7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mistaken identity of East Asian vine species resolved after 100 yearsNew light has been shed on a misclassified vine species in the Ryukyu Islands of East Asia. This plant was first discovered in 1917 in Taiwan, when it was provisionally identified as Kadsura japonica. The plant was recently spotted again after 100 years, and further investigation proved that it was in fact a different species: Kadsura matsudae. The findings were published on June 30th in the onlin
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insight into how telomeres protect cells from premature senescenceResearchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have further uncovered the secrets of telomeres, the caps that protect the ends of our chromosomes. They discovered that an RNA molecule called TERRA helps to ensure that very short (or broken) telomeres get fixed again. The work, which was recently published in the journal Cell, provides new insi
7h
Gizmodo
Back In Stock: This $70 Harmony Remote Includes The All-Powerful Harmony Hub Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 $70 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. The Hub allows you to use your iPhone, Android device, or even an Amazon Echo to control everything a Harmony remote can (which is basically any piece of home theater gear you can think of). So even when you inevitably lose the
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disney Research, Pixar Animation Studios and UCSB accelerate rendering with AIResearchers from Disney Research, Pixar Animation Studios, and the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed a new technology based on artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning that eliminates noise from the simulation of light flow in 3D scenes and thereby enables production-quality rendering at much faster speeds.
8h
Futurity.org
Walking even a tiny bit slower can signal dementia The connection between slowed walking speed and declining mental acuity appears to arise in the right hippocampus, a finger-shaped region buried deep in the brain that is important to memory and spatial orientation. The findings, published in Neurology , suggest that older patients may benefit if their doctors regularly measure their walking speed and watch for changes over time, which could be e
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Is PatrioticAmericans don’t like kings telling them what to do—and neither do scientists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
NotPetya developers may have obtained NSA exploits weeks before their public leak [Updated] Enlarge / A computer screen displaying Eternalromance, one of the NSA exploits used in Tuesday's NotPetya outbreak. (credit: Matthew Hickey ) Update: This post was revised throughout to reflect changes F-Secure made to Thursday's blog post. The company now says that the NotPetya component was probably completed in February, and assuming that timeline is correct, it didn't have any definitive bear
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Ars Technica
The complete history of the IBM PC, part one: The deal of the century SSPL/Getty Images One could claim that the IBM PC was not really IBM's first PC at all. In September 1975 the company introduced the IBM 5100, its first "portable" computer. ("Portable" meant that it weighed just 55 pounds and you could buy a special travel case to lug it around in.) The 5100 was not technically a microcomputer; it used a processor IBM had developed in-house called the PALM which
8h
The Atlantic
The Little Hours Is an Alt-Comedy Gone Medieval The Little Hours begins by introducing viewers to three nuns, each tending to their daily chores at a convent in 14th-century Italy. As Alessandra (Alison Brie), Genevra (Kate Micucci), and Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza) work, a local villager walks by pushing a wagon. “Beautiful morning, sisters,” he says. “Hey! Don’t fucking talk to us!” Fernanda yells back. “Fucking creep! Get the fuck out of here!”
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The Atlantic
Germany's Same-Sex Marriage Victory German lawmakers voted Friday to legalize same-sex marriage, just days after Chancellor Angela Merkel unexpectedly dropped her longstanding opposition to the vote taking place. The landmark decision, which grants same-sex couples full marital rights and the right to adoption, makes Germany the 14th country in Europe to legalize same-sex unions, and the 23rd country worldwide. The bill was approve
8h
The Atlantic
Does the Government Track Anti-Public-Land Extremists? The United States government owns more than a fifth of the land in 12 states, all of which are in the West. Recently, Americans everywhere have been reminded of how controversial that fact remains. In the past four years, armed militants have twice attempted to occupy federal facilities or stop federal employees from doing their job. In April 2014, Cliven Bundy and his supporters initiated an arm
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bizarro comet challenging researchersScientists pursue research through observation, experimentation and modeling. They strive for all of these pieces to fit together, but sometimes finding the unexpected is even more exciting. That's what happened to University of Central Florida's astrophysicist Gal Sarid, who studies comets, asteroids and planetary formation and earlier this year was part of a team that published a study focused o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study reveals new drug target for gout and other inflammatory diseasesParticle-driven diseases sound exotic and include things like silicosis and asbestos, but actually also include much more common diseases like Alzheimer's, gout and even atherosclerosis. A new report published online in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests a potential drug target for particle-driven diseases like these and many others.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Size not important for fish in the largest mass extinction of all timeUnderstanding modern biodiversity and extinction threats is important. It is commonly assumed that being large contributes to vulnerability during extinction crises. However, researchers from the University of Bristol and the Chengdu Center of the China Geological Survey, have found that size played no role in the extinction of fish during the largest mass extinction of all time.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to cardiovascular risk factors linked with arterial distensibility in adolescenceThe longitudinal study on children and adolescents conducted by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku, Finland, is unique worldwide. The study shows that cardiovascular risk factors, such as overweight, high blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and insulin resistance, are associated with arterial distensibility in adol
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fixation of powder catalysts on electrodesChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new method to tightly fix catalyst powders on electrode surfaces. Currently, the high physical stress induced on catalyst films by gas evolving reactions hampers the application of powder based catalysts. The developed technique is potentially interesting for hydrogen production by water electrolysis. A team from the Center for Electrochemical S
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insight into how telomeres protect cells from premature senescenceResearchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have further uncovered the secrets of telomeres, the caps that protect the ends of our chromosomes. They discovered that an RNA molecule called TERRA helps to ensure that very short (or broken) telomeres get fixed again. The work, which was recently published in the journal Cell, provides new insights into ce
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illegal activities threaten natural World Heritage -- IUCNIllegal fishing, logging and poaching, are impacting two-thirds of the 57 natural World Heritage sites monitored by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) this year, putting some of the world's most precious and unique ecosystems and species at risk.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colon cancer nuclear pore dynamics are captured by HS-AFMOne of the key reasons for cancer mortality is the highly invasive behaviour of cancer cells, which is often due to aggressive metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by various growth factors and cytokines secreted from cells of the immune system, which operate through various signaling pathways. Remarkably, these signaling pathways enter the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds become immune to influenzaAn influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Subtle molecular changes along the upper digestive tract could guide cancer therapyBased on a new molecular study of tissues biopsied from various parts of the upper digestive tract, researchers have identified significant, if subtle, differences in gene mutations and other factors that could help in developing more tailored treatment options for cancer patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wilderness areas are being destroyed but the World Heritage Convention can protect themA new study urges the UNESCO World Heritage Convention to better conserve wilderness areas within Natural World Heritage Sites. The study revealed that only 1.8 percent of the world's wilderness is protected in these sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Noise thermometry' yields accurate new measurements of Boltzmann constantBy measuring the random jiggling motion of electrons in a resistor, researchers have contributed to accurate new measurements of the Boltzmann constant, a fundamental scientific value that relates the energy of a system to its temperature.
8h
Gizmodo
The Jerry Orbach Art Car Is Now A Reality It’s possible that some of you may recall that last year noted painter of tinkering Christopher Walkens and improbable lunchboxes Brandon Bird revealed his plans to create a Jerry Orbach -themed art car. Those dreams are now a reality, as ORBACH1 is now complete. The car is a 2008 Ford Crown Victoria, and ex-police cruiser, which is ideal for a car designed to honor the star of the long, long run
8h
Wired
The Best New Products in June, From the New iPad to Coding RobotsPlus: Microsoft's Surface Laptop, Monument Valley II, and Dyson's fancy cord-free vacuum.
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Science | The Guardian
Bridge to Tintagel raises philosophical and practical objections Critics of planned bridge say increased footfall could erode island’s structures – that is, if anyone is willing to cross it Plans for a footbridge soaring high above the waves between the Cornish mainland and the island fortress of Tintagel have caused a storm of protest. The site’s custodians, English Heritage, say the bridge will help more visitors reach the island and understand its history b
8h
Ars Technica
CDC warns against eating placenta—in case you needed another reason Placenta pills (credit: Dan Ox ) Some eat it raw, others cook it. Some make it into jerky, and others grind the cooked, dried remains into a brown powder and fill capsules. However it's done, eating the placenta after childbirth is thought to ward off postpartum depression and boost milk production, among other things. There is no solid scientific evidence backing these benefits , though, and coo
8h
New Scientist - News
It’s not you – solving a Rubik’s cube quickly is officially hardMaths says the shortest route to finishing a Rubik's cube is a particularly difficult puzzle similar to the travelling salesperson problem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron stars could be our GPS for deep space travelNASA's Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer, or NICER, is an X-ray telescope launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in early June 2017. Installed on the International Space Station, by mid-July it will commence its scientific work – to study the exotic astrophysical objects known as neutron stars and examine whether they could be used as deep-space navigation beacons for future generations of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optimizing horse vaccination schedules: Early age immune response in foalsResearchers have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds become immune to influenzaAn influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find out how bromine fits into Venusian chemistryVenus and Earth are almost twins as planets, but they have evolved very differently so studying atmosphere of Venus might help us understand why Earth evolved as it has. In 2012, Vladimir Krasnopolsky from MIPT created a photochemical model incorporating numerous components of the atmosphere of Venus - at that time he supposed that hydrogen bromide could be one of them. Last year he and his collea
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Andalusian experts indicate new elements responsible for instability in chromosomesThe researchers state that RNA joins with DNA by chance or because of a disease, the structure of the chromatin, the protein envelope of the chromosomes is altered, causing breaks in the DNA. Gene mutations involved in the transcription and transport of RNA also cause damage in DNA, which they have shown is caused by changes in the chromatin. In these circumstances, the DNA cannot replicate itself
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spinning electrons open the door to future hybrid electronicsA discovery of how to control and transfer spinning electrons paves the way for novel hybrid devices that could outperform existing semiconductor electronics. In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Linkoping University in Sweden demonstrate how to combine a commonly used semiconductor with a topological insulator, a recently discovered state of matter with unique electrical
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No pain, no gain?A study shows that people find sport less strenuous if they believe it's doing them good.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Japanese children learn to write through rhythmHow do we learn to write? A Japanese study looked at the development of writing skills in Japanese first-grade students, and revealed aspects of handwriting development that have been largely neglected in research carried out in Latin alphabet communities.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mistaken identity of East Asian vine species resolved after 100 yearsNew light has been shed on a misclassified vine species in the Ryukyu Islands of East Asia. This plant was first discovered in 1917 in Taiwan, when it was provisionally identified as Kadsura japonica. The plant was recently spotted again after 100 years, and further investigation proved that it was in fact a different species: Kadsura matsudae. The findings were published on June 30th in the onlin
8h
The Atlantic
Urban Warfare, Then and Now A few weeks ago, the Atlantic Monthly Press released Mark Bowden’s excellent book, Hue 1968, A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam. As he did previously in Black Hawk Down, Bowden brings the reader down the deadly streets of a savage urban battle, meticulously describing the action from the points of view the participants. Currently, the roughly yearlong battle for the Iraqi city of Mosu
8h
Gizmodo
New Doctor Who Set Pictures Tease a Fateful Return Another Spider-Man villain is confirmed for Homecoming . A new Jetsons TV show could be in the works. Rosario Dawson has already exited New Mutants . No one can get their story straight about Spider-Man’s role in Venom . Plus, a new clip from the next episode of Preacher , and behind the scenes on The Last Jedi . Spoilers get! Wonder Woman 2 Speaking with The Advocate , Patty Jenkins revealed she
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fixation of powder catalysts on electrodesChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new method to tightly fix catalyst powders on electrode surfaces. Currently, the high physical stress induced on catalyst films by gas evolving reactions hampers the application of powder-based catalysts. The developed technique is potentially interesting for hydrogen production by water electrolysis. A team involving Dr Corina Andronescu, Stefa
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Widely Used Pesticide Is a Buzzkill for HoneybeesFindings add fuel to the debate over whether a commonly used chemical damages insect populations -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Freeze-Dried Placenta Pills Linked to Newborn's Dangerous Bacterial InfectionSome celebrities take such therapies, claiming health benefits -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will women vote for women in 2018? It depends on if they're marriedThe 2018 elections promise to be the "Year of the Woman," with more women planning to step into local, state and federal elections than ever before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The black forest and climate changeAs the climate change progresses, droughts are expected to become more and more common and more intense in Europe, as in many parts of the globe. However, many plants are not able to handle this kind of climate. This includes the Norway spruce, which is Germany's most important commercial tree species and accounts for the majority of trees in the Black Forest. Valentia Vitali and Prof. Dr. Jürgen
8h
The Scientist RSS
House Proposes NSF and NOAA Cuts, NASA GainsThe most recent bill from appropriators increases NASA funds from current levels and rescues the National Science Foundation from President Trump's deeper cuts.
8h
Ingeniøren
Qatar-krisen truer forsyningen af helium til hospitaler, halvlederfabrikker og forskningsanlægSaudi-Arabiens blokade af Qatar har fået ørkenlandet, som er verdens næststørste leverandør af helium, til at indstille produktionen.
8h
Futurity.org
Neanderthal used toothpicks for painful teeth Researchers have found signs of dental manipulations and multiple toothpick grooves on the teeth of a 130,000-year-old Neanderthal, evidence of a kind of “prehistoric dentistry.” “As a package, this fits together as a dental problem that the Neanderthal was having and was trying to presumably treat itself, with the toothpick grooves, the breaks, and also with the scratches on the premolar,” says
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Black Forest and climate changeSilver and Douglas firs could replace Norway spruce in the long run due to their greater resistance to droughts.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid biopsies: A non-invasive look at treatment responseA new study, to be presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, shows that so-called "liquid biopsies", blood tests that detect circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA), may not only sound an early alert that a treatment's effect is diminishing, but may also help explain why -sometimes offering clues about what to do next.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zoning in on specifics of Mediterranean diet for colorectal healthThe benefits of a 'Mediterranean diet' (MD) are well-known when it comes to colorectal protection, but it's hard to know specifically what elements of the diet are the healthiest. Now a new study, presented today at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer suggests loading up on fish and fruit, and cutting back on soft drinks are the three most important things.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do impurities move in tungsten?The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) has developed a method for investigating at high-speed utilizing a supercomputer the migration paths of plasma particles (impurity atoms) that immerged inside the fusion reactor materials. Here, we take out numerous small domains covering the entire volume of the material and apply molecular dynamics1) to the domains. This method is applicable to ge
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human activities worsen air quality in Dunhuang, a desert basin in ChinaDue to the increasing contribution of human activities, air quality has become worse in the most recent decade over the Dunhuang area, and the main reason is a shift to a mixture of coarse and fine particles, having previously been due to dust aerosol alone.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AI helps to fight against lung cancerLung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in 2015 in United States. Early detection of lung nodules will undoubtedly increase the five-year survival rate for lung cancer according to prior studies. In a paper published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences, researchers propose a novel rating method based on geometrical and statistical features to extract initial nodule candid
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with multiple sclerosis may benefit from over-the-counter therapyA pilot study suggests over-the-counter antioxidant lipoic acid holds promise for treating patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Researchers are using the findings from the pilot trial to design the expanded multi-site clinical trial to begin later this year in Portland and other sites that have yet to be finalized.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new way out of the cycle of rejectionPeople who are feeling rejected or isolated are more likely to engage in healthy activities if they see messages that appeal to emotion rather than rationality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do impurities move in tungsten?One part of the vacuum vessel (the plasma facing material) of the fusion experimental device and future fusion reactor comes into contact with plasma. When the plasma ions enter into the material, those particles become a neutral atom and stay inside the material. If seen from the atoms that compose the material, the plasma ions that entered become impurity atoms. The impurity atoms migrate slowly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Size not important for fish in the largest mass extinction of all timeUnderstanding modern biodiversity and extinction threats is important. It is commonly assumed that being large contributes to vulnerability during extinction crises.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Painted Jezebel butterflies deter predators with flashy wing coloursA research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has unraveled the mystery behind the wing colours of the Painted Jezebel, a common butterfly found in urban and forested landscapes throughout the Asia-Pacific region, known for its bright yellow and red wing colours.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why politically motivated cyberattacks might be the new normalAn international cyberattack struck parts of Europe, Asia, and the United States on Tuesday, crippling tens of thousands of computers at banks, hospitals, and government offices worldwide. Initial analysis found that the attack was designed for profit, with the hackers demanding $300 in Bitcoin in exchange for unlocking victims' screens. But further evidence now suggests that the malware was a "wi
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Gizmodo
The Fourth of July Twilight Zone Marathon Schedule, With Links For Cordcutters GIF It’s that time of year again. Time to hunker down and watch the Twilight Zone marathon on the SyFy Channel. Or, if you’re impatient, time to get ahead of the curve and binge-watch the entire series on Netflix or Amazon Prime. The SyFy Channel has been doing Twilight Zone marathons for years on both New Year’s and the Fourth of July. This year’s summer marathon starts at midnight Eastern time
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Secret square' discovered beneath world-famous Avebury stone circleArchaeologists from the universities of Leicester and Southampton have found a striking and apparently unique square monument beneath the world-famous Avebury stone circle in Wiltshire.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The LHC racks up recordsAn unprecedented number of particles has been reached in record time. Just five weeks after physics resumed, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is already running at full throttle. On Wednesday 28 June 2017 the LHC established yet another record-breaking high, with 2556 proton bunches circulating in each direction of the accelerator. The beams in the LHC are made up of bunches of protons, spaced seve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bayer stock plunges on profit warningShares in German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer plummeted in Frankfurt Friday, after it issued a profit warning over weak performance at its agrochemical and over-the-counter medicines units.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Miniature technology, big hope for disease detectionThe field of medicine is always on the lookout for better disease diagnostic tools—simpler, faster, and cheaper technologies to enhance patient treatment and outcomes. Currently, microfluidic bioassay devices are the preferred diagnostic tools that allow clinicians to measure the concentration of disease biomarkers within a patient's biological sample, such as blood. They can indicate the likeliho
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Science | The Guardian
Europe's extreme June heat clearly linked to climate change, research shows Heatwaves that saw deadly forest fires in Portugal and soaring temperatures in England were made up to 10 times more likely by global warming, say scientists Human-caused climate change dramatically increased the likelihood of the extreme heatwave that saw deadly forest fires blazing in Portugal and Spain, new research has shown. Much of western Europe sweltered earlier in June, and the severe he
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New Scientist - News
Abortion law needs a UK-wide update, not just Northern IrelandThe provision of abortions for Northern Irish women has been a hot issue this week in both Belfast and Westminster, but UK-wide law has also failed to keep up with medical reality
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds become immune to influenzaAn influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts indicate new elements responsible for instability in chromosomesGenome instability is the main risk factor in the development of tumours in humans. Understanding how, where, when and why these mutations are produced in DNA is one of the great objectives of the global scientific community. Therefore, a group of experts from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Center for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (Cabimer) has published a study that in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-tech sensors to gather long-term biogeochemical dataThe crew of the Royal Research Ship Discovery, a scientific research vessel of the United Kingdom, recently deployed high-technology biogeochemical sensors onto existing 'Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program' (OSNAP) moorings in the Rockall Trough, a major deep-water area in the North Atlantic Ocean. By taking continuous measurements in this important yet remote location, the sensors
9h
Popular Science
NASA filled the sky with glowing blue and green clouds Space It looks like a Fourth of July display, but it’s for science. The long-awaited launch made a spectacular light show along the east coast. Check it out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spinning electrons open the door to future hybrid electronicsA discovery of how to control and transfer spinning electrons paves the way for novel hybrid devices that could outperform existing semiconductor electronics. In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Linköping University in Sweden demonstrate how to combine a commonly used semiconductor with a topological insulator, a recently discovered state of matter with unique electrical
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: staggeringly profitable scientific publishing, a skull cult and Asteroid Day It is an industry like no other, with profit margins to rival Google – and it was created by one of Britain’s most notorious tycoons: Robert Maxwell. Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing actually bad for science ? While thinking about scalping: fragments of three ancient skulls found in Turkey have all the hallmarks of being carved with flint after being defleshed firs
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The Atlantic
Solving the Mystery of Whose Laughter Is On the Golden Record The Golden Record was never meant for this planet. Yet it has remained an object of curiosity on Earth, even after decades of hurtling through the void of outer space. In fact, the Golden Record has had something of a revival lately. For years, there’s been talk of making a modern, internet-crowdsourced follow-up to the original 1977 version. The original record plays a prominent role in the new
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Miniature technology, big hope for disease detectionResearchers develop a simple printing method to create effective disease detection tools.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Singapore scientists uncover how the liver unclogs itselfA multi-disciplinary team of researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore at the National University of Singapore, the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology of A*STAR, and BioSyM, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology have described the mechanical principles adopted by liver cells as they remove excess bile during obstructive cholestasis. This study was published
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colon cancer nuclear pore dynamics are captured by HS-AFMUsing high-speed atomic force microscope, for the first time, a team of researchers from Kanazawa University has captured "living" nano-nuclear pores of colon cancer cells. In their article just published in ACS Nano, the researchers also reveal the first nano dying code - loss of nuclear pore inner channel protein elasticity.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery could influence methods to control bacteria on medical and other surfacesNew research has revealed how bacteria thin the liquid they are swimming through in order to free themselves when trapped by walls or other obstacles. This finding could influence methods to control bacterial growth on medical, industrial, and agricultural surfaces.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Kids' Climate Change Case to Go to TrialThe plaintiffs include 21 children and young adults, who argue the federal government has encouraged fossil fuel use despite knowing the dangers of climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Viden
VIDEO: Sådan arbejder svømmerens musklerSvømning er knaldgod træning for især skulder, ryg og ben - og så sparer det dine muskler for hårde stød.
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Futurity.org
Fewer painkillers with less invasive pancreas surgery A minimally invasive form of the surgery used to treat severe pancreatitis results in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioid painkillers, and fewer complications. Compared with other surgical approaches, the laparoscopic form of total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto-transplantation may be an ideal option for some pancreatitis patients, surgeons report. “In an era of opioid addiction, pe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deal or no deal—animals who assist with parenting may simply be playing the marketFor centuries evolutionary biologists have been considering a difficult question: why do some animals 'choose' not to have children and instead help others rear their young? Researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London, with colleagues from the University of Sussex and the University of Exeter, have been studying wasps to try and find the answer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The human fingerprint on Europe's recent heatThis June, Europe experienced some remarkable heat. Temperature records were smashed across the west of the continent with extremely hot days followed by warm uncomfortable nights for many.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cheap, efficient and stable photoelectrode could improve water splitting with solar energyWater splitting with solar energy could provide an efficient route for large scale renewable energy conversion and storage. Scientists from TU Delft and AMOLF have now engineered a very efficient and stable photoelectrode, a material that absorbs light and directly splits water into hydrogen and oxygen. Furthermore, they use silicon wafers as the light absorbing material, so the system is also che
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Clearing Out the Fantastic Ecobee3 Smart Thermostat With a Huge Discount Ecobee3 Smart Thermostat , $170 Update : Sold out on Amazon, but Best Buy has it available for the same price . The new Ecobee4 smart thermostat has Alexa built right in, but the previous generation Ecobee3 is still great, and Amazon’s clearing them out for an all-time low $170 right now . That’s about the same price as an Ecobee Lite, but you get an all-important remote temperature sensor, plus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Generic, situation-aware guidelines to help robots co-exist successfully alongside humansArtificial intelligence experts from the University of Hertfordshire, Dr Christoph Salge and Professor Daniel Polani, have designed a concept which could lead to a new set of generic, situation-aware guidelines to help robots work and co-exist successfully alongside humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four strains of bacteria work together to produce pigment for food and cosmetics industryNature makes the vibrant pigments manufacturers want for foods and cosmetics, but getting them from plants to the products we buy is so difficult that many manufacturers rely on artificial colors. Now, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have shown that four strains of E. coli bacteria working together can convert sugar into the natural red anthocyanin pigment found in strawberries, op
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Immigrant youth help to build nationsImmigrants and refugees, especially those from developing nations, are often portrayed by segments of the media and policy makers as an economic burden, a threat to our social cohesion and "our way of life."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building codes not enough to protect homes against water damage in severe stormsWhen Tropical Cyclone Debbie made landfall in North Queensland early in 2017, it led to nearly A$1 billion in insured losses. Fortunately, there were no deaths or serious injuries where people sheltered in buildings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SFU researchers chart a path to decarbonizing Canadian transport in new reportA new report from researcher Tiffany Vass and professor Mark Jaccard in Simon Fraser University's School of Resource and Environmental Management challenges several assumptions about decarbonizing Canadian transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transfer of atomic mass with a photon solves the momentum paradox of lightIn a recent publication, Aalto University researchers show that in a transparent medium each photon is accompanied by an atomic mass density wave. The optical force of the photon sets the medium atoms in motion and makes them carry 92% of the total momentum of light, in the case of silicon.
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Gizmodo
Here Are Some of the Worst Fireworks-Related Injuries Ever Recorded Images: Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr It’s that time of year again—the time where we American humans decide to blow things up in order to celebrate the birth of our country. But it just so happens that humans and explosions don’t get along so well—and they never have. Thankfully, when humans don’t manage to kill themselves blowing things up, there are doctors who professionally report their
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Live Science
Do Some People Really Think Chocolate Milk Comes from Brown Cows?Millions of Americans believe brown cows produce chocolate milk? The way the media reported this factoid raises questions about science literacy – but different ones than you may think.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Gold MatterThe white matter tracts that wind throughout this microetching are based on diffusion spectrum imaging data from a human brain, realistically portraying the circuits found within a sagittal brain section.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cameras light up bats in the darkAn Associate Professor in veterinary public health at Massey University has been involved in developing tools to watch bats as they hibernate that may be key to saving them from a disease decimating their populations.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene identified that produces protein that helps volatile chemicals be released from flowers(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Purdue University in the U.S. and the University of Amsterdam and Université catholique de Louvain in the Netherlands has isolated the gene responsible for producing a protein that aids the release of volatile chemicals in flowering plants. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they isolated the gene and showed that it was respo
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geckos and skinks back from the brinkResearchers from The University of Western Australia are supporting a new project to trial the release of critically endangered blue-tailed skinks into a wild enclosure.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pickett's Charge—what modern mathematics teaches us about Civil War battleThe Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the American Civil War, and Gen. George Pickett's infantry charge on July 3, 1863, was the battle's climax. Had the Confederate Army won, it could have continued its invasion of Union territory. Instead, the charge was repelled with heavy losses. This forced the Confederates to retreat south and end their summer campaign.
9h
Popular Science
Clear summer skies are making Greenland's ice sheet melt even faster Environment The icy island is having a meltdown. As Greenland's cloud cover decreases, more sunlight is reaching the surface and melting its colossal ice sheet. Read on.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substanceThe majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis. It was the first to look at use of multiple substances in a nationally representative group of US women age 18 to 44.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Quantum Computing Becomes More AccessibleIncreased testing of quantum computing techniques will open the door to solving new kinds of problems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
The Atlantic
Enrollment Crises and Budget Crises: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories In The Land Of Bill Gates, A Standoff Over Money For Schools Hanna Brooks Olsen | GOOD Teachers being asked to foot the bill [on school supplies] isn’t a pattern that’s limited to Washington; it’s a nationwide problem , due in large part to the fact that teachers, who are evaluated on student success, can’t do their jobs without basic supplies. But it’s surprising that in a prosperous state with
9h
The Atlantic
What Interacting With Robots Might Reveal About Human Nature Robot panic seems to move in cycles, as new innovations in technology drive fear about machines that will take over our jobs, our lives, and our society—only to collapse as it becomes clear just how far away such omnipotent robots are. Today’s robots can barely walk effectively, much less conquer civilization. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t good reasons to be nervous. The more pressing proble
9h
The Atlantic
Parents Share How They Protect Their Kids Online Earlier this week, I asked parents to share their approach to protecting the privacy of their children as they begin to use devices with Internet access and social networks. The inquiry was inspired by an Aspen Ideas Festival talk where Julia Angwin and Manoush Zomorodi revealed how their reporting on privacy changed their parenting. The parents who’ve replied so far are in agreement that the tas
9h
Ingeniøren
Amazons luftige ide: Vil bygge ‘bistader’ til pakkedroner i byerneAmazon har søgt patent på en pakkelevering med droner ind til byerne, hvor dronerne skal udgå fra bistade-lignende højhuse.
9h
Futurity.org
Why these killer whales can’t stay pregnant Up to two-thirds of pregnancies of endangered southern resident killer whales fail, according to new research. Published in PLOS ONE , the study helps resolve the debate about which environmental stressors— food supply, pollutants, or boat traffic—are most responsible for the struggling population’s ongoing decline. “Based on our analysis of whale health and pregnancy over this seven-year period,
10h
Wired
Designing Genderless Emoji? It Takes More Than Just Losing the LipstickIt took a year and a half for Paul Hunt to cook up Unicode's first gender-inclusive emoji—but now your keyboard is a little less binary.
10h
Wired
Opinion: Climate Change Is Making Cities SickCity leaders must do more to integrate climate concerns into public health policy.
10h
Ars Technica
The beefy Dell Precision 7520 DE can out-muscle a growing Linux laptop field Enlarge / Kind of a looker, no? (credit: Scott Gilbertson) Project Sputnik has done an admirable job over the years of bringing a "just works" Linux experience to Dell Ultrabooks like the XPS 13 Developer Edition—in fact, we've tested and largely enjoyed those experiences multiple times now . But while the XPS 13 is a great machine that I would not hesitate to recommend for most Linux users, it d
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study turns up heat on artichokesA Texas A&M AgriLife Research-led study recently published in Seed Science and Technology showed how Texas producers interested in growing artichokes may be able to extend their growing season through the use of ethylene regulators.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Immigrants on Temporary Protected Status more civically engagedU.S. immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Honduras on Temporary Protected Status, despite its in-between and temporary nature, generally do better than undocumented immigrants in educational attainment and civic engagement in their communities, according to a new report led by the University of Kansas Center for Migration Research.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
America's Rights to Bear Fireworks Are GrowingState restrictions are loosening, prices are dropping—but injuries are climbing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Gizmodo
Alex Jones Has a Perfectly Normal Chat About All the Slave Children Who Are Sent to Mars GIF You might know Alex Jones as the guy who peddles conspiracy theories about politics and pizza . Or you might know him as the guy who was successfully sued by yogurt. But it’s easy to forget that he also believes some rather interesting things about NASA, the moon, and alien life. Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, the majority of Jones’s energy has been focused on pushing
10h
Live Science
Air Pollution May Make Solar Panels Less EfficientFrom inefficient grids, shortfalls in policy, and even an eclipse, solar-energy collection faces no shortage of hurdles. Scientists have discovered another stumbling block: air pollution.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring the toxin genes of monocled cobra through venom gland transcriptomicsResearchers at University of Malaya investigated the venom-gland transcriptomes of monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) from Malaysia and Thailand. Their findings unveil a pool of novel bioactive molecules, and provide a solution to the long-standing puzzle of the geographical variability of venom from this important Asian cobra.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump supporters believe U.S. society is fair, according to studyVoters who supported Donald Trump are more likely than other Americans—even other conservatives—to oppose social justice efforts, a new University of Michigan study shows.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists manipulate 'signaling' molecules to control cell migrationJohns Hopkins researchers report they have uncovered a mechanism in amoebae that rapidly changes the way cells migrate by resetting their sensitivity to the naturally occurring internal signaling events that drive such movement. The finding, described in a report published online March 28 in Nature Cell Biology, demonstrates that the migratory behavior of cells may be less "hard-wired" than previo
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Preserving the active chromatin stateIf cellular identity is to be maintained, it is important that actively transcribed chromatin stretches remain in a loose configuration as long as these genes are needed. Marc Bühler and his group have uncovered a novel positive feedback loop – crucially involving the histone acetyltransferase Mst2 – which ensures that (transcriptionally active) euchromatin cannot be easily converted into (inactiv
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality simulates classroom environment for aspiring teachersTwo University at Buffalo education researchers have teamed up to create an interactive classroom environment in which state-of-the-art virtual reality simulates difficult student behavior, a training method its designers compare to a "flight simulator for teachers."
10h
The Atlantic
The Perils of Meritocracy American culture nurtures many myths about the moral value of hard work. The phrase “by the bootstraps,” still widely used to describe those Americans who have found success through a combination of dogged work and stubborn will, rose from a mis-remembering of The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen : In it, the eponymous aristocrat pulls himself from a swamp— not by his bootstraps, but by
10h
Ingeniøren
Nu er også boreplatformene - omsider - kommet på nettetHardwarebegrænsinger har udsat boreplatformenes tilkobling til nettet – men en ny generation af maskiner med indbyggede sensorer har sat skub i udviklingen.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As metro areas grow, whites move farther from the city centerIn the middle of the 20th century, cities began to change. The popularity of the automobile and the construction of interstate highways fueled the growth of suburbs, while discriminatory housing policies segregated neighborhoods and helped create the phenomenon of "white flight" away from downtowns.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA simulates asteroid impacts to help identify possible life-threatening eventsWhen an asteroid struck the Russian city of Chelyabinsk in 2013, the blast from the asteroid's shock wave broke windows and damaged buildings as far away as 58 miles (93 kilometers), injuring more than 1,200 people.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines geology of Oklahoma's largest earthquakeOklahomans are no strangers to Mother Nature's whims. From tornadoes and floods to wildfires and winter storms, the state sees more than its share of natural hazards. But prior to 2009, "terra firma" in Oklahoma meant just that—earthquakes rarely shook the state.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Sustainable Design of Communities Dramatically Reduces WasteMoving beyond the green-home level, ambitious projects are attempting to join blocks of buildings into a single sustainable unit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's the economic value of the Great Barrier Reef? It's pricelessDeloitte Access Economics has valued the Great Barrier Reef at A$56 billion, with an economic contribution of A$6.4 billion per year. Yet this figure grossly underestimates the value of the reef, as it mainly focuses on tourism and the reef's role as an Australian icon.
11h
Wired
The Beautiful, Impossible Dream of a Simpler SmartphoneWhy is it so hard to build a smartphone that doesn't drive us crazy?
11h
Wired
Elon Musk's Chicago Tunnel Makes a Dumb Idea Even DumberAirport connections to mass transit are tricky to build.
11h
Wired
The Encryption Debate Should End Right Now, After Vault 7, Shadow Brokers, WannaCry, and PetyaAny case for intelligence agencies to have special access to encryption moot.
11h
Wired
The Battle to Get Gender Identity Into Your Health RecordsA decade ago, most electronic health care records collected just one piece of gender-related data: sex. Here's how that changed.
11h
Science | The Guardian
'Just go for a run': testing everyday advice for my depression | Martha Mills If you say you’re depressed, people are quick to dispense wisdom on how to deal with it. Martha Mills decided to take them literally, and try them out for herself So, it turns out I’m getting better at depression . That isn’t to say I’ve stopped suffering it, or that it is any less debilitating when it sneaks up after a two-year hiatus and pile-drives me into a blistering agony of mental carpet b
11h
Live Science
Has Anyone Ever Gone Blind from Staring at a Solar Eclipse?It's not just an old wives' tale: Staring at the sun for too long can permanently damage detailed vision, evidence suggests.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique elucidates the inner workings of neural networks trained on visual dataNeural networks, which learn to perform computational tasks by analyzing large sets of training data, are responsible for today's best-performing artificial intelligence systems, from speech recognition systems, to automatic translators, to self-driving cars.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5 launch proves reliability and flies new fairingAn Ariane 5 carrying two telecom satellites inside a new lighter fairing lifted off on the fourth mission from Europe's Spaceport in two months.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: 3-D printed planetary models3-D-printed scale models of asteroids and other planetary bodies are used for real-life testing of spacecraft navigation and landing systems – martian moon Phobos seen in the foreground here.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tree rings pinpoint eruption of Icelandic volcano to half a century before human settlementAn international group of researchers has dated a large volcanic eruption in Iceland to within a few months. The eruption, which is the oldest volcanic eruption to be precisely dated at high northern latitudes, occurred shortly before the first permanent human settlements were established, when parts of the now mostly treeless island were still covered with forest.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
The blue wings of this dragonfly may be surprisingly aliveThe wings of adult morpho dragonflies show tiny respiratory channels that may support a complex of nanostructures that shine blue.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
Floating Wind Plan Could Finally Crack California’s Offshore MarketFalling prices, improving technology, and smart public policies are changing the calculations.
11h
Live Science
Nanotech's Big Ideas: From Tumor Zappers to Space ElevatorsScientists and engineers at Future Con described the latest discoveries in nanotechnology that are fueling research in space travel and in medicine.
11h
Gizmodo
Iran Hit 129 Degrees Yesterday, Breaking Asia's Heat Record For June (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali, File) Iran broke the record for Asia’s highest temperature ever recorded during June yesterday. It was a scorching 128.7 degrees in the southwestern city of Ahvaz, which works out to 53.7 degrees Celsius. The previous June record in Iran was 127.4 degrees. And if that wasn’t enough, the heat index, which factors in humidity, hit a whopping 142 degrees. Amazingly, if you on
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New system makes fast, customized antibiotic treatments possibleA diagnostic system developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology enables rapid and accurate customization of the antibiotic to the patient. The system makes for faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times. The findings were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
11h
Science-Based Medicine
Antibiotic Prophylaxis For Dental Procedures Did you know that getting your teeth cleaned can kill you? Ok, that’s really not true (except in extremely rare, freak circumstances), but since today’s post is somewhat boring and unimaginative, I had to draw you in with what real journalists call a “hook”, and what hack writers like me call “click bait.” Looks like it worked. Most of the […]
11h
Viden
VIDEO: Sådan arbejder badmintonspillerens musklerEn stor del af af kroppens muskler kommer i aktion, når badmintonspilleren hvirvler rundt på banen. Men særligt benene knokler på højtryk.
11h
Ingeniøren
Reciprokt kuppelformet samlingssted møder RoskildefolketDTU-studerende står bag ny konstruktion, der let kan bygges op, pilles ned og genanvendes.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Light-Powered Computers Brighten AI's FutureOptical computers may have finally found a use—improving artificial intelligence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Neurocritic
What Is Thought? Is that some sort of trick question? Everyone knows what thought is . Or do they... My questions for you today are: How do you define “a thought” (yes, a single thought)? Where is the boundary from one thought to the next? What is “thought” more generally? Does this cognitive activity require conscious awareness? Or language? We don't want to be linguistic chauvinists, now do we, so let's assume
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Table top plasma gets wind of solar turbulenceScientists from India and Portugal recreated solar turbulence on a tabletop using a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse to excite a hot, dense plasma and followed the evolution of the giant magnetic field generated by the plasma dynamics. This opens the possibility of studying astrophysical phenomena like the evolution of stars, in the lab.
11h
The Atlantic
A Columbia Professor's Critique of Campus Politics For years, Columbia University Professor John McWhorter and Brown University Professor Glenn Loury have conducted frank public conversations on Bloggingheads.tv where they puzzle through issues facing the United States in real time. Both are original thinkers with heterodox views. I’ve watched them slowly refine their positions on campus activism and identity, sometimes invoking their own experie
11h
The Atlantic
How Republicans Can Fix American Health Care The Senate health-care bill is not definitively dead, but it’s unmistakably ailing—and the prognosis is not promising. The prognosis was never promising. All the various Republican health-care proposals circulated since 2010 would remove health-insurance coverage from tens of millions of people, many of them the GOP’s most loyal voters. Look for example at the dilemma facing Kentucky’s Rand Paul.
11h
The Atlantic
The Senate GOP Health-Care Bill Inches Closer to Obamacare The more Senate Republicans tweak their faltering health-care proposal in a frantic scramble for votes, the more it is beginning to look like the law they were trying to replace. Republicans are considering keeping a key Obamacare tax increase on investment income so they can use the money to soften cuts to Medicaid and increase subsidies for low-income people in their bill. The shift is an attem
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prebiotic atmosphere discovered on accretion disk of baby starAn international research team, led by Chin-Fei Lee of the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA, Taiwan), has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect complex organic molecules for the first time in the atmosphere of an accretion disk around a very young protostar. These molecules play a crucial role in producing the rich organic chemistry ne
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oceans are warming rapidly, study saysMore than 90 percent of the Earth's energy imbalance (EEI) in the climate system is sequestered in the ocean, and consequently, the ocean heat content (OHC) is increasing. Therefore, OHC is one of the most important indicators of global warming. During the past 30 years, many independent groups have worked to estimate historical OHC changes. However, high uncertainty prevails among the published g
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New avenue for the large-scale synthesis of Janus particlesChinese researchers have developed an emulsion interfacial polymerization method to fabricate Janus particles exhibiting chemical and topological anisotropy. The results were published in the journal Science Advances in an article titled "A general strategy to synthesize chemically and topologically anisotropic Janus particles."
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The first galaxies were even more violent than expectedAn international team of researchers has shown that the hot diffuse gas that fills the space between the galaxies has the same concentration of iron in all galaxy clusters that were studied in sufficient detail by the Japanese Suzaku satellite. It seems that most of the iron inside the intergalactic gas arose long before the first clusters of galaxies were formed. The results will be presented thi
12h
The Atlantic
A Call to Police Comity Among Political Allies, Not Opponents Peter Wehner, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, believes that most every American has a role to play in helping their compatriots co-exist despite their differences, and “a good place to start is with self-reflection and looking within—first at ourselves as individual, then the parties and political movements we are a part of.” In his view, “All of us, but particular our pol
12h
The Atlantic
This One Senate Staffer Could Sink the GOP's Health-Care Plan As Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell tries to negotiate his way to a health-care bill that can win at least 50 Republican votes, there is one woman in the Senate who could stop the bill cold. She isn’t even a senator. Elizabeth MacDonough is the Senate’s parliamentarian, the first woman to hold that post, which involves advising lawmakers on the chamber’s byzantine rules and procedures. She
12h
The Atlantic
'Forest Bathing': How Microdosing on Nature Can Help With Stress On first glance, it looked like a two-hour walk in the woods. Our guide had already tackled the hard part of finding a trail with minimal elevation gain and limited poison oak along its flanks. This wasn’t a hike, we were reminded. A hike usually involved clear endpoints and physical exertion. We were invited to walk slower than usual, perhaps a quarter of our normal speed. To pay attention to th
12h
Ingeniøren
Hvordan pakker man bedst en parkeringsplads på Roskilde?DTU-studerende skal løse et af de evindelige problemer, som festivalen kæmper med: biler.
12h
Ingeniøren
Danmark under mulde: Landet er fyldt med skjulte, dybe daleEn over 17 års lang kortlægning foretaget af statsgeologerne hos GEUS rykker for alvor til vores viden og antagelser om, hvad der gemmer sig under vores fødder.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare, exceptionally preserved fossil reveals lifestyle of ancient armor-plated reptileAn exceptionally preserved fossil from the Alps in eastern Switzerland has revealed the best look so far at an armored reptile from the Middle Triassic named Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi. The fossil is extremely rare in that it contains the animal's complete skeleton, giving an Anglo-Swiss research team a very clear idea of its detailed anatomy and probable lifestyle for the first time, according to
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Popular class of drugs reverse potentially harmful genetic changes from heart diseaseBeta blockers are commonly used world-wide to treat a variety of cardiovascular conditions, such as arrhythmias and heart failure. Scientists have known for decades that the medications work by slowing the heart rate and reducing the force of contraction -- lessening the burden of work carried out by the heart. However, new research out of York University has now shown that these drugs also revers
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Table top plasma gets wind of solar turbulenceScientists from India and Portugal recreate solar turbulence on a table top using a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse to excite a hot, dense plasma and followed the evolution of the giant magnetic field generated by the plasma dynamics. This opens the possibility of studying astrophysical phenomena like the evolution of stars, in the lab.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient Swiss reptile shows its bizarre scale armor for the first timeGrisons, 241 million years ago -- Instead of amidst high mountains, a small reptile suns itself on an island beach in a warm shallow sea, where many fish and marine reptiles frolic. This is the story told by an excellently preserved new discovery of the reptile Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi studied by paleontologists from the University of Zurich.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes may cause tumor aggressiveness and drug resistance in African-American prostate cancerA form of genetic variation, called differential RNA splicing, may have a role in tumor aggressiveness and drug resistance in African-American men with prostate cancer, according to research published out of the George Washington University Cancer Center in Nature Communications.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare, exceptionally preserved fossil reveals lifestyle of ancient armor-plated reptileAn exceptionally-preserved fossil from the Alps in eastern Switzerland has revealed the best look so far at an armoured reptile from the Middle Triassic named Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi. The fossil is extremely rare in that it contains the animal's complete skeleton, giving an Anglo-Swiss research team a very clear idea of its detailed anatomy and probable lifestyle for the first time, according to
13h
Ingeniøren
Uffe Ellemann blev ramt af ransomware: Jeg smadrede harddisken med en forhammer Hensigten med det igangværende hackerangreb er at sprede mistillid og forvirring, mener tidligere udenrigsminister Uffe Ellemann-Jensen og peger på Rusland som arnested for forbrydelserne https://www.version2.dk/artikel/uffe-ellemann-blev-ramt-ransomware-jeg-smadrede-harddisken-med-forhammer-1077967 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Forsvaret, 3Shape, Siemens og mange flere virksomheder jagter nye it-folk Der er job for både nyuddannet og erfarne it-specialister. Tjek ugens jobliste og se om der er noget for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-forsvaret-3shape-siemens-mange-flere-virksomheder-jagter-nye-it-folk-8864 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
13h
The Atlantic
Antibiotic Resistance Is Lurking in The Environment Colistin is an antibiotic of last resort, one of the final options left when all other drugs fail. It is an older antibiotic and sometimes toxic to the kidneys. Yet precisely because colistin is not a particularly safe drug and thus rarely used, bacteria didn’t develop resistance to it. Until they did, of course. At first, the occasional resistance mutation popped up, here and there. Then in 2015
13h
Ingeniøren
A+++ er lagt i gravenEU-landene har nu endeligt godkendt den aftale, der skal gøre det af med den stadigt voksende stribe af plusser på energimærkningen af elektronik.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan reveals plans to put a man on moon by 2030Japan has revealed ambitious plans to put an astronaut on the Moon around 2030 in new proposals from the country's space agency.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Some scientists think there’s no upper limit on ageing. Let’s hope they’re wrong | Stewart DakersEven if bodies could be made to live forever, minds would still fail. As one of the crumbling generation, I want a better life, not a longer one “A hundred and ruddy 20 … within 30 years, that’s what they’re saying … just imagine, being 50 again … after all, we are simply material cells … ah, but what about the mind?” A post-bingo conversation with some of my crumbly friends in the community centr
14h
Ars Technica
GrubHub trial may finally answer contractor vs. employee quandary Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News ) SAN FRANCISCO—A federal judge has allowed a labor lawsuit filed against GrubHub to go forward, paving the way for a bench trial this fall. On Thursday, US Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley largely denied the startup’s attempt to have the case decided on summary judgement. The case, which was first filed back in 2015 , is one of a slew of ong
14h
Ingeniøren
Biobrændstof og batterier skal løfte luftfartenKlimapåvirkningen skal holdes i ave, selv om lufttrafikken bliver ved med at stige. Men biomassen er begrænset, og batterierne tunge.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Subtle molecular changes along the upper digestive tract could guide cancer therapyBased on a new molecular study of tissues biopsied from various parts of the upper digestive tract, researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified significant, if subtle, differences in gene mutations and other factors that could help in developing more tailored treatment options for cancer patients.
15h
Live Science
Great Facts About the Five Great LakesThe Great Lakes — Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario and Erie — make up the largest body of fresh water on Earth.
15h
Live Science
Lake Ontario FactsLake Ontario may be the smallest Great Lake, but its waters run deep.
15h
Live Science
What Are Genies?Genies are supernatural beings, but not necessarily the generous wish-fulfilling servants who live in lamps.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scampering dogs in Chile help restore burnt forestsForest fires in Chile ravaged vast swathes of land this year, leaving patches once thick with sturdy old trees reduced to burnt landscapes. Now, three plucky dogs are helping replant it all.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Half-a-degree of warming boosted extreme weatherHalf a degree Celsius of global warming has been enough to increase heat waves and heavy rains in many regions of the planet, researchers reported Friday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could Apple's next big thing be a car?Is an Apple Car about to hit the road?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method of measurement could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensorsA new method for measuring extremely tiny objects could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors for use in fields including medical research and gas detection.
16h
Ingeniøren
Ny rapport: Investorer tør ikke sætte deres penge i energiteknologiDanmarks otte styrkepositioner indenfor energiteknologi trues af mangel på privat kapital, der ikke orker at arbejde med lange og kapitaltunge udviklingsforløb - samtidig med at de offentlige forskningsinvesteringer falder.
17h
The Atlantic
Venezuela's Ex-Security Chief Charged With Human Rights Violations The former head of Venezuela’s National Guard, Antonio Benavides, has been charged with “serious and systematic” human rights violations, the state prosecutors’ office announced Thursday. Benavides was removed from his post last week after his troops were captured on film firing handguns at protesters, but was soon reassigned to a position as head of Venezuela’s Capital District government. In 20
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method of measurement could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensorsNew method of measurement could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overactive scavenger cells may cause neurodegeneration in Alzheimer'sFor the first time, researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated a surprising effect of microglia, the scavenger cells of the brain: If these cells lack the TDP-43 protein, they not only remove Alzheimer's plaques, but also synapses. This removal of synapses by these cells presumably lead to neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older Americans don't get -- or seek -- enough help from doctors & pharmacists on drug costsThe majority of Americans over age 50 take two or more prescription medicines to prevent or treat health problems, and many of them say the cost weighs on their budget, a new poll finds. But many older adults aren't getting -- or asking for -- as much help as they could from their doctors and pharmacists to find lower-cost options, the data reveal. This suggests an opportunity for clinicians and p
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wilderness areas are being destroyed but the World Heritage Convention can protect themA University of Queensland-led international study published today urges the UNESCO World Heritage Convention to better conserve wilderness areas within Natural World Heritage Sites.Lead author and UQ Ph.D. student in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences James Allan said the study revealed that only 1.8 percent of the world's wilderness is protected in these sites.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Peter Thiel Is Funding Effort to Bring Woolly Mammoths Back to LifeIt’s a book. It’s a major motion picture. But where’s the science?
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wilderness areas are being destroyed but the World Heritage Convention can protect themA University of Queensland-led international study published today urges the UNESCO World Heritage Convention to better conserve wilderness areas within Natural World Heritage Sites.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mars rover opportunity on walkabout near rimNASA's senior Mars rover, Opportunity, is examining rocks at the edge of Endeavour Crater for signs that they may have been either transported by a flood or eroded in place by wind.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer researchers overestimate reproducibility of preclinical studiesCancer scientists overestimate the extent to which high-profile preclinical studies can be successfully replicated, new research suggests.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why there are so many species of tropical trees and other organismsWhy does biodiversity grade from exuberance at the equator through moderation at mid-latitudes toward monotony at higher ones? Data from an international network of long-term forest dynamics research sites is finally providing an answer.
19h
The Atlantic
U.S. Sanctions Chinese Entities With Financial Ties to North Korea The Trump administration issued a round of secondary sanctions against two Chinese citizens, a Chinese shipping company, and a Chinese bank for their financial ties to North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced Thursday. Mnuchin said the sanctions were part of a larger effort to block financial channels used by North Korea to advance its weapons pr
19h
cognitive science
Can Microbes Encourage Altruism? submitted by /u/cocodilux [link] [comments]
19h
The Atlantic
How Trump Created a Problem for U.S. Farmers In March Thomas Sleight, the president of the U.S. Grains Council, flew to Mexico to calm worried partners. His association represents U.S. farmers who trade abroad, and while it has connections in more than 50 countries, Mexico is one of the most important; lately, it’s been a bit uneasy there. The future of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is uncertain, and after Trump took office Sl
19h
Wired
Do You See Me Now? Psychology, Photography, and the Mobile AgeThe world uploads 1.8 billion photos each day. They all say the same thing: "I am."
20h
Ars Technica
Uber: Discovery shows Waymo has “zero evidence,” plays blame game Enlarge / Former Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski, at right, at a transportation conference in 2016. (credit: John Sommers II for Transport Topics ) Documents filed in the Waymo v. Uber litigation yesterday laid out in the starkest terms yet where each side stands. After extraordinary amounts of discovery, Waymo hasn't found the 14,000 files its says were downloaded from Google, Waymo's parent c
21h
Ars Technica
StarCraft Remastered devs unveil price, explain how much is being rebuilt Enlarge (credit: Sam Machkovech ) SANTA MONICA, California—Before giving us a world-premiere look at StarCraft Remastered 's gameplay, the franchise's holders at Blizzard rattled off a few major rules for how the game would be made. "Blend classic with modern." "Community's voice." One of the buzz phrases made Blizzard Classic Games Producer Pete Stilwell laugh: "Don't be disruptive." "That's how
21h
The Atlantic
'The President ... Says What He Wants to Say' U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said Thursday President Trump was merely expressing his view as a citizen when he attacked MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski on Twitter. “The president is a citizen as well, and he says what he wants to say,” Chao said at the Aspen Ideas Festival, which is co-hosted by The Aspen Institute and The Atlantic . “I think one of the things that’s important is that you ha
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Incremental discovery may one day lead to photosynthetic breakthroughPhotosynthesis is one of the most complicated and important processes -- responsible for kick-starting Earth's food chain. While we have modeled its more-than-100 major steps, scientists are still discovering the purpose of proteins that can be engineered to increase yield. Now researchers have uncovered secrets about another protein, CP12 -- the full understanding of which may provide an addition
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Even perfectly clean hands can lead to MRSA transmission in NICU babiesA new study found that even if hospital workers follow handwashing guidelines as closely as possible, MRSA can still be transmitted among their newborn patients in the NICU.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic evidence from the South Caucasus region shows surprising long-term stabilityThe South Caucasus -- home to the countries of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan -- geographically links Europe and the Near East. The area has served for millennia as a major crossroads for human migration, with strong archaeological evidence for big cultural shifts over time. And yet, surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA evidence finds no evidence of any upheaval over the last 8,000 years.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Wild ducks caught on camera snacking on small birdsWild mallard ducks have been spotted hunting and eating migratory birds to the surprise of scientists.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acoustic scientist sounds off about the location of cave paintingsOne popular theory about the Paleolithic cave paintings proposes that sites were chosen based on the acoustics in the caves. The originators of the theory reported a causal connection between the 'points of resonance' in three French caves and the position of Paleolithic cave paintings.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A perturbed skin microbiome can be 'contagious' and promote inflammationIn a new study, researchers have shown for the first time that, not only can infection with the Leishmania parasite alter the skin microbiome of affected mice, but this altered microbial community can be passed to uninfected mice that share a cage with the infected animals.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solving a sweet problem for renewable biofuels and chemicalsScientists are trying to break through the innovation bottleneck for the renewable bioproduction of fuels and chemicals. They've looked into a new approach -- harnessing the trial-and-error power of evolution to coax nature into revealing the answer. By growing bacteria over generations under specially controlled conditions in fermentation tanks, they have test-tube evolved bacteria to better ferm
22h
Science | The Guardian
Happy Asteroid Day! A conversation about peaceful, global scientific collaboration Today is the 3rd annual Asteroid Day, and the first to be presented under the auspices of the United Nations, with live global broadcasts raising awareness about asteroids Today, more than 1,000 local events in around 200 countries are being organised to celebrate Asteroid Day. Sanctioned by the United Nations in 2016, it is a global day of education to raise awareness about asteroids. In additio
22h
Gizmodo
Trump's Election Fraud Commission Asked States to Send Sensitive Voter Information Over Insecure Email President Donald Trump and Kris Kobach, vice chair of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. (Photo: Getty) The White House on Wednesday requested that every state surrender a laundry list of voter data, including partial social security numbers, using an insecure email address unprotected by even basic encryption technology. Encouraging state election officials to transmit v
22h
Gizmodo
Your Wallet Will Rest Easy With These Sub-$200 Memory Foam Mattresses Zinus Memory Foam Mattress Sale , $120-$190 If you haven’t replaced your metal spring mattress with a giant block of foam that you bought on the internet, what are you even doing with your life? Today only, Amazon’s marking Zinus 12" foam mattresses down to just $120 for a twin, $160 for a full, or $190 for a queen , all of which are all-time low prices, beating even one-day Gold Box deals. It’s
22h
Ars Technica
Trump talks increasing fossil fuel exports, relaxing offshore drilling rules The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant. (credit: Nuclear Regulatory Commission ) President Trump gave a speech about energy in the US today, highlighting six policy issues that will direct his administration’s energy policy for the time being. The initiatives Trump talked about today were a hodgepodge of new announcements and old policy, focusing on nuclear energy and fossil fuel exports. Despite calling for
22h
The Atlantic
Trump Administration Approves Its First Arms Sale to Taiwan The U.S. State Department has approved the sale of $1.4 billion in arms to the island of Taiwan, a state official told the Associated Press on Thursday. The deal—which includes missiles, torpedoes, and technical support for early warning radar—is the first of its kind under the Trump administration. The last U.S. arms deal with Taiwan was approved in December 2015 for $1.8 billion. Like its prede
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Security Measures What We’re Following Return of the Travel Ban: Parts of President Trump’s executive order restricting travel from six Muslim-majority countries are going back into effect tonight , with the government empowered to block any travelers who do not have a “bona fide relationship” with a “person or entity” in the U.S—a restriction that the State Department will interpret narrowly, new guidelines indic
23h
Wired
With Blue Apron’s IPO, Wall Street Reins in Silicon ValleyIt's a sign of the times.
23h
Big Think
Did the Sun Really Have an Evil Twin Responsible for the Death of the Dinosaurs? The results of this study help us better understand how stars are born and how they develop. Read More
23h
The Atlantic
A Right-Leaning Foreign-Policy Think Tank Shuts Down The Foreign Policy Initiative, a well-known, right-leaning think tank in Washington, is shutting down its operations. FPI will close this summer, most likely in August, according to four sources with knowledge of the situation. The think tank was founded in 2009 and its primary seed donor was Republican hedge-fund billionaire Paul Singer, among other benefactors. Singer was critical of President
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Science : NPR
Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows A huge new study conducted in 33 sites across Europe finds that seeds coated with neonicotinoid pesticides harm bees living nearby. The damage, though, depends on local conditions. (Image credit: Courtesy of Centre for Ecology & Hydrology)
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The Scientist RSS
Basic Science Declining in CanadaA new report urges the Canadian government to increase funding for fundamental research.
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Ars Technica
State-by-state climate analysis shows warming hits some harder than others Enlarge / For this map, red's bad. (credit: Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al. (Science, 2017) ) One of the challenges of understanding climate change is that both the expected change in temperature and the effect that will have vary depending on the location. So Oregon's climate won't change in the same way Georgia's will. And, even if it did, the impact of those changes will be different, since
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Very strong' climate change signal in record June heatSearing weather across the UK and Europe was made more likely by human-induced climate warming say scientists.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cyber Bully Pulpit Today in 5 Lines President Trump’s travel ban will go into effect at 8 p.m. ET, with new guidelines restricting travelers who don’t have a “bona fide relationship” with a person or entity in the United States. On Twitter, Trump criticized Morning Joe host Mika Brzezinski, alleging that during a visit to Mar-a-Lago “she was bleeding badly from a face-lift.” Several Republican lawmakers, including
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Female Sharks Can Carry A Pregnancy For Years | SHARK WEEK #SharkWeek | Starts Sun Jul 23 If you think 9 months is a long time to be pregnant, be glad you're not a shark. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ See the full lineup of specials! http://www.SharkWeek.com Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follo
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Gizmodo
Crime Group Behind 'Petya' Ransomware Resurfaces to Distance Itself From This Week's Global Cyberattacks Image: Janus Cybercrime Solutions Janus Cybercrime Solutions, the author of Petya—the ransomware initially attributed with Tuesday’s global cyberattacks—resurfaced on Twitter late Wednesday, seemingly offering to help those whose files can no longer be recovered. The altruistic gesture, even if it does prove fruitless, is uncharacteristic of the criminal syndicate that launched an underworld ente
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Gizmodo
Guy Who Worked on the iPhone Shows Off Some Clunky Prototypes Image: Getty In case you didn’t see one of the endless internet posts on the subject—it’s the 10th anniversary of the iPhone’s release. Hurray! Amongst the painful wankery about how the iPhone “changed everything” emerged one actually interesting bit: A look at some clumsy early prototypes of the combination iPod, phone, and internet communicator . Ken Kocienda, the creator of the iPhone’s softwa
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The Atlantic
When Your Parenthood Goals Conflict With Your Partner’s When my colleague Olga wrote last month about how people decide whether to have children , she talked to a woman named Isabel Caliva, who’d been on the fence about parenthood until she read a Rumpus advice column that helped her think about the choice in terms of what losses she’d most regret later. For Isabel, that was a relief: “It changed my perspective from having to make the right choice to
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cognitive science
Heart or Brain? submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Car seat laws for older kids have limited impactLaws that require increasingly older kids to sit in car safety seats appear to have limited impact, new research has found.
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Ars Technica
McMansion Hell returns, ditches all Zillow images to prevent legal battle Enlarge Zillow and McMansion Hell have buried the hatchet. The company won’t sue, and the blog won’t use images from Zillow anymore. However, the blog's creator, Kate Wagner, will keep all archival Zillow images (including her commentary) on her site. In a brief statement, Zillow said it will “not pursue any legal action.” The company issued the statement shortly after an Electronic Frontier Foun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ex-bosses stand trial over 2011 Fukushima crisisThree former executives at the operator of Fukushima's power plant start their trial Friday on the only criminal charges brought over the 2011 disaster, the worst nuclear accident in a generation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bizarro comet challenging researchersScientists pursue research through observation, experimentation and modeling. They strive for all of these pieces to fit together, but sometimes finding the unexpected is even more exciting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An algorithm helps protect Mars Curiosity's wheelsThere are no mechanics on Mars, so the next best thing for NASA's Curiosity rover is careful driving.
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Ars Technica
Mylan shareholders hate how much money board of directors makes Enlarge / Heather Bresch, CEO of Mylan NV, refers to a chart while speaking during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in Washington, DC on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) A whopping 83 percent of Mylan shareholders voted down the company’s astronomical executive compensation packages. But a majority of shareholders still supports most of the company’
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