EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research identifies key mechanism behind some deafnessAlthough the basic outlines of human hearing have been known for years -- sensory cells in the inner ear turn sound waves into the electrical signals that the brain understands as sound -- the molecular details have remained elusive. New research has identified a crucial protein in this translation process.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognitionResearchers have examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. It turns out that cognitive performance was improved by a daily intake of cocoa flavanols.
6h
Ingeniøren
Rederier vil sætte sejl på fragtskibeneStore supertankere drevet af bunkerolie er, hvad de fleste ser for sig, når de tænker på shippingindustrien. Men flere firmaer er hoppet med på den grønne bølge, og er nu i gang med at undersøge mulighederne for at drive forretning med hjælp fra vind og sejl.
12h

LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pair female engineering students for projects, and they flourishFemale first-year students earn a higher grade when paired with at least one other female for group projects in introductory college engineering classes, according to new research.
3min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel molecular dynamics captures atomic-level detail of CRISPR-Cas9 activityFor the first time, researchers have discovered the myriad structural changes that activate and drive CRISPR-Cas9, the innovative gene-splicing technology that’s transforming the field of genetic engineering.
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teenage weight gain linked to increased stroke risk as an adultKids who become overweight during their teenage years may be more likely to develop a stroke decades later than kids who did not become overweight during those years, according to a study.
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers help develop technique for assessing, reducing risk of future strokeUsing health records, researchers developed an algorithm for scoring the risk of a stroke patient experiencing a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation, a major risk factor for a second stroke.
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Incremental discovery may one day lead to photosynthetic breakthroughPhotosynthesis is one of the most complicated and important processes—responsible for kick-starting Earth's food chain. While we have modeled its more-than-100 major steps, scientists are still discovering the purpose of proteins that can be engineered to increase yield, as scientists recently proved in Science. Now researchers have uncovered secrets about another protein, CP12—the full understand
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
State revenue declines lead to cuts in children's Medicaid benefits, education spendingState spending cuts during economic downturns fall more heavily on children than the elderly, according to new research by experts at Rice University. Their findings are published in the National Tax Journal and analyze implications for policymakers.
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NIST 'noise thermometry' yields accurate new measurements of Boltzmann constantBy measuring the random jiggling motion of electrons in a resistor, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have contributed to accurate new measurements of the Boltzmann constant, a fundamental scientific value that relates the energy of a system to its temperature. NIST made one measurement in its Boulder, Colorado, laboratory and collaborated on another in China
1min
The Atlantic
Planned Parenthood to Senate Republicans: 'Don't Take Our Stuff!' Sarah Stevens, a lactation consultant from Anchorage, Alaska, traveled all the way to Washington, D.C., this week to speak to her senator, Lisa Murkowski—one of the few Republican holdouts on the party’s health-care overhaul. Shortly after she explained to Murkowski why she’d made the trek, she told me why, too. Starting at age 15 and into her late 20s, Stevens said, she received all of her prima
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows antibiotics effective for treatment of small skin infectionsNew multicenter research, which included Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators, could change treatment approaches to simple skin abscesses, infections often caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIST 'noise thermometry' yields accurate new measurements of boltzmann constantBy measuring the random jiggling motion of electrons in a resistor, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have contributed to accurate new measurements of the Boltzmann constant, a fundamental scientific value that relates the energy of a system to its temperature.
7min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving a sweet problem for renewable biofuels and chemicalsWhether or not society shakes its addiction to oil and gasoline will depend on a number of profound environmental, geopolitical and societal factors.
7min
cognitive science
Predicting the Brain Activation Pattern Associated With the Propositional Content of a Sentence: Modeling Neural Representations of Events and States (fMRI and machine learning used to predict thoughts) submitted by /u/dem0n0cracy [link] [comments]
10min
Gizmodo
Music Festival Confetti Cannons Might Be Our Only Surefire Defense Against Drones GIF As if random asteroids and vengeful hawks weren’t enough of a reason to keep a wary eye on the skies, drones have gone from being harmless RC toys to genuine weapons. Until now, the only way to stay safe was to only go outside on windy days, but it looks like there’s a new weapon for the war on drones : confetti cannons. The pilot in this video was trying to capture footage of an over-energiz
25min
The Atlantic
DARPA's Ex-Leader's Speculative Dream of Mind-Melding Empathy The former head of DARPA, Arati Prabhakar, has a dream. It’s a civilian utopian neuroscience dream that’s kind of the inverse of the scenarios that the far-out research wing of the military normally develops. In a presentation at the Aspen Ideas Festival, which is co-hosted by the Aspen Institute and The Atlantic , she’d just shown a video from University of Utah research in which a soldier who’d
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State revenue declines lead to cuts in children's Medicaid benefits, education spendingState spending cuts during economic downturns fall more heavily on children than the elderly, according to new research by experts at Rice University. Their findings are published in the National Tax Journal and analyze implications for policymakers.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Incremental discovery may one day lead to photosynthetic breakthroughPhotosynthesis is one of the most complicated and important processes -- responsible for kick-starting Earth's food chain. While we have modeled its more-than-100 major steps, scientists are still discovering the purpose of proteins that can be engineered to increase yield, as scientists recently proved in Science. Now researchers have uncovered secrets about another protein, CP12 -- the full unde
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Possible early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorderMeasuring a set of proteins in the blood may enable earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study from the Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute at UT Southwestern Medical Center.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solving a sweet problem for renewable biofuels and chemicalsReed Cartwright and Xuan Wang have teamed up to try to break through the innovation bottleneck for the renewable bioproduction of fuels and chemicals. They've looked into a new approach -- harnessing the trial-and-error power of evolution to coax nature into revealing the answer.By growing bacteria over generations under specially controlled conditions in fermentation tanks, they have test-tube ev
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers find link between food allergies and childhood anxietyResearchers studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children and found that children with a food allergy had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood anxiety. Food allergies were not associated with symptoms of childhood depression or with symptoms of anxiety or depression among their caregiv
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers discover the most abundant viruses in Earth's oceansForty-four of the most abundant new viruses in all the Earth's oceans have been identified by scientists. The finding has been achieved thanks to the application of cutting-edge techniques that mix flow cytometry and genomics and molecular biology techniques.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprisingly exact timing of voluntary movementsAlmost everything we do -- walking, talking, or drinking coffee -- is completely dependent on accurate timing when activating many muscles at once. The prevailing theory has been that the exact timing of this type of movement is not voluntarily controlled, and the timing has therefore been assumed to be fully automated when learning movements. However, a new study shows that people are fully capab
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ryanair random seat allocation is not so random says expertPassengers have more chance of winning the National Lottery jackpot than being allocated middle seats at random on a Ryanair flight, according to a new analysis.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microfluidic chip predicts risk of preterm birthPreterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Now, researchers have developed a system to capture and identify a scarce blood peptide called P1 that can predict increased risk of preterm birth, offering the opportunity to delay birth or increase fetus viability to save lives and reduce lifelong disabilities.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered Hawaiian monk seal gives birth on remote beachA Hawaiian monk seal conservation volunteer has captured rare video of one of the animals giving birth.
31min
Science : NPR
Researchers Analyze Economic Impact Of Climate Change In The U.S. A team of scientists and economists claims they've come up with the most thorough analysis of the cost of climate change in the U.S. Most of the country will suffer economic loss in addition to higher mortality from heat waves and loss of agriculture productivity by 2100. But like all predictions far into the future, this one has a wide range of outcomes and could be overshadowed by new technolog
40min
Science : NPR
Maryland Farmer Fights To Keep Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Alive The Chesapeake Bay cleanup depends heavily on farmers taking steps to keep runoff from entering the bay. But the Environmental Protection Agency's plan to help them do it has been controversial. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to one Maryland farmer who changed his mind about the EPA efforts to clean up the bay.
40min
Gizmodo
McMansion Hell is Back Online, Will Not Comply With Zillow's Demands Photo: Getty Earlier this week, the real estate site Zillow sent a cease-and-desist letter to the writer behind McMansion Hell , a blog that makes fun of ugly suburban houses. McMansion Hell’s creator, Kate Wagner, uses Zillow photos in her posts—which Zillow claims is a violation of their terms of service. However, Wagner’s lawyers at the Electronic Frontier Foundation say that her blog is a “cl
43min
Inside Science
Grooves on a Bird’s Beak Help it Fly Faster Grooves on a Bird’s Beak Help it Fly Faster Scientists are inspired by a unique bird to help make fluids flow faster. Grooves On A Bird's Beak Help It Fly Faster Video of Grooves On A Bird's Beak Help It Fly Faster Creature Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 16:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- In 1941, Swiss engineer George de Mestral took a hike with his dog and noticed seve
43min
Inside Science
A Study About Nothing Physics Scientists find new ways to measure the infinitesimally small fluctuations that exist in a vacuum. 06/29/2017 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/study-about-nothing
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social status of listener alters our voicePeople tend to change the pitch of their voice depending on who they are talking to, and how dominant they feel, a study has found.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The sharpest laser in the worldWith a linewidth of only 10 mHz, the laser that the researchers have now developed has established a new world record.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrogen peroxide protects plants against sun damagePlants use hydrogen peroxide -- best known for use in bleach and hair treatments -- to control how their cells react to varying levels of light, new research shows.
43min
Science : NPR
The Bubonic Plague Is Back, This Time In New Mexico In medieval times, they called it "the black death." It's still around, routinely cropping up in the U.S. This time, the New Mexico Department of Health reports three cases. (Image credit: Corbis)
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Confusion over symptoms may be affecting whether women take tamoxifen for breast cancerWomen who are at high risk of developing breast cancer may be failing to take the preventive anti-cancer drug tamoxifen because they are confusing naturally occurring symptoms with side effects from the medicine, according to a study of nearly 4,000 women led by Queen Mary University of London.
49min
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Hearing Be Restored by Making the Brain More Childlike?In mouse experiments, scientists bring back the “critical period” of early in life, in which the ability to process sounds emerges -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
49min
The Atlantic
Convictions in the Murder of Boris Nemtsov A Russian jury convicted five men Thursday in the murder of Russian opposition leader and prominent Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov, concluding a trial Nemtsov’s family has criticized as being insufficient. Nemtsov, one of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most vocal critics, was killed while walking near the Kremlin in February 2015, just days before he was expected to help lead a major rally in M
52min
New Scientist - News
Strongest evidence yet that neonicotinoids are killing beesStudies in Europe and Canada show that controversial neonicotinoid insecticides have adverse effects on reproduction of honeybees and wild bees
57min
New Scientist - News
Old brains can’t hear similar sounds but a drug can change thatAs we age, telling tones apart gets harder – which makes learning languages difficult. A drug that restores hearing in old mice may one day improve human hearing
57min
Wired
Uber's Scandal Provides a Chance to Remake Silicon ValleyOpinion: The lesson of Uber is that we get the companies and the economy we ask for.
58min
Gizmodo
Watch a Simulated Asteroid Hit the Atmosphere at 45,000 Miles Per Hour GIF Four years ago, an asteroid the size of a city bus screamed across the skies of Chelyabinsk, Russia , shattering glass around a 60 mile perimeter and sending 1,200 people to hospitals with related injuries. In an effort to learn more about these rare but dangerous encounters with objects from space, NASA has used a supercomputer to recreate the moment an asteroid of comparable size hits the a
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What Amazon wants from Whole Foods: Data on shopping habitsWhy is Amazon spending nearly $14 billion for Whole Foods ? One reason: People who buy yoga mats and fitness trackers on Amazon might also like grapes, nuts and other healthy items at the organic grocery chain.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change can't halt Vienna third runway: courtAustria's constitutional court on Thursday overturned a landmark ruling that had blocked Vienna airport's plans to build a third runway because of climate change worries.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global cyberattack may have aimed for havoc, not extortionThe cyberattack that has locked up computers around the world while demanding a ransom may not be an extortion attempt after all, but an effort to create havoc in Ukraine, security experts say.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify new mechanism for keeping DNA protein in lineThe actions of a protein used for DNA replication and repair are guided by electrostatic forces known as phosphate steering, a finding that not only reveals key details about a vital process in healthy cells, but provides new directions for cancer treatment research.
1h
The Atlantic
Hamilton's Peaceful Protest In November last year, the morning after the presidential election, the cast of Hamilton faced a day where they had two shows to perform, in the wake of a result that left many of them horrified. “It was a soul-crushing day,” the show’s producer, Jeffrey Seller, said. Some of the production’s actors told him they felt unsafe in America. A wardrobe person was in floods of tears. The company held a
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACP Applauds House for Passage of Multifaceted Approach to Medical Liability ReformThe American College of Physicians (ACP) applauds the House of Representatives for its passage of a multifaceted approach to medical-liability reform, the "Protecting Access to Care Act" (H.R. 1215), yesterday.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomechanical acoustics study sheds light on running injuriesDevoted runners suffer from a surprisingly high rate of injury. One reason for these injuries is that runners endure many shocks from the impact, and these cause vibrations that travel from the foot throughout the entire body. A researcher who focuses on acoustics and biomechanics, studied these repetitive shocks and investigated how runners adapt their running patterns.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic 'fossils' reveal long-term viral partnerships in grassDefective viruses incorporated into grass genomes may adapt to form partnerships with other genome-incorporated viruses in order to complete their life cycle, according to a new study. The findings suggest that partner viruses evolve in concert, enabling them to maintain their relationship over time.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Industrial farming disrupts burn-regrowth cycle in grasslandsThe world's open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, due to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellulosic biofuels can benefit the environment if managed correctlyCould cellulosic biofuels -- or liquid energy derived from grasses and wood -- become a green fuel of the future, providing an environmentally sustainable way of meeting energy needs? In a new article, researchers say yes, but with a few important caveats.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscessesMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. New research found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help heal MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that current treatment options for MRSA still have a role, even a
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism behind precise spinal cord development foundScientists have uncovered how nerve cells in the spinal cord are organized in precise patterns during embryo development -- a finding that could give insight into regenerative medicine.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enabling more stable and scalable quantum computingResearchers have discovered a new topological material which may enable fault-tolerant quantum computing.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A wave's 'sweet spot' revealedFor surfers, finding the 'sweet spot,' the most powerful part of the wave, is part of the thrill and the challenge. Now a researcher has found the exact location on the wave where a surfer gains the greatest speed to get the best ride.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does carrying extra weight offer better survival following a stroke?Despite the fact that obesity increases both the risk for stroke and death, a new study has found that people who are overweight or even mildly obese survive strokes at a higher rate as compared to those with a normal body weight.
1h
Gizmodo
Exclusive: Elon Musk Explains Lusty Floor Tweets Image: AP/Gizmodo Yesterday was SpaceX founder Elon Musk’s birthday. But instead of getting some loving from his beautiful girlfriend or perhaps one of his fancy cars (they can do that now, right?), Musk apparently decided to pop a few Ambien and craft a love poem to the floor. You see, last night, he sent the following nuggets out into the world: Together, the tweets formed a kind of poem, an od
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA detects drop in global firesThe ongoing transition from nomadic cultures to settled lifestyles and intensifying agriculture has led to a steep drop not only in the use of fire on local lands, but in the prevalence of fire worldwide, researchers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and colleagues found.
1h
Live Science
Millions of Pickle-Shaped Organisms Are Invading Northwest WatersThe waters off the Oregon coast are mysteriously awash with strange, jelly-like creatures that look like translucent slugs, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
1h
Live Science
Quitting Religion? Mom and Dad Would Prefer a Slow FadeQuitting or switching religions can impact adult children's closeness with their parents.
1h
Ars Technica
Car-charging company is on a tear, buying GE stations, securing investments Enlarge / Closeup of Chargepoint electric-vehicle charger at Google headquarters in Silicon Valley (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images). (credit: Getty Images ) Car-charging network Chargepoint announced that it would buy General Electric’s electric vehicle (EV) charging stations today for an undisclosed amount of money. Chargepoint also announced a $42 million investment from Siemens, w
1h
NeuWrite San Diego
Feelin’ the Beat (Frequency)What do you think when you read the word interference? If you’re like most people, you probably think it’s negative. Colloquially, interference tends to be obstructive or destructive, like interference keeping your radio or TV from picking up a station, or pass interference in football. I’m NeuWriting to inform you of a recent study in … Continue reading Feelin’ the Beat (Frequency)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient South Carolina whale yields secrets to filter feeding's originsThe blue whale is the largest animal that has ever lived. And yet they feed almost exclusively on tiny crustaceans known as krill. The secret is in the baleen, a complex filter-feeding system that allows the enormous whales to strain huge volumes of saltwater, leaving only krill and other small organisms behind. Now, researchers who have described an extinct relative of baleen whales offer new ins
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change damages US economy, increases inequalityUnmitigated climate change will make the United States poorer and more unequal, according to a new study. The poorest third of counties could sustain economic damages costing as much as 20 percent of their income if warming proceeds unabated.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to neonic pesticides results in early death for honeybee workers and queensWorker and queen honeybees exposed to field realistic levels of neonicotinoids die sooner, reducing the health of the entire colony, biologists have found. The researchers were also surprised to find that the neonicotinoid contaminated pollen collected by the honeybees came not from crops grown from neonicotinoid treated seeds, but plants growing in areas adjacent to those crops. This is season-lo
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing CRISPR into focusResearchers have generated near-atomic resolution images of key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function. The findings reveal multiple layers of error detection that prevent unintended genomic damage. Structural understanding informs efforts to improve the accuracy of CRISPR systems for gene editing and to reduce off-target effects.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly identified small RNA fragments defend the genome when it's 'naked'A scientific research team has discovered might be considered emergency replacements for the epigenetic 'sentries' that normally protect the genome from transposons and viruses. These shock troops are pressed into service across the genome only during curiously undefended moments when early, preimplantation embryos are stripped of epigenetic marks and later reprogrammed. It could be one of the ear
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Ars Technica
Windows 10 will try to combat ransomware by locking up your data Enlarge / Cryptolocker was one of the ransomware pioneers, bringing together file encryption and bitcoin payment. (credit: Christiaan Colen / Flickr ) The latest Windows 10 build, today's 16232 , contains a few new security features. In addition to the richer control over exploit mitigation that Microsoft announced earlier this week, the new build also includes a trial of a new anti-ransomware ca
1h
Popular Science
Nest Cam IQ review: A seriously smart (and expensive) indoor security camera Gadgets It will even learn to recognize your face, but sadly, not your dog's. The Nest IQ is a fantastic security camera, but it comes at a premium price. Read on.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AGU, SSA reaffirm position statement on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban TreatyScientific research in Earth and space sciences advances our understanding of our world and contributes to strong global economies, security, and public health and safety. The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Seismological Society of America (SSA) today announced a revision of their position statement, 'The Capability to Monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) Should be Expand
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Futurity.org
New alloy sensors for jet engines can handle high heat A team of researchers has created a new material that could be used in microscopic sensors, also known as microelectromechanical systems [MEMS], for devices that are part of the Internet of Things. The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances, and public utilities comprising the Internet of Things will depend on these kinds of mi
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most modern horses are descendants of recently imported Oriental stallionsResearchers who have analyzed the Y chromosomes of more than 50 horses representing 21 breeds have found that the paternal lines of nearly all modern horses trace to stallions brought to Europe from the Orient over the last 700 years. The findings reveal the overwhelming influence of breeding schemes driven by strong selection on males.
1h
The Atlantic
Which Christians Is Trump Willing to Protect? On Sunday, June 11, when some Iraqi Christians were on their way to church, Detroit’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement office arrested dozens. More were arrested on their way home from church. Torn from children and families, they were sent to various detention centers, most going to a facility in Youngstown, Ohio. They are now facing deportation to Iraq. President Donald Trump and Vice Presid
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Gizmodo
Enormous Genetic Study Will Help Scientists Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease Image: David Shankbone /Wikimedia Commons There’s no doubt that inflammatory bowel disease is horrible. Its consequences, all sorts of gastrointestinal distress, can be downright debilitating. But treating it is full of uncertainty—folks with the same symptoms might respond in wildly different ways. That’s why scientists are trying to pinpoint its cause, among all the genetic complexities that ca
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Popular Science
If you live in the South, climate change could kill your economy Environment Northern states might actually profit as the planet warms. Climate change is going to hurt the economy, and the poor will get the worst of it. Read on.
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The Scientist RSS
Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids Harm to BeesTwo large studies find that, in real-world conditions, the insecticides are detrimental to honey bees and bumblebees.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A perturbed skin microbiome can be 'contagious' and promote inflammation, Penn study findsIn a new study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown for the first time that, not only can infection with the Leishmania parasite alter the skin microbiome of affected mice, but this altered microbial community can be passed to uninfected mice that share a cage with the infected animals.
2h
Wired
MIT Research Helps Deploy Flying Cars SafelyA bit of clever math keeps everybody safe—and sane.
2h
The Atlantic
The American South Will Bear the Worst of Climate Change’s Costs Climate change will aggravate economic inequality in the United States, essentially transferring wealth from poor counties in the Southeast and the Midwest to well-off communities in the Northeast and on the coasts, according to the most detailed economic assessment of the phenomenon ever conducted. The study, published Thursday in Science , simulates the costs of global warming in excruciating d
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Don't bee alarmed but...the pesticides we use are harming these guys.
2h
NYT > Science
Angela Merkel Sets Collision Course With Trump Ahead of G-20The German chancellor predicted “very difficult” talks with the United States on climate and trade at next week’s Group of 20 gathering in Hamburg.
2h
Big Think
Artificial Photosynthesis: Bill Gates Calls The Potential “Magical” Harnessing the power of photosynthesis may be able to produce all the hydrogen for energy we need. Read More
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Futurity.org
Police in U.S. more likely to arrest minorities during traffic stops Researchers analyzing data from millions of traffic stops in the United States have found that black and Hispanic drivers are more likely to be cited, searched, and arrested at stops than white drivers. The researchers note that such disparities alone are not necessarily indicative of racial bias. However, by looking at the rate at which officers discover contraband on searched drivers, they find
2h
Popular Science
Commercial agriculture is preventing wildfires—and that's not good news Environment We need more scorched earth. Around the world, fires are failing to spark, and grasslands are suffering. Over the past two decades, the amount of burned land has plummeted globally by nearly 25…
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even perfectly clean hands can lead to MRSA transmission in NICU babiesA new study led by Drexel University found that even if hospital workers follow handwashing guidelines as closely as possible, MRSA can still be transmitted among their newborn patients in the NICU.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acoustic scientist sounds off about the location of cave paintingsOne popular theory about the Paleolithic cave paintings proposes that sites were chosen based on the acoustics in the caves. The originators of the theory reported a causal connection between the 'points of resonance' in three French caves and the position of Paleolithic cave paintings. David Lubman, an acoustic scientist and fellow of ASA, will share some of the insights from his research during
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New system makes fast, customized antibiotic treatments possibleUsing nanotechnology, image processing tools and statistical analysis, researchers have developed a system that enables faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times.
2h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Largest-ever study of controversial pesticides finds harm to bees Scientists say the industry-funded work confirms that neonicotinoids are harmful, but manufacturers question its conclusions. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22229
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Gizmodo
All the Glimpses Into the World of Attilan (and Beyond) We Saw in the Inhumans Trailer GIF Our first proper look at the Inhumans TV show is here, and while the trailer is... rough , it does give us our first good look at some of the extra characters and wider Inhuman society we can expect to see in Marvel’s latest TV show. Here’s all the hints we spotted! The trailer starts out on the moon—which isn’t that surprising in the vast lore of the Inhumans, as their insular society has at
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acoustic scientist sounds off about the location of cave paintingsTo date, the exact purpose of Paleolithic cave paintings is unknown. Evidence suggests, however, that these ancient works of art are more than mere decorations. Cave paintings may have played a role in Paleolithic man's religious rituals. Alternatively, some suggest that caves with many detailed paintings of animals might have served as spaces for hunting groups to bond and prepare for their hunts
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More milkweeds located throughout the landscape can help conserve monarchsAdding milkweeds and other native flowering plants into midwestern agricultural lands is key to restoring monarch butterflies, with milkweed sowers from all sectors of society being critically needed for success.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children with autism should be checked for DCD, study recommendsResearchers are recommending in a new study that children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder should be checked for developmental coordination disorder since the two maladies are linked.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New antiviral drug inhibits epidemic SARS, MERS and animal coronavirusesA new antiviral drug candidate inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including the SARS and MERS coronaviruses, a multi-institutional team of investigators reports. The findings support further development of the drug candidate for treating and preventing current coronavirus infections and potential future epidemic outbreaks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest risk of deathA molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumor removal, according to a new clinical study. As a result, 'ultralow' risk patients could be treated less aggressively and overtreatment avoided, leading to fewer toxic effects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovering the early age immune response in foalsResearchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals, a finding described in the May 16 issue of PLOS ONE. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules, said Dr. Julia Felippe,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Car seat laws for older kids have limited impactLaws that require increasingly older kids to sit in car safety seats appear to have limited impact, new research has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers ID new mechanism for keeping DNA protein in lineElectrostatic forces known as phosphate steering help guide the actions of an enzyme called FEN1 that is critical in DNA replication and repair, finds a new study led by Berkeley Lab researchers. The findings help explain how FEN1 distinguishes which strands of DNA to target, revealing key details about a vital process in healthy cells as well as providing new directions for cancer treatment resea
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscessesMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. NIAID-funded research published in The New England Journal of Medicine found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help heal MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that cu
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows high pregnancy failure, nutritional stress in southern resident killer whalesA multi-year survey of the nutritional, physiological and reproductive health of endangered southern resident killer whales suggests that up to two-thirds of pregnancies failed in this population from 2007 to 2014. The study links this orca population's low reproductive success to stress brought on by low or variable abundance of their most nutrient-rich prey, Chinook salmon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find mechanism behind precise spinal cord developmentScientists have uncovered how nerve cells in the spinal cord are organized in precise patterns during embryo development -- a finding that could give insight into regenerative medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is this the long-sought answer to the question of tropical biodiversity?The question of 'Why so many species of tropical trees and other organisms' has challenged biologists for centuries. A group of 50 scientists from 12 countries think they have the answer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellulosic biofuels can benefit the environment if managed correctlyCould cellulosic biofuels -- or liquid energy derived from grasses and wood -- become a green fuel of the future, providing an environmentally sustainable way of meeting energy needs? In Science, researchers at the US Department of Energy-funded Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center say yes, but with a few important caveats.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer researchers overestimate reproducibility of preclinical studiesCancer scientists overestimate the extent to which high-profile preclinical studies can be successfully replicated, new research from McGill University suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling a single brain chemical may help expand window for learning language and musicSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered that curtailing activity of the neuromodulator adenosine extends the critical period of auditory learning in mice and offers promising results for humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making sense of petunia scentsResearchers have identified a key protein that helps release the flowery essence of petunias.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Globally, the rise of agriculture is squashing some firesA global assessment reveals that burned areas have declined by approximately 24 percent over the past 18 years, with the expansion of agricultural playing a major part.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For some US counties, climate change will be particularly costlyA highly granular assessment of the impacts of climate change on the US economy suggests that each 1°Celsius increase in temperature will cost 1.2 percent of the country's gross domestic product, on average.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Field tests show sustained neonicotinoid exposure negatively affects beesIn two of the first large-scale, field-realistic studies to date, researchers in Europe and Canada have affirmed what's been hypothesized about neonicotinoids -- that prolonged exposure to these insecticides negatively affects bees.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First pan-European field study shows neonicotinoid pesticides harm honeybees and wild beesResearchers from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) publish results of a large-scale, field-realistic experiment to assess neonicotinoid impacts on honeybees and wild bees across Europe, in the peer-review journal Science on June 29, 2017.The experiment -- undertaken in the UK, Germany and Hungary -- exposed three bee species to winter oilseed rape crops treated with seed coatings containing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who is responsible if a brain-controlled robot drops a baby?As brain-controlled robots enter everyday life, an article published in Science states that now is the time to take action and put in place guidelines that ensure the safe and beneficial use of direct brain-machine interaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient viral 'fossils' reveal evolutionary mechanismsStudying DNA fragments left by ancient viruses in their host's genome has shown even non-autonomous viruses could prosper by helping each other.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI: Earth is losing its fire powerThe world's open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, thanks to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine and NASA researchers published today in Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global forest network cracks the case of tropical biodiversityWhy does biodiversity grade from exuberance at the equator through moderation at mid-latitudes toward monotony at higher ones? Data from an international network of long-term forest dynamics research sites is finally providing an answer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to neonics results in early death for honeybee workers and queens, York U studyWorker and queen honeybees exposed to field realistic levels of neonicotinoids die sooner, reducing the health of the entire colony, a new study led by York University biologists has found. The researchers were also surprised to find that the neonicotinoid contaminated pollen collected by the honeybees came not from crops grown from neonicotinoid treated seeds, but plants growing in areas adjacent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Climate change damages US economy, increases inequalityUnmitigated climate change will make the United States poorer and more unequal, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The poorest third of counties could sustain economic damages costing as much as 20 percent of their income if warming proceeds unabated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Future-proofing 'big data' biological research depends on good digital identifiers'Big data' research runs the risk of being undermined by the poor design of the digital identifiers that tag data. A group of worldwide researchers, led by Julie McMurry, at Oregon Health & Science University, has assembled a set of pragmatic guidelines to create, reference and maintain web-based identifiers to improve reproducibility, attribution, and scientific discovery. The guidance, publishin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic 'fossils' reveal long-term viral partnerships in grassDefective viruses incorporated into grass genomes may adapt to form partnerships with other genome-incorporated viruses in order to complete their life cycle, according to a new PLOS Pathogens study. The findings suggest that partner viruses evolve in concert, enabling them to maintain their relationship over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elephantiasis on the decline in CameroonLymphatic filariasis -- a parasitic infection commonly known as elephantiasis -- is among the 10 neglected tropical diseases that the World Health Organization (WHO) is aiming to eliminate by 2020. In Cameroon, large-scale annual mass drug administration efforts are successfully curbing rates of LF, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer researchers overestimate reproducibility of preclinical studiesCancer scientists overestimate the extent to which high-profile preclinical studies can be successfully replicated, new research publishing June 29 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Jonathan Kimmelman and colleagues from McGill University suggests.
2h
The Atlantic
Will Ferrell Needs to Be Weird Again A glance at Will Ferrell’s recent history at the box office does not suggest anything resembling a crisis. His last starring role, the 2015 Christmas comedy Daddy’s Home with Mark Wahlberg, was a huge hit that did well enough to spawn a sequel (coming later this year). Before that, he teamed with Kevin Hart to make Get Hard , a prison comedy that grossed more than twice its budget; Anchorman 2 ,
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The Atlantic
Winners of the BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition Entrants in the fourth annual BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition , put on by the California Academy of Sciences, were invited to “celebrate and illustrate the rich diversity of life on Earth, and inspire action to protect and conserve it through the power of imagery.” These images originally appeared in the online magazine bioGraphic , and they were kind enough to share some of the
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Gizmodo
Saturn’s Hexagonal Storm Is Pure Chaotic Beauty In New Cassini Images Image: NASA Cassini’s last hurrah has been so bittersweet: On the one hand, it marks the end of a 20-year-long journey to explore Saturn and its moons. But the Grand Finale has also featured some of the most spectacular shots of the gas giant and its moons ever taken. It’s a complex cocktail of emotions. Today, the intrepid orbiter sent back some truly stellar pics of the planet’s most unusual fe
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Science | The Guardian
NHS prescribed record number of antidepressants last year Data prompts debate about whether rise shows drugs are handed out too freely or whether more people are getting help The NHS prescribed a record number of antidepressants last year, fuelling an upward trend that has seen the number of pills given to patients more than double over the last decade. The figures raised questions over whether the rise shows doctors are handing out the drugs out too fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds hackers could use brainwaves to steal passwordsResearchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggest that brainwave-sensing headsets, also known as EEG or electroencephalograph headsets, need better security after a study reveals hackers could guess a user's passwords by monitoring their brainwaves.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method could enable more stable and scalable quantum computing, physicists reportResearchers from the University of Pennsylvania, in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University and Goucher College, have discovered a new topological material which may enable fault-tolerant quantum computing. It is a form of computing that taps into the power of atoms and subatomic phenomena to perform calculations significantly faster than current computers and could potentially lead to advance
3h
Gizmodo
Airbnb to Launch Luxury Tier for the Super Rich and No, You’re Not Invited Image: Getty Rooms of spectacular opulence are coming to Airbnb. But the new feature targets elite tourists—not the unwashed masses of thrifty travelers trying to be bougie for a weekend. Airbnb is launching a new premium service for the super rich, known inside the company as “Airbnb Lux,” according to Bloomberg . Those with enough money will be able to rent out mansions, penthouses, and mega-ho
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Large-scale study 'shows neonic pesticides harm bees'The largest study to-date on neonicotinoid pesticides concludes they harm honeybees and wild bees.
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Futurity.org
No one has ever seen 2 black holes this close together Approximately 750 million light years from Earth lies a gigantic, bulging galaxy with two supermassive black holes at its center. These are among the largest black holes ever found, with a combined mass 15 billion times that of the sun. Long-term observations suggest one of the black holes appears to orbit the other—the first duo ever shown to be moving in relation to each other. It is also, pote
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Parkour Robot Easily Bounces Its Way Over ObstaclesWith a spinning tail and small thrusters, it has total control over its orientation in mid-air so that it’s always ready for the next hop.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moving closer to defeating 'superbugs' with simplified forms of teixobactinScientists have produced new, effective and simplified forms of teixobactin -- a new generation antibiotic which defeats multi-drug resistant infections such as MRSA -- as part of a pioneering research effort to tackle antimicrobial resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bullying and bias can cost schools millions in lost fundingWhen children avoid school to avoid bullying, many states can lose tens of millions of dollars in lost funding, and California alone loses an estimated $276 million each year because children feel unsafe. New research highlights the hidden cost to communities in states that use daily attendance numbers to calculate public school funding.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treatment benefits patients with thalassaemia and HCVMany individuals with the blood disorder thalassaemia also carry the hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to contaminated transfusions before 1990. Due to the co-existence of iron overload (from repeated blood transfusions), these patients are at increased risk of developing liver cancer. A new study indicates that treatment with a combination of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir as a once a day single pill leads
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lung cancer screening could save money as well as lives, research showsLung cancer screening programs should target high-risk people and identify other tobacco-related conditions, suggests a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets of success of tourism entrepreneurs revealed by new researchResearch into innovative entrepreneurs starting to work in tourism has found, in some of the first analysis undertaken, how they have to use initiative and hard work – and often work for nothing – to overcome the barriers in setting up their innovation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PTSD in children quickly and effectively treatable within hoursChildren and adolescents with posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) can be successfully treated with only a few hours of EMDR or cognitive behavioral writing therapy (CBWT), report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dual-arm construction robot with remote-control functionA new concept construction robot has been developed for disaster relief situations. This robot has a double swing dual arm mechanism and has drastically improved operability and mobility compared to conventional construction machines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The gene behind follicular lymphomaScientists have discovered an important gene whose loss lies behind follicular lymphoma, an incurable cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cellulosic biofuels can benefit the environment if managed correctlyCould cellulosic biofuels - or liquid energy derived from grasses and wood - become a green fuel of the future, providing an environmentally sustainable way of meeting energy needs? In Science, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy-funded Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center say yes, but with a few important caveats.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global forest network cracks the case of tropical biodiversityIf aliens sent an exploratory mission to Earth, one of the first things they'd notice—after the fluffy white clouds and blue oceans of our water world—would be the way vegetation grades from exuberance at the equator through moderation at mid-latitudes toward monotony at higher ones. We all learn about this biodiversity gradient in school, but why does it exist?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First pan-European field study shows neonicotinoid pesticides harm honeybees and wild beesResearchers from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) publish results of a large-scale, field-realistic experiment to assess neonicotinoid impacts on honeybees and wild bees across Europe, in the peer-review journal Science on 29 June 2017.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic 'fossils' reveal long-term viral partnerships in grassDefective viruses incorporated into grass genomes may adapt to form partnerships with other genome-incorporated viruses in order to complete their life cycle, according to a new PLOS Pathogens study. The findings suggest that partner viruses evolve in concert, enabling them to maintain their relationship over time.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exposure to neonics results in early death for honeybee workers and queens: studyWorker and queen honeybees exposed to field realistic levels of neonicotinoids die sooner, reducing the health of the entire colony, a new study led by York University biologists has found.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth is losing its fire powerThe world's open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, thanks to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine and NASA researchers published today in Science.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Climate change damages US economy, increases inequalityUnmitigated climate change will make the United States poorer and more unequal, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The poorest third of counties could sustain economic damages costing as much as 20 percent of their income if warming proceeds unabated.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future-proofing 'big data' biological research depends on good digital identifiers"Big data" research runs the risk of being undermined by the poor design of the digital identifiers that tag data. A group of worldwide researchers, led by Julie McMurry, at Oregon Health & Science University, has assembled a set of pragmatic guidelines to create, reference and maintain web-based identifiers to improve reproducibility, attribution, and scientific discovery. The guidance, publishin
3h
The Scientist RSS
Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone DiscoveredA small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice.
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Deja vu for U.S. nuclear waste
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Cholera vaccine faces major test in Yemen
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Predicting where victims of Mexico's violence are buried
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Stem cell approach for cataracts challenged
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Europe's top court alarms vaccine experts
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European bee study fuels debate over pesticide ban
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The unbearable lightness of neutrinos
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How latitude affects biotic interactions
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A cocktail of toxins
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Releasing plant volatiles, as simple as ABC
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Rejuvenating brain plasticity
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Plasmons that won't stick
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Help, hope, and hype: Ethical dimensions of neuroprosthetics
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The enlightened empiricist
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If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?: My Adventures in the Art and Science of Relating and Communicating
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Quantify endangered species listings
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Research cuts threaten public trust
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AAAS Leshner fellow aligns science with public service
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Burn less, baby, burn less
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Are better drugs just a click away?
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Get a grip
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An early skull cult from Neolithic Turkey
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Damage confirmed
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Strong under pressure
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Costing out the effects of climate change
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To bunch or to antibunch
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Specialization in brain neurogenic niche
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Active transport of aromas
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Antiviral gets the jump on coronaviruses
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Treating WNT-driven colorectal cancer
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Separating charges is a gas
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Genomics trace plant gene evolution
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Characterizing a 12-hour biological clock
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Social activity: A new dimension in STEM
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Temperature signals in seed germination
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Great American ozone loss
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A vaccine for heroin addiction?
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Pairing up copper and tin to reduce CO2
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Restoring auditory cortex plasticity in adult mice by restricting thalamic adenosine signaling Circuits in the auditory cortex are highly susceptible to acoustic influences during an early postnatal critical period. The auditory cortex selectively expands neural representations of enriched acoustic stimuli, a process important for human language acquisition. Adults lack this plasticity. Here we show in the murine auditory cortex that juvenile plasticity can be reestablished in adulthood if
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Science current issue
A human-driven decline in global burned area Fire is an essential Earth system process that alters ecosystem and atmospheric composition. Here we assessed long-term fire trends using multiple satellite data sets. We found that global burned area declined by 24.3 ± 8.8% over the past 18 years. The estimated decrease in burned area remained robust after adjusting for precipitation variability and was largest in savannas. Agricultural expansio
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Science current issue
Estimating economic damage from climate change in the United States Estimates of climate change damage are central to the design of climate policies. Here, we develop a flexible architecture for computing damages that integrates climate science, econometric analyses, and process models. We use this approach to construct spatially explicit, probabilistic, and empirically derived estimates of economic damage in the United States from climate change. The combined va
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Science current issue
Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, whil
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Science current issue
Anti-coalescence of bosons on a lossy beam splitter Two-boson interference, a fundamentally quantum effect, has been extensively studied with photons through the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect and observed with guided plasmons. Using two freely propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) interfering on a lossy beam splitter, we show that the presence of loss enables us to modify the reflection and transmission factors of the beam splitter, thus revealing
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Science current issue
Iodide management in formamidinium-lead-halide-based perovskite layers for efficient solar cells The formation of a dense and uniform thin layer on the substrates is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs) containing formamidinium with multiple cations and mixed halide anions. The concentration of defect states, which reduce a cell’s performance by decreasing the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density, needs to be as low as possible. We s
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Science current issue
Decoding of position in the developing neural tube from antiparallel morphogen gradients Like many developing tissues, the vertebrate neural tube is patterned by antiparallel morphogen gradients. To understand how these inputs are interpreted, we measured morphogen signaling and target gene expression in mouse embryos and chick ex vivo assays. From these data, we derived and validated a characteristic decoding map that relates morphogen input to the positional identity of neural prog
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Science current issue
Hypothalamic regulation of regionally distinct adult neural stem cells and neurogenesis Neural stem cells (NSCs) in specialized niches in the adult mammalian brain generate neurons throughout life. NSCs in the adult mouse ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) exhibit a regional identity and, depending on their location, generate distinct olfactory bulb interneuron subtypes. Here, we show that the hypothalamus, a brain area regulating physiological states, provides long-range regio
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Science current issue
Emission of volatile organic compounds from petunia flowers is facilitated by an ABC transporter Plants synthesize a diversity of volatile molecules that are important for reproduction and defense, serve as practical products for humans, and influence atmospheric chemistry and climate. Despite progress in deciphering plant volatile biosynthesis, their release from the cell has been poorly understood. The default assumption has been that volatiles passively diffuse out of cells. By characteri
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Science current issue
Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale Theory predicts that higher biodiversity in the tropics is maintained by specialized interactions among plants and their natural enemies that result in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). By using more than 3000 species and nearly 2.4 million trees across 24 forest plots worldwide, we show that global patterns in tree species diversity reflect not only stronger CNDD at tropical versus
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Science current issue
Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees Neonicotinoid seed dressings have caused concern world-wide. We use large field experiments to assess the effects of neonicotinoid-treated crops on three bee species across three countries (Hungary, Germany, and the United Kingdom). Winter-sown oilseed rape was grown commercially with either seed coatings containing neonicotinoids (clothianidin or thiamethoxam) or no seed treatment (control). For
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Science current issue
Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops Experiments linking neonicotinoids and declining bee health have been criticized for not simulating realistic exposure. Here we quantified the duration and magnitude of neonicotinoid exposure in Canada’s corn-growing regions and used these data to design realistic experiments to investigate the effect of such insecticides on honey bees. Colonies near corn were naturally exposed to neonicotinoids
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Science current issue
Click chemistry enables preclinical evaluation of targeted epigenetic therapies The success of new therapies hinges on our ability to understand their molecular and cellular mechanisms of action. We modified BET bromodomain inhibitors, an epigenetic-based therapy, to create functionally conserved compounds that are amenable to click chemistry and can be used as molecular probes in vitro and in vivo. We used click proteomics and click sequencing to explore the gene regulatory
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New Products
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Extraordinary and poor
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Cellulosic biofuel contributions to a sustainable energy future: Choices and outcomes Cellulosic crops are projected to provide a large fraction of transportation energy needs by mid-century. However, the anticipated land requirements are substantial, which creates a potential for environmental harm if trade-offs are not sufficiently well understood to create appropriately prescriptive policy. Recent empirical findings show that cellulosic bioenergy concerns related to climate mit
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Science current issue
Liquefied gas electrolytes for electrochemical energy storage devices Electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries have seen little change in their electrolyte chemistry since their commercialization, which has limited improvements in device performance. Combining superior physical and chemical properties and a high dielectric-fluidity factor, the use of electrolytes based on solvent systems that exclusively use components that are typically gaseous under s
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Science current issue
Atomic structure of the human cytomegalovirus capsid with its securing tegument layer of pp150 Herpesviruses possess a genome-pressurized capsid. The 235-kilobase genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is by far the largest of any herpesvirus, yet it has been unclear how its capsid, which is similar in size to those of other herpesviruses, is stabilized. Here we report a HCMV atomic structure consisting of the herpesvirus-conserved capsid proteins MCP, Tri1, Tri2, and SCP and the HCMV-spec
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Science | The Guardian
Pesticides damage survival of bee colonies, landmark study shows The world’s largest ever field trial demonstrates widely used insecticides harm both honeybees and wild bees, increasing calls for a ban Widely used insecticides damage the survival of honeybee colonies, the world’s largest ever field trial has shown for the first time, as well as harming wild bees. The farm-based research, along with a second new study, also suggests widespread contamination of
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The Atlantic
The Long, Slow Death of Chavismo On Tuesday , a helicopter-riding gunman threw grenades at the Supreme Court building in downtown Caracas . No one was injured . In a video later posted online, the alleged attacker, Oscar Perez, a former police captain and B-movie actor , and a group of gun-toting masked men declared that they represented the military, police, and civilians who oppose Nicolas Maduro, the president of Venezuela. T
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The Atlantic
Mika Brzezinski and Donald Trump's Penchant for Blood Feuds In battle, blood is weakness. Blood is loss. Blood is a visual symbol that, while one may have fought valiantly, one was also—at least for a moment—bested by another. On the battlefield, the one who bleeds is the Loser (Sad!); the one who does not is the Winner. Related Story Seeing Red: The Rise of Mensesplaining Donald Trump, it’s often said, sees the world—and human life in general—as a roilin
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Petunias spread their scent using pushy proteinsScent molecules hitch a ride on a particular protein to escape flowers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Climate change could exacerbate economic inequalities in the U.S.Counties across the United States won’t all pay the same price for climate change, a new simulation predicts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method could enable more stable and scalable quantum computing, Penn physicists reportResearchers from the University of Pennsylvania, in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University and Goucher College, have discovered a new topological material which may enable fault-tolerant quantum computing.
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Why does acupuncture work?New study offers answers for why acupuncture works and why other studies found conflicting results on its effectiveness.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Diesel Brothers Have Creative Design Ideas For Their MLB National League UTV's Seats #DieselBrothers Diesel Dave and the Muscle pay a visit to Ken from Expressions Upholstery to give the National League UTV customized leather seats. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Diesel! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebo
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Gizmodo
How Will We Stop Hackers From Invading Our Brains Once We’re Cyborgs? Image: Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence Rapid developments in brain-machine interfacing and neuroprosthetics are revolutionizing the way we treat paralyzed people, but the same technologies could eventually be put to more generalized use—a development that’ll turn many of us into veritable cyborgs. Before we get to that point, however, we’ll need to make sure these neural devices are safe, secure,
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Ars Technica
Edgar Wright’s new film Baby Driver is the perfect antidote to The Fast and the Furious Enlarge / L to R: Jon Bernthal, Eiza González, Ansel Elgort, and Jon Hamm have just robbed a bank. (credit: Working Title) Baby Driver is the new film from Edgar Wright opening in theaters this week. I'm here to tell you it's jolly, jolly good. Consider it an old-school, analogue, manual transmission alternative to the CGI, self-driving car nonsense that was the most recent Fast and Furious movie
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: This Beautiful Parasitic Bird Could Soon Turn Up in Your YardScientists developed a model to predict the spread of pin-tailed whydahs, and found they could strain native bird species in California, Texas and elsewhere.
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Gizmodo
This Discounted Hue Bloom Accent Light Can Paint Your Walls With Color Philips Hue Bloom , $46 You’re probably familiar with the color-changing Hue lights that screw into your existing lamps and light fixtures, but if you really want to paint your rooms with color, you’ll want to pick up a few Hue Bloom accent lights as well. These lights used to sell for around $80, and have sold for $60 for the last few months, but today’s $46 deal on Amazon is the best we’ve ever
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate new firewall that protects cellphones from security threatSome 400 million people change their phone's components, such as touchscreens, chargers, and battery or sensor assemblies, which are all susceptible to significant security breaches and attacks. These components, referred to as 'field replaceable units (FRUs),' communicate with the phone CPU over simple interfaces with no authentication mechanisms or error detection capabilities. A malicious vendo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find link between food allergies and childhood anxietyResearchers studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children and found that children with a food allergy had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood anxiety. Food allergies were not associated with symptoms of childhood depression or with symptoms of anxiety or depression among their caregiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests association between gut bacteria and emotionResearchers have identified gut microbiota that interact with brain regions associated with mood and behavior. This may be the first time that behavioral and neurobiological differences associated with microbial composition in healthy humans have been identified.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study examines effectiveness of labor induction in IndiaResearchers have published a major study of two different types of labur induction methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3,000-year-old textiles are earliest evidence of chemical dyeing in the LevantArchaeologists have revealed that cloth samples found in the Israeli desert present the earliest evidence of plant-based textile dyeing in the region. They are estimated to date from the 13th-10th centuries BCE, the era of David and Solomon.
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The Atlantic
Marie Tillman: Don't Slam the Door on Immigrants Since November’s election, I’ve thought often of my late husband Pat Tillman, who in an act of patriotism walked away from an NFL contract to join the Army after September 11. Pat’s loyalty to American ideals did not mean that he was unquestioning of his country, and his willingness to challenge the status quo makes me wonder what he’d say about it and its leaders today. What would he make of the
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New Scientist - News
‘Missing link’ whale could filter feed and hunt larger preyA whale that lived 30 million years ago had extraordinary back teeth for sieving out small prey, while its front teeth let it catch big prey too
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cognitive science
What do listeners and performers agree on in free jazz improvisation? -- Full text with audio submitted by /u/musicstudies [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People lived in chilly Andean highlands year-round over 7,000 years agoUC Davis study confirms that intrepid hunter-gatherers -- women, men, and children -- called the Andean highlands home over 7,000 years ago. The team of archaeologists and geochemists marshaled five lines of scientific evidence to arrive at this conclusion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pushing metals to their limitsModern aircraft and power generation turbines depend on precision-machined parts that can withstand harsh mechanical forces in high-temperature environments. In many cases, higher operating temperatures lead to more efficient performance. This motivates the search for new ultrahigh-temperature metal alloys that can maintain their shape and strength at temperatures where ordinary steel would melt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Palm cockatoos beat drum like Ringo StarrWhen it comes to percussion, the palm cockatoo is the animal kingdom's match for Ringo Starr or Phil Collins, new research suggests.
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Ingeniøren
Regeringen melder endnu en gang pas om thoriumreaktorerPå en anden politisk scene gør de forskellige aktører sig klar til kampen om nyfordeling af forskningsmidler, mens en universitetsrektor taler udenom på et konkret spørgsmål fra den ansvarlige minister.
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Popular Science
Name your price for this professional white hat hacking training Sponsored Post Become a security expert through 63 hours of training, worth $1,271. Name your price for this professional white hat hacking training. Become a security expert through 63 hours of training, worth $1,271. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Senator complains about “cost increases” in NASA’s fixed price contracts Enlarge / Sen. Richard Shelby, (R-Ala.) speaks during a Senate Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee hearing in 2016. (credit: NASA) As part of the annual US budget process, the NASA administrator meets with the appropriations subcommittees in the Senate and House to discuss the president's budget request. Under the new president, NASA doesn't yet have an administrator, so
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Gizmodo
We Regret to Inform You That Fidget Spinners Are Now Exploding Screencap: WEYI After transitioning from an obscure curiosity to a ubiquitous annoyance in record time, fidget spinners finally completed the 21st century novelty toy cycle this month, becoming something that could potentially burn down your house. According to local news reports, at least two bluetooth-enabled spinners have now burst into flames while charging, may god have mercy on us all. Moth
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The Atlantic
Trump's Travel Ban Returns The travel ban is back. President Trump’s controversial executive order will go into partial effect on Thursday night for the first time since January. The ban imposes broad restrictions on visa travel from six Muslim-majority countries and temporarily suspends U.S. refugee admissions worldwide. The Trump administration said it will begin enforcing the ban at 8 p.m. ET. The move comes less than a
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Live Science
Light Makes New Material Creep Like a CaterpillarA new type of polymer — material made of long chains of molecules — inches along like a caterpillar when illuminated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Instagram enlists AI to filter nasty commentsInstagram on Thursday said it is using artificial intelligence to filter nasty comments and spam at the popular Facebook-owned photo-sharing service.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dialysis membrane made from graphene filters more quicklyNow MIT engineers have fabricated a functional dialysis membrane from a sheet of graphene -- a single layer of carbon atoms, linked end to end in hexagonal configuration like that of chicken wire. The graphene membrane, about the size of a fingernail, is less than 1 nanometer thick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA observes Tropical Storm Dora dissipating rapidlyTwo days of satellite imagery from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite showed that Dora, formerly a hurricane, went from generating moderate rainfall to barely any rainfall.
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Blog » Languages » English
Portal Marathon Results! Congrats everyone! The Portal Marathon finished at 17 hours 35 minutes! Join us for the closing ceremony at 4 PM EDT on 6/30.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA observes Tropical Storm Dora dissipating rapidlyTwo days of satellite imagery from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite showed that Dora, formerly a hurricane, went from generating moderate rainfall to barely any rainfall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildlife of northern Central African Republic in dangerThe first aerial assessment of the impact of Central African Republic's recent conflict on wildlife and other natural resources in the northern part of the country shows that wildlife populations have been depleted in large areas of their former range, yet there is hope as some populations of Kordofan giraffe, giant eland, buffalo, roan, and other key species that still survive in low numbers. No
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Live Science
July Fourth Comes Early: NASA Sounding Rocket Releases Colorful Morning Cloud Show (Photos, Video)A NASA sounding rocket launched early this morning and lit up the skies over the U.S. East Coast with colorful clouds, ringing in an early July Fourth celebration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exciting new material uses solar energy to remove man-made dye pollutants from waterA novel composite material has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University which shows promise as a catalyst for the degradation of environmentally-harmful synthetic dye pollutants, which are released at a rate of nearly 300,000 tonnes a year into the world's water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Live-pig markets and traders could provide insight to controlling African swine feverUnderstanding how live pigs are traded between villages and backyard farmers can help health agencies better understand how devastating swine diseases spread, according to a study published recently in the journal PLOS ONE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wildlife of northern Central African Republic in dangerThe first aerial assessment of the impact of Central African Republic's recent conflict on wildlife and other natural resources in the northern part of the country shows that wildlife populations have been depleted in large areas of their former range, yet there is hope as some populations of Kordofan giraffe, giant eland, buffalo, roan, and other key species that still survive in low numbers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTA study recommends that children with autism be checked for DCDUTA researchers are recommending in a new study that children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder should be checked for developmental coordination disorder since the two maladies are linked.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Live-pig markets and traders could provide insight to controlling African swine feverUnderstanding how live pigs are traded between villages and backyard farmers can help health agencies better understand how devastating swine diseases spread, according to a study published recently in the journal PLOS ONE.
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Gizmodo
Here's What Causes Those Car-Swallowing Sinkholes to Form GIF Modern satellite technology lets us spot dangerous threats like extreme weather, giant icebergs , and even foreign militaries. But when it comes to sinkholes, all we can do is wait and hope that our cars won’t be swallowed by a sudden gaping chasm in a city street. So how do sinkholes form , and why is it so hard to predict where they’ll appear? YouTube’s Practical Engineering , also known as
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Science : NPR
C. Diff Infections Are Falling, Thanks To Better Cleaning And Fewer Antibiotics The bacterium C. difficile causes one of the most common infections in hospitals and nursing homes. After climbing for decades, the rate of new infections is now falling. (Image credit: David Phillips/Science Source)
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Ancient Whales Used Teeth to Filter-Feed BRIEF: Ancient Whales Used Teeth to Filter-Feed Researchers examine 30-million-year-old whale fossils to uncover how these marine mammals ate before baleen. Coronodon-whales-topimage.jpg The two main whales in the center of this artist's reconstruction are Coronodon havensteini , the lower two in the background are Echovenator sandersi. Image credits: Alberto Gennari Creature Thursday, June 29, 2
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Futurity.org
Injection sends ‘genetic cargo’ to neurons all over the body Researchers have developed new virus-based vectors that can deliver “genetic cargo” to cells past the blood-brain barrier and in neurons throughout the body, potentially making way for new treatments for diseases like Parkinson’s. Viruses have evolved to be highly effective vehicles for delivering genes into cells. Seeking to take advantage of these traits, scientists can reprogram viruses to fun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exciting new material uses solar energy to remove man-made dye pollutants from waterA novel composite material has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University which shows promise as a catalyst for the degradation of environmentally-harmful synthetic dye pollutants, which are released at a rate of nearly 300,000 tonnes a year into the world's water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 helps to treat diabetic woundsMembers of the Faculty of Biology and A.N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, a unit of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, have tested on a mouse model a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, helping to treat diabetic wounds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly identified small RNA fragments defend the genome when it's 'naked'Today in Cell, a team from CSHL describes its discovery of what might be considered emergency replacements for the epigenetic 'sentries' that normally protect the genome from transposons and viruses. These shock troops are pressed into service across the genome only during curiously undefended moments when early, preimplantation embryos are stripped of epigenetic marks and later reprogrammed. It c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing CRISPR into focusHarvard Medical School researchers have generated near-atomic resolution images of key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function. The findings reveal multiple layers of error detection that prevent unintended genomic damage. Structural understanding informs efforts to improve the accuracy of CRISPR systems for gene editing and to reduce off-target effects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new ribosomal biogenesis regulation point to treat cancer and 5q- syndromeResearchers in the Oncobell program at IDIBELL-ICO have unveiled a new role for free 40S ribosomes as guardians of genetic information required to synthesize themselves. This mechanism can be potentially targeted as a cancer therapy and a potential point of intervention for the treatment of 5q- syndrome, a rare sporadic genetic disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique enables safer gene-editing therapy using CRISPRScientists took an important step toward safer gene-editing cures for life-threatening disorders, from cancer to HIV to Huntington's disease, by developing a technique that can spot editing mistakes a popular tool known as CRISPR makes to an individual's genome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into why the immune system fails to see cancerInvestigators have uncovered a critical strategy that some cancers may be using to cloak themselves -- they find evidence of this genetic program across 30 human cancers of the peripheral tissue, including melanoma skin cancer. Their results are published June 29 in Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most modern horses are descendants of recently imported oriental stallionsResearchers who have analyzed the Y chromosomes of more than 50 horses representing 21 breeds have found that the paternal lines of nearly all modern horses trace to stallions brought to Europe from the Orient over the last 700 years. The findings reported in Current Biology on June 29 reveal the overwhelming influence of breeding schemes driven by strong selection on males.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic evidence from the South Caucasus region shows surprising long-term stabilityThe South Caucasus -- home to the countries of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan -- geographically links Europe and the Near East. The area has served for millennia as a major crossroads for human migration, with strong archaeological evidence for big cultural shifts over time. And yet, surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA evidence reported in Current Biology on June 29 finds no evidence of any
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient South Carolina whale yields secrets to filter feeding's originsThe blue whale is the largest animal that has ever lived. And yet they feed almost exclusively on tiny crustaceans known as krill. The secret is in the baleen, a complex filter-feeding system that allows the enormous whales to strain huge volumes of saltwater, leaving only krill and other small organisms behind. Now, researchers who have described an extinct relative of baleen whales in Current Bi
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Ars Technica
After ACA arrived in an Oregon county, there was a 17% drop in cardiac arrest Enlarge (credit: Getty | Spauln ) In the years after health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act unfurled in Multnomah County, Oregon, cardiac arrests among those newly covered fell 17 percent , researchers report this week in the Journal of the American Heart Association . The pilot study, led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the Heart Institute of Cedars-Sina
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Wired
Twitter's Music-Site Meme War Isn't About Civility, It's About MoneyThe social media platform is cracking down on accounts spreading copyrighted materials harder than those spreading hate.
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Science | The Guardian
'Metal-on-metal' hip implant patients recalled for tests over toxicity fears Alert issued by regulatory agency calls for for MRI scans and blood tests on expanded pool from 56,000 patients using devices believed to be at risk of bone or muscle damage Thousands of patients with “metal-on-metal” hip implants will be recalled for a battery of tests, including MRI scans and blood tests, due to concerns over toxicity. The alert , issued by the Medicines and Healthcare products
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Gizmodo
The iPhone Forever Changed How We Read Takes on the Internet Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo/Youtube Before the iPhone was released, there were very few iPhone takes on the internet. 10 years ago, that changed. Now there are lots of takes . Since Gizmodo couldn’t possibly write all the iPhone 10th anniversary think pieces we came up with, here are just a few of our favorites: Fuck the iPhone, the Palm Pilot Changed Phones Forever Image: Gizmodo The iPhone Came O
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Popular Science
The skull cult at the world’s oldest temple probably isn’t quite what you think Science But it’s hugely important all the same. Honestly, we should all be so okay with death that we're willing to carve stuff into people's skulls.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Horse version of ‘Who’s your daddy?’ answeredGenetics and horse pedigrees reveal all modern domestic stallions’ sires.
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5hThe Islamic State Is Losing Its Hold on MosulExactly three years after the Islamic State declared its “caliphate” from Mosul’s historic Grand Mosque of al-Nuri, Iraqi forces announced Thursday the recapture of the site, as the battle to reclaim ISIS’s last urban stronghold in Iraq reached its final stages.The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Who Would the Founders Impeach? It’s hard to find defenders of impeachment—or at least, it’s hard to find good faith, consistent defenders of impeachment. Just look at former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who once voted to impeach President Bill Clinton for obstruction of justice, only to recently assert that it’s impossible for a president, and in particular Donald Trump, whom he supports, to obstruct justice. Most of the hypoc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How air pollution is linked to type 2 diabetesResearchers examine associations of air pollution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are people 'rolling the dice' when it comes to food safety?A new study has revealed the levels of bad behaviors in restaurants which increase the public's risk of getting food poisoning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Campylobacter to blame for most foodborne infections in DenmarkCampylobacter is to blame for more than 4,600 foodborne infections in Denmark and is thus still the most common cause of foodborne disease. This is one of the findings of the annual report for 2016 on the incidence of diseases that can be transmitted from animals and food to humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Malaria control in African schools dramatically cuts infection and reduces risk of anemiaSchools that provide prevention education, insecticide-treated nets and antimalarial treatment, in regions where malaria is highly seasonal, could reduce the risk of schoolchildren developing anemia and improve their cognitive performance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slow-growing ponderosas survive mountain pine beetle outbreaksSlow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving mountain pine beetle outbreaks in western Montana as climate change increases the frequency of drought and insect pests, according to new research.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most modern horses are descendants of recently imported oriental stallionsResearchers who have analyzed the Y chromosomes of more than 50 horses representing 21 breeds have found that the paternal lines of nearly all modern horses trace to stallions brought to Europe from the Orient over the last 700 years. The findings reported in Current Biology on June 29 reveal the overwhelming influence of breeding schemes driven by strong selection on males.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient South Carolina whale yields secrets to filter feeding's originsThe blue whale is the largest animal that has ever lived. And yet they feed almost exclusively on tiny crustaceans known as krill. The secret is in the baleen, a complex filter-feeding system that allows the enormous whales to strain huge volumes of saltwater, leaving only krill and other small organisms behind. Now, researchers who have described an extinct relative of baleen whales in Current Bi
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic evidence from the South Caucasus region shows surprising long-term stabilityThe South Caucasus—home to the countries of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan—geographically links Europe and the Near East. The area has served for millennia as a major crossroads for human migration, with strong archaeological evidence for big cultural shifts over time. And yet, surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA evidence reported in Current Biology on June 29 finds no evidence of any upheav
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new ribosomal biogenesis regulation point to treat cancer and 5q- syndromeResearchers at the Catalan Institute of Oncology have discovered a new role for free 40S ribosomes as guardians of genetic information required to synthesize themselves. This mechanism, which relies on a complex of free 40S ribosomes and the RNA binding protein LARP1, is independent from the 40S ribosomes role in protein synthesis, which can be potentially targeted as a cancer therapy. Moreover, t
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique enables safer gene-editing therapy using CRISPRScientists from The University of Texas at Austin took an important step toward safer gene-editing cures for life-threatening disorders, from cancer to HIV to Huntington's disease, by developing a technique that can spot editing mistakes a popular tool known as CRISPR makes to an individual's genome. The research appears today in the journal Cell.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study reveals key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function at near-atomic resolutionHarvard Medical School and Cornell University scientists have generated near-atomic resolution snapshots of CRISPR that reveal key steps in its mechanism of action. The findings, published in Cell on June 29, provide the structural data necessary for efforts to improve the efficiency and accuracy of CRISPR for biomedical applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly identified small RNA fragments defend the genome when it's 'naked'Our genomes are minefields, studded with potentially damaging DNA sequences over which hundreds of thousands of sentries stand guard. These sentries, called epigenetic marks, attach to the double helix at such spots and prevent the underlying DNA sequences from springing into destructive action.
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Futurity.org
The first things bodies do to reject a donor organ Researchers have uncovered the first molecular steps that lead to immune system activation and eventual rejection of a transplanted organ. The findings, published in Science Immunology , could be useful for creating better donor-recipient matches and developing new ways to prevent rejection of transplanted tissues. Approximately 50 percent of all transplanted organs are rejected within 10 to 12 y
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Gizmodo
Can Gecko Feet Help Us Clean Up Space Junk? GIF Video: NASA/H. Jiang et al (Science Robotics (2017)) There’s a crapload of debris orbiting our planet and potentially posing a hazard to our astronauts and our satellites. One estimate says there are 21,000 pieces of space junk larger than 10 centimeters, that could collide with other objects at velocities ten times faster than a bullet. How do we get it down? You can’t just grab any old spac
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Popular Science
This gecko-inspired robot could help solve our space debris dilemma Science Get a gecko grip. A new robotic gripper inspired by gecko feet can hold giant dangerous space debris—and let it go with a feather-light touch.
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New Scientist - News
The way we run protects our upper bodies but our legs sufferIn-depth analysis has revealed how running sends shocks through the body in greater detail than ever before, and hints at new ways to prevent common injuries
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New Scientist - News
Artificially intelligent painters invent new styles of artBig stylistic shifts in art usually come from genius painters like Picasso – but an AI is being trained to create unconventional pictures of its own
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Gizmodo
Genre-Blending Genius Edgar Wright Talks Ant-Man, Baby Driver and Grand Theft Auto Image: Sony At first glance, Baby Driver doesn’t look like it uses genre conventions in the way that Edgar Wright’s other works have. While you can easily see the homages to zombie horror and paranoid sci-fi in Shaun of the Dead and World’s End , the fusion at the heart of Baby Driver ’s DNA is initially more elusive to parse. But once you put sunglasses on and deconstruct it, it’s right there: t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More milkweeds located throughout the landscape can help conserve monarchsAdding milkweeds and other native flowering plants into midwestern agricultural lands is key to restoring monarch butterflies, with milkweed sowers from all sectors of society being critically needed for success.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bright thinking leads to breakthrough in nuclear threat detection scienceTaking inspiration from an unusual source, a Sandia National Laboratories team has dramatically improved the science of scintillators—objects that detect nuclear threats. According to the team, using organic glass scintillators could soon make it even harder to smuggle nuclear materials through America's ports and borders.
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Quanta Magazine
Can Microbes Encourage Altruism? Parasites are among nature’s most skillful manipulators — and one of their specialties is making hosts perform reckless acts of irrational self-harm. There’s Toxoplasma gondii , which drives mice to seek out cats eager to eat them, and the liver fluke Dicrocoelium dendriticum , which motivates ants to climb blades of grass, exposing them to cows and sheep hungry for a snack. There’s Spinochordode
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Gizmodo
Do Not Be Alarmed By NASA’s Eerie Artificial Clouds Image: NASA In news that is sure to vindicate chemtrail truthers, NASA has finally delivered on its longstanding promise to produce a dazzling display of artificial clouds. And dang, was it cool. On Thursday, June 29th , at 4:25 am Eastern time, a two stage Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket blasted skyward from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. During its eight-minute flight, the sound
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Early Prime Day, Logitech Gold Box, High Sierra Bags, and More Logitech computing gear , High Sierra bags and luggage , and early access Prime Day deals lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Prime Day Mark your calendars, because Amazon’s third annual Prime Day is July 11 , with the deals actually kicking off at 9PM ET the night before. Advertisement Advertisemen
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Futurity.org
Gecko-like gripper could clean up space junk Right now, about 500,000 pieces of human-made debris are whizzing around space, orbiting our planet at speeds up to 17,500 miles per hour. The debris poses a threat to satellites, space vehicles, and astronauts. What makes tidying up especially challenging is that the debris exists in space. Suction cups don’t work in a vacuum. Traditional sticky substances, like tape, are largely useless because
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More milkweeds located throughout the landscape can help conserve monarchsAdding milkweeds and other native flowering plants into midwestern agricultural lands is key to restoring monarch butterflies, with milkweed sowers from all sectors of society being critically needed for success.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bright thinking leads to breakthrough in nuclear threat detection scienceTaking inspiration from an unusual source, a Sandia National Laboratories team has dramatically improved the science of scintillators -- objects that detect nuclear threats. According to the team, using organic glass scintillators could soon make it even harder to smuggle nuclear materials through America's ports and borders.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New anesthesia dosing models may increase safety of remifentanil for obese patients and children-Researchers have developed new dosing models that may provide the scientific basis for more accurate administration of remifentanil, a synthetic opioid commonly used during surgery, in children and obese patients.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Clean Coal’s Flagship Project Has FailedA plan to slash emissions from coal burning by 65 percent has proved too problematic at the beleaguered Kemper power plant.
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Ars Technica
Google Photos 3.0 is out now, with automatic sharing features If you remember back at Google I/O, new sharing features were announced for Google Photos. Most of the features revolved around making sharing easier or more likely to happen, with features like "Shared Libraries" and "Suggested Sharing." Google announced on its blog that those features are finally ready and are shipping now in Google Photos 3.0. "Shared Libraries" lets you pick a Google Photos c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene networks dictate plants' responses to cold, stressRecent advances in technology have allowed scientists to probe the molecular nature of life, analyzing thousands of genes at a time and recognizing patterns of gene interaction. Complexity scientists have now explored gene co-expression networks that have evolved to help plants withstand drought and cold.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Textbook knowledge in molecular interactions refutedVan der Waals interactions between molecules are among the most important forces in biology, physics, and chemistry, as they determine the properties and physical behavior of many materials. For a long time, it was considered that these interactions between molecules are always attractive. Now, researchers have found that in many rather common situations in nature the van der Waals force between t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bumble bees make a beeline for larger flowersBumble bees create foraging routes by using their experience to select nectar-rich, high-rewarding flowers. A study now suggests that bees actually forage more efficiently when flower sizes are large rather than small. This indicates that for these insect pollinators foraging quickly is more efficient than foraging accurately.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five reasons why Amazon-Whole Foods won't win grocery warGoodbye, Kroger? Safeway? Albertsons? Costco? Even Walmart and Target?
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New Scientist - News
Wildfires’ ‘killer haze’ tracked with Twitter as it spreadsThe Indonesian government is using a tool that mines social media chatter to track deadly smog and monitor the evacuation of local people
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest risk of deathA molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumor removal, according to a new clinical study led by UC San Francisco in collaboration with colleagues in Sweden. As a result, 'ultralow' risk patients could be treated less aggressively and overtreatment avoided, leading to fewer toxic effects.
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Futurity.org
To stop cancer’s spread, break its ‘legs’ Cancer cells most often kill by crawling away from their original tumors to later re-root in vital parts of the body in a process called metastasis. Bristly leg-like protrusions that cover cancer cells enable them to creep. When researchers gently heated minuscule gold rods with a laser in experiments on common laboratory cultures ( in vitro ) of cancerous human cells, they were able to mangle th
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Viden
Video: Ny robotprinter printer robotterTeknologien kan lave robotter med potentiale inden for rumfart og til brug i katastrofesituationer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine scientists and astronauts join forces to create world's deepest coral nurseryNestled in the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary, 10 tree-like structures made of PVC pipes rise up from the ocean floor. They are adorned with plastic cards that hang from fiberglass branches. The cards house growing pieces of endangered coral. An odd sight to see, this group of makeshift trees could help solve one of the greatest environmental problems facing the world's oceans today—the loss of cor
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Ars Technica
Trump picks Republican to fill empty commissioner seat at FCC Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Nerthuz) The Federal Communications Commission's empty slots are about to be filled. President Donald Trump will nominate Republican Brendan Carr to the FCC's fifth and final commissioner position, the White House announced last night. Carr served as FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai's Wireless, Public Safety, and International Legal Advisor for three years. After Trump el
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The Atlantic
There's a Fried-Chicken Sandwich Floating in the Stratosphere Why did the chicken cross the troposphere? To get to the other layer in Earth’s atmosphere. A fried-chicken sandwich was carried by a giant balloon to the stratosphere on Thursday, where it will float for the next four days, reaching altitudes of 50,000 to 80,000 feet. The flight is part publicity stunt, part launch test. It’s the product of an unlikely partnership between KFC, the fast-food chic
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The Atlantic
The NSA Confronts a Problem of Its Own Making It is hard to imagine more fitting names for code-gone-bad than WannaCry and Eternal Blue. Those are just some of the computer coding vulnerabilities pilfered from the National Security Agency’s super-secret stockpile that have been used in two separate global cyber attacks in recent weeks. An attack on Tuesday featuring Eternal Blue was the second of these to use stolen NSA cyber tools—disruptin
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Blog » Languages » English
Mystic Rising: Closing Ceremony You are cordially invited to join the Mystic Closing Ceremony on Friday today, June 30, at 4 pm to celebrate for science. There will be points, badges, and promotions galore! RSVP on Facebook or join the fun directly on Eyewire.org .
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Live Science
Why Scientists Are Growing Herpes-Ridden Turtle Skin in the LabDr. Frankenstein, eat your heart out: Scientists have grown the pebbly green skin of sea turtles in the lab for the first time ever.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Variation at a central metabolic gene influences male fruit fly lifespanThe overexpression of an important gene that regulates energy metabolism can cause a severe shortening of lifespan in male fruit flies but has only a small negative effect on lifespans of female fruit flies, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The findings, which involve metabolic genes and pathways that are important in humans and other animals, shed more light on sex-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collaboration produces surprising insights into the properties of butterfly wingsA collaboration between biologists and materials scientists at the University of Pennsylvania is yielding new insights into the wings of the "skipper butterfly" in the Costa Rican rainforest. What they learn could lead to technological advancements in systems ranging from power-efficient computer displays to sensors to energy efficient buildings, windows and vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data processing helps uncover the impact of loan forgiveness programsIn 2017, 44.2 million Americans held student loan debt, totaling more than $1.4 trillion, according to the U.S. Federal Reserve. With the cost of tuition rising at most higher education institutions and enrollment increasing, these numbers are expected to keep climbing.
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Gizmodo
A Deadly Brain-Invading Worm Is Disturbingly Widespread in Florida Angiostrongylus cantonensis larva. (Image: CDC) Scientists in Florida have found traces of rat lungworm in five counties, bolstering the idea that this potentially fatal parasite may be expanding its geographical range on account of—you guessed it—climate change. If this sounds familiar, you’re probably thinking of the recent rash of rat lungworm infections in Hawaii . Previously, over the past 2
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomechanical acoustics study sheds light on running injuriesDevoted runners suffer from a surprisingly high rate of injury. One reason for these injuries is that runners endure many shocks from the impact, and these cause vibrations that travel from the foot throughout the entire body. Delphine Chadefaux, a researcher who focuses on acoustics and biomechanics, studies these repetitive shocks and investigates how runners adapt their running patterns, and wi
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Names Foreign Policy Experts Kori Schake and Amy Zegart as Contributing Editors The Atlantic continues to grow its masthead with the addition of foreign policy experts Kori Schake and Amy Zegart as contributing editors covering national security and international affairs. Schake and Zegart have recently written for The Atlantic —Schake on how Trump is destroying his own administration’s policies and Zegart on James Comey’s stunning testimony —and will contribute regularly at
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The Atlantic
The Power of Art That Makes You Pause Louis Armstrong is rightly lauded as one of the most influential jazz artists of all time, but less frequently appreciated is the impact he had on ending segregation in the United States. In 1931, when Charles Black, Jr., was a 16-year-old freshman at the University of Texas, he went to see Armstrong play at the Driskill Hotel in Austin, hoping, in his own words, that there would be “lots of girl
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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Ars Technica
June 29, 2007: Waiting at the San Francisco and Cincinnati Apple Stores on iDay Enlarge / On the evening of June 29, 2007, everyone was doing this, right? (credit: Jacqui Cheng) Ten years ago today, folks like our own Lee Hutchinson waited (in line or online) for the first iPhone's formal release. We've been examining the product's impact all week as it turns 10, and today we couldn't help but resurface our version of those infamous "look at that line, tho" stories from a de
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D-printed implants can improve integration of amputee prosthetic devices with boneA new study evaluated two additive manufacturing methods for producing either fine or coarse textured titanium implants and compared the strength of bone integration, interlocking, and torque in rats given one or both types of the implants in the distal femurs. The ability to apply this technology to customize implant surface textures and geometries to match the specific anatomy of human amputees
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A wave's 'sweet spot' revealedFor surfers, finding the "sweet spot," the most powerful part of the wave, is part of the thrill and the challenge.
6h
Gizmodo
If Michelangelo Made Mistakes They'd Look Like This Liquid Paper Masterpiece GIF YouTube’s Draw with Jazza , also known as Josiah Brooks, is a talented artist who occasionally challenges himself to only work with random office supplies. For his latest piece he worked exclusively with Liquid Paper, a white, fast-drying paint once used to correct mistakes on an ancient device known as a typewriter. What’s even more remarkable than Jazza’s ability to create a dynamic scene w
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bumble bees make a beeline for larger flowersBumble bees create foraging routes by using their experience to select nectar-rich, high-rewarding flowers. A study by Shohei Tsujimoto and Hiroshi Ishii of the University of Toyama in Japan now suggests that bees actually forage more efficiently when flower sizes are large rather than small. This indicates that for these insect pollinators foraging quickly is more efficient than foraging accurate
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Immersive journalism in a post-truth worldIn a recent Frontiers in Digital Humanities article, Eva Dominguez, a senior digital communication consultant and multimedia journalist, analyzes the rise of immersive journalism and its particular set of challenges.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists move closer to defeating 'superbugs' with simplified forms of teixobactinScientists have produced new, effective and simplified forms of teixobactin - a new generation antibiotic which defeats multi-drug resistant infections such as MRSA - as part of a pioneering research effort to tackle antimicrobial resistance.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Understanding the Real Innovation behind the iPhoneA decade ago Apple didn’t just create a phone with some extra features, it introduced a full-fledged handheld computer that could also make calls and browse the internet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers push metals to their limitsModern aircraft and power generation turbines depend on precision-machined parts that can withstand harsh mechanical forces in high-temperature environments. In many cases, higher operating temperatures lead to more efficient performance. This motivates the search for new ultrahigh-temperature metal alloys that can maintain their shape and strength at temperatures where ordinary steel would melt.
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Gizmodo
Jezebel John Mayer Doesn’t Want to Talk About Having Sex With Katy Perry | Deadspin The Rockets Migh Jezebel John Mayer Doesn’t Want to Talk About Having Sex With Katy Perry | Deadspin The Rockets Might Not Be Done Making Moves | The Root Off-Duty Ill. Cop ‘Detained’ Black Teen For Not Following Orders, Lansing Police Say | Fusion California Gives a Giant Middle Finger to Monsanto |
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn collaboration produces surprising insights into the properties of butterfly wingsA collaboration between biologists and materials scientists at the University of Pennsylvania is yielding new insights into the wings of the "skipper butterfly" in the Costa Rican rainforest. What they learn could lead to technological advancements in systems ranging from power-efficient computer displays to sensors to energy efficient buildings, windows and vehicles.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-printed implants can improve integration of amputee prosthetic devices with boneA new study evaluated two additive manufacturing methods for producing either fine or coarse textured titanium implants and compared the strength of bone integration, interlocking, and torque in rats given one or both types of the implants in the distal femurs.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Camera-trap research paves the way for global monitoring networksIn recent years, there have been numerous calls for coordinated global monitoring networks to understand and mitigate the effects of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss around the world. A new study led by Lindsey Rich, who recently completed her doctorate in wildlife conservation in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment, demonstrates that camera traps are one of the most
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Variation at a central metabolic gene influences male fruit fly lifespanThe overexpression of an important gene that regulates energy metabolism can cause a severe shortening of lifespan in male fruit flies but has only a small negative effect on lifespans of female fruit flies, according to new research from North Carolina State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OSC data processing helps uncover the impact of loan forgiveness programsMost of us have been affected by the burden of student debt. In 2007, Congress created programs that would forgive and reduce student loans if certain criteria were met. Hongyu Chen, graduate assistant in the Department of Economics at OSU, ran data simulations on OSC's Oakley Cluster to discover what the impact of these programs might be. The results are impressive and have the potential to impac
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Success with first 20 patients undergoing minimally invasive pancreatic transplant surgerySurgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids and fewer complications, compared with standard surgical approaches.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ryanair random seat allocation is not so random says Oxford University expertPassengers have more chance of winning the National Lottery jackpot than being allocated middle seats at random on a Ryanair flight, according to new Oxford University analysis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals secrets of success of tourism entrepreneursUniversity of Surrey research into innovative entrepreneurs starting to work in tourism has found, in some of the first analysis undertaken, how they have to use initiative and hard work - and often work for nothing - to overcome the barriers in setting up their innovation.
6h
Gizmodo
The NES30 Pro Is the Perfect Portable Controller for the Nintendo Switch All photos: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo Nintendo put a great deal of thought into the design of the Switch with the exception of the alternative Pro Controller, which feels like an afterthought. It might be official, and a perfect way to play Nintendo Switch games on a TV, but it comes with a steep price tag, and a bulky design that flies in the face of the Switch’s best feature: portability. So I’v
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers refute textbook knowledge in molecular interactionsVan der Waals interactions between molecules are among the most important forces in biology, physics, and chemistry, as they determine the properties and physical behavior of many materials. For a long time, it was considered that these interactions between molecules are always attractive. Now, for the first time, Mainak Sadhukhan and Alexandre Tkatchenko from the Physics and Materials Science Res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make giant molecular cages for energy conversion and drug deliveryScientists from Trinity College Dublin and AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have created 'molecular cages' that can maximise the efficiency of converting molecules in chemical reactions, and that may in future also be used as sensors and drug-delivery agents. The cages can be packed with different molecules, many of wh
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Gizmodo
This Real Life Iron Man Is Only a Superhero on Laundry Day GIF Those blockbuster Marvel movies only show our favorite superheroes when they’re out saving the world. If you want a glimpse of what heroes like Iron Man do the rest of the time, look no further than this incredibly articulated humanoid robot called TEO, who’s recently learned to iron clothing. TEO’s been in development at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid in Getafe, Spain, for a few years
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant molecular cages made for energy conversion and drug deliveryThe porous, 'sponge'-type molecules have an enormous internal surface area. This allows their use as 'molecular flasks' or 'molecular containers' that change the reactivity and properties of encapsulated molecules.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vortex-antivortex pairs found in magnetic trilayersResearchers have discovered magnetic vortex-antivortex pairs arising from correlated electron spins in a newly engineered trilayer material. The discovery could advance memory cells and points to the potential development of 3-D magnetic logic circuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The Statue of Liberty's true colorsThe Statue of Liberty is an iconic blue-green symbol of freedom. But did you know she wasn't always that color?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The sharpest laser in the world: Physicists develop a laser with a linewidth of only 10 mHzNo one had ever come so close to the ideal laser before: theoretically, laser light has only one single color (also frequency or wavelength). In reality, however, there is always a certain linewidth. With a linewidth of only 10 mHz, the laser that the researchers from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now developed together with US researchers from JILA, has established a new wo
6h
Ars Technica
Tom Wheeler defends Title II rules, accuses Pai of helping monopolists Enlarge / Then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in 2015. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler spoke out against the FCC's proposed repeal of net neutrality rules this week, saying the repeal will help monopoly broadband providers abuse their dominant position. There's "a monopoly provider for three-quarters of the homes in America, and no choice
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Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Computing Gear With Today's Logitech Gold Box Deals Logitech Gold Box Whether you’re in the market for a new keyboard, mouse, webcam, or gaming headset, Amazon’s got what you need in today’s Logitech Gold Box . Inside, you’ll find a dozen deals on popular Logitech products to fit any budget, including the venerable Performance Mouse MX for $40 , the solar-powered K750 keyboard , the $25 G230 headset , and the C922x webcam for an all-time low $50,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whale-watching comes under scrutiny at South Africa meetingWhale-watching is a growing tourist business in many parts of the world, and delegates to an international whale conference in South Africa say guidelines to protect the animals are increasingly needed.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists move closer to defeating 'superbugs' with simplified forms of teixobactinScientists have produced new, effective and simplified forms of teixobactin -- a new generation antibiotic which defeats multi-drug resistant infections such as MRSA -- as part of a pioneering research effort to tackle antimicrobial resistance.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does carrying extra weight offer better survival following a stroke?Despite the fact that obesity increases both the risk for stroke and death, a new study has found that people who are overweight or even mildly obese survive strokes at a higher rate as compared to those with a normal body weight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprisingly exact timing of voluntary movementsAlmost everything we do -- walking, talking, or drinking coffee -- is completely dependent on accurate timing when activating many muscles at once. The prevailing theory has been that the exact timing of this type of movement is not voluntarily controlled, and the timing has therefore been assumed to be fully automated when learning movements. However, a new study shows that people are fully capab
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The sharpest laser in the worldWith a linewidth of only 10 mHz, the laser that the researchers from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now developed together with US researchers from JILA, a joint institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado Boulder, has established a new world record. The results have been published in the current issue of Physical Review Lett
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bumble bees make a beeline for larger flowersBumble bees create foraging routes by using their experience to select nectar-rich, high-rewarding flowers. A study by Shohei Tsujimoto and Hiroshi Ishii of the University of Toyama in Japan now suggests that bees actually forage more efficiently when flower sizes are large rather than small. This indicates that for these insect pollinators foraging quickly is more efficient than foraging accurate
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Statue of Liberty's true colors (video)The Statue of Liberty is an iconic blue-green symbol of freedom. But did you know she wasn't always that color? When France gifted Lady Liberty to the US, she was a 305-foot statue with reddish-brown copper skin. See how this statue transitioned from penny red to chocolate brown to glorious liberty green in this Reactions video, just in time for Independence Day: https://youtu.be/_ZSLrXtg1-o.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treating lymphatic fluid leaks improves protein loss in patients with single-ventricle heart diseaseFocusing on a rare but devastating complication in patients with single-ventricle heart disease, a research team has revealed the role of leakage from the liver lymphatic system, and used a novel procedure to seal off those leaks and improve symptoms in patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depression linked to physical health decline in cancer caregiversA new report finds that symptoms of depression are the only significant predictor of caregivers' physical health decline.
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Ingeniøren
Skibsfarten – en supertanker, der langsomt er ved at skifte teknologiInd med sejl og batterier, og ud med kaptajnen. Søtransporten udviklinger sig langsomt, men sikkert – og de første eksempler på fremtiden er på vej i vandet.
6h
Wired
Rotten Tomatoes is Deciding What Movies You Don't See—Without You Knowing ItMore and more movies are tanking—and sure, they might be bad, but something else may be at play: metadata dependency.
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Scientific American Content: Global
On Being a Weird American on the Fourth of JulyAs the flags and patriotic words fly, that unusual adjective helps me resolve some internal conflicts—and turns out to be widely useful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic
What to Make of Trump and Macron's Upcoming Rendezvous in Paris President Trump accepted French President Emmanuel Macron’s invitation Wednesday to attend next month’s Bastille Day parade in the French capital, less than a month after the leaders’ first tense meeting in Brussels. The parade, which commemorates the storming of the royal fortress during the French Revolution more than 200 years ago, will also celebrate the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entering
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immersive journalism in a post-truth worldImmersive journalism allows viewers to have an intensely subjective experience of an objective situation. It promises new ways of heightening interest in and empathy for news stories, but it also runs the risk of aligning with a post-truth politics centering around subjectivism and relativism. Many challenges remain, chiefly with regards to the technological and ethical aspects of turning an exter
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers refute textbook knowledge in molecular interactionsVan der Waals interactions between molecules are among the most important forces in biology, physics, and chemistry, as they determine the properties and physical behavior of many materials. For a long time, it was considered that these interactions between molecules are always attractive. Now, researchers from the University of Luxembourg found that in many rather common situations in nature the
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A wave's 'sweet spot' revealedFor surfers, finding the 'sweet spot,' the most powerful part of the wave, is part of the thrill and the challenge. Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California postdoctoral researcher Nick Pizzo has found the exact location on the wave where a surfer gains the greatest speed to get the best ride.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CVIA volume 2 issue 2 major new China focus issueThe new journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the second issue of Volume 2, with a Special China Focus Issue. The CVIA China Focus Issue has been Guest Edited by Professor Changsheng Ma, Capital Medical University and National Center for Cardiovascular Clinical Research, Beijing, China and brings together contributions from leading cardiologists in the Unite
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Gizmodo
What the Hell is Happening Here? Monroe MacKinney thought he had reeled in just another largemouth bass from his parents’ eight-acre pond. But after peering into the fish’s mouth, the Missouri fisherman realized he’d actually hauled up a Russian nesting doll of nightmares. MacKinney’s catch had apparently swallowed an Eastern Mole (Scalopus aquaticus) , which are common throughout the eastern United States, Canada, and even some
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Live Science
What Really Made the iPhone So Transformative?The iPhone changed the game not because of the technical details of the device, but rather as a result of its creators' imagination and courage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research findsTrace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding the epidemiology of sarcopenia throughout the lifecourseRecent definitions of sarcopenia have integrated information on muscle mass, strength, and physical function. A new systematic review by researchers at the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, has now evaluated the epidemiology of these three distinct physiological components affected by the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make giant molecular cages for energy conversion and drug deliveryThe porous, 'sponge'-type molecules have an enormous internal surface area. This allows their use as 'molecular flasks' or 'molecular containers' that change the reactivity and properties of encapsulated molecules.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eighty-five percent of Spanish children eat too much saltSalt is a hidden enemy in children's diets. So says the conclusion of a study by researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid, which suggests that over 80 percent of Spanish schoolchildren consume excess salt; this is associated to greater risk of high blood pressure, osteoporosis and obesity. According to the authors, we first need to know the sources of dietary salt intake before we can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ryanair random seat allocation is not so random says Oxford University expertPassengers have more chance of winning the National Lottery jackpot than being allocated middle seats at random on a Ryanair flight, according to new Oxford University analysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment benefits patients with thalassaemia and HCVMany individuals with the blood disorder thalassaemia also carry the hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to contaminated transfusions before 1990.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study examines effectiveness of labor induction in IndiaResearchers from the University of Liverpool with colleagues from Gynuity Health Care in New York and the Government Medial College, Nagpur, India, have published a major study of two different types of labour induction methods in The Lancet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists investigate link between air pollution and type 2 diabetesResearchers from University of Leicester and EarthSense examine associations of air pollution in Leicestershire.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oceans are warming rapidly, study saysScientists examine the ocean heat content change on decadal and multi-decadal scales and at different ocean basins and find that the oceans are robustly warming, regardless of which data was used.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are people 'rolling the dice' when it comes to food safety?A new study, conducted by a team of UK based researchers led by the University of Liverpool known as the ENIGMA Project, has revealed the levels of bad behaviours in UK kitchens which increase the public's risk of getting food poisoning.
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The Atlantic
Fixing the 5 Percent An oversized poster of the Seinfeld character Kramer watches over Phil Rizzuto’s daily routine. When Rizzuto, named for the famous New York Yankees shortstop, swallows his 6 a.m. pills, Kramer is looming over him, looking quizzical. Same for the 9 a.m., noon, 6 p.m., and midnight doses, each fistful of pills placed in a carefully labeled Dixie cup. “I live on medication,” he says. Listen to the a
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Popular Science
Park rangers recall their most dangerous encounters with nature Environment Daring tales from the field. National Park Rangers have to be ready to weather whatever. Here are some of their stories.
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Ars Technica
Amazon Prime Day is on July 11, with early access on July 10 Enlarge Amazon Prime Day 2017 is almost upon us: starting from 6pm on July 10 (Monday), and running until the end of July 11, you'll be able to stock up on toilet rolls and other odd things that Amazon has failed to shift over the last year, plus a few nice products that you'll actually be interested in. Prime Day 2017 is officially on July 11, but Amazon is adding six more hours of shopping this
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Inside Science
A Study About Nothing A Study About Nothing Scientists find new ways to measure the infinitesimally small fluctuations that exist in a vacuum. boiling-vacuum_TOP.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Also created homepage composite image using a .gif by TBH-1138 ) Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) (homepage image license:CC BY-SA 3.0) Physics Thursda
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognitionIn a recent review published in Frontiers in Nutrition, Italian researchers examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. It turns out that cognitive performance was improved by a daily intake of cocoa flavanols.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social status of listener alters our voicePeople tend to change the pitch of their voice depending on who they are talking to, and how dominant they feel, a study by the University of Stirling has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One step closer to a DNA vaccine against dengue virusIn a new study, researchers inoculated mice with a new DNA vaccine candidate (pVAX1-D1ME) in order to evaluate its efficiency. They found that the vaccine candidate was able to induce persistent humoral and cellular immune responses and provided efficient protection against lethal challenge from one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DV1). These results are encouraging for the future developme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lung cancer screening could save money as well as lives, research showsLung cancer screening is likely to be cost-effective, particularly if it also identifies other tobacco-related conditions in high-risk people, suggests new research published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New avenue for the large-scale synthesis of 'God' Janus particlesThe research team led by Prof. WANG Shutao and Prof. JIANG Lei in Thecnical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) reveals a general emulsion interfacial polymerization strategy opens a new avenue for the large-scale synthesis of 'god' Janus particles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Surrey's research reveals secrets of success of tourism entrepreneursUniversity of Surrey research into innovative entrepreneurs starting to work in tourism has found, in some of the first analysis undertaken, how they have to use initiative and hard work -- and often work for nothing -- to overcome the barriers in setting up their innovation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploiting acidic tumor microenvironment for the development of novel cancer nano-theranosticsThe acidic tumor microenvironment (TME), which is mainly resulted from the high glycolytic rate of tumor cells, has been characterized as a hallmark of solid tumor and found to be a pivotal factor participating in tumor progression. Recently, due to the increasing understanding of acidic TME, it has been shown that the acidic TME could be utilized as a multifaceted target during the design of vari
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pain neuron may protect fungal inflammation and bone destructionScientists discovered unexpected functions of pain neuron. Pain neuron may inhibit fungi-induced osteo-inflammation via CGRP-Jdp2 axis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Serious pain afflicts a third of nursing home residents in last 6 months of lifeMany nursing home residents have a fairly pain-free experience until the end of life, but at least a third suffer persistent, significant pain during their last six months, according to a new study from the University of Manitoba, University of British Columbia and University of Alberta that could have implications for end-of-life care in Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bullying and bias can cost schools millions in lost fundingWhen children avoid school to avoid bullying, many states can lose tens of millions of dollars in lost funding, and California alone loses an estimated $276 million each year because children feel unsafe. New research from The University of Texas at Austin published in School Psychology Quarterly highlights the hidden cost to communities in states that use daily attendance numbers to calculate pub
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Gizmodo
Spider-Man: Homecoming Proves How Good Skipping the Origin Story Can Be Spider-Man Homecoming opens July 7. All Images: Sony Spider-Man: Homecoming is not your typical Marvel movie—and that’s exactly what makes it great. Directed by relative newcomer Jon Watts, Spider-Man: Homecoming is almost goofy. It’s weird, wholesome, and there’s an almost unpolished feel to it, especially in the film’s early scenes. A lot of the movie is about kids who do a lot of dumb stuff. I
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The Atlantic
Baby Driver Is a Tribute to the Magic of the Earbud It’s rude to wear headphones when interacting with other people, and it’s ruder to leave your music on when doing so. So say the etiquette books, and so would say common sense for most people—especially those over a certain age. Yet anyone who’s recently shared a car with a high schooler, or stood in a checkout line in a college town, might report that this particular norm is eroding. Last year,
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Ars Technica
Survey: Pain patients overwhelmingly prefer medical marijuana over opioids Enlarge (credit: Getty | ShaunGoo ) When patients have a choice between opioids and medical marijuana for a painful condition, an overwhelming majority say they prefer marijuana, that it works just as well, and has fewer side effects, a new survey finds. Though the survey , involving 2,897 medical cannabis patients, didn’t track actual drug use or efficacy, the findings fits with previous data. D
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Live Science
In Photos: Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf Through TimeA huge crack in Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf is about to calve a Delaware-size iceberg. Here's a look at the gorgeous, yet collapsing, ice sheet.
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Gizmodo
Milo Yiannopoulos’s Dangerous New Book Isn’t Even Worth Hating Photo: AP Former Breitbart tech editor Milo Yiannopoulos is scheduled to publish his book Dangerous next Tuesday, on Independence Day. Ahead of that release Gizmodo has obtained a copy of the finished book, as well as the January draft previously leaked to Buzzfeed. Maybe “the most controversial book of the decade” was intended as a career comeback, but it reads like an epitaph. Ugly as his belie
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Ars Technica
Ryzen Pro: AMD takes on Intel on the corporate desktop, with one key omission AMD AMD today launched Ryzen Pro (styled "PRO" in AMD's branding, but we're not going to do that here), a series of processors designed for the corporate desktop. Close counterparts to the existing line of consumer-oriented Ryzen chips, the Pro parts are aimed at Intel's vPro-compatible processors, which enable a number of additional administrative, security, and management capabilities. Most of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising new therapeutic approach for debilitating bone diseaseAustralian researchers have demonstrated that a new type of therapeutic could greatly reduce bone disease in patients with the bone cancer, multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that develops in bone, causing progressive bone destruction, bone fractures, and often devastating pain. Unlike existing treatments, this new approach rebuilds bone tissue, making it more resistant to fractures.Th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osaka University researchers push metals to their limitsOsaka University-led research team develops a new metal alloy with exceptional mechanical performance at ultrahigh temperatures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research findsTrace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new Indiana University research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene networks dictate plants' responses to cold, stressRecent advances in technology have allowed scientists to probe the molecular nature of life, analyzing thousands of genes at a time and recognizing patterns of gene interaction. In a recent paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, complexity scientist Samuel Scarpino and co-authors explore gene co-expression networks that have evolved to help plants withstand drought and cold.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Languid JetsetterAn undescribed jellyfish in Pacific waters near Hawaii, likely a Bathykorus species, propels itself by moving water in and out of its circular cavity.
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Gizmodo
Could James Bond Become the Next Big Shared Universe? Matt Reeves discusses his hopes for The Batman . The cast of Netflix’s Castlevania show has been revealed. Deadpool 2 's cast expands, and already starts throwing around comic book references. Plus, a very blurry Doctor Who set picture might confirm a months-old rumor. To me, my Spoilers! James Bond While the future of the next Bond film remains mostly hidden—including whether or not Daniel Craig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bullying and bias can cost schools millions in lost fundingWhen children avoid school to avoid bullying, many states can lose tens of millions of dollars in lost funding, and California alone loses an estimated $276 million each year because children feel unsafe.
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Gizmodo
Alan Moore's Weird Noir Anthology Series Show Pieces Is Coming to Shudder Shudder Alan Moore has had many works adapted into films—including Watchmen , From Hell , and V for Vendetta —but noir thriller Show Pieces , first released in 2012, is the first time the acclaimed author wrote specifically for the screen. The five-part series hits horror streaming network Shudder tomorrow. Created with director Mitch Jenkins, and featuring Moore himself among the cast, the Kicks
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Ingeniøren
Roskilde-madbod benytter elbil som powerbankDTU-studerende tester under Roskilde Festival, om elbiler kan erstatte dieselgeneratorer og gøre festivalens strømforbrug mere grønt.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walgreens to buy half of Rite Aid stores for $5.2 bnUS pharmacy chain Walgreens announced a new deal on Thursday to buy half of competitor Rite Aid's stores for nearly $5.2 billion after canceling a two previous merger attempts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single-celled eukaryote fossil with evidence of mineralizing found in Yukon(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found an example of a single-celled eukaryote fossil with evidence of mineralizing in Yukon territory, Canada. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes how they found the sample and what was revealed by studying it using high-resolution transmission electron microscop
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The Atlantic
The iPhone is Dead. Long Live the Rectangle There’s a paradox in technology. For something new to become widespread, familiar, and mass-market, it must create enough novelty and curiosity to draw people’s attention. But novelty alone is not enough to reach saturation. To permeate life, a technology must elicit more than novelty and curiosity in its users. It must become ordinary. It must recede into the background, where it continues to ru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five mass extinctions—and what we can learn from them about the planet todayOf all the species that have ever lived, more than 99% are now extinct. Most of them quietly disappeared during periods of "background extinction", whereby a handful of species become extinct every 100,000 years or so.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-rise buildings much more energy intensive than low-riseOffice and residential buildings use more energy per square metre, the taller they are, according to new research from UCL.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How does municipal waste collection affect climate change?Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid suggest a new methodology to assess the environmental impact of the containers used for the collection of urban waste.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Affordable Catalysts Give Green Vehicles a PushReducing the platinum in fuel-cell catalysts could help bring hydrogen-powered vehicles to the mass market -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Access to the internet is great, but it’s not a human rightThe ability to get online is now routinely regarded as a universal human right, but it really doesn't deserve that lofty status, says Steve Fuller
8h
Popular Science
This dress changes color to show how polluted your air is From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News The attention-grabbing garment highlights a deadly problem. Dominique Paul made a dress that measures air quality and changes colors to reflect the level of pollution.
8h
Viden
10 teknologier, der ændrer vores verden de næste 10 årFire eksperter kommer med deres bud på hvilke teknologier, der de næste ti år vil ændre vores verden fundamentalt
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fuel and chemicals from plant wasteFrom the inexhaustible raw material lignin, which as a constituent of many plants accumulates in great quantities, fuels and other important substances could in theory be extracted for industry – so far, though, it can't be done efficiently enough. Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have now found a method for identifying heretofore unseen intermediate products of the ca
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
True romance in the air at Tokyo virtual reality showIt is Saturday night and you want to have a date with someone special, but you're too tired to get off the sofa.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skull fragments with carved long, deliberate lines found at Gobekli Tepe(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the German Archaeological Institute has found long, deliberate marks carved into ancient skulls found at the Göbekli Tepe dig site. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes the skull fragments they have been studying and offer some possible explanations for the markings they found.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silicon-on-Seine: world's biggest tech incubator opens in ParisParis takes a step closer Thursday to fulfilling its ambition of becoming Europe's technology capital when President Emmanuel Macron inaugurates Station F, the world's largest start-up incubator on the banks of the Seine.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Leicester develops pioneering X-ray technique to analyze ancient artifactsLeicester leads an international team to develop new method for conducting materials analysis on historical objects.
8h
The Atlantic
The Fall of MIT's Counter-Culture Dorm The walls of Senior House, a dorm on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s campus, are not composed of lifeless, cream-colored cinder blocks. Instead, they ooze passion and raw emotion, providing a concrete canvas for residents’ renderings of cartoon characters, inspirational phrases, and internal dialogues. The murals reflect the community of students who knew Senior House not just as a pl
8h
The Atlantic
A Map That Shows You Everything Wrong With Your Brain The woman who would be mapping my brain, Cynthia Kerson, had tanned, toned arms and long silvery hair worn loose. Her home office featured an elegant calligraphy sign reading “BREATHE,” and also a mug that said “I HAVE THE PATIENCE OF A SAINT—SAINT CUNTY MCFUCKOFF.” Kerson is a neurotherapist, which means she practices a form of alternative therapy that involves stimulating brain waves until they
8h
Ingeniøren
God lyd og lynhurtige opkald over 4G og WiFi på vej til flere danskereMobilkunder hos Yousee kan nu bruge 4G-nettet eller deres egen internetforbindelse til opkald. Den nye teknologi breder sig dermed langsomt til landets mobilnetværk.
8h
Gizmodo
A Delaware-Sized Iceberg Is Tearing Off Antarctica Right Now The Larsen C ice shelf as seen by the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instrument on the Sentinel-1A satellite on June 28th. Image: NASA Earth Observatory Like that painful hangnail you’ve been eyeing for days—except billions of times larger, made of ice not keratin, and studied by dozens of scientists worldwide—a Delaware-sized glacier along Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf is hanging by a thread,
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How conspiracy theories feed political fragmentationConspiracy theories are all the rage these days. Barely a day goes by without someone accusing someone else of engaging in fake news, post-truths, witch hunts and organised political skulduggery.
8h
Ars Technica
With iPhone, Apple showed AT&T and Verizon who’s boss Enlarge / A poster announces the arrival of Apple's iPhone at the AT&T store in Orem, Utah, Monday, June 18, 2007. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Ten years ago today—on June 29, 2007 —many waited (in line or online) for the first iPhone's formal release. Apple's now-signature product has made a lasting mark not only on our communications, but on many unexpected walks of life. This week as the
8h
Wired
Vivobarefoot Ultra Blooms: Earth-Friendly Running Shoes Made of AlgaeThese new running shoes are made from algae-based foam. They look like Crocs, but you can run a marathon in them.
8h
Wired
Cadillac Challenges Tesla With the Super Cruise Self-Driving SystemDebuting on the CT6 sedan, Super Cruise watches the driver to solve the ever-tricky "handoff problem."
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can we ditch dark energy by better understanding general relativity?A renewed suggestion that dark energy may not be real—dispensing with 70% of the stuff in the universe—has reignited a longstanding debate.
9h
Science-Based Medicine
Adrenal fatigue: A fake disease (updated)“Adrenal fatigue” is not a real medical condition, but some claim it is real and that medicine is ignoring it. What does the science say?
9h
Gizmodo
This is What an ISIS Drone Workshop Looks Like A drone and a mobile IED at an Islamic State factory discovered by Iraqi forces today on June 23, 2017 in the frontline neighborhood of Al-Shifa, on the edge of the Islamic State occupied Old City of west Mosul (Photo by Martyn Aim/Getty Images) The Islamic State has increasingly used drones and other robotic IEDs against American, Iraqi, and civilian targets in Iraq . And as the Coalition fights
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop pioneering X-ray technique to analyze ancient artifactsA pioneering X-ray technique that can analyse artefacts of any shape or texture in a non-destructive way has been developed by an international team of researchers led by the University of Leicester.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the homeless create homesThe number of people facing housing insecurity, already on the rise, began to climb more steeply as a result of the Great Recession. This upward trend will likely be exacerbated if President Trump's proposed cuts to food stamps, Medicaid and housing subsidies are enacted, which will force even more to make a choice between food on the table and a roof above their heads.
9h
Ars Technica
Information overload makes social media a swamp of fake news Enlarge / Sorry, I’m not home right now. (credit: flickr user: Rosmarie Voegtli ) Once upon a time, it wasn’t crazy to think that social media would allow great ideas and high-quality information to float to the top while the dross would be drowned in the noise. After all, when you share something, you presumably do so because you think it’s good. Everybody else probably thinks what they’re shari
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using thermal light sources to take accurate distance measurementsNew research has made it possible for the first time to compare the spatial structures and positions of two distant objects, which may be very far away from each other, just by using a simple thermal light source, much like a star in the sky.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Miniature plumbing fast-tracks drug developmentSydney researcher Lidia Matesic has developed a technique to speed up the development of nuclear medicines allowing hospitals to not only make nuclear medicine in-house, but also tailor-made to the patient.
9h
Gizmodo
Prime Day Is July 11 This Year, But a Few Deals Are Already Available Prime Day Mark your calendars, because Amazon’s third annual Prime Day is July 11 , with the deals actually kicking off at 9PM ET the night before. Of course, we’ll be sifting through the avalanche of deals to help you find the best stuff, but in the meantime, a few great digital discounts are already live on Amazon’s Prime Day hub page . The highlights here are six months of Audible for $9 each
9h
The Atlantic
The Norwegian Teen-Drama Series Loved Around the World Teens around the world are in mourning on Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook because their favorite TV show just ended after four remarkable seasons. But it’s a program few in the U.S. have likely seen: a low-budget web series from Norway called Skam , or “shame.” The series from the Norwegian state broadcaster NRK follows a group of friends attending the (real and very respectable) Hartvig Nissen Sch
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Take that chocolate milk survey with a grain of saltIt's been all over the news lately: a survey by the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy suggests that 7 percent of American adults believe chocolate milk comes from brown cows.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A dual-arm construction robot with remote-control functionA group of Japanese researchers developed a new concept construction robot for disaster relief situations. This robot has a double swing dual arm mechanism and has drastically improved operability and mobility compared to conventional construction machines.
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Science | The Guardian
Avebury stone circle contains hidden square, archaeologists find Radar technology detects inner stone structure thought to commemorate Neolithic building dating to 3500BC and a focal point for Neolithic community A mysterious square formation has been discovered within the Neolithic stone circle monument at Avebury, rewriting the narrative of one of the wonders of the prehistoric world. Archaeologists believe the hidden stones, discovered using radar technolog
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study explores plant adaptations to drought and cold stressRecent advances in technology have allowed scientists to probe the molecular nature of life, analyzing thousands of genes at a time and recognizing patterns of gene interaction. In a recent paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, complexity scientist Samuel Scarpino and co-authors explore gene co-expression networks that have evolved to help plants withstand drought and cold.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Synthetic "Melanin" Could Act as a Natural SunscreenThe pigmentlike nanoparticles could protect cells from the sun’s damaging rays -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
The Atlantic
Is It Time to Reassess the U.S.-South Korea Alliance? When South Korea’s President Moon Jae In greets President Donald Trump at the White House today, their warm smiles will do little to mask the fact that they meet at perhaps the most dangerous moment in the six-decade old U.S.-South Korean alliance. The failure of a quarter-century of diplomacy has left the North Korean dictatorship on the cusp of possessing a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballis
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Genomic Vaccines Fight Disease in Ways Not Possible BeforeVaccines composed of DNA or RNA, instead of protein, could enable rapid development of preventives for infectious diseases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Quantum computers are about to get realQubit-based machines are gearing up to solve problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers.
9h
Wired
Your Connected Devices Are Screwing Up AstronomyThe radio spectrum is a limited commodity—and more and more of it is getting slurped up by consumer devices.
9h
Wired
iPhone Turns 10: How It Became the Everything MachineIt was the iPhone that taught people to tap, swipe, and pinch-to-zoom until they unwittingly fell in love.
9h
Wired
The Trump Administration Can’t Stop China From Becoming an AI SuperpowerIf America wants to stay ahead, it's not a matter of trying to slow China down.
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Science | The Guardian
What it's like to find out you’re autistic aged 33 – video Meet Keran Bunker, who has always struggled to keep jobs or a place to live and did not find out he had autism with ADHD until he was 33. Relying on prompts and visual cues to get through the day, his condition frequently sabotages his efforts to lead a normal life. However, after trying to get back into work for two years, a new start with Deliveroo is beginning to show promising signs Special t
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Volcano Forecast? New Technique Could Better Predict EruptionsTaking a cue from weather forecasters, researchers combine satellite measurements and models in attempt to predict volcanic activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Organoids Proposed to Screen Patients for High-Priced DrugsDutch scientists want to create mini-organs for all 1,500 cystic fibrosis patients in the Netherlands.
10h
Science | The Guardian
I’m HIV-positive. But thanks to drugs no one can catch the virus from me | Michael NugentAdvances in medication now mean that the virus can no longer be detected in my blood, so it’s impossible for me to transmit it to anybody I will always remember how I felt the moment I was told of my diagnosis as HIV-positive . It was 4 July 2016, and I thought that was it for me. I thought I was a risk to others, and on a countdown to death. I’m not alone in those views – a new survey shows nearl
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How soil dwelling bacteria adapt to richer or poorer conditionsScientists have identified a unique mechanism that the soil dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens uses to effectively exploit nutrients in the root environment.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kepler has taught us that rocky planets are commonRocky planets are probably a whole lot more common in our galaxy than astronomers previously believed—according to the latest release of Kepler Space Telescope data last week—a scenario that enhances the prospects for extraterrestrial life in nearby solar systems.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antimalarial drugs offer a smorgasbord of new herbicidesA team of plant biologists and chemists from The University of Western Australia in collaboration with staff from chemical company BASF have used the surprisingly close relationship between plants and malarial parasites to turn a molecule developed for possible malaria treatment into a new herbicide.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals albatross interactions with fishing vessels in the southern oceanAn international research team involving the University has tracked the foraging patterns of albatrosses in the southern ocean and found that nearly 80 percent of them follow fishing boats, giving scientists new insight into the risk fishing vessels present to seabirds.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brooding dinosaursA new method used to perform geochemical analysis of fossilized eggs from China has shown that oviraptorosaurs incubated their eggs with their bodies within a 35–40° C range, similar to extant birds today. This finding is the result of Franco-Chinese collaboration coordinated by Romain Amiot of the Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon: Terre, planètes et environnement (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/Université Claud
10h
The Atlantic
What Right-Wing Populist Movements Share: Blaming Immigrants What’s behind the surge of populism that brought Donald Trump to power? For Fareed Zakaria, trends in technology and globalization are one important factor, insofar as they have created a disconnect between economic growth and jobs in the United States. That isn’t, however, the whole story. “There's an interesting puzzle,” he declared in a Wednesday lecture at the Aspen Ideas Festival, which is c
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US postdocs face steep challenges when starting families Researchers from ethnic minorities are more likely to be discouraged from taking parental leave. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22200
10h
Viden
Tilbage til 80'erne: Danmark var i front for mobiltelefonens fødselGodt nok vejede en af de første danske "mobil"telefon syv kilo og kostede ca. 42.000 kroner, men i en årrække var vi helt i front på det mobile verdenskort.
10h
The Atlantic
Building a Fair-Trade Fashion Line Out of ‘Pride, Not Pity’ In a world of fast fashion, sustainable-fashion brands tout their dedication to transparent and ethical production. While goods from these companies can be expensive, the goal is to pay producers a living wage while creating fashionable, high-quality clothing. As resistance to fast fashion was picking up, Harper Poe graduated from college and started a day job that didn’t inspire her. She quit, a
10h
Ingeniøren
Vær dig selv på arbejdspladsen – det kan føre til forfremmelse Autenticitet undervurderes til tider, men det at være sig selv er en kraftfuldt værktøj, der kan føre dig og ikke mindst din arbejdsplads fremad. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/vaer-dig-selv-paa-arbejdspladsen-kan-foere-forfremmelse-8809 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
Ingeniøren
It-angreb: Den anvendte malware skal blot smadrer data, ikke skaffe løsepenge Det ligner ransomware, men er reelt et stykke malware, som smadrer data ved hjælp af kryptering, som bagmændene aldrig har haft en chance for at dekryptere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/notpetya-bagmaend-havde-aldrig-chance-at-dekryptere-data-id-kode-helt-tilfaeldig-1077950 Version2
10h
Live Science
KFC Chicken Sandwich to Launch to Edge of Space 6/29 @ 8AM ETA Kentucky Fried Chicken sandwich is now scheduled to travel into the stratosphere on Thursday (June 29) aboard one of World View Enterprise's Stratollite high-altitude balloon systems.
11h
Wired
Inside Nike Breaking2, the Epic Quest for the Perfect MarathonNike's quest to break the two-hour marathon did not go as planned. But when you're pushing the limits of human performance, nothing ever does.
11h
Gizmodo
Peter Thiel Described as 'Great Ambassador' For New Zealand Despite Secret Citizenship Peter Thiel during a meeting of the White House American Technology Council on June 19, 2017 (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Peter Thiel, the billionaire tech mogul and high profile Trump supporter, was granted New Zealand citizenship in 2011, a fact that only came to light back in January. But the politician in charge of granting citizenship at the time has now defended the unusual move
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny 'tornado' boosts performance of electrospray ionization mass spectrometryAdding the equivalent of a miniature tornado to the interface between electrospray ionization (ESI) and a mass spectrometer (MS) has allowed researchers to improve the sensitivity and detection capability of the widely-used ESI-MS analytical technique. Among the scientific fields that could benefit from the new technique are proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics – which serve biomedical and heal
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The Niagara Falls of MarsVarious researchers are often preoccupied with the quest for flowing water on Mars. However, this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), shows one of the many examples from Mars where lava (when it was molten) behaved in a similar fashion to liquid water.
11h
Live Science
Delaware-Size Iceberg Is About to Break Off of AntarcticaAntarctica's Larsen C ice shelf is speeding up, indicating that a massive iceberg could break off, or calve, anytime now.
11h
Ingeniøren
IDA dropper spektakulær udvidelseEntreprenørbud lå mindst 25 procent over budgettet for udvidelsen af IDAs hovedkvarter i København. Derfor dropper IDA udvidelsen.
11h
Ingeniøren
Regeringen vil lade sol og vind slås på markedsvilkårVindmølleindustrien frygter at nyt udspil om støtte til vedvarende energi vil slagte lokale aktører og ændre hele energisektoren.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart detectors set to monitor urban bat lifeThe activity of urban bats in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park (QEOP) in London is being monitored in real time using new, automated smart detectors.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds global support for new UN framework for children's rights onlineThe global push for a new international framework governing the rights of children online has gained new momentum, after a multinational study found governments and NGOs are calling for formal assistance to recognise and address children's digital rights.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt KU-firma satser på udvikling af ekstremt effektive vaccinerVaccineforskere fra Københavns Universitet har netop stiftet et firma ”AdaptVac Aps”...
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Er loftet for den menneskelige levealder nået?Stigningen i menneskets levealder tiltrækker stor samfundsmæssig interesse. Flere og flere...
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Blodkræftpatienter har højere risiko for at udvikle alvorlig øjensygdomPersoner, der har fået diagnosticeret kronisk blodkræft, udvikler i 30 procent flere tilfælde...
11h
Big Think
The Effects of White vs. Whole-wheat Bread May Vary Greatly Between IndividualsIt’s become a convention now that when we reach for carbohydrates it is always better to choose the complex variety found in whole grain products, vegetables, and legumes. The benefits include more fiber, nutrients, and a lower glycemic response in the body (the effect the food we consume has on ... Read More
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean, electrically-driven process to separate commercially important metals from sulfide minerals in one stepMIT researchers have identified the proper temperature and chemical mixture to selectively separate pure copper and other metallic trace elements from sulfur-based minerals using molten electrolysis. This one-step, environmentally friendly process simplifies metal production and eliminates the toxic byproducts such as sulfur dioxide.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists produce dialysis membrane made from grapheneDialysis, in the most general sense, is the process by which molecules filter out of one solution, by diffusing through a membrane, into a more dilute solution. Outside of hemodialysis, which removes waste from blood, scientists use dialysis to purify drugs, remove residue from chemical solutions, and isolate molecules for medical diagnosis, typically by allowing the materials to pass through a po
11h
Live Science
10 Cool Technologies You Can Thank the iPhone ForTen years ago, the original iPhone hit stores in the U.S. and revolutionized how companies designed and built cellphones. Here are some of the technologies that the original iPhone and its successors have made must-haves for all modern smartphones.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists work to develop heat-resistant 'cow of the future'University of Florida scientists are working to breed the "cow of the future" by studying the more heat-tolerant Brangus cow—a cross between an Angus and a Brahman.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydrogen peroxide protects plants against sun damagePlants use hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) -- best known for use in bleach and hair treatments -- to control how their cells react to varying levels of light, new research shows.
11h
The Atlantic
America Needs a Dead Man's Switch Few people in Washington now doubt that Russia tried to interfere with the 2016 presidential election. As more information about the response to that interference has been publicly disclosed, it’s become clear that key decisions were made by good people trying to do the right thing for the right reasons that nevertheless led to bad outcomes. The accounts of former FBI Director James Comey and of
11h
The Atlantic
Can Your DNA Tell You the Healthiest Way to Live Your Life? A double helix begins to swirl on my screen after I upload the raw data from my 23andMe genetic test to a site called DNA Lifestyle Coach . An ethnically ambiguous illustrated girl greets me, gleefully eating a bowl of vegetables while holding her cell phone. Against a salmon-colored backdrop are the words: “MY DIET COACH,” offering a health plan “tailored” to my genetics. Here is what the DNA Li
11h
Science : NPR
'Sea Pickles' Wash Ashore In Pacific Northwest Unicorns of the sea or sea pickles. Whatever you call them, pyrosomes are suddenly making life hard on the Pacific coast of the U.S. and Canada. Rachel Martin and Steve Inskeep explain.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inorganic biomaterials for soft-tissue adhesionResearchers at Okayama University describe in Acta Biomaterialia a new type of biocompatible adhesive material. The adhesive, made from nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, glues both synthetic hydrogels and mouse soft tissue, providing a promising alternative to organic materials currently in use for clinical applications.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodistribution of selenium highlights developmental exposure risksANSTO and Griffith University environmental researchers and imaging scientists have contributed to a better understanding of how pollutants accumulate and are distributed in amphibians during the larval and metamorphic stages of development.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global companies pledge transparency on climate riskMultinationals worth $3.5 trillion and financial institutions managing $25 trillion in assets pledged on Thursday to follow new guidelines for disclosing exposure to climate change risk in both operations and investments.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Darwin's 'strangest animal ever' finds a familyCharles Darwin, Mr. Evolution himself, didn't know what to make of the fossils he saw in Patagonia so he sent them to his friend, the renowned paleontologist Richard Owen.
12h
The Atlantic
How Black Girls Aren’t Presumed to Be Innocent A growing body of evidence has shown that the American education and criminal-justice systems dole out harsher and more frequent discipline to black youth compared with their non-black peers. But while most of that research has focused on black boys, a new study from the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality specifically turned its attention to society’s perception of black girls. Resea
12h
The Atlantic
If Buddhist Monks Trained AI The Harvard psychologist Joshua Greene is an expert in “trolleyology,” the self-effacing way he describes his research into the manifold variations on the trolley problem. The basic form of this problem is simple: There’s a trolley barreling towards five people, who will die if they’re hit. But you could switch the trolley onto another track on which only a single person stands. Should you do it?
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogen peroxide protects plants against sun damagePlants use hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - best known for use in bleach and hair treatments - to control how their cells react to varying levels of light, new research shows.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In Oakland, hackers race DIY autonomous cars—and it may revolutionize your rideThey aren't much to look at with their bare plywood or plastic frames, exposed wires and electronic innards on display.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung to create 950 jobs in S. CarolinaSamsung will spend $380 million on a facility in South Carolina, creating 950 jobs over the next three years, company officials announced Wednesday.
12h
The Atlantic
The iPhone Was Inevitable A man sits in a chair in front of a small documentary camera crew. He’s trim, dressed in all black. A red notebook sits on his lap. “Here’s what I wrote in 1989,” he says. “This is a very personal object. It must be beautiful. It must offer the kind of personal satisfaction that a fine piece of jewelry brings. It will have a perceived value even when it’s not being used. It should offer the comfo
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Københavns Universitet bidrager til den største globale genopretning af skov i verdenshistorienKøbenhavns Universitet samarbejder med den internationale bevægelse ”The Bonn Challenge”...
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyberattack: Shipping giant's terminals slowly recovering (Update)Danish shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk, one of the global companies hardest hit by a malicious software that froze computers around the globe, said Thursday that most of its terminals are now operational, though some remain crippled.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Western Digital says JV partner Toshiba's complaints harmfulWestern Digital Corp. lashed back against its joint venture partner Toshiba on Thursday in a deepening feud over the Japanese company's plan to sell its computer memory business.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Torus nuclear fusion project gets Brexit funding pledgeThe government pledges to pay its "fair share" towards an EU backed nuclear project after Brexit.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lebanon dam planned atop fault line stirs fearsLebanon's government says a dam planned for a valley near Beirut is vital to tackle chronic water shortages, but the location on a seismic fault line has raised fears among residents.
13h
Ingeniøren
Esben Lunde strammer skruen: Universiteter skal kæmpe om at rådgive myndighederneMiljø- og Fødevareministeriet lader alle universiteter byde ind på den forskningsbaserede myndighedsrådgivning. Universiteterne er betænkelige, mens landmændene jubler.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study links at-risk orcas' failed pregnancies to scarce foodEndangered killer whales that frequent the inland waters of Washington state are having pregnancy problems because they cannot find enough fish to eat, according to a new study.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nigerian widows seek to sue Shell in Dutch courtsFour Nigerian women are taking legal action in the Dutch courts against Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell accusing it of complicity in the 1990s executions of their husbands by the Nigerian military, Amnesty International said Thursday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon Prime Day promo starts night of July 10, now 30 hoursAmazon is extending its annual "Prime Day" promotion to 30 hours this year.
14h
Viden
Smartphonen - og 9 andre store opfindelser i det 21. århundredeDet 21. århundrede ville slet, slet ikke have været det samme uden bl.a. streamingtjenester, wi-fi og sociale medier.
14h
Live Science
Lake Huron FactsLake Huron has the longest shoreline of the Great Lakes. It is the second largest by surface area and the third largest by volume of water.
15h
cognitive science
Interpreting Deep Neural Networks using Cognitive Psychology submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Unleashing the power of moss to clean citiesA team of German designers has reinvented the tree to clean up urban air pollution. Using the natural power of moss, they hope to make city air safer to breathe.
15h
Viden
10 år med iPhone: I dag har næsten alle en smartphone i lommen88 procent af danskerne har i dag en smartphone, men bruger den på forskellige måder fra generation til generation.
15h
Ingeniøren
Roskilde-app vil forudsige fremtiden med brugernes data De seneste to år har blandt andre IBM arbejdet med big data på Roskilde Festival. Indtil nu har de kunnet spore koncertgæsterne og se deres vaner. Nu vil de forudsige fremtiden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/roskilde-festival-data-gaesternes-musiksmag-bevaegelser-skal-forudse-koncertvaner-1077931 Version2
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New opioid use in older adults with COPD associated with increased risk of cardiac deathOlder adults with COPD who recently started using opioids have an increased risk of coronary artery disease-related death compared to non-opioid users, researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found. Among these patients, new opioid use is associated with a 215 percent increase in coronary artery disease-related death for long-term care residents and an 83 percent increase in coronary artery dis
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines palliative care trends in patients with end-stage liver diseaseA new study has uncovered low rates of referral for palliative care in US patients with end-stage liver disease, although rates have been slowly increasing over time.
16h
Gizmodo
Canon Might Finally Fix All the Problems With Its Cheapest Full Frame Camera All images: Canon The $2000 Canon 6D Mark II is the first ever refresh to Canon’s cheapest full frame camera, the Canon 6D (now Canon 6D Mark I), and it might actually fix all the Mark I’s problems. The original 6D launched back in 2013, and, at the time, it was one of the cheapest full frame cameras you could buy. Professional shooters and serious hobbyists prefer full frame cameras over cheaper
17h
The Atlantic
Vatican Cardinal Charged With Sexual Assault Australia’s most senior member of the Catholic Church, Cardinal George Pell, was charged with multiple counts of sexual assault on Wednesday, making him the highest-ranking Vatican official to ever incur the charges. Pell is also the chief financial adviser to Pope Francis, whose “zero tolerance” policy toward sexual assault has been accused of lacking follow-through and failing to curb the churc
17h
Gizmodo
EVE Online Developer Gets Sent A Bag Of 'Dicks' In The Mail When people got mad, they used to sent a letter. In the internet era, if somebody’s going to use non-electronic mail—which, as I understand it, is powered by snails and horses—it has to be elaborate. Case in point: an EVE Online player who tried to mail one of CCP’s designers a bag full of candy shaped like dicks and other assorted dick memorabilia. Brenton “CCP Larrikin” Hooper recently took to
17h
Ars Technica
US seeks more airport security, could expand airplane laptop ban Enlarge / A passenger places a laptop computer back into his bag after passing through a TSA check point at Salt Lake City International Airport. (credit: George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) In a speech today, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said that airlines that don't get on board with new security procedures could see electronic devices banned on their airplanes—or be barred fr
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sick of your internet provider? Do some research before you jump shipWe are lucky to live in the age of broadband internet availability just about everywhere.
17h
Ingeniøren
SKYBRUD: Tidligere kunne de ikke måles, i dag kan de overses... Nu skal nye radarer lure demDer er huller i DMI’s vejrdata, selv om man trækker på flere end 250 målestationer landet over. Opgradering af vejrradar-netværket skal give mere præcise vejrudsigter og bedre overblik over nedbøren.
17h
Gizmodo
The TSA Messed With the Wrong 20-Pound Lobster and Its Owner Is Pissed Just a lobster. Photo: Getty “They are dumb,” Christopher Stracuzza tells the New York Times . “They are like the dumbest people in the world.” They, in this case, are the TSA agents who manhandled his gigantic lobster and went viral with a photo on the agency’s Twitter account. Stracuzza hit the seafood jackpot on a trip to a market in Connecticut. He picked up 12 standard lobsters and one hulki
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new weapon for the war on cancerScientists have adapted an engineered human blood opsonin protein known as FcMBL, which was originally developed as a broad-spectrum pathogen capture agent, to target circulating tumor cells -- the notoriously rare and difficult-to-locate agents of metastasis. Using magnetic beads coated with FcMBL, they were able to capture >90 percent of seven different types of cancer cells, demonstrating that
19h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
A billion-year arms race against viruses shaped our evolution Proteins involved in gene regulation once fought viruses. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22191
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Vaccine ruling from Europe's highest court isn't as crazy as scientists think Media and scientific uproar over admissible evidence 'exaggerated', say legal scholars. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22222
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Survey reveals basic research in Canada is falling by the wayside The number of researchers who work on basic-science questions has dropped precipitously. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22224
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US lawmakers’ science spending plans ignore Trump cuts NASA sees a slight increase under the proposed budget whereas funding for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is cut by 13%. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22226
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Gizmodo
The Oldest Known Porno Movie Prominently Features A Car Long before everyone had machines on their desks, laps, and in their pockets capable of providing them with pornography from a global pornography-distribution network, people had to distribute hardcore pornography on celluloid film, like animals. The earliest example seems to be a 1915 movie that revolves around a car. That’s right, a car. Even in the infancy of both automobiles and filmed pornog
19h
NYT > Science
In Blow to ‘Clean Coal,’ Flawed Plant Will Burn Gas InsteadSouthern Company built its plant in Mississippi to show how coal could be burned with fewer carbon emissions. But it never worked as designed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paving the way for promising treatment for hot flashesFifteen years ago, Dr. Naomi Rance was at work when she experienced her first hot flash. Rance, a physician and researcher, took note. As it turns out, her basic scientific research on estrogen's involvement with hot flashes may lead to a promising treatment for them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boaty McBoatface returns home from abyssResearchers have captured unprecedented data about some of the coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth - known as Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) - during first voyage of the yellow robotic submersible known as Boaty McBoatface, which arrived back in the UK last week. The team captured data on temperature, speed of water flow and underwater turbulence rates of the Orkney Passage, a region of the South
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inflammatory bowel disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culpritsScientists have closed in on specific genes responsible for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from a list of over 600 genes that were suspects for the disease. The team produced a high resolution map to investigate which genetic variants have a causal role in the disease.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
Rainbow Photons Pack More Computing PowerQuantum bits, aka qubits, can simultaneously encode 0 and 1. But multicolored photons could enable even more states to exist at the same time, ramping up computing power. Christopher Intagliata... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
New Scientist - News
People with higher IQs are more likely to live to their 80sA study of over 65,000 people has found that people who scored higher on an intelligence test at the age of 11 were less likely to die of a range of diseases
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Inmarsat's European short-haul wi-fi spacecraft launchesThe UK's biggest space company takes the next step in its project to boost wi-fi in planes over Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher IQ in childhood is linked to a longer lifeHigher intelligence (IQ) in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk of major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, smoking related cancers, respiratory disease and dementia, finds a new study.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adolescent obesity linked to early mortality from cardiovascular diseasesWhile there is solid evidence that adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, less is known about the association between body mass index (BMI) and rarer cardiovascular diseases.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Valuable substances extracted from conifer stumps and rootsThe stumps and roots of coniferous trees contain extractives which can be processed into highly valuable products.
20h
cognitive science
Study illustrates how the cortex assigns credit for causality submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
20h
Gizmodo
US Lifts Airline Laptop Ban In Exchange For 'Intensive Security Measures' Photo: Getty The Trump administration has kept airlines and nations on edge as it weighed a decision to expand an in-flight ban on electronics larger than a smartphone. On Wednesday, the administration announced that it will not expand the ban, and it will lift be lifted in countries that were already affected. But the terms of the decision are a bit suspicious. Back in March, the Department of H
20h
Wired
Why Victims of Facebook Censorship Don't Leave FacebookWhen network effects mean social monopoly.
20h
Wired
DHS Won't Extend Laptop Ban, But Its New Protocols Will Make Airport Security Extra AnnoyingExpect more pat downs and closer inspection of your gadgets on flights into and out of the United States.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personal assistance relationships are complex and need support, study findsPersonal assistance relationships are usually empowering and flexible for both employer and workers, but can become emotionally fraught and even wounded, according to a report launched today.
20h
The Atlantic
Who Is the Man Behind Venezuela's Helicopter Attack? In the wake of a helicopter attack on Venezuela’s Supreme Court building in Caracas on Tuesday evening, the identity of the pilot has raised a number of questions regarding the nature of the incident. Shortly following the attack, photos of the pilot in a blue helicopter carrying a banner with the word “Libertad,” or “Freedom,” appeared on social media, signaling an act of public opposition towar
20h
The Atlantic
Where Will the Removal of Confederate Monuments Stop? Perhaps not since the collapse of the Soviet Union has there been such a vogue for tearing down statues. And just as the removal of images of Lenin and Stalin rubbed nerves across the former Soviet Socialist Republics, the effacing of statutes in the United States has become an acrimonious debate. The most recent flashpoint came in New Orleans, where Mayor Mitch Landrieu ordered the removal of st
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How to eavesdrop on urban bats with smart sensorsFor the first time, urban bats are being monitored in real time using smart sensors at a London park.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK CO2 and energy costs 'set to rise'Household energy bills and carbon emissions will rise unless ministers devise new policies to save power, a report says.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In Turkey, carved skulls provide the first evidence of a neolithic 'skull cult'Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time, researchers say. Thus, these modified skull fragments could point to a new 'skull cult' -- or ritual group -- from the Neolithic period. Throughout history, people have valued skulls for different reasons, from ancestor worship to the belief that.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning the climate tide by 2020The world needs high-speed climate action for an immediate bending -- down of the global greenhouse -- gas emissions curve, leading experts caution. Aggressive reduction of fossil-fuel usage is the key to averting devastating heat extremes and unmanageable sea level rise, authors argue. In the run-up to the G20 summit of the planet's leading economies, the article sets six milestones for a clean i
21h
The Atlantic
The Wall Street Journal's Editor: Beware Calling Donald Trump a Liar Last January, Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal , urged caution in using the word “lie” to label untruths spoken by Donald Trump. Last week, The New York Times published an opinion article titled “ Trump’s Lies ” that purported to be a definitive list of the president’s falsehoods, invoking the word “lie” repeatedly. What did Gerard Baker think about that? Katie Couric aske
21h
Ars Technica
$7.5 billion Kemper power plant suspends coal gasification Enlarge / Lignite coal mine adjacent to Southern Co.'s Kemper County power plant near Meridian, Mississippi. Photographer: Gary Tramontina/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images ) Southern Company and Mississippi Power announced Wednesday afternoon that they would suspend all coal gasification operations at a Kemper County plant and simply use natural gas instead. The deci
21h
Wired
Instagram Unleashes a Smart Algorithm to Blast Away Nasty CommentsThe social media site wants to turn itself into the friendliest place on the internet.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowawaysWherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify cause, possible treatment for life-threatening gut conditionInvestigators have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanostructures taste the rainbowCombining nanophotonics and thermoelectrics, engineers generate materials capable of distinguishing between tiny differences in wavelengths of light.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What's on your skin? Archaea, that's whatIt turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms -- and they're not just bacteria. A study has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How family and friends influence breast cancer treatment decisionsWhen a woman walks into the oncologist's office, she's usually not alone. In fact, a new study finds that half of women have at least three people standing behind them, sitting next to them or waiting at home to help.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Memories Erased from Snail NeuronsScientists block particular enzymes to remove the cellular signatures associated with specific memory types.
21h
Gizmodo
The Most Important Thing in the Universe to Star-Lord Was Almost a Darth Vader Figure Image: Marvel/Disney There are few items that have had a larger effect on Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy franchise than the Sony Walkman. While its presence in the studio’s films is played up largely for laughs and character work, the Walkman and the music held on its cassettes have profoundly shaped the look and feel of the movies. But in an interview with Mashable , it’s been revealed that Pe
21h
cognitive science
Developing fetuses react to face-like shapes from the womb, no learning or experience after birth required submitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature deathA new study of 60 million Americans -- about 97 percent of people age 65 and older in the United States -- shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat users might want to be cautious using app's latest featurePopular cellphone app Snapchat has introduced a new feature called Snap Map that allows users to share their location with friends. Worry about security surfaced immediately.
22h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Health Care and Ransomware What We’re Following Cybercrime: Computers in at least 64 countries were affected yesterday by ransomware that—like last month’s “WannaCry” cyberattack—demanded money from victims in exchange for access to their files. This time, though, the malware that hackers used was more sophisticated, and it earned them less than $10,000—leading some analysts to suspect the demand was to disguise some other
22h
Ars Technica
Remains from “skull cult” discovered at world’s oldest stone monuments German Archaeological Institute The monumental rock pillars of Göbekli Tepe date back over 11,000 years and tower over a small hill in Turkey. Excavated just a couple of decades ago , these mysterious structures are part of the world's oldest known monumental religious complex. Each pillar is covered in hundreds of images, including carvings of humans and dangerous animals like snakes and scorpio
22h
Science | The Guardian
Superbug risk escalating and greater resources needed, disease experts say Summit calls for national body and the recognition antibiotic-resistant superbugs are a patient safety issue Australia needs a national body to coordinate work to slow the spread of superbugs, experts say. An infectious diseases specialist, Prof Lindsay Grayson, says Australia is at a crossroads in dealing with the rise of antimicrobial resistance, which the World Health Organisation has called a
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malaria control in African schools dramatically cuts infection and reduces risk of anemiaSchools that provide prevention education, insecticide-treated nets and antimalarial treatment, in regions where malaria is highly seasonal, could reduce the risk of schoolchildren developing anemia and improve their cognitive performance, according to new research by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inequalities in malaria research funding in sub-Saharan AfricaA quarter of countries in sub-Saharan Africa receive very little funding for research into malaria despite having high malaria-related death rates.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study raises concern over accuracy of melanoma diagnosesConcerns over the accuracy of melanoma diagnoses are raised in a study of US pathologists published by The BMJ today.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher IQ in childhood is linked to a longer lifeHigher intelligence (IQ) in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk of major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, smoking related cancers, respiratory disease and dementia, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
22h
Wired
WikiLeaks Dump Reveals a Creepy CIA Location-Tracking TrickBy hacking into computers and tracking the Wi-Fi networks nearby, the CIA could pinpoint Windows PCs around the world.
22h
Live Science
Brain-Infecting 'Rat Lungworm' Spreads in FloridaA parasitic worm that can infect people's brains has been found throughout Florida, according to a new study.
22h
The Atlantic
How Activism Can Advocate for Art When art and activism come together, they usually do so in a way that moves in one direction: Artists use their work to highlight, interrogate, and illuminate issues in the world. But what if it were the other way around? What if artists can also use their activism to engage people in and educate them about art? This is one of the goals of Movement Art Is, an organization co-founded by the dancer
22h
Science : NPR
Boaty McBoatface Makes Its Triumphant Return, Hauling 'Unprecedented Data' The curiously named submersible wrapped up its inaugural voyage last week. And, as the British Antarctic Survey noted Wednesday, Boaty acquitted itself well on the seven-week expedition. (Image credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canada: Top court orders Google to block website search resultsCanada's top court on Wednesday ordered Google to remove a website from its worldwide search results, in what some experts are calling a landmark international copyright protection case.
22h
Gizmodo
Researchers Think They Can Use Twitter to Spot Riots Before Police Researchers in the UK used machine learning algorithms to analyze 1.6 million tweets in London during the infamous 2011 riots, which resulted in widespread looting, property destruction and over 3,000 arrests. According to the researchers, analyzing Twitter data to map out where violence occurred in London boroughs was faster and more accurate than relying on emergency calls—or even on-the-ground
23h
Wired
Reiner_Riedler_Lifesaving_Machines
23h
The Atlantic
GE CEO Criticizes President Trump on China and the Paris Accords When asked what it’s like to “navigate the age of Donald Trump” on Wednesday at the Aspen Ideas Festival, Jeffrey Immelt, the chairman and CEO of GE, was at first reluctant to offer a critique. “Thanks for that question,” he said with a sarcastic chuckle. His role is “first and foremost to run a good company,” he said. “We’re businesspeople. We should participate politically when it’s meaningful
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Facial models suggest less may be more for a successful smileResearch using computer-animated 3-D faces suggests that less is more for a successful smile, according to a new study.
23h
Gizmodo
Tinder Keeps Swiping Right on New Ways to Take Your Money Image: Tinder Summer’s here, the weather’s hot and sticky. What did you expect Tinder to do? It has needs... ...It needs your money to stay afloat! In the infamous app’s latest scheme to get you to pay for the ability to swipe right on your future excruciatingly awkward first date, Tinder’s offering to let you peek behind the blinds, so that you can see a listing of only people who like you. The
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Voulez-Vous Marcher Avec Moi? Today in 5 Lines Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will reportedly try to send a revised version of the GOP’s health-care bill to the Congressional Budget Office “as soon as Friday.” Trump promised a “big surprise” related to the legislation is in the works, but did not offer further details. Trump accepted French President Emmanuel Macron’s invitation to visit Paris on Bastille Day next mon
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The Atlantic
Just How Lucrative Is a Ransomware Attack? The ransomware attack that spread to computer systems in at least 64 countries Tuesday earned hackers less than $10,000 in ransom from victims seeking to regain access to their files, prompting some analysts to question whether such attacks are money-making schemes at all. The cyberattack began in Ukraine using an updated version of a ransomware called “Petya,” which Microsoft said was traced to
23h
The Atlantic
What the Republican Health-Care Holdouts Want After abandoning a quick vote on his original proposal, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wants to come up with a revised health-care bill by Friday so it can be ready for debate and a vote when lawmakers return to Washington the week of July 10. His challenge is stark: At least 10 Republican senators have declared their opposition to the plan McConnell originally unveiled, and he can afford
23h
The Atlantic
What Pro-Life Democrats Want from the DNC A group of pro-life Democrats met with Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez at DNC headquarters in Washington, DC on Tuesday, according to Kristen Day, the executive director of pro-life group Democrats for Life of America. Day said that members of her organization as well as other Democrats who identify as pro-life, including Democratic congressman Daniel Lipinski of Illinois and other
23h
The Atlantic
Where Not to Use Your Phone As MIT professor and psychologist Sherry Turkle sees it, students are obsessed with perfection and invulnerability. That’s why they will email her their questions instead of coming to office hours. “As I get famouser and famouser, I post more office hours, and the numbers [of students attending them] come down,” said Turkle, who researches and writes on peoples’ relationship to technology , durin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Super-strong metal made for next tech frontierEngineers have developed a strong, durable new material to help shape advanced MEMS sensors needed for the internet of things.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biofuel from waste: Zeolite catalysts pave the road to decentralized chemical processesFuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: the reaction takes place in very confined space
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CT technology shows how blood flow can predict effectiveness of ovarian cancer treatmentTechnology can provide a new window into whether or not patients are responding to treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. A multi-center clinical trial has demonstrated that CT Perfusion, which measures blood flow and blood volume to tumors associated with ovarian cancer, can provide an accurate prediction of how well a treatment is working, allowing physicians the opportunity to better plan treat
23h
The Scientist RSS
US House Introduces Alternative Spending Bills for 2018The proposals would funnel more money into some science programs, but make new research cuts of their own.
23h
Popular Science
California says a popular herbicide causes cancer Health But three out of four health agencies disagree. California will require a cancer warning on products containing glyphosate, a commonly used pesticide. Here's what you should know.
23h
Gizmodo
Wildlife Officials Assure Citizens That Alleged Lake Shark Threat Isn’t Real [Updated] Image: Albert Kok /Wikimedia Commons It’s hard work being online these days. What with all of the “fake news” and “viral posts” corrupting the World Wide Web. So how are you supposed to know what’s real and what’s bullcrap, or rather, bull shark crap? When it comes to hoax stories about inland shark sightings, at least, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is here to set you str
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use Google to shop? Here's what you should know after the big EU fineGoogle was levied a record $2.7 billion fine by the European Commission for allegedly favoring its Google Shopping results over other comparison shopping services.
23h
Science : NPR
Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success After years of failed attempts at cleaning up the dead zones, the Chesapeake Bay, once a national disgrace, is teeming with wildlife again. But success is fragile, and it might be even more so now. (Image credit: Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR)
23h
Ars Technica
Judges refuse to order fix for court software that put people in jail by mistake Enlarge / The Supreme Court of California’s headquarters is also home to the 1st District in San Francisco. (credit: Coolcaesar ) On Wednesday, a California appeals court denied efforts to overturn a county court’s decision not to intervene in an ongoing dispute between the public defender’s office and the administrative arm of the Alameda County Superior Court itself. The dispute is over alleged
23h
Big Think
Our Personality Literally Changes How We See the World People possessing openness can take diverging visual stimuli and combine them in a special way. Read More
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revitalizing Detroit requires development of specific neighborhoodsDespite the relatively large number of employees working in downtown Detroit, the city continues to be afflicted by urban blight, surrounded by a swath of vacant neighborhoods. Changing this pervasive phenomenon has been at the forefront for developers, city officials and groups like Detroit Future City, an initiative with a strategic vision for the city's future.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Slow-growing ponderosas survive mountain pine beetle outbreaksSlow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving mountain pine beetle outbreaks in western Montana as climate change increases the frequency of drought and insect pests, according to new research published by a team of University of Montana scientists.
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Gizmodo
Is Zillow's Claim Against the Blog McMansion Hell Legit, or an Embarrassment? A specimen of the form, 2006. Image via Getty. Real estate aggregator Zillow—where you may have searched for an apartment or snooped for how much an acquaintance paid for their house—has gotten some bad press after sending a toughly worded cease-and-desist letter to the creator of the viral blog McMansion Hell . Late Monday afternoon , the blog’s creator Kate Wagner posted on Twitter about an ala
23h
Science : NPR
New Island Surfaces Along Coast Of North Carolina's Outer Banks There's a new island off the coast of North Carolina. Dave Hallac, Superintendent of Cape Hatteras National Seashore, tells NPR's Robert Siegel about it.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature deathA new study of 60 million Americans -- about 97 percent of people age 65 and older in the United States -- shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIAID scientists identify cause, possible treatment for life-threatening gut conditionInvestigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and international colleagues have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.
23h
Popular Science
Meet drone dueling, the sport California is about to inadvertently kill Aviation Vague legislation protects humans from watching awesome robot battles A bill designed to protect people from armed drones could end drone duels as a legal sport.
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cognitive science
[Crosspost From R/IAmA] I Am Neuroscientist Dr. Michael Merzenich, A Principal Discoverer Of Lifelong Brain Plasticity. AMA About Your Brain’s Ability To Change From The Cradle To The Grave. submitted by /u/MichaelMerzenich [link] [comments]
23h
Live Science
This Is What Happens When a Firecracker Explodes in Your EyeA man in India suffered severe eye injuries after lighting a firecracker, according to a new case report.
1d
Live Science
Amazing Video Shows Spider Spinning 80+ Feet of WebbingAn incredible video shows what Darwin's bark spiders can do.
1d
Live Science
No, There Isn't Poop in Your Iced CoffeeIs there an unwanted add-in in your iced coffee?
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Live Science
Cockatoos Drop Sick Beats to Charm MatesMusic agents take note: There's an extraordinary drummer in town with impeccable rhythm, but instead of using drumsticks, this master of the beat bangs around seed pods and sticks, a new study finds.
1d
Live Science
Carved Human Skulls Reveal Cultic Rituals at Mysterious Site in TurkeyThe skulls had been de-fleshed and carved soon after death.
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Live Science
In Photos: Carved Human Skulls Discovered at Ritual SiteArchaeologists have discovered round stone buildings, pillars and elaborate animal carvings at Göbekli Tepe in Turkey. More recently, they have discovered carved human skulls that may have been part of rituals.
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Science : NPR
U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes An analysis examining mortality among millions of Americans concludes that a tiny decrease in levels of soot could save about 12,000 lives each year. (Image credit: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
Uber Reveals $120 Million Bonus Dispute Between Fired Engineer and Google Photo: Getty Uber laid out new details in a court filing today about how it learned the former lead of its self-driving car unit, Anthony Levandowski, took documents from Google, his former employer. The ride-hailing company has long maintained that it didn’t know Levandowski had allegedly downloaded 14,000 documents from Google’s autonomous vehicle unit before leaving to launch his own startup,
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Blog » Languages » English
Scout, Scythe, and Mystic Training Hangouts with HQ This Friday a new batch of players will be promoted, revealing superpowers hitherto unknown. But with great power comes great responsibility so HQ will host two hangouts to orient you with your sweet new skills and snazzy user interface upgrades. Promotions will be revealed at the end of the Closing Ceremony taking place in Eyewire chat on Friday, June 30 at 4 pm. Mystic Training : Friday at 5 pm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UM tesearch: Slow-growing ponderosas survive mountain pine beetle outbreaksSlow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving mountain pine beetle outbreaks in western Montana as climate change increases the frequency of drought and insect pests, according to new research published by a team of University of Montana scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revitalizing Detroit requires development of specific neighborhoodsDebuting a new economic model, a team of researchers from Princeton University and the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond have identified 22 Detroit neighborhoods that, if developed, could bring in millions of dollars and attract thousands of residents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mildly obese fare better after major heart attackPeople who survive a major heart attack often do better in the years afterward if they're mildly obese, a study by cardiologists shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in futureIn the past, climate scientists have tended to underestimate the risk of a co-occurrence of heatwave and drought. This is the conclusion of one of the first studies to examine compound climate extremes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?Scientists are a step closer to understanding how our DNA is squeezed into every cell in the body. They provide the first-ever detailed picture of the nucleosome, the most basic building block of chromosomes (the structures that house our DNA). This finding will inform research on all processes that involve chromosomes, such as gene expression and DNA repair, which are critical to the understandin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biodegradable cleaning products and eco-friendly plastics from mushroom wasteMore than 50,000 tonnes of mushroom waste are generated in Europe each week, posing an environmental challenge for the main industries that market this product worldwide. The new European project Funguschain aims to obtain high antimicrobial and antioxidant substances from these residues applicable to sectors as varied as food, cleaning or plastics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient antiviral defense system could revolutionize a new class of RNA-based medicineMedicinal payload could be delivered by engineered RNAs that can be controlled by a billion year-old 'genetic fossil' found in all cells, say investigators.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Getting a flu ‘shot’ could soon be as easy as sticking on a Band-AidMicroneedle patches may make home-based vaccination a reality.
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Gizmodo
Why Putting Regular Gas Into A Car That Needs Premium Won't Save You Any Money The question of whether or not you can damage a car that asks for premium gas by using regular gas is one that never seems to die. I’ve seen this question tear families apart, with sobbing and recriminations—it’s not pretty. That’s why I reached out to an actual fuel systems engineer to get to the bottom of this eternal question, once and for all. The question is likely to come up even more frequ
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Ars Technica
Tuesday’s massive ransomware outbreak was, in fact, something much worse Enlarge / Code in Tuesday's attack, shown on the left, was altered to permanently destroy data. (credit: Matt Suiche ) Tuesday's massive outbreak of malware that shut down computers around the world has been almost universally blamed on ransomware, which by definition seeks to make money by unlocking data held hostage only if victims pay a hefty fee. Now, some researchers are drawing an even blea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carnegie Science Center gets $7.5M donation for new wingThe Carnegie Science Center has received its largest gift, a $7.5 million donation from PPG and its corporate foundation for the interactive museum in Pittsburgh.
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Popular Science
Meet eight species living on the brink, thanks to weather and climate change Animals A volatile future will affect way more than just the polar bears. Leopards, frogs, and fish all face weather and climate-related challenges. Read on.
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Wired
Editor's Note: Unicorn-Making MachinesBehind the scenes of Backchannel's incubator week.
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Ars Technica
Darkest Dungeon: The Crimson Court Review: A renewed thirst for blood Enlarge / The Ancestor is still a total jerk in new cutscenes and narration. (credit: Red Hook ) Darkest Dungeon 's first-ever DLC, The Crimson Court , is going to be a hard sell for many players. That's not just a pun on the expansion's extreme difficulty, either, although there is plenty of that here. For those new to the game—and perhaps looking at The Crimson Court as an excuse to hop aboard
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weighty matters'Adolescent weight gain confers long-term increased stroke risk' Dr. Rexrode has co-authored an editorial about new research that highlights the link between adolescent weight gain and stroke risk later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NSF-funded researchers demonstrate advanced network applications.The National Science Foundation (NSF) has long been a leader in supporting research that has formed the basis for smart and connected communities, pushing sensor and networking capabilities beyond today's Internet of Things (IoT) to next-generation technologies able to revolutionize our lives in smart communities across the nation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teenage weight gain linked to increased stroke risk as an adultKids who become overweight during their teenage years may be more likely to develop a stroke decades later than kids who did not become overweight during those years, according to a study published in the June 28, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health insurance expansion linked to fewer sudden cardiac arrestsThe incidence of sudden cardiac arrest, a sudden and usually deadly loss of heart function, declined significantly among previously uninsured adults who acquired health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, also known as 'Obamacare,' according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The hippocampus underlies the link between slowed walking and mental declineThe connection between slowed walking speed and declining mental acuity appears to arise in the right hippocampus, a finger-shaped region buried deep in the brain at ear-level, according to a 14-year study conducted by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health insurance expansion via Obamacare linked to fewer cardiac arrestsThe incidence of cardiac arrest significantly decreased among middle-aged adults who acquired health insurance after the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) expanded coverage. Among older adults with constant health insurance coverage, the incidence of cardiac arrest remained the same. These preliminary findings highlight the importance of preventive medical care but do not definitively prove that hea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This year's hot graduation gift: Snapchat geofiltersAnn Beverly had eyed a set of golf clubs as a college graduation gift for her son. In an impulse buy during commencement, though, she just had to tack on something else.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How artificial intelligence is taking on ransomwareTwice in the space of six weeks, the world has suffered major attacks of ransomware—malicious software that locks up photos and other files stored on your computer, then demands money to release them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Man sentenced for money laundering in massive hacking schemeA Pakistani man has been sentenced to four years in prison for laundering nearly $20 million as part of an international computer and telephone hacking scheme.
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Gizmodo
Save $40 On Samsung's 1TB 850 EVO SSD Samsung 850 EVO 1TB , $280 Samsung’s EVO line are the best SSDs for most people, and MassDrop has the 850 EVO 1TB for $280 today , or $40 less than Amazon’s current price . That’s a decent chunk of change, but it’s one of the best upgrades you can make for your PC.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontierThe technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the internet of things, will depend on microscopic sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soybean rust study will allow breeders to tailor resistant varieties to local pathogensMidwestern growers don't worry much about soybean rust, but the fungal disease has been popping up at the end of the growing season nearly every year since 2006. But because the fungus can't survive winter without a host plant, it's not much of a threat to Midwest crops under current conditions.
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Ars Technica
Our furry friends are getting fat just like us; 1 in 3 are overweight Enlarge / Who’s a good little fatty? (credit: Getty | phatthanit_r ) Our loyal companions are packing on the pounds in step with us, a new study finds. Surveying about 2.5 million dogs and 500,000 cats in the US during 2016, a group of researchers found that about one in three were overweight or obese . Looking over data from the last decade, the researchers say the new figures reveal a 169-perce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How family and friends influence breast cancer treatment decisionsWhen a woman walks into the oncologist's office, she's usually not alone. In fact, a new study finds that half of women have at least three people standing behind them, sitting next to them or waiting at home to help.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decrease in lead exposure in early childhood significantly responsible for drop in crime rateKids exposed to lead as young children are more likely to be suspended or incarcerated during their school years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can antipoverty programs work globally?Leaders of MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), one of world's foremost centers for antipoverty research, have developed their own formal framework for thinking about this vexing question, over the last several years. Now, in a new article, two J-PAL directors have unveiled the lab's approach.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combating chronic kidney disease with exerciseA research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise. The team had patients engage in a specially designed exercise program and found that it improved their blood vessel health and exercise capacity.
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Gizmodo
The Era of Chaos-Inducing Ransomware Is Here and It's Scary as Hell Image: Pexels The ‘90s cyberpunk thriller Hackers is used too often to illustrate the fearful future of cyber security, but it’s popular for a reason. The film’s seemingly fictional scenarios keep coming true. Take this week’s global ransomware attack, for instance. It’s a plot twist that would make Matthew Lillard leer at the camera and cackle. On Tuesday morning, a message from unknown hackers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study on human skin microbiome finds archaea abundance associated with ageIt turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms—and they're not just bacteria. A study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3,000-year-old textiles are earliest evidence of chemical dyeing in the LevantTel Aviv University archaeologists have revealed that cloth samples found in the Israeli desert present the earliest evidence of plant-based textile dyeing in the region. They were found at a large-scale copper smelting site and a nearby temple in the copper ore district of Timna in Israel's Arava desert and are estimated to date from the 13th-10th centuries BCE.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Sneaky Deer Moms Use Another Species as Babysitters BRIEF: Sneaky Deer Moms Use Another Species as Babysitters White-tailed deer mothers deposit their babies with female mule deer, which then defend the fawns from predators. fawn cropped.jpg Image credits: USFWS Mountain-Prairie via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Mule deer mothers are fierce, rushing to t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?Scientists are a step closer to understanding how DNA, the molecules that carry all of our genetic information, is squeezed into every cell in the body. How DNA is "packaged" in cells influences the activity of our genes and our risk for disease. Elucidating this process will help researchers in all areas of health care, from cancer and heart disease, to muscular dystrophy and osteoarthritis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanostructures taste the rainbowEngineers at Caltech have for the first time developed a light detector that combines two disparate technologies—nanophotonics, which manipulates light at the nanoscale, and thermoelectrics, which translates temperature differences directly into electron voltage—to distinguish different wavelengths (colors) of light, including both visible and infrared wavelengths, at high resolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanopipette technology wins first place in NIH 'Follow that Cell' challengeNader Pourmand, professor of biomolecular engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at UC Santa Cruz, has won the $300,000 first place prize in the Follow that Cell Challenge organized by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zeolite catalysts pave the road to decentral chemical processesFuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: The
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptionsResearchers have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice meltA marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet, a team of researchers has concluded.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debrisResearchers combined gecko-inspired adhesives and a custom robotic gripper to create a device for grabbing space debris. They tested their gripper in multiple zero gravity settings, including the International Space Station.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes clean pollutants in wastewaterResearchers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
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Ars Technica
Man drives into Ten Commandments monument in Arkansas Capitol, streams it on Facebook (video link) This is one way to break the Ten Commandments. An Arkansas man was arrested early Wednesday after police said he rammed his vehicle into a newly installed stone monument of the Ten Commandments at the Arkansas Capitol grounds. The man also streamed the toppling of the one-day-old structure live on Facebook. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontierEngineers have developed a strong, durable new material to help shape advanced MEMS sensors needed for the internet of things.
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Gizmodo
Eerily Accurate Facial Reconstructions Are Allowing the Dead to Speak Image: FaceLab/Liverpool John Moores University/Lusacrosscity Researchers at Liverpool John Moore’s University have reconstructed the face of a man who lived in Dublin some 500 years ago. Incredibly accurate reconstructions like this are providing archaeologists with new way of studying the past—while also allowing them to visualize some of the most forgotten figures in history. Known only as SK2
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Gizmodo
It Turns Out Selling Ugly $50,000 Smartphones Is Actually a Bad Business Model Image: Vertu Despite selling $50,000 Android cellphones to rich and famous stars like Quincy Jones and Seal, the England-based company Vertu appears to be struggling with paying its bills and employees. What a shocking development. According to a juicy new report in the Telegraph , employees are worried about the future of the company after noticing that production had been running at reduced cap
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Ars Technica
Google must alter worldwide search results, per orders from Canada’s top court Enlarge / An employee walks in a hallway at Google Canada's engineering headquarters in Waterloo, Ontario. (credit: Cole Burston/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A small Canadian firm has acquired an injunction against Google from the Supreme Court of Canada that is being called the first global de-indexing order. Equustek, a Vancouver-based maker of networking devices, sued a former distributor call
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New on MIT Technology Review
Ransomware Is a Real Threat, but Don’t Forget the BotnetsThere’s a far more potent security threat to worry about.
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Popular Science
Think weather forecasts are bad? Try forecasting a volcanic eruption. Science A new technique could bring us closer to accurately predicting volcano behavior. Forecasting the weather is hard enough. Forecasting volcanic eruptions is even harder. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's on your skin? Archaea, that's whatIt turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms -- and they're not just bacteria. A study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.
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New Scientist - News
Gecko-inspired robot has grippers that could clean up space junkHundreds of thousands of pieces of debris orbit our planet. A device that sticks to space junk like a gecko’s toes might be able to help clear them up
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New Scientist - News
Birds play sick jungle beat with drumsticks they make themselvesIn behaviour extraordinarily like ours, male palm cockatoos have been filmed making drumsticks and playing regular rhythms on hollow trees, to attract females
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Gizmodo
Incredible New Observation Shows Supermassive Black Holes Orbiting Each Other Press release art that doesn’t at all accurately depict what orbiting black holes 24 light years away would look like but does look pretty nice (Image: Joshua Valenzuela/UNM) You think our galaxy is special? Ha. Our boring pinwheel of gas and dark matter might be a nice hangout for humans. But 750 or so million light years away, there’s an elliptical galaxy, Galaxy 0402+379, whose two supermassiv
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Ars Technica
The digital tools that designed the Tesla Model 3 and crash-tested your Honda minivan Enlarge (credit: Tesla ) Understandably, the focus of a lot of our car coverage here at Ars has been on things like hybrid and electric powertrains, autonomous vehicles, and the rise of the connected car. But there are other interesting technology stories in the auto industry that are a little more hidden from the average driver. Take Gordon Murray's iStream idea, for example. From the same brain
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Science | The Guardian
Dead heads: Turkish site reveals more evidence of neolithic 'skull cult' Fragments of three skulls found at Göbekli Tepe have hallmarks of being carved with flint after being scalped and defleshed first Fragments of carved bone unearthed at an ancient site on a Turkish hillside are evidence that the people who spent time there belonged to a neolithic “skull cult” – a group that embraces rituals around the heads of the dead. The remains were uncovered during field work
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Gizmodo
Leaked Manual Reveals How CIA Can Track Windows Users by Gauging Wi-Fi Signal Photo: Getty On Wednesday, WikiLeaks released the latest issue in its ongoing Vault 7 series—a trove of secret or otherwise classified US Central Intelligence Agency files from 2013 to 2016 describing previously undisclosed malware and viruses. Today’s release includes documentation on “ELSA,” a purported CIA project for tracking human targets carrying wi-fi-enabled devices. The malware involved
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Science | The Guardian
Cockatoos play drum solos to attract mates – video Researchers have captured footage of cockatoos in North Queensland, Australia, playing drum solos with little sticks and pods in an attempt to attract the opposite sex Cockatoos impress opposite sex with Phil Collins-style drum solos Continue reading...
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Wired
No, Donald Trump Isn't Calling For an Internet TaxReading too much into vague tweets (or anything, really) won't get you very far.
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Dana Foundation
Changing the World with Smartphones “We are wildly ambitious,” Tom Insel, M.D., says when asked about his plans for Verily Life Sciences, a research organization parented by Google. After 13 years, Insel rocked the world of brain science when he announced plans to step down as director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in late 2015. His departure from NIMH, however, wasn’t a leave from neuroscience research or publi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA researcher paves way for promising treatment for hot flashesFifteen years ago, Dr. Naomi Rance was at work when she experienced her first hot flash. Rance, a physician and researcher at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson, took note. As it turns out, her basic scientific research on estrogen's involvement with hot flashes may lead to a promising treatment for them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mildly obese fare better after major heart attackPeople who survive a major heart attack often do better in the years afterward if they're mildly obese, a study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists showed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes clean pollutants in wastewaterCornell University researchers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
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Futurity.org
Microscope could test tumors during surgery A new microscope can give surgeons real-time pathology data to guide cancer-removal surgeries and can also non-destructively examine tumor biopsies in 3D. When women undergo lumpectomies to remove breast cancer, doctors try to remove all the cancerous tissue while conserving as much of the healthy breast tissue as possible. “Surgeons are sort of flying blind during these breast-conserving surgeri
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Gizmodo
6 Things the US Government Is Doing That Supervillains Have Also Done Image: Storm Entertainment Supervillains have seized power many times over the past several decades. Sometimes they simply want domination, or they employ military might to eliminate those they hate or fear. Sometimes, it’s even worse. Our current government may not be hunting the X-Men (at least not yet) but it shouldn’t surprise you to learn that the people in power are doing things so awful, c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart attack shown to be 'systemic condition'An acute heart attack should not be viewed in isolation – myocardial infarction is a "systemic" condition with an impact upon the whole body and engenders responses in other organs, such as liver and spleen, a new study concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brooding dinosaursA new method used to perform geochemical analysis of fossilized eggs from China has shown that oviraptorosaurs incubated their eggs with their bodies within a 35--40° C range, similar to extant birds today, scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First 'haploid' human stem cells could change the face of medical researchStem cell research holds huge potential for medicine and human health. In particular, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), with their ability to turn into any cell in the human body, are essential to the future prevention and treatment of disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleep disturbances predict increased risk for suicidal symptoms, study findsSleep disturbances can warn of worsening suicidal thoughts in young adults, independent of the severity of an individual's depression, a study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analysis of Neanderthal teeth grooves uncovers evidence of prehistoric dentistryA discovery of multiple toothpick grooves on teeth and signs of other manipulations by a Neanderthal of 130,000 years ago are evidence of a kind of prehistoric dentistry, according to a new study researcher.
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Science | The Guardian
Maximum human lifespan could far exceed 115 years – new research Five research teams say there is no compelling evidence there is an upper limit on mortality, disputing claim in Nature The maximum human lifespan could far exceed previous predictions, according to work that challenges the idea that humans are approaching a hard limit on longevity. The latest research comes in response to a recent high-profile paper that concluded “maximum longevity has hit a ce
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Male cockatoos have the beatMale cockatoos tap trees to a beat to get girls.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanostructures taste the rainbowEngineers create nanoscale light detectors capable of distinguishing between different colors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CT technology shows how blood flow can predict effectiveness of ovarian cancer treatmentTechnology developed at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute can provide a new window into whether or not patients are responding to treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. A multi-center clinical trial has demonstrated that CT Perfusion, which measures blood flow and blood volume to tumors associated with ovarian cancer, can provide an accurate prediction of how well a treatment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combating chronic kidney disease with exerciseA University of Delaware research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise. The team had patients engage in a specially designed exercise program and found that it improved their blood vessel health and exercise capacity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3,000-year-old textiles are earliest evidence of chemical dyeing in the LevantTel Aviv University archaeologists have revealed that cloth samples found in the Israeli desert present the earliest evidence of plant-based textile dyeing in the region. They are estimated to date from the 13th-10th centuries BCE, the era of David and Solomon.
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Gizmodo
Leaked Facebook Rules Reveal Why It Won't Protect Black Children From Hate Speech Image: Facebook via ProPublica On Wednesday, ProPublica published dozens of startling training documents reportedly used by Facebook to train moderators on hate speech. As the trove of slides and quizzes reveals, Facebook uses a warped, one-sided reasoning to balance policing hate speech against users’ freedom of expression on the platform. This is perhaps best summarized by the above image from
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The Atlantic
The Battle for Mosul Enters Its Final Stage Eight months ago, thousands of Iraqi and Kurdish troops, supported by the United States, France, Britain, and other western nations, began a massive operation to retake Iraq's second largest city of Mosul from ISIS militants. Now, after months of war, the Iraqi military says it has reached the final few days of the battle, having encircled an estimated 350 remaining Islamic State militants in Mos
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Science | The Guardian
A winning smile avoids showing too many teeth, researchers say US scientists have investigated the makeup of the perfect smile, saying the findings could be useful for clinicians working to restore facial movement If you want your smile to appear pleasant, you might want to avoid a dazzling beam, research suggests. A study by scientists in the US has found that wide smiles with a high angle and showing a lot of teeth are not the best at creating a positive i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consensus recommendations on isotretinoin and timing of skin proceduresA new article reports on a panel of national experts that was convened and a review of the medical literature that was done to provide evidence-based recommendations regarding the safety of skin procedures performed either concurrently with, or immediately after, treatment with the acne medication isotretinoin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No detectable limit to how long people can liveBy analyzing the lifespan of the longest-living individuals from the USA, the UK, France and Japan for each year since 1968, investigators found no evidence for such a limit, and if such a maximum exists, it has yet to be reached or identified.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding early melanoma metastasis and developing new targets for treatmentA new study allows to visualize 'in vivo' how melanomas act before metastasis occurs, and how these invasive signals are reactivated when surgery is not efficient. The researchers have also identified new metastasis mechanisms induced by very small lesions in the skin, which represent new progression biomarkers and potential targets for melanoma treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change impacts Antarctic biodiversity habitatIce-free areas of Antarctica -- home to more than 99 percent of the continent's terrestrial plants and animals -- could expand by more than 17,000 km2 by the end of this century, a study reveals. The study is among the first to investigate how ice-free areas in Antarctica may be affected by climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gaitWorld champion sprinter Usain Bolt may have an asymmetrical running gait, say researchers, throwing into question whether symmetry matters for speed. Using a 'two-mass' model for assessing patterns of ground-force application suggests Bolt's right and left legs may perform differently, defying scientific assumptions that asymmetry hinders performance. Unexpected and potentially significant asymmet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from waterThe lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria, report scientists.
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Popular Science
How to smile without looking like a creep, according to scientists Health Researchers have tried to isolate the traits of a winning grin. Using a variety of computer-animated faces, researchers from the University of Minnesota have isolated the traits of a winning smile. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?Scientists are a step closer to understanding how our DNA is squeezed into every cell in the body. They provide the first-ever detailed picture of the nucleosome, the most basic building block of chromosomes (the structures that house our DNA). This finding will inform research on all processes that involve chromosomes, such as gene expression and DNA repair, which are critical to the understandin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adolescent obesity linked to early mortality from cardiovascular diseasesWhile there is solid evidence that adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, less is known about the association between body mass index (BMI) and rarer cardiovascular diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in futureIn the past, climate scientists have tended to underestimate the risk of a co-occurrence of heatwave and drought. This is the conclusion of one of the first studies to examine compound climate extremes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Palm cockatoos beat drum like Ringo StarrNew research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows when it comes to percussion, the palm cockatoo is the animal kingdom's match for Ringo Starr or Phil Collins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The gene behind follicular lymphomaEPFL scientists have discovered an important gene whose loss lies behind follicular lymphoma, an incurable cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New antibody appears to re-activate immune system in cancer therapyAdding an investigational antibody to the chemotherapy rituximab appears to restore its cancer-killing properties in certain leukemia patients with a natural resistance to the drug, according to a small, proof-of-concept study by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designed proteins to treat muscular dystrophyThe cell scaffolding holds muscle fibers together and protects them from damage. Individuals who suffer from muscular dystrophy often lack essential components in this cell scaffold. As a result, their muscles lack strength and become progressively weaker. The research team of Professor Markus Rüegg at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has now designed two proteins that stabilize the cell scaff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptionsA team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debrisResearchers combined gecko-inspired adhesives and a custom robotic gripper to create a device for grabbing space debris. They tested their gripper in multiple zero gravity settings, including the International Space Station.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antiviral inhibits epidemic SARS, MERS and animal coronavirusesA new antiviral drug candidate inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including the SARS and MERS coronaviruses, a multi-institutional team of investigators reports this week in Science Translational Medicine. The findings support further development of the drug candidate for treating and preventing current coronavirus infections and potential future epidemic outbreaks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In Turkey, carved skulls provide the first evidence of a neolithic 'skull cult'Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time, researchers say. Thus, these modified skull fragments could point to a new 'skull cult' -- or ritual group -- from the Neolithic period. Throughout history, people have valued skulls for different reasons, from ancestor worship to the belief that.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 2 inflammation might be good for the belly but bad for the liverAn inflammatory response once thought to protect against obesity could exacerbate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is why new findings suggest some targeted treatments for metabolic syndrome might need to be reevaluated. NAFLD is the most common type of progressive liver disease in developed countries and the second leading indication for liver transplantation. What's more, direct
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice meltA team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has discovered that a marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop yeast-based tool for worldwide pathogen detectionColumbia University researchers have developed a tool that is likely to revolutionize the way we detect and treat pathogens in everything from human health to agriculture to water. Using only common household baker's yeast, they've created an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for maj
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH study sheds light on immune responses driving obesity-induced liver diseaseNew findings from mouse models reveal that the type of immune response that helps maintain healthy metabolism in fatty tissues, called type 2 immunity, also drives obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The work, led by NIAID scientists, shows the inflammatory environment in the fatty liver is more complex than previously thought. These insights may inform the development of new
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High sea surface temperatures may affect immune competence of California sea lionsAnomalously high sea surface temperatures may compromise the immune response of California sea lions, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse from Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hoarding symptoms moderately stable during adolescenceHoarding symptoms are stable during adolescence, mainly due to genetic effects, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Volen Ivanov from the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Facial models suggest less may be more for a successful smileResearch using computer-animated 3-D faces suggests that less is more for a successful smile, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nathaniel Helwig from the University of Minnesota, US, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientist identify key locations for spread of pin-tailed whydahsInvasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! This study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the pin-tailed whydah (Vidua macroura) and its recent spread into the Americas.
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Gizmodo
A Fax Machine and a Photocopier Walk Into a Bar: The Hasselblad X1D All images: Victor Jeffreys II/Gizmodo There’s a terrible noise every time I click the shutter. Like a machine out of an office in the 80s clawing its way thirty years into the future to emit an obnoxious noise from this stunning camera in my hands. The Hasselblad X1D is among the first crop mirrorless medium format cameras to hit the market. “Medium format” means the sensor on the camera is enor
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Wired
This Cell Phone Can Make Calls Even Without a BatteryUniversity of Washington researchers have made a phone that draws what little power it needs from thin air.
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Futurity.org
This brain region is key for cause and effect The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a key part of the brain for linking a cause to an observed effect, a new study suggests. The new findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience , not only add insight into how the brain works, but also could lead to improvements in the care of patients who suffer traumatic brain injuries that affect the area, says lead author Wael Asaad, an assistant p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The multi-colored photons that might change quantum information scienceWith leading corporations now investing in highly expensive and complex infrastructures to unleash the power of quantum technologies, researchers have achieved a breakthrough in a light-weight photonic system created using on-chip devices and off-the-shelf telecommunications components. The team demonstrates that photons can become an accessible and powerful quantum resource when generated in the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World first: New polymer goes for a walk when illuminatedScientists have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To this end, they clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world's first machine to convert light directly into walking, simply using one fixed light
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The value of natureMoney may not grow on trees, but trees themselves and all that they provide have a dollar value nonetheless, say authors of a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogsWith a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a new study, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when they are exposed to explosive materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's kind of a drag: Engineer shows how minimizing fluid friction can make oceangoing vessels more fuel-efficient and reduce harmful emissionsImagine walking from one side of a swimming pool to the other. Each step takes great effort -- that's what makes water aerobics such effective physical exercise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Network of neurons crucial for vocal learning identifiedResearchers have identified a network of neurons that plays a vital role in learning vocalizations by aiding communication between motor and auditory regions of the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Bee-Zed asteroid orbits in the opposite direction to planetsIn our solar system, an asteroid orbits the Sun in the opposite direction to the planets. It takes 12 years to make one complete orbit around the Sun. Researchers have developed a general theory on retrograde co-orbitals and retrograde orbital resonance.
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New Scientist - News
ISIS is weaponising consumer drones and we can’t stop them – yetThe terrorist group is already strapping grenades to drones as it fights to retain the Iraqi city of Mosul, but what happens if airborne terror comes to the West?
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New Scientist - News
Modified maize that kills with RNA is given go-ahead in the USMonanto's SmartStax Pro, which kills a specific insect pest using RNA interference, has been approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency
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New Scientist - News
Planets in other star systems fit a puzzling patternData from the Kepler space telescope show that exoplanets tend to be similar in size to their neighbours and regularly spaced, no matter the size of their star
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The Atlantic
Advertising That Exploits Our Deepest Insecurities The function of advertising, wrote Robert E. Lane in The Loss of Happiness in Market Democracies , “is to increase people’s dissatisfaction with any current state of affairs, to create wants, and to exploit the dissatisfactions of the present. Advertising must use dissatisfaction to achieve its purpose.” The web browser is a dissatisfaction-seeking machine. Every search query we input reflects a
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Popular Science
Researchers say we have three years to act on climate change before it's too late Environment If we want a smooth transition into a sustainable future, we need to act fast. New comment in Nature says that we have three years to act on climate change.
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Big Think
AI Just “Landed” a Boeing 737 for the First Time By Itself An AI-driven robot has successfully flown and landed a simulated Boeing 737 for the first time. Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Gecko-inspired robot grippers could grab hold of space junkAboard a microgravity plane, NASA is testing gecko-inspired grippers that one day could help clear up space junk.
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Wired
Gecko-Inspired Gripper May Soon Snag Space JunkIt could not only help robots get a good grip on things like space debris, but supercharge robots right here on Earth.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Drumming Cockatoos and the Rhythms of LovePalm cockatoos are the only animals observed to use tools for rhythmic drumming, seemingly to attract mates, prompting speculation about the rise of human music.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
It's Browntown's Favorite Game Show: Brown vs. Brown! | Alaskan Bush People #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c How much do the Browns really know about each other? Find out on the only game show hosted in Browntown! Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/alaskan-bush-people/ More Bush People! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Palm cockatoos beat drum like Ringo StarrProfessor Rob Heinsohn said while songbirds and whales can belt out a musical tune, few species recognise a beat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop yeast-based tool for worldwide pathogen detectionColumbia University researchers have developed a tool that is likely to revolutionize the way we detect and treat pathogens in everything from human health to agriculture to water. Using only common household baker's yeast, they've created an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for maj
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptionsA team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High sea surface temperatures may affect immune competence of California sea lionsAnomalously high sea surface temperatures may compromise the immune response of California sea lions, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse from Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice meltA team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has discovered that a marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in future: studyA combination of severe drought and a heatwave caused problems for Russia in the summer of 2010: fires tore through forests and peat bogs. Moscow was shrouded in thick smog, causing many deaths in the local population. At the same time, Pakistan was engulfed in heavy rain, as the high-pressure area over Russia blocked a low-pressure zone over Pakistan. This led to the country's worst flooding for
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Carved human skulls found at ancient worship center in TurkeyVisitors to an ancient ritual site may have carved human skulls as part of ancestor worship.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning the climate tide by 2020The world needs high-speed climate action for an immediate bending-down of the global greenhouse-gas emissions curve, leading experts caution. Aggressive reduction of fossil-fuel usage is the key to averting devastating heat extremes and unmanageable sea level rise, the authors argue in a comment published in the renowned scientific journal Nature this week. In the run-up to the G20 summit of the
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Science | The Guardian
Cockatoos impress opposite sex with Phil Collins-style drum solos Scientists find male birds performing alone with small sticks before female audience, with calls, periodic blushing, and raising feathers on their crests Researchers have captured the first footage of cockatoos bashing out drum solos with little sticks and seedpods in what are believed to be musical displays to impress the opposite sex. Scientists took the extraordinary footage after stalking the
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Case for Cosmic ModestyIf we want to find life elsewhere, we should search for it in all of its possible forms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
New Evidence of an Ancient Neolithic Skull Cult Proves Humans Have Always Been Metal Photo: Getty It’s hard to say how long The Metal has been around. This is because The Metal does not care for the laws of linear time. What we do know is that for thousands of years, humanity has both feared and revered The Metal, as evidenced once again by the recent discovery of an ancient skull cult. According to a new paper published today in Science Advances , German researchers digging in t
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New Scientist - News
Google’s €2.4bn fine is small change – the EU has bigger plansThe European Union’s ruling against Google underlines its goal to move our relationship with tech firms away from Silicon Valley’s winner-takes-all mentality
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Gizmodo
This Discounted Battery Pack Is Perfect For Your MacBook or Nintendo Switch Aukey USB-C Power Delivery Battery Pack , $54 with code AUKEYPB6 There are precious few battery packs out there with USB-C power delivery, and this 30,000mAh model from Aukey is one of the most affordable we’ve seen. In addition to the two standard USB output ports, the USB-C port works as both an input and high-speed output port that can charge a 12" MacBook at full speed, or raise your Nintendo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coral may hold cancer insightsStanford researchers are exploring how corals that re-colonized Bikini Atoll after nuclear bomb tests 70 years ago have adapted to persistent radiation. Their work is featured in a PBS series.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soybean rust study will allow breeders to tailor resistant varieties to local pathogensMidwestern growers don't worry much about soybean rust, but the fungal disease has been popping up at the end of the growing season nearly every year since 2006. But because the fungus can't survive winter without a host plant, it's not much of a threat to Midwest crops under current conditions. But it's a major problem for soybean growers in Africa and South America. University of Illinois resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can antipoverty programs work globally? J-PAL offers user's guideLeaders of MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), one of world's foremost centers for antipoverty research, have developed their own formal framework for thinking about this vexing question, over the last several years. Now, in a new article, two J-PAL directors have unveiled the lab's approach.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biofuel from wasteFuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potentially lethal parasite rat lungworm found throughout FloridaResearchers have found rat lungworm, a parasitic nematode that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.
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The Scientist RSS
Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma MetastasisGlowing cells mark the routes of tumor spread by way of newly formed lymph vessels.
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The Scientist RSS
Evidence for Human Lifespan Limit ContestedFive groups of scientists criticize a widely publicized Nature paper from 2016 suggesting that humans can only live up to 115 years.
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NYT > Science
A Sense of Duty to Teach Climate ChangeThe New York Times asked teachers how they are approaching the subject of climate change in their classrooms.
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NYT > Science
Feature: Greetings, E.T. (Please Don’t Murder Us.)A new initiative to beam messages into space may be our best shot yet at learning whether we’re alone in the universe. There’s just one problem: What if we’re not?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can antipoverty programs work globally? J-PAL offers user's guideIt is a huge question in development economics: If a program yields good results in one country, will it work in another? Does a vaccination policy in India translate to Africa? Does a teen-pregnancy prevention program in Kenya work in Rwanda?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of Neanderthal teeth grooves uncovers evidence of prehistoric dentistryNeanderthals treating toothaches?
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The Atlantic
Writing the Rules of Cyberwar The Washington Post ’s report last week on Russian cyber efforts to disrupt the 2016 election—and the Obama administration’s months-long debate over how to respond—ended on a foreboding note. Among the measures apparently adopted in response to the hack was “a cyber operation that was designed to be detected by Moscow but not cause significant damage,” involving “implanting computer code in sensi
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The Atlantic
The Bachelorette Reveals Itself for What It Is This post reveals minor plot points for The Bachelorette Season 13 Episode 6. A few years ago, in response to a combination of scientific studies, legal cases, and human tragedies , commentators began to question the morality of watching American football. We’d always known the sport was an especially dangerous one to play—that, indeed, is part of its brute appeal—but now there was undeniable evi
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Ars Technica
Verizon illegally denied Charter access to utility poles, complaint says Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | WIN-Initiative ) Charter Communications has filed a complaint against Verizon, saying the telco violated New York state's public service law and regulations by denying access to utility poles. Charter is required to extend its network in New York state to 145,000 homes and businesses by May 2020 under a condition imposed on its purchase of Time Warner Cable, and it
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify key locations for spread of Pin-tailed WhydahsInvasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! A new study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura), and its recent spread into the Americas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Guinness World Records names graphene aerogel as world's least dense 3-D printed structureThe world's lightest 3-D printed structure is so lightweight that it can be placed on top of a cotton ball or the petals of a flower.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why using antibiotic eye drops for pinkeye is the wrong way to goUsing antibiotic eye drops for pinkeye is often the wrong way to go but 60 percent of patients nationwide are getting prescriptions for the common eye infection that typically clears up on its own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags alongThis week from AGU: As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along; New volcanic island unveils explosive past; Massive waves of melting Greenland ice warped Earth's crust; and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify key locations for spread of pin-tailed whydahsInvasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! A new study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the pin-tailed whydah (Vidua macroura), and its recent spread into the Americas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research group focuses on economics of transportation needs for rural elderlyA multidisciplinary team of researchers is examining economic issues associated with providing transportation for the rural elderly and other socially disadvantaged populations.The aging baby boomer population is increasing the importance of mobility issues, including transportation, to society, the researchers said, also noting studies are needed to examine potential alternatives to increase the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change impacts Antarctic biodiversity habitatIce-free areas of Antarctica -- home to more than 99 percent of the continent's terrestrial plants and animals -- could expand by more than 17,000 km2 by the end of this century, a study published today in Nature reveals.Led by University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences Ph.D. student Jasmine Lee, the study is the first to investigate how ice-free areas in Antarctica may be affected by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIO researchers visualize early melanoma metastasis and identify new targets for treatmentA study led by the researcher Marisol Soengas at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO) allows to visualize 'in vivo' how melanomas act before metastasis occurs, and how these invasive signals are reactivated when surgery is not efficient. The researchers have also identified new metastasis mechanisms induced by very small lesions in the skin, which represent new progression biomarkers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World first: New polymer goes for a walk when illuminatedScientists have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To this end, they clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world's first machine to convert light directly into walking, simply using one fixed light
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inflammatory bowel disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culpritsScientists have closed in on specific genes responsible for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from a list of over 600 genes that were suspects for the disease. The team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the GIGA Institute of the University of Liège combined efforts to produce a high resolution map to investigate which gene
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No detectable limit to how long people can liveBy analyzing the lifespan of the longest-living individuals from the USA, the UK, France and Japan for each year since 1968, Hekimi and Hughes found no evidence for such a limit, and if such a maximum exists, it has yet to be reached or identified.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient antiviral defense system could revolutionize a new class of RNA-based medicineMedicinal payload could be delivered by engineered RNAs that can be controlled by a billion year-old 'genetic fossil' found in all cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem-cell researchers solve mystery of relapse in acute myeloid leukemiaLeukemia researchers led by Dr. John Dick have traced the origins of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to rare therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells that are already present at diagnosis and before chemotherapy begins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The multi-colored photons that might change quantum information scienceWith leading corporations now investing in highly expensive and complex infrastructures to unleash the power of quantum technologies, INRS researchers have achieved a breakthrough in a light-weight photonic system created using on-chip devices and off-the-shelf telecommunications components. In their paper published in Nature, the team demonstrates that photons can become an accessible and powerfu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of Neanderthal teeth grooves uncovers evidence of prehistoric dentistryA discovery of multiple toothpick grooves on teeth and signs of other manipulations by a Neanderthal of 130,000 years ago are evidence of a kind of prehistoric dentistry, according to a new study led by a University of Kansas researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep disturbances predict increased risk for suicidal symptoms, Stanford study findsSleep disturbances can warn of worsening suicidal thoughts in young adults, independent of the severity of an individual's depression, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese authorities put the brakes on a surge in live streamingIt's becoming a common refrain. A new social networking technology takes China by storm. Its users outsmart the censors, ushering in an era of relative freedom. And then, almost inevitably, the Communist Party begins to feel threatened and shuts it down.
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Gizmodo
Samsung Wants to Sell Refurbished Note 7s With the Silliest Possible Name Image: Reddit.com/ Crushader Samsung caught a whole mess of bad press last year after numerous reports of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone exploding. The company, however, apparently believes there’s still a rabid fanbase demanding a defused version of its mobile time bomb. So a refurbished version of the phone is going back on shelves next month—bearing what might be the most delusional name possibl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hints of extra dimensions in gravitational waves?Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute/AEI) in Potsdam found that hidden dimensions – as predicted by string theory – could influence gravitational waves. In a recently published paper they study the consequences of extra dimensions on these ripples in space-time, and predict whether their effects could be detected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2020 deadline to avert climate catastrophe: expertsHumanity must put carbon dioxide emissions on a downward slope by 2020 to have a realistic shot at capping global warming at well under two degrees Celsius, the bedrock goal of the Paris climate accord, experts said Wednesday.
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Ingeniøren
Førende klimaforskere: Vi har tre år til at redde klimaetHvis det ikke skal blive uforholdsmæssigt dyrt eller helt umuligt at opfylde intentionerne i den globale klimaaftale, skal vi senest i 2020 begynde at reducere CO2-udledningen, skriver Christiana Figueres og andre eksperter i et opråb i Nature.
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Futurity.org
System uses Twitter to detect riots before police New research shows that social media can be a useful resource of information for police when managing major disruptive events like riots or large-scale protests. An analysis of data taken from the London riots in 2011 shows that computer systems could automatically scan through Twitter and detect serious incidents, such as shops being broken into and cars being set alight, before reports reached
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Ars Technica
Facebook’s secret rules mean that it’s OK to be anti-Islam, but not anti-gay Enlarge / CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook's 2016 "F8" conference. (credit: Facebook) This article originally appeared on ProPublica on June 28, 2017. In the wake of a terrorist attack in London earlier this month, a US congressman wrote a Facebook post in which he called for the slaughter of "radicalized" Muslims. " Hunt them, identify them, and kill them," declared US Rep. Clay Higgins, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Minnesota scientist: EPA pressured her to change testimonyA Minnesota scientist who leads an Environmental Protection Agency scientific advisory board says she was pressured by the agency's chief of staff to change her testimony before Congress to downplay the Trump administration's decision not to reappoint half of the board's members.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How minimizing fluid friction can make oceangoing vessels more fuel-efficient and reduce harmful emissionsImagine walking from one side of a swimming pool to the other. Each step takes great effort—that's what makes water aerobics such effective physical exercise.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calculating 'old' and 'new' water runoffJust ahead of a rainstorm, Cody Ross might run out to an agricultural research site as part of his graduate work. He'll need to get some dye into an injection well. The point? To evaluate the path that water follows from the field during and after the rainstorm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunitiesChina's trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major market for those in the business of abating and measuring air pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Potentially lethal parasite rat lungworm found throughout FloridaUniversity of Florida researchers have found rat lungworm, a parasitic nematode that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.
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Gizmodo
How a Chlorine 'Freak Accident' in a Pool Hospitalized Five Kids Photo: Getty You can finally add “swimming pools” to your running list of seemingly mundane-but-murderous-pastimes. At around 7pm EDT on Monday, local authorities in Tampa responded to an emergency call involving five sick children at a local pool. As reported by ABC News and others, a “cloud of chlorine gas” appeared in the Calypso Pool hours after a thunderstorm had caused one of the water pump
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Wired
Petya Ransomware Hides State-Sponsored Attacks, Say Ukrainian AnalystsAnalysis shows Petya looks more like a targeted, state-sponsored attack than just ransomware.
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Live Science
Is There a Limit to the Human Life Span?There may be no limit to how long humans can live, or at least no limit that anyone has found yet, contrary to a suggestion some scientists made last year, five new studies suggest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potentially lethal parasite rat lungworm found throughout FloridaUniversity of Florida researchers have found rat lungworm, a parasitic nematode that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's kind of a dragImagine walking from one side of a swimming pool to the other. Each step takes great effort -- that's what makes water aerobics such effective physical exercise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunitiesChina's trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major market for those in the business of abating and measuring air pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calculating 'old' and 'new' water runoffResearchers use math and on-the-ground analyses to the follow water held in the soil versus fresh rainfalls. This can improve water management in drought- and flood-affected areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tweaking muscle metabolism prevents obesity and diabetes in miceMildly stressing muscle metabolism boosts levels of a beneficial hormone that prevents obesity and diabetes in mice, according to a new University of Iowa study. The findings, published in the EMBO Journal, show that triggering ER stress in mouse muscle cells causes them to produce and secrete significant amounts of the anti-diabetic hormone fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21), which then has wide
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World first: New polymer goes for a walk when illuminatedScientists at Eindhoven University of Technology and Kent State University have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To this end, they clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world's first machine to co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change impacts Antarctic biodiversity habitatIce-free areas of Antarctica - home to more than 99 per cent of the continent's terrestrial plants and animals - could expand by more than 17,000km2 by the end of this century, a study published today in Nature reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The multi-colored photons that might change quantum information scienceWith leading corporations now investing in highly expensive and complex infrastructures to unleash the power of quantum technologies, INRS researchers have achieved a breakthrough in a light-weight photonic system created using on-chip devices and off-the-shelf telecommunications components. In their paper published in Nature, the team demonstrates that photons can become an accessible and powerfu
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Gizmodo
Scientists Push Back Against Controversial Paper Claiming a Limit To Human Lifespans Jeanne Calment in 1995 Image: AP Humans don’t like dying, they don’t like the idea of dying, and most have made not dying an important part of their life. Lots of folks are interested in making us not die for longer, so it was a real bummer last year when a team of researchers said that the maximum human lifespan has plateaued at around 115 years of age. Some folks might live to be older, but tho
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Science | The Guardian
Antarctica's ice-free areas to increase by up to a quarter by 2100, study says If greenhouse gas emissions aren’t reduced, ice-free areas are expected to surge by as much as 17,000 square kilometres Climate change will cause ice-free areas on Antarctica to increase by up to a quarter by 2100, threatening the diversity of the unique terrestrial plant and animal life that exists there, according to projections from the first study examining the question in detail. If emission
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Cat Turned Milk into Popular PlasticCasein, used in artistic buttons and now coffee creamer, got started when a cat got rowdy in a lab -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
London police arrest four in Windows support scam bust Enlarge / Customers of the telecommunications and Internet provider TalkTalk are among those who have been targeted in a Windows support scam operation in the UK. London Police announced the arrest of four suspected of involvement with the ring today. (credit: Carl Court/Getty Images) City of London Police, collaborating with Microsoft, have made four arrests as the result of a two-year investiga
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Quanta Magazine
Solution: ‘Bongard Problems and Scientific Discovery’ This month’s puzzle featured inductive visual Bongard problems that mimic the process of scientific reasoning. Besides the traditional geometric puzzles, we also added some inductive number and word problems. As in scientific problems found in nature, Bongard-type problems give us exemplars that follow a particular unknown rule or pattern and others that do not follow it, or follow a different or
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New Scientist - News
A fine-tuned universe may be controversial but can’t be ignoredThe suggestion that our universe has physical laws and constants inexplicably just right for life is in the ascendant. Expect a heated debate, says Geraint Lewis
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Popular Science
Everything you never wanted to know about how ticks hunt you (and how to avoid them) Health Your complete guide to the horrifying reality of tick season. Your complete guide to the horrifying reality of tick season.
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Popular Science
Explore hidden worlds with this handy UV flashlight Sponsored Post It's also great for security, and you can get one now for $9.99. Explore hidden worlds with this handy UV flashlight. It's also great for security, and you can get one now for $9.99. Read on.
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Popular Science
DNA may finally find a family for strange creatures that stumped Darwin Animals An unholy mash-up of a camel, a rhino, and an elephant. Some of the strangest animals studied by Charles Darwin have finally yielded DNA clues. Read on.
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The Atlantic
A Newly Discovered Manuscript and Its Lesson on Islam “What does the Koran say about…?” is perhaps the most common question my students ask me in the Islamic history courses I teach. It’s an understandable question, but they will be disappointed with the answer if they hope it will explain how Islam has been interpreted and practiced for all of history. In the post-enlightenment West, a society historically influenced by Protestantism’s “back-to-the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia scraps plans to ban Telegram messaging appRussia has ditched plans to ban the Telegram messaging app after its owner agreed to register the company in the country, authorities said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from waterThe lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria. Scientists report a new development toward this goal in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogsWith a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop a model that marries ecology and economics to determine how to protect biodiversityMoney may not grow on trees, but trees themselves and all that they provide have a dollar value nonetheless.
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Wired
When Russell Westbrook Won NBA MVP, Humanity Outpaced ScienceThrough sheer will and indefatigability, the point guard became more than the NBA's MVP—he became a metaphor for hope.
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Futurity.org
Painless patch works just as well as flu shot A phase I clinical trial finds that influenza vaccination using Band-Aid-like patches with dissolvable microneedles is safe and well-tolerated by study participants. In addition, the patches are as effective in generating immunity against influenza, and study participants strongly preferred them over vaccination with a hypodermic needle and syringe. Despite the potentially severe consequences of
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Big Think
Ever Wonder If Your Dog or Cat Would Eat You If You Died? Would your dog, cat, or other pet eat you if you died? The truth about if — and how soon — our animal friends start to see us in a different light. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highway safety: National Academies committee recommends implementation improvementsAn estimated 550,000 commercial motor carriers —trucks and buses, employing over 4 million drivers—move freight and passengers across U.S. highways each year, resulting in about 100,000 fatality- or injury-causing crashes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micron-sized hydrogel cubes show highly efficient delivery of a potent anti-cancer drugMany potent anti-cancer drugs have major drawbacks—they fail to mix with water, which means they will have a limited solubility in blood, and they lack selectivity to cancer cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gaitA new method for assessing patterns of ground-force application suggests the right and left legs of the world's fastest man may perform differently, defying current scientific assumptions about running speed.
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Gizmodo
For One Weekend, The Drama Of YouTube Comes To Life YouTube as a website and community bursts with positivity and good vibes. It’s also a cesspool of divisive discourse, which can sometimes turn into harassment. You’ll find all that and more at VidCon. VidCon, founded by the vlogging brothers Hank and John Green in 2010, is a convention designed for YouTubers, streamers, and other video makers to meet and network. VidCon 2017, which I attended, to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water (video)The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria. Scientists report a new development toward this goal in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogsWith a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The value of natureMoney may not grow on trees, but trees themselves and all that they provide have a dollar value nonetheless.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highway safety: National Academies committee recommends implementation improvementsCongress asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to investigate whether the methods used to evaluate the safety of long-distance trucks and busses were adequate. A committee, co-chaired by Carnegie Mellon University's Joel Greenhouse, found that while the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's (FMCSA) Safety Measurement System (SMS) used to identify vehicles at hi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Micron-sized hydrogel cubes show highly efficient delivery of a potent anti-cancer drugResearchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center have developed micro-cubes that can sponge up a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug and deliver it to cancer cells. Tissue culture tests show these tiny, porous cubes, loaded with the hydrophobic drug, are more potent against liver cancer cells and less harmful to normal liver cells, compared to the dr
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New on MIT Technology Review
Autonomous Grocery Vans Are Making Deliveries in LondonThe vehicles can find their way along real roads in order to deliver bags of food to Greenwich residents.
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The Atlantic
Is Big Philanthropy Compatible With Democracy? In 1912, John D. Rockefeller went to Congress with a simple request. He wanted permission to take the vast wealth he’d accumulated, and pour it into a charitable foundation. Many were outraged. John Haynes Holmes, a Unitarian minister and a cofounder of the NAACP and ACLU, told the Senate that from the standpoint of the leaders of democracy, “this foundation, the very character, must be repugnant
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The Atlantic
The Advantages of Autistic Employees Fourteen of the employees at EY, the consulting firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, probably wouldn’t have made it past a standard job interview. “They don’t look at you in the eye, and in a traditional interview you would say, this is not a good candidate,” explained EY director Hiren Shukla, during an interview at the Aspen Ideas Festival. That’s because those 14 have the high-functioning for
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Paul E. Turner (Yale) 3: Phage Therapy Part 1: Introduction to Virus Ecology and Evolution: Dr. Paul Turner describes the fundamental biology of viruses, how they interact with their host organisms, and how they might have originally evolved long ago. Part 2: Virus Adaptation to Environmental Change: Turner’s laboratory uses experimental evolution to study how viruses adapt to environmental changes. Part 3: Phage Therapy: Turner provi
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Paul E. Turner (Yale) 2: Virus Adaptation to Environmental Change Part 1: Introduction to Virus Ecology and Evolution: Dr. Paul Turner describes the fundamental biology of viruses, how they interact with their host organisms, and how they might have originally evolved long ago. Part 2: Virus Adaptation to Environmental Change: Turner’s laboratory uses experimental evolution to study how viruses adapt to environmental changes. Part 3: Phage Therapy: Turner provi
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Paul E. Turner (Yale) 1: Introduction to Virus Ecology and Evolution Part 1: Introduction to Virus Ecology and Evolution: Dr. Paul Turner describes the fundamental biology of viruses, how they interact with their host organisms, and how they might have originally evolved long ago. Part 2: Virus Adaptation to Environmental Change: Turner’s laboratory uses experimental evolution to study how viruses adapt to environmental changes. Part 3: Phage Therapy: Turner provi
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Science | The Guardian
The science of shootouts offers escape from England’s penalty complex | Ben LyttletonTraining for shootouts can deliver escape from the penalty lottery, but England must stop living in the past At least this time, an England team made it to a penalty shootout. In recent tournaments, the senior team finished bottom of their 2014 World Cup group, and lost against Iceland in their first Euro 2016 knockout match. So when England Under-21s reached the Euro 2017 semi-final and took a fa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gaitResearchers from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, say world champion sprinter Usain Bolt may have an asymmetrical running gait, throwing into question whether symmetry matters for speed. Using a 'two-mass' model for assessing patterns of ground-force application suggests Bolt's right and left legs may perform differently, defying scientific assumptions that asymmetry hinders performance. Une
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to seek more security on international flightsThe Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vortex-antivortex pairs found in magnetic trilayersA international team of researchers has discovered magnetic vortex-antivortex pairs arising from correlated electron spins in a newly engineered trilayer material. The discovery could advance memory cells and points to the potential development of 3-D magnetic logic circuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When the going got tough, Nintendo and Microsoft decided to go for broke on video-game strategyNintendo was hemmed in on both sides and in deep trouble.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study examines use of fat grafting for postmastectomy breast reconstructionThe use of fat grafting as a tool for breast reconstruction following a mastectomy may improve breast satisfaction, psychosocial well-being, and sexual well-being in patients, according to a study.
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Live Science
Tiny, Lens-Free Camera Could Hide in Clothes, GlassesA tiny, paper-thin camera that has no lens could turn conventional photography on its head, according to new research.
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The Atlantic
Are Bubbles a Whale's Way of Giving the Finger? Humpback whales are mysterious and graceful creatures. They’re most famous for their unusual yet beautiful dance-like breaching, where they launch themselves out of the sea and into the air. Scientists aren’t exactly sure why humpbacks breach, but they think it could be for hygiene, communication, and play. Another oddly beautiful behavior that humpbacks are well known for is even less understood
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks at rainfall from Tropical Storm DoraNow a tropical storm, Hurricane Dora has been skirting southwestern Mexico's coast since it formed and has transported tropical moisture onshore that has produced some heavy rain showers. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has analyzed those rainfall rates.
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Wired
Eviation's Alice Commuter Is an Electric Plane for Wealthy CommutersThe battery-powered "private jet" could be in service by 2021.
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Live Science
OMG Mission: Greenland's Ice Melting Faster Than Previously Thought (Video)Thanks to rising temperatures, glaciers in Greenland are melting faster than scientists previously thought — and a new NASA video shows how researchers are tracking the feet per day of changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovering, counting, cataloguing proteinsScientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast, in a newly published report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New plant species discovered in new national park in AustraliaA new species of bush tomato discovered in a recently established national park in Australia provides a compelling argument for the importance of federal investment in science and conservation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic tests help identify relative risk of 25 cancer-associated mutationsResearchers assigned levels of risk to 25 mutations associated with breast and ovarian cancer in a large, Stanford-led study. The results may be helpful in guiding treatment and screening recommendations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein associated with Parkinson's disease linked to human upper GI tract infectionsAcute and chronic infections in a person's upper gastrointestinal tract appear to be linked to Parkinson's disease, say scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
With health care cuts looming, low-cost magnesium a welcome option for treating depressionThe cost of depression is great -- 350 million people worldwide suffer from this disorder and costs for traditional SSRI treatments are high. New clinical research results show magnesium is effective at addressing symptoms and is safer and easier on the wallet than prescription therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More precise diagnostics for improved cancer outcomesIn the future, it may be possible to diagnose cancer much earlier using improved detection systems. Computing resources at the Texas Advanced Computing Center help researchers explore improved breast tissue mapping, nanopore and lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and cell-entering cancer detectors. Advanced computing is critical for the simulation and materials design aspects of these emerging diagnostic d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mitochondrial disease has a disproportionate healthcare burden in USMitochondrial diseases are a diverse group of disorders caused by mutated genes that impair energy production in a patient's cells, often with severe effects. Patients with these diseases incur high medical costs for hospitalization, and suffer higher-than-typical rates of comorbid diseases and in-hospital mortality. Researchers who analyzed those costs say their findings underscore the importance
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: ECCO Shoes, Echo Shows, Unlocked LG G5, and More ECCO shoes , Echo Shows , and Hillbilly Elegy lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals 2-Pack Echo Shows , $360 with code SHOW2PACK | 2-Pack Echoes , $260 with code ECHO2PACK Now that Amazon’s touchscreen-equipped Echo Show is out, and seems to be quite good , it bears repeating that you can buy two and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Spotify and Pandora struggle, Apple Music lowers its subscription pricesApple's latest move to corner the music streaming market came quietly but is expected to reverberate quickly.
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Ars Technica
John Romero’s Doom II floppy disks sell for over $3,000 Enlarge / Back in my day... (credit: eBay / John Romero ) If you want to play the original version of Doom II , the game will set you back just $1.24 during the current Steam sale . If you want a boxed copy of the original floppy disk version, circa 1994, there's a copy available on eBay right now for $75 . But if you want Doom II floppy disks that were once owned (and potentially signed) by Doom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA looks at rainfall from Tropical Storm DoraNow a tropical storm, Hurricane Dora has been skirting southwestern Mexico's coast since it formed and has transported tropical moisture onshore that has produced some heavy rain showers. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has analyzed those rainfall rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new weapon for the war on cancerA group of researchers at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University has adapted an engineered human blood opsonin protein known as FcMBL, which was originally developed as a broad-spectrum pathogen capture agent, to target circulating tumor cells -- the notoriously rare and difficult-to-locate agents of metastasis. Using magnetic beads coated with FcMBL, they were able to capture >90 percent of sev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vortex-antivortex pairs found in magnetic trilayersA international team of researchers has discovered magnetic vortex-antivortex pairs arising from correlated electron spins in a newly engineered trilayer material. The discovery could advance memory cells and points to the potential development of 3-D magnetic logic circuits. They discuss their work in this week's Applied Physics Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Longer reproductive years linked to lower cardiovascular & cerebrovascular risk in womenA new study has shown that every 1 year increase in reproductive duration -- years from menarche to menopause--was associated with a 3 percent reduction in a woman's risk of angina or stroke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Who'll be responsible when self-driving car crashes?Fully self-driving cars aren't quite here yet, but they're coming.
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Ars Technica
WEN hair loss scandal exposed dirty underbelly of personal care products Enlarge (credit: Getty | PeopleImages ) The pharmacy in any corner drug store brims with carefully formulated, tested, and regulated drugs. But aisles packed with personal care products—shampoos, makeup, lotions—are a different story. For the most part, these products aren’t regulated at all. The gels, creams, and concoctions we slather on our skin and massage into our heads on a daily basis clea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microneedle patch developed for flu vaccinationAn influenza vaccine can produce robust immune responses and be administered safely with an experimental patch of dissolving microneedles, shows new research. The method is an alternative to needle-and-syringe immunization; with further development, it could eliminate the discomfort of an injection as well as the inconvenience and expense of visiting a flu clinic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Image analysis and artificial intelligence will change dairy farmingAn early detection method for cow lameness (hoof disease), a major disease of dairy cattle, has now been developed from images of cow gait with an accuracy of 99 percent or higher by applying human gait analysis. This technique allows early detection of lameness from cow gait, which was previously difficult. It is hoped that a revolution in dairy farming can be achieved through detailed observatio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ruthenium rules for new fuel cellsScientists have fabricated a durable catalyst for high-performance fuel cells by attaching single ruthenium atoms to graphene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Serotonin contributions to cocaine's allureA new study reinforces long-held suspicions that the brain chemical serotonin, a molecule usually associated with mood, appetite and libido, makes a direct contribution to the actions of cocaine. Scientists can now clearly see details of how the brain uses serotonin not just to regulate mood, but also to drive both rapid and long-lasting changes in the brain. They suspect these changes may contrib
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The trouble with being a handsome birdMale birds often use brightly colored plumage to be attractive to females. However, such eye-catching trimmings may also attract unwanted attention from predators. Now, a new study has found that showy males indeed perceive themselves to be at a greater risk of predation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hacking the human brain: Lab-made synapses for artificial intelligenceOne of the greatest challenges facing artificial intelligence development is understanding the human brain and figuring out how to mimic it. Now, one group reports that they have developed an artificial synapse capable of simulating a fundamental function of our nervous system -- the release of inhibitory and stimulatory signals from the same 'pre-synaptic' terminal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Indoor air in schools could add to children's exposure to PCBsThe US banned PCBs nearly four decades ago, but they persist in the environment and have been found in animals and humans since then. Now researchers report that concentrations of airborne PCBs inside schools could result in some students inhaling the compounds at higher levels than they would consume through their diets. Exposure through both are lower than set limits, but cumulative amounts, res
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ozone recovery may be delayed by unregulated chemicalsRecent increases in an unregulated ozone-depleting substance, could delay recovery of Antarctic ozone levels by 5-30 years, depending on emissions scenarios. The findings suggest that a previously ignored chemical called dichloromethane may now be contributing to ozone depletion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslidesNew research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gene editing technique could drive out mosquito-borne diseaseScientists have demonstrated a way to edit the genome of disease-carrying mosquitoes that brings us closer to suppressing them on a continental scale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proteins linked to HIV transmission could actually be beneficial for reproductionProtein fragments found in semen, and previously only known for their ability to enhance HIV infection, also appear to play an important role in reproductive biology. A team of researchers discovered that these fragments could help dispose of damaged or unneeded sperm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ingredient found in soap can alter 'wettability' of your skinIt's possible to alter the wettability of your skin using an ingredient commonly found in cosmetic cleaners, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seizures follow similar path regardless of speedResearchers show that the neurons of mice undergoing seizures fire off in a sequential pattern no matter how quickly the seizure propagates -- a finding that confirms seizures are not the result of neurons randomly going haywire.
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Gizmodo
Trump Accuses Amazon of Not Paying 'Internet Taxes,' Which Aren't a Thing Source: Getty In an apparent attempt to discredit The Washington Post the day after it published a report on fake Donald Trump Time magazine covers hanging up at his golf courses, the president posted one of his most confusing tweets since taking office. Syntax issues aside, this sentence makes absolutely no sense. Of course, there is no such thing as an internet tax. Trump was likely referring t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South Africa approves export of 800 lion skeletons this yearSome 800 skeletons of captive-bred lions can be legally exported from South Africa this year, the government said Wednesday, meeting demand for the bones in parts of Asia while alarming critics who believe the policy threatens Africa's wild lions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeastMitochondria, best known for their role as powerhouses of eukaryotic cells, fulfill numerous vital functions. Knowledge about the precise protein composition as well as the functions of individual proteins is essential to understand fundamental processes of cell biology and diseases that are caused by cellular defects.
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The Atlantic
Why the GOP's Plan for Health Care Hit a Wall One key reason Senate Republicans have been forced to retract and retool their plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act is that the legislation favors one pole of the party’s modern coalition so emphatically over the other. The teetering Senate repeal bill, like its predecessor the House passed in May, would shower a large tax cut almost exclusively on the very high earners who compose the party’s
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The Atlantic
The Elusive Teacher Next Door In San Francisco, the average one-bedroom apartment rents for over $3,000 a month. When I first heard that San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, inspired by the story of a homeless teacher, intends to allocate $44 million toward housing for public-school teachers, I imagined the Tyrell Corporation headquarters protruding from the center of an empty parking lot on the outskirts of the city. Each night, an a
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Ars Technica
Why is Jeff Bezos building rocket engines in Alabama? He’s playing to win Enlarge / Sen. Richard Shelby, right, welcomes Blue Origin President Rob Meyerson to Huntsville, Alabama, this week. (credit: Huntsville/Madison County Chamber) This week the governor of Alabama announced that Blue Origin would build a factory in Huntsville, Alabama, for its new BE-4 rocket engine. "I must commend founder Jeff Bezos and company President Robert Meyerson for their vision to create
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Scientific American Content: Global
Overlooked Water Loss in Plants Could Throw Off Climate ModelsErrors could cause researchers to overestimate the rate of photosynthesis when water is scarce -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Screwing In This Lightbulb Turns Your Entire Desk Into a Touchscreen Smartphone GIF What if all those apps you rely on at work weren’t trapped on your smartphone’s tiny screen? They may not be for much longer. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Future Interfaces Group lab have come up with a novel way for your smartphone to spill out onto your desk while still letting you interact with apps you rely on using your fingers. In a paper that will be presented at the Sym
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook's high-stakes dilemma over suicide videosAmanda Hebert felt powerless as she watched a Facebook video of her 32-year-old friend taking her own life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovering, counting, cataloguing proteinsScientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
E-cigarettes increase risk of cigarette smoking in youthA new collaborative Dartmouth study finds strong and consistent evidence of greater risk between initial e-cigarette use and subsequent cigarette smoking initiation, regardless of how initiation was defined and net other factors that predict cigarette smoking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delaying lymph node biopsy after melanoma diagnosis does not affect survival ratesPostponing lymph node biopsy more than 30 days after melanoma diagnosis doesn't adversely impact long-term clinical outcomes, according to new study findings published on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines use of fat grafting for postmastectomy breast reconstructionThe use of fat grafting as a tool for breast reconstruction following a mastectomy may improve breast satisfaction, psychosocial well-being, and sexual well-being in patients, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consensus recommendations on isotretinoin and timing of skin proceduresA new article published by JAMA Dermatology reports on a panel of national experts that was convened and a review of the medical literature that was done to provide evidence-based recommendations regarding the safety of skin procedures performed either concurrently with, or immediately after, treatment with the acne medication isotretinoin.
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Futurity.org
Can Siri learn to ‘grasp’ our metaphors? New research suggests Siri and other digital helpers could someday learn the algorithms that humans have used for centuries to create and understand metaphorical language. For example, ask Siri to find a math tutor to help you “grasp” calculus and she’s likely to respond that your request is beyond her abilities. That’s because metaphors like “grasp” are difficult for Apple’s voice-controlled per
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artists and architects think differently compared to other peopleArchitects, painters and sculptors conceive of spaces in different ways from other people and from each other, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological toolsPsychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology aims to provide peace and positive stimulation to dementia patientsTo alleviate boredom and increase engagement, elderly patients in long-term care facilities can engage with the Ambient Activity Technology device any time to view family photos, hear their favorite music, and play games.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genomic copy number variants contribute to cognitive impairment in the UKGenetic alterations of rare deletions or duplications of small DNA segments, called copy number variants (CNVs), have been known to increase risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. Now, a new study reports that even in the absence of a disorder, people carrying a CNV associated with these disorders may have impaired cogniti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Matrix' inside tissues and tumorsScientists have developed a groundbreaking method to reveal the structure of tissues and tumors with unprecedented detail, by completely dissolving away cells and leaving the delicate extracellular matrix intact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male infertility could be linked to noisy bedroomsLong-term exposure to a noisy environment, particularly at night, is linked to infertility in men. The researchers found that exposure above the WHO night noise level (55 dB -- equivalent to the noise of a suburban street) is linked to a significant increase in infertility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remote sensing technologies key to the future of the oil palm industryRemote sensing technologies, using satellite and aerial data, could revolutionize the management of the oil palm industry, bringing both business and environmental benefits, say environmental experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airwaysCystic fibrosis (CF) alters the structure of mucus produced in airway passages. In pigs affected by CF, mucus strands (made of MUC5B protein) are more tangled than normal, and the sheets of mucus (made of MUC5AC protein) that cover the strands are denser. These structural abnormalities may help explain why people with CF have difficulty clearing mucus from their lungs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting eruptions using satellites and mathVolcanologists are beginning to use satellite measurements and mathematical methods to forecast eruptions and to better understand how volcanoes work, shows a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain signals deliver first targeted treatment for world's most common movement disorderResearchers have delivered targeted treatment for essential tremor -- the world's most common neurological movement disorder -- by decoding brain signals to sense when patients limbs are shaking.
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Gizmodo
Eau de Bull: A Cologne of Arsenic and Environmental Racism for Acting Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Wood Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG; photos via Balch & Bingham, Shutterstock The Justice Department’s Environmental and Natural Resources Division is responsible for enforcing compliance with federal environmental laws. So to find that the fingerprints of coal lobbyist-turned-ENRD acting Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Wood are on an environmental-racism scandal is, actually, pret
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Pico Brew helps bring the craft beer movement to your kitchenI think a lot of us know someone among our extended family and friends who's tried their hand at brewing their own beer.
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Ars Technica
30 small ISPs urge Ajit Pai to preserve Title II and net neutrality rules Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | designer491) A group of small Internet service providers yesterday urged Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai to preserve the FCC's net neutrality rules and the related classification of ISPs as common carriers. "We have encountered no new additional barriers to investment or deployment as a result of the 2015 decision to reclassify broadband as a te
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Futurity.org
Hunter-gatherer past taught our brains to love exercise The link between exercise and the brain may be a product of our evolutionary history and past as hunter-gatherers, researchers say. Anthropologist David Raichlen and psychologist Gene Alexander, who together run a research program on exercise and the brain, propose an “adaptive capacity model” for understanding, from an evolutionary neuroscience perspective, how physical activity impacts brain st
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Scientific American Content: Global
Accelerating Sea Ice Floes Could Spread Pollution FasterArctic ice drift has been speeding up 14 percent per decade since the late 1980s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Patrick May: Google will barely feel multibillion-dollar slap on the wristTake THAT, Google!
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Science | The Guardian
Climate change is an energy problem, so let's talk honestly about nuclear Fear of nuclear energy runs deep but it may be the most efficient and clean energy source we have, albeit with complications Of all the hazards facing humankind, climate change is the single greatest threat we have ever faced. In a few short decades, we have altered the climate more than we ever thought possible and now, in the midst of the greatest heatwave recorded in decades in the hottest yea
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New Scientist - News
Women need a rosy outlook? Then give us reason to be optimisticTalking up the idea that women need to up their optimism to live longer is patronising in an age of stubborn gender inequality, says Lara Williams
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companies weigh cyberattack cost, with Ukraine hit hardCompanies and governments around the world on Wednesday counted the cost of a software epidemic that has disrupted ports, hospitals, and banks. Ukraine, which was hardest hit and where the attack likely originated, said it had secured critical state assets—though everyday life remained affected, with cash machines out of order.
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Ars Technica
Google News website gets redesigned, now looks like something from this decade Google Google is launching a major redesign for Google News, bringing the site more in line with Google's company-wide "Material Design" guidelines. A gray background and white cards around each story bring the site more in line with what Google has been doing on Android and makes it look a lot like Google Now. Everything is a lot more spaced out, so you'll see less information on a single page.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remains of early, permanent human settlement in Andes discoveredExamining human remains and other archaeological evidence from a site at nearly 12,500 feet above sea level in Peru, the scientists show that intrepid hunter-gatherers -- men, women and children -- managed to survive at high elevation before the advent of agriculture, in spite of lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and exposure to elements.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the cortex assigns credit for causalityNew research affirms a key role for neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the crucial learning task of determining what caused a desired result.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progressionResearchers discovered injecting potato virus particles into melanoma tumor sites activates an anti-tumor immune system response. And simultaneously injecting the nanoscale plant virus particles and a chemotherapy drug--doxorubicin--into tumor sites further helps halt tumor progression in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cheap, energy-efficient and clean reaction to make chemical feedstockCombining experimental and computer chemistry, scientists find the conditions to break carbon-hydrogen bonds at low temperature with cheap titanium in place of rare metals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Now or later: How taste and sound affect when you buyNew research finds the type of sensory experience an advertisement conjures up in our mind -- taste and touch vs. sight and sound -- has a fascinating effect on when we make purchases. The study finds that advertisements highlighting more distal sensory experiences (sight/sound) lead people to delay purchasing, while highlighting more proximal sensory experiences (touch/taste) lead to earlier purc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unique stem cells as a potential asthma treatmentA new therapy developed through stem cell technology holds promise as a treatment for chronic asthma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term sustained effect of biological psoriasis treatmentBiological treatment of psoriasis shows a good efficacy in clinical trials. Since most analyses have focused on short-term outcomes of single biological agents, little has been known about long-term outcomes in clinical practice, where switching between biological agents is common. A study that followed 583 individuals for up to 10 years shows a satisfactory long-term effectiveness of biologic tre
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Wired
Pentagon ‘Space Corps’ Plan Leaves Earth Science in the DustScientists and the military have often tussled when it comes to who is more important in outer space.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Pirate sites, grizzly bears and a cholera outbreak The week in science: 23–29 June 2017. Nature 546 580 doi: 10.1038/546580a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers examine chemo-mechanics of heart defectElastin and collagen serve as the body's building blocks. Any genetic mutation short-circuiting their function can have a devastating, and often lethal, health impact. For the first time, new research led by engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer look at both genetic and mechanical attributes, to better understand a disorder that affects how elastin and collagen function.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social connections impact voter turnout, decisions, says FSU researchPeople more closely connected to electoral candidates in their social network vote at higher rates, according to Matthew Pietryka, an assistant professor of political science. The term 'social network' refers to the wide collection of family, friends and acquaintances that an individual has, as well as a social connection's family, friends and acquaintances.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyberattack blocks Maersk terminals, new ordersDanish shipping mammoth Maersk said Wednesday it had shut down some of its computer systems after a global cyberattack disrupted operations at its terminals and hindered it from taking new orders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social connections impact voter turnout, decisions, research saysWhen it comes to voter turnout and election outcomes, it's not just what you know, but perhaps who you know that makes the difference, according to a new study led by a Florida State University researcher.
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Gizmodo
Here's Your Requisite 'Shows the Whole Damn Thing' War for the Planet of the Apes Trailer Image: Still via Youtube It’s always the same with blockbuster movie marketing these days—the closer you get to release, the more and more footage comes out to the point you could piece together everything chronologically and come away with a huge chunk of the actual movie. Sometimes the studios themselves do it for you in the form of trailers like this. So if you’re excited to see War for the Pl
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Scientific American Content: Global
Tests for Lyme Disease Miss Early Cases—but a New Approach Might HelpStandard methods often fail to catch infections during the first month -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
Scientists Have Figured Out How to Selectively Erase a Snail Memory Researchers learn how to selectively erase memories in snails, a first step. Read More
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The Atlantic
Netflix’s Okja Is a Must-See Fable About a Super-Pig Okja begins with a splendiferous introduction to its title character. Who is Okja? The ecstatic businesswoman Lucy Mirando (Tilda Swinton) is thrilled to tell us, via multimedia presentation, by revealing to the press and her investors a new kind of “super-pig” her global corporation has discovered. A giant, lumbering beast resembling a hippo (though with a more baleful face), this creature is th
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Gizmodo
Boaty McBoatface Has Returned From Its Inaugural Mission With a Trove of Data Boaty returns from one of its three mission to the Orkney Passage in the Southern Ocean. (Image: BAS) The world’s most famous yellow submarine has returned home after a successful mission to Antarctica’s Weddell Sea. Expedition organizers say Boaty McBoatface captured “unprecedented” data during its maiden voyage, analyzing deep sea currents at depths exceeding 13,000 feet. Boaty’s back in Britai
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Gizmodo
The Root A White House Reporter Grew Tired of the ‘Fake News’ Narrative, So He Fought Back | Deadspi The Root A White House Reporter Grew Tired of the ‘Fake News’ Narrative, So He Fought Back | Deadspin The Knicks Are Done With Phil Jackson | The Slot Watch Donald Trump Creep Out an Irish Reporter While She Is Reporting on Him | Fusion Here’s a Trump Voter Close to Tears Over Losing Health Care Under the GOP’s Bill |
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor kan vi ikke se flere stjerner på nattehimlen?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor himlen ikke er helt dækket af stjerner. Lektor på Aarhus Universitet forklarer paradokset.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Socioeconomic status in childhood linked with cardiac structure and function in adulthoodThe multicenter trial shows that low socioeconomic status in childhood increases the risk of higher left ventricular mass and poorer diastolic function in adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tackling iron, zinc deficiencies with 'better' breadThe health effects of zinc and iron deficiencies can be devastating, particularly in developing countries. One strategy for addressing this problem involves fertilizing crops with the micronutrients. But no one has yet figured out whether these added nutrients end up in food products made with the fortified crops. Now researchers report that this type of biofortification can boost micronutrients i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant womenTaking a low-dose aspirin before bed can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, which can cause premature birth and, in extreme cases, maternal and fetal death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mouse's view of the world, seen through its whiskersNeuroscientists have thoroughly mapped the touch, visual and auditory regions of the brain's cortex, but how does this sensory information get processed into our perception of the world? Researchers have for the first time reconstructed the spatial map a mouse creates with its whiskers, and found evidence that layers 2 and 3 of the somatosensory cortex integrate the discret inputs from each whiske
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What we can learn about global flu evolution from one person's infectionA new study has found that flu evolution within some individuals can hint at the virus's eventual evolutionary course worldwide. The study of 10-year-old flu samples also found the virus's evolution in individual transplant patients partially mirrors later global trends.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hey Siri, an ancient algorithm may help you grasp metaphorsAsk Siri to find a math tutor to help you 'grasp' calculus and she's likely to respond that your request is beyond her abilities. That's because metaphors like 'grasp' are difficult for Apple's voice-controlled personal assistant to, well, grasp. But new research suggests digital helpers could someday learn the algorithms that humans have used for centuries to create and understand metaphorical la
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The Atlantic
Will Grad Students Lose the Right to Unionize Under Trump? Trevor Hull wakes up every morning and goes to a lab where he mixes chemicals together, using materials like lead and cadmium to synthesize other substances. A man who he calls his boss sometimes gives him directions and orders, and he’s paid on a bi-weekly basis. He says he feels like he works at a small business. “In my day to day life, it feels like a job,” he told me. Hull’s lab, though, is a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four new beamlines get go ahead at the ESRF, opening new frontiers in X-ray scienceThe ESRF Council, representing the 22 partner nations of the ESRF, gave the green light for the construction and commissioning of four new beamlines from 2018-2022. The beamlines are designed to exploit the enhanced performance of the first of a new generation of synchrotron, the Extremely Brilliant source (EBS), which is being built at the ESRF.
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Quanta Magazine
The Tricky Translation of Mathematical Ideas My latest story is about the mathematician June Huh , who came into the field late and by an unorthodox path. Huh’s approach to mathematics has been similarly surprising: He and his two collaborators, Eric Katz and Karim Adiprasito, solved an important problem called the Rota conjecture by figuring out how to translate ideas from one area of math to a realm where those ideas wouldn’t seem to belo
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Ars Technica
Qualcomm, Vivo show off slow but convenient under-display fingerprint sensor Enlarge / THIS is actually the most accurate finger angle for the tall, skinny fingerprint reader. The problem is this is not really comfortable. (credit: Ron Amadeo) The next wave of fingerprint readers on smart devices could be more inconspicuous than they are now. Earlier this year, Synaptics announced a new range of fingerprint sensors that can be integrated under polymers, ceramics, and glas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech firms want to detect emotions and expressions, but people don't like itAs revealed in a patent filing, Facebook is interested in using webcams and smartphone cameras to read our emotions, and track expressions and reactions. The idea is that by understanding emotional behaviour, Facebook can show us more of what we react positively to in our Facebook news feeds and less of what we do not – whether that's friends' holiday photos, or advertisements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) will change dairy farmingA group of researchers led by Osaka University developed an early detection method for cow lameness (hoof disease), a major disease of dairy cattle, from images of cow gait with an accuracy of 99 percent or higher by applying human gait analysis. This technique allows early detection of lameness from cow gait, which was previously difficult. It is hoped that a revolution in dairy farming can be ac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly established, a national park in Australia unveils a new plant speciesA team of botanists from the US has named a new bush tomato species, based on collections made by their Australian colleagues, during government-funded surveys in a brand new national park.
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Gizmodo
Find a Friend or Family Member to Buy an Echo Show With You, and Save $50 Each 2-Pack Echo Shows , $360 with code SHOW2PACK | 2-Pack Echoes , $260 with code ECHO2PACK Now that Amazon’s touchscreen-equipped Echo Show is out, and seems to be quite good , it bears repeating that you can buy two and save $100 with promo code SHOW2PACK . Owning two allows you to use them as videoconferencing intercoms, and even if you don’t need both yourself, maybe you could find a friend and g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does religion protect against suicide?Religious participation is linked to lower suicide rates in many parts of the world, including the United States and Russia, but does not protect against the risk of suicide in sections of Europe and Asia, finds new research by a Michigan State University scholar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progressionResearchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in collaboration with researchers from Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and RWTH Aachen University (Germany) have adapted virus particles—that normally infect potatoes—to serve as cancer drug delivery devices for mice. But in a recent article published in Nano Letters, the team showed injecting the virus particles alongside che
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Globally, floods seem to be decreasing even as extreme rainfall rises. Why?Over the past decade we have seen a substantial increase in our scientific understanding of how climate change affects extreme rainfall events. Not only do our climate models suggest that heavy rainfall events will intensify as the atmosphere warms, but we have also seen these projections start to become reality, with observed increases in rainfall intensity in two-thirds of the places covered by
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The Atlantic
Criminal Charges for 1989 Hillsborough Disaster British prosecutors charged six people Wednesday in connection with the deaths of 96 soccer fans who were trampled during the 1989 F.A. Cup semifinal match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough Stadium. The incident began on April 15, 1989 after police, in an attempt to relieve a bottleneck of Liverpool fans outside Sheffield’s Hillsborough Stadium, opened an exit gate before ki
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Wired
Stasher Silicone Bag Review: These Reusable Silicone Bags Make for Killer Sous VideStasher has teamed up with sous-vide company Anova to market its silicone bags to trendy home chefs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing the forest through the trees with a new LiDAR systemResearchers use gated digital holography methods to develop foliage penetrating LiDAR that can survey obscured ground.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giving birth multiple times has impact on stroke recovery, study showsWhile perimenopausal female mice that gave birth multiple times (multiparous) were at higher risk of stroke, they recovered better than mice that had not ever reproduced.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sensitive faces helped dinosaurs eat, woo and take temperatureDinosaurs' faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought, and crucial to tasks from precision eating and testing nest temperature to combat and mating rituals, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic treatment for killer sepsisNew expertise is contributing to a world-first £1.5million study aiming to tackle one of the biggest public health threats we face -- antibiotic resistance.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Phelps Vs. Shark: The Battle for Ocean Supremacy | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 The Great White Shark meets the Greatest of All Time. Who will win the battle for ocean supremacy? Phelps V. Shark starts Sunday, July 23 at 8p. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why it's important to understand social media's dark historyIt was in April 2016 that Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg announced that the social media platform was providing its nearly two billion users the opportunity to livestream content. The move was viewed as a natural extension of the platform's primary goal: providing a space for the average person to share their daily experiences, from the mundane to the meaningful.
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Scientific American Content: Global
4 More FAQs about PercentagesHow do you quickly calculate 25 percent of a number? Or 33 percent of a number? And how can you quickly calculate percentage increases? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly established, a national park in Australia unveils a new plant speciesA new species of bush tomato discovered in a recently established national park in Australia provides a compelling argument for the importance of federal investment in science and conservation. The study was published in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Socioeconomic status in childhood linked with cardiac structure and function in adulthoodThe multicenter trial coordinated by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that low socioeconomic status in childhood increases the risk of higher left ventricular mass and poorer diastolic function in adulthood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male infertility could be linked to noisy bedrooms, study suggestsLong-term exposure to a noisy environment, particularly at night, is linked to infertility in men, according to a study in Environmental Pollution. The researchers found that exposure above the WHO night noise level (55 dB -- equivalent to the noise of a suburban street) is linked to a significant increase in infertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Image analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) will change dairy farmingA group of researchers led by Osaka University developed an early detection method for cow lameness (hoof disease), a major disease of dairy cattle, from images of cow gait with an accuracy of 99 percent or higher by applying human gait analysis. This technique allows early detection of lameness from cow gait, which was previously difficult. It is hoped that a revolution in dairy farming can be ac
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Futurity.org
Here’s what happens when you overheat Your body has a maximum operating temperature, according to a physician who knows an overheated person when she sees one. When you heat up, your body has ways to keep you at a temperature where your enzymes work optimally, says Jaiva Larsen of the University of Arizona, where the temperature has reached 116° F this week. Enzymes are proteins that speed up specific chemical reactions in the body.
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Futurity.org
Keeping smartphones nearby makes us dumber New research indicates that our cognitive capacity is reduced whenever our phones are within reach—whether it’s turned on or off. Adrian Ward and coauthors conducted experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure, for the first time, how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby, even when they’re not using them. In one experiment, the researche
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Science | The Guardian
Daily aspirin dose could lower pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women Low dose taken by women at risk of pre-eclampsia throughout pregnancy more than halves chances of premature birth, finds study Pregnant women who are at risk of pre-eclampsia could substantially lower the chances of premature delivery by taking a daily dose of aspirin, research has found. A low dose of the drug taken throughout pregnancy more than halved the chances of a premature birth due to pr
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Science | The Guardian
8 Minutes review – dancers and scientists make a stunning cosmic voyage Sadler’s Wells, London Alexander Whitley’s poetic and playful creation captures the alien unknowableness of the universe, as well as its visual magic Eight minutes is the time it takes for the sun’s light to reach the Earth: it’s also the title of Alexander Whitley ’s new work, which is inspired by solar physics and aspires to conjure, through dance, the immensity of the forces that shape our uni
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Ars Technica
A touch of Cocoa: Inside the original iPhone SDK Enlarge / Web apps, declared Steve Jobs. All the original iPhone needs is Web apps! (credit: Jacqui Cheng) When 2016 was over, Apple announced that its app store business generated well over $28 billion in sales that year. While that includes sales of software for its desktop operating system, it does not include the vast quantity of applications that are given away for free (many of which enable
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Gizmodo
British Badass Gets Thrown 20 Feet By a Runaway Bus, Brushes Himself Off and Walks Away GIF We’d say this video is another good example of why it’s important to look both ways before crossing the street, but this out-of-control bus in Reading, England, comes around the corner so quickly that local badass Simon Smith wouldn’t have been able to avoid, even if he saw it coming. Remarkably, and probably all thanks to the sweet vest he was wearing, Smith stood up, dusted himself off, and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pets strengthen neighbourhood tiesTalk to any pet owner and you are bound to invoke stories about the joy and companionship of having a pet. But evidence is mounting that the effect of pets extends beyond their owners and can help strengthen the social fabric of local neighbourhoods. Now a cross-national study involving Perth, Australia, and three US cities has lent weight to the observation that pets help build social capital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: It's nonsense to say fracking can be made safe, whatever guidelines we come up withCan fracking be safe? A new study suggests how fracking – the process of extracting oil and gas trapped in rocks deep underground by blasting water into the rock at high pressure – can be conducted without causing earthquakes, which is one of the most well known concerns. While this kind of research can help produce guidelines to reduce the risks associated with fracking, ultimately, it makes no s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subjects impact little on poor pupils' job prospectsSchool leavers from poorer families are significantly more likely to be unemployed regardless of which subjects they have studied, research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar minimum is comingHigh up in the clear blue noontime sky, the sun appears to be much the same day-in, day-out, year after year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene and terahertz waves could lead the way to future communicationBy utilizing terahertz waves in electronics, future data traffic can get a big boost forward. So far, the terahertz (THz) frequency has not been optimally applied to data transmission, but by using graphene, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have come one step closer to a possible paradigm shift for the electronic industry.
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Futurity.org
Acupuncture doesn’t help women with PCOS get pregnant Acupuncture, alone or used with the medication clomiphene, does not appear to be an effective way to treat infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The finding casts doubts on previous smaller trials that have suggested the procedure may improve reproductive function in women affected by infertility. “Our hypothesis was that women who received acupuncture with clomiphene would do much
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space farms will feed astronauts and earthlingsCanadian researchers are leading an effort to grow crops in space, paving the way for humanity to live on other worlds and push the frontiers on Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique unveils 'matrix' inside tissues and tumorsScientists have developed a groundbreaking method to reveal the structure of tissues and tumors with unprecedented detail, by completely dissolving away cells and leaving the delicate extracellular matrix intact.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
EASL releases editorial response to Cochrane Review of DAAs in HCVEASL raises serious concerns over a Cochrane systematic review and questions conclusions in an editorial published today in Journal of Hepatology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genomic copy number variants contribute to cognitive impairment in the UKGenetic alterations of rare deletions or duplications of small DNA segments, called copy number variants (CNVs), have been known to increase risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. Now, a new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that even in the absence of a disorder, people carrying a CNV associated with these disorders
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How 'The Gruffalo' helped academics boost youngsters' motor skills and language abilityCombining movement and storytelling activities boosts pre-school children's key motor skills and language ability, according to Coventry University experts who used bestselling book 'The Gruffalo' during their research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The trouble with being a handsome birdMale birds often use brightly coloured plumage to be attractive to females. However, such eye-catching trimmings may also attract unwanted attention from predators. Now, a new study led by Monash University has found that showy males indeed perceive themselves to be at a greater risk of predation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare archaeological find could be the first time unique pottery seen in the South WestArchaeologists excavating a site where Iron Age, Roman, and early medieval communities lived for more than a thousand years have unearthed pottery believed to have never been seen before in the South West.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The world's tropical zone is expanding, and Australia should be worriedThe Tropics are defined as the area of Earth where the Sun is directly overhead at least once a year—the zone between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reptile skin grown in lab for first time, helps study endangered turtle diseaseScientists recently reconstructed the skin of endangered green turtles, marking the first time that skin of a non-mammal was successfully engineered in a laboratory, according to a study. In turn, the scientists were able to grow a tumor-associated virus to better understand certain tumor diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using mathematical methods to study complex biological networksComplex biological processes, such as the metabolism, often involve thousands of different compounds coupled by chemical reactions. These process chains are described by researchers as chemical reaction networks. Researchers have developed new mathematical methods to study the energetic properties of these networks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
After lung surgery: Innovative method for filling, sealing pleural cavitiesResearchers have developed a new method for filling and sealing pleural cavities. The process consists of injecting polyurethane foams into the lungs with a self-expanding and self-modelling capacity that replaces aggressive surgical and palliative treatments used so far.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adaptive cyber security decision support to prevent cyber attacksRecognizing the complexity of cyber attacks and the multi-stakeholder nature of tackling cyber security are the key components of a new data-driven cyber security system currently being developed. The aim is to support organizations of all sizes in maintaining adequate levels of cyber security through a semi-automatic, regularly updated, organization-tailored security assessment of their digital i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene and terahertz waves could lead the way to future communicationBy utilizing terahertz waves in electronics, future data traffic can get a big boost forward. So far, the terahertz (THz) frequency has not been optimally applied to data transmission, but by using graphene, researchers have come one step closer to a possible paradigm shift for the electronic industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New innovation feeds the world with more fish proteinAs the world faces a projected population increase from today’s 7.5 billion people to 9 billion people by 2050, the demand for sustainable food sources is on the rise. The answer to this looming dilemma may well reside within the booming field of aquaculture. While wild fisheries have been on the decline for the last 20 years, aquaculture, or fish farming, is the fastest growing food-producing sec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes in ChinaA large, nationally representative survey in 2013 of adults in China finds that the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes was about 11 percent and that of prediabetes was nearly 36 percent, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acupuncture may not be effective in treating infertilityAcupuncture, alone or with the medication clomiphene, does not appear to be effective in treating infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to an international team of researchers. The finding casts doubts on previous smaller trials that have suggested that acupuncture may improve reproductive function in women affected by infertility.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Dog, Squirrel, or Gecko?Although it's clearly a lizard, the aptly named thick-tailed gecko (Underwoodisaurus milii) has a bulky backside and is known to bark when in danger.
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The Scientist RSS
First RNAi Insecticide ApprovedThis month, the EPA registered four products that include RNA interference technology intended to control corn rootworms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NATO says cyber attacks a call to armsNATO chief Jens Stoltenberg warned the alliance must step up its defence against cyberattacks, saying they could potentially trigger their Article 5 mutual defence commitment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird-like dinosaurs hatched eggs like chickens: studyFeathered dinosaurs that walked on two legs and had parrot-like beaks shared another characteristic with modern birds—they brooded clutches of eggs at a temperature similar to chickens, a study showed Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots to help children with autismNew research involving the University of Portsmouth is aiming to develop robots to help children with autism in ways humans can't.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progressionThe researchers discovered injecting potato virus particles into melanoma tumor sites activates an anti-tumor immune system response. And simultaneously injecting the nanoscale plant virus particles and a chemotherapy drug--doxorubicin--into tumor sites further helps halt tumor progression in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds long-term sustained effect of biological psoriasis treatmentBiological treatment of psoriasis shows a good efficacy in clinical trials. Since most analyses have focused on short-term outcomes of single biological agents, little has been known about long-term outcomes in clinical practice, where switching between biological agents is common. A Swedish study that followed 583 individuals for up to 10 years shows a satisfactory long-term effectiveness of biol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trials show unique stem cells a potential asthma treatmentA study led by scientists at Monash University has shown that a new therapy developed through stem cell technology holds promise as a treatment for chronic asthma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Now or later: How taste and sound affect when you buyNew research finds the type of sensory experience an advertisement conjures up in our mind -- taste and touch vs. sight and sound -- has a fascinating effect on when we make purchases.The study led by marketing professors at Brigham Young University and the University of Washington finds that advertisements highlighting more distal sensory experiences (sight/sound) lead people to delay purchasing,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study illuminates serotonin contributions to cocaine's allureA new study reinforces long-held suspicions that the brain chemical serotonin, a molecule usually associated with mood, appetite and libido, makes a direct contribution to the actions of cocaine. Scientists can now clearly see details of how the brain uses serotonin not just to regulate mood, but also to drive both rapid and long-lasting changes in the brain. They suspect these changes may contrib
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant womenTaking a low-dose aspirin before bed can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, which can cause premature birth and, in extreme cases, maternal and fetal death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Concussion protocols often not followed during FIFA World CupIn the 2014 soccer World Cup, concussion assessment protocols were not followed in more than 60 percent of plays in which players involved in head collisions were not assessed by sideline health care personnel, according to a study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'hot Jupiter' exoplanet detected by K2 mission(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has identified a new extrasolar planet from the data provided by Kepler spacecraft's prolonged mission known as K2. The newly found exoworld, designated EPIC 228735255b, is a so-called "hot Jupiter" on an eccentric orbit around its parent star. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 21 on the arXiv server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cheap, energy-efficient and clean reaction to make chemical feedstockThey are all around you! Most plastics, conductive polymers, and even medicines derive from molecules with a double bond between two carbon atoms, C=C. These molecules are called olefins and are mainly produced from fossil fuels through an energy-intensive and polluting process known as steam cracking. It requires temperatures of 800°C and produces the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Needless to da
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Gizmodo
Our First Look at Iron Man's New Avengers: Infinity War Armor The new Hellboy film will be rated R. The next season of iZombie has a peculiar political inspiration. The Supernatural spinoff has found another cast member. A Star Trek legend will go behind the camera for Discovery . Plus, new pictures from the set of Deadpool 2 , and more Game of Thrones featurettes. Spoilers Get! Avengers: Infinity War The latest update to the Iron Man armor—or at least, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Valuable substances extracted from conifer stumps and rootsCT The stumps and roots of coniferous trees contain extractives which can be processed into highly valuable products. In his doctoral dissertation on chemistry at the University of Helsinki, Harri Latva-Mäenpää studies methods which could be used to harvest these precious molecules from biomass.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new method of modeling drug-target interactions fixes a detrimental bias of past techniques"Drug discovery is a very long process. At each stage, you may find your drug is not good enough and you need to seek another candidate," explains A*STAR's Xiao-Li Li. His team won 'best paper' at the 2016 International Conference on Bioinformatics for a novel approach to correcting an intrinsic problem with machine learning methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better understanding the principles of silicon etching leads to improved surface patterningFrom solar cells that capture more light, to medical devices that resist colonization by bacteria; there are many applications for materials given a bristly coating of silicon nanowires. Creating these nanostructured silicon surfaces can be challenging—but A*STAR researchers have now discovered how to control at least one route.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The body relies on thousands of sugar–protein complexes to stay healthyOver two weeks in 2004, Song Zhiwei witnessed the slow death of a colony of cells. Song, a bioengineer at the A*STAR Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI), had bathed a plate of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) with lectin, a toxic protein derived from plants. He then observed the millions of cells shrink to a dozen survivors. They looked average, but Song knew they had superpowers. The secret
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles improve the strength of metallic alloysSuperalloys are the wonder materials of metallurgy. By fine-tuning their composition, scientists can increase mechanical strength and improve resistance to corrosion and high-temperature shape changes. A*STAR researchers have shown that adding nanoparticles can make these materials even stronger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cheap, energy-efficient and clean reaction to make chemical feedstockCombining experimental and computer chemistry, scientists find the conditions to break carbon-hydrogen bonds at low temperature with cheap titanium in place of rare metals.
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The Atlantic
Getting Along Despite the Threat of Deportation For Maria Hinojosa, the anchor and executive producer of “Latino USA,” the question of how to live together in relative peace and prosperity is complicated by the ascendent political coalition that is eager to deport millions of undocumented immigrants––and the anti-immigrant fringe that bears animus toward even legal immigrants. “Having been born in Mexico and becoming an American citizen in the
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Popular Science
China launches Asia's biggest post-WWII warship From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The Type 055 "Renhai" is headed out to sea China just launched Asia's biggest warship in 80 years, the 12,000-14,000 ton Type 055 destroyer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlled rupturing of thin films can make low-cost nanopatterned arrays for solar cells and biomolecular detectionThe phenomenon of 'dewetting'—usually considered a nuisance as it causes solids to bead up into islands, much like raindrops on glass—has been harnessed for a useful application. An A*STAR-led team has clarified how dewetting can assemble arrays of 3-D nanostructures for applications including single molecule sensing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human reared wolves found to display signs of attachment and affection towards foster-parents(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences in Hungary has found that wolves hand-reared by adoptive humans grow to show signs of attachment and affection towards their human foster parents. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the researchers describe how they asked a group of volunteers to hand raise wolf puppies and then t
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Viden
Forskning afslører hvorfor chimpansen er så stærkChimpanser er bygget til eksplosiv styrke, mens mennesker er bygget til udholdenhed.
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Ingeniøren
Ny boks skal gøre danske biler intelligenteEn "smartphone" til bilen skal automatisere betaling af parkering, give dig WiFi i bilen og sende data til forsikringsselskab og vejhjælpere.
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Futurity.org
Caregiver stress can shorten dementia patients’ lives People with dementia may actually die sooner if their family caregivers are experiencing mental stress, research shows. Researchers tracked the mortality of 176 patients with neurodegenerative diseases that are corrosive to brain function from 2007 to 2016. They also measured the mental health of the family members who took care of them. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New wheelchair prototype with an innovative propulsion systemA new wheelchair prototype with an innovative propulsion system has been developed by Massey University engineers that attempts to minimise chronic shoulder and wrist problems for self-propelled wheelchair users, while making it easier for users to travel uphill.
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Science-Based Medicine
The Skinny on Saturated FatThe bottom line is that there are trade-offs and complexities when it comes to biology. A high carbohydrate diet is a risk factor for many diseases, and this is highly genetically variable. Types of sugar matter, weight matters, exercise matters, and genetics matter. The same is true of fat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A levitated nanosphere as an ultra-sensitive sensorSensitive sensors must be isolated from their environment as much as possible to avoid disturbances. Scientists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated how to remove from and add elementary charges to a nanosphere that can be used for measuring extremely weak forces.
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Gizmodo
This ECCO Gold Box Was Made For The Indecisive Shoe-Wearer Up to 40% off ECCO shoes ECCO has been around since the ‘60s but the timeless, comfortable styles of their men’s and women’s shoes are what’s on display today. Amazon’s Gold Box has ECCO men’s dress shoes, loafers, and sneakers, and women’s sandals and sneakers, for as low as $52. Trust me, these things will last, but this 24-hour sale will not. Here are a couple styles to check out, but head to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows fairy wrens aware that their mating plumage attracts predators(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Monash University and Australian National University has found that male superb fairy wrens are aware that their seasonal bright plumage attracts predators and take extra precautions because of it. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they carried out with the birds and what they learned about them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A method to engineer crystals with a large fraction of reactive facets