MOST POPULAR

The Atlantic
Why Kimmel's Obamacare Pitch Was So Powerful “No parent should ever have to decide if they can afford to save their child’s life.” That was the emotional crescendo to Jimmy Kimmel’s tearful monologue Monday night, in which he detailed his son’s recent birth and heart surgery before pivoting to a pitch for health-care access. Kimmel opened his show, ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” by telling the audience that his wife, Molly, gave birth to a boy,
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find giant wave rolling through the Perseus galaxy clusterCombining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio observations and computer simulations, an international team of scientists has discovered a vast wave of hot gas in the nearby Perseus galaxy cluster. Spanning some 200,000 light-years, the wave is about twice the size of our own Milky Way galaxy.
1h
Ingeniøren
Faste kan beskytte hjernen mod ældningBritiske forskere har påvist, at et hormonstof maven danner, når den er tom, kan beskytte hjerneceller fra at ældes og dø. Dansk forsker bekræfter, at faste kan forlænge livet.
8h

LATEST

Inside Science
BRIEF: Why Athletes Hit the Wall BRIEF: Why Athletes Hit the Wall Findings could lead to a future drug that mimics the health benefits of exercise. 130217-F-LI951-240.JPG Image credits: U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Darnell T. Cannady Sports Tuesday, May 2, 2017 - 11:45 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) – You've probably seen videos of marathon runners collapsing just short of the finish line. Despite their brains urgin
21min
Ars Technica
Amid outrage and tumbling stocks, Mylan’s chairman pocketed $97M Enlarge / Robert J. Coury of Mylan (L) and Mylan CEO Heather Bresch attend a benefit in New York City on November 2, 2015. (credit: Getty | Gilbert Carrasquillo ) Last year, furor over the skyrocketing price of Mylan’s life-saving EpiPens hit a fever pitch . Lawmakers seethed , parents broke into tears at pharmacy counters, regulators opened investigations , competitors raced to come up with chea
26min
Science | The Guardian
Is it really possible to live until you're 146? The science of ageing Scientists doubt that extreme natural longevity is feasible. But if lifespan is ruled by a genetic ‘clock’, that view could change The grim reaper comes for everyone in the end, but sometimes he is in less of a rush. This was certainly true for Sodimedjo, an Indonesian man who died on Sunday , but whether he was the full 146 years he claimed remains doubtful – not least because his purported birt
26min
New on MIT Technology Review
Tencent’s New Lab Shows It’s Serious about Mastering AITencent has established an AI lab in Seattle, and the company is building a very serious research team back in China.
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pathways leading to beta cell division identified, may aid diabetes treatmentPancreatic beta cells help maintain normal blood glucose levels by producing the hormone insulin -- the master regulator of energy (glucose). Impairment and the loss of beta cells interrupts insulin production, leading to type 1 and 2 diabetes. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, mapped out pathways that r
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic finding may allow doctors to predict newborn health during pregnancyUCLA scientists have discovered specific genetic changes in the placentas of women who gave birth to growth-restricted infants.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling the HIV epidemic: A progress report on efforts in sub-Saharan AfricaIn a Research Article published in PLOS Medicine, Richard Hayes of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK and colleagues report on a clinical trial evaluating an intervention to achieve universal HIV testing and treatment in Zambia. The authors estimate that, after one year, the overall proportion of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) had increased from 44 perce
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers confirm nearby star a good model of our early solar systemNASA's SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back and stripped of most creature comforts in the front, took a big U-turn over the Pacific west of Mexico.
48min
The Atlantic
Could Small-Town Harvards Revive Rural Economies? In the mid-1970s, the town of Fairfield, Iowa, had a problem. Parsons College, which had been one of the town’s economic anchors for nearly a century, lost its accreditation in 1967 and shut down in 1973. The town faced the future of many rural towns across America: declining population and worsening economic fortunes. But local politicians had an idea: They’d recruit a new educational institutio
48min
Viden
Tech-milliardær vil flytte biler under jorden med 200 km/tMed et netværk af underjordiske tunneller og avanceret teknologi vil Elon Musk forbedre trafikken i LA.
49min
Ars Technica
CERN points giant magnet at the Sun to look for dark matter particles That blue tube contains a magnet similar to the ones used to steer particles around the LHC. With the identification of the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, scientists put the last piece of the Standard Model of physics in place. What they haven't found is any hint of something beyond the Standard Model. And that hasn't been for lack of trying. Supersymmetry, the most popular extensio
50min
Gizmodo
Incredible Slo-Mo Footage of the Tiny Lightning Produced When You Crush a Wintergreen Candy GIF You may have heard the myth that biting into a Wint-O-Green Lifesavers produces visible sparks in a dark room. It’s hard to believe that a small candy can produce its own lightning, but this incredible high-speed video by Smarter Every Day reveals it’s just simple science at work. Advertisement When you bite into, or crush, a candy made of real sugar (not an artificial sweetener) the atoms in
50min
Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: April 2017 In April we may have finished “only” 57 cells (how far we’ve come since the early days!), but what cells they were! At the start of the month we completed Sector 6, and at the end we had a great time with our Neuroquest competition. We also released enhancements to Scythe gameplay like real-time SC points and the new “last Scythe wins” reaping system. Stay tuned for some even bigger changes happe
51min
WIRED
Trump’s Pressure on Tech Outsourcers Might Be Paying Off A new promise by one of the country's top H-1B employers to hire US tech workers suggests the bully pulpit might be working for Trump. The post Trump's Pressure on Tech Outsourcers Might Be Paying Off appeared first on WIRED .
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers confirm nearby star a good model of our early solar systemIowa State University's Massimo Marengo is part of a research team that has confirmed a nearby star's planetary system contains separate belts of asteroids, similar to our own solar system. The star is also about one-fifth the age of our sun. All that makes this star a good model of the early days of our solar system. The findings have just been published by The Astronomical Journal.
54min
Gizmodo
Chris Pratt Had a Very Bad Idea for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Chris Pratt is back as Star-Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. All Images: Disney Nostalgia is a huge part of the charm in Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy. There’s the classic pop music, of course, but also the reverence Chris Pratt’s character Peter Quill, a.k.a. Star-Lord, has for the pop culture of his childhood, things the character loved before he was snatched off Earth. This posed a p
56min
The Atlantic
The Looming Clash Between Trump and Republicans on Taxes When the White House released President Trump’s one-page sheet of principles for tax cuts, Republican leaders in Congress said it would serve as a “guidepost” for their efforts to overhaul the tax code. Not even a week later, the GOP is already veering off the Trump trail. Trump is prioritizing steep rate cuts for businesses and individuals that wouldn’t necessarily be offset by increases elsewhe
1h
Gizmodo
Monitor Your Home From Anywhere With Yi's $35 Security Camera Yi Home Camera , $35 Yi, manufacturer of your favorite affordable action cam , also makes a home IP security camera, and you can pick it up for just $35 today , or $5 less than usual. The Yi Home Camera includes all the basic features you’d expect, including two-way audio, automatic activity alerts to your phone, and remote monitoring. And unlike other companies that rely on cloud storage and mon
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reserach supports new criteria for evaluating urologic cancer in womenExperts in women's health are recommending physicians follow new guidelines to determine when women warrant further evaluation and testing for urologic cancers when there is microscopic blood in their urine.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Period tracking apps failing users in basic ways, study findsA new University of Washington study finds that smartphone apps to track menstrual cycles often disappoint users with a lack of accuracy, assumptions about sexual identity or partners, and an emphasis on pink and flowery form over function and customization.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not even the Himalayas are immune to traffic smogUniversity of Cincinnati researchers find evidence of truck pollution in one of the most remote corners of the planet: the Himalayas.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fierce mating battle between wild cuttlefish is captured on video for first timeA male cuttlefish fights fiercely to protect his mate after a rival steals her away, using all his cunning and strength to win her back. A videotape of this encounter, the first time this behavior has been filmed in the wild, is analyzed this week in American Naturalist by biologists from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Brown University, and colleagues.
1h
Blog » Languages » English
Susi’s 25 Million point interview! Congratulations to @susi for making it to 25 million points in Eyewire! Here’s an interview between susi and fellow player @r3 about susi’s big accomplishment! A special thanks from HQ to r3 for conducting this interview and to susi for some great responses. And of course, for being a great part of the Eyewire community. For science! Hello Susi and congratulations on an amazing 25 million points
1h
The Scientist RSS
Polio Vaccine Pioneer DiesJulius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.
1h
The Atlantic
CNN Takes on Donald Trump's 'Fake News' Label CNN and Donald Trump are it again. The two have been feuding for months. On Tuesday, the network refused to air an ad by Trump’s campaign that called the mainstream media “fake news,” a term frequently used by the president. The campaign, Donald J. Trump for President, Inc, responded, blasting CNN in a press release , titled, “Fake News Station Refuses to Run Ad Highlighting The President’s First
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft out to regain ground in schools with Surface LaptopMicrosoft on Tuesday unveiled a Surface laptop and streamlined operating software in a move aimed at regaining ground in classrooms, where Google Chromebooks have taken hold.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India-based IT company Infosys plans Indiana tech centerIndia-based information technology company Infosys announced Tuesday that it will establish a central Indiana tech center as part of a broader expansion in the United States that is projected to create 10,000 jobs in the coming years.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toxic mine pollution halted near scenic Washington lakeToxic mine pollution is no longer flowing into Washington state's picturesque Lake Chelan for the first time in nearly 60 years because of a $500 million cleanup to contain contamination from the a mine, officials said this week.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walrus, caribou face extinction risk in Canadian ArcticBoth Atlantic walrus and eastern migratory caribou are at risk of extinction in Canada's Arctic, a panel of experts has warned.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Study looks at cannabis ingredient's ability to help children's tumours UK research into cannabidiol (CBD) comes after surge in parents administering it to children without medical advice British scientists are investigating whether a compound found in cannabis could be used to shrink brain tumours in children. The study of the effects of cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, was prompted by the growing number of parents giving it to childr
1h
Gizmodo
This Artificially Intelligent Speech Generator Can Fake Anyone’s Voice GIF Credit: 1987Maou The human voice, with all its subtlety and nuance, is proving to be an exceptionally difficult thing for computers to emulate. Using a powerful new algorithm, a Montreal-based AI startup has developed a voice generator that can mimic virtually any person’s voice, and even add an emotional punch when necessary. The system isn’t perfect, but it heralds a future when voices, lik
1h
Popular Science
Here’s all the education related stuff Microsoft announced today, including Windows 10 S Technology Microsoft wants into the classroom The latest products from Microsoft are built to bring students and school districts into its infrastructure.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find giant wave rolling through the Perseus galaxy clusterCombining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio observations and computer simulations, an international team of scientists has discovered a 200,000-light-year wave of hot gas in the Perseus galaxy cluster.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Stephen Jeffcoate obituary My brother, Stephen Jeffcoate, who has died aged 77, was a former professor of biochemical endocrinology at the Chelsea Hospital for Women in London. Steve was the eldest of four sons born to a Liverpool gynaecologist, Professor Sir Norman Jeffcoate, and his wife, Josephine Lindsay. He went to local schools in Liverpool and later obtained first class honours in medical sciences at Cambridge Unive
1h
New Scientist - News
NASA might run out of space suits before it quits the ISSThe US space agency’s involvement with the ISS is funded until 2024, but it might run out of space suits before then, despite spending $200 million on new designs
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals first recording of cuttlefish fighting over a mate in the wildOn a research dive in 2011 off the Aegean Sea coast of the fishing village Çe?mealt?, Turkey, a lucky pair of graduate students bore accidental witness to a phenomenon scientists have otherwise only ever seen in the lab: the theater and violence of male cuttlefish competing for a mate.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Shocking' levels of PCB chemicals in UK killer whale LuluOne of the UK's last killer whales, which was found dead last year, had some of the highest levels of a toxic pollutant ever recorded.
1h
The Atlantic
The Shipping and Handling of a Gigantic Space Telescope The James Webb Space Telescope is ready for the next step in its journey to becoming the most powerful space observatory ever, tasked with glimpsing the oldest stars and galaxies in the universe. NASA has finished testing the telescope’s 21-foot-tall, honeycomb-like gold-plated mirrors and scientific instruments at NASA’s facility in Maryland. Soon, the hardware will be packed up and shipped to T
1h
The Atlantic
May Day Marches and Protests Around the World People filled the streets of cities around the world yesterday, marching on May Day, or International Labor Day. Groups supporting a wide variety of causes—mostly centered on improving worker’s rights—staged largely peaceful demonstrations, however, some groups were met with force, and others fought with police. Below are just some of the scenes from May Day 2017 in Moscow, Chicago, Paris, Manila
1h
The Atlantic
Older Voters Are Complicating the GOP's Plans for Health Care House Republican leaders struggling to pass their alternative to the Affordable Care Act are colliding head-on with the GOP’s new demographic reality: Their coalition is centered on older white voters, many of whom fear losing benefits from the Obama-era law. An Atlantic analysis shows that House Republicans who have expressed opposition to the GOP’s replacement plan are heavily concentrated in d
1h
Gizmodo
Why On Earth Would You Fast Every Other Day? Image: PracticalCures.com /Flickr If you distill life down into its most basic parts, you’re here to do one thing: eat. Aside from a few days mandated by certain religions, every single day is a journey to consume enough food to make it to the next day. And maybe not get bored or uncomfortable along the way. Advertisement Simultaneously, Americans live in a society that values people who look lik
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Got a sweet tooth? Blame your liverA hormone called FGF21 that is secreted by the liver after eating sweets may determine who has a sweet tooth and who doesn't, according to a study in Cell Metabolism published May 2. Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research at the University of Copenhagen found that people with particular variants of the FGF21 gene were about 20% more likely to be top-ranking
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wastewater injection rates may have been key to Oklahoma's largest earthquakeChanges to the rate of wastewater injection in disposal wells may have contributed to conditions that led to last year's Pawnee earthquake in Oklahoma, according to a new report published May 3 as part of a focus section in Seismological Research Letters.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NIST data to aid production and storage of 'fascinating' medicationAmantadine hydrochloride may be the most common medication you've never heard of. This compound has been around for decades as the basis for antiviral and other medications, from flu therapy to treatments for brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease and the fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals first recording of cuttlefish fighting over a mate in the wildThe whole arsenal of cuttlefish coloration, postures and aggression played out during a chance observation now described in a study in the American Naturalist.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple blood tests lead to improved hypertension treatment in African countriesUsing two simple blood tests, Western University researchers were able to drastically improve treatment for resistant hypertension across three sites in Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa.The study demonstrates that for patients in Africa with hard-to-control hypertension, identifying the cause was the key to lowering blood pressure. By testing patients' levels of plasma renin in combination with lev
1h
Live Science
Shake Your Tail Feathers: Dinosaur Sported Modern-Looking PlumeA 145-million-year-old dinosaur about the size of a wild turkey sported a plume of tail feathers that were surprisingly modern-looking and aerodynamic in shape, a new study finds.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Net Neutrality Rules May Slow Innovation, but Uncertainty Will Be WorseFCC chairman Ajit Pai argues that rules governing Internet providers discourage investment, but killing them could create more problems for content providers.
2h
Popular Science
Female dragonflies feign death to avoid sex Animals Boy oh boy is animal reproduction upsetting Being a lady dragonfly is pretty bad—but let's talk about what's worse.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
At last, a clue to where cancer metastases are bornScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered why some cancers may reoccur after years in remission.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Language shapes how the brain perceives timeLanguage has such a powerful effect, it can influence the way in which we experience time, according to a new study. Linguists have discovered that people who speak two languages fluently think about time differently depending on the language context in which they are estimating the duration of events.
2h
Science | The Guardian
'Exercise pill' could deliver benefits of fitness in tablet form Drug could transform lives of those who are unable to exercise because of obesity or serious physical disability, mouse study suggests For those who cannot exercise, it could be the answer: rather than spending hours in the gym, the benefits of fitness training could be delivered in a tablet. The prospect of an “exercise pill” might be music to the ears of couch potatoes, long-distance truck driv
2h
The Atlantic
What Risk Says About Julian Assange Every time Julian Assange appears in Laura Poitras’s new documentary, Risk , there’s a distinct impression of his quiet thrill at being on camera. His eyes constantly dart toward the lens whenever he’s being filmed, whether he’s chatting to his cohorts at Wikileaks, donning an elaborate disguise (including different-colored contact lenses) to evade public attention, or loudly mocking the accusati
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Origin of Milky Way's hypothetical dark matter signal may not be so darkA mysterious gamma-ray glow at the center of the Milky Way is most likely caused by pulsars. The findings cast doubt on previous interpretations of the signal as a potential sign of dark matter.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn study finds linkage between social network structure and brain activityNew research performed at the University of Pennsylvania finds that the brain's response to social exclusion differs depending on the structure of a person's social network. Those with tight-knit social circles show less dynamic brain activity when excluded than those whose friend groupings are more diffuse.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New NIST data to aid production and storage of 'fascinating' medicationAmantadine hydrochloride may be the most common medication you've never heard of. Now, chemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have published the very first data on this important chemical's thermodynamic properties, including data on how it responds to heat and changes from a solid into a gas.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parkinson's in a dish: Researchers reproduce brain oscillationsAbnormal oscillations in neurons that control movement, which likely cause the tremors that characterize Parkinson's disease, have long been reported in patients with the disease. Now, University at Buffalo researchers working with stem cells report that they have reproduced these oscillations in a petri dish, paving the way for much faster ways to screen for new treatments or even a cure for Park
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Exercise-in-a-pill' boosts athletic endurance by 70 percentSedentary mice given the drug ran longer without training.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH discovery in mice could lead to new class of medications to fight mid-life obesityA team of scientists led by researchers from the National Institutes of Health has identified an enzyme that could help in the continuous battle against mid-life obesity and fitness loss. The discovery in mice could upend current notions about why people gain weight as they age, and could one day lead to more effective weight-loss medications.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stool microbes predict advanced liver diseaseNonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- a condition that can lead to liver cirrhosis and cancer -- isn't typically detected until well advanced. Even then, diagnosis requires a biopsy. To more easily detect NAFLD, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers and their collaborators report that the microbial makeup of a patient's stool -- gut microbiome -- can be used to predict advanced NAFLD w
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Got a sweet tooth? Blame your liverA hormone called FGF21 that is secreted by the liver after eating sweets may determine who has a sweet tooth and who doesn't, according to a study in Cell Metabolism published May 2. Researchers found that people with particular variants of the FGF21 gene were about 20 percent more likely to be top-ranking consumers of sweets and candy, such as ice cream, chocolate, and gumdrops than their counter
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The science of 'hitting the wall'Runners, swimmers, and cyclists are familiar with the phenomenon of 'hitting the wall' when the connection between brain and body feels like it's been lost. In Cell Metabolism on May 2, researchers show in mice the physiological basis for why this phenomenon occurs. Their research also found that training is not the only way to enhance endurance -- it can also be achieved using a small molecule to
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wastewater injection rates may have been key to Oklahoma's largest earthquakeChanges to the rate of wastewater injection in disposal wells may have contributed to conditions that led to last year's Pawnee earthquake in Oklahoma, according to a new report published May 3 as part of a focus section in Seismological Research Letters.
2h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
No researcher is too junior to fix science If young scientists plan to advance their careers before setting the system right, nothing will change, warns John Tregoning. Nature 545 7 doi: 10.1038/545007a
2h
Ars Technica
Liveblog: Apple’s Q2 2017 earnings call happens May 2 at 5pm ET Enlarge / The fifth-generation iPad. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Liveblog starts in: View Liveblog Apple will host its earnings call for the second quarter of its fiscal 2017 this afternoon at 5pm Eastern (10pm UK), and we'll be liveblogging the call and the analyst Q&A session to give you all the information, along with our insights and charts. Apple's numbers were down year over year for most o
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
World's Biggest Space Telescope Heads West on Path to LaunchpadWith its testing at Goddard Space Flight Center completed, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope embarks for further testing in Texas before its 2018 launch -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution: On mosaics and melting-potsGenetic studies of cichlid fishes suggest that interspecies hybrids played a prominent role in their evolution. Analysis of a unique fossil cichlid from the Upper Miocene of East Africa now provides further support for this idea.
2h
Gizmodo
The Green Turtle, the First Chinese American Superhero, Is Back in Shadow Hero Comics Panda Express When MacArthur Genius Gene Luen Yang revived the Green Turtle in his 2014 book The Shadow Hero , he both reimagined the little-known hero’s origins to truly make him the first Chinese American superhero and breathed new life into the character. Now, thanks to a collaboration between Yang, artist Sonny Liew, and Panda Express, the Green Turtle is back with an all-new adventure in cel
2h
Ars Technica
YouTube’s redesign is official, and there’s a dark mode YouTube has a new look, with the desktop site getting a "Material Design" revamp today. The design has slowly been leaking out in A/B testing, but today the company is making it official . YouTube says the new design aims for a "simple, consistent, and beautiful" look. Most of YouTube's box-heavy card design has been erased, instead going with a simple white background, the usual grid of thumbnai
2h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Massive Change Is Coming To Tanana, Alaska | Yukon Men #YukonMenTV | Fridays at 9/8c Stan returns to Tanana and is shocked to find the new road complete and some visitors already taking advantage of Tanana's resources. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/yukon-men More Yukon: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/yukon-men/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Origin of milky way's hypothetical dark matter signal may not be so darkA mysterious gamma-ray glow at the center of the Milky Way is most likely caused by pulsars. The findings cast doubt on previous interpretations of the signal as a potential sign of dark matter.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stereotactic radiation highly effective for kidney cancerKidney cancer patients may soon have more treatment choices that provide a higher quality of life, thanks to research completed by physician scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Their recent study showed that treating metastatic kidney cancer with an advanced and focused form of radiation called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy achieves more than 90 percent control of local tumors,
2h
Futurity.org
Can ‘smoke-free’ policies nudge LGBT people to quit? Cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) people in the United States is higher than among heterosexual adults—nearly 24 percent of the LGBT population smoke compared to nearly 17 percent of the straight population. But a new study finds evidence of less smoking and greater intentions to quit among LGBT smokers who live in communities with smoke-free policies. “Past re
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Crave Sugar? Maybe It's in Your Genes Specific genetic variants have been linked to the sweet tooth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biochemical pathways of kidney disease revealedResearchers have developed an innovative fruit fly-based model of the types of harmful cysts that can form on kidneys. The model has enormous potential for assisting the study of how cells proliferate in polycystic kidney disease and cancer.
3h
Popular Science
Keep the party in the pool with the waterproof G-DROP speaker Sponsored Post Waterproof and buoyant, this durable speaker is perfect for adventure playlists. Waterproof and buoyant, this durable speaker is perfect for adventure playlists. Read on.
3h
Ars Technica
SpaceX, Blue Origin have opened a “window of opportunity” for US Air Force Enlarge / SpaceX launches the NROL-76 satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office on Monday morning. (credit: SpaceX) On Monday morning, SpaceX successfully launched a national security payload for the first time, cracking the market for US military missions. The first stage of the rocket then landed within a couple of miles from where it had taken off less than 10 minutes earlier, marking t
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic ice rift spreadsThe rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica now has a second branch, which is moving in the direction of the ice front, researchers revealed after studying the latest satellite data. The main rift in Larsen C, which is likely to lead to one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, is currently 180 km long. The new branch of the rift is 15 km long.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find a likely genetic driver of smoking-related heart diseaseCigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Repetition a key factor in language learningA new study has focused on language acquisition in the brain. Even short repetitive exposure to novel words induced a rapid neural response increase that is suggested to manifest memory-trace formation.
3h
Popular Science
How to control your computer with your voice DIY Siri or Cortana aren't just for your phone Both Windows 10 and macOS Sierra come with voice-activated digital assistants to do your bidding. Here are all the different ways you can put them to use.
3h
Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Custom Indochino Suits, Anker Lightning Cables, Harmony Remote, and More $350 made-to-measure suits , $25 Casio watches , and the best Lightning cables lead off Tuesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 $70 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. Advertisement
3h
The Atlantic
How Trump's Property in Manila Looms Over His Interactions With Duterte For the second time in a two-week period, President Donald Trump reached out to the authoritarian leader of a country where he has business interests. On April 17, it was Turkish President Recep Erdogan, whom Trump congratulated in the aftermath of a constitutional referendum that was widely seen as a power grab . Trump owns a pair of buildings in Istanbul that he himself has described as constit
3h
The Atlantic
Senator Ted Cruz, NASA’s Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, Space and Mars Experts to Join The Atlantic’s Summit on the Future of American Space Exploration Washington, D.C. (May 2, 2017)– Space discovery has been an enduring source of national pride, since Project Mercury and the Vostok Program first competed to put men into orbit in the 1950s and ‘60s. In recent years, new players have taken prominent roles in ambitious missions, including space tourism and missions to Mars. At this junction in space exploration, The Atlantic will convene “ On the
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New data shows avocado consumers have improved nutrient intakesA new analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, compared avocado consumers to non-consumers and found that consuming avocados may be associated with an overall better diet, higher intake of essential nutrients, lower body weight, lower Body Mass Index (BMI) and smaller waist circumference.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geologists use radioactive clock to document longest earthquake recordUsing radioactive elements trapped in crystallized, cream-colored 'veins' in New Mexican rock, geologists have peered back in time more than 400,000 years to illuminate a record of earthquakes along the Loma Blanca fault in the Rio Grande rift. It is the longest record of earthquakes ever documented on a fault.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Origin of Milky Way's hypothetical dark matter signal may not be so darkA mysterious gamma-ray glow at the center of the Milky Way is most likely caused by pulsars – the incredibly dense, rapidly spinning cores of collapsed ancient stars that were up to 30 times more massive than the sun. That's the conclusion of a new analysis by an international team of astrophysicists, including researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The f
3h
WIRED
Surface Laptop Gives Microsoft an Answer to Chromebooks, Sorta Windows 10 S makes your laptop easier to use, longer-lasting, and a whole lot more secure. The post Surface Laptop Gives Microsoft an Answer to Chromebooks, Sorta appeared first on WIRED .
3h
WIRED
Heading to the Movies? Prep With Our Sci-Fi Plot Generator Consider it a blaster class in filmmaking. The post Heading to the Movies? Prep With Our Sci-Fi Plot Generator appeared first on WIRED .
3h
Ars Technica
20,000 Chinese writers will create their own Wikipedia competitor "The Chinese Encyclopaedia is not a book, but a Great Wall of culture," said editor-in-chief Yang Muzhi. (credit: Wikipedia via Getty Images) The Chinese government has hired tens of thousands of scholars to create an online version of the national encyclopedia, which will compete in size and scope with the Chinese-language version of Wikipedia. The third edition of the Chinese Encyclopaedia will
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feeding strategies in competing hummingbird species observed in a small area in BrazilBeing the vertebrates with the highest metabolic rate thanks to their rapid wing flaps, the hummingbirds have evolved various feeding behaviors. While they tend to go for food high in energy, strong competition affects greatly their preferences and behavior towards either dominance, obedience, traplining or a strategy named hide-and-wait, conclude scientists after observing several species of humm
3h
TEDTalks (video)
Behind the lies of Holocaust denial | Deborah Lipstadt"There are facts, there are opinions, and there are lies," says historian Deborah Lipstadt, telling the remarkable story of her research into Holocaust deniers -- and their deliberate distortion of history. Lipstadt encourages us all to go on the offensive against those who assault the truth and facts. "Truth is not relative," she says.
3h
Gizmodo
This Is Our First 'Sound' From the Creepy Void Inside Saturn's Rings Image: NASA Today, Cassini prepares to once again boldly go where no spacecraft has gone before: into the gap between Saturn and its rings. While we’re all excited to see the the results of Cassini’s second dive, astronomers are still parsing through the findings from her first. And some, including a soundscape generated from the emptiness, are pretty freaky. Advertisement Apparently, the orbiter
3h
The Atlantic
Jimmy Kimmel’s Latest Monologue Gets Personal and Political Jimmy Kimmel was already near tears before he said a word on Monday night’s Jimmy Kimmel Live —his first episode hosting the late-night show after it went on a mysterious weeklong hiatus. “I have a story to tell about something that happened to our family last week,” he said, assuring his viewers that despite his demeanor, his tale has a happy ending. Kimmel’s wife Molly McNearney, a co-head writ
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black rhinos to come back home to RwandaAround 20 of Africa's endangered Eastern black rhinos are returning in an "extraordinary homecoming" to Rwanda after the species disappeared there 10 years ago, the African Parks organisation said Tuesday.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healthy housing for refugees in extreme climatesRefugees living in extreme climates ranging from 45 degrees to -10 degrees, such as those in Jordan, could benefit from improved living conditions as a result of an international collaborative research project led by the University of Bath.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How fluids flow through shaleMost of the world's oil and natural gas reserves may be locked up inside the tiny pores comprising shale rock. But current drilling and fracturing methods can't extract this fuel very well, recovering only an estimated 5 percent of oil and 20 percent of gas from shale. That's partly due to a poor understanding of how fluids flow through these small pores, which measure only nanometers across.
3h
Ars Technica
GOP’s “Internet Freedom Act” permanently guts net neutrality authority Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Chris Clor) Nine Republican US senators yesterday submitted legislation that would prohibit the Federal Communications Commission from ever again using the regulatory authority that allowed the commission to impose net neutrality rules. The " Restoring Internet Freedom Act " would prohibit the FCC from classifying ISPs as common carriers under Title II of the Commu
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why space dust emits radio waves upon crashing into a spacecraftWhen spacecraft and satellites travel through space they encounter tiny, fast moving particles of space dust and debris. If the particle travels fast enough, its impact appears to create electromagnetic radiation (in the form of radio waves) that can damage or even disable the craft's electronic systems.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists say agriculture is good for honey beesWhile recent media reports have condemned a commonly used agricultural pesticide as detrimental to honey bee health, scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that the overall health of honey bee hives actually improves in the presence of agricultural production.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealed: The biochemical pathways of kidney diseaseIn a study, recently published in PLOS Genetics, Chiara Gamberi and her coauthors developed an innovative fruit fly-based model of the types of harmful cysts that can form on kidneys. The model has enormous potential for assisting the study of how cells proliferate in polycystic kidney disease and cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution: On mosaics and melting-potsGenetic studies of cichlid fishes suggest that interspecies hybrids played a prominent role in their evolution. Analysis of a unique fossil cichlid from the Upper Miocene of East Africa now provides further support for this idea.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greater life expectancy in patients with recommended mitral valve operations from high-volume surgeonsPatients can maximize chances of high-quality mitral valve repair through referral to surgeons with large annual repair rates.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prescribing patterns change following direct marketing restrictionsA study of how policies restricting pharmaceutical promotion to physicians affect medication prescribing found that physicians in academic medical centers (AMCs) prescribed fewer of the promoted drugs, and more non-promoted drugs in the same drug classes, following policy changes to restrict marketing activities at those medical centers. The analysis encompassed 16.1 million prescriptions; while t
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First extensive immune profile of sarcomas shows some likely susceptible to immunotherapySome types of sarcomas elicit a greater immune response than others, which sheds light on how immunotherapy could be used for this connective-tissue cancer, according to a new study in Cancer. Photos, video available.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Restricting sales visits from pharmaceutic reps associated with changes in physician prescribingImplementation of policies at academic medical centers that restricted pharmaceutical detailing (pharmaceutical representative sales visits to physicians) was associated with modest but significant reductions in prescribing of detailed drugs across six of eight major drug classes; however, changes were not seen in all of the academic medical centers that enacted policies, according to a study publ
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Types and distribution of payments from industry to physiciansIn 2015, nearly half of physicians were reported to have received a total of $2.4 billion in industry-related payments, primarily involving general payments (including consulting fees and food and beverage), with a higher likelihood and value of payments to physicians in surgical than primary care specialties and to male than female physicians, according to a study published by JAMA in a theme iss
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Restricting pharmaceutical reps' marketing tactics changes physician prescribing behaviorA team, led by the University of California, Los Angeles' Ian Larkin and Carnegie Mellon University's George Loewenstein, examined restrictions at 19 academic medical centers placed on pharmaceutical representatives' visits to doctors' offices. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the results reveal that the restrictions caused physicians to switch from prescribing drugs t
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why space dust emits radio waves upon crashing into a spacecraftWhen spacecraft and satellites travel through space they encounter tiny, fast moving particles of space dust and debris. If the particle travels fast enough, its impact appears to create electromagnetic radiation that can damage or even disable the craft's electronic systems. A new study published this week in Physics of Plasmas uses computer simulations to show that the cloud of plasma generated
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How fluids flow through shaleCurrent drilling and fracturing methods can't extract oil and natural gas very well, recovering an estimated 5 percent of oil and 20 percent of gas from shale. That's partly due to a poor understanding of how fluids flow through these small pores, which measure only nanometers across. But new computer simulations, described this week in the Physics of Fluids, can better probe the underlying physic
3h
Gizmodo
This Guy Loves to Cover His Hand With the World's Grossest Bugs GIF GIF: YouTube / InsecthausTV Do you have hobbies? Maybe cycling or carpentry or something low key? Well, this guy has a cooler hobby than you. Advertisement Adrian Kozakiewicz loves to cover his hand with gnarly bugs, film it, and then put the videos on YouTube. His channel, InsecthausTV , is one of the most fucked up and fascinating things you’ll see on the internet this week. There are also
3h
Futurity.org
‘Sieve’ sorts mirror-image molecules for new drugs Scientists have created the first molecular sieve designed to separate chiral molecules, a discovery that could lead to new pharmaceuticals and advancements in chemistry and biology. A trait common among the molecules in cells is chirality. Objects that have chirality are mirror images of one another. Just as humans have two hands that are mirror images of one another, molecules exhibit handednes
3h
Live Science
If Aliens Visit, Don't Expect a Hollywood Ending, Ridley Scott WarnsFilm director Ridley Scott suggests that intelligent aliens are "out there," and Earth's inhabitants should prepare for the worst.
3h
Live Science
What It Means to Be in Remission | VideoActress Shannen Doherty announced that her breast cancer was in remission. What does it mean for cancer to go into remission?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Losses reduce subsequent risk taking among bettors—applies to many other risky decisions, tooPsychologically, loss is known to cause about twice as much pain as pleasure caused by similar gain. However, earlier studies focusing on how prior outcomes affect subsequent risk taking have reported conclusions that appear mutually contradictory.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The chemistry of whiskeyDerby Day is around the corner, and with it comes big hats, horses with funny names, and bourbon. The latest episode of Reactions celebrates the chemical process of distillation that makes bourbon and other whiskey varieties possible. Since water and ethanol, along with tasty flavors, have different boiling points, they can be separated by carefully heating the mash that starts off every whiskey.
3h
Ars Technica
Trump admin. rolls back Obama-era nutrition standards for school lunches Enlarge / US First Lady Michelle Obama holds a cafeteria lunch at Parklawn Elementary School in Alexandria, Virginia, January 25, 2012. (credit: Getty | SAUL LOEB ) Just a week into his position, US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced Monday a rollback of nutrition standards for school meals , previously championed by former First Lady Michelle Obama as part of a larger initiative to
3h
Gizmodo
Scientists Want to Grow Your Music-Blasted Ears Some New Parts Ear organoid with hair cells in blue. Image: Indiana University School of Medicine Hearing loss can be inevitable for some older folks, as well as for their music blasting, phone screen-staring grandchildren. Naturally, many of those who’ve lost their hearing are keen on getting it back, somehow, with things like hearing aids and cochlear implants. Advertisement But what if your doctor could just
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctic iceberg crack develops forkThe fissure that will lead to the breakaway of one of the largest bergs ever seen has a new branch.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA to measure greenhouse gases over the mid-Atlantic region in mayIn May, a team of Goddard scientists will begin measuring greenhouse gases over the Mid-Atlantic region—an area chosen in part because it encompasses a range of vegetation, climate, and soil types that would influence the exchange of carbon dioxide and methane between the Earth and the atmosphere.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some—but not all—corals adapting to warming climateA new WCS study reveals evidence that some corals are adapting to warming ocean waters - potentially good news in the face of recent reports of global coral die offs due to extreme warm temperatures in 2016. The study appears in the latest issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series.
3h
WIRED
How a Missing Penny Explains the Conservation of Energy Energy is the answer to so many questions. But what is energy? That is the question. The post How a Missing Penny Explains the Conservation of Energy appeared first on WIRED .
3h
WIRED
Architects Discover Emoji, and Guess What They Aren’t All Happy About It Pulling ornament into the digital age generates just a few feels in the field. The post Architects Discover Emoji, and Guess What They Aren't All Happy About It appeared first on WIRED .
3h
Gizmodo
Surface Laptop Is Microsoft's Shot at a Portable Computer for Everyone All screenshots: Microsoft Meet Microsoft’s Surface Laptop, a portable computer made for basically everyone and meant to take on high-design competitors like the Apple MacBook. The new Surface Laptop is lightweight, ships with the newly announced Windows 10 S (but can be upgraded to Windows 10 Pro), and includes many familiar details featured on other Microsoft hardware products. Advertisement Th
3h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Researchers frustrated by Italian misconduct probe Alfredo Fusco denies claims that his research lab hired a photo studio to manipulate images. Nature 545 13 doi: 10.1038/545013a
3h
Futurity.org
Close-ups show how hairy fibers move when plants grow Using a powerful microscope to examine plant cell walls has afforded researchers new insight into the process of plant cell growth at a level of detail previously unseen, a new study suggests. The researchers, who report their findings in Nature Plants , used an atomic force microscope, which allowed them to take high-resolution images at the nanometer level. This enabled them to watch microfibri
3h
Science | The Guardian
From the Fyre festival to Brexit, schadenfreude is the emotion that defines our times We’re biologically wired to find joy in others’ misfortunes. But this is now the ‘spitegeist’ – and a core characteristic of populist politics around the world Even Mother Teresa would have felt a glimmer of glee. Pretty much everyone else did. Over the weekend the internet erupted into spasms of schadenfreude when a luxury music festival descended into what a lawsuit described as closer to The H
3h
Gizmodo
This New Dinosaur Looked an Awful Lot Like a Chicken Say hello to Jianianhualong tengi. (Credit: Julius T. Csotonyi 2017 / Xu, Currie, Pittman et al. 2017) Meet Jianianhualong tengi , a distinctly chicken-like dinosaur that lived 125 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period. This newly discovered species of dinosaur now represents the earliest known common ancestor of birds and closely related bird-like dinos, with a feathering pattern assoc
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists say agriculture is good for honey beesScientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture evaluated the impacts of row-crop agriculture, including the traditional use of pesticides, on honey bee health. Results indicated hive health was positively correlated to the presence of agriculture. According to the study, colonies in a non-agricultural area struggled to find adequate food and produced fewer offspring. The find
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Language shapes how the brain perceives timeLanguage has such a powerful effect, it can influence the way in which we experience time, according to a new study. Professor Panos Athanasopoulos, a linguist from Lancaster University and Professor Emanuel Bylund, a linguist from Stellenbosch University and Stockholm University, have discovered that people who speak two languages fluently think about time differently depending on the language co
3h
Gizmodo
J.K. Rowling Apologizes for Killing Snape and Harry Potter Fandom Promptly Self-Immolates Image: Warner Bros. Since 2015, J.K. Rowling has made it an annual tradition to apologize on the anniversary of the fictional Battle of Hogwarts for killing off a Harry Potter character. This year’s selection was not met with the usual mourning. Advertisement In 2015, she apologized for Fred Weasley. In 2016, it was Remus Lupin. Both are mostly beloved characters, and her apology turned into more
4h
Ingeniøren
Elon Musks nyeste vision: Elektriske rulleskøjter skal fragte biler rundt i tunnelsystemerTesla og Space X-stifteren er endnu engang på banen med et bud på fremtidens teknologi, som denne gang skal nedbringe kødannelse i store byer. Som sædvanlig går han i gang med at udføre projektet i praksis.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Feeding strategies in competing hummingbird species observed in a small area in BrazilBeing the vertebrates with the highest metabolic rate thanks to their rapid wing flaps, the hummingbirds have evolved various types of feeding behaviour. While the nectar-feeders tend to go for food high in energy, strong competition affects greatly their preferences and behaviour towards either dominance, subordination, a strategy known as trapline and a fourth one named hide-and-wait, conclude t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria take a deadly risk to surviveBacteria need mutations—changes in their DNA code—to survive under difficult circumstances. When necessary, they can even mutate at different speeds. This is shown in a recent study by the Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium. The findings open up various new avenues for research, ranging from more efficient biofuel production methods to a better trea
4h
Futurity.org
Wearable ‘plasma paper’ kills all sorts of germs Researchers have invented an inexpensive, effective way to kill bacteria and sanitize surfaces with devices made of paper. “Paper is an ancient material, but it has unique attributes for new, high-tech applications,” says Aaron Mazzeo, an assistant professor in Rutgers University department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. “We found that by applying high voltage to stacked sheets of metal
4h
Gizmodo
Windows 10 S: What You Need to Know About Microsoft's New Lightweight OS Image: Screenshot, Microsoft Google Chrome has become so good that when it comes to affordable, quality laptops , it’s a better buy than a cheap Windows device. So Microsoft needs a lightweight OS to compete, and it’s really hoping that the education-focused Windows 10 S will be that OS. What is it? Windows 10 S is Microsoft’s new lightweight operating system. It’s meant to be cheaper and less pr
4h
Gizmodo
Deadspin I Have A Weak Take On Matt Niskanen’s Hit On Sidney Crosby | Jezebel Jimmy Kimmel Opened Mo Deadspin I Have A Weak Take On Matt Niskanen’s Hit On Sidney Crosby | Jezebel Jimmy Kimmel Opened Monday’s Show in Tears With a Story About His Baby’s Open Heart Surgery | Fusion Local GOP Posts Unhinged, Racist Screed Against America’s First Muslim Congressman | The Root Baltimore Orioles’ Adam Jones Called N-Word, Hit With Peanuts at Fenway Park |
4h
Ars Technica
The $999 Surface Laptop is Microsoft’s take on the regular old notebook Microsoft In all the years it has been making hardware, Microsoft has shied away from making a traditional clamshell laptop, at least in part because the company didn't want to upset its OEM partners by competing with them directly. But it has been edging closer to that territory with each new Surface Pro iteration and with the convertible Surface Book , and today Microsoft is formally announcing
4h
Ars Technica
Indian IT firm Infosys to hire 10,000 American workers Enlarge / Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka discussing financial results in Bangalore in April 2017. (credit: MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images) An Indian company that has been accused of abusing the H-1B visa process says it will hire 10,000 American workers over the next two years. Bangalore-based Infosys, which has been criticized in testimony before Congress over its use of the H-1B visa program, annou
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ecology team finds leaf litter has slower decomposition rate in warm temperaturesThe time it takes for a leaf to decompose might be the key to understanding how temperature affects ecosystems, according to Kansas State University ecologists.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deep learning helps scientists keep track of cell's inner partsDonnelly Centre researchers have developed a deep learning algorithm that can track proteins, to help reveal what makes cells healthy and what goes wrong in disease.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long lost monitor lizard 're-discovered' on Papua New Guinean islandScientists have recently found and re-described a monitor lizard species from the island of New Ireland in northern Papua New Guinea. It is the only large-growing animal endemic to the island that has survived until modern times. The lizard, Varanus douarrha, was already discovered in the early 19th century, but the type specimen never reached the museum where it was destined as it appears to have
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The courting cephalopods of the East China SeaWilliam Shakespeare wrote with a quill, Helen Keller liked her typewriter, and the oval squid prefers to use its body, when it comes to expressing love. But unlike these famous authors, the romanticisms of Sepioteuthis lessoniana were unknown. Until now.
4h
The Atlantic
President Trump Wants a Government Shutdown Chalk up one more first for the Donald Trump administration: a president saying the country needs a government shutdown. In a pair of tweets Tuesday morning, Trump raged against a recent deal to fund the government through September and said that the government needed a good shutdown when this deal runs out: The reason for the plan negotiated between the Republicans and Democrats is that we need
4h
The Atlantic
French Elections 2017: Who Will Win? When Jean-Marie Le Pen, the far-right National Front (FN) candidate, came in second place in the first round of France’s presidential election in 2002, earning a coveted spot to the runoff against then President Jacques Chirac, he was met with outright rejection. His shocking advance, the first time a member of the far right had advanced that far in a French election since World War II, prompted
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The critical importance of pace in long-distance racesA new study by the lecturer Jordan Santos-Concejero of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical and Sports Education suggests that elite Kenyan runners cannot defend their brain oxygenation when they are obliged to run to the point of exhaustion and close to their physiological limits. This partly contradicts the results of a study published previously and stresses the critical importance of controlli
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists plot antibiotic resistance on a world mapAntibiotic resistance is a serious problem for human health. Uncontrolled antibiotic usage in agriculture and medicine makes bacteria resistant to drugs and these drugs become less effective. This means that infections that used to be curable could become lethal once again.ResistoMap is an interactive visualization of the gut resistome to different antibiotics. The map will help to identify nation
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NMR technique offers 'molecular window' into living organismsA novel technique developed by University of Toronto Scarborough researchers can for the first time get a high-resolution profile of which molecules are present inside a living organism.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop recycling for carbon fiber compositesA WSU research team for the first time has developed a promising way to recycle the popular carbon fiber plastics that are used in everything from modern airplanes and sporting goods to the wind energy industry.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic ice rift spreads: New branch revealed in latest data from ice shelfThe rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica now has a second branch, which is moving in the direction of the ice front, Swansea University researchers revealed after studying the latest satellite data.
4h
Ars Technica
Half-Life, Portal scribe leaves Valve Faliszek was thrilled to pose for this Ars Technica photo back in 2009. Chet Faliszek, one of Valve's most public-facing personalities and a key writer behind some of the company's most well-remembered games, has left the company after a 12-year stint, according to GamesIndustry.biz . Faliszek insisted to GamesIndustry that there is "nothing exciting or drama filled" behind his departure. "I work
4h
Viden
Fra Berlin til Vestjylland: Hunulv har vandret langtDen lange tur fra Tyskland er foregået ganske ubemærket.
4h
NYT > Science
Touch New Stamp and Presto, Total Solar Eclipse Becomes MoonThe U.S. Postal Service is going all out for this summer's total solar eclipse, with a first-of-its kind stamp.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Domino effect in pharmaceutical synthesisChemists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) headed by Prof. Dr. Svetlana B. Tsogoeva at the Chair of Organic Chemistry I have made research into pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis more efficient, more sustainable and more environmentally friendly. They have developed a novel synthetic route towards antiviral quinazoline heterocycles that have not been described previously
4h
Gizmodo
This Stretchable Sculpture of The Notorious B.I.G. Is Actually Made From Thousands of Sheets of Paper GIF GIF: YouTube Artist Felix Semper’s latest work, a bust of Notorious B.I.G. he calls Big Poppa , looks like it was carved from a giant chunk of heavy stone. But it’s actually made from thousands of sheets of paper that have been all glued together— allowing the sculpture to be stretched and elongated, but still able to return to its original form. Advertisement It’s almost like playing with a
4h
The Atlantic
Tiny Suns Are Transforming the Search for Extraterrestrial Life Written speculation about life beyond the confines of Earth dates back thousands of years, to the time of the Greek philosophers Epicurus and Democritus. Unrecorded curiosity about this question undoubtedly goes back much further still. Remarkably, today’s generation seems about to get an answer from the study of exoplanets—planets orbiting other stars than the Sun. The early results are upending
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Can Amazon and Twitter Kill Off TV by Streaming Live Events?New live Twitter programming and streaming NFL games on Amazon Prime will test whether the Internet can hold the same allure for live action as the humble TV.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA to measure greenhouse gases over the mid-Atlantic region in mayIn May, a team of Goddard scientists will begin measuring greenhouse gases over the Mid-Atlantic region -- an area chosen in part because it encompasses a range of vegetation, climate and soil types that would influence the exchange of carbon dioxide and methane between Earth and the atmosphere.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some -- but not all -- corals adapting to warming climateA new WCS study reveals evidence that some corals are adapting to warming ocean waters -- potentially good news in the face of recent reports of global coral die offs due to extreme warm temperatures in 2016.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The chemistry of whiskey (video)Derby Day means it's time to recognize the chemical process of distillation, which makes bourbon possible. Water and ethanol have different boiling points, so they can be separated by carefully heating the whiskey's mash. Each distillery carefully protects their still design, and the strongest flavors require aging. But might some innovative makers find a way to hack the process?
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2017Oak Ridge National Laboratory aids St. Jude's brain development research with software to speed processing of microscopy images; a bottleneck in the process to breakdown lignin for use in biofuels may occur at the plant cell wall's surface; predicting how ecosystems respond to environmental change could become more precise through new process sensitivity index method; through "quantum mechanical s
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New NMR technique offers 'molecular window' into living organismsNMR Technique developed at U of T Scarborough has potential for noninvasive disease diagnosis using current MRI technology.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep learning helps scientists keep track of cell's inner partsHigh throughput screens of image-based data allow a direct view of proteins' whereabouts in the cell but the lack of fast and accurate analysis tools has been a bottleneck. Scientists reveal DeepLoc, a deep learning algorithm that is faster and more accurate than the human eye and brings analysis time down from months to hours.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long lost monitor lizard 're-discovered' on Papua New Guinean islandScientists have recently found and re-described a monitor lizard species from the island of New Ireland in northern Papua New Guinea. It is the only large-growing animal endemic to the island that has survived until modern times. The lizard, Varanus douarrha, was already discovered in the early 19th century, but the type specimen never reached the museum where it was destined as it appears to have
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parenting-based therapies are best for children with disruptive behaviorsTherapy that involves the parents in the treatment of children with disruptive behavior disorders shows the best results compared to more than 20 other therapeutic approaches, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) are characterize
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel compound blocks replication of Zika and other virusesThe cells of vertebrates have evolved pathways that act like an internal defense, inhibiting viral infections by preventing replication of the pathogens. Drugs that activate those existing systems suggest a promising novel approach to treating dangerous infections by Zika and other viruses, say researchers from the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU),
4h
Gizmodo
Back In Stock: This $70 Harmony Remote Includes The All-Powerful Harmony Hub Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 $70 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. Advertisement The Hub allows you to use your iPhone, Android device, or even an Amazon Echo to control everything a Harmony remote can (which is basically any piece of home theater gear you can think of). So even when you inevi
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fashion mannequins communicate 'dangerously thin' body idealsThe body size of mannequins used to advertise female fashion in the UK are too thin and may be promoting unrealistic body ideals, say researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Propagation research on rare trees expands species recovery potentialWhen seeds from a rare tree are difficult or impossible to obtain, what's a conservationist to due? Grafting may be the answer to the protection of a species endemic to the southern Mariana Islands.
4h
Gizmodo
When Fans Take Their Love For Twitch Streamers Too Far Illustration by Jim Cooke It was one in the morning when the Twitch streamer Ellohime heard a knock at his front door. Advertisement He had been grinding away at a PC game that night in December 2015 while his infant daughter and fiancée slept. His 22-year-old brother was crashing in the central Florida home, too, and it wasn’t unheard of for him to invite friends over at odd hours. Ellohime left
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The courting cephalopods of the East China SeaThe oval squid are unusual in that they actively alter their skin's patterning. With their body language too, they can communicate a variety of mating, warning and social signals. These have been documented for the first time by researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Domino effect in pharmaceutical synthesisChemists have made research into pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis more efficient, more sustainable and more environmentally friendly. They have developed a novel synthetic route towards antiviral quinazoline heterocycles that have not been described previously in professional literature.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA fingerprinting reveals how malaria hides from our immune systemDNA fingerprinting has revealed how the malaria parasite shuffles genes to create different strains and hide from our immune system. This trick allows the parasite to remain undetected and re-infect the same people, much like the flu.
4h
WIRED
Astrobee: The Adorable Little Robot That’ll Soon Jet Around the ISS Astrobee will float around assisting astronauts in a range of tasks. It's a fascinating glimpse at NASA's robotic future in space. The post Astrobee: The Adorable Little Robot That'll Soon Jet Around the ISS appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED
What Remains of Edith Finch Is a Great Game—if You See Yourself in It Your experience with the sincere first-person exploration game will depend on how closely you can identify with its ideas. The post What Remains of Edith Finch Is a Great Game—if You See Yourself in It appeared first on WIRED .
4h
The Atlantic
A Fresh Bailout Deal for Greece Greece and its international creditors have struck a deal that would allow the country to receive bailout funds in exchange for more cuts to government pensions and higher taxes. Under the terms of the agreement, Greece will, among other things, cut pensions in 2019 and reduce the amount at which taxes must be paid in 2020 in order to save 2 percent of gross domestic product. In return, Greece’s
4h
The Atlantic
Is America Holding Out on Protecting Children's Rights? Recently, I asked my 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old students what they thought all children need in order to grow up healthy and strong. They responded readily: Lots and lot of water. Fruits and vegetables. Love. Schools. Homes. Parents. A life. Stuff to play with. A 5-year-old went a step further: “Legos.” A 6-year-old snapped back. “Legos? You don’t need them, but you would want them.” The list my stud
4h
Ars Technica
Samsung joins the self-driving car gold rush Enlarge (credit: JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images) The tech industry has a bad case of four-wheel fever, and it looks like there's no cure in sight. Before too long, it will be impossible to buy a new car without an embedded LTE modem—ostensibly there for our convenience, but with the side effect of creating a new revenue stream from monetized data. And then there's the self-driving car gold rush. A
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoking decreases MAIT cells, implicated in the pathology of autoimmune diseasesNew research published in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology provides another reason why smoking tobacco is harmful.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is safeElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective treatment for severe depression and other mental disorders, and a new study headed by researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark documents that the risk is very small. The most significant result in the study is that only one ECT-related death has been reported for the 414.747 ECT treatments that are registered in studies published after 200
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ecology team finds leaf litter has slower decomposition rate in warm temperaturesResearch, published in Global Change Biology with help from Kansas State University ecologists, found that leaf litter is not as sensitive to increases in temperature as ecologists once thought.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fluid flow in the brain unravelled for the first timeThe puzzle of how the brain regulates blood flow to prevent it from being flooded and then starved every time the heart beats has been solved with the help of engineering.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria take a deadly risk to surviveBacteria need mutations -- changes in their DNA code -- to survive under difficult circumstances. When necessary, they can even mutate at different speeds. This is shown in a recent study by the Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium. The findings open up various new avenues for research, ranging from more efficient biofuel production methods to a bette
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts call for registry of egg donorsA commentary and accompanying editorial published in the May issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Onlinecalls for a registry of egg donors to monitor long-term health after egg donation.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A trend towards a stable, warm and windless state in ChinaDuring 1961-2014, the surface temperature (wind speed) increased (decreased) over northern and northeastern China (NNEC) and the day-to-day variability (DDV) of the surface temperatures and wind speeds decreased, indicating a trend towards a stable, warm and windless state of the surface weather conditions over NNEC.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Erasable ink for 3-D printing3-D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3-D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This devel
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antarctic ice rift spreadsThe rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica now has a second branch, which is moving in the direction of the ice front, Swansea University researchers revealed after studying the latest satellite data. The main rift in Larsen C, which is likely to lead to one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, is currently 180 km long. The new branch of the rift is 15 km long.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The courting cephalopods of the East China SeaThe oval squid are unusual in that they actively alter their skin's patterning. With their body language too, they can communicate a variety of mating, warning and social signals. These have been documented for the first time by researchers.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Learning How to Be a Human BatHow do people learn to echolocate? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Radical idea could restore ice in the Arctic OceanWindmill-powered pumps on buoys throughout the Arctic Ocean could help bring back shrinking sea ice, researchers say.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infrared 3D scanner: Fast and accurateInfrared 3D scanners have been used in video games for quite some time. Whereas in video games the scanners are, for example, only able to identify if a player throws his arms up in the air while playing virtual volleyball, the new 3D scanner is able to be much more precise. With a resolution of one million pixels and real-time data processing, numerous applications are possible with this new devi
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers create a roadmap of bipolar disorder and how it affects the brainIn the largest MRI study on patients with bipolar disorder, a global consortium published new research showing that people with the condition have differences in the brain regions that control inhibition and emotion. By revealing clear and consistent alterations in key brain regions, the findings offer insight to the underlying mechanisms of bipolar disorder. Lithium treatment was associated with
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
California handgun sales spiked after two mass shootings, study findsIn the six weeks after the Newtown and San Bernardino mass shootings, handguns sales jumped in California, yet there is little research on why -- or on the implications for public health, according to a researcher.
5h
Ars Technica
Microsoft takes on Chrome OS with new Windows 10 S (credit: Johannes Hemmerlein ) NEW YORK—In a move to curtail Google's growing presence in the education market, Microsoft has announced a new Windows variant: Windows 10 S. Previously rumored as " Windows 10 Cloud ," the new Windows variant is defined by one specific design decision: it can only run and install applications that are obtained through the Windows Store. Both applications are built
5h
Ingeniøren
Vejdirektoratet nedlægger nødtelefoner langs motorvejeneUdbredelsen af mobiltelefoni overflødiggør de stationære nødtelefoner langs det danske vejnet. Vejdirektoratet vil derfor tage telefonerne ned i løbet af sommeren 2017.
5h
Ingeniøren
Fået nok af cookie-tracking og overvågning? Tysk browser kan øge din privacy Frem for at indsamle personlige data til centrale servere foretager tysk privacybrowser databehandling lokalt på brugernes enhed. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/faaet-nok-cookie-tracking-soegeovervaagning-tysk-browser-oeger-din-privacy-paa-nettet Version2
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Parents Tinker with Kids' Diet to Treat ADHDMedication and therapy remain the most effective treatments, but some are looking to alternatives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MicroRNA reduces stroke riskThe molecule microRNA-210 stabilizes deposits in the carotid artery and can thus prevent them from tearing, and prevent dangerous blood clots from forming. These results open up new treatment approaches to reduce stroke risk in patients with carotid arteries at risk of rupturing.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar cells with nanostripesSolar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: they convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. On their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers. These structures might serve as transport paths for charge carriers.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Losses reduce subsequent risk taking among bettorsPsychologically, loss is known to cause about twice as much pain as pleasure caused by similar gain. However, earlier studies focusing on how prior outcomes affect subsequent risk taking have reported conclusions that appear mutually contradictory.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stenciling with atoms in 2-dimensional materials possibleThe possibilities for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene, appear almost limitless. In new research, material scientists report two discoveries that will provide a simple and effective way to 'stencil' high-quality 2-D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics.
5h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Party drug’s power to fight depression puzzles scientists​ Ketamine can ease depression in hours, but researchers might have misjudged how it works. Nature 545 17 doi: 10.1038/545017a
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Environmental scientist takes high tech to salt marshesAnyone who has not spent time in a salt marsh may think of it as a hot, buggy, muggy, muddy, smelly, harsh and dismal environment – and that may be true, especially during the summer.
5h
Futurity.org
How to ‘stencil’ 2D materials for future electronics Two discoveries could provide a simple and effective way to “stencil” high-quality 2D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics. In 2004, the discovery of a way to isolate a single atomic layer of carbon—graphene —opened a new world of 2D materials with properties not necessarily found in the familiar 3D world. Among these materials are a la
5h
Futurity.org
Nice clothes could get you better restaurant service Restaurant servers believe well-dressed customers are most likely to leave good tips, research shows. This judgment could result in better service for those diners. “Everyone uses first impressions to make snap judgments,” says Dae-Young Kim, associate professor of hospitality management in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources. “This study also shows pote
5h
Gizmodo
'An Embarrassment': Scientists React to the NYT's Climate Change Column Illustration: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo Bret Stephens unleashed a Category 6 hurricane on Twitter last week, when he penned a column for the New York Times espousing opinions on climate change that can best be described as... controversial. While acknowledging that human-caused global warming is a settled matter, Stephens argued that the risk climate change poses is not. As a Times push notification sent
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA fingerprinting reveals how malaria hides from our immune systemDNA fingerprinting has revealed how the malaria parasite shuffles genes to create different strains and hide from our immune system. This trick allows the parasite to remain undetected and re-infect the same people, much like the flu.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Domino effect in pharmaceutical synthesisChemists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) headed by Prof. Dr. Svetlana B. Tsogoeva at the Chair of Organic Chemistry I have made research into pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis more efficient, more sustainable and more environmentally friendly. They have developed a novel synthetic route towards antiviral quinazoline heterocycles that have not been described previously
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bromances flourish thanks to changing anti-gay sentimentsA decline in homophobia is allowing young men to embrace the benefits of a non-sexual bromance with close male friends. According to Stefan Robinson of the University of Winchester in the UK, young men nowadays are socially encouraged to enjoy deep, emotional and physically intimate friendships. The so-called 'bromance' allows them to achieve the kind of closeness that is deeper than in other time
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feeding strategies in competing hummingbird species observed in a small area in BrazilBeing the vertebrates with the highest metabolic rate thanks to their rapid wing flaps, the hummingbirds have evolved various feeding behaviors. While they tend to go for food high in energy, strong competition affects greatly their preferences and behavior towards either dominance, obedience, traplining or a strategy named hide-and-wait, conclude Brazilian scientists after observing several speci
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fashion mannequins communicate 'dangerously thin' body idealsNew research from the University of Liverpool shows that the body size of mannequins used to advertise female fashion in the UK are too thin and may be promoting unrealistic body ideals.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential for Saudi Arabian coral reefs to shineCareful marine management and stricter fishing laws could enable Saudi Arabia's coral reefs to thrive.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Losses reduce subsequent risk taking among bettors -- applies to many other risky decisions, tooA new study carried out by the University of Eastern Finland Business School among horse race bettors shows that loss reduces subsequent risk taking, and bettors also tend to avoid loss when betting money they have already won. The findings were published in Management Science.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop recycling for carbon fiber compositesA WSU research team for the first time has developed a promising way to recycle the popular carbon fiber plastics that are used in everything from modern airplanes and sporting goods to the wind energy industry.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X-ray microscope optics resolve 50-nm features while eliminating chromatic aberrationsA collaborative team led by Osaka University researchers developed an optical system for full-field X-ray microscopes using two monolithic imaging mirrors that eliminates the chromatic aberrations that have previously limited microscope resolution. The mirror structure allowed an X-ray microscope system to resolve 50-nm-sized features with high stability over a 20-hour period. In addition to spect
5h
Viden
DNA fra hunulv beviser: Ulvepar har slået sig ned i DanmarkDNA-prøver dokumenterer, at en hunulv for første gang er flyttet permanent til Vestjylland, hvor den danner par med en han. Vi forventer unger i år eller næste år, siger forsker.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Erasable ink for 3D printing3D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This development opens up many new applications of 3D f
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lower more than you lift: Benefits for experienced resistance-trainersGreater benefits occur when lowering (i.e. eccentric) a greater load than is lifted (i.e. concentric) during resistance-training, research concludes. Individuals that trained with accentuated eccentric loads gained more strength and they showed greater increases in blood hormone concentration compared to those who used the same load for both lowering and lifting phases (i.e. traditional resistance
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the blog to blame for Vladimir Putin's 2011-12 elections defeat?In the 2011-12 elections, government leaders in Russia underestimated the power of the internet and it impacted the outcome of the elections. The open internet provided an opportunity for the opposition to communicate and rally support against the governing political group. The government's failure to gain control of the digital flow of information eroded support for their status quo. Fast forward
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neuralink wants to wire your brain to the internet – what could possibly go wrong?Neuralink – which is "developing ultra high bandwidth brain-machine interfaces to connect humans and computers" – is probably a bad idea. If you understand the science behind it, and that's what you wanted to hear, you can stop reading.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward a better understanding of structure-metabolism relationships in human aldehyde oxidase (Update)(Phys.org)—Drug design involves guided trial-and-error. How the body metabolizes a particular drug is important for determining drug efficacy. There have been many studies to understand how xenobiotics interact with cytochrome P450s, an important class of enzymes in drug metabolism, but little research has been done to understand aldehyde oxidase (AOX) metabolism. AOX, located in the liver, plays
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Wins Reprieve in U.S. Budget DealCongress gives National Institutes of Health a big boost and avoids cuts to research agencies sought by Trump -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Popular Science
What it's like to climb a century-old oak tree Entertainment Excerpt: Witness Tree What was it like up there in its branches? I decided that to know the big oak and its world well, I would have to change my vantage point.
5h
Popular Science
From the archives: How to stay fit and live longer, according to a 1920s authority on exercise Health Original headline: "Keep Your Neck and Abdomen Strong and You Can Count on a Fifty Per Cent Longer Life than the Average Man." "Keep Your Neck and Abdomen Strong and You Can Count on a Fifty Per Cent Longer Life than the Average Man." Read on.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three-thousand-year-old axes found in farmer's field in mid-NorwaySome 3,000 years ago, 24 axes were cached in Stjørdal municipality, about 44 km east of Trondheim. They’re now seeing the light of day once again.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sodium, magnesium to replace lithium in batteriesScientists have produced novel electrolytes for rechargeable sodium and magnesium batteries. The research group’s objective was to develop alternatives to lithium-ion technology.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
X-ray microscope optics resolve 50-nm features while eliminating chromatic aberrationsX-ray microscopes are commonly used in combination with full-field imaging techniques in spectromicroscopy applications, where they allow the chemical structures of materials to be analyzed and visualized simultaneously. However, the performance of these microscopes is often affected by problems with chromatic aberrations, and previous solutions to the problem have often proved difficult to manufa
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New line of attack on spinal muscular atrophyScientists have discovered a physiological chain of events in animal models in which motor neurons and their communication with muscle become disrupted by the mutation that causes spinal muscular atrophy.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earliest relative of Brachiosaurus dinosaur found in FranceScientists have re-examined an overlooked museum fossil and discovered that it is the earliest known member of the titanosauriform family of dinosaurs.
5h
Gizmodo
Our First Fleeting Look at the Villain of Justice League There are more rumors about who’ll direct the next Bond movie. James Gunn has big plans for Gamora in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 . Could an old friend be joining Peter Capaldi in his final episode of Doctor Who ? Plus, a new look at Once Upon a Time ’s musical episode, and new King Arthur clips. Spoilers now! Justice League Leaked images of some of the film’s tie-in lego sets appear to reveal
5h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ears-in-a-DishUsing three-dimensional culture, which allows cells to grow in a ball-shape aggregate, scientists created inner ear organoids containing sensory neurons and hair cells.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Erasable ink for 3-D printing3-D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3-D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This devel
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species of dinosaur increases the already unexpected diversity of 'whiplash dinosaurs'A new sauropod species has been named Galeamopus pabsti by the same team which recently reinstated the brontosaurus as a distinct genus.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weight loss can slow down knee joint degenerationOverweight and obese people who lost a substantial amount of weight over a 48-month period showed significantly lower degeneration of their knee cartilage, according to a new study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drinking in pregnancy: Excess transcription factor Heat Shock Factor 1 can delay embryonic neural migrationTranscription factor Heat Shock Factor 1, which the developing brain releases to shield the vital organ from the ravages of environmental stress, actually can contribute to impairing the embryonic brain when too much Hsf1 is produced, research indicates. While the finding was made in a preclinical model, it raises questions about neural risks for human infants if mothers drink alcohol in the first
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modest increases in kids' physical activity could avert billions in medical costsIncreasing the percentage of elementary school children in the United States who participate in 25 minutes of physical activity three times a week from 32 percent to 50 percent would avoid $21.9 billion in medical costs and lost wages over the course of their lifetimes, new research suggests.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into powerful inflammatory regulatorA new study in mice reveals how a protein called Brd4 boosts the inflammatory response -- for better and for worse, depending on the ailment. The study is the first to show that this protein, while problematic in some circumstances, also can protect the body from infection.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate instability over the past 720,000 yearsA new analysis of an ice core from Dome Fuji in Antarctica, along with climate simulation results, shows a high degree of climate instability (that is, rapid climate fluctuations) within glacial periods with intermediate temperatures. This instability was attributed primarily to global cooling caused by a reduced greenhouse effect.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is the blog to blame for Vladimir Putin's 2011-12 elections defeat?In the 2011-12 elections, Russia's government leaders underestimated the power of the internet and it impacted the outcome of the elections and spurred massive demonstrations in response to Vladimir Putin's stage-managing the presidential succession and evidence of widespread fraud. While the effects of internet use on political participation are well understood, the mechanisms of how this happens
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study challenges formaldehyde cancer findingsA newly published reanalysis of raw data from a study widely used by chemical assessment agencies to set hazard assessments for formaldehyde shows no link between formaldehyde exposure and leukemia. The peer-reviewed paper was just published online in the Journal of Critical Reviews in Toxicology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How life (barely) survived the greatest extinction?A new research highlights an assemblage including microbial mats, trace fossils, bivalves, and echinoids that represent a refuge in a moderately deep-water setting. A refuge describes an ecosystem that acts as a sanctuary for organisms during and immediately following times of environmental stress.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Under pressure: Understanding how portal hypertension occurs following liver injuryResearchers at the Medical University of South Carolina report that liver injury results in the loss of nitric oxide production, which causes an increase in pressure within the liver vasculature. This finding could provide a platform for the development of novel treatment options for portal hypertension.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising temperatures lead to increased fire risk in IndonesiaA new paper published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, shows that rising temperatures have increased the risk of fires even during non-drought years in Indonesia, possibly making mild fire seasons in the country a thing of the past. The study was conducted by scientists at IRI, the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Temple University and the Center for Internationa
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Cultural Fault Line That Is Reshaping Global PoliticsResearch shows perceived threats from outside may be the unifying explanation behind Brexit, Trump and the strength of Le Pen in France -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ministers will not appeal pollution rulingThe UK Government has decided not to appeal against the High Court's rejection of a bid to delay publication of its draft plan to tackle illegal levels of air pollution.
5h
Futurity.org
Getting kids to run around would save the U.S. billions Getting half of American 8- to 11-year-olds into 25 minutes of physical activity three times a week would save $21.9 billion in medical costs and lost wages over their lifetimes, new research suggests. The relatively modest increase—from the current 32 percent to 50 percent of kids participating in exercise, active play, or sports that often—would also result in 340,000 fewer obese and overweight
5h
WIRED
You Like Drone Photos, Yeah? Check Out These Stunning Shots Aerial photographs provide a refreshing take on a familiar scene. And flying robots that take pictures are cool. The post You Like Drone Photos, Yeah? Check Out These Stunning Shots appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED
How to Prep Your Phone for International Travel If you want the option to hail an Uber from the Acropolis, read this guide. The post How to Prep Your Phone for International Travel appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How ancient crops could counteract climate change effectsFarmers who grow single crops are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, but now researchers are resurrecting ancient crop varieties to encourage diversity and offset the risks of extreme weather.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic Peninsula ice more stable than thoughtGlacier flow at the southern Antarctic Peninsula has increased since the 1990s, but a new study has found the change to be only a third of what was recently reported.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Golden years are longer and healthier for those with good heart health in middle agePeople who have better cardiovascular health in middle age live longer and spend fewer of their later years with chronic illnesses of all types. They also save money on healthcare costs.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combination therapy could provide new treatment option for ovarian cancerA new study identifies a potential test that may help select patients for whom combination therapy could be most effective.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart disease risks experienced in childhood impact cognition later in lifeCardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking have long been associated with cognitive deficiencies in adults. A new study found the burden of cardiovascular risk factors from childhood and adolescence is associated with worse midlife cognition regardless of adulthood exposure.
5h
Gizmodo
Marvel Joins Comixology's All-You-Can Read Subscription Service Image: Comixology/Amazon. When Amazon and Comixology first announced Unlimited last year, two of the biggest comics publishers around were conspicuously absent from the list of comics available in the read-what-you-want service: Marvel and DC. But today, one of them has finally gotten on board. Advertisement io9 can exclusively reveal that, starting today, a selection of Marvel comics— ranging fr
5h
The Atlantic
When Memories Are True Even When They’re Not By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean In My Name Is Lucy Barton , the bestselling novel Elizabeth Strout published last year, the ailing narrator recalls her childhood with the help of her mother’s stories. Now, in a new book, Anyth
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Propagation research on rare trees expands species recovery potentialMany rare tropical tree species are restricted to a small, endemic range with very few remaining reproductive individuals. These species suffer from many threats. Conservation agencies often attempt to rebuild the population within the known endemic range of these endangered trees.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photoluminescent display absorbs, converts light into energyBy replacing the phosphor screen in a laser phosphor display (LPD) with a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC), one can harvest energy from ambient light as well as display high-resolution images. "Energy-harvesting laser phosphor display and its design considerations", published recently by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Photonics for Energy, describes
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare albino orangutan rescued on Borneo islandA rare albino orangutan has been rescued on the Indonesian part of Borneo island where villagers were keeping the white-haired, blue-eyed creature in a cage, a protection group said Tuesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is electricity use in the developing world about to skyrocket?Cities in the developing world may soon see dramatic spikes in electricity consumption for heating and cooling, according to a new study led by researchers from the Earth Institute's Quadracci Sustainable Engineering Lab.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For a green alga, spotted salamanders are stressful hostsNew research shows how two drastically different organisms—a green alga and the spotted salamander—get along as cellular roommates. Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History and Gettysburg College found that this symbiosis, the only known example that includes a vertebrate species, puts stress on algal cells, changing the way they make energy, but does not seem to negatively impact sala
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of dinosaur increases the already unexpected diversity of 'whiplash dinosaurs'Researchers from Italy and Portugal describe yet another new sauropod species from 150 million years ago, from Wyoming, USA
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bioinspired agent kills drug-resistant bacteriaResearchers in Ireland have developed a bioinspired antimicrobial treatment that can rapidly kill drug-resistant bacteria. The treatment consists of iodo-thiocyanate complexes, which are inspired by enzymes and reactive molecules produced by our immune system.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Patientforeninger får indflydelse på tilsyn Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed vil have patienter og patientforeninger med ved bordet, når tilsyn og patientrettet kommunikation skal tilrettelægges.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Interactive Brain ArtA new media installation at Columbia University renders the brain larger than life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photoluminescent display absorbs, converts light into energyA study recently published in the SPIE Journal of Photonics for Energy demonstrates how to convert a luminescent solar concentrator into an energy-harvesting laser phosphor display by projecting intensity modulated light. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Propagation research on rare trees expands species recovery potentialWhen seeds from a rare tree are difficult or impossible to obtain, what's a conservationist to due? Grafting may be the answer to the protection of a species endemic to the southern Mariana Islands.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble captures a sea of spiral galaxiesWhile one instrument of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observed a pair of spiral galaxies for its 27th anniversary last month, another simultaneously observed a nearby patch of the sky to obtain this wide-field view.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earliest relative of Brachiosaurus dinosaur found in FranceScientists have re-examined an overlooked museum fossil and discovered that it is the earliest member of the titanosauriform family of dinosaurs.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar cells with nanostripesSolar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: They convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. On their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers. These structures might serve as tr
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To ease Mexico City's water woes, look up, study suggestsFor Mexico City's biggest businesses and its poorest neighborhoods, rainwater harvesting could help address an enormous water crisis plaguing the city, a recent Columbia Water Center study found. Although critics often contend that rainwater harvesting is not cost-effective in the short-term, the researchers used a new methodology to calculate whether the approach would yield cost savings over 10
6h
Ars Technica
You have a few months to claim Amazon Underground’s best free games Enlarge (credit: Amazon) Amazon Underground, the company's experiment in "actually free" smartphone apps and games, will soon go even more underground. As in, dead and buried. A developer blog confirmed the news on Friday, saying that the program will stop accepting new software on May 31 and that its download service will be fully shuttered in "summer 2017." The Underground app store launched ju
6h
Ingeniøren
Affaldsknuser med stor appetit: Dette hjul har spist 500 ton affald Affald Forurening
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomer ponders the idea of looking for long extinct intelligent alien life(Phys.org)—Jason Wright, an astronomy professor at Penn State, has uploaded a paper to the arXiv preprint sever that addresses the issue of whether we have looked hard enough for extinct alien life—particularly intelligent forms of extraterrestrial life. In his paper, he questions whether enough effort is being put into looking for evidence of space-faring alien life forms (technosignatures) that
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to boil down a pile of diverse research papers into one cohesive pictureFrom social to natural and applied sciences, overall scientific output has been growing worldwide – it doubles every nine years.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why we choose terrible passwords, and how to fix themThe first Thursday in May is World Password Day, but don't buy a cake or send cards. Computer chip maker Intel created the event as an annual reminder that, for most of us, our password habits are nothing to celebrate. Instead, they – and computer professionals like me – hope we will use this day to say our final goodbyes to "qwerty" and "123456," which are still the most popular passwords.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CAST project passes an important milestone in search for axion(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working on the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) project report passing an important milestone in their search for the axion—they have moved below established astrophysical constraints and are now working in an area that is expected to reap many rewards regarding both the axion and other avenues of physics research. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ph
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
California Proposes Ambitious New Cap-and-Trade ProgramThe legislation would set one of the highest prices for carbon in the world.
6h
Videnskabens Verden
Vi mennesker har en slags politisk hjerne. Den har ikke udviklet sig så frygteligt meget siden urtiden. Og det er en af grundene til, at der er en sammenhæng mellem vores frygt for smitte og vores holdning til indvandrere. Indvandring er et hedt politisk emne, og mange partier scorer både høje stemmetal og masser af likes på Facebook på deres stramme integrationspolitik. På sociale medier og på de
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How 3-D food printers could improve mealtimes for people with swallowing disordersIt's hard to imagine food prepared in a printer can be tasty and look good. But a presentation at a 3-D food printing conference today shows how printed foods could improve the lives of people with swallowing disorders. These people are only able to eat foods textured in a particular way, which often don't look very nice on the plate.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The terrestrial and aerial components of a European spatial and urban mapping projectDeveloping a good, high-resolution 3-D map is a long, tedious and expensive process: a vehicle scans the surrounding environment from ground level up to the top of roofs or trees, while an aerial perspective is added using a drone. But a new approach, in which the terrestrial vehicle and drone are operated in tandem, has now been developed as part of a European project called mapKITE. EPFL researc
6h
Science | The Guardian
BBC revives Tomorrow's World name for season of programmes Science and technology show’s name to be used as umbrella for year-long partnership with institutions such as Royal Society The BBC is to revive the Tomorrow’s World name for a year-long season of science and technology programmes. Fondly remembered by TV fans of a certain age, the show ran for almost 40 years on BBC1 from 1965 until it was axed in 2003. Its name is being used as an umbrella for
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Art and Science of Making Movies Moves to the Outdoors, 1917Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study opens new line of attack on spinal muscular atrophyScientists have discovered a physiological chain of events in animal models in which motor neurons and their communication with muscle become disrupted by the mutation that causes spinal muscular atrophy.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For a green alga, spotted salamanders are stressful hostsNew research shows how two drastically different organisms -- a green alga and the spotted salamander -- get along as cellular roommates. Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History and Gettysburg College found that this symbiosis, the only known example that includes a vertebrate species, puts stress on algal cells, changing the way they make energy, but does not seem to negatively impac
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioinspired agent kills drug-resistant bacteriaMicrobial resistance to antibiotics and biocides is increasing, and our ability to effectively treat bacterial infections and contamination is under threat. Researchers have developed an antimicrobial treatment that can rapidly kill drug-resistant bacteria. These iodo-thiocyanate complexes caused rapid bacterial death in the tested strains, which included an antibiotic-resistant strain. They could
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop course for online blended learningAcross the country, classrooms are making the transition to blended learning models. Typically, students work together, with devices, with a teacher and seek information from a number of educational resources. Recently, researchers at the University of Kansas developed an online course to help teachers create blended learning environments by moving from teacher-centered to student-centered learnin
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The ecological 'pawprint' of domestic dogs is much greater than previously realisedHumans and their canine companions share many close bonds. Wolves (Canis lupus) were the first animal domesticated by people, some time between 15,000 and 50,000 years ago.
6h
Gizmodo
Back For Wedding Season: The Best Price Ever On Your Favorite Custom Suits [Exclusive] Indochino Premium Suits , $350 + free shipping, use promo code KINJA, expires 5/8 You voted Indochino your favorite custom clothing company by a wide margin, and this week you can dress yourself in one of their premium suits for just $350 . Use promo code KINJA . Advertisement You do not have to go through the measurement and customization process to lock in this discount. You can checkout now an
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Capacitor withstands temperatures of up to 300 degrees CelsiusHeat, dust and moisture damage electronic components. Protecting against dust and moisture is fairly straightforward, but heat remains a problem because it is created within the component itself. Anywhere electricity flows, heat is generated as well. There is not always enough space in the electronic component to draw away the waste heat with cooling fins or ventilators. Devices that operate in a
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The progress toward sustainabilityThe integration of economic development, modern management and environmental protection created the field of sustainability management. The effort to ensure that humans could continue to benefit from the miracle of this planet, and increase the distribution of those benefits to all of humanity is well underway. In some sense, it is a race against time as we learn how to reduce the impact of econom
6h
WIRED
Don’t Look Now, But Even Buses Are Going Autonomous Reno, Nevada jumps headfirst into the autonomous future---and tries to answer some big questions about public transit in the process. The post Don't Look Now, But Even Buses Are Going Autonomous appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designed molecules selectively remove unwanted ions from complex solutions for energy productionNuclear energy accounts for some 19 percent of the U.S. electrical energy supply. The waste contains materials that are difficult to remove. Scientists developed four classes of molecules, called chelators, to selectively capture specific ions. These molecules use a combination of chemical bonding, attractions between opposite charges, and/or wrapping the ions in complementary binding pockets.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-sensitivity microwave amplifier detects very weak signalsIn the coming years, the European Space Agency (ESA) will be launching a series of new weather satellites that will be able to measure important meteorological data, such as precipitation, water vapor or temperature, better than ever before. The heart of these measuring devices consists of extremely sensitive microwave amplifiers that were developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid St
6h
The Atlantic
Dueling Accounts of a Brexit Meeting U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is expected Tuesday to cite the importance of a united front against the other 27 members of the European Union as her country negotiates the terms of its divorce from the bloc—the process known as “Brexit.” May’s expected remarks come a day after Frankfurter Allgemeine , the German newspaper, reported that Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, le
6h
Gizmodo
Scientists Just Found a Completely New Kind of Symbiotic Relationship A single spotted salamander embryo encased in an egg. (Image: Roger Hangarter) In a scientific first, researchers have discovered a bizarre inter-species relationship in which salamanders and algae cozy up together to share cells. Scientists aren’t entirely sure why these two very different organisms have adopted such an intimate arrangement, but the discovery could represent a completely new for
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Does Your Pooch Love You?The answer may surprise you -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast and accurate infrared 3-D scannerInfrared 3-D scanners have been used in video games for quite some time. Whereas in video games the scanners are, for example, only able to identify if a player throws his arms up in the air while playing virtual volleyball, the new 3-D scanner of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF is able to be much more precise. With a resolution of one million pixels and r
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sodium and magnesium to replace lithium in batteriesScientists supported by the SNSF have produced novel electrolytes for rechargeable sodium and magnesium batteries. The research group's objective was to develop alternatives to lithium-ion technology.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray microscope optics resolve 50-nm features while eliminating chromatic aberrationsX-ray microscopes are commonly used in combination with full-field imaging techniques in spectromicroscopy applications, where they allow the chemical structures of materials to be analyzed and visualized simultaneously. However, the performance of these microscopes is often affected by problems with chromatic aberrations— optical effects that limit the resolution or degree of fineness to which im
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
Smelling Disease, Why You’re a Privacy Hypocrite, and AI’s Imitation Game—The Download, May 2, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bending sheet glass using lasers and gravityA new Fraunhofer technique makes it possible to bend sheet glass into complex or unconventional shapes with the help of laser beams. This opens up a whole new range of potential products for architects and designers. The researchers are taking advantage of a particular attribute glass has of becoming viscous and therefore malleable when exposed to high temperatures. Precise calculations and gravit
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A simple reward system could make crowds a whole lot wiserThere's a problem with the wisdom of crowds.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Webb Telescope completes Goddard testing, heading to Texas for moreNASA's James Webb Space Telescope has successfully passed the center of curvature test, an important optical measurement of Webb's fully assembled primary mirror prior to cryogenic testing, and the last test held at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, before the spacecraft is shipped to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston for more testing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Archean Ocean as an ideal breeding ground for lifeIn a project funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, the biochemist Markus Keller demonstrated successfully how important metabolic mechanisms were able to develop in cells four billion years ago. His research provides completely new insights into the origin of life.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sugar-craving crushed—in flies, at leastYale scientists have discovered ways to blunt the craving for sugar—in fruit flies, at least.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
1000 km range thanks to a new battery conceptYou cannot get far today with electric cars. One reason is that the batteries require a lot of space. Fraunhofer scientists are stacking large cells on top of one another. This provides vehicles with more power. Initial tests in the laboratory have been positive. In the medium term, the project partners are striving to achieve a range of 1000 kilometers for electric vehicles.
7h
Dagens Medicin
GLP1-midler kan måske stabilisere blodsukker ved type 1-diabetesCenter for Diabetesforskning og Steno Diabetes Center er gået sammen om et ph.d.-projekt, der skal afprøve et helt nyt behandlingsregime til patienter med type 1-diabetes. Regimet går ud på at mindske udsving i blodsukkerret efter måltider med GLP1-analogen Byetta.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inkjet-printed batteries bring us closer to smart objectsThe race is on to develop everyday objects that have network connectivity and can send and receive data: the so-called 'Internet of Things'. But this requires flexible, lightweight and thin rechargeable power sources. Currently available batteries are packaged into fixed shapes and sizes, making them unsuitable for many future needs.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biological sensor can detect glucose levels in saliva more accurately and cost-efficiently than blood testDiabetes is a metabolic disease defined by high blood sugar levels, and can affect organs such as the heart, eyes and kidneys. According to the World Health Organization, over 420 million people suffer from this condition worldwide. People with diabetes must monitor their blood glucose levels regularly and frequently, but the existing method is invasive, as it requires taking a blood sample from t
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find evidence of traffic pollution in remote HimalayaSmog from cars and trucks is an expected health hazard in big cities, but researchers from the University of Cincinnati found pollution from truck exhaust on one of the most remote mountain roads in the world.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New species of dinosaur increases the already unexpected diversity of 'whiplash dinosaurs'A new sauropod species has been named Galeamopus pabsti by the same team which recently reinstated the brontosaurus as a distinct genus.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earliest relative of Brachiosaurus dinosaur found in FranceScientists have re-examined an overlooked museum fossil and discovered that it is the earliest known member of the titanosauriform family of dinosaurs.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of 14 million Arab Spring tweets reveals normal people drive huge movementsThe massive Arab Spring protests that began in late December 2010 and spread from North Africa to the Middle East generated huge crowds and had quick and profound effects—including the overthrow of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who had held a firm grip on the country for decades.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collaboration yields promising innovation in stain resistanceWhen you spill pasta sauce on your favorite shirt but there is no trace of it after being washed, you can thank oleophobicity, a resistance to oil commonly applied to textiles.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Food ingredient blends more sensitive to climate change, study findsA recent Purdue study, featured on the cover of the May edition of the Journal of Food Science, deciphers why food ingredient blends are more sensitive to changes in climate than single ingredients.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find more efficient way to make oil from dead treesThe mountain pine beetle has destroyed more than 40 million acres of forest in the western United States. That amounts to an area the size of Washington state that is strewn with conifers left for dead.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cassini ran through the 'big empty'Nasa says its Saturn probe encountered very few particles in its dive inside the rings last week.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trans-Pacific journey of atmospheric particlesPuzzling skiers, occasional brownish-yellow plumes waft over Colorado ski resorts during winter and spring. Instead of wondering, researchers led by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory decided to get to the bottom of the plumes' source and content. Their research, now published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences found that the plumes hold countless dust particles carried from r
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heat-resistant ultrasonic transducersTechnical systems must be regularly checked for defects, such as cracks. Up to now, piezo sensors measuring pressure, force or voltage have been used to reliably detect such faults – but only to around 200 degrees Celsius. Now, special high-temperature piezo sensors can continuously monitor components that are as hot as 900 degrees Celsius. Fraunhofer researchers will present their development at
7h
WIRED
Hundreds of Apps Can Listen for Marketing ‘Beacons’ You Can’t Hear So-called ultrasonic beacons are becoming even more popular with marketers. Here's how to shut them out. The post Hundreds of Apps Can Listen for Marketing ‘Beacons’ You Can’t Hear appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED
Why Are Data-Viz Designers So Obsessed With Circles? A new book from data designer Manuel Lima looks at why so many infographics are circular. The post Why Are Data-Viz Designers So Obsessed With Circles? appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED
Hackers Aren’t the Only Ones Defending Your Right to Federal Data On Thursday, two senators introduced a bill that would make it much, much harder for any administration to disappear public data. The post Hackers Aren't the Only Ones Defending Your Right to Federal Data appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED
Look to Zuck’s F8, Not Trump’s 100 Days, to See the Shape of the Future While the fate of the Trump administration matters, it may shape the world much less decisively than the changes rapidly altering the digital landscape. The post Look to Zuck's F8, Not Trump's 100 Days, to See the Shape of the Future appeared first on WIRED .
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery creates a new paradigm for creating materials from crystalsLook closely enough, and you'll see ingenious patterns everywhere in nature. Scientists and engineers have long understood this, but mimicking Mother Nature in building such patterns— especially highly ordered crystal structure—has proven challenging. Recently, Maria Sushko and Kevin Rosso at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) significantly advanced understanding by clarifying the drivin
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Fossil sheds light on 'Jurassic Park' dinosaursA fossil kept in storage in a museum for decades turns out to that of a new species, say researchers.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving costs with cover cropsAgricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have found a cost-saving strategy for cotton growers in Alabama who use cover crops.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deforestation endangering the majority of the world's species, says new global researchHundreds of thousands of species could soon go extinct due to the effects of deforestation, new research examining global data has found.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s how an asteroid impact would kill youMost deaths caused by an asteroid impact would result from shock waves and winds generated from the blast, rather than effects such as earthquakes and tsunamis, new simulations show.
7h
Science | The Guardian
Alarm sounded over delays to develop UK mini nuclear reactors Lords scold government for lack of progress on small modular reactors plan, warning UK nuclear sector will suffer if firms walk away The government’s failure to deliver on a multimillion-pound competition to develop mini atomic power stations has hurt the nuclear sector and risks international companies walking away from the UK, a Lords committee has warned. In 2015 the then chancellor George Osb
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Hunt for Endemic Insects on Easter IslandA cave scientist goes in search of the last vestiges of an ancient ecosystem -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
New Scientist - News
Neutron stars that slow down could be eating ‘backwards’ gasMost binary neutron stars are thought to spin ever faster as they devour their companions - but some slow down, and it could be to do with their gassy meals
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monitoring astronauts' lung healthAstronauts in space are valuable sources of scientific data. Researchers collect blood and urine samples to understand what effects living in weightlessness has on their bodies. For one experiment, investigators are interested in their breath.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oldest Norwegian ice locatedParts of the ice of the Juvfonne snow patch in Jotunheimen are 7600 years old, which makes it the oldest dated ice on mainland Norway.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop efficient multifunctional catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation to gasolineConverting CO2 from a detrimental greenhouse gas into value-added liquid fuels not only contributes to mitigating CO2 emissions, but also reduces dependence on petrochemicals. However, since CO2 is a fully oxidized, thermodynamically stable and chemically inert molecule, the activation of CO2 and its hydrogenation to hydrocarbons or other alcohols comprises challenging tasks. Most research to date
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New colored coating surface for superior rust resistancePolymer chemists at Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan invented a simple coating process to color metals, leading to higher performance and energy savings. The method involves a chemical modification to non-ionic polymers and nanotechnology.
8h
Ingeniøren
Hundes sædkvalitet falder - ligesom mændsBritiske forskere mener, hormonforstyrrende stoffer skader frugtbarheden hos menneskets bedste ven. Forskningen kan være med til at forklare betydelige fald i menneskelig sædkvalitet.
8h
Ingeniøren
Danske kraftværker fyrede løs, mens vi betalte for at komme af med vind- og solstrømBlæsevejr og solskin gav negative elpriser i hele Danmark mandag. Alligevel fyrede en del kraftværker op under kedlerne for at producere varme til stuerne - og endnu mere strøm.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
New AI Tech Can Mimic Any VoiceEmerging technologies in speech generation raise ethics and security concerns -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cassini finds 'The Big Empty' close to SaturnAs NASA's Cassini spacecraft prepares to shoot the narrow gap between Saturn and its rings for the second time in its Grand Finale, Cassini engineers are delighted, while ring scientists are puzzled, that the region appears to be relatively dust-free. This assessment is based on data Cassini collected during its first dive through the region on April 26.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real-time evidence of morphological changes of dust particles due to internal mixing with pollutionFrequent occurrence of both anthropogenic pollution and natural dust in East Asia has great impact on regional air quality, human health and climate. Until now, their interaction and consequent effect on dust morphology remain statistically unclear, because even though the traditional filter-based bulk sampling method can provide accurate chemical compounds, it cannot distinguish the mixing state
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First intensive measurements of shallow cumulus clouds over the Inner Mongolia GrasslanShallow cumulus (SCu) clouds play an important role in the global redistribution of water and energy and in the transport of surface heat, moisture and momentum to the free troposphere. SCu clouds or fair-weather cumuli are characterized by their small size, relatively weak convection, and no precipitation, which is significantly different from cumulus congestus and deep convection clouds.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How dandelion seeds act as a perfect pipette in the labTaraxacum officinale, better known as the common dandelion, is a much-maligned weed cursed the world over for its ability to infest lawns and crops. The plant's paratrooper-like seed dispersal system makes it difficult to eradicate, even for those with the greenest thumbs.
8h
Live Science
More Americans Than Ever Are Single (And Why That's a Good Thing)This trend of single Americans has the chance to redefine the traditional meaning – and confines – of home, family and community, says one social scientist.
8h
Science : NPR
Why Social Media Isn't Always Very Social Studies show that people who spend more time on social media sites feel more socially isolated than those who don't. This might be because of a disconnect between our online lives and our real ones. (Image credit: Dan Sipple/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
8h
Live Science
Growing Siberian Crater Seen by SatelliteThe Siberian "megaslump" holds the remains of Pleistocene bison, horses and even cave lions.
8h
Live Science
Could the US Stop Nuclear Weapons?Despite decades of research and billions of dollars in investment, no one has a nuclear missile defense system that is remotely reliable, experts say.
8h
Live Science
Eerie Dark Swath Extends Across Arabian Satellite PhotoDarkness intrudes into light in this spooky satellite image of the Arabian Sea.
8h
WIRED
India’s Silicon Valley Is Dying of Thirst. Your City May Be Next Bangalore was once the icon of a globalized, high tech, utopian future. Now it's the thirsty sign of a global catastrophe The post India’s Silicon Valley Is Dying of Thirst. Your City May Be Next appeared first on WIRED .
8h
The Atlantic
Carrie Fisher's Perfect Farewell on Catastrophe The night before she suffered the heart attack that would kill her, Carrie Fisher had dinner with Sharon Horgan, the creator and co-star of Amazon’s Catastrophe . Horgan later recalled to the Associated Press, “She had been at the antique market earlier that day and she was showing me all these lovely little bits and pieces that she bought for her mom to bring back.” That small anecdote gains a l
8h
The Atlantic
Lessons From Isaac Asimov's Multivac In his 1955 short story Franchise , Isaac Asimov imagined how American democracy might be radically transformed by the digital age. In the story, set in 2008, Americans’ political will is exercised not by individual citizens who stand in line to vote, but by a massive supercomputer—the Multivac—that processes an ocean of public data with inscrutable algorithms to reliably predict the outcome of t
8h
The Atlantic
The Next Great Experiment We are witnessing, on a massive scale, diminishing faith in institutions of all kinds. People don’t trust the government . They don’t trust banks and other corporations . They certainly don’t trust the news media . At the same time, we are living through a period of profound technological change. Along with the rise of bioengineering, networked devices, autonomous robots, space exploration, and m
8h
Dagens Medicin
Ny kommunikationschef på Aarhus Universitetshospital
8h
Ingeniøren
40-årig mand svindler Google og Apple for 800 millioner Hvor mange falske regninger, de to selskaber har betalt, vides ikke. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/40-aarig-mand-svindler-google-apple-800-millioner-1076158 Version2
9h
NYT > Science
Pulse of the People: How Marching for Science Risks Politicizing ItIf science begins to be seen as a “liberal” pursuit, one researcher said, it risks losing public favor.
9h
cognitive science
Computers and the Mind – What’s the Difference? submitted by /u/pardeu [link] [comments]
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better quality relationships associated with reduced dementia riskPositive social support from adult children is associated with reduced risk of developing dementia, according to a new research published today. Conversely, negative social support is linked with increased risk, according to the 10-year follow-up study carried out by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), University College London (UCL), London Metropolitan University and
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop efficient multifunctional catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation to gasolineScientists succeeded in preparing a high efficient, stable, and multifunctional Na¨CFe3O4/HZSM-5 catalyst for the direct production of gasoline from CO2 hydrogenation. This catalyst exhibited 78% selectivity to C5¨CC11 as well as low CH4 and CO selectivity under industrial relevant conditions. And gasoline fractions are mainly isoparaffins and aromatics thus favoring the octane number.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Excess transcription factor Heat Shock Factor 1 can delay embryonic neural migrationTranscription factor Heat Shock Factor 1, which the developing brain releases to shield the vital organ from the ravages of environmental stress, actually can contribute to impairing the embryonic brain when too much Hsf1 is produced, research led by Children's National Health System scientists indicates. While the finding was made in a preclinical model, it raises questions about neural risks for
9h
Ingeniøren
Forskere: Kometnedslag 10.950 f.Kr. fremtvang de første landbrugssamfundEt stort meteornedslag for godt 13.000 år siden startede en miniistid. Efterfølgende knaphed kan have medført de første landbrugssamfund, mener skotske forskere.
9h
Science : NPR
A New Generation Overthrows Gender Parents, schools and elected officials are working to catch up and adapt to the needs of children and teens who don't fit into familiar gender categories. (Image credit: Bert Johnson/KQED)
9h
The Atlantic
The Fight for Control of the Heritage Foundation The drama over the attempt to remove the president of the Heritage Foundation, Jim DeMint, is partly classic Washington power politics. But it also reflects tensions over the organization’s relationship with the Trump administration and with Trumpist ideology. DeMint, the former South Carolina senator who has led the conservative institution since 2013, is widely expected to be ousted soon—either
9h
The Atlantic
What Trump Gets Right—and Progressives Get Wrong—About Andrew Jackson In an interview excerpt that ricocheted around the internet Monday morning, Trump implied that the Civil War didn’t have to happen, and had Andrew Jackson been the president, it might not have happened because he would have talked some sense into the parties. Or something. In this same interview, the president also sang the praises of the people of Tennessee who, he assured us, love Andrew Jackso
9h
The Atlantic
Should Communities Have a Say in How Residents Are Punished for Crime? CHICAGO—In most courts in the Cook County district, a person accused of a crime will have their case decided in a courtroom, by a judge. There’s little attempt to tackle any issues underlying the crime, and few alternatives to incarceration if they’re found guilty. A new court opening this summer in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood is looking to change that equation for some offenders. The R
9h
The Atlantic
Why U.S. Criminal Courts Are So Dependent on Plea Bargaining Shondel Church was arrested in Kansas City, Missouri, last July, accused of stealing a generator and a tool box from his stepmother. He sat in Lafayette County Jail for six weeks before his first conversation with a public defender, Matthew Gass. Gass was reportedly hopeful that he could win the case at trial, but explained that the intensity of his workload meant he would need six months to prep
9h
Ingeniøren
Professor: »Til trods for sit negative ry, er al bekymring ikke destruktiv eller meningsløs«Amerikansk professor beretter, at bekymring er en glimrende motivationsfaktor og kan fungere som en emotionel buffer.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create a roadmap of bipolar disorder and how it affects the brainIn the largest MRI study on patients with bipolar disorder, a global consortium published new research showing that people with the condition have differences in the brain regions that control inhibition and emotion. By revealing clear and consistent alterations in key brain regions, the findings offer insight to the underlying mechanisms of bipolar disorder. Lithium treatment was associated with
10h
Ingeniøren
Hovedtransplantation: Rotter overlever med et ekstra hovedItaliensk kirurg vil i december lave verdens første hovedtransplantation på et menneske. Nu er han måske kommet tættere på målet efter succesfuldt rotteforsøg.
10h
The Atlantic
Will the Supreme Court Defend Citizenship? Very few Americans have heard of Afroyim v. Rusk , a 1967 U.S. Supreme Court case on citizenship, but all Americans can perhaps be grateful for it. Most of the Court’s landmark decisions are famous for their tangible effects, like dismantling racial segregation or legalizing abortion rights. Afroyim ’s impact can instead be felt by what hasn’t happened: No natural-born Americans have been involun
10h
The Atlantic
The Historical Exclusion Behind the Puerto Rico Bankruptcy Crisis Puerto Rico just hit another debt deadline. At midnight on Monday , a year-long moratorium on lawsuits from the island’s creditors will expire, which many forecasters project might worsen a developing financial catastrophe on the island, as at least a dozen creditors are expected to sue and tie up more territorial funds. Things took a turn for the worst last weekend, when bondholders rejected a r
10h
Dagens Medicin
Radikale foreslår talegenkendelse til SundhedsplatformenEt talegenkendelsesmodul skal gøre livet lettere for de hospitalsafdelinger i Region Hovedstaden, hvis klinikere skriver mest fritekst i journalsystemet Sundhedsplatformen. Det foreslår De Radikale nu til udvalgsbehandling for regionens budget for 2018.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New lease of life for Ukraine's war-torn mountain observatoryPerched spectacularly 2,000 metres up on a snowcapped peak in Ukraine's Carpathian Mountains, the Bilyi Slon observatory has stood empty and battered by the elements for some seven decades.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Milena Penkowa er sigtet i ny sag Hjerneforskeren risikerer at miste autorisation. Hun sigtes for at overtræde straffeloven og for at drive lægevirksomhed fra sin bopæl i strid med autorisationsloven.
11h
Science-Based Medicine
Medical Neglect of ChildrenMedical neglect caused horrific suffering for these children, ending in death or permanent impairment. Their parents failed them, but so did society.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Exotic pet therapy?A group in Ontario are using animals like capybaras and kinkajous to reduce stress.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook CEO dinner hosts say he's not running for presidentAn Ohio family that hosted Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for dinner says he made it clear he wasn't planning to run for president in 2020.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic Peninsula ice more stable than thoughtGlacier flow at the southern Antarctic Peninsula has increased since the 1990s, but a new study has found the change to be only a third of what was recently reported.
12h
Ingeniøren
Udviklere bag Dankort-app: Vi har testet designudkast på fortovet og i s-toget Vi har kastet alle brugertest, vi kunne tænke på, efter den her app, siger creative director hos det digitale bureau In2Media. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/appfirma-bag-dankort-app-vi-har-testet-designudkast-paa-fortovet-s-toget-1076141 Version2
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antarctic Peninsula ice more stable than thoughtGlacier flow at the southern Antarctic Peninsula has increased since the 1990s, but a new study has found the change to be only a third of what was recently reported.
13h
cognitive science
How the Memory Palace changes your brain; Creating "Uselessness" in life; How to improve your Life Context and Darwin was a Slacker, You Should be too. An assortment of tasty brain goodies in this week's Monday Morsels. submitted by /u/neuralle [link] [comments]
14h
Gizmodo
Someone Has Turned Every Song on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Into a Star Wars Parody Image: Lucasfilm Princess Leia’s Stolen Death Star Plans (say it out loud in the same rhythm as you would Sgt. Peppers Lonely Heart’s Club Band ) is the project of Palette-Swap Ninja, who has gamely rendered a parody of every Sgt. Pepper’s song as the story of A New Hope . Here’s the crazy part: They’re all really good! Advertisement As detailed on Palette-Swap Ninja’s website , there are many wa
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New coating surface for superior rust resistance with 'colorless' colorElectric fields can mobilize non-ionic particles to coat metal surfaces.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pinpointing where seizures are coming from, by looking between the seizuresA computational approach developed at Boston Children's Hospital, described in the journal Neurosurgery, published online May 2, 2017, could enable more patients with epilepsy to benefit from surgery when medications do not help.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight loss can slow down knee joint degenerationOverweight and obese people who lost a substantial amount of weight over a 48-month period showed significantly lower degeneration of their knee cartilage, according to a new study.
14h
Gizmodo
China's Shot at Wikipedia Aims to Be a 'Great Wall of Culture' Image sources: Getty, Wikipedia China and Wikipedia have always had a contentious relationship and it appears that authorities are beginning to realize that if they can’t allow access to the site, they’ll have to build one of their own. But the leader of the new project says “our goal is not to catch up, but overtake.” South China Morning Post reports: Advertisement Advertisement “The Chinese Enc
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
An Ostrich-Like Robot Pushes the Limits of Legged LocomotionRobots are still learning to walk. Here’s one that runs on two legs.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Stor forskerpris til diabetes-professor Professor Filip Krag Knop har modtaget pris for sit arbejde med tarmhormonernes betydning for stofskifte, fedme og type 2-diabetes.
14h
Ingeniøren
Revnet tandhjul skyld i helikopterulykkeMetaltræthed i rotorens planetgear var skyld i ulykken, der sidste år kostede 13 mennesker livet, da en Super Puma-helikopter styrtede ned nær Turøy. Det fastslår den norske havarikommission i foreløbig undersøgelsesrapport.
15h
Gizmodo
Stranger Things Season 2 Will Have More Horror In It Joyce Byers (Winona Rider) is still scared in Stranger Things season 2. Image: Netflix May is here, which means we have almost exactly six months until Netflix releases the second season of Stranger Things on Halloween. And, according to the show’s stars, that second season is going to borrow heavily from a certain genre. Advertisement “I think this season will be a lot [darker]. A lot more horro
16h
The Scientist RSS
Experts Skeptical of Plans for First Human Head TransplantDespite claims of preclinical success by a leading surgeon, doctors, scientists, and medical ethicists say the science is not ready.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New roadmap provides blueprint to tackle burden of asthmaA new roadmap has been published identifying key priority areas that need to be addressed to tackle the burden of asthma.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Secrets of tea plant revealed by scienceBotanists unlock the genetic workings of the tea plant, in a move that could improve flavour.
17h
Gizmodo
Trump’s Likely Federal Family Planning Pick Is Anti-Contraception, Pro Threesomes With God Photo: Getty Donald Trump is reportedly adding another member to his administration that wants to see the destruction of the program that they’ve been charged with leading. Politico reports that Teresa Manning, an anti-contraception activist, will oversee the budget for the federal family planning program. Manning has previously said that “family planning is what occurs between a husband and a wi
17h
Ingeniøren
Sådan undgår du, at dit kropssprog saboterer din faglighed Selvfølgelig skal du være fagligt dygtig, men for at få succes på jobbet skal du også have styr på dit kropssprog. En amerikansk ekspert opsummerer kroppens syv dødssynder. Nummer fem er en overraskelse for de fleste. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-undgaar-du-at-dit-kropssprog-saboterer-din-faglighed-7640 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Men need more frequent lung cancer screening than womenPersonalized screening strategies, such as a gender approach, could be a way to optimize results and allocate resources appropriately.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
British territories' environment 'at risk'Overseas territories' ministers say Brexit is distracting the government from environmental issues.
18h
The Atlantic
The Military's U-Turn on Student Athletes Military athletes must now serve at least two years of active duty before they are recruited into professional sports, the Pentagon announced Monday. The news reverses a 2016 policy that allowed service academy athletes to “go pro” directly after graduating, and will apply to this year’s graduating class. “Our military academies exist to develop future officers who enhance the readiness and the l
18h
Ars Technica
Theranos settles “series of lies” lawsuits from investor that chipped in $96M Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: NBC Today ) On Monday, Theranos announced the settlement of two lawsuits that were in response to an alleged “series of lies.” Both suits had been brought by Partner Fund Management LP, a hedge fund that invested $96.1 million in the blood-testing company. In the suits, both filed in the Delaware Court of Chancery, PFM claimed that Theranos misl
18h
New Scientist - News
Listening to your heartbeat helps you read other people’s mindsPeople who are more aware of their heartbeats are better at perceiving the emotions of others, suggesting training might help some autism symptoms
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paperImagine wearing clothes with layers of paper that protect you from dangerous bacteria. A research team has invented an inexpensive, effective way to kill bacteria and sanitize surfaces with devices made of paper.
18h
Ars Technica
Intel patches remote hijacking vulnerability that lurked in chips for 7 years Enlarge (credit: Intel ) Remote management features that have shipped with Intel processors since 2010 contain a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over the computers that run on vulnerable networks, according to advisories published by Intel and the researcher credited with discovering the critical flaw . Intel has released a patch for the vulnerability, which resides in the chipmak
19h
Gizmodo
What's the Best Clothes Hanger? I’m Priscilla /Unsplash You probably own about 100 clothes hangers, and yet the only time you give them a second thought is when you can’t find enough. But not all of them are created equal, and some are downright terrible (I’m looking at you, wire hangers), so we want to know which ones you trust to hold your wardrobe. Advertisement 1) Your nomination should contain the specific name of the prod
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily


Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.