Women should continue cervical cancer screening as they approach age 65While current guidelines indicate that cervical cancer screening can be stopped for average risk patients after age 65, many women lack the appropriate amount of screening history to accurately assess their risk. A new study found that incidence rates of cervical cancer do not begin to decline until 85 years of age among women without a hysterectomy and that women over 65 who have not been recentl
19h
The Atlantic
Another Senior Fox News Employee Is Out Fox News’s Bill Shine has resigned from his position as co-president, the network’s acting CEO, Rupert Murdoch, announced Monday. Shine’s fellow co-president, Jack Abernethy, will retain his position, while senior employees Suzanne Scott and Jay Wallace will help to absorb some of his responsibilities. Shine was an employee of Fox News since its founding in 1996. Shine’s resignation comes less th
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding real rewards in a virtual worldRemembering where a goal is requires the same parts of the brain in virtual reality as it does in the real world, a new study demonstrates. The study showed that mice performed poorly on the virtual test if they lacked Shank2, a protein known to be associated with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New roadmap provides blueprint to tackle burden of asthmaA new roadmap has been published identifying key priority areas that need to be addressed to tackle the burden of asthma.
19h
Ars Technica
Carbon intensity is falling in industrial, electric power sectors (credit: EIA ) Over the last seven years, the electrical power sector has gone from being one of the most carbon-emitting sectors of the American economy per unit of fuel consumed to one of the least carbon-emitting sectors. That’s according to new data from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) . Despite the good news, the EIA’s numbers show that, since 1975, the carbon emissions of the
19h
The Atlantic
What Hamas's New Document Does and Doesn't Say Hamas unveiled Monday a new political document supporting the establishment of a Palestinian state based on 1967 lines, marking a rhetorical shift just days ahead of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’s visit to Washington. “Hamas advocates the liberation of all of Palestine but is ready to support the state on 1967 borders without recognizing Israel or ceding any rights,” Khaled Mesha
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Dealing With Deal Makers What We’re Following Budget Business: Congress has reached a bipartisan agreement on a spending bill that will keep the federal government running until the end of September. Although the bill includes an increase of up to $15 billion in defense spending, lawmakers rejected the drastic cuts President Trump had proposed in other areas, such as the biomedical-research agency the National Institutes
19h
Science | The Guardian
Health report links antibiotics to risk of miscarriage Canadian study finds taking the drugs raises chances of having a miscarriage by between 60% and 100% Many common antibiotics may double the risk of miscarriage in early pregnancy, research has shown. A Canadian study has found that taking the drugs raised the chances of having a miscarriage by between 60% and 100%. Continue reading...
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The Atlantic
Warning: This Drug May Kill You Offers a Close-Up of the Opioid Epidemic The most affecting and enraging moment in Warning: This Drug May Kill You , an documentary about the opioid crisis that airs on HBO Monday, is its opening montage, spliced together from camera-phone footage. Scene after scene shows addicts nodding off, collapsing onto the ground, or being revived by paramedics. In one case, the most heartbreaking, a woman lies motionless on the floor of the toy a
20h
The Atlantic
The Supreme Court Rules Cities Can Be Victims of Housing Discrimination The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that Miami can sue Bank of America and Wells Fargo under the Fair Housing Act of 1968, a judgement that allows other cities to sue banks that may have preyed upon people of color by targeting them for high-risk loans. The ruling was not a total win for Miami, because the Court agreed with a lower court finding that says the city must prove the damage done by ba
20h
The Atlantic
Who's Really in Charge of the United States Government? Official Washington, especially its Republican elements, is telling itself a comforting story about the Trump administration. Senator John McCain summarized the story to CNN’s Jake Tapper on Sunday. “Sometimes it’s important to watch what the president does rather than what he says.” The senator added: “[Trump is] surrounding himself with an outstanding national security team. I can’t guarantee t
20h
Live Science
What Cancer Did Val Kilmer Have? A Look At Some PossibilitiesActor Val Kilmer recently revealed that he had cancer that left him with a "swollen" tongue, but exactly what type of cancer could have caused this symptom?
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Men need more frequent lung cancer screening than womenPersonalized screening strategies, such as a gender approach, could be a way to optimize results and allocate resources appropriately.
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Live Science
What the 'Frork'? McDonald's Fry Fork Helps You Get Every CalorieMove over, spork: McDonald's has a new hybrid utensil, and this one combines a fork and fries.
20h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Battle Hmm... of the Republic Today in 5 Lines Congress reached a deal to fund the government through September. In an interview with The Washington Examiner ’s Salena Zito, President Trump questioned why the Civil War could “not have been worked out,” and suggested that Andrew Jackson was upset about the conflict, which began several years after his death. Separately, Trump told Bloomberg News that he would meet with North K
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrons losing weightThe measured mass of electrons in solids is always larger than the value predicted by theory. The reason for this is that theoretical calculations do not account properly for various interactions with other electrons or lattice vibrations – that "dress" the electrons. EPFL scientists have now carried out a study on a lithium-containing copper oxide and have found that its electrons are 2.5 times l
21h
Popular Science
The trouble with Elon Musk's 'Boring' plan to fight traffic with tunnels Technology There are likely better ways to reduce congestion While the idea seems sexy, experts are skeptical of its feasibility—or even if it’s the right approach to solving the gridlock woes of modern metropolises. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Astronomer Wonders If We've Looked Hard Enough For Signs of Long Extinct Alien Life Image: NASA, JPL-Caltech Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus is the latest target in the perennial excitement around finding extraterrestrial life. Its warm subterranean ocean is thought to contain all the right ingredients to harbor alien microbes, which would arguably be the biggest scientific discovery in human history. While finding microbes—even biosignatures on places like Mars—would be incredible,
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding real rewards in a virtual worldResearchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have demonstrated that remembering where a goal is requires the same parts of the brain in virtual reality as it does in the real world. Published in the journal eNeuro, the study showed that mice performed poorly on the virtual test if they lacked Shank2, a protein known to be associated with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
California handgun sales spiked after 2 mass shootings, study findsIn the six weeks after the Newtown and San Bernardino mass shootings, handguns sales jumped in California, yet there is little research on why -- or on the implications for public health, according to a Stanford researcher.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large spikes in handgun acquisitions seen in aftermath of mass shootingsLarge increases in handgun acquisitions occurred in California immediately following the mass shootings in Newtown, Conn., in 2012 and San Bernardino, Calif., in 2015. The spikes were short-lived and accounted for less than 10 percent of annual handgun acquisitions statewide, but researchers express concern about whether repeated shocks of this kind could lead to substantial increases in the preva
21h
Live Science
Meet Tajiri! April the Giraffe's Baby Gets a 'Hopeful' NameThey'll call him "Taj." The baby giraffe born on April 15 at Animal Adventure Park (AAP) in Harpursville, New York, finally has a name: Tajiri, or "hope" in Swahili.
21h
Big Think
Why You Don't (and Can't) Think Alone Science (and life) keep hammering nails “into the coffin of the rational individual ." But rationalism and individualism still haunt and systematically mislead—even about where your mind is. Read More
21h
The Atlantic
Is Trump's Campaign Act Wearing Thin? Usually, the first 100 days of an administration are when a president starts to figure out the job and feel at home. Sometimes, he accomplishes much during that period; other opening stretches are more vexed, but by the end a commander in chief has begun to inhabit his office. Something funny is happening with President Trump, though: Over the last week or two, he has instead appeared to return t
21h
Gizmodo
This New Luxury Sleeper Train In Japan Is Beautiful And Insane Sweeping glass windows for scenic views, specially designed nickel silver cutlery, cypress bathtubs. Japan has a new ultra-luxurious sleeper train in service starting today, and man, it’s unbelievable. Advertisement Announced back in 2014, the new “Train Suite Shiki-shima” operated by JR East debuted Monday, and there’s already a crazy demand for it, according to the South China Morning Post , wh
21h
Live Science
Shannen Doherty's Cancer: What Does It Mean to Be in Remission?Actress Shannen Doherty announced in an Instagram post on Saturday (April 29) that her breast cancer is in remission.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM says will be first to profit from electric carsUS auto giant General Motors is poised to become the first manufacturer to make a profit from electric vehicles, a GM executive predicted on Monday.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbnb, San Francisco reach deal on rental registrationsSan Francisco and Airbnb reached a deal Monday that aims to prevent the short-term rental website from listing housing units that are not following city rules that limit the duration of stays and the number of nights units can be rented.
22h
The Atlantic
The Best Business Reads of April Every month, the editors of The Atlantic’ s Business Channel compile a list of the most insightful and interesting pieces of journalism about money and economics from around the web. This month’s picks include a peek into the ultra-demanding lives of street vendors, an investigation of the biggest oil trade Wall Street ever saw, and a story that questioned the wisdom of the juicing trend—or at le
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Gizmodo
20 Amazing New Scifi and Fantasy Books to Add to Your Reading List in May May brings M.R. Carey’s new tale set in the same zombified world as The Girl With All the Gifts , a surreal new short-story collection from Haruki Murakami, a posthumous novel about dinosaurs from Michael Crichton—and many more. Dig in! All Systems Red by Martha Wells On a scientific mission to a faraway planet, a corporate security droid becomes self-aware and starts referring to itself as “Murd
22h
Live Science
New 2D Materials Could Conduct Electricity Near the Speed of LightResearch into super-thin materials holds promise for advanced quantum computing technologies.
22h
Live Science
Fidget Spinners: What They Are, How They Work and Why the ControversyFidget spinners are delighting kids and driving teachers up the wall.
22h
Gizmodo
Keep Your Cans Cold For Hours With RTIC's $9 Steel Koozie RTIC Stainless Steel Can Cooler , $9 Let’s be honest here, thin fabric koozies are mostly useful for decoration; they don’t really keep a can cold for very long. This vacuum-insulated RTIC contraption though ? It’s the real deal. Over 13,000 Amazon reviewers have given this a 4.6 star review average , and you can get one (or more!) for just its best price ever right now.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Care management program reduced health care costs in Partners Pioneer ACOPesearchers at Partners HealthCare published a study showing that Partners Pioneer ACO not only reduces spending growth, but does this by reducing avoidable hospitalizations for patients with elevated but modifiable risks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination therapy could provide new treatment option for ovarian cancerUCLA study identifies a potential test that may help select patients for whom combination therapy could be most effective.
22h
Live Science
Trump Administration Erases EPA's Climate Change PagesThe climate change page on the Environmental Protection Agency's website — a government site that presents the science explaining the changing climate, as well as ways to address it — is now void of data.
22h
Gizmodo
Neither of These Women Wanted to Be Pregnant. Only One Could Get an Abortion. Illustration by Jim Cooke/GMG Earlier this month, Donald Trump quietly signed a bill allowing states to withhold federal family planning funds from organizations that provide abortion services. Advertisement A few weeks before that, the president offered a strange ultimatum to Planned Parenthood, proposing that his administration would stop its defunding efforts if the health care provider would
22h
Popular Science
Everyday items PopSci editors can't leave home without Gadgets What's in our bags? A lot of chapstick, apparently. What's in my bag? A lot of chapstick, apparently.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances: Bioinformatics applied to development & evaluation of boron-containing compoundsThe interest for developing boron-containing compounds as drugs is increasing after some successful cases. This review investigates the scope of bioinformatics to facilitate computer-aided drug design as well as the technical limitations in this field.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Medicaid patients wait longer to see doctorsAccording to a new study by MIT researchers, Medicaid patients wait longer to see doctors than people with private health insurance.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoking-related heart disease tied to effects of a single geneSmoking counteracts the effect of a gene that normally protects against heart disease, according to a group of researchers.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of telemedicine for mental health in rural areas on the rise but unevenNewly published research by Harvard Medical School and the RAND Corporation reveals a dramatic growth in the use of telemedicine for the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders in rural areas, but strikingly uneven distribution of services across states.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find a likely genetic driver of smoking-related heart diseaseCigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team co-led by researchers Penn and Columbia has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global aid for health leaves older adults out in the coldDevelopment assistance for health targets younger more than older age groups, with 90 percent of the assistance going to people below the age of 60. Children below the age of 5 receive the most development assistance for health. Development assistance for health globally was $3.13 per person younger than age 60 in recipient countries, in contrast to $0.91 per person aged 60 and older.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modest increases in kids' physical activity could avert billions in medical costsIncreasing the percentage of elementary school children in the United States who participate in 25 minutes of physical activity three times a week from 32 percent to 50 percent would avoid $21.9 billion in medical costs and lost wages over the course of their lifetimes, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Golden years are longer and healthier for those with good heart health in middle agePeople who have better cardiovascular health in middle age live longer and spend fewer of their later years with chronic illnesses of all types. They also save money on healthcare costs.
22h
Big Think
Two Reasons Why Trump Won Over This Philosophy Professor 'Trump supporter' is not a synonym for moron. Philosophy professor Daniel Bonevac is a reminder that understanding your opposites, not dismissing them, is the way forward. Read More
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
Is Facebook Targeting Ads at Sad Teens?The social network appears to leverage sensitive user data to aim ads at teenagers who say they feel “anxious” and “worthless.”
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New management takes over New Mexico-based national labScientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory will continue to focus on national security and work related to the proliferation of nuclear weapons despite the first management change in decades at New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories, officials said Monday.
22h
Popular Science
These conservatives want to convince you that climate change is real Environment Understanding science doesn't make you liberal A new ad campaign tries to make it clear that climate change is real and that acceptance of the science isn't a partisan issue.
22h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Science wins reprieve in US budget deal Congress gives National Institutes of Health a big boost and avoids cuts to research agencies sought by Trump. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21835
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paying online community members to write product reviews backfires badly: studyOnline user reviews have become an essential tool for consumers who increasingly rely on them to evaluate products and services before purchase. The business models of online review platforms such as Yelp and TripAdvisor, and e-commerce sites such as Amazon and Expedia critically depend on them. Should such sites pay users to encourage them to write reviews? According to a forthcoming study in the
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decades-long research culminates in a new way of creating left- and right-handed moleculesAn international team of researchers, led by Mark E. Davis at Caltech, has succeeded in making the first chiral molecular sieves. This discovery opens new areas of investigation in both chemistry and biology, and has broad implications for pharmaceutical companies and other specialized chemical manufacturers.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiments reveal a new mechanism that could explain the source of a destructive feature of the 2011 Tohoku earthquakeIt is a common trope in disaster movies: an earthquake strikes, causing the ground to rip open and swallow people and cars whole. The gaping earth might make for cinematic drama, but earthquake scientists have long held that it does not happen.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stenciling with atoms in 2-D materials possibleThe possibilities for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene, appear almost limitless. In new research, Penn State material scientists report two discoveries that will provide a simple and effective way to "stencil" high-quality 2D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics.
22h
The Atlantic
The Fear of Feelings at Work It’s clear which emotions are acceptable at work: Happiness and enthusiasm are welcomed, but sadness and fear are usually awkward and taboo. That’s likely why workers tend to cry in the bathroom but smile at their desks. While emotions such as fear or sadness are perceived negatively by companies, they can actually be helpful for work, according to Susan David, a psychologist at Harvard Medical S
22h
Gizmodo
The First Episode of American Gods Demands a Sacrifice to Reveal Its Magic The most vital thing the first episode of American Gods establishes is the importance of sacrifice. Deities need you to give up a part of yourself if you’re going to get anything out of them. Miracles don’t happen for free. Fittingly, American Gods opens in the past, with a story that shows an ill-fated Viking longboat making landfall on the North American continent (a different sequence from the
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Variable mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chicago [Biological Sciences]In their study of influenza mortality in Chicago in 1918, Grantz et al. (1) conclude that pandemic-related mortality was related to “neighborhood level social factors” (e.g., illiteracy, homeownership, unemployment). Because “social factors” do not directly cause influenza illness or mortality, they must be surrogates for other factors. Other studies of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Shanks and Brundage: Many plausible mechanisms of pandemic mortality disparities [Biological Sciences]In our recently published paper (1), we find evidence that several metrics of socioeconomic status were associated with influenza and pneumonia mortality during the 1918 pandemic. We agree with Shanks and Brundage (2) that there are many possible causal mechanisms behind this association and appreciate the hypotheses that they add...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
ACOX2 deficiency in primary malignant cardiac tumors [Biological Sciences]ACOX2 (acyl-CoA oxidase 2) is a peroxisomal enzyme that plays a key role in the metabolism of bile acid intermediates and the oxidation of branched-chain fatty acids. A recent PNAS paper by Vilarinho et al. (1) on ACOX2 deficiency in an 8-y-old male with elevated transaminase levels identifies a homozygous...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of cholesterol on the molecular structure and transitions in a clinical-grade lung surfactant extract [Chemistry]The lipid–protein film covering the interface of the lung alveolar in mammals is vital for proper lung function and its deficiency is related to a range of diseases. Here we present a molecular-level characterization of a clinical-grade porcine lung surfactant extract using a multitechnique approach consisting of H1–C13 solid-state nuclear...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SNAT7 is the primary lysosomal glutamine exporter required for extracellular protein-dependent growth of cancer cells [Biochemistry]Lysosomes degrade cellular components sequestered by autophagy or extracellular material internalized by endocytosis and phagocytosis. The macromolecule building blocks released by lysosomal hydrolysis are then exported to the cytosol by lysosomal transporters, which remain undercharacterized. In this study, we designed an in situ assay of lysosomal amino acid export based...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Using microsecond single-molecule FRET to determine the assembly pathways of T4 ssDNA binding protein onto model DNA replication forks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]DNA replication is a core biological process that occurs in prokaryotic cells at high speeds (∼1 nucleotide residue added per millisecond) and with high fidelity (fewer than one misincorporation event per 107 nucleotide additions). The ssDNA binding protein [gene product 32 (gp32)] of the T4 bacteriophage is a central integrating...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural features and lipid binding domain of tubulin on biomimetic mitochondrial membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Dimeric tubulin, an abundant water-soluble cytosolic protein known primarily for its role in the cytoskeleton, is routinely found to be associated with mitochondrial outer membranes, although the structure and physiological role of mitochondria-bound tubulin are still unknown. There is also no consensus on whether tubulin is a peripheral membrane protein...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
NGF-TrkA signaling in sensory nerves is required for skeletal adaptation to mechanical loads in mice [Medical Sciences]Sensory nerves emanating from the dorsal root extensively innervate the surfaces of mammalian bone, a privileged location for the regulation of biomechanical signaling. Here, we show that NGF-TrkA signaling in skeletal sensory nerves is an early response to mechanical loading of bone and is required to achieve maximal load-induced bone...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Drebrin restricts rotavirus entry by inhibiting dynamin-mediated endocytosis [Microbiology]Despite the wide administration of several effective vaccines, rotavirus (RV) remains the single most important etiological agent of severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide, with an annual mortality of over 200,000 people. RV attachment and internalization into target cells is mediated by its outer capsid protein VP4. To...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Discovery of chemoautotrophic symbiosis in the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamia (Bivalvia: Teredinidae) extends wooden-steps theory [Microbiology]The “wooden-steps” hypothesis [Distel DL, et al. (2000) Nature 403:725–726] proposed that large chemosynthetic mussels found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents descend from much smaller species associated with sunken wood and other organic deposits, and that the endosymbionts of these progenitors made use of hydrogen sulfide from biogenic sources (e.g., decaying...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-cell analysis of HIV-1 transcriptional activity reveals expression of proviruses in expanded clones during ART [Microbiology]Little is known about the fraction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviruses that express unspliced viral RNA in vivo or about the levels of HIV RNA expression within single infected cells. We developed a sensitive cell-associated HIV RNA and DNA single-genome sequencing (CARD-SGS) method to investigate fractional proviral...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neurophysiological dynamics of phrase-structure building during sentence processing [Neuroscience]Although sentences unfold sequentially, one word at a time, most linguistic theories propose that their underlying syntactic structure involves a tree of nested phrases rather than a linear sequence of words. Whether and how the brain builds such structures, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we used human intracranial recordings and...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Defective synaptic connectivity and axonal neuropathology in a human iPSC-based model of familial Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]α-Synuclein (αSyn) is the major gene linked to sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD), whereas the G209A (p.A53T) αSyn mutation causes a familial form of PD characterized by early onset and a generally severe phenotype, including nonmotor manifestations. Here we generated de novo induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients harboring the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective in vivo removal of pathogenic anti-MAG autoantibodies, an antigen-specific treatment option for anti-MAG neuropathy [Neuroscience]Anti-MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein) neuropathy is a disabling autoimmune peripheral neuropathy caused by monoclonal IgM autoantibodies that recognize the carbohydrate epitope HNK-1 (human natural killer-1). This glycoepitope is highly expressed on adhesion molecules, such as MAG, present in myelinated nerve fibers. Because the pathogenicity and demyelinating properties of anti-MAG autoantibo
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dissociation of Per1 and Bmal1 circadian rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in parallel with behavioral outputs [Neuroscience]The temporal order of physiology and behavior in mammals is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we monitored the circadian rhythms of the expression of clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the SCN of freely moving mice and...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adult enteric nervous system in health is maintained by a dynamic balance between neuronal apoptosis and neurogenesis [Neuroscience]According to current dogma, there is little or no ongoing neurogenesis in the fully developed adult enteric nervous system. This lack of neurogenesis leaves unanswered the question of how enteric neuronal populations are maintained in adult guts, given previous reports of ongoing neuronal death. Here, we confirm that despite ongoing...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Immunomodulation-accelerated neuronal regeneration following selective rod photoreceptor cell ablation in the zebrafish retina [Neuroscience]Müller glia (MG) function as inducible retinal stem cells in zebrafish, completely repairing the eye after damage. The innate immune system has recently been shown to promote tissue regeneration in which classic wound-healing responses predominate. However, regulatory roles for leukocytes during cellular regeneration—i.e., selective cell-loss paradigms akin to degenerative disease—are...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hippo pathway mediates resistance to cytotoxic drugs [Pharmacology]Chemotherapy is widely used for cancer treatment, but its effectiveness is limited by drug resistance. Here, we report a mechanism by which cell density activates the Hippo pathway, which in turn inactivates YAP, leading to changes in the regulation of genes that control the intracellular concentrations of gemcitabine and several...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Knockout of the LRRC26 subunit reveals a primary role of LRRC26-containing BK channels in secretory epithelial cells [Physiology]Leucine-rich-repeat-containing protein 26 (LRRC26) is the regulatory γ1 subunit of Ca2+- and voltage-dependent BK-type K+ channels. BK channels that contain LRRC26 subunits are active near normal resting potentials even without Ca2+, suggesting they play unique physiological roles, likely limited to very specific cell types and cellular functions. By using Lrrc26...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The artery wall is equipped with a water permeation barrier that allows blood to flow at high pressure without significant water leak. The precise location of this barrier is unknown despite its importance in vascular function and its contribution to many vascular complications when it is compromised. Herein we map...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural toggle in the RNaseH domain of Prp8 helps balance splicing fidelity and catalytic efficiency [Genetics]Pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression that requires both high efficiency and high fidelity. Prp8 has long been considered the “master regulator” of the spliceosome, the molecular machine that executes pre-mRNA splicing. Cross-linking and structural studies place the RNaseH domain (RH) of Prp8 near the spliceosome’s...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Case for the genetic code as a triplet of triplets [Genetics]The efficiency of codon translation in vivo is controlled by many factors, including codon context. At a site early in the Salmonella flgM gene, the effects on translation of replacing codons Thr6 and Pro8 of flgM with synonymous alternates produced a 600-fold range in FlgM activity. Synonymous changes at Thr6...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mouse model of Epstein-Barr virus LMP1- and LMP2A-driven germinal center B-cell lymphoproliferative disease [Immunology and Inflammation]Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a major cause of immunosuppression-related B-cell lymphomas and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In these malignancies, EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A provide infected B cells with surrogate CD40 and B-cell receptor growth and survival signals. To gain insights into their synergistic in vivo roles in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unifying mechanism for different fibrotic diseases [Medical Sciences]Fibrotic diseases are not well-understood. They represent a number of different diseases that are characterized by the development of severe organ fibrosis without any obvious cause, such as the devastating diseases idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and scleroderma. These diseases have a poor prognosis comparable with endstage cancer and are uncurable....
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome complex potentiates venous thrombosis in response to hypoxia [Medical Sciences]Venous thromboembolism (VTE), caused by altered hemostasis, remains the third most common cause of mortality among all cardiovascular conditions. In addition to established genetic and acquired risk factors, low-oxygen environments also predispose otherwise healthy individuals to VTE. Although disease etiology appears to entail perturbation of hemostasis pathways, the key molecular...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Redefining the essential trafficking pathway for outer membrane lipoproteins [Microbiology]The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a permeability barrier and an intrinsic antibiotic resistance factor. Lipoproteins are OM components that function in cell wall synthesis, diverse secretion systems, and antibiotic efflux pumps. Moreover, each of the essential OM machines that assemble the barrier requires one or more lipoproteins....
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Honeybee gut microbiota promotes host weight gain via bacterial metabolism and hormonal signaling [Microbiology]Social bees harbor a simple and specialized microbiota that is spatially organized into different gut compartments. Recent results on the potential involvement of bee gut communities in pathogen protection and nutritional function have drawn attention to the impact of the microbiota on bee health. However, the contributions of gut microbiota...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lysibodies are IgG Fc fusions with lysin binding domains targeting Staphylococcus aureus wall carbohydrates for effective phagocytosis [Microbiology]The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria contains abundant surface-exposed carbohydrate molecules that are highly conserved within and often across species. The potential therapeutic usefulness of high-affinity antibodies to cell wall carbohydrates is unquestioned, however obtaining such antibodies is challenging due to the poor overall immunogenicity of these bacterial targets. Autolysins...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coding of navigational affordances in the human visual system [Neuroscience]A central component of spatial navigation is determining where one can and cannot go in the immediate environment. We used fMRI to test the hypothesis that the human visual system solves this problem by automatically identifying the navigational affordances of the local scene. Multivoxel pattern analyses showed that a scene-selective...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstructing the spectrotemporal modulations of real-life sounds from fMRI response patterns [Neuroscience]Ethological views of brain functioning suggest that sound representations and computations in the auditory neural system are optimized finely to process and discriminate behaviorally relevant acoustic features and sounds (e.g., spectrotemporal modulations in the songs of zebra finches). Here, we show that modeling of neural sound representations in terms of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dantrolene requires Mg2+ to arrest malignant hyperthermia [Physiology]Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a clinical syndrome of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to volatile anesthetic gases, where susceptible persons may develop lethally high body temperatures. Genetic predisposition mainly arises from mutations on the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR). Dantrolene is administered to alleviate MH symptoms, but...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nuclear Shp2 directs normal embryo implantation via facilitating the ER{alpha} tyrosine phosphorylation by the Src kinase [Physiology]Estrogen and progesterone coupled with locally produced signaling molecules are essential for embryo implantation. However, the hierarchical landscape of the molecular pathways that governs this process remains largely unexplored. Here we show that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2, a positive transducer of RTK signaling, is predominately localized in the nuclei...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insect haptoelectrical stimulation of Venus flytrap triggers exocytosis in gland cells [Plant Biology]The Venus flytrap Dionaea muscipula captures insects and consumes their flesh. Prey contacting touch-sensitive hairs trigger traveling electrical waves. These action potentials (APs) cause rapid closure of the trap and activate secretory functions of glands, which cover its inner surface. Such prey-induced haptoelectric stimulation activates the touch hormone jasmonate (JA)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Zeaxanthin-dependent nonphotochemical quenching does not occur in photosystem I in the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the process that protects the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and algae from photodamage by dissipating as heat the energy absorbed in excess. Studies on NPQ have almost exclusively focused on photosystem II (PSII), as it was believed that NPQ does not occur in photosystem I (PSI)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ctf4-related protein recruits LHP1-PRC2 to maintain H3K27me3 levels in dividing cells in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 2 catalyzes the H3K27me3 modification that warrants inheritance of a repressive chromatin structure during cell division, thereby assuring stable target gene repression in differentiated cells. It is still under investigation how H3K27me3 is passed on from maternal to filial strands during DNA replication; however, cell division...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sensorimotor-independent development of hands and tools selectivity in the visual cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The visual occipito-temporal cortex is composed of several distinct regions specialized in the identification of different object kinds such as tools and bodies. Its organization appears to reflect not only the visual characteristics of the inputs but also the behavior that can be achieved with them. For example, there are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Mann, Core Concept: Unraveling the enigma of fast radio bursts [Correction]CORE CONCEPTS Correction for “Core Concept: Unraveling the enigma of fast radio bursts,” by Adam Mann, which appeared in issue 13, March 28, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:3269–3271; 10.1073/pnas.1703512114). Victoria Kaspi was incorrectly identified as the principal investigator of the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment. Kaspi should...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Naviaux et al., Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome,” by Robert K. Naviaux, Jane C. Naviaux, Kefeng Li, A. Taylor Bright, William A. Alaynick, Lin Wang, Asha Baxter, Neil Nathan, Wayne Anderson, and Eric Gordon, which appeared in issue 37, September 13, 2016, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Targeting bacterial cell wall carbohydrates MRSA (green) engulfed by macrophages (red) following treatment with a lysibody. The cell walls of Gram-positive bacteria contain numerous surface carbohydrates that are often highly conserved across species, providing a potential therapeutic target for the attachment of high-affinity antibodies. However, the poor immune response provoked...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Peter C. Nowell (1928-2016) [Retrospectives]The pioneering cancer cytogeneticist, Peter C. Nowell, died on December 26, 2016, from complications of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 88. His work laid the foundation for the recognition of the genetic basis of cancer that paved the way for modern targeted cancer therapeutics. Nowell’s observations of changes in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
EBV germinates lymphoma from the germinal center in a battle with T and NK cells [Immunology and Inflammation]Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus infecting more than 95% of the population by adulthood. EBV is the first human virus known to associate with human cancers and the latent infection by EBV poses a public health burden worldwide (1). In the past five decades, scientific discoveries linked the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crossing the arterial wall with CARS [Physiology]Regulation of the flow and movement of water is essential to the health and well-being of our bodies. Involving a diverse array of structures that range from molecular gatekeepers to tissue barriers, water flow and concentration are maintained at precise levels. However, in many instances we do not have a...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mind the magnesium, in dantrolene suppression of malignant hyperthermia [Physiology]Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic syndrome wherein exposure to halogenated volatile anesthetics or to depolarizing muscle relaxants during general anesthesia may trigger a life-threatening hypermetabolic state driven by excessive Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle (1). Over 25 y ago, the acute administration of dantrolene...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adapt to more wildfire in western North American forests as climate changes [Ecology]Wildfires across western North America have increased in number and size over the past three decades, and this trend will continue in response to further warming. As a consequence, the wildland–urban interface is projected to experience substantially higher risk of climate-driven fires in the coming decades. Although many plants, animals,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-throughput, low-loss, low-cost, and label-free cell separation using electrophysiology-activated cell enrichment [Applied Biological Sciences]Currently, cell separation occurs almost exclusively by density gradient methods and by fluorescence- and magnetic-activated cell sorting (FACS/MACS). These variously suffer from lack of specificity, high cell loss, use of labels, and high capital/operating cost. We present a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based cell-separation method, using 3D electrodes on a low-cost disposable chip;...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Immunochemical engineering of cell surfaces to generate virus resistance [Applied Biological Sciences]Modern immunochemical engineering allows the creation of cells that either secrete antibodies or incorporate them into various cellular compartments, including the plasma membrane. Because the receptors for most viruses are known, if one can achieve the proper stoichiometry and geometry, plasma membrane-associated antibodies to these receptors should block viral infection....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bistable metamaterial for switching and cascading elastic vibrations [Applied Physical Sciences]The realization of acoustic devices analogous to electronic systems, like diodes, transistors, and logic elements, suggests the potential use of elastic vibrations (i.e., phonons) in information processing, for example, in advanced computational systems, smart actuators, and programmable materials. Previous experimental realizations of acoustic diodes and mechanical switches have used nonlineariti
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure and mechanics of aegagropilae fiber network [Applied Physical Sciences]Fiber networks encompass a wide range of natural and manmade materials. The threads or filaments from which they are formed span a wide range of length scales: from nanometers, as in biological tissues and bundles of carbon nanotubes, to millimeters, as in paper and insulation materials. The mechanical and thermal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Icy ocean worlds offer chances to find life [Biochemistry]Sometime in the early 2030s, a washing machine-sized robot could be carefully descending toward the icy crust of Jupiter’s moon Europa. Armed with cameras, a spectrometer, a microscope, and a scoop, the vehicle would be lowered from a UFO-like sky crane similar to the one that delivered the Curiosity rover...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IP3-mediated gating mechanism of the IP3 receptor revealed by mutagenesis and X-ray crystallography [Biochemistry]The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) is an IP3-gated ion channel that releases calcium ions (Ca2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum. The IP3-binding sites in the large cytosolic domain are distant from the Ca2+ conducting pore, and the allosteric mechanism of how IP3 opens the Ca2+ channel remains elusive. Here, we...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural and stereoelectronic insights into oxygenase-catalyzed formation of ethylene from 2-oxoglutarate [Biochemistry]Ethylene is important in industry and biological signaling. In plants, ethylene is produced by oxidation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, as catalyzed by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase. Bacteria catalyze ethylene production, but via the four-electron oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate to give ethylene in an arginine-dependent reaction. Crystallographic and biochemical studies on t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Small molecule-mediated inhibition of myofibroblast transdifferentiation for the treatment of fibrosis [Cell Biology]Fibrosis, a disease in which excessive amounts of connective tissue accumulate in response to physical damage and/or inflammatory insult, affects nearly every tissue in the body and can progress to a state of organ malfunction and death. A hallmark of fibrotic disease is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix-secreting activated...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Integrin extension enables ultrasensitive regulation by cytoskeletal force [Cell Biology]Integrins undergo large-scale conformational changes upon activation. Signaling events driving integrin activation have previously been discussed conceptually, but not quantitatively. Here, recent measurements of the intrinsic ligand-binding affinity and free energy of each integrin conformational state on the cell surface, together with the length scales of conformational change, are used...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Deubiquitinase YOD1 potentiates YAP/TAZ activities through enhancing ITCH stability [Cell Biology]Hippo signaling controls the expression of genes regulating cell proliferation and survival and organ size. The regulation of core components in the Hippo pathway by phosphorylation has been extensively investigated, but the roles of ubiquitination−deubiquitination processes are largely unknown. To identify deubiquitinase(s) that regulates Hippo signaling, we performed unbiased siRNA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three-dimensional stable lithium metal anode with nanoscale lithium islands embedded in ionically conductive solid matrix [Chemistry]Rechargeable batteries based on lithium (Li) metal chemistry are attractive for next-generation electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, excessive dendrite growth, infinite relative dimension change, severe side reactions, and limited power output severely impede their practical applications. Although exciting progress has been made to solve parts of the above issues, a versatile...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Musicians join scientists to explore data through sound [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Composer Margaret Schedel grew up with a mathematically minded father who had a fondness for flow charts. “He’d say, ‘You can’t remember how to do the laundry? Make a flow chart!’” Schedel recalls. Like her father, Schedel was fascinated by computer science, but her dyslexia made programming challenging. “I think...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Social interactions among grazing reef fish drive material flux in a coral reef ecosystem [Ecology]In human financial and social systems, exchanges of information among individuals cause speculative bubbles, behavioral cascades, and other correlated actions that profoundly influence system-level function. Exchanges of information are also widespread in ecological systems, but their effects on ecosystem-level processes are largely unknown. Herbivory is a critical ecological process in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inducing protein aggregation by extensional flow [Engineering]Relative to other extrinsic factors, the effects of hydrodynamic flow fields on protein stability and conformation remain poorly understood. Flow-induced protein remodeling and/or aggregation is observed both in Nature and during the large-scale industrial manufacture of proteins. Despite its ubiquity, the relationships between the type and magnitude of hydrodynamic flow,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lignocellulose pretreatment in a fungus-cultivating termite [Environmental Sciences]Depolymerizing lignin, the complex phenolic polymer fortifying plant cell walls, is an essential but challenging starting point for the lignocellulosics industries. The variety of ether– and carbon–carbon interunit linkages produced via radical coupling during lignification limit chemical and biological depolymerization efficiency. In an ancient fungus-cultivating termite system, we reveal unprece
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intensifying postfire weather and biological invasion drive species loss in a Mediterranean-type biodiversity hotspot [Environmental Sciences]Prolonged periods of extreme heat or drought in the first year after fire affect the resilience and diversity of fire-dependent ecosystems by inhibiting seed germination or increasing mortality of seedlings and resprouting individuals. This interaction between weather and fire is of growing concern as climate changes, particularly in systems subject...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstructed ancestral enzymes suggest long-term cooling of Earth’s photic zone since the Archean [Evolution]Paleotemperatures inferred from the isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ30Si) of marine cherts suggest that Earth’s oceans cooled from 70 ± 15 °C in the Archean to the present ∼15 °C. This interpretation, however, has been subject to question due to uncertainties regarding oceanic isotopic compositions, diagenetic or metamorphic resetting of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Massive horizontal transfer of transposable elements in insects [Evolution]Horizontal transfer (HT) of genetic material is central to the architecture and evolution of prokaryote genomes. Within eukaryotes, the majority of HTs reported so far are transfers of transposable elements (TEs). These reports essentially come from studies focusing on specific lineages or types of TEs. Because of the lack of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural and functional innovations in the real-time evolution of new ({beta}{alpha})8 barrel enzymes [Evolution]New genes can arise by duplication and divergence, but there is a fundamental gap in our understanding of the relationship between these genes, the evolving proteins they encode, and the fitness of the organism. Here we used crystallography, NMR dynamics, kinetics, and mass spectrometry to explain the molecular innovations that...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bisulfite-converted duplexes for the strand-specific detection and quantification of rare mutations [Genetics]The identification of mutations that are present at low frequencies in clinical samples is an essential component of precision medicine. The development of molecular barcoding for next-generation sequencing has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting such mutations by massively parallel sequencing. However, further improvements in specificity would be useful for...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Contractile and chiral activities codetermine the helicity of swimming droplet trajectories [Physics]Active fluids are a class of nonequilibrium systems where energy is injected into the system continuously by the constituent particles themselves. Many examples, such as bacterial suspensions and actomyosin networks, are intrinsically chiral at a local scale, so that their activity involves torque dipoles alongside the force dipoles usually considered....
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Autonomous sweat extraction and analysis applied to cystic fibrosis and glucose monitoring using a fully integrated wearable platform [Physiology]Perspiration-based wearable biosensors facilitate continuous monitoring of individuals’ health states with real-time and molecular-level insight. The inherent inaccessibility of sweat in sedentary individuals in large volume (≥10 µL) for on-demand and in situ analysis has limited our ability to capitalize on this noninvasive and rich source of information. A wearable...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Regulating plant physiology with organic electronics [Plant Biology]The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) provides flow-free and accurate delivery of small signaling compounds at high spatiotemporal resolution. To date, the application of OEIPs has been limited to delivery of nonaromatic molecules to mammalian systems, particularly for neuroscience applications. However, many long-standing questions in plant biology remain unanswered due...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Computational modeling of epiphany learning [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Models of reinforcement learning (RL) are prevalent in the decision-making literature, but not all behavior seems to conform to the gradual convergence that is a central feature of RL. In some cases learning seems to happen all at once. Limited prior research on these “epiphanies” has shown evidence of sudden...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Economic inequality increases risk taking [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Rising income inequality is a global trend. Increased income inequality has been associated with higher rates of crime, greater consumer debt, and poorer health outcomes. The mechanisms linking inequality to poor outcomes among individuals are poorly understood. This research tested a behavioral account linking inequality to individual decision making. In...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Morality constrains the default representation of what is possible [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The capacity for representing and reasoning over sets of possibilities, or modal cognition, supports diverse kinds of high-level judgments: causal reasoning, moral judgment, language comprehension, and more. Prior research on modal cognition asks how humans explicitly and deliberatively reason about what is possible but has not investigated whether or how...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Memory-n strategies of direct reciprocity [Social Sciences]Humans routinely use conditionally cooperative strategies when interacting in repeated social dilemmas. They are more likely to cooperate if others cooperated before, and are ready to retaliate if others defected. To capture the emergence of reciprocity, most previous models consider subjects who can only choose from a restricted set of...
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Gizmodo
The U.S. Gymnastics System Wanted More Medals, And Created A Culture Of Abuse To Get Them Illustration by Jim Cooke/GMG Seventeen years ago, the U.S. women’s gymnastics team placed fourth at the Sydney Olympics, finishing behind Romania, Russia, and China. Coming four years after the gold medal from the Magnificent Seven, this placement was seen—both inside and outside the sport, by the press and by coaches like the famed Bela Karolyi—as a failure. After the competition, Karolyi, who
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New porous solids may lead to better drugsResearchers have succeeded in a decades-long quest to make a new type of molecular sieve that may open new ways to produce chiral molecules.
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Futurity.org
Hassles don’t stop these predators from eating urchins Research along the shores of the Galápagos Islands has untangled a complex food web of sea lions, fish, urchins, and algae, revealing who eats (or doesn’t eat) whom and what impact they have on each other. Despite popular metaphors and cartoons depicting straightforward “food chains,” ecologists typically doubt that they’ll see predators in diverse tropical ecosystems have meaningful impacts on s
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The Atlantic
Why the Phrase 'Late Capitalism' Is Suddenly Everywhere A job advertisement celebrating sleep deprivation? That’s late capitalism. Free-wheeling Coachella outfits that somehow all look the same and cost thousands of dollars ? Also late capitalism. Same goes for this wifi-connected $400 juicer that does no better than human hands , Pepsi’s advertisement featuring Kendall Jenner , United Airlines’ forcible removal of a seated passenger who just wanted t
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Gizmodo
Donald Trump Suddenly Refuses to Talk About His False Wiretapping Claims Image: Getty Donald Trump is still convinced that former president Barack Obama ordered wiretapping of Trump Tower last year, despite a congressional investigation and multiple intelligence agencies stating unequivocally there is no evidence of his claim. But that didn’t stop our Cheeto-in-Chief from reviving this old, tired fantasy during a television interview that aired this morning. This time
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cities provide paths from poverty to sustainabilityUnderstanding how cities develop at the neighborhood level is key to promoting equitable, sustainable urbanization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paying online community members to write product reviews backfires badlyOnline user reviews have become an essential tool for consumers who increasingly rely on them to evaluate products and services before purchase. The business models of online review platforms like Yelp and TripAdvisor, and e-commerce sites like Amazon and Expedia critically depend on them. Should such sites pay users to encourage them to write reviews? According to a new study, that is a bad idea.
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Gizmodo
Barrett Brown's Lawyers Still Don't Know Why He Was Abruptly Taken Back to Prison [Update: He's Out] Image: Getty The re-incarceration of Barrett Brown has drawn considerable attention since it happened on Thursday, with startled friends and supporters openly accusing the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) of retaliation over the award-winning journalist’s often entertaining essays about his life behind bars. [ Brown has been released from custody and in an interview with Gizmodo details the ordeal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoke-free policies help decrease smoking rates for LGBT populationAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) individuals is higher than among heterosexual adults -- nearly 24 percent of the LGBT population smoke compared to nearly 17 percent of the straight population. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of lower smoking prevalence and greater
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women should continue cervical cancer screening as they approach age 65While current guidelines indicate that cervical cancer screening can be stopped for average risk patients after age 65, many women lack the appropriate amount of screening history to accurately assess their risk. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that incidence rates of cervical cancer do not begin to decline until 85 years of age among women without a hysterectomy a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stenciling with atoms in 2-dimensional materials possibleThe possibilities for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene, appear almost limitless. In new research, Penn State material scientists report two discoveries that will provide a simple and effective way to 'stencil' high-quality 2-D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New porous solids may lead to better drugsResearchers have succeeded in a decades-long quest to make a new type of molecular sieve that may open new ways to produce chiral molecules.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paperImagine wearing clothes with layers of paper that protect you from dangerous bacteria. A Rutgers University-led team has invented an inexpensive, effective way to kill bacteria and sanitize surfaces with devices made of paper.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study offers new insight into powerful inflammatory regulatorA new study in mice reveals how a protein called Brd4 boosts the inflammatory response -- for better and for worse, depending on the ailment. The study is the first to show that this protein, while problematic in some circumstances, also can protect the body from infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cities provide paths from poverty to sustainabilityUnderstanding how cities develop at the neighborhood level is key to promoting equitable, sustainable urbanization.
23h
Futurity.org
Using CRISPR against cancer shows success in mice Using CRISPR to edit the “fusion genes” that can cause or worsen cancer reduced the size of tumors and improved survival in mice, report researchers. “This is the first time that gene editing has been used to specifically target cancer fusion genes. It is really exciting because it lays the groundwork for what could become a totally new approach to treating cancer,” explains lead study author Jia
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Ars Technica
Kiosk delivers pirated movies to USB sticks in the middle of a mall Enlarge (credit: TorrentFreak ) At this point, the most common ways to get illegal digital content are no secret. There's peer-to-peer downloading, "cyberlocker"-type sites, and unauthorized streaming sites that demand to put sketchy software on your computer. But what if you could download Hollywood flicks to a USB drive at a convenient kiosk for just a few cents each? And do so while shopping a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paperImagine wearing clothes with layers of paper that protect you from dangerous bacteria.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cities provide paths from poverty to sustainabilityNew international agreements commit all UN member nations to solving humanity's greatest challenges over the next few decades, from eliminating extreme poverty and unhealthy living conditions to addressing climate change and arresting environmental degradation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paying online community members to write product reviews backfires badlyOnline user reviews have become an essential tool for consumers who increasingly rely on them to evaluate products and services before purchase. The business models of online review platforms like Yelp and TripAdvisor, and e-commerce sites like Amazon and Expedia critically depend on them. Should such sites pay users to encourage them to write reviews? According to a study in the INFORMS journal M
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Live Science
Congress Gives Trump's Science Budget Cuts the Cold ShoulderDespite proposals by President Trump to drastically slash science budgets, the fiscal year 2017 budget provides funding at roughly the same levels as the prior year.
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Gizmodo
Better Excuses for Avoiding Journalists During Your Company's Massive Sexual Harassment Scandal Photo: Getty Despite his company’s litany of problems , Uber CEO Travis Kalanick was supposed to appear onstage at Code Conference, a fancy tech gathering, at the end of May. It would have been a good time for the yelling executive to weigh in on the allegations of sexual harassment at his company, the ongoing investigation into those claims, the assorted lawsuits Uber faces from its competitors,
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NYT > Science
The New Threat to Wolves in and Around YellowstonePacks of the animals, once endangered, have flourished, but biologists worry about the effects of renewed hunting outside the national park.
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NYT > Science
Empirical Evidence: Cats Love PeopleGiven a choice between human affection, toys and food, the felines sometimes chose people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Whose line is it, anyway?Engineering students have lots of experience with lines, from the structural lines of buildings to the lines of code in software. But a new class is teaching them about other lines – the kind that might be tossed their way in an improvisational comedy scene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New coral bleaching database to help predict fate of global reefsA research team has developed a new global coral bleaching database that could help scientists predict future bleaching events. The new database contains 79 percent more reports than previous, widely used voluntary databases.
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Gizmodo
This Week's Doctor Who Was the Show at Its Very Best Image: BBC. The general arc of a companion’s introduction on Doctor Who is pretty much the same each time. They have their “bigger on the inside” moment, they do a bit of space-time travel, and then they learn that running around in a Police Box spaceship can be quite grim. With newcomer Bill, Doctor Who is back in that swing—but it hasn’t done it this well in a very long time. This week’s “Thin
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WIRED
That Orange Is the New Black Leak Was Never Going to Pay Off Putting an unreleased series on the Pirate Bay unless Netflix pays up? Good luck with that. The post That Orange Is the New Black Leak Was Never Going to Pay Off appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mice with missing lipid-modifying enzyme heal better after heart attackUsing a mouse heart attack model, researchers have shown that knocking out one particular lipid-modifying enzyme, along with a short-term dietary excess of a certain lipid, can improve post-heart attack healing and clear inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tea tree genome contains clues about how one leaf produces so many flavorsThe most popular varieties of tea -- including black tea, green tea, Oolong tea, white tea, and chai -- all come from the leaves of the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis, otherwise known as the tea tree. Despite tea's cultural and economic significance, relatively little is known about the shrub behind the tea leaves. However, the first draft of the tea tree genome may help explain why tea leaves
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stroke prevention may also reduce dementiaOntario's stroke prevention strategy appears to have had an unexpected, beneficial side effect: a reduction also in the incidence of dementia among older seniors. A new paper is the first to look at the demographics of both stroke and dementia across Ontario since the province pioneered Canada's first stroke prevention strategy in 2000.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adjusting medications may reduce fall risk in older adultsSimply adjusting the dose of an older adult's psychiatric medication could reduce their risk of falling, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supercomputers assist in search for new, better cancer drugsFinding new drugs that can more effectively kill cancer cells or disrupt the growth of tumors is one way to improve survival rates for ailing patients. Researchers are using supercomputers to find new chemotherapy drugs and to test known compounds to determine if they can fight different types of cancer. Recent efforts have yielded promising drug candidates, potential plant-derived compounds and i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Get ready: Your future surgery may use an automated, robotic drillA computer-driven automated drill, similar to those used to machine auto parts, could play a pivotal role in future surgical procedures. Researchers developed the drill that produces fast, clean, and safe cuts, reducing the time the wound is open and the patient is anesthetized, thereby decreasing the incidence of infection, human error, and surgical cost. This automated machine could reduce a sur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Subconscious fear of infection may explain skepticism towards immigrantsThere is a strong correlation between our fear of infection and our skepticism towards immigrants, according to a new study. New cross-national research explains why political discussions of immigration are so heated and why integration often fails.
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Live Science
Fasting Vs. Traditional Diet: Which Is Better for Weight Loss?Fasting diets are trendy these days, but they may be no better for weight loss than traditional diets, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bronx River's Cleanup Brings Herring HomeCalled an "open sewer" in the recent past, the Bronx River is now clean enough for a type of herring to once again be introduced and to make runs to the ocean. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
Det her sker i din hjerne under stressFlere overbelastes psykisk i forbindelse med deres arbejde, og flere føler sig stressede, viser undersøgelser. Her er, hvad der sker i din hjerne under stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pancreatic cancer patients may live longer by traveling to academic hospital for operationNew study findings link traveling to an academic medical center for surgical removal of pancreatic or thyroid cancer with higher quality surgical care for both cancers. Although the study shows better care at high-volume surgical centers for patients with pancreatic or thyroid cancer, few patients travel for their cancer operations, it concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrenceA new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle has been created by researchers, aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease.
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Futurity.org
How ‘smart’ stem cells could lead to arthritis vaccine Researchers have modified mouse stem cells to combat the kind of inflammation that arthritis and other conditions cause. The stem cells may one day be used in a vaccine that would fight arthritis and other chronic inflammation conditions in humans, a new paper suggests. Such stem cells, known as SMART cells (Stem cells Modified for Autonomous Regenerative Therapy), develop into cartilage cells th
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Popular Science
Pregnant women shouldn’t be afraid to take antibiotics Health The link between antibiotics and miscarriage is murky—but infections are definitely bad When you have a tiny human growing inside you, you’re careful about what you put in your mouth. But you know what’s worse than an increased risk? A surefire bacterial…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mice with missing lipid-modifying enzyme heal better after heart attackUsing a mouse heart attack model, Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., and his University of Alabama at Birmingham colleagues have shown that knocking out one particular lipid-modifying enzyme, along with a short-term dietary excess of a certain lipid, can improve post-heart attack healing and clear inflammation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart disease risks experienced in childhood impact cognition later in lifeCardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking have long been associated with cognitive deficiencies in adults. A new study, published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found the burden of cardiovascular risk factors from childhood and adolescence is associated with worse midlife cognition regardless of adulthood exposure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treatment of pregnant patients with bone and joint injuries complicated, requires team of physiciansNearly one in 1,000 pregnant women in the United States suffer bone and joint injuries due to car crashes, domestic violence, drug or alcohol use, or osteoporosis. The stage of a woman's pregnancy -- how her body may have changed during the course of the pregnancy -- needs to be factored into the mother and fetus' orthopedic trauma care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of heart transplant rejection reduced by desensitising patient antibodiesThe risk of heart transplant rejection can be reduced by desensitising patient antibodies, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preventing graft rejection in high-risk corneal transplant patientsTreating donor corneas with a cocktail of molecules prior to transplanting to a host may improve survival of grafts and, thus, outcomes in high-risk corneal transplant patients, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
As scientists take to Twitter, study shows power of 'visual abstract' graphicsWhen it comes to sharing new research findings with the world, Twitter has emerged as a key tool for scientists -- and for the journals where they publish their findings. But a new study shows a way for that research to reach even more people, by boiling a research paper down into a Twitter-friendly graphic called a 'visual abstract.'
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Popular Science
Survivors of America’s first atomic bomb test want their place in history Military The long road from Trinity to recognition People downwind of the atomic Trinity test want a place in the official history, and compensation for their damages, too.
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Gizmodo
Internet Gremlin Chuck Johnson's Website Becomes Inaccessible During Neo-Nazi Crowdfund Campaign [Updated] Image: Screenshot from Wesearchr After becoming the first person banned for life from Twitter, Chuck Johnson has largely receded from public view. Rumors (either planted or encouraged by Johnson himself ) occasionally crop up that he’s taken on the role of a shadowy string-puller connected to the Trump administration, but his only visible venture besides the infrequently updated GotNews blog is W
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Live Science
YouTube's Alex Dainis: Blending Filmmaking and GeneticsIf you've ever wanted to peek behind the scenes at the day-to-day activities in a genetics laboratory — there's a YouTube channel for that.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Water tubing accidents, table run-ins cause Neandertal-like injuriesPeople’s injury patterns today can’t explain how Neandertals got so many head wounds.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Night LightsThe bioluminescent mushroom, Neonothopanus gardneri, glows green when luciferase enzymes interact with luciferin molecules, triggering a chemical reaction that releases light.
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The Scientist RSS
Gut Organoid Transplants Produce Colorectal Cancer in MiceBy implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease
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Big Think
New Genetic Study Shows the Origin of Dog Breeds There are 400 breeds in total, including 23 distinct “clades” or types. Read More
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NYT > Science
For Families of Teens at Suicide Risk, ‘13 Reasons’ Raises ConcernsA rising chorus of mental health experts contends that many of the show’s messages on suicide are inaccurate and potentially dangerous.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stroke prevention may also reduce dementiaOntario's stroke prevention strategy appears to have had an unexpected, beneficial side effect: a reduction also in the incidence of dementia among older seniors. A new paper by researchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute is the first to look at the demographics of both stroke and dementia across Ontario since the province pioneered Canada's first stroke prevention strat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regular use of aspirin can lower risk of breast cancer for womenThe use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) reduces the risk of breast cancer in women, a new study concludes. Researchers saw an overall 16 percent lower risk of breast cancer in women who reported using low-dose aspirin at least three times per week.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain tissue structure could explain link between fitness and memoryStudies have suggested a link between fitness and memory, but researchers have struggled to find the mechanism that links them. A new study found that the key may lie in the microstructure of the hippocampus, a region in the middle of the brain involved in memory processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earthquakes can make thrust faults open violently and snap shutEngineers and scientists experimentally observe surface twisting in thrust faults that can momentarily rip open the earth's surface.
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Gizmodo
This Wireless Wall Device Will Literally Monitor Your Every Step GIF For years, we’ve been told that strapping a fitness tracker to your wrist is a great way to track your physical activity and fitness level. But researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have come up with a non-invasive, non-wearable way to do the same thing —and more accurately—using invisible wireless signals. The team developed a new device called the WiGa
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Popular Science
China's J-31 stealth fighter gets an improved prototype—and a potential future as a carrier From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal More government funding may be on the way. The Shenyang J-31 fighter gets more flight times, and the prospects of a big Navy order.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers develop radar simulator to characterize scattering of debris in tornadoesResearchers have developed the first numerical polarimetric radar simulator to study and characterize the scattering of debris particles in tornadoes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A glow stick that detects cancer?A new mechanism produces a water-resistant chemiluminescent probe that is 3,000-times-brighter than those currently in use. It has particular application to medical and cancer diagnosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Connecting the dots between insulin resistance, unhealthy blood vessels and cancerThis research highlights biological mechanisms driven by insulin resistance that impair blood vessel health and may be shared by both cancer and cardiovascular disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel gene editing approach to cancer treatment shows promise in miceNew CRISPR-based gene therapy effectively targets cancer-causing 'fusion genes' and improves survival in mouse models of aggressive cancers, researchers report.
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Gizmodo
Take Command Of Your Very Own Starship Enterprise, Now Just $30 Air Hogs U.S.S. Enterprise Drone , $30 Air Hogs’ Starship Enterprise drone would be the ultimate gift for the Star Trek fan in your life this holiday season, so go to warp factor 8 and get over to Amazon while it’s just $30, easily an all-time low.
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Ars Technica
Too little, too late? FCC wins net neutrality court case (credit: Flickr user: Steve Rhodes ) If the Federal Communications Commission still intended to enforce net neutrality rules, a court decision issued today would have qualified as great news at the commission. The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit denied the broadband industry's petition for a rehearing of a case that upheld net neutrality rules last year. A three-judge pan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earth science: Rock samples indicate water is key ingredient for crust formationBy examining the cooling rate of rocks that formed more than 10 miles beneath the Earth's surface, scientists have found that water probably penetrates deep into the crust and upper mantle at mid-ocean spreading zones, the places where new crust is made.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast cancers found by mammography do not regress if left untreatedBreast cancers detected by mammography screening do not spontaneously disappear or regress if left untreated, according to a new study. The scientific findings contradict claims that many cancers found via mammography may simply “go away” if left undiscovered or untreated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is alternate-day fasting more effective for weight loss?Alternate day fasting regimens have increased in popularity because some patients find it difficult to adhere to a conventional weight-loss diet. A new article reports on a randomized clinical trial that compared the effects of alternate-day fasting with daily calorie restriction on weight loss, weight maintenance and indicators of cardiovascular disease risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model could speed up colon cancer researchUsing the CRISPR gene editing system, researchers have shown they can generate colon tumors in mice that very closely resemble human colon tumors, an advance that should allow scientists to learn more about how the disease progresses and also help them test potential new drugs.
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The Atlantic
Trump Would Meet Kim Jong Un 'Under Right Circumstances' President Trump says he will meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “under the right circumstances,” raising once more the question of what his administration’s North Korea policy is. “If it would be appropriate for me to meet with him, I would absolutely, I would be honored to do it,” Trump told Bloomberg News on Monday. “If it’s under the, again, under the right circumstances. But I would do that
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The Atlantic
Growing Old in New York's Snarkiest Early-Internet Community When I first met my husband, I found that to really be a part of his life, I had to join his online social network. Nowadays this is a familiar story. Many people have friends they mainly or exclusively see online. What’s unusual is that my husband was then already in his 50s, and I wasn’t following him to Instagram or Facebook, but to Echo —a bulletin-board-style virtual community founded in 199
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA's Next Big Observatory to Go under the MicroscopeAn independent review panel will scrutinize the space agency’s in-progress Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope to ensure the project is on track -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Ridley Scott Says Neill Blomkamp's Alien 5 Won't Happen Image: Alien (1979) Not only won’t happen, Scott says it was never that close to happening. His Covenant and whatever comes after it will be the only development in the Alien universe for a while. Advertisement Answering a question from Allocine , Scott was asked if Neill Blomkamp’s Alien 5 would ever happen and his answer was “I don’t think, so no.” In the video embedded above, Scott also says,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Valleytronics' advancement could help extend Moore's LawComputer scientists have discovered a new way to control energy levels between electronic valleys in 2-D semiconductors. The breakthrough could help extend Moore's Law, allowing industry to build computer chips that are faster, more powerful and cheaper that those available today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gauging 5-year outcomes after concussive blast traumatic brain injuryMost wartime traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are mild but the long-term clinical effects of these injuries have not been well described. A new article identifies potential predictors of poor outcomes in service members diagnosed with concussive blast TBI.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The mysterious powers of spider silksSpider silks, ounce for ounce, can be stronger than steel, and much more tough and flexible. They tend not to provoke the human immune system and some even inhibit bacteria and fungi, making them potentially ideal for surgery and medical device applications. Exploitation of silks has been slow, due to challenges with identifying and characterizing their genes, but researchers have now made a major
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Ars Technica
Meet Greyhound.com, the site that doesn’t allow password changes Enlarge / This is what Greyhound.com e-mails you when you forget your password. When it comes to websites with bad password policies, there's no shortage of bad actors. Sites—some operated by banks or other financial services—that allow eight- or even six-character passwords, sometimes even allowing letters to be entered in either upper- or lower-case? Yup. Sites that e-mail forgotten passwords i
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Gizmodo
Congress Just Rejected Trump's Plans to Slash the NIH Budget Image: Getty Images In what feels like rare good news from Washington, on Sunday night Congress struck a deal to boost funding to the National Institutes of Health by $2 billion over the next five months, effectively rejecting President Trump’s plan to slash the agency’s budget for the current fiscal year. Advertisement A proposal from the Trump administration floated earlier this year aimed to c
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Live Science
SpaceX Launches US Spy Satellite on Secret Mission, Nails Rocket LandingA SpaceX Falcon rocket lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday (May 1) to boost a classified spy satellite into orbit for the U.S. military, then turned around and touched down at a nearby landing pad.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earthquakes can make thrust faults open violently and snap shutEngineers and scientists experimentally observe surface twisting in thrust faults that can momentarily rip open the earth's surface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To sell more healthy food, keep it simpleDespite extensive research on how to persuade consumers to improve their diets, academicians have largely failed to present food retailers with easy-to-use suggestions. Brian Wansink, director of Cornell's Food and Brand Lab and a leading expert in changing eating behavior, seeks to change this by providing an organizing framework that integrates insights from marketing, nutrition, psychology, pub
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Ars Technica
Tesla pulls the plug on SolarCity door-to-door sales (credit: Kevin Krecji ) Tesla said on Friday that it would be ending SolarCity’s door-to-door solar panel sales. Instead, the photovoltaic installer will rely primarily on online sales and retail sales for residential panels. In a statement to GreenTechMedia , a Tesla spokesperson said that the decision "reflects what most of our prospective customers prefer and will result in a better experience
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Gizmodo
$100 Million Lawsuit Claims Fyre Festival Owners Knew It Was Doomed All Along Photo: National Nuclear Security Administration On Monday, Daniel Jung, an attendee of the luxury-weekend-turned- Hunger Games shit show that was the Fyre Festival, launched a $100 million class action suit against the owners, saying they knowingly charged attendees thousands of dollars to be “stranded on a remote island” with “little more than bread and a slice of cheese.” The class action suit
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Ars Technica
Hacker leaks Orange is the New Black new season after ransom demands ignored (credit: Lionsgate/Netflix) An individual or group going by the name "thedarkoverlord" has posted much of the upcoming season of Netflix's series Orange is the New Black , apparently as punishment for not paying an extortion demand. According to information obtained by Databreaches.net , the episodes were stolen from a post-production studio along with episodes from dozens of other television pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To sell more healthy food, keep it simpleA leading expert in changing eating behavior provides an organizing framework that proposes dozens of small, low-cost in-store changes that retailers can use to boost sales of healthy foods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Connecting the dots between insulin resistance, unhealthy blood vessels and cancerThis research highlights biological mechanisms driven by insulin resistance that impair blood vessel health and may be shared by both cancer and cardiovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop radar simulator to characterize scattering of debris in tornadoesResearchers have developed the first numerical polarimetric radar simulator to study and characterize the scattering of debris particles in tornadoes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five new truffle species identified in New HampshireThey aren't the type you'd sprinkle over pasta. But University of New Hampshire researchers have found five new truffle species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A glow stick that detects cancer?Chemiluminescence, or chemical light, is the principle behind the glow sticks (also known as light sticks) used at rock concerts and as quick tools to grab when the electricity goes out. But they can also be used to diagnose diseases by identifying concentrations of biological samples. A new mechanism developed by Tel Aviv University researchers produces a 3,000-times-brighter, water-resistant che
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Popular Science
Everything you need to know about the tornadoes (and blizzards) that struck this weekend Environment Twisters in Texas and Mississippi, floods in Arkansas, blizzards in Kansas Wicked weather struck parts of the United States this weekend. Read on.
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Ars Technica
A taste of what virtual reality could be on the Nintendo Switch This short video lays out how to test stereoscopic 3D on your Nintendo Switch right now. Though Nintendo executives have hinted that the company might be interested in testing out the virtual reality waters, the most concrete look we've gotten at any potential plans comes from this patent application for a head-mounted Switch holster. An enterprising YouTuber wasn't willing to wait for that paten
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NYT > Science
One Day, a Machine Will Smell Whether You’re SickResearchers are perfecting technology that sniffs out signs of disease in breath, blood and urine.
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NYT > Science
Clues to Zika Damage Might Lie in Cases of TwinsWhile identical twins often share a fate, fraternal twins typically don’t, a divergence that offers clues to researchers. But one case is confounding these expectations.
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Come On In. The Water’s Fine (Mostly).Chemists calculated how much urine is in swimming pools by measuring the presence of a proxy: an artificial sweetener that passes straight through the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A glow stick that detects cancer?A new mechanism developed by Tel Aviv University researchers produces a water-resistant chemiluminescent probe that is 3,000-times-brighter than those currently in use. It has particular application to medical and cancer diagnosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model for predicting presidential election results based on television viewershipA comparative study on predicting presidential election outcomes using models built on watch data for thousands of television shows has found that simple "single-show models" can have high predictive accuracy. Given the recent performance of poll-data-driven models in predicting the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the Brexit vote outcomes, models based on television viewership offer an accurat
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The Atlantic
Why There Was a Civil War President Trump has peppered his first months in office with periodic announcements about the history of the nation he now leads, which he shares in the apparent presumption that others will be similarly amazed and astonished. In February, he marked Black History Month with a rambling speech, name-checking a variety of historical figures. “I am very proud now that we have a museum, National Mall,
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The Atlantic
ESPN Is Not Doomed Last week, ESPN laid off 100 employees, including several well-known SportsCenter anchors and popular writers. This kicked off a round of dire proclamations that ESPN is “dying” and even that that its business is “collapsing,” in part, some say , because of the leftward tilt of its on-screen talent. Some of this hyperbole stems from the modern journalistic convention to announce the end of any in
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The Atlantic
The Opposition's Way Forward in Venezuela For nearly a month, protesters in Venezuela have clashed with the military. Thousands march daily in the streets against the government and are met with volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets fired by police. About 30 people have been killed so far. The country has seen protests like this before, most recently in 2014. But this one is different. In less than a month, President Nicolás Maduro open
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Big Think
What a Purple Column of Light Named “Steve” Teaches Us About Our Potential Here’s how a discovery by a plucky band of sky-watchers changed science. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for V/Q imaging in pulmonary embolismThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging has published appropriate use criteria for ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) imaging in pulmonary embolism. This is the second in a series of new AUC developed by SNMMI in its role as a qualified provider-led entity under the Medicare Appropriate Use Criteria program for advanced diagnostic imaging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain tissue structure could explain link between fitness and memoryStudies have suggested a link between fitness and memory, but researchers have struggled to find the mechanism that links them. A new study by University of Illinois researchers found that the key may lie in the microstructure of the hippocampus, a region in the middle of the brain involved in memory processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model for predicting presidential election results based on television viewershipA comparative study on predicting presidential election outcomes using models built on watch data for thousands of television shows has found that simple 'single-show models' can have high predictive accuracy. Given the recent performance of poll-data-driven models in predicting the 2016 US presidential election and the Brexit vote outcomes, models based on television viewership offer an accurate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment of pregnant patients with bone and joint injuries complicated, requires team of physiciansNearly one in 1,000 pregnant women in the United States suffer bone and joint injuries due to car crashes, domestic violence, drug or alcohol use, or osteoporosis. According to a literature review in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the stage of a woman's pregnancy -- how her body may have changed during the course of the pregnancy -- needs to be f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supercomputers assist in search for new, better cancer drugsFinding new drugs that can more effectively kill cancer cells or disrupt the growth of tumors is one way to improve survival rates for ailing patients. Researchers are using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to find new chemotherapy drugs and to test known compounds to determine if they can fight different types of cancer. Recent efforts have yielded promising drug candidates,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adjusting meds may reduce fall risk in older adultsSimply adjusting the dose of an older adult's psychiatric medication could reduce their risk of falling, a new University of Michigan study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tea tree genome contains clues about how one leaf produces so many flavorsThe most popular varieties of tea -- including black tea, green tea, Oolong tea, white tea, and chai -- all come from the leaves of the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis, otherwise known as the tea tree. Despite tea's cultural and economic significance, relatively little is known about the shrub behind the tea leaves. However, the first draft of the tea tree genome published in Molecular Plant may
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Gizmodo
Facebook Handed Over Data on 'Insecure' and 'Overwhelmed' Teenagers to Advertisers Image: Getty Facebook probably knows more about you than your own family, and the company often uses these type of insights to help sell you products. The best—or worst!—new example of this comes from the newspaper The Australian , which says it got its hands on some leaked internal Facebook documents. Advertisement The 23-page document allegedly revealed that the social network provided detailed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercomputers assist in search for new, better cancer drugsSurgery and radiation remove, kill, or damage cancer cells in a certain area. But chemotherapy—which uses medicines or drugs to treat cancer—can work throughout the whole body, killing cancer cells that have spread far from the original tumor.
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Popular Science
How drone swarms could help protect us from tornadoes Environment Eyes in the sky Jamey Jacob hopes to extend tornado warning time. Read on to learn about how he's building rugged drones that fly through these violent storms.
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Science | The Guardian
SpaceX launches top-secret US spy satellite – and then safely lands booster Unmanned Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Nasa-leased pad in Florida No details released about mission for National Reconnaissance Office SpaceX has launched a top-secret spy satellite for the US government and then successfully landed the booster for recycling. The unmanned Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from its Nasa-leased pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Continue reading...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ill-gotten gains are worth less in the brainThe brain responds less to money gained from immoral actions than money earned decently, reveals a new study. The research helps explain why most people are reluctant to seek illicit gains by identifying a neural process that dampens the appeal of profiting at other people's expense.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First US success of nonhuman primate gene editingScientists have shown that gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 technology can be quite effective in rhesus monkey embryos -- the first time this has been demonstrated in the US.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Team discovers a new invasive clam in the USThey found it in the Illinois River near the city of Marseilles, Ill., about 80 miles west of Lake Michigan -- a strange entry point for an invasive Asian clam. The scientists who found it have no idea how it got there. But the discovery -- along with genetic tests that confirm its uniqueness -- means that a new species or 'form' of invasive clam has made its official debut in North America.
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Scientific American Content: Global
SpaceX Launches Spy Satellite, Sticks the LandingThis was the company's inaugural launch for the US Department of Defense, and its ninth successful landing of its Falcon 9 booster -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Congress Totally Ignored Trump's Cuts to NIH Funding From the start, it didn’t seem likely Republican lawmakers would agree with President Trump’s proposed cuts to the National Institutes of Health. Even some of the most conservative legislators had worked in recent years to increase the agency’s funding, and the White House figures represented a dramatic reversal of that effort. With the release of their budget agreement for 2017, lawmakers have d
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The Atlantic
A Bipartisan Spending Deal That Shortchanges Trump Updated on May 1 at 2:03 p.m. ET President Trump has indisputably rocked the conventions of political culture and international diplomacy during his first 100 days in the White House. His initial imprint on the federal budget, however, will be much lighter. In the $1.1 trillion spending bill Congress unveiled early Monday morning, Trump secured up to $15 billion in additional defense spending for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Screen size, shape affect user perception of smartwatchesLarge screens are more effective for promoting the hedonic (perceived attractiveness) and pragmatic (perceived control) qualities of smartwatches, while round and square screens are associated with hedonic and pragmatic quality, respectively, according to a study published online April 21 in the Journal of Computer Mediated Communication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rock samples indicate water is key ingredient for crust formationBy examining the cooling rate of rocks that formed more than 10 miles beneath the Earth's surface, scientists led by The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences have found that water probably penetrates deep into the crust and upper mantle at mid-ocean spreading zones, the places where new crust is made. The finding adds evidence to one side of a long-standing debate on how mag
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's all in the math: New tool provides roadmap for cell developmentResearchers have created a new tool, based on the principles of topology, to generate a roadmap of the many possible ways in which a stem cell may develop into specialized cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The science behind making the perfect pitchApplied mathematicians used mathematical models to figure out the best strategies to throw something at a target. The team found that while underhand throws are best for reaching a target close by and above the shoulder, overhand throws are more accurate for targets below the shoulder -- like a wastepaper basket -- and are more forgiving to errors over long distances.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene editing strategy eliminates HIV-1 infection in live animalsA permanent cure for HIV infection remains elusive due to the virus's ability to hide away in latent reservoirs. But now, scientists show that they can excise HIV DNA from the genomes of living animals to eliminate further infection.
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New on MIT Technology Review
How to Provide High-Speed Internet Access to All AmericansTelecommunications policy expert Susan Crawford explains why Americans pay too much money for connectivity that’s too slow and offers potential solutions.
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Popular Science
Prevent your phone from distracting you while driving DIY While still using it for navigation Protect yourself and the people around you by making your Android phone or iPhone easier to operate when you're out on the road.
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Popular Science
Diversify your resume by learning how to code Sponsored Post Access 80 hours of comprehensive training to give your career a boost. Access 80 hours of comprehensive training to give your career a boost. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Widely-Reported Study on Fish and Microbeads Might Have Been Faked Damselfish larvae that has ingested microplastic particles. (Image: Oona M. Lönnstedt) A headline grabbing - study published in Science last year that warned about the effects of plastic microbeads on larval fish is on the verge of being retracted. In a case involving missing data, shoddy research methods, and outright fabrication, it’s one of the most egregious examples of scientific fraud we’ve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rock samples indicate water is key ingredient for crust formationBy examining the cooling rate of rocks that formed more than 10 miles beneath the Earth's surface, scientists led by The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences have found that water probably penetrates deep into the crust and upper mantle at mid-ocean spreading zones, the places where new crust is made.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tea tree genome contains clues about how one leaf produces so many flavorsThe most popular varieties of tea—including black tea, green tea, Oolong tea, white tea, and chai—all come from the leaves of the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis, otherwise known as the tea tree. Despite tea's immense cultural and economic significance, relatively little is known about the shrub behind the tea leaves. However, the first draft of the tea tree genome published May 1 in the journal
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Gizmodo
Alex Jones and His Pill-Pushing Chiropractor Are Here to Save Your Colon From the Globalists Illustration: Jim Cooke/GMG A good chunk of both the left and right-wing media worlds spent the past two weeks fixated on the child-custody trial of Alex Jones, the Austin-based conspiracy king and the most recognizable voice of paranoia in the United States. His lawyer argued in court that Jones’s bananas on-air behavior is “playing a character,” calling him a “performance artist” to counter his
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Get A Load Of This Character Who's Wandered On To The WelderUp Lot | Vegas Rat Rods #VegasRatRods | Mondays 10/9c The world's happiest used car salesman comes to WelderUp for a Rat Rod. Can cynical Steve build a truck that'll keep a smile on his face? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/vegas-rat-rods More Rat Rods: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/vegas-rat-rods/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Appeals court won't reconsider net neutrality ruling (Update)A federal appeals court said Monday it won't reconsider its ruling to uphold the government's "net neutrality" rules that require internet providers to treat all online traffic equally.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New coral bleaching database to help predict fate of global reefsA UBC-led research team has developed a new global coral bleaching database that could help scientists predict future bleaching events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrenceA Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease. In the study, published today in Nature Nanotechnology, mice that received an injection with the nanoparticle showed a 70 to 80 percent reduction in tumor size. Most significantly, mice treated with these nanoparticles showed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paleontologists learning more about dinosaurs with virtual realityA key piece of evidence proving how dinosaurs evolved into modern-day birds could soon be studied across the world.
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The Atlantic
Sebastian Gorka Isn't Wrong About Everything Since the inauguration of Donald Trump, the counterterrorism community has united in a cathartic, hundred-day communal hatefest against his chief counterterrorism adviser, Sebastian L. Gorka, Ph.D. It felt good. Gorka, a former Breitbart national security editor, is a remarkably friendless man among experts on terrorism and jihadism. I know no one in the field who considers him an authority on an
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The Atlantic
Frank Rich on How American Politics Came to Look So Much Like Veep On Election Day, as voters were taking to the polls to decide whether Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump would become president, the cast and crew of HBO’s Veep were in Pasadena, filming scenes about an election ... in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. During the episode, which aired Sunday night, former president Selina Meyer was tasked with monitoring the integrity of an election the internat
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Viden
Er kvinderne i virkeligheden det stærkeste køn?Hunner lever i snit betydeligt længere end hanner. Ny dansk forskning peger på, at det skyldes generne.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silent seizures recorded in the hippocampus of two patients with Alzheimer's diseaseInvestigators have identified silent, seizure-like activity in the hippocampus -- a brain structure significantly affected in Alzheimer's disease -- in two patients with Alzheimer's disease and no known history of seizures. These alterations in the brain's electrical activity could not be detected by standard EEG readings and primarily occurred during sleep, a time when memories are consolidated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oxygen improves blood flow, restores more function in spinal cord injuriesBlocking a specific enzyme and putting more oxygen through the spinal cord produces better blood flow, ultimately improving motor function such as walking, neuroscientists have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists surprised to discover lymphatic 'scavenger' brain cellsThe brain has its own inbuilt processes for mopping up damaging cellular waste -- and these processes may provide protection from stroke and dementia. Scientists discovered a new type of lymphatic brain 'scavenger' cell by studying tropical freshwater zebrafish -- which share many of the same cell types and organs as humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shunned by microbes, organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environmentsOrganic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration, a new study reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-family homes killed L.A.'s urban forestAnalyzing aerial imagery, scientists have found a loss of green cover up to 55 percent in single-family home lots of the Los Angeles region from 2000-09.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plant cell walls' stretch-but-don't-break growth more complex than once thoughtPlant cell wall growth is typically described as a simple process, but researchers using a microscope that can resolve images on the nanoscale level have observed something more complex.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein that kick-starts gene expression in developing embryos.The formation of a human embryo starts with the fertilization of the oocyte by the sperm cell. This yields the zygote, the primordial cell that carries one copy each of the maternal and paternal genomes. However, this genetic information starts being expressed only after the zygote divides a couple of times. But what triggers this process, called "zygotic genome activation," was unknown until now.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Personalized psychiatry matches therapy to specific patients with depressionSelecting the antidepressant that will be most effective for a specific patient suffering from depression can be a 'try and try again' process. Examining new personalized and precision psychiatry approaches, a new study shows that body mass index, sex of the patient, and symptom profile can be used to determine a personalized treatment that guides antidepressant choice and significantly improves p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wireless device can see through walls to detect walking speedA growing body of research suggests that your walking speed could be a strong predictor of health issues like cognitive decline, falls, and even certain cardiac or pulmonary diseases. A new device that can measure the walking speed of multiple people with 95 to 99 percent accuracy using wireless signals.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
SpaceX launches 'spy satellite' from FloridaA SpaceX Falcon 9 has launched a classified military satellite - known only as NROL-76 - into orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter, Bloomberg team up for streaming news channel (Update)Twitter is launching a 24-hour streaming news channel in partnership with the Bloomberg Media, in a major expansion of the social media firm's video operations, the two firms announced Monday.
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cognitive science
Sent to Prison by a Software Program's Secret Algorithms submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Saucony Shoes, Electric Smoker, Star Wars Prints, and More Running shoes , Star Wars prints , and a popular electric smoker lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundCore , $29 with code ANKSPK77 Anker’s SoundCore blew away the competition to take the title of your favorite affordable Bluetooth speaker, and today, you can pick one up for $29 , the best p
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Ingeniøren
ESA søger ingeniører og forskere til Månen og MarsDen Europæiske Rumorganisation udvider netop nu staben med en række forskningsstillinger, der skal hjælpe med at forberede nye missioner.
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Ars Technica
Verizon’s bizarre claim that the FCC isn’t killing net neutrality rules Verizon has always supported net neutrality. (credit: eBay/ ) No major Internet service provider has done more to prevent implementation of net neutrality rules in the US than Verizon. After years of fighting the rules in courts of law and public opinion, Verizon is about to get what it wants as the Federal Communications Commission—now led by a former Verizon lawyer—prepares to eliminate the rul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team discovers a new invasive clam in the USThey found it in the Illinois River near the city of Marseilles, Illinois, about 80 miles west of Lake Michigan - a strange entry point for an invasive Asian clam. The scientists who found it have no idea how it got there. But the discovery - along with genetic tests that confirm its uniqueness - means that a new species or "form" of invasive clam has made its official debut in North America.
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Scientific American Content: Global
High Ground Is Becoming Hot Property as Sea Level RisesClimate change may now be a part of the gentrification story in Miami real estate -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid abuse drops when doctors check patients' drug historyThere's a simple way to reduce the opioid epidemic gripping the country, according to new Cornell University research: Make doctors check their patients' previous prescriptions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mayo Clinic researchers develop new tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrenceA Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New coral bleaching database to help predict fate of global reefsA UBC-led research team has developed a new global coral bleaching database that could help scientists predict future bleaching events. The new database contains 79 percent more reports than previous, widely used voluntary databases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
City of Hope researchers find regular use of aspirin can lower risk of breast cancer for womenA City of Hope-led study found that the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) reduces the risk of breast cancer in women who are part of the California's Teacher's Study.
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Futurity.org
‘Hammered’ bones put humans in N. America 115,000 years early Mastodon bones recovered from a site in San Diego appear to dramatically revise the timeline for when humans first reached North America. The bones, tusks, and molars are about 130,000 years old. They were sharply broken and found deeply buried alongside large stones that appeared to have been used as hammers and anvils. See digital 3D models of the bones and stones 3D model of a mastodon bone fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting walking speed with wireless signalsWe've long known that breathing, blood pressure, body temperature and pulse provide an important window into the complexities of human health. But a growing body of research suggests that another vital sign - how fast you walk - could be a better predictor of health issues like cognitive decline, falls, and even certain cardiac or pulmonary diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Valleytronics' advancement could help extend Moore's LawIn the world of semiconductor physics, the goal is to devise more efficient and microscopic ways to control and keep track of 0 and 1, the binary codes that all information storage and logic functions in computers are based on.
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WIRED
American Gods Gives ‘Faithful Adaptation’ All New Meaning Feeling disoriented by Starz's new show? Readers of Neil Gaiman's fantasy novel felt the same. You just have to believe. The post American Gods Gives 'Faithful Adaptation' All New Meaning appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Senseless Government Rules Could Cripple the Robo-Car Revolution Opinion: The government is driving automotive innovation into the past. The post Senseless Government Rules Could Cripple the Robo-Car Revolution appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
These molecules may drive brain inflammation While brain inflammation is a major part of neurodegenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, and others, comparatively little is known about its causes and exact role in various diseases. Now, researchers may have made a key discovery about the molecular trigger for brain inflammation, a new study suggests. In a study published in the Journal of Experimental
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Ars Technica
Nintendo figured 2.3 million NES Classics was enough (it wasn’t) Enlarge / Both of these miniature NES systems share something in common: they're no longer being made. Last we heard, the NES Classic Edition had sold 1.5 million units through the end of December, not nearly enough to meet apparently healthy demand during the holiday season and beyond. Now that the company has officially discontinued the plug-and-play box, Nintendo of America President Reggie Fi
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Live Science
Ice Age Animal Bones Uncovered During LA Subway ExcavationThe discovery of ice age mammal bones — one belonging to an extinct camel and the other to either a mastodon or a mammoth (it's hard to say which) — temporarily stopped construction of Los Angeles' subway line extension last month.
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Popular Science
From the archives: 100 years of mastodon fossil fascination Science It's almost easy to find mastodon bones in the United States Popular Science has been reporting on mastodons, a common North American ice age character, for well over a century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Valleytronics' advancement could help extend Moore's LawA University at Buffalo-led team has discovered a new way to control energy levels between electronic valleys in 2-D semiconductors. The breakthrough could help extend Moore's Law, allowing industry to build computer chips that are faster, more powerful and cheaper that those available today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pancreatic cancer patients may live longer by traveling to academic hospital for operationNew study findings link traveling to an academic medical center for surgical removal of pancreatic or thyroid cancer with higher quality surgical care for both cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene editing strategy eliminates HIV-1 infection in live animals, Temple researchers showA permanent cure for HIV infection remains elusive due to the virus's ability to hide away in latent reservoirs. But now, in new research published in print May 3 in the journal Molecular Therapy, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and the University of Pittsburgh show that they can excise HIV DNA from the genomes of living animals to eliminate further infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel gene editing approach to cancer treatment shows promise in miceNew CRISPR-based gene therapy effectively targets cancer-causing 'fusion genes' and improves survival in mouse models of agressive cancers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The gene that starts it allEPFL scientists have discovered the protein that kick-starts gene expression in developing embryos.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant cell walls' stretch-but-don't-break growth more complex than once thoughtPlant cell wall growth is typically described as a simple process, but researchers using a microscope that can resolve images on the nanoscale level have observed something more complex.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When single-family homes killed L.A.'s urban forestAnalyzing aerial imagery, scientists from the USC Dornsife College find a loss of green cover up to 55 percent in single-family home lots of the Los Angeles region from 2000-09.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shunned by microbes, organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environmentsA new study reveals that organic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists surprised to discover lymphatic 'scavenger' brain cellsThe brain has its own inbuilt processes for mopping up damaging cellular waste -- and these processes may provide protection from stroke and dementia.University of Queensland scientists discovered a new type of lymphatic brain 'scavenger' cell by studying tropical freshwater zebrafish -- which share many of the same cell types and organs as humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists breeding Schroedinger cat statesPhysicists have learned how they could breed Schrödinger cats in optics. Scientists tested a method that could potentially amplify superpositions of classical states of light beyond microscopic limits and help determine the boundaries between the quantum and classical worlds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Silent seizures' discovered in patients with Alzheimer's diseaseDeep in the brains of two patients with Alzheimer's disease, the main memory structure, the hippocampus, displays episodic seizure-like electrical activity. These non-convulsive hippocampal seizures are the first signs of 'silent' brain electrical network dysfunction described in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oxygen improves blood flow, restores more function in spinal cord injuries: U of A studyUAlberta neuroscientists find that blocking a specific enzyme and putting more oxygen through the spinal cord produces better blood flow, ultimately improving motor function such as walking.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's all in the math: New tool provides roadmap for cell developmentColumbia University researchers have created a new tool, based on the principles of topology, to generate a roadmap of the many possible ways in which a stem cell may develop into specialized cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ill-gotten gains are worth less in the brainThe brain responds less to money gained from immoral actions than money earned decently, reveals a new UCL-led study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model could speed up colon cancer researchUsing the CRISPR gene editing system, MIT researchers have shown they can generate colon tumors in mice that very closely resemble human colon tumors, an advance that should allow scientists to learn more about how the disease progresses and also help them test potential new drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn scientists illuminate genetics underlying the mysterious powers of spider silksSpider silks, ounce for ounce, can be stronger than steel, and much more tough and flexible. They tend not to provoke the human immune system and some even inhibit bacteria and fungi, making them potentially ideal for surgery and medical device applications. Exploitation of silks has been slow, due to challenges with identifying and characterizing their genes, but researchers have now made a major
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