiconductors could transform HD displaysNew research by Berkeley Lab scientists could help usher in a new generation of high-definition displays, optoelectronic devices, photodetectors, and more. They have shown that a class of 'soft' semiconductors can be used to emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The work could challenge quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semicon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dementia patients may die sooner if family caregivers are mentally stressedPatients with dementia may actually die sooner if their family caregivers are mentally stressed, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists in Limbo as US Supreme Court Allows Modified Travel BanJustices overturn lower court rulings on policy targeting people from six majority-Muslim countries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Who Gets to Use Facebook's Rainbow 'Pride' Reaction? James Berri traveled three hours to Sacramento earlier this month for his first Pride parade, one of hundreds of annual LGBTQ celebrations across America. Berri also talked about the experience on Facebook, reading and reacting to other people’s posts with thumbs-up likes and Facebook’s new rainbow “Pride” emoji. Throughout June, the platform is offering a rainbow flag alongside likes, hearts, an
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The Atlantic
The Compounded Pain of Contamination and Dislocation EAST CHICAGO—Until Carmencita Robinson received a letter last July stating that her public housing complex would need to be evacuated due to toxic levels of lead and arsenic in the soil, she’d had no idea she’d been living on contaminated land for nearly a decade. “I felt betrayed,” she said. “They knew that there was lead, and they misled the families that were there because they continuously ac
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Dagens Medicin
De fremskridtsfjendtlige praktiserende lægerDet er ejendommeligt, at man ikke har kunnet skabe et mere sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen. Det er mere kompliceret, end Jørgen Grønnegaard Christensen forestiller sig. Men prøv engang at kigge på Fanø.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate how some genes evolved from an immune function to an olfactory role in some mammalsMammals possess several lines of defense against microbes. One of them is activated when receptors called Fprs, which are present on immune cells, bind to specific molecules that are linked to pathogens. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, showed in 2009 that these same receptors were also present in the nose of mice, probably to detect contaminated food or to avoid sick
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Formation of artificial cells with a skeletal support reinforcement to withstand application realizedA research group of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Keio University and Tohoku University have successfully developed an artificial cytoskeletal structure for cell models (liposomes or artificial cells) using DNA nanotechnology, and demonstrated that liposomes with the cytoskeletal structure were almost as strong as living cells.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How AI helped auction off $19 billion worth of radio spectrumMobile phone carriers scooped up airwaves no longer needed by television broadcasters last March in a $19-billion auction designed by UBC and Stanford University researchers.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds way to pack more data in single acoustic beam for underwater communicationsA new strategy for sending acoustic waves through water could potentially open up the world of high-speed communications activities underwater, including scuba diving, remote ocean monitoring, and deep-sea exploration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could humans ever regenerate a heart? A new study suggests the answer is 'yes'When Mark Martindale decided to trace the evolutionary origin of muscle cells, like the ones that form our hearts, he looked in an unlikely place: the genes of animals without hearts or muscles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New class of 'soft' semiconductors could transform HD displaysA new type of semiconductor may be coming to a high-definition display near you. Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that a class of semiconductor called halide perovskites is capable of emitting multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animals, not drought, shaped our ancestors' environmentThe shores of Lake Turkana, in Kenya, are dry and inhospitable, with grasses as the dominant plant type. It hasn't always been that way. Over the last four million years, the Omo-Turkana basin has seen a range of climates and ecosystems, and has also seen significant steps in human evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbe mystery solved: What happened to the Deepwater Horizon oil plumeThe Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 is one of the most studied spills in history, yet scientists haven't agreed on the role of microbes in eating up the oil. Now a research team at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has identified all of the principal oil-degrading bacteria as well as their mechanisms for chewing up the many di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Messages with moral-emotional words are more likely to go viral on social mediaTweets about political topics that include moral and emotional language are more likely to spread within the ideological networks of the sender, a team of researchers has found. Its study, which examined Twitter messages related to gun control, climate change, and same-sex marriage, points to both the potential and limits of communicating on social media.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Curtain system creates soundproofed office spaces in open floor plansAnyone who has worked in an office with an open floor plan becomes aware of a major downside of these otherwise collaborative spaces: It is impossible to hold confidential meetings with colleagues—or even make a personal phone call to schedule a dentist appointment in your office.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Have Finally Figured Out Why Chimps Are So Damn Strong Illustration by Sam Woolley Humans may have big, bulbous brains, but when it comes to pure muscle power, we’re often considered the weakest of the great apes. Even chimpanzees, who are significantly smaller than us, exhibit levels of strength that are practically super-human by our standards. New research shows the degree to which our primate cousins are stronger than us—and why their tiny bodies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel platform uses nanoparticles to detect peanut allergiesA team of chemical and biomolecular engineers at the University of Notre Dame have developed a novel platform to more accurately detect and identify the presence and severity of peanut allergies, without directly exposing patients to the allergen.
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NYT > Science
The Solution for Skin Ailments Could Be Right Under Your NoseWhile bacteria has long been associated with disorders like acne and eczema, scientists are now fighting back with friendly members of the skin’s microbiome.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mitochondria targeting anti-tumor compoundThe compound folic acid-conjugated methyl-BETA-cyclodextrin (FA-M-BETA-CyD) has significant antitumor effects on folate receptor-ALPHA-expressing (FR-ALPHA (+)) cancer cells, researchers have found. The compound significantly reduced ATP production while simultaneously increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Side effects in animal models were minimal but further testing is still requi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuron-integrated nanotubes to repair nerve fibersA new study sheds light on the properties of nanostructures capable of ensuring an effective integration with nerve cells, an essential quality for developing innovative systems targeting the repair of neuronal damages, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot cities spell bad news for beesCommon wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase, a new research study concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treating Lyme disease: When do symptoms resolve in children?Researchers in infectious disease examined how quickly Lyme disease symptoms typically resolve in children, a question that has received little prior study.
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Wired
T.J. Miller May Hate Silicon Valley, But He Talks Like a FounderHumblebrags, save-the-world aspirations, and sail-related sports hobbies? Yup, sounds like a founder to us.
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Ars Technica
Without telling media, Arizona judge orders dozens of articles to be deleted Enlarge (credit: Arizona Cardinals ) In 2013, Megan Welter had a really bad night. Welter, at that time a cheerleader for the Arizona Cardinals, got into a drunken fight with her boyfriend. It ended with her calling 911 and reporting him for domestic violence. Welter's boyfriend was a professional fighter, who "smashed [her] head into the tile" and put her in a "choke hold with his legs," she tol
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why Waymo’s Partnership with Avis Makes SenseAlphabet’s autonomous-driving division doesn’t care for auto maintenance, while rental firms are keen to find purpose as the model of car ownership changes.
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Popular Science
A third of marine megafauna died in a mass extinction that we didn’t even know about Animals Ancient climate change was to blame. Almost all of the species that have ever existed are now extinct—why should swimming sloths be any more important than the rest? Here's why.
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The Atlantic
How Will Silicon Valley Work Without T.J. Miller? If you watched Sunday night’s fourth-season finale of Silicon Valley without reading the accompanying online chatter, you might not have realized that it marked the final appearance of one of its most beloved characters, Erlich Bachman (played by the comedian T.J. Miller). On a mission to retrieve the tech CEO Gavin Belson (Matt Ross) from his retreat at a Tibetan monastery, Erlich gets waylaid a
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The Atlantic
Is East Chicago the Next Flint? Demetra Turner and her family moved into the West Calumet Public Housing Complex in East Chicago, Indiana in May 2016. A month later, she found out she would have to evacuate her new home due to extremely elevated levels of lead and arsenic in the soil and water. It turned out the public housing complex was sitting on top of a Superfund site, one of the most toxic in the country. East Chicago is
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The Atlantic
Is ISIS More Violent During Ramadan? As Muslims observe Eid al-Fitr, the three-day festival marking the end of Ramadan, they celebrate the completion of a monthlong period of fasting, self-reflection, and spiritual renewal. It also marks the end of a holy month marred by several tragedies, from the attack in London that killed eight people to the blast that killed 17 people at an ice cream shop in Baghdad. Such violence during Ramad
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where are the new therapies for heart disease?Despite dramatic reductions in the death rate from cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, it remains the leading causes of death, and experts have expressed concern that the number of new therapies coming to market has lagged.
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Ars Technica
Murder charges for doc who prescribed alleged “horrifyingly excessive” opioids Enlarge / Pills. (credit: Getty | smartstock ) An Oklahoma doctor is facing five counts of second-degree murder charges following the opioid overdose deaths of her patients. Prosecutors charged osteopathic physician Regan Ganoung Nichols, 57, on Friday in Oklahoma County District Court. Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter told reporters that Nichols prescribed trusting patients a “ horrifyingly
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Gizmodo
Oscar Mayer Made a Drone to Rain Hot Dogs Down on Humanity GIF As is currently en vogue for any company making a product that ends up in consumers’ hands, Oscar Mayer is expanding its Weinermobile fleet with a phallic flying drone that can (supposedly) drop a single hot dog on someone not too worried about what they’re eating. If Silicon Valley had its way, we’d only eat things that fell from the sky. The drone itself appears to be a custom creation, wei
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The Atlantic
U.S. Company Discontinues the Siding Used on the Grenfell Tower Every high-rise building in London the U.K. government has tested for combustible siding has failed the safety test, the government said Monday, bringing the total to 75. The tests, which are focused on the buildings’ exteriors, were ordered after the Grenfell Tower caught fire earlier this month and killed 79 people. News of the widespread failures has angered the public, and it prompted Arconic
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The Atlantic
A New Penalty for the Uninsured in the GOP Health-Care Bill Republicans are trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act’s mandate forcing nearly all Americans to pay a tax if they don’t have health insurance. But they’ve just proposed a new penalty of their own for people who go without coverage: a six-month waiting period. Under a provision added Monday to the Senate GOP’s health-care bill, an individual who is uninsured for more than 63 days would have to
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Popular Science
Bacteria in the sky may help to make it rain Science Here's how they do it. Certain bacteria can cause water to freeze into ice, in turn making it rain. But just how much do these tiny organisms contribute to our annual rainfall?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Lack of sleep + spat with spouse = potential health problemsA lack of sleep can certainly lead to crankiness and a spat with your spouse, but new research shows that if it happens consistently, it could take a serious toll on your health. Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center took blood samples from couples before and after an argument, and found that spouses who fought after not getting enough sleep had higher levels of inflammati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endocrine Society issues Scientific Statement on obesity's causesA new Scientific Statement issued by the Endocrine Society calls for more research aimed specifically at understanding the underlying mechanisms that make it difficult to maintain long-term weight loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Childhood asthma may lead to thickening of left ventricle in adulthoodYoung adults with a history of asthma are at a greater risk of thickening of the left ventricle, which can cause shortness of breath, chest pain, fainting, and eventually lead to heart failure, according to research published today in JACC: Heart Failure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early cardiology care linked to lower risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillationThe risk of stroke was significantly reduced in patients newly diagnosed with a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation who received early care from a cardiologist, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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New Scientist - News
SpaceX has launched and landed two used rockets in one weekendOn 23 and 25 June, SpaceX launched two Falcon 9 rockets using boosters that had already been to space, the second and third time SpaceX has flown used boosters
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Gizmodo
The Far-Right Alliance Is Over Richard Spencer in front of the Lincoln Memorial All images: Bryan Menegus & Sophie Kleeman/Gizmodo We were promised a showdown at high noon. Instead, Washington DC was host to two pitifully-attended competing rallies this Sunday, followed by a Twitter slapfight between two 39-year-old men. What was scheduled to be a single rally for free speech at the Lincoln Memorial was cleaved in two when sev
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Today only, get an Amazon Echo for just $130 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with new deals to share. Now you can get an Amazon Echo for one of the best prices we've seen: just $130. This is Amazon's original Alexa-enabled smart speaker, so it's a great device to get while at this discounted price. It may also come in handy during Amazon's annual Prime Day—a day when the company discounts a bunch of
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Science | The Guardian
Rome metro excavations unearth 3rd-century 'Pompeii-like scene' Archaeologists find remains of building and skeleton of a crouching dog that appears to have died in the fire that destroyed it Digging for Rome’s new underground network has unearthed the charred ruins of an early 3rd-century building and the 1,800-year-old skeleton of a crouching dog that apparently perished in the same blaze that caused the structure to collapse. Archaeologists said on Monday
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microscope can scan tumors during surgery and examine cancer biopsies in 3-DA new microscope could provide accurate real-time results during cancer-removal surgeries, potentially eliminating the 20 to 40 percent of women who have to undergo multiple lumpectomy surgeries because cancerous breast tissue is missed the first time around.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mechanism for bacterial division discovered in some bacteriaScientists show how some pathogenic bacteria -- such as the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis -- use a previously unknown mechanism to coordinate their division. The discovery could help develop new ways to fight them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking photos of experiences boosts visual memory, impairs auditory memoryA quick glance at any social media platform will tell you that people love taking photos of their experiences -- whether they're lying on the beach, touring a museum, or just waiting in line at the grocery store. New research shows that choosing to take photos may actually help us remember the visual details of our encounters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution casts shadow over solar energy productionGlobal solar energy production is taking a major hit due to air pollution and dust. The first study of its kind shows airborne particles and their accumulation on solar cells is cutting energy output by more than 25 percent in certain parts of the world. The regions hardest hit are also those investing the most in solar energy installations -- China, India and the Arabian Peninsula.
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The Atlantic
Ramadan 2017 in the USA The Muslim three-day Eid al-Fitr festival, marking the end of the month of Ramadan, began this weekend in parts of the world where sightings of the new moon were made. During Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting, devout Muslims must abstain from food, drink, and sex from dawn until sunset. The fast, one of the five pillars of Islam, is seen as a time for spiritual reflection, prayers, and charit
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The Atlantic
America's Military: Overcommitted and Underfunded I confess up front to being a budget hawk. I basically believe that as long as the Pentagon is still buying two manned fighter planes after the unmanned revolution, there is more than enough money going to the Defense Department—because if money were really tight, one or both of those programs would be cancelled, and the military services would be undercutting each other's budgets to increase the
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Gizmodo
Facebook Wants Kids in Juvenile Detention to Get Internet Access Photo: AP Facebook is supporting a bill currently before the California legislature that, if passed, would give children in juvenile detention facilities and foster care homes the right to internet access. The bill, AB 811 , would require that kids in the system be allowed to send and receive unopened mail and make and receive confidential phone calls, as well as have access to the internet for e
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Scientific American Content: Global
Liquid Fuels from SunshineArtificial-leaf technology converts carbon dioxide to fuels and more -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Fake climate negotiations produce real impacts Enlarge (credit: Scott K. Johnson) CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts—Some critics of the Paris Agreement on climate change probably think they could have done a better job with the agreement's details. Recently, a group of people taking a system dynamics course at MIT’s Sloan School of Management got the chance to take a whack at it. Ars dropped in on a mock climate negotiation exercise run by MIT’s John
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Could These High-Tech Crab Calls Really Boost Wild Bill's Catch? #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Wild Bill tests out a new piece of technology in his pots - a device that mimics the sound of a feeding frenzy underwater to attact more crab. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly
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Gizmodo
It's Back! Get 100 Velcro Cable Ties For $6 With Prime Shipping 100 Velcro Cable Ties , $6 Velcro cable ties can transform the rat king of cables behind your desk or home theater into something more manageable , and you can get 100 of them today on Amazon for just $6 . Now, Amazon frequently lists these at $5, but as add-on items that only ship as part of a $25 order. Today, you’ll pay $1 more, but you can get free Prime shipping.
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Big Think
Google to Achieve "Supremacy" in Quantum Computing by the End of 2017 Google is closing in on achieving a major quantum computing milestone. Read More
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Scientists in limbo as US Supreme Court allows modified travel ban Justices overturn lower court rulings on policy targeting people from six majority-Muslim countries. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22190
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NYT > Science
Matter: Fire May Be the Only Remedy for a Plague Killing Deer and ElkDeer and elk are dying from chronic wasting disease in growing numbers. Burning the land may be the only way to turn back the disease.
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Nearly Half of Teens Have Had Sex by Age 19, Survey FindsSexual activity declined among adolescents in the 1990s, and rates have remained low. Still, teenagers in the United States are more likely to become pregnant than those in other western countries.
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cognitive science
Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach -- even if it's off. That's the takeaway finding from a new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
The Most Pessimistic Episode of Veep Yet This post contains minor spoilers through Season 6, Episode 10 of Veep . The finale of the last season of Veep found Selina Meyer, mediocre politician and terrible person, laid low for her shortcomings. She had lost the U.S. presidency. The one real achievement she had accomplished during her brief stint in the Oval Office—brokering freedom for Tibet—had been, in the eyes of the American media, t
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cognitive science
The studies show that playing video games can change how our brains perform, and even their structure. submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein librariesDiscovering the function of a gene requires cloning a DNA sequence and expressing it. Until now, this was performed on a one-gene-at-a-time basis, causing a bottleneck. Scientists have invented a technology to clone thousands of genes simultaneously and create massive libraries of proteins from DNA samples, potentially ushering in a new era of functional genomics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New experimental and theoretical approaches 'dive into the pool' of membranes organellesEngineers have developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.
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Futurity.org
Racial gap shows up in hospital readmissions Medicare Advantage aims to more effectively manage care and control costs, but black patients enrolled in the program are much more likely to be readmitted to the hospital after surgery than those enrolled on traditional Medicare. Further, significant disparities still remain in the readmission rate between black and white Medicare patients. “Our findings suggest that the risk-reduction strategie
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Gizmodo
Transformers: The Last Knight: The Spoiler FAQ Did you see Michael Bay’s fifth movie in the disturbingly profitable Transformers franchise this weekend? Did you have a question about it, besides “Why is this movie about giant robots and explosions so boring ?” Our patented Spoiler FAQ has all the answers you need and also probably several you didn’t. Here we are again . Hello, my old friend. I wish I could say it was good to see you. Advertis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Previously unknown extinction of marine megafauna discoveredOver two million years ago, a third of the largest marine animals like sharks, whales, sea birds and sea turtles disappeared. This previously unknown extinction event not only had a considerable impact on the earth's historical biodiversity but also on the functioning of ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in lightUsing the brightest light ever produced on Earth, physicists have changed the way light behaves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Peering through opaque brains with new algorithmA new algorithm helps scientists record the activity of individual neurons within a volume of brain tissue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microplastics sloughed from synthetic fabrics in the washing machineBillions of pieces of plastic are floating in the oceans. Their effects are also sufficiently well-known: marine animals swallow them or get tangled up in them, which can cause them to die in agony. On the other hand, we know less about the consequences of the smallest pieces of plastic, known as microplastics. Researchers have now started to investigate how microplastics are generated and where t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A little place for my stuffJust as people endlessly calculate how to upsize or downsize, bacteria continually adjust their volume (their stuff) to fit inside their membrane (their space). But what limits their expansion? The answer will suprise you.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai researcher identifies best practices for cochlear implant hearing preservationFindings could transform treatment worldwide and enhance patient care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's gene associated with failure to adapt to cognitive challenge in healthy adultsHealthy adults carrying the gene APOE4 -- the strongest known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) -- may struggle to adapt their brain activity to increasing cognitive demands as they get older, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain's fight and flight responses to social threatA study published in eNeuro exploring the neural correlates of the 'fight-or-flight' response finds that people who choose to flee perceive a greater threat, which leads them to mentally and behaviorally disengage from the situation.
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Live Science
'Burung Harry Potter' Owls Found in Indonesian MarketsConcerned scientists look for "Harry Potter" effect to explain Indonesia's new owl trade.
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Popular Science
Artificial algae could help save our oceans From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Using mimicry to fight climate change. Scientists are using faux-coralline algae to seed aquatic ecosystems. It's a novel tool for dealing with climate change and ocean acidification.
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Ars Technica
Some beers, anger at former employer, and root access add up to a year in prison (credit: Alan Stanton ) The Internet of Things' "security through obscurity" has been proven once again to not be terribly secure thanks to an angry and possibly inebriated ex-employee. Adam Flanagan, a former radio frequency engineer for a company that manufactures remote meter reading equipment for utilities, was convicted on June 15 in Philadelphia after pleading guilty to two counts of "unaut
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Significant racial disparities persist in hospital readmissionsDespite being designed to more effectively manage care and control costs, black patients enrolled with Medicare Advantage are far more likely to be readmitted to the hospital after a surgery than those enrolled on traditional Medicare, research shows. Furthermore, significant disparities continue to exist in readmission rate between black and white Medicare patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beyond bananas: 'Mind reading' technology decodes complex thoughtsNew research builds on the pioneering use of machine learning algorithms with brain imaging technology to "mind read."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are activity monitors fit for exercise research? Getting there, but further steps neededActivity monitors or fitness trackers are fun and informative gadgets to help track daily physical activity. But as a source of objective data for research on the health benefits of exercise, they're not yet fully up to speed, reports a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lack of sleep fuels harmful inflammatory response to marital stressA lack of sleep doesn’t just leave you cranky and spoiling for a fight. Researchers say it also puts you at risk for stress-related inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbes from ships may help distinguish one port from anotherMuch the way every person has a unique microbial cloud around them, ships might also carry distinct microbial signatures. The key is testing the right waters -- the bilge water from the bottoms of ships.
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Live Science
Bread's Done! This Company Wants to Help Astronauts Bake in SpaceA team of engineers and scientists may have just found a way for astronauts to enjoy fresh bread in space.
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The Atlantic
Why Would Anyone Fear a Self-Driving Car? To understand what the world will be like in ten years, it isn’t enough to look back at how different things were a decade ago and presume the differences will be comparable. The pace of technological change is speeding up so quickly, says Astro Teller, who leads the arm of Google that aims at “moonshots,” that one must look back 30 years to experience the same amount of discontinuity we’ll feel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ten million tonnes of fish wasted every year despite declining fish stocksIndustrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tonnes of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain firefighters gain upper hand over blaze near nature reserveSpanish firefighters on Monday beat back a wildfire which threatens a renowned national park that is home to endangered species and has forced the evacuation of over 2,000 people from homes, campsites and hotels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ten million tons of fish wasted every year despite declining fish stocksIndustrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tons of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to Sea Around Us research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review: Insomnia medication may wake up some patients from vegetative stateA systematic review of zolpidem for noninsomnia neurological disorders, including movement disorders and disorders of consciousness, finds reason for additional research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subway digging uncovers 'Pompeii-like scene' in RomeDigging for Rome's new subway has unearthed the charred ruins of a 3rd century building and the 1,800-year-old skeleton of a dog that apparently perished in a fire.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report reveals improvements and persistent inequities in college access and success in NYCA new report from the Research Alliance for New York City Schools provides an in-depth look at high school students' pathways into and through college, revealing large improvements in college access, but also highlighting persistent differences in outcomes for historically underrepresented groups of students.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to rapidly map the 'social networks' of proteinsSalk scientists have developed a new high-throughput technique to determine which proteins in a cell interact with each other. Mapping this network of interactions, or "interactome," has been slow going in the past because the number of interactions that could be tested at once was limited. The new approach, published June 26 in Nature Methods, lets researchers test millions of relationships betwe
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Gizmodo
What Sorcery Keeps This Giant Ball Floating on a Tiny Stream of Water? GIF We’ve all made a tiny ping-pong ball float on a hair dryer, but what YouTube’s Veritasium is demonstrating here—a giant styrofoam ball floating on the side of a thin stream of water —seems to contradict every scientific law governing our universe. But there is an explanation as to what’s happening. When you place a ping-pong ball on the stream of hot air blasting out of a hair dryer pointed u
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to rapidly map the 'social networks' of proteinsSalk scientists improved upon a classic approach to mapping the interactions between proteins.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predicting future outcomes in the natural worldWhen pesticides and intentional fires fail to eradicate an invasive plant species, declaring biological war may be the best option.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study changes in the biodiversity of California's sandy beachesAnd to think it was all right there in her garage. A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydraulic fracturing rarely linked to felt seismic tremors: studyNew research suggests hydraulic fracturing and saltwater disposal has limited impact on seismic events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Young American Latinos report the most discriminationAlthough the United States has seen a dramatic increase in Mexican and Latin American immigrants since 1970, a recent study by Penn State researchers is one of the few where perceived discrimination is examined in this population. The study found that undocumented Latino immigrants are not the most likely group to report discrimination.
5h
Ars Technica
Ringless voicemail spam won’t be exempt from anti-robocall rules Enlarge / The FCC was asked to decide whether this ringless voicemail technology should be subject to anti-robocall rules. (credit: Stratics Networks ) A petition to exempt ringless voicemails from anti-robocall rules has been withdrawn after heavy opposition. In March, a marketing company called All About the Message petitioned the Federal Communications Commission for a ruling that would preven
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Science | The Guardian
New study confirms the oceans are warming rapidly | John Abraham Although there’s some uncertainty in the distribution among Earth’s ocean basins, there’s no question that the ocean is heating rapidly As humans put ever more heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, the Earth heats up. These are the basics of global warming. But where does the heat go? How much extra heat is there? And how accurate are our measurements? These are questions that climate scientis
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Live Science
4 Dead, Liverless Sharks Wash Ashore in Weird WhodunitIn a strange case of extremely picky eating, orcas off the coast of South Africa are killing great white sharks, but the killer whales are chowing down only on the sharks' livers and, in some cases, their hearts, researchers say.
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Futurity.org
How ‘weirdo’ hatchetfish hide in light New research shows how hatchetfish use light to hide. Contrary to previous ideas, they don’t do so by acting as mirrors. The midwater region is the largest habitat by volume in the world, making up 99 percent of Earth’s livable space. It’s home to a myriad of occupants, many of which have evolved peculiar abilities to allow them to survive. “They spend their whole lives sort of suspended in the m
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Big Think
Racism is a Disease That Everyone Suffers From, Says 'Racists Anonymous' Instead of viewing racism as a moral failure, Racists Anonymous treats it like a disease from which everyone suffers. Read More
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Popular Science
Sorry, but Anonymous has no evidence that NASA has found alien life Space We wish. Before you freak out, let’s talk.
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Live Science
Space Robots to the Rescue! How NASA Will Service Aging SatellitesSatellites were built to last, but how might space agencies service them if they run low on fuel?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Own-point-of-view' video method leverages power of perception to improve emergency careThe 'own-point-of-view' perspective video technique, coupled with a subjective re situ interview, provides a better understanding of how physicians make clinical decisions in an authentic treatment setting, compared with the conventional external perspective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking photos of experiences boosts visual memory, impairs auditory memoryA quick glance at any social media platform will tell you that people love taking photos of their experiences -- whether they're lying on the beach, touring a museum, or just waiting in line at the grocery store. New research shows that choosing to take photos may actually help us remember the visual details of our encounters. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the A
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The beach time capsuleAnd to think it was all right there in her garage.A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young American Latinos report the most discriminationAlthough the United States has seen a dramatic increase in Mexican and Latin American immigrants since 1970, a recent study by Penn State researchers is one of the few where perceived discrimination is examined in this population. The study found that undocumented Latino immigrants are not the most likely group to report discrimination.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report reveals improvements and persistent inequities in college access and success in NYCA new report from the Research Alliance for New York City Schools provides an in-depth look at high school students' pathways into and through college, revealing large improvements in college access, but also highlighting persistent differences in outcomes for historically underrepresented groups of students.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking pictures of sentimental goods may help people declutter, donate moreThe cure for a cluttered home might be just a snapshot away. According to researchers, people are more likely to increase donations to second-hand nonprofit businesses if they take a picture of the item first.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cedars-Sinai team develops risk assessment score to predict, help prevent sudden cardiac arrestA Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigator and his team have developed a new risk assessment tool that brings physicians closer to predicting who is most likely to suffer a sudden cardiac arrest, a condition that is fatal in more than 90 percent of patients.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study details evidence for past large earthquakes in the Eastern Tennessee seismic zoneThe Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone (ETSZ), a zone of small earthquakes stretching from northeastern Alabama to southwestern Virginia, may have generated earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater within the last 25,000 years, according to a study published June 27 in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.
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New Scientist - News
Research on male animals prevents women from getting best drugsMale and female mice differ in many ways – a finding that suggests women could be missing out on the best medical treatments, as most are tested on male animals
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New Scientist - News
More killer hail coming unless we curb global warmingExtreme hail storms can be a threat to life and property. If we carry on polluting the planet we'll have to face more of them, warns physicist Raymond Pierrehumbert
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Blog » Languages » English
Mystics Rising: Water vs Electronics One gives us life, and one is water! Pick your team now, this competition is going to be electric. Swag: Land yourself in the top 50% of players on the winning team and you’re in a raffle for a free tee or a free mug Bonuses: Earn 5,000 points – 2,500 bonus Earn 15,000 points – 5,000 bonus Earn 25,000 points – 10,000 bonus For every 25,000 points above 25,000 – 5,000 bonus Member of winning team
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Wired
Amazon Echo Show Review: Yeah, It's Creepy, But It's Got Big PotentialAdding a screen to an Echo brings Alexa to the next level.
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Live Science
Why Total Solar Eclipses Are Total CoincidencesAncient astronomers interpreted solar eclipses as omens of disaster, while folktales around the world typically explained the celestial events as a conflict between the sun and a devouring celestial dragon, wolf or rat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large-scale production of living brain cells enables entirely new researchImportant pieces of the puzzle to understand what drives diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are still missing today. One crucial obstacle for researchers is that it is impossible to examine a living brain cell in someone who is affected by the disease. With the help of a new method for cell conversion, researchers have found a way to produce diseased, aging brain cells on a large scale i
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Live Science
Edges of Black Holes Re-Created in a Bathtub of WaterThe chaotic region near the edge of a black hole's event horizon has just been simulated using a simple bath of water, and the results confirm a long-held theory about how black holes lose their angular momentum.
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Big Think
Ketamine is Helping Alleviate Depression—Fast A new study published in Nature shows just how quick relief is possible with ketamine. Read More
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting future outcomes in the natural worldWhen pesticides and intentional fires fail to eradicate an invasive plant species, declaring biological war may be the best option.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydraulic fracturing rarely linked to felt seismic tremorsNew research suggests hydraulic fracturing and saltwater disposal has limited impact on seismic events.
6h
The Atlantic
Why Is the Onus on Women to Curb Workplace Interruptions? The recent spectacle of Senator Kamala Harris’s male colleagues repeatedly cutting her off at Senate Intelligence Committee hearings is the latest reminder of what several studies dating back to at least 1975 have shown, and what female professionals have been saying for decades: All too often , women at work can’t finish a sentence without being interrupted, usually by a man. Part of the problem
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The Atlantic
What Trump Doesn't Understand About MS-13 As President Trump sat for Time’s Person of the Year interview last year, he excused himself and returned with a copy of Newsday . He wanted to show editor Michael Scherer a headline . “‘EXTREMELY VIOLENT’ GANG FACTION,” it read, and the article told of murders in Suffolk County, New York, all linked to MS-13. One murder was that of 16-year-old Kayla Cuevas, who’d argued with MS-13 members at her
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The Atlantic
The Post-College Therapy Void Before he arrived at Wichita State University, Steve Paniagua had never seen a therapist. He’d struggled with depression and suicidal tendencies for years, but his family could never afford treatment. As soon as he got to the Kansas school, Paniagua called the school’s counseling center. He learned that he could meet with a licensed therapist as often as he needed to, free of charge. “For two yea
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The Atlantic
The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Major Church-State Barrier The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that the state of Missouri cannot deny public funds to a church simply because it is a religious organization. Seven justices affirmed the judgment in Trinity Lutheran v. Comer , albeit with some disagreement about the reasoning behind it. The major church-state case could potentially expand the legal understanding of the free-exercise clause of the First Amendme
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Gizmodo
The Amazon Echo Show Is the Best Dumb Smart Machine in My Home Image: Carmen Hilbert/Gizmodo The first night the Amazon Echo Show was in my bedroom I had to carefully lay it face down on my nightstand. The display, which was cycling through my upcoming meetings, most recent news, and the weather, was simply too bright. It was like having a little super informative sun shining in my face. The second night, as if it knew, the Echo Show had another slide on its
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Gizmodo
Pilot Asks Passengers To Pray After Plane Starts Shaking Violently GIF An AirAsia X flight from Perth, Australia, to Kuala Lampur, Malaysia, encountered some sort of technical problem yesterday, which made the plane start to wobble and vibrate for over an hour. Faced with such a dilemma, the pilot, normally a calm, collected voice over a loudspeaker, asked everyone to pray instead. Twice. People were asleep when the passengers heard a loud bang and the shaking s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study details evidence for past large earthquakes in the Eastern Tennessee seismic zoneThe Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone (ETSZ), a zone of small earthquakes stretching from northeastern Alabama to southwestern Virginia, may have generated earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater within the last 25,000 years, according to a study published June 27 in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
You've Done the Research: Now Share It with the WorldScientific American, the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and the Kavli Foundation announce a new course that teaches scientists how to write for the public -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Noninvasive Biopsies for Identifying CancerUltrasensitive blood tests known as liquid biopsies promise to improve diagnosis and care -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Europeans back allocation of asylum seekers proportionally, study finds Survey asked what kind of asylum system is fair, with 72% saying countries should receive applications according to capacity rather than current system The majority of Europeans support proportional allocation of asylum seekers, a system that takes into account each country’s capacity, research has revealed. But the study also shows that support for the system is dramatically affected by the numb
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New Scientist - News
Peruvian monkey avoids stomach trouble by adding mud to its dietRylands’ saki seems to go out of its way to eat the muddy walls of treetop termite mounds – perhaps to prevent toxic side effects from its seed-rich diet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Information overload fuels 'fake news': study"Fake news" has become a troubling phenomenon, allegedly used to manipulate voters and fuel a rise in global populism. In one case, it inspired a man to shoot up a Washington pizzeria.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Amazon Echo, Multi-Room Speaker, Minions Sale, and More An under-desk elliptical , $50 off the Amazon Echo , and every Minions accessory you could ever want lead off Monday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Amazon Echo , $130 The Amazon Echo is arguably this decade’s iPhone, and if you still don’t have one (or more) set up in your home, Amazon’s running an unprecedented $50 discount (if yo
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Popular Science
Using a phone or tablet causes symptoms that look a lot like carpal tunnel syndrome Health But it’s not necessarily the real thing. Using phones and tablets can cause hand pain, according to a recent study. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When kids talk to robots: Enhancing engagement and learningConversational robots and virtual characters can enhance learning and expand entertainment options for children, a trio of studies by Disney Research shows, though exactly how these autonomous agents interact with children sometimes depends on a child's age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gonorrhea treatment targets enzyme needed for respirationResearchers have identified a possible new treatment for gonorrhea, using a peptide that thwarts the infection-causing bacterium by interfering with an enzyme the microbe needs to respirate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drones that driveBeing able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature many birds, insects, and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: Imagine machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren't near roads and then squeeze through tight spaces on the ground to transport objects or rescue people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does socioeconomic status affect women's decisions not to continue breastfeeding?A new study has shown that among women who intended to breastfeed, nearly 25 percent of those defined as socioeconomically (SE) marginalized stopped after only one month, compared to about 7 percent of the women in the SE privileged group.
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Ars Technica
The Nokia 6 comes to the US for $229 If you remember, all the way back in February, HMD's Nokia Android lineup made its international debut at Mobile World Congress. The highest-end device, the Nokia 6 , impressed us with its metal body, great build quality, stock Android, and low €229 price tag. Now the phone is finally coming to America, care of Amazon, which will sell the device in "early July" for $229. HMD Global, the company n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising seas could result in 2 billion refugees by 2100In the year 2100, 2 billion people - about one-fifth of the world's population - could become climate change refugees due to rising ocean levels. Those who once lived on coastlines will face displacement and resettlement bottlenecks as they seek habitable places inland, according to Cornell University research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microplastics from the washing machineWe know about the disastrous ways in which plastic affects the world's oceans. Billions of pieces of plastic are floating in the oceans. Their effects are also sufficiently well-known: marine animals swallow them or get tangled up in them, which causes them to die in agony. On the other hand, we know less about the consequences of the smallest pieces of plastic, known as microplastics. Empa resear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting diluteness: New experimental and theoretical approaches 'dive into the pool' of membranes organellesInside each and every living cell, there are miniscule structures called membraneless organelles. These tiny powerhouses use chemistry to cue the inner workings of a cell—movement, division and even self-destruction.
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Live Science
Facts About Gnus (Wildebeests)Wildebeests, also called gnus, are large African antelopes.
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Futurity.org
This trick could help you get rid of clutter If you’re having trouble donating an item to Goodwill, try taking a photo of it. “We all have at least one, but, in many cases, multiple items that we hold onto—even though we no longer use them—because the items still have sentimental value,” says Karen Winterich, research fellow and associate professor of marketing at Penn State. “These items have some type of meaning that says, ‘this is who I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Identity crisis? Vapers who continue to smoke are in denial about their addiction and could struggle to kick the habitPeople who vape as well as smoke traditional cigarettes may find it harder to quit as they don’t see themselves as smokers, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Colon cancer: Greater surgical precision using robotic surgeryUp until now, the removal of bowel tumors in the lesser pelvis (rectal cancers) involved a major, generally invasive operation. This operation can now be done in a much gentler way using an innovative procedure, robotic surgery. Thanks to a better three-dimensional view of the operating area and robotic instruments that allow highly accurate surgery to be performed in the anatomically constricted
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twitter-monitoring system detects riots far quicker than police reportsSocial media can be an invaluable source of information for police when managing major disruptive events, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Topsy-turvy motion creates light switch effect at UranusUranus' magnetosphere, the region defined by the planet's magnetic field and the material trapped inside it, gets flipped on and off like a light switch every day as it rotates along with the planet, scientists have discovered. It's 'open' in one orientation, allowing solar wind to flow into the magnetosphere; it later closes, forming a shield against the solar wind and deflecting it away from the
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NYT > Science
Carbon in Atmosphere Is Rising, Even as Emissions StabilizeScientists are concerned over the cause of the rapid rise, which may indicate the world’s natural sponges that absorb carbon dioxide have changed.
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Ars Technica
Waymo hires Avis to look after its autonomous cars in Arizona Enlarge / Waymo is using a fleet of Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans to develop its self-driving technology. (credit: Waymo) Back in April, we reported on Waymo's plans to offer an autonomous ride-hailing service in Phoenix, Arizona. The project has been spun off from Google's self-driving car project, and Waymo is using a fleet of adapted Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans to perfect its self-dr
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The Atlantic
The Supreme Court Partially Unblocked Trump's Travel Ban Updated at 2:57 p.m. ET The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review a series of lower-court rulings blocking the Trump administration’s controversial travel ban on Monday, setting up a major showdown over presidential power and religious discrimination. In an unsigned order issued on the Court’s last day before its summer recess, the justices scheduled oral arguments in the case for when they return
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Gizmodo
Walt Disney's Hand-Drawn Map of Disneyland Just Sold for a Bonkers Price Art dealer Mike Van Eaton stands next to an original hand-drawn map of Disneyland from 1953. Image: AP The Disney fan army can’t get enough of Mickey Mouse and his magical empire. That’s why its no surprise that someone spent $708,000 on a hand-drawn map of Disneyland in California, conceived by none other than the MickeyMaster himself, Walt Disney. Disney and artist Herb Ryman drew the map one w
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Gizmodo
Doctor Who Reminds Us Why the Cybermen Will Always Be Its Scariest Enemies Image: BBC When asked about the scariest Doctor Who villains, fan have all sorts of responses. The Daleks are the go-to, but there’s new-era villains like the Weeping Angels, or everything from Autons to Zygons. But this week’s Doctor Who was a chilling reminder that there’s actually only one true answer, though: The Cybermen. When the Cybermen made their nu- Who debut in 2006's “Rise of the Cybe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazon basin deforestation could disrupt distant rainforest by remote climate connectionThe ongoing deforestation around the fringes of the Amazon may have serious consequences for the untouched deeper parts of the rainforest. A new research study shows that it is not only the climate that is adversely affected by deforestation. In fact, the very stability of the ecosystem in the entire Amazon region is altered when deforestation takes place in the outermost regions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small chips, big impact: Researcher studies cardiovascular, sickle cell diseaseA researcher is developing new miniature models to better understand the factors that lead to heart disease and sickle cell anemia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cool power: Breakthroughs in solar panel cooling technologyBreakthroughs in solar panel cooling tech will help keep NASA’s Parker Solar Probe operating at peak performance — even while flying through the sun’s corona
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers design sounds that can be recorded by microphones but inaudible to humansResearchers have designed a sound that is completely inaudible to humans (40 kHz or above) yet is audible to any microphone. The sound combines multiple tones that, when interacting with the microphone's mechanics, create what researchers call a 'shadow,' which is a sound that the microphones can detect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early antiretroviral therapy linked with bone loss in patients with HIVCurrent HIV treatment guidelines now recommend initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the time of diagnosis. However, a new study has found that such early ART causes greater bone loss compared with deferring ART.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Premature infants at greater risk of SIDSPremature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detecting dilutenessEngineers at Washington University in St. Louis and Princeton University developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microplastics from the washing machineBillions of pieces of plastic are floating in the oceans. Their effects are also sufficiently well-known: marine animals swallow them or get tangled up in them, which causes them to die in agony. On the other hand, we know less about the consequences of the smallest pieces of plastic, known as microplastics. Empa researchers have now started to investigate how microplastics are generated and where
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists use algorithm to peer through opaque brainsA new algorithm helps scientists record the activity of individual neurons within a volume of brain tissue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2-D material's traits could send electronics R&D spinning in new directionsResearchers created an atomically thin material at Berkeley Lab and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as 'spintronics.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catalyst for genetic kidney disease in black people identifiedBetween 15 and 20 percent of black people carry a genetic mutation that puts them at risk for certain chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them develop the illness -- a variance that long has puzzled researchers. Now a study has found that the gene mutation's toxic effects require higher than normal levels of a protein called suPAR to trigger the onset and progression of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel viral vectors deliver useful cargo to neurons throughout the brain and bodyCaltech team develops new viral vectors for efficiently delivering genes to neurons throughout the body and across the blood-brain barrier
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in lightUsing the brightest light ever produced on Earth, University of Nebraska-Lincoln physicists have changed the way light behaves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Previously unknown extinction of marine megafauna discoveredOver two million years ago, a third of the largest marine animals like sharks, whales, sea birds and sea turtles disappeared. This previously unknown extinction event not only had a consid-erable impact on the earth's historical biodiversity but also on the functioning of ecosystems. This has been demonstrated by researchers at the University of Zurich.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmetic complaints climb but products still on marketA new Northwestern Medicine study reports consumer complaints more than doubled for cosmetic products from 2015 to 2016, with hair care products being the biggest offender. But consumers remain at risk because the industry receives little regulatory scrutiny and does not require pre-approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Characterizing the mouse genome reveals new gene functions and their role in human diseaseThe first results from a functional genetic catalogue of the laboratory mouse has been shared with the biomedical research community, revealing new insights into a range of rare diseases and the possibility of accelerating development of new treatments and precision medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how sex 'blindspot' could misdirect medical researchThe sex of animals frequently has an effect in biomedical research and therefore should be considered in the study of science, report scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. In the largest study of its kind, researchers found that the differences between male and female mice had an effect that could impact research results in more tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monitoring changes in wetland extent can help predict the rate of climate changeMonitoring changes to the amount of wetlands in regions where permafrost is thawing should be at the forefront of efforts to predict future rates of climate change, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of a new mechanism for bacterial divisionEPFL scientists show how some pathogenic bacteria -- such as the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis -- use a previously unknown mechanism to coordinate their division. The discovery could help develop new ways to fight them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals mysterious equality with which grains pack it inFor the first time, researchers have been able to test a theory explaining the physics of how substances like sand and gravel pack together, helping them to understand more about some of the most industrially processed materials on the planet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vinegar: A cheap and simple way to help plants fight droughtResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. Published in Nature Plants, the study reports a newly discovered biological pathway that is activated in times of drought. By working out the details of this pathway, scientists were able to induce greater tolerance for drought-like
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biodiversity loss from deep-sea mining will be unavoidableBiodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of scientists, economists and lawyers argue. They say the International Seabed Authority, which is responsible for regulating undersea mining in areas outside national jurisdictions, must recognize the risk and communicate it clearly to member states and the public to spur discussions as to whe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool to identify and control neuronsOne of the big challenges in the Neuroscience field is to understand how connections and communications trigger our behavior. Researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience developed a tool to identify and control neurons. The new technique, called Calcium and Light-Induced Gene Handling Toolkit or 'Cal-Light,' allows researchers to observe and manipulate the neural activities underl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is there an association between socioeconomic status in childhood and the heart?Socioeconomic inequalities are a public health challenge in cardiovascular disease and a new study published by JAMA Pediatrics examined the association of childhood family socioeconomic status in youth on measures of left ventricular mass and diastolic function 31 years later in adulthood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How many adverse events are reported to FDA for cosmetics, personal care?A new research letter published by JAMA Internal Medicine examines adverse events for cosmetics and personal care products in the US Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System (CFSAN), a repository made publically available in 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Peanut family secret for making chemical building blocks revealedThe peanut and its kin -- legumes -- have not one, but two ways to make the amino acid tyrosine. That might seem small, but why this plant family has a unique way to make such an important chemical building block is a mystery that extends back to the 1960s and is one that has captured the attention of Hiroshi Maeda, a professor of botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using 'sticky' nanoparticles, researchers develop strategy to boost body's cancer defensesIn the journal Nature Nanotechnology, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report on strides made in the development of a strategy to improve the immune system's detection of cancer proteins by using 'sticky' nanoparticles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein librariesDiscovering the function of a gene requires cloning a DNA sequence and expressing it. Until now, this was performed on a one-gene-at-a-time basis, causing a bottleneck. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Medical School have invented a technology to clone thousands of genes simultaneously and create massive libraries of proteins
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microscope can scan tumors during surgery and examine cancer biopsies in 3-DA new UW microscope could provide accurate real-time results during cancer-removal surgeries, potentially eliminating the 20 to 40 percent of women who have to undergo multiple lumpectomy surgeries because cancerous breast tissue is missed the first time around.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulling the tablecloth out from under essential metabolismMost organisms share the biosynthetic pathways for making crucial nutrients because it is is dangerous to tinker with them. But now a collaborative team of scientists has caught plants in the process of altering where and how cells make an essential amino acid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrasound imaging of the brain and liverUltrasound is commonly used in diagnostic imaging of the body's soft tissues, including muscles, joints, tendons and internal organs. A technology called high-intensity focused ultrasound is also being explored for therapeutic uses including the removal of uterine fibroids and the destruction of tumors. A suite of noninvasive, adaptive focusing techniques -- that allow ultrasonic beams to be focus
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Search a Gorge for the Secrets of WindResearchers hope to find a way to more accurately forecast wind strength -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Birds use cigarette butts for chemical warfare against ticksUrban house finches incorporate more fibres from cigarette butts into their nests if they have live ticks in them, suggesting the toxic chemicals in the butts may deter the parasites
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New Scientist - News
Cyberattack on UK parliament exploited weak email passwordsA hack that locked MPs out of their parliamentary email accounts over the weekend could have been easily stopped by more following basic security practices
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Wired
Cozmo, the World's Cutest Robot, Now Teaches You to CodeThe toy's creators have a new app that teaches programming with MIT's Scratch language.
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Wired
'Angry Birds Evolution' Review: Glimpse the Dark Heart of BrandingFifteen games in to the Angry Birds franchise, Rovio Entertainment's newest title reveals a lot about cynicism in 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer hijacks natural cell process to surviveCancer tumors manipulate a natural cell process to promote their survival suggesting that controlling this mechanism could stop progress of the disease, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopauseLong-term, high intake of vegetable protein from such foods as whole grains, soy and tofu, may protect women from early menopause and could prolong reproductive function, results of a new study from epidemiologists suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physician heal thyself: Simple coping strategies for pervasive physician burnoutThe proverb, 'physician heal thyself,' is probably more relevant today than it was in biblical times with the fast pace of life, the impact of multitasking and the unending bombardment of information, which have made emotional exhaustion almost certain. And this is especially true for obstetricians and gynecologists who experience professional burnout rates between 40 to 75 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find clever way to help you de-clutter your homeIf your attic is full of stuff you no longer use but can't bear to give away, a new study may offer you a simple solution. Researchers found that people were more willing to give away unneeded goods that still had sentimental value if they were encouraged to take a photo of these items first, or find another way to preserve the memories.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combination approach improves power of new cancer therapyAn international research team has found a way to improve the anti-cancer effect of a new medicine class called 'Smac mimetics.'
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Live Science
The Second Amendment & the Right to Bear ArmsAt the center of the gun control debate, few things are as hotly disputed in the United States as the Constitution's Second Amendment.
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Ingeniøren
ESA giver grønt lys for rumobservatorium til måling af gravitationsbølgerEfter succesen med testsatellitten Lisa Pathfinder har det europæiske rumagentur valgt Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) som sin næste store videnskabelige rummission.
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Popular Science
Last week in tech: Amazon’s massive drone delivery hub may be coming to your city (in the distant future) Technology Plus: Free vintage Sega games and the latest from the wild world of cryptocurrency. All the biggest tech news of the week, including Amazon's drone hub patent, and the OnePlus 5 smartphone.
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The Atlantic
RIP Gchat Let’s first acknowledge that Gchat was never officially called Gchat. Launched in February 2006, Google named it Google Talk, refusing to refer to it by its colloquial name . For anyone mourning its demise, which the company announced in a March blog post , those names sound awkward, like they’re describing something else. To me, and to many other users, it’s Gchat, and always will be. The brilli
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Scientific American Content: Global
Martin Shkreli, Who Raised Drug Prices 5,000 Percent, Heads into Fraud TrialAccusers say he lied to investors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
The Impacts of Deep Ocean Mining Will 'Last Forever,' Scientists Warn An ROV imaging a hydrothermal vent. Image: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas The search for raw materials to feed the all-powerful Sarlacc of capitalism is pushing industries to increasingly remote and alien environments. One of the most exciting frontiers to emerge of late is the deep ocean—rife with valuable metals like copper and zinc, as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray technique provides a new window into exotic properties of an atomically thin materialAn international team of researchers, working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley, fabricated an atomically thin material and measured its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as "spintronics."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in lightPhysicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are seeing an everyday phenomenon in a new light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists catch plants in the act of changing chemistry thought to be immutable because necessary for lifeBecause plants can't get up and run away, they've had to be clever instead. They are the chemists of the living world, producing hundreds of thousands of small molecules that they use as sunscreens, to poison plant eaters, to scent the air, to color flowers, and for much other secret vegetative business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using 'sticky' nanoparticles, researchers develop strategy to boost body's cancer defensesAfter radiation treatment, dying cancer cells spit out mutated proteins into the body. Scientists now know that the immune system can detect these proteins and kill cancer in other parts of the body using these protein markers as a guide - a phenomenon that University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are looking to harness to improve cancer treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals mysterious equality with which grains pack it inAt the moment they come together, the individual grains in materials like sand and snow appear to have exactly the same probability of combining into any one of their many billions of possible arrangements, researchers have shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a new mechanism for bacterial divisionMost rod-shaped bacteria divide by splitting into two around the middle after their DNA has replicated safely and segregated to opposite ends of the cell. This seemingly simple process actually demands tight and precise coordination, which is achieved through two biological systems: nucleoid occlusion, which protects the cell's genetic material from dividing until it replicates and segregates, and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monitoring changes in wetland extent can help predict the rate of climate changeMonitoring changes to the amount of wetlands in regions where permafrost is thawing should be at the forefront of efforts to predict future rates of climate change, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Previously unknown extinction of marine megafauna discoveredOver two million years ago, a third of the largest marine animals like sharks, whales, sea birds and sea turtles disappeared. This previously unknown extinction event not only had a consid-erable impact on the earth's historical biodiversity but also on the functioning of ecosystems. This has been demonstrated by researchers at the University of Zurich.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodiversity loss from deep-sea mining will be unavoidableBiodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of 15 marine scientists, resource economists and legal scholars argue in a letter published today in the journal Nature Geoscience.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vinegar: A cheap and simple way to help plants fight droughtResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. Published in Nature Plants, the study reports a newly discovered biological pathway that is activated in times of drought. By working out the details of this pathway, scientists were able to induce greater tolerance for drought-like
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ultrasound techniques for peering inside bony structuresUltrasound—sound with frequencies higher than those audible to humans—is commonly used in diagnostic imaging of the body's soft tissues, including muscles, joints, tendons and internal organs. A technology called high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is also being explored for therapeutic uses including the removal of uterine fibroids and the destruction of tumors.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein librariesDiscovering the function of a gene requires cloning a DNA sequence and expressing it. Until now, this was performed on a one-gene-at-a-time basis, causing a bottleneck. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Medical School have invented a technology to clone thousands of genes simultaneously and create massive libraries of proteins
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Avis teams up with Waymo on self-driving car programAvis is teaming up with Waymo on a self-driving car program.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use head related transfer functions to personalize audio in mixed and virtual realityMove your head left, now right. The way you hear and interpret the sounds around you changes as you move. That's how sound in the real world works. Now imagine if it worked that way while you were listening to a recording of a concert or playing a video game in virtual reality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When kids talk to robots: Enhancing engagement and learningConversational robots and virtual characters can enhance learning and expand entertainment options for children, a trio of studies by Disney Research shows, though exactly how these autonomous agents interact with children sometimes depends on a child's age.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising seas could result in 2 billion refugees by 2100In the year 2100, 2 billion people -- about one-fifth of the world's population -- could become climate change refugees due to rising ocean levels. Those who once lived on coastlines will face displacement and resettlement bottlenecks as they seek habitable places inland, according to Cornell University research.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Creating a personalized, immersive audio environmentThe way you hear and interpret the sounds around you changes as you move. That's how sound in the real world works. Now imagine if it worked that way while you were listening to a recording of a concert or playing a video game in virtual reality. During Acoustics '17 Boston, Ivan J. Tashev and Hannes Gamper, with Microsoft's Audio and Acoustics Research Group, will explain how they are using head
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Gizmodo
Do Insects Enjoy Sex? GIF Image: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo As species, we have little in common with bees, fruit flies and beetles. Bugs are so alien to us that it’s hard to know how exactly they experience the world. Do they feel pain? Do they experience pleasure? What is sex like for them? Do they enjoy it in any way—physical or otherwise? This week on Giz Asks , we asked neuroscientists, biologists, and entomologists to he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moisture-responsive 'robots' crawl with no external power sourceUsing an off-the-shelf camera flash, researchers turned an ordinary sheet of graphene oxide into a material that bends when exposed to moisture. They then used this material to make a spider-like crawler and claw robot that move in response to changing humidity without the need for any external power.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
How Biotech Patents Are Linked to U.S. Food ProductivityWhat do patent databases say about how much food we’ll be able to grow? Researchers from the U.S. and France tried to find out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees quick development of Hurricane DoraThe fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed on June 25 and by June 26 it was already a hurricane. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dora on June 25 when it was a tropical storm and the next day it became the first hurricane of the season.
7h
Inside Science
‘Burung Harry Potter’ Owls Found in Indonesian Markets ‘Burung Harry Potter’ Owls Found in Indonesian Markets Concerned scientists look for “Harry Potter” effect to explain Indonesia’s new owl trade. Owl_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Andrea Kirkby via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Creature Monday, June 26, 2017 - 10:15 Olivia Trani, Contributor (Inside Science) -- In the wizarding world of Harry Potter, owls are magical companions that deli
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The Atlantic
How Much Can One Strongman Change a Country? Politicians—especially ideological ones—have to eventually deal with the “then what?” question. With Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s narrow victory in a tense April referendum granting him sweeping new powers (amid opposition allegations of voter fraud), he could very well dominate the country’s politics through 2029. He would have more than a decade to reshape Turkey, altering the very
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Futurity.org
Tweets about TV shows can make us like them less Seeing negative social media comments about a TV show can lower enjoyment of others watching, but seeing positive comments doesn’t seem to significantly boost enjoyment of the show, a new study suggests. Participants in a study who saw negative messages—in the form of tweets—flash on a television screen while watching a sitcom clip were more likely to say other people would rate the show negative
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Gizmodo
Spain Is Digging Up Salvador Dalí's Body Because the World Is a Surreal Nightmare Photo: AP A Spanish judge just ordered the body of Salvador Dalí to be exhumed for a paternity test. The order comes as a result of a lawsuit filed by a woman named Pilar Abel, a tarot card reader who claims to be Dalí’s illegitimate daughter. In court, Abel claimed that her mother was working near the Dalí family’s vacation home in the 1950s and that the two “had a friendship that developed into
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New on MIT Technology Review
SpaceX Is Making Commercial Space Launches Look like Child’s PlayTwo successful launches in a weekend, one using a recycled rocket—and the booster landed successfully each time.
8h
Ingeniøren
Efter MgO-kendelse: Byggerådgivere forudser store prisstigningerDen første sag om brug af fugtsugende MgO-plader skærper ansvaret hos dem, der godkender projektændringer. Det kan koste dyrt og blive døden for projektændringer advarer advokat og rådgiverdirektør.
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Gizmodo
Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Has Been Valued at a Whopping $42 Billion A view of the Great Barrier Reef from a helicopter ride. The reef is responsible for an estimated 64,000 tourism jobs, according to a new Deloitte report. (Image: Sarah Ackerman/Flickr) With the Great Barrier Reef under unprecedented environmental stress, a new report is raising the alarm in terms of its potential economic loss. Valued at Aus$56 billion (US$42 billion), the largest living structu
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Gizmodo
Jezebel These Are Some Things T.J. Jezebel These Are Some Things T.J. Miller Said in an Interview With The Hollywood Reporter | Deadspin Reports: The Cavaliers Might Have Been Close To Getting Paul George | Fusion GOP Sen. Compares People With Preexisting Conditions to People Who Have Crashed A Car | The Root Is Airbnb Turning NYC’s Brooklyn White? |
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Gizmodo
The Anti-Vaccination Movement Is Working with the Nation of Islam to Scare Black Families It was October 2015, and a crowd of thousands were gathered on Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Minister Tony Muhammad of the Nation of Islam claimed to be uncovering a conspiracy. In front of a throng gathered for the anniversary of the Million Man March, he accused the federal government of systematically poisoning black and Latinx children. “It has been brought to our attention,” he thun
8h
Live Science
Flood Facts, Types of Flooding, Floods in HistoryWherever rain falls, a flood can occur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are activity monitors fit for exercise research? Getting there, but further steps neededActivity monitors or fitness trackers are fun and informative gadgets to help track daily physical activity. But as a source of objective data for research on the health benefits of exercise, they're not yet fully up to speed, reports a paper in Progress in Preventive Medicine, the official journal of the European Society of Preventive Medicine. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees quick development of Hurricane DoraThe fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed on June 25 and by June 26 it was already a hurricane. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dora on June 25 when it was a tropical storm and the next day it became the first hurricane of the season.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Readily available drug cocktail may help prevent sepsis shock and deathEven in advanced medical settings, sepsis is still very dangerous and accounts for over 400,000 deaths annually in the US alone. While new drugs are in development, a group of researchers has determined that a combination of intravenous vitamin C, corticosteroids (a steroid), and thiamine (vitamin B) may be effective in preventing progressive organ dysfunction and reducing the number of deaths fro
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moisture-responsive 'robots' crawl with no external power sourceUsing an off-the-shelf camera flash, researchers turned an ordinary sheet of graphene oxide into a material that bends when exposed to moisture. They then used this material to make a spider-like crawler and claw robot that move in response to changing humidity without the need for any external power.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Panda love spreads to benefit the planetLoving pandas isn't just a feel-good activity. Recent Michigan State University (MSU) work shows China's decades of defending panda turf have been good not just for the beloved bears, but also protects habitat for other valuable plants and animals, boosts biodiversity and fights climate change.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People living at home with dementia at risk of potentially dangerous antipsychotic usagePhysicians are still prescribing off-label antipsychotics to help families manage the behavioral and psychologic symptoms of dementia (BPSD) -- potentially unaware these medications drive mortality rates 1.6 times higher in elderly people with dementia.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Talking scienceIn 22 years, Karin Heineman has been behind the camera for hundreds of scientific stories. By bringing a plethora of scientists into the world of media, she has garnered unique expertise in bridging the communication gap between those in and out of the lab. During Acoustics '17 Boston, Heineman, executive producer of Inside Science TV, will share some of her experience and highlight important elem
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NYT > Science
Q&A: A Matter of Considerable GravityAll the planets in the solar system interact gravitationally with the sun, but Jupiter’s great mass makes this interaction visible.
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Futurity.org
How organizations fail to prevent ‘insider threat’ leaks Although the probability is low that a company or government organization will have to cope with information being leaked by someone working inside, the probability rises over time that an “insider threat” event will occur, political scientist Scott Sagan argues in a new book. An insider threat comes from within an organization—employees, former employees, contractors, or business associates—who
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Wired
V2V Tech For Motorcycles Could Keep Riders SafeIsraeli firm Autotalks has developed a vehicle-to-vehicle communication system that could alert motorcyclists to crashes before they happen.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Most Opioid Prescriptions Are for People with Depression, Other Mood DisordersThe finding raises questions about how different people respond to pain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
This Could Be the Most Detailed Image of a Distant Star Yet Image: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/E. O’Gorman/P. Kervella Orion is the Beyonce of constellations. Pretty much everyone has heard of it and seen it (you can even see it in New York despite the light pollution). It’s hard not to like it. And if you spend some time studying its behavior and meaning, you’ll only appreciate its intricacies even more. So there’s good reason to be excited about this new image
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Viden
Kiloet "taber" sig: Nu skal det vejes på en ny mådeForskere er i gang med at udvikle en mere præcis metode til at måle kilo, så vægt ikke længere er baseret på en fysisk genstand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study uncovers link between male hormones and metabolic disease in polycystic ovary syndromeScientists have discovered the link between increased male hormones and metabolic complications such as diabetes and fatty liver disease in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).
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Big Think
Why Socialism Is Back as a Political Force That Will Only Grow The political and economic ideas of socialism are coming back into fashion. Read More
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study describes changes to structural brain networks after radiotherapy for brain tumorsResearchers compared the thickness of brain cortex in patients with brain tumors before and after radiation therapy was applied and found significant dose-dependent changes in the structural properties of cortical neural networks, at both the local and global level.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fluid in the knee holds clues for why osteoarthritis is more common in femalesResearchers have more evidence that males and females are different, this time in the fluid that helps protect the cartilage in their knee joints.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beyond bananas: 'Mind reading' technology decodes complex thoughtsThis latest research led by CMU's Marcel Just builds on the pioneering use of machine learning algorithms with brain imaging technology to "mind read." The findings indicate that the mind's building blocks for constructing complex thoughts are formed by the brain's various sub-systems and are not word-based.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panda love spreads to benefit the planetLoving pandas isn't just a feel-good activity. Recent Michigan State University (MSU) work shows China's decades of defending panda turf have been good not just for the beloved bears, but also protects habitat for other valuable plants and animals, boosts biodiversity and fights climate change.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Latest stats are just a start in preventing gun injuries in kidsNew stats on firearm deaths and injuries are disturbing, but the picture to make policy is far from complete, researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ohio concentrates effort to reduce harmful Lake Erie algaeOhio's environmental regulators who have pledged to drastically cut what's feeding the harmful algae in Lake Erie will consolidate oversight of the work to make sure money is being well spent and research isn't overlapping.
8h
Live Science
What Are Sinkholes?Sinkholes occur when the ground collapses gradually or suddenly due to dissolving bedrock, sometimes taking homes or cars with it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers use replica to pinpoint California dam repairsInside a cavernous northern Utah warehouse, hydraulic engineers send water rushing down a replica of a dam built out of wood, concrete and steel—trying to pinpoint what repairs will work best at the tallest dam in the U.S for a spillway torn apart in February during heavy rains that triggered the evacuation of 200,000 people living downstream.
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Ars Technica
After nine launches in 2017, it’s tough to be an honest critic of SpaceX SpaceX Elon Musk and SpaceX had one hell of a weekend. While much of the country celebrated the summer weekend at the beach or enjoying time with friends, SpaceX was hard at work launching two rockets for customers, one from the East Coast and one from the West Coast. One of those rockets had previously been flown. And despite dangerous returns due to high-energy missions and inclement weather, t
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Ars Technica
Back to the iPhone future: Lessons from a decade of Apple influence in medicine Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) Ten years ago this week—on June 29, 2007 —many waited (in line or online) for the first iPhone's formal release. Steve Jobs revealed what he promised would be a game-changing device months earlier, providing plenty of time for the lofty dreams, predictions, and excitement to build. The decade since has largely justified the hype. Apple's now-signature
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cash Is Falling Out of Fashion--Will It Disappear Forever?Cash will likely become less popular, thanks to the high cost of using cash and the growing array of alternatives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
War for the Planet of the Apes Is One of the Best—and Bleakest—Summer Blockbusters Ever War for the Planet of the Apes is intense and incredible. All Images: Fox When War for the Planet of the Apes ended, I was unable to move. Glued to my seat, I sat dumbfounded at the achievement I’d just witnessed: an exquisitely filmed, emotionally stunning film that challenges what a big-budget, summer blockbuster is supposed to be. And it’s about a planet of apes. The crazy thing is, the movie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Topsy-turvy motion creates light switch effect at UranusMore than 30 years after Voyager 2 sped past Uranus, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers are using the spacecraft's data to learn more about the icy planet. Their new study suggests that Uranus' magnetosphere, the region defined by the planet's magnetic field and the material trapped inside it, gets flipped on and off like a light switch every day as it rotates along with the planet. It's
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon basin deforestation could disrupt distant rainforest by remote climate connectionThe ongoing deforestation around the fringes of the Amazon may have serious consequences for the untouched deeper parts of the rainforest. A new research study shows that it is not only the climate that is adversely affected by deforestation. In fact, the very stability of the ecosystem in the entire Amazon region is altered when deforestation takes place in the outermost regions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lending plants a hand to survive droughtThe findings have helped some plants survive 50 percent longer in drought conditions, and could eventually benefit major crops such as barley, rice and wheat, which are crucial to world food supplies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Significant racial disparities persist in hospital readmissionsA new study in the journal Health Affairs shows that, despite being designed to more effectively manage care and control costs, black patients enrolled with Medicare Advantage are far more likely to be readmitted to the hospital after a surgery than those enrolled on traditional Medicare. Furthermore, significant disparities continue to exist in readmission rate between black and white Medicare pa
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amazon basin deforestation could disrupt distant rainforest by remote climate connectionThe ongoing deforestation around the fringes of the Amazon may have serious consequences for the untouched deeper parts of the rainforest. A new research study shows that it is not only the climate that is adversely affected by deforestation. In fact, the very stability of the ecosystem in the entire Amazon region is altered when deforestation takes place in the outermost regions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Topsy-turvy motion creates light switch effect at UranusA Georgia Tech study suggests Uranus' magnetosphere, the region defined by the planet's magnetic field and the material trapped inside it, gets flipped on and off like a light switch every day as it rotates along with the planet. It's 'open' in one orientation, allowing solar wind to flow into the magnetosphere; it later closes, forming a shield against the solar wind and deflecting it away from t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot cities spell bad news for beesA new study from North Carolina State University finds that common wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NAWI Graz researchers measure light fields in 3-DResearchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz present the new method of 3-D-plasmon tomography in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-scale production of living brain cells enables entirely new researchImportant pieces of the puzzle to understand what drives diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are still missing today. One crucial obstacle for researchers is that it is impossible to examine a living brain cell in someone who is affected by the disease. With the help of a new method for cell conversion, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found a way to produce diseased, aging b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neuron-integrated nanotubes to repair nerve fibersCarbon nanotubes exhibit interesting characteristics rendering them particularly suited to the construction of special hybrid devices -- consisting of biological issue and synthetic material -- planned to re-establish connections between nerve cells, for instance at spinal level, lost on account of lesions or trauma. This is the result of a piece of research published on the scientific journal Nan
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Fungal FireworksThe fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.
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Futurity.org
Bias against overweight kids starts early Even children as young as nine may carry a prejudice against peers who are overweight—and might not even realize they feel that way. The study could serve as a starting point for further studies on implicit weight bias in children, experts say. “When children are stigmatized for being overweight, it can cause further weight gain and other health consequences,” says Asheley Skinner, associate prof
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutron-rich nucleus shapeshifts between a rugby ball and a discusThere are two coexisting, competing quantum shapes at low energy in 98Kr, never before seen for neutron-rich Kr isotopes, report scientists. The team also showed that these isotopes experience a gentle onset of deformation with added neutrons, in sharp contrast with neighboring isotopes of rubidium, strontium, and zirconium, which change shapes suddenly at neutron number 60. This study marks a dec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dietary and lifestyle recommendations for patients at risk of macular degenerationAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe visual impairment in older populations and is characterized by progressive destruction of the retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptors due to low-grade inflammation, ischemia and oxidative stress. Studies show evidence that carotenoids and antioxidants derived either from the diet or from supplements may significantly red
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New standardized clinical practices reduce premature infant morbidity and mortality in first week of lifeThe Golden Week program was recently recognized nationally for its standardized set of practices for premature infants, providing them with quality care in their first week of life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hearing a warning sound turns into fearing it over time, mouse study suggestsChanges in lattice-like structures in the brain known as perineuronal nets are necessary to 'capture' an auditory fear association and 'haul' it in as a longer-term memory, an adult mouse model reveals.
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Ingeniøren
Fejlagtige vandanalyser kan fjerne analysegrundlag for landbrugspakkens første årLige nu forsøger Aarhus Universitet at finde ud af, hvad det reelt betyder, at et privat laboratorium har benyttet en forældet analysemetode for kvælstof og fosfor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrocaloric refrigerator offers alternative way to cool everything from food to computers(Phys.org)—Researchers have built an electrocaloric refrigerator the size of a beverage coaster that can generate a temperature difference of about 2 K between the hot and cold ends of the device. The cooling mechanism, which is based on the electrocaloric effect, involves alternately applying and removing an electric field to a material to increase and decrease the material's temperature, respect
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The Atlantic
Northern Irish Party Agrees to Support U.K.'s Conservative Government The U.K.’s ruling Conservative Party has reached an agreement with the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) that gives Prime Minister Theresa May a 14-seat parliamentary majority as she navigates her country’s departure from the European Union. Under the deal signed Monday at 10 Downing Street, 10 DUP members of Parliament (MPs) will support May’s minority government during votes on piv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes may have important effects in patients with acute heart failureResearchers have found that patients with acute heart failure and diabetes, compared with those without diabetes, have distinct markers related to inflammation, cardiovascular function, and kidney health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imprecise iron supplementation can spur increase in SalmonellaIndividuals who do not produce enough iron are anemic, and often experience fatigue. One common remedy is for physicians to prescribe an iron infusion to their anemic patients. This makes sense, but can lead to unexpected consequences like increasing the risk of food poisons such as Salmonella. These types of poisons depend on abundant access to iron. Physicians should be attuned to this dynamic w
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Different origins of Cu-Pb-Zn-bearing and W-bearing granitesThe source of granite is crucial for its metallogenic specialization. A recent research revealed the different origins of ore-bearing granites in the Nanling Range of South China. The Middle-Late Jurassic Cu-Pb-Zn-bearing and W-bearing granites were derived from non-simultaneous partial melting of the mafic amphibolitic and the muscovite-rich metasedimentary basements, respectively.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fatality rates are high within 2 years of drug-induced liver injuryMost patients suffering liver toxicity due to medications or herbal or dietary supplements recover from the acute liver injury without long-term problems, but some do not survive the injury or they require liver transplantation.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mitochondria targeting anti-tumor compoundResearchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have found that the compound folic acid-conjugated methyl-BETA-cyclodextrin (FA-M-BETA-CyD) has significant antitumor effects on folate receptor-ALPHA-expressing (FR-ALPHA (+)) cancer cells. The compound significantly reduced ATP production while simultaneously increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Side effects in animal models were mini
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twitter-monitoring system detects riots far quicker than police reportsSocial media can be an invaluable source of information for police when managing major disruptive events, new research from Cardiff University has shown.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D printing with living tissues may help treat joint diseasesDegeneration of cartilage and other joint tissues is a major cause of disability.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination approach improves power of new cancer therapyAn international research team has found a way to improve the anti-cancer effect of a new medicine class called 'Smac mimetics.'
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physician heal thyself: Simple coping strategies for pervasive physician burnoutThe proverb, 'physician heal thyself,' is probably more relevant today than it was in biblical times with the fast pace of life, the impact of multitasking and the unending bombardment of information, which have made emotional exhaustion almost certain. And this is especially true for obstetricians and gynecologists who experience professional burnout rates between 40 to 75 percent.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular brisk walks and a daily longer one help lower office workers' blood lipidsA recent study from New Zealand's University of Otago shows for the first time that taking 2-minute brisk walks every 30 minutes and a half-hour walk each day reduces blood lipid levels when measured in response to a meal consumed around 24 hours after starting the activity.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopauseResults of a new study from epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that long-term, high intake of vegetable protein from such foods as whole grains, soy and tofu, may protect women from early menopause and could prolong reproductive function.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Beers and the Bees: Pollinators Provide a Different Kind of Brewer's YeastA North Carolina lab taps stinging insects for an ancient microbe to use in “bumblebeer” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Wired
Star Wars News: So, What’s Going on With the Han Solo Movie?The Star Wars standalone movie about young Han Solo had quite the shakeup last week. Here's everything you need to know about what went down.
9h
Futurity.org
‘Building blocks’ in bacteria look like soccer balls Scientists have created the first detailed image of a bacterial microcompartment shell—the organisms’ submicroscopic nanoreactors, which are made entirely of protein and serve as the basic “building blocks” of bacteria. The results of the research show how the architectural principles of bacterial microcompartments, or BMCs, apply to both “good” and “bad” bacteria that use these nanoreactors to p
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A functional prototype nonvolatile ferroelectric domain wall memory(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from institutions in Australia, the U.S. and China has developed a functional prototype nonvolatile ferroelectric domain wall memory. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their prototype, its properties and how well it worked.
9h
Ars Technica
Monster Hunter: World promises “deep, meaty experience on console” Enlarge Monster Hunter 's trick—and it's a persuasive one—is to deliver us back to a time when giant lizards trod the Earth, while keeping our current enviable status as masters of the food chain intact. In Jurassic Park , when the dinosaurs escaped their pens, humans became frail prey, cowering in toilets, whispering prayers under trucks. Monster Hunter 's vision of the Jurassic-flung human is w
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greater muscle strength -- better cognitive function for older peopleGreater muscle strength is associated with better cognitive function in ageing men and women, according to a new Finnish study. The association of extensively measured upper and lower body muscle strength with cognitive function was observed, but handgrip strength was not associated with cognitive function.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to stay sane when your child can't sleepYour child's sleep problems may be making you depressed and unsure of your parenting skills, says a new paper by UBC sleep expert and nursing professor Wendy Hall. The good news is you can turn the situation around. In this Q&A, she talks about the connection between parental sanity and infant sleep -- and offers a few suggestions for parents unsure of the way forward.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lending plants a hand to survive droughtA research team led by the Australian National University has found a new way to help plants better survive drought by enhancing their natural ability to preserve water.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movementA technique for inserting a gene into specific cell types in the adult brain can be used to alter the function of brain circuits and change behaviors in an animal model. The method will allow scientists to better understand what roles certain cell types play in the brain's complex circuitry. Researchers hope the approach might someday lead to developing treatments for conditions like epilepsy that
9h
Science | The Guardian
If it quacks like a duck … will a car horn be less annoying? Experts in South Korea think they have found a less irritating way to express your frustration with fellow motorists. Well, it beats flipping them the bird At the risk of sounding like Michael Gove , I think the problem with experts is that they don’t agree. Researchers in Seoul, having tested various car noises on 100 volunteers , have found that horns would suit us all much better if they sound
9h
Gizmodo
More Clarifications About Both Venom and Silver and Black's Place in the Marvel Movieverse Don’t expect many new faces in between Infinity War and Avengers 4 . A new Spider-Man: Homecoming cast list seemingly confirms another Marvel cameo. Get a first look at Pixar’s new experimental short. Plus, a new trailer for Doctor Who ’s season finale and set pictures from Jessica Jones season 2. Spoilers now! Ad Astra Deadline reports that Brad Bitt and Tommy Lee Jones will play father and son
9h
Science : NPR
Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know Many American women want to breast-feed — and try to. Only about half keep it up. It's like they've lost the instinct. One researcher thinks she's figured out why and how to get the instinct back.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Steelhead trout population declines linked with poor survival of young fish in the oceanSteelhead trout are entrenched in the economy, ecology, and culture of the Pacific Northwest. Declining numbers of steelhead in the rivers flowing through British Columbia, Washington state, and Oregon are troubling fishers and fisheries managers alike. A new study published today in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (CJFAS) shows that survival of young steelhead trout in ocea
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should robot artists be given copyright protection?When a group of museums and researchers in the Netherlands unveiled a portrait entitled The Next Rembrandt, it was something of a tease to the art world. It wasn't a long lost painting but a new artwork generated by a computer that had analysed thousands of works by the 17th-century Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find clever way to help you de-clutter your homeIf your attic is full of stuff you no longer use but can't bear to give away, a new study may offer you a simple solution.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insights into the toxin behind tetanusTetanus toxin is the neurotoxin that causes lockjaw. Many are vaccinated, but tetanus still kills tens of thousands of people per year worldwide. Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, led by Dr. Pål Stenmark, have now uncovered the poison's structure. For the first time, the way the poison is constructed has been revealed.
9h
Ars Technica
Botched Sega Forever launch blighted by poor emulation Enlarge (credit: Sega) The concept behind Sega Forever is a good one: bring a selection of classic Sega games to iOS and Android, and let people play them for free. Unfortunately, the execution has left something to be desired. Following the launch of Sega Forever last week, players have taken to the App Store and Google Play to complain about choppy frame rates, out-of-sync audio, and input lag,
9h
Gizmodo
Disney Says President Trump Will Speak at the Hall of Presidents, Contradicting Earlier Reports [Updated] An artist’s depiction of every Disney fan’s worst nightmare, a robotic Donald Trump at Walt Disney World’s Hall of Presidents When President Trump was elected, many wondered what would happen with Walt Disney World’s Hall of Presidents attraction in Florida. Back in May, Motherboard reported that the new robo-Trump would break tradition and might not speak at all . But Disney announced yesterday
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain sends reinforcements as fire spreads near wildlife reserveFirefighters were battling Monday to contain a blaze threatening a renowned national park in southern Spain which has already led to the evacuation of some 2,000 people.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch scientists fete rare meteorite findDutch scientists on Monday celebrated the discovery of only the sixth meteorite found in recent history in The Netherlands, which at 4.5-billion years old may hold clues to the birth of our solar system.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Portugal airline chief fears increasing drone near-missesPortugal's national airline chief said Monday he is considering asking authorities to order that all drones in the country be grounded, following a series of near-misses with commercial aircraft.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Camera-trap research paves the way for global monitoring networksBiodiversity loss is one of the driving factors in ecosystem change, on par with climate change and human development. When one species, especially a large predator, disappears from an area, other populations will be affected, sometimes changing entire landscapes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World View Enterprises looking to popularize use of stratospheric balloons(Phys.org)—World View Enterprises bills itself on its website as a "full-service commercial launch provider"—it offers to take various types of equipment up to the edge of space using a balloon for a short amount of time for less money than NASA charges. The newly burgeoning field of balloon science is the topic of a Feature piece by journalist Adam Mann for the journal Science—he takes a closer l
9h
The Scientist RSS
Human Presence Influences Chimps Hunting HabitsResearchers find differences in predatory behavior between a long-observed chimp tribe and a recently habituated one.
10h
Ingeniøren
Teleankenævn: Pas på dyre ferie-emojier på 16 bitFerie-SMSer fra Vietnam har kostet en forbruger 1.000 kroner, fordi hun ikke vidste, hvordan emojier ændrer ved kodningen af SMSer. Teleankenævnet mener, det er hendes egen fejl.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mouse lemurs may provide insight into human behaviour and well-beingSomething to Google today: mouse lemurs.
10h
Gizmodo
MassDrop's Legendary Sennheiser Headphone Deal Just Went Live Again, But You'll Have to Hurry Sennheiser HD 6XX , $250 at 9AM ET. 7500 units available. Sennheiser’s HD 650 open back headphones are widely considered some of the best-sounding cans you can buy for under $1000, and the best chance to get them is when MassDrop drops a new shipment of the legendary HD 6XX. The 6XX is basically exactly the same as the 650, but with a 6' cable rather than the original’s 10', which is actually a b
10h
Futurity.org
Bendy glass lets these sea sponges hang tight Sea sponges known as Venus’ flower baskets remain fixed to the sea floor with nothing more than an array of thin, hair-like anchors that are essentially glass. A new study suggests it’s the internal architecture of those anchors, known as basalia spicules, that helps them to do it. The spicules, each about half the diameter of a human hair, are made of a central silica (glass) core clad within 25
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find clever way to help you de-clutter your homeIf your attic is full of stuff you no longer use but can't bear to give away, a new study may offer you a simple solution. Researchers found that people were more willing to give away unneeded goods that still had sentimental value if they were encouraged to take a photo of these items first, or find another way to preserve the memories.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetic implants used to treat 'dancing eyes'A UCL-led research team has successfully used magnets implanted behind a person's eyes to treat nystagmus, a condition characterized by involuntary eye movements.
10h
Ars Technica
How 7 words unfit for TV fostered an open Internet 20 years ago today Comedian George Carlin's monologue, "Seven words you can never say on television," opened the door for the American Civil Liberties Union to convince the US Supreme Court to nullify legislation outlawing "indecent" online speech. Twenty years ago today the Supreme Court issued a landmark decision and unanimously overturned congressional legislation that made it unlawful to transmit "indecent" mat
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yes, microlending reduces extreme povertyA small boost in microlending to the developing world could lift more than 10.5 million people out of extreme poverty. That's one conclusion of my study, published last month in The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, which found that microfinance not only reduces how many households live in poverty but also how poor they are.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'I wanna be white!' Can we change race?Few academics expect to find their work hotly debated in the New York Times. Those who publish in feminist philosophy journals can reasonably expect a certain degree of obscurity. How then did philosophy professor Rebecca Tuvel's article, "In Defense of Transracialism," become the target of an angry petition, vociferous debate and international media commentary?
10h
Wired
The Alien Rocks Dusting the Streets of Your NeighborhoodJon Larsen proved that micrometeorites can be found in urban areas. And he also offers the world its first real glimpse of them.
10h
Live Science
Coastal Louisiana Is Sinking Faster Than ExpectedNew research shows that the worst-case scenarios of years past are now the average along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, as sea level rise, erosion, and subsidence eat away a Manhattan-sized chunk of land each year.
10h
Ingeniøren
Byggeskadefond efter voldgift: Nu skal vi gennemgå alle vores MgO-sagerUdskiftningen af de fugtsugende MgO-plader i almene boliger kommer til at koste omkring 450 mio. kr. Efter den første voldgiftskendelse går Byggeskadefonden, som forsikrer de almene boliger, nu i gang med at se på, om kendelsen kan føre til forlig i andre sager.
10h
Ars Technica
If Ferrari built an M3: The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn (video link) It's fair to say that I'd been looking forward to getting behind the wheel of the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio for some time. The brand's new flagship sedan is a $72,000, 505hp (377kW) rear-wheel drive statement of intent, a car that says to rivals at BMW and Mercedes and Cadillac that the Italians are back. It first caught our attention at th
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Futurity.org
Something big is warping the outer solar system The plane of our solar system is warped in the outer reaches of the Kuiper Belt, suggesting the presence of an unknown Mars-to-Earth-mass planetary object far beyond Pluto—but much closer than Planet Nine. An unknown, unseen “planetary mass object” may lurk in the outer reaches of our solar system, according to new research on the orbits of minor planets. The object would be different from—and mu
10h
The Atlantic
How to Reawaken a Sense of Solidarity in America For Michele Moody-Adams, a professor of political philosophy and legal theory at Columbia University, ensuring continued peace and prosperity in the United States depends not only on our ability to restore trust in government and the officials who run it. It is just as critical “that we figure out how to reawaken a sense of solidarity with each other as citizens, and to revive the belief that sol
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enhanced stability in the presence of water could help reduce smokestack emissions of greenhouse gasesHeat and humidity can harm materials. The conditions inside smokestacks often damage materials that could remove carbon dioxide. This is especially true for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which remove carbon dioxide under milder conditions. To clean up the waste gases generated by industrial processes and in making energy, scientists created a new hybrid material. They combined polymers with met
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial brain helps Gaia catch speeding starsWith the help of software that mimics a human brain, ESA's Gaia satellite spotted six stars zipping at high speed from the centre of our galaxy to its outskirts. This could provide key information about some of the most obscure regions of the Milky Way.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New bone identification method will help the study of past human societiesA new technique enabling archaeologists to distinguish between the bones of sheep and goats has been developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Sound-reflecting shelters inspired ancient rock artistsAncient Europeans sought rock art sites where sounds carried.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2017Which 10 disruptive solutions are now poised to change the world? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
10 Emerging Technologies to WatchInnovations that are on the verge of making a difference to society -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VTT's miniature hyperspectral camera launched to space in Aalto-1 satelliteVTT's small and lightweight hyperspectral camera was successfully launched to space in Aalto-1 nanosatellite on 23rd of June 2017. Scalable sensing technology offers opportunities for new SmallSat- based services.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers measure light fields in 3-DResearchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz present the new method of 3-D-plasmon tomography in Nature Communications.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the gas industry can help fight climate change in SiberiaPermafrost is the layer of permanently frozen earth – over a 1,000 metres thick in some places – that lies just beneath the land surface in Arctic regions. It formed over the past few million years when ice ages predominated.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Help us find out what our possibly habitable exoplanet neighbour is actually likeThere was a lot of excitement when Proxima b was discovered – a potentially habitable exoplanet around our nearest neighbour star, Proxima Centauri. Located a mere 4.24 light years away, we may actually be able to send tiny robots there in the next few decades. And now you can help lead the way.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot cities spell bad news for beesA new study from North Carolina State University finds that common wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase.
10h
Popular Science
How to go ultralight camping DIY Hit the trail without any extra baggage. Going camping doesn’t have to feel like gearing up for a Himalayan expedition. Here’s how to get ready for an overnight hike without breaking the bank—or your back. Read…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iron chemistry matters for ocean carbon uptakeFor many years, scientists have speculated that seeding the ocean with iron might help to stave off climate change. Iron in seawater promotes the growth of phytoplankton, which in turn devours carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. Iron basically allows the ocean to soak up carbon.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny magnetic tremors unlock exotic superconductivityDeep within solids, individual electrons zip around on a nanoscale highway paved with atoms. For the most part, these electrons avoid one another, kept in separate lanes by their mutual repulsion. But vibrations in the atomic road can blur their lanes and sometimes allow the tiny particles to pair up. The result is smooth and lossless travel, and it's one way to create superconductivity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manipulating Earth-abundant materials to harness the sun's energyDepositing one layer of atoms at a time can result in materials that greatly improve fuel cells, batteries and other devices. In this research, scientists precisely added chromium to iron oxides to control the electronic and optical properties. The result was a highly ordered thin film of chromium ferrite (Fe2CrO4). Chromium ferrite becomes more electrically conductive by absorbing light. The mate
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to help kids navigate fake news and misinformation onlineYoung people get a huge amount of their news from social media feeds, where false, exaggerated or sponsored content is often prevalent. With the right tools, caregivers can give kids the knowledge they need to assess credible information for themselves.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New form of carbon discovered that is harder than diamond but flexible as rubberScientists have found a way to make carbon both very hard and very stretchy by heating it under high pressure. This "compressed glassy carbon", developed by researchers in China and the US, is also lightweight and could potentially be made in very large quantities. This means it might be a good fit for several sorts of applications, from bulletproof vests to new kinds of electronic devices.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The crown jewel of the HL-LHC magnetsWhile the LHC is at the start of a new season of data taking, scientists and engineers around the world are working hard to develop brand new magnets for the LHC upgrade, the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Phone scams cost billions. Why isn't technology being used to stop them?World-wide, credit card fraud and other scams cost the public billions of dollars. While credit card fraud is the clear leader in sheer volume of money lost, "regular scams" still result in a significant amount of money being lost each year.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet the dogs with OCDCuriously, and perhaps eagerly, I am looking at a bull terrier named Sputnik, searching for a resemblance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More than meets the eye to ulcer-inducing bacterial proteinScientists at The University of Western Australia and Perth-based biotech Ondek Pty Ltd have revealed new insights into the function of an important bacterial protein in Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach ulcers.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble scopes out a galaxy of stellar birthThis image displays a galaxy known as ESO 486-21 (with several other background galaxies and foreground stars visible in the field as well). ESO 486-21 is a spiral galaxy—albeit with a somewhat irregular and ill-defined structure—located some 30 million light-years from Earth.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-term study finds energy development has lasting impact on deer populationsA new long-term study finds that energy development has longer-lasting impacts on mule deer populations than previously thought.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016A series of unprecedented storms over the Southern Ocean likely caused the most dramatic decline in Antarctic sea ice seen to date, a new study finds.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
International FOOD-konference bød på lovende forskning i fødevareanalyse med supercontinuum laserForskere fra Institut for Fødevarevidenskab (FOOD) ved Københavns Universitet har som de...
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drivers cautious but curious over automated cars, first Canadian study showsSay what you will about old dogs and new tricks, it appears men over 50 are most keen to embrace fully automated cars when computer-chauffeured vehicles finally appear on Canadian streets.
11h
Gizmodo
President Trump Has Deleted 22 Tweets Since Taking Office President Trump looks bewildered as George Mathew CEO of Kespry explains how a drone works during the American Leadership in Emerging Technology Event in the East Room of the White House on June 22, 2017 (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) Yesterday, President Trump sent a tweet simply saying that he was going to appear on the TV show Fox & Friends. But the tweet has since been deleted
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steelhead trout population declines linked with poor survival of young fish in the oceanResearchers find declining survival of juvenile steelhead trout in the ocean is strongly coupled with significant declines in populations of wild and hatchery steelhead in the Pacific Northwest
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into the toxin behind tetanusTetanus toxin is the neurotoxin that causes lockjaw. Many are vaccinated, but tetanus still kills tens of thousands of people per year worldwide. Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, led by Dr. Pål Stenmark, have now uncovered the poison's structure. For the first time, the way the poison is constructed has been revealed.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Near instantaneous evolution discovered in bacteriaHow fast does evolution occur? In certain bacteria, it can occur almost instantaneously, a University at Buffalo molecular biologist has discovered.
11h
Wired
What Is Steganography?It's basically hiding bad things in good things.
11h
Wired
Bong Joon-ho, *Snowpiercer'*s Auteur, Returns With a Netflix Film About a Hippo-PigBong Joon-ho is back to indulge his obsessions with 'Okja,' about a friendship between a young girl and a ... manatee-hippo thingy.
11h
Wired
Fast, Precise Cancer Care Is Coming to a Hospital Near YouThe FDA just approved at test that can tell you how different drugs will work for you, based on the genetic makeup of your tumor.
11h
New Scientist - News
The death of King Coal hints we are at a climate turning pointCoal use is dying out and wind and solar energy are booming. This means the world is changing around you despite inaction by backward-looking politicians
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Men quitting pink collar jobs because they feel stereotypedMen often appear to have an advantage over women in the workplace, but that is not always the case in female-dominated industries.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How companies and employees benefit from workplace flexibilityWorking from home gets a bad rap. Google the phrase and examine the results—you'll see scams or low-level jobs, followed by links calling out "legitimate" virtual jobs.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: SOHO's summer solstice sunResidents of Earth's northern hemisphere enjoyed the greatest number of daylight hours in a single day all year on 21 June 2017. This summer solstice occurs when the tilt of Earth's axis is most inclined towards the sun, which sits directly over the Tropic of Cancer.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Earth’s dry zones support a surprising number of treesA Google Earth-based estimate of dryland forests adds serious leafage to Earth’s total tree count.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
Get Hacked and Your Cybersecurity Company May PayA small but growing number of cybersecurity companies are introducing warranty programs that can serve as insurance against the cost of a potential data breach.
11h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #6: Biler er noget vi deler - også med robotterneI fremtiden er det slut med at købe biler. De skal ud af garagen og ind i en app, og chaufførtjansen lader vi teknologien om. SIRI-kommissionen har kortlagt fremtidens digitale transport.
11h
The Atlantic
What Jeff Tweedy Has Been Trying to Say Jeff Tweedy’s Together at Last, an acoustic album of songs he’s previously recorded, forces the listener to reckon anew with how one of the best songwriters of our day mostly sings in gibberish. Without the layers of instrumental intrigue that distinguish Wilco’s folk rock, the American Dixie cup drinker assassin-ing down the avenue of “I Am Trying to Break Your Heart” and the muzzle of bees of “
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
If Trump Won't Uphold the Paris Agreement, Will You?If your answer is yes, declare your personal commitment by becoming a citizen-signer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
World's Largest Wind Turbine Would Be Taller Than the Empire State BuildingMassive, flexible blades would bend with storm winds like the palm trees that inspired them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Live Science
10 Amazing Things Scientists Just Did with CRISPRWith CRISPR technology, advances in gene editing are now coming fast and furious.
12h
Ingeniøren
Ny helikopter skal cruise med 400 km/t Helikoptere
12h
Ingeniøren
Tunnel fra Helsingør til Helsingborg? Dansk/svensk undersøgelse på vejAnalysen af den økonomiske holdbarhed ved en eventuel fast trafikforbindelse mellem Helsingør og Helsingborg forventes klar om tre år.
12h
The Atlantic
Finding Faith in Democracy at Moments of National Conflict For David Moss, author of Democracy: A Case Study , history provides a guide for coping with disagreement in a nation as vast as the United States. “Robust faith in the democracy itself has the power to transform our differences from a potentially grave weakness into a precious source of strength,” he writes, drawing on an insight that great American statesmen have expressed from the beginning: I
12h
The Atlantic
How to Talk to Anti-Vaxers If you run into a left-leaning “consultant” these days, there’s a fairly good chance they used to work for the Obama administration. Scores of federal officials and bureaucrats have resigned or been fired since President Trump’s inauguration, some after realizing their goals were not in line with the new president’s. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dise
12h
The Atlantic
The Poverty Just Over the Hills From Silicon Valley On the drive up the coast from the southernmost part of Northern California’s San Mateo County, Highway 1’s two lanes are surrounded by wind-whipped seas on one side and redwood forests on the other. The landscape is dotted with wild yellow mustard in the spring and pumpkins in the fall. A popular place for day-trippers to picnic, go wine-tasting, and shop at roadside farm stands, the region—affe
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