Gizmodo
Feast Your Eyes On The First Defenders Trailer GIF Netflix We’ve seen Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist all individually do battle with the evil that plagues Netflix’s corners of the Marvel Universe. Now, for the first time we get a look at all four of them fighting together as the Defenders they were destined to become. Advertisement A newly resurrected Elektra’s back and she it seems as if she’s brought a whole mess of well
36min
The Atlantic
What Critiques of 'Smug Liberals' Miss Last April, Emmett Rensin warned in Vox about what he called “the smug style in American liberalism.” Its adherents believe that American life is not divided by moral or policy differences, “but by the failure of half the country to know what's good for them.” He worried that an ideology responsible for a lot of good for a century was now indulging in the posture of a “condescending, defensive sn
1h
Ingeniøren
Prisen for Landbrugspakken: Mere ammoniak i luften og en ekstraregning til sundhedsvæsenetNår landmændene i 2020 har udnyttet Landbrugspakkens lempede gødskningsregler, vil det koste sundhedsvæsenet 57 mio. kr. årligt at afbøde helbredsvirkningerne.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common cold duration is shortened similarly by zinc acetate and zinc gluconate lozengesThere is no significant difference between zinc acetate lozenges and zinc gluconate lozenges regarding their efficacy in shortening the duration of common colds according to a meta-analysis.
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One step closer to finding out how wine may protect your neuronsLow to moderate intake of red wine can delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Researchers have now found out how wine compounds are protective against neuronal death: they should pass through your stomach first.
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helistroke service: Flying the physician to the stroke patient worksFlying a stroke specialist by helicopter to a nearby stroke patient for emergency care is feasible, saves money and, most importantly, gets critical care to patients faster than transporting the patient to a hospital first, according to a single-patient, proof-of-concept study.
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
You're not too old to learn thatA new theory by UC Riverside psychology professor Rachel Wu asserts that if we as adults continue to learn the way we did as children, we can redefine what it means to be an 'aging' adult.
5min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mayo Clinic-invented technologies show brain tumor firmness, adhesion before surgeryIt's not often that a fall saves someone's life. Helen Powell, 74, says that was the case for her. A computerized tomography scan that followed her fall revealed a cancerous brain tumor that led her to Mayo Clinic and surgery using first-in-the-world technology.
5min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The IASLC Atlas of PD-L1 Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Testing in Lung Cancer releasedThe IASLC has released the IASLC Atlas of PD-L1 Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Testing in Lung Cancer, a resource designed to help pathologists, clinicians, other health care personnel and patients better understand emerging programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays, as well as important areas of clarity and debate.
5min
Science : NPR
Urgent Care Services For Cancer Patients Offer A Gentler ER Alternative Some hospitals and oncology practices are setting up urgent care sites tailored to the needs of cancer patients, to help keep them out of the emergency room when complications or side effects arise. (Image credit: Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine)
7min
The Atlantic
FBI Director James Comey Returns to Capitol Hill FBI Director James Comey has no regrets about the agency’s handling of the investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s private email server just days before the presidential election. “It was a hard choice, I still believe in retrospect the right choice, as painful as it’s been,” Comey told the Senate Judiciary committee, adding that the thought that he had affected the 2016 el
7min
Latest Headlines | Science News
March highlights questions about benefits of scienceActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the intersection of science and activism.
19min
WIRED
Huzzah! 360 Cameras You Can Snap on Your Phone Insta360's Nano and Air bring 360 cameras to the masses. But they're not without flaws. The post Huzzah! 360 Cameras You Can Snap on Your Phone appeared first on WIRED .
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool for measuring police and law enforcement interactions reflects police-based discrimination experiencesResearchers have developed a new tool to catalog police and law enforcement interactions with black men, the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale, with the hope of documenting people's experiences and perceptions of police-based discrimination.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP spots formation of Tropical Cyclone DonnaThe tropical low pressure area previously known as System 99P organized and developed into tropical cyclone Donna in the South Pacific and now threatens Vanuatu. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided visible and infrared data on the newly developed storm.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report: Even in death, indigenous border crossers marginalizedOf the hundreds of people who die trying to cross into the U.S. from Mexico each year, those with indigenous backgrounds are less likely to be identified than those with more European ancestry, a new analysis reveals.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What roundworms can teach us about human growthHuman beings and the roundworm C. elegans have more in common than you'd expect. Thanks to a common ancestor more than 700 million years ago humans and roundworms have a similar hormone to drive and regulate growth. By activating or deactivating this hormone scientists can stimulate or stunt the growth of the worms.
25min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool reflects black men's experiences of police-based discriminationResearchers have developed a new tool to catalog police and law enforcement interactions with black men, the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale, with the hope of documenting people's experiences and perceptions of police-based discrimination.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP spots formation of Tropical Cyclone DonnaThe tropical low pressure area previously known as System 99P organized and developed into tropical cyclone Donna in the South Pacific and now threatens Vanuatu. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided visible and infrared data on the newly developed storm.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Death rate higher in women than men after discharge from emergency departments for heart arrhythmiasAtrial fibrillation and flutter (also known as AFF) is associated with serious health problems and is a significant contributor to death rates. Investigators have identified differences in outcomes for male and female patients who presented with AFF to emergency departments in Alberta, Canada and were then discharged. Most importantly, women experienced higher death rates than men at 30 and 90 day
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report: Even in death, indigenous border crossers marginalizedOf the hundreds of people who die trying to cross into the US from Mexico each year, those with indigenous backgrounds are less likely to be identified than those with more European ancestry, a new analysis reveals.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than half of mental health NHS patients experience relapsesA new study has shown that approximately 53 per cent of NHS patients displayed clinical symptoms of depression and anxiety within a year after completing psychological treatments.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Got hives? Hold the steroidsDespite standard use for the itching associated with urticaria (commonly known as hives), prednisone (a steroid) offered no additional relief to emergency patients suffering from hives than a placebo did, according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Levocetirizine and Prednisone Are Not Superior to Le
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Half of breast cancer patients pursue reconstruction without understanding risksMore than half of breast cancer patients (57 percent) undergoing mastectomy lack the necessary medical knowledge to make a high-quality decision about reconstructive surgery that aligns with their personal goals, suggesting a trend toward overtreatment, according to a new study conducted by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and R
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study looks at maternal smoking in pregnancy, severe mental illness in offspringA population-based study that analyzed data for nearly 1.7 million people born in Sweden suggests family-related factors, rather than causal teratogenic effects (birth defect causing), may explain much of the association between smoking during pregnancy and severe mental illness in offspring, according to a new article published by JAMA Psychiatry.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Half of patients make poor decisions about breast reconstructionAfter receiving a devastating breast cancer diagnosis, women have a lot of tough decisions to make about treatment options. Those who choose to have a mastectomy then face another difficult decision: whether or not to have breast reconstruction surgery. A new study finds that an surprising number of women aren't making decisions that balance medical knowledge with personal outcomes preferences. Pa
26min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers concerned about cancer’s sugary disguiseTricky cancer cells, brain-shaping smartphones, a cow-burying badger and more in reader feedback.
26min
The Atlantic
An $8 Billion Shot in the Arm for the GOP Health-Care Bill? Updated on May 3 at 11:37 a.m. ET Republican leaders are now hoping an extra $8 billion is enough to get their stalled American Health Care Act across the House floor. The GOP effort suffered what appeared to be a mortal blow on Tuesday when Representative Fred Upton of Michigan, a 30-year Hill veteran and the former chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, announced his opposition to the O
27min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Arctic drilling, controversial reforms and new views of Saturn The week in science: 28 April–4 May 2017 Nature 545 10 doi: 10.1038/545010a
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook adding 3,000 people to filter out violent contentFacebook said Wednesday it would add 3,000 people to screen out violent content as the social media giant faces scrutiny for a series of killings and suicides broadcast on its platform.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Starvation causes atypical cell deathResearchers from the Cell death group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Cristina Muñoz-Pinedo, have characterized the cell death process due to starvation, in which the endoplasmic reticulum plays a leading role. Their work, chosen as the cover of the latest Molecular and Cellular Biology journal, was carried out within TRAIN-ERs, a European collaborative action
33min
Scientific American Content: Global
Combining Three Vehicle Technologies Could Nearly Eliminate Auto EmissionsA new report finds that layering autonomous and electric tech with ride-sharing could cut carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
TEDTalks (video)
How to exploit democracy | Laura GalanteHacking, fake news, information bubbles ... all these and more have become part of the vernacular in recent years. But as cyberspace analyst Laura Galante describes in this alarming talk, the real target of anyone looking to influence geopolitics is dastardly simple: it's you.
42min
Science | The Guardian
Janna Levin on the discovery of gravitational waves This month’s Perimeter Institute public lecture is “Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space” by Janna Levin, author and professor of physics and astronomy at Columbia University On the one hand, this was expected. We know that mass bends space and time, and so when mass moves it really should cause ripples in space and time, in much the same way that a gymnast moving on the surface of a
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Operating smart devices from the space on and above the back of your handIt relies on a depth sensor that tracks movements of the thumb and index finger on and above the back of the hand. In this way, not only can smartwatches be controlled, but also smartphones, smart TVs and devices for augmented and virtual reality.
45min
New on MIT Technology Review
Apple-Picking Robot Prepares to Compete for Farm JobsOrchard owners say they need automation because seasonal farm labor is getting harder to come by.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consumers warned about accuracy of heart rate appsConsumers are being warned about the accuracy of heart rate apps after a study found huge variability between commercially available apps, even those using the same technology.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supercharging the computers that will save the worldA computer scientist has developed new techniques and tools to manage high performance computing systems more efficiently. This in an effort to comply with the increasing demand to handle large amounts of data within research and allowing for advance simulations.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple blood tests lead to improved hypertension treatment in African countriesUsing two simple blood tests, researchers were able to drastically improve treatment for resistant hypertension across three sites in Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa. The study demonstrates that for patients in Africa with hard-to-control hypertension, identifying the cause was the key to lowering blood pressure. By testing patients' levels of plasma renin in combination with levels of aldosterone
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fierce mating battle between wild cuttlefishA male cuttlefish fights fiercely to protect his mate after a rival steals her away, using all his cunning and strength to win her back. A videotape of this encounter, the first time this behavior has been filmed in the wild, is analyzed by biologists.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Childhood exposure to cardiovascular risk factors impairs learning and memory in midlifeA Finnish study coordinated by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku shows that exposure to cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, elevated serum LDL-cholesterol and smoking in childhood and adolescence, is associated with poorer learning ability and memory in middle age.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows prejudice, not principle, often underpins 'free-speech defense' of racist languageA new study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology reveals a positive correlation (Pearson r = .43) between having racial prejudice and defending racist speech using the 'free speech argument' -- a stronger correlation than the researchers expected.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One step closer to finding out how wine may protect your neuronsLow to moderate intake of red wine can delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Researchers have now found out how wine compounds are protective against neuronal death: they should pass through your stomach first.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neonic pesticides threaten wild bees' spring breeding, study findsA University of Guelph study has revealed that thiamethoxam, one of the most commonly used neonicotinoid, leads to fewer fully developed eggs in queen bumblebees from four wild bumblebee species. This will likely translate into slower egg-laying rates, which will hinder colony development and growth. Researchers also found queen bees from two of the four species ate less nectar after pesticide exp
47min
Futurity.org
How scientists made better ‘bio oil’ from trees killed by beetles Scientists have created a new method for producing “bio oil” from trees killed by the mountain pine beetle. The new method is more cost-effective than previous methods, potentially making way for commercial fuel applications, a new study suggests. The mountain pine beetle has destroyed more than 40 million acres of forest in the western United States. That amounts to an area the size of Washingto
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anemonefish dads further fathering researchLike the father in "Finding Nemo," anemonefish dads will do almost anything to support their offspring. Their parenting instincts are so strong that if you give a bachelor anemonefish a scoop of anemonefish eggs from an unrelated nest, he will care for them—constantly nipping at them to remove debris and fanning them with oxygen-rich waters—as if they were his own. (Any other fish would eat them,
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
35-year South Carolina alligator study uncovers mysteries about growth and reproductionResearch by wildlife biologists from Clemson University and the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center near Georgetown is shattering conventional scientific understanding about American alligator growth and reproduction.
51min
Dana Foundation
2017 World Science Festival The World Science Festival celebrates its tenth anniversary this year and is once again offering a great series of programs. From May 30 to June 4 in New York City, you can attend events ranging from a trivia night on mummies to a panel talk on the biggest questions in cosmology. Of course, we’re most interested in the brain-related events, and they don’t disappoint. On Wednesday, May 31, psychol
53min
Scientific American Content: Global
Dreams of the Stone Age Dated for First Time in Southern AfricaAncient rock art research could piece together how the peoples who lived in the region some 5,700 years ago interacted -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
53min
Ars Technica
Watch F1’s Fernando Alonso try the Indy 500 oval for the first time One of F1's biggest stories in 2017 actually involves a rival open-wheel series. Two-time F1 World Driver's Champion Fernando Alonso is going to skip the Monaco Grand Prix later this month, because he'll be 4,500 miles away competing in the 101st Indianapolis 500 instead. Alonso races in F1 for the McLaren-Honda team, and for the third season running that partnership is plumbing new depths of unr
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water-repellant material sheds like a snake when damagedImagine a raincoat that heals a scratch by shedding the part of the outer layer that's damaged. To create such a material, scientists have turned to nature for inspiration. They report a water-repellant material that molts like a snake's skin when damaged to reveal another hydrophobic layer beneath it.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Almost 6 in 10 teens take a break from social mediaA new survey reveals that 58 percent of American teens report taking significant breaks from social media, and that many of these breaks are voluntary. The findings are drawn from a broader Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey that explores teens' social media, messaging, and video content habits, with a special focus on understanding if and why teens take breaks from th
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More evidence why depressed dads should seek helpA father's depression has a direct effect on both internalized and externalized behavioral problems in adolescents, according to a recent study.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New source of dangerous electrical instability in the heartSudden cardiac death resulting from fibrillation -- erratic heartbeat due to electrical instability -- is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Now, researchers have discovered a fundamentally new source of that electrical instability, a development that could potentially lead to new methods for predicting and preventing life-threatening cardiac fibrillation.
53min
Ingeniøren
Nu er de sidste analoge togradioer slukketBanedanmark har i weekenden slukket for jernbanens gamle analoge radiosystem, som nu er fuldt erstattet af det digitale radiosystem GSM-R. Men også det nye system kan være forældet om få år.
54min
Futurity.org
Why conservation won’t save us from diseases Conservation projects that protect forests and encourage a diversity of plants and animals provide a variety of benefits to humans. But a new study suggests that improved human health is not among those benefits—at least when health is measured through the lens of infectious disease. The findings, published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B , are based on an analysis of the rel
55min
Scientific American Content: Global
Europe Set to Invest in Quantum TechA billion-euro, 10-year “Quantum Technology Flagship” project will pursue advances in sensors, communications and computing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning chicken poop and weeds into biofuelChicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa. They report their app
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study could provide first clues about the social lives of extinct human relativesA new study of the bony head-crests of male gorillas could provide some of the first clues about the social structures of our extinct human relatives, including how they chose their sexual partners.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Challenges faced by birds in the Gulf of MexicoThe Gulf of Mexico is hugely important to birds that migrate between North America and the Neotropics -- almost all migrants have to go around it or across it. However, coastal habitats around the Gulf of Mexico face more and more threats from human activity. A new study brings together what we know -- and don't know -- about the state of the region's ecosystems and the birds that pass through the
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Linkage between social network structure and brain activityNew research finds that the brain's response to social exclusion differs depending on the structure of a person's social network. Those with tight-knit social circles show less dynamic brain activity when excluded than those whose friend groupings are more diffuse.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Training program may improve police officers' ability to help older adultsAfter participating in a training program in aging-related health, police officers anticipated having more empathy for and awareness of aging-related conditions, and greater ability to provide older adults with appropriate community referrals.
1h
Science | The Guardian
The controversy over statins has revealed something: the nocebo effect is real | Ann RobinsonJust as placebos can have a positive effect, expectation of side-effects can have a negative one. That’s why proper doctor-patient communication is so vital Statins are back in the news; a new study shows that media-fuelled controversy among health experts has dented public confidence in the cholesterol-lowering drugs that prevent 80,000 heart attacks and strokes every year in the UK. The benefits
1h
Ars Technica
Facebook enters war against “information operations,” acknowledges election hijinx Enlarge / Facebook Security gave details last week on how the company is fighting nation-state and other groups' efforts to use the social network to amplify false news and covert propaganda efforts. (credit: Getty Images/ NurPhoto) Facebook Security has revealed more of how the company has begun to combat the spread of propaganda and "fake news," acknowledging for the first time that the company
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anemonefish dads further fathering researchLike the father in 'Finding Nemo,' anemonefish dads will do almost anything to support their offspring. Their parenting instincts are so strong that if you give a bachelor anemonefish eggs from an unrelated anemonefish nest, he will care for them as if they were his own. (Any other fish would eat them.) A new study of Amphiprion ocellaris reveals some of the potent hormonal signals that regulate t
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starvation causes atypical cell deathResearchers from IDIBELL -- within the Marie Curie ITN TRAIN-ERs -- have characterized the cell death process due to starvation, in which the endoplasmic reticulum plays a leading role.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Mexican-Americans receive less intensive stroke rehabilitationMichigan Medicine researchers found that allocation of rehabilitation services differs by ethnicity, which may help explain why Mexican-Americans have worse outcomes after stroke.
1h
Popular Science
Listen to the surprisingly empty gap between Saturn and its rings Space Cassini made its second epic ring dive on Tuesday Cassini has made just 2 of 22 dives through Saturn's rings, but scientists are already gathering surprising data. Read on.
1h
Futurity.org
Watch: Cuttlefish use eyes and arms to fight over mate On a research dive in 2011 off the Aegean Sea coast of the fishing village Çeşmealtı, Turkey, a lucky pair of graduate students got to see two male cuttlefish competing for a mate. It’s a violent, theatrical phenomenon scientists have otherwise only ever seen in the lab. “Out of nowhere he just swam up, grabbed her, and they mated in the head-to-head position.” “This male just kind of appeared ri
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Judging moral character: A matter of principle, not good deedsPeople evaluate others' moral character -- being honest, principled, and virtuous -- not simply by their deeds, but also by the context that determines how such decisions are made. Furthermore, the research found that what differentiates the characteristics of moral character (from positive yet nonmoral attributes) is that such qualities are non-negotiable in social relationships.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel treatment offers kidney failure patients with rare disorder new hopeA novel treatment offers kidney failure and kidney transplant patients with a rare disorder new hope. The treatment allows targeted elimination of plasma cell clones producing abnormal proteins that deposits in the kidneys and leads to kidney failure, according to new research.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking devices reduce warblers' chances of returning from migrationThe tools ornithologists use to track the journeys of migrating birds provide invaluable insights that can help halt the declines of vulnerable species. However, a new study shows that these data come at a cost -- in some cases, these tracking devices reduce the chances that the birds carrying them will ever make it back to their breeding grounds.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleepy drivers make dangerous drivers: How to stay awake behind the wheelKnowing the signs of becoming drowsy behind the wheel, many of which are similar to distracted and drunk driving, could potentially be lifesaving.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Got a sweet tooth? Blame your liverA hormone called FGF21 that is secreted by the liver after eating sweets may determine who has a sweet tooth and who doesn't, according to a new study. Researchers found that people with particular variants of the FGF21 gene were about 20 percent more likely to be top-ranking consumers of sweets and candy, such as ice cream, chocolate, and gumdrops than their counterparts in the study.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Excessive DNA replication and its potential use against cancerDNA over-replication is a phenomenon that can have devastating consequences for proliferating cells. When parts of the genome are duplicated more than once, cells suffer from 'genomic instability' (alterations to the structure, composition and/or number of chromosomes), and this process gives rise to aberrant cells as those detected in many carcinomas. The cooperation of two proteins called CDC6 a
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists suggest the world should brace itself for a new wave of biological invasionsWe are all becoming increasingly familiar with the impacts of invasive species. Knotweed from Japan can destroy building foundations, zebra mussels from eastern Europe can clog-up drinking water pipes, and an Asian fungus is causing ash tree die-back in our forests. Now an international team of scientists has identified how our rapidly changing world will bring new types of invaders, often from ve
1h
Gizmodo
Why the Hell Doesn't the Surface Laptop Have a USB-C Charger? Image: YouTube Microsoft announced the Surface Laptop yesterday, and our first impressions of the device were great. It’s super thin, looks like a Macbook, and somehow manages to cost less. But there was one glaring weakness we couldn’t get over: It uses a proprietary charging cable rather than USB-C, the new standard that many other modern laptops employ. Advertisement Now, there’s evidence that
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water-repellant material sheds like a snake when damagedImagine a raincoat that heals a scratch by shedding the part of the outer layer that's damaged. To create such a material, scientists have turned to nature for inspiration. They report in ACS' journal Langmuir a water-repellant material that molts like a snake's skin when damaged to reveal another hydrophobic layer beneath it.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Article on microplastic particles to be retractedThe research article on consumption of microplastics by larval fish that was reported for misconduct in research will be retracted from the journal Science. The researchers behind the study themselves requested to retract the article at the end of last week, following sharp criticism of the study in an opinion from the Central Ethical Review Board.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First large-scale population analysis reinforces ketamine's reputation as antidepressantResearchers have mined the FDA Adverse Effect Reporting System (FAERS) database for depression symptoms in patients taking ketamine for pain. They found that depression was reported half as often among the more than 41,000 patients who took ketamine, as compared to patients who took any other drug or drug combination for pain.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakesIn balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA and produce proteins, researchers find evolution determined that speed is favored much more.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black bear boom in New YorkThe black bear population in southern New York has grown and expanded its range since the early 1990s, which has led to increased encounters with humans.
1h
Live Science
Cosmic Tsunami! Galaxy Cluster Flyby Triggers Gravitational Disturbance | VideoA new look at the Perseus galaxy cluster with the Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a massive wave rippling out into a spiral.
1h
Ingeniøren
Rapport: Skats EFI-system dumpede halvdelen af tests og blev alligevel sat i drift Op til idriftsættelsen af Skats inddrivelsessystem, EFI, var der planlagt 9.700 tests. 700 aldrig blev gennemført, 5.700 lykkedes og 3.400 fejlede. Alligevel blev systemet sat i drift. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/rapport-skats-efi-system-dumpede-halvdelen-tests-blev-alligevel-sat-drift-1076255 Version2 Forside relaterede artikler Skat godt på vej med EFI-afløser: Det skal gå stærkt, for milli
1h
The Atlantic
Another American Detained in North Korea North Korea confirmed Wednesday it detained a U.S. citizen at the Pyongyang International Airport in April for allegedly attempting to commit “hostile acts” against the country. The American, who was identified as Kim Sang Dok (also known as Tony Kim), is a professor who was visiting North Korea to teach accounting at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), North Korea’s state-run
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Scientists Are Turning Alexa into an Automated Lab HelperAmazon’s voice-activated assistant follows a rich tradition of researchers using consumer tech in unintended ways to further their work.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Speech and language deficits in children with autism may not cause tantrumsSpeech or language impairments may not be the cause of more frequent tantrums in children with autism, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings could help parents of children with autism seek out the best treatment for behavior problems.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
35-year South Carolina alligator study uncovers mysteries about growth and reproductionResearch by wildlife biologists from Clemson University and the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center near Georgetown is shattering conventional scientific understanding about American alligator growth and reproduction.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recognizing food brands puts preschoolers at risk for obesityYoung children who recognize food name brands, such as Lucky Charms, M&M's and Cheetos, often eat unhealthy items that lead to their high body mass index.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Operating smart devices from the space on and above the back of your handSmartwatches such as the Apple Watch have been called a 'revolution on the wrist', but the operation of these devices is complicated, because the screen is small. Together with colleagues from Finland and Denmark, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics therefore have developed a novel input method that expands the input space to the back of the hand and the 3-D space above the bac
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cost of Zika outbreak in the United States could be highEven a relatively mild Zika outbreak in the United States could cost more than $183 million in medical costs and productivity losses, suggests a computational analysis led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers, while a more severe one could result in $1.2 billion or more in medical costs and productivity losses.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computers learn to understand humans better by modelling themResearchers from Aalto University, University of Birmingham and University of Oslo present results paving the way for computers to learn psychologically plausible models of individuals simply by observing them. In newly published conference article, the researchers showed that just by observing how long a user takes to click menu items, one can infer a model that reproduces similar behavior and ac
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning chicken poop and weeds into biofuelChicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa. They report their app
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social smoking carries same heart-disease risks as everyday habitSocial smokers' risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol is identical to those who light up every day, new research has found.
1h
Futurity.org
Mitochondria use ‘toolkit’ when free radicals attack New research shows how mitochondria—the energy generators within cells—can withstand attacks on their DNA from rogue molecules. The findings could pave the way for new treatments to tackle neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. The research could also have important implications for clinical advances in mitochondrial donation—sometimes called a “three-parent baby”—used to correct defects in fault
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How calorie restriction may prolong lifeA new review proposes a theory to explain how calorie restriction can extend life across a variety of species.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lab mice may not be effective models for immunology researchLaboratory mice may not be effective models for studying immune responses to disease. This research reveals the limitations of laboratory mice as immunological models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
VISTA peeks through the Small Magellanic Cloud's dusty veilVISTA's infrared capabilities have now allowed astronomers to see the myriad of stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy much more clearly than ever before. The result is this record-breaking image -- the biggest infrared image ever taken of the Small Magellanic Cloud -- with the whole frame filled with millions of stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Facebook likes don't make you feel betterReceiving 'likes' on social media posts doesn't make people feel better about themselves or improve their mood if they are down, new research concludes.
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Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Monitor to QHD and IPS For Just $170 Acer 23.8" QHD IPS Display , $170 I know 4K is the new hotness, but 2560x1440 QHD monitors still give you a ton of screen real estate, and work with a wider variety of computers. So if you’re looking to upgrade your workspace, $170 is a terrific price for a QHD IPS panel , let alone one from a top-tier manufacturer like Acer.
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Popular Science
A high-speed blender for 75 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets It's $100. A high-speed blender for 75 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
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Futurity.org
This star is like ‘time travel’ to our early solar system Thanks to key observations made with the assistance of NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft, astronomers confirm that a recently discovered star, called epsilon Eridani, mirrors our own solar system in a number of ways—only much earlier in its history. The SOFIA aircraft, a 747 loaded with a 2.5-meter telescope in the back, was just beginning the second half of
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Dagens Medicin
Ny viden om migræne kan åbne for nye behandlingerMigræneanfald påvirker hjernestammen, men ikke ’blod-hjerne-barrieren’, viser ny forskning.
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Gizmodo
A Second Giant Crack Has Appeared on Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf Rift in the Larsen C ice shelf photographed by NASA’s IceBridge aerial survey in November 2016. Image: NASA/John Sonntag A 80-mile-long crack along Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf has remained stable since February, but scientists have now detected a new branch, one that’s extending about six miles from the main rift. It seems like only a matter of time before the 2,000 square mile ice shelf plun
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Brad Pitt Opened Up About Life, Love and Alcohol For the First Time Since the Divorce | Dead Jezebel Brad Pitt Opened Up About Life, Love and Alcohol For the First Time Since the Divorce | Deadspin Manny Machado Repeatedly Curses Red Sox’s “Fucking Bullshit,” Says He Has No Respect For Organization | Fusion The Heritage Foundation Is Celebrating Its Complete Political Victory by Devouring Itself | The Root NY College Mistakes Black Student Carrying a Glue Gun for an ‘Active Shooter’ |
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Gizmodo
The Secret to How Hollywood Makes an Actor Vomit Massive Amounts of Blood GIF Adam Savage and the Tested crew recently had the opportunity to visit the sets of Alien: Covenant , and in their latest video they not only get some hands-on time with many of the weapons used in the upcoming prequel, they also learned the secrets of how alien-infected actors are able to vomit so much blood. Advertisement You probably assumed the actor simply held the fake blood in their mout
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dietary gluten is not linked to heart risk in non-celiacsA study revealed that while dietary gluten does not increase heart disease risk in people without celiac disease, limiting whole grains may increase their heart risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists scrutinize first aid for man o' war 'jellyfish' stingsResearchers investigated which commonly recommended first aid actions are the most effective for Physalia, man 'o war jellyfish, stings. They found the best first aid is to rinse with vinegar to remove any residual stingers or bits of tentacle on the skin and then immerse in 45°C hot water or apply a hot pack for 45 minutes-findings that defy the recent abandonment of historic advice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insights to redirect leading HIV cure strategyNew research has provided the first evidence that viruses and hosts share highly similar regulatory sequences in their promoters -- the initiation sequences of human genes that code for functional proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PET/CT helps predict therapy effectiveness in pediatric brain tumorsIn this first ever molecular drug-imaging study in children, researchers used whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine whether bevacizumab (Avastin) treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) in children is likely to be effective.
1h
WIRED
Mr. Know-It-All: How Do I Deal With My Friend the Encryption Hypocrite? Got a friend who insists on using Signal—but is a total blabbermouth on social? Take heart. The post Mr. Know-It-All: How Do I Deal With My Friend the Encryption Hypocrite? appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NY Times swings to profit on digital gainsThe New York Times said Wednesday it added more than 300,000 digital subscribers in the first quarter, helping the media group swing to profit.
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Futurity.org
Gene editing in monkeys, not mice, could improve research A new study shows that gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 technology can work in rhesus monkey embryos. The results, published in the current issue of Human Molecular Genetics , open the door for pursuing gene editing in nonhuman primates as models for new therapies, including pharmacological, gene-, and stem cell-based therapies, says Keith Latham, animal science professor at Michigan State Universi
1h
Viden
VIDEO: Ta' med frivillige på lortejagt i ulvelandTrofæet er varme efterladenskaber, der afslører, hvor ulven kommer fra.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising link between blood sugar, brain cancer foundNew research further illuminates the surprising relationship between blood sugar and brain tumors and could begin to shed light on how certain cancers develop.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prenatal cocaine exposure increases risk of higher teen drug useMothers smoking crack cocaine during pregnancy -- and its lingering effects on their children -- are the focus of 20-plus years of ongoing research, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Holy chickens: Did Medieval religious rules drive domestic chicken evolution?Chickens were domesticated from Asian jungle fowl around 6,000 years ago. Since domestication they have acquired a number of traits that are valuable to humans, including those concerning appearance, reduced aggression and faster egg-laying, although it is not known when and why these traits evolved. Now, an international team of scientists has combined DNA data from archaeological chicken bones w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water-repellant material sheds like a snake when damaged (video)Imagine a raincoat that heals a scratch by shedding the part of the outer layer that's damaged. To create such a material, scientists have turned to nature for inspiration. They report in ACS' journal Langmuir a water-repellant material that molts like a snake's skin when damaged to reveal another hydrophobic layer beneath it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists suggest the world should brace itself for a new wave of biological invasionsAn international team of scientists has identified how our rapidly changing world will bring new types of invaders, often from very unexpected places.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK health spending needs to grow faster than GDPThe NHS is frequently in the news about its ongoing funding crisis. New research suggests demand for health services is set to continue to grow faster than GDP per head in all developed countries around the world. Along with a paper about the J-value model for life-expectancy growth in industrialized countries, the research establishes a reason why people in the UK will want to spend an increasing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Persistent photoconductivity' offers new tool for bioelectronicsResearchers have developed a new approach for manipulating the behavior of cells on semiconductor materials, using light to alter the conductivity of the material itself.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell 'canibalism' educates our defensesCNIC scientists show that when macrophages ingest these expired cells they acquire protective properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biophysics: Conflict or coexistenceCompetition within mixed bacterial populations can give rise to complex growth dynamics. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich are probing the interplay between differential growth rates and stochastic factors in determining the composition of such populations.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Training program may improve police officers' ability to help older adultsAfter participating in a training program in aging-related health, police officers anticipated having more empathy for and awareness of aging-related conditions, and greater ability to provide older adults with appropriate community referrals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Excessive DNA replication and its potential use against cancerWhen parts of the genome are duplicated more than once, cells suffer from 'genomic instability', and this process gives rise to aberrant cells as those detected in many carcinomas. The cooperation of two proteins (CDC6, CDT1) is essential for normal DNA replication but when they are not properly regulated, the genetic material replicates in excess. A new paper sets out the fatal consequences of in
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Popular Science
Hulu's $40 Live TV service is basically basic cable for cord-cutters Technology The live streaming TV landscape has gotten a lot more complicated in the past year. Hulu's new Live TV service mixes streaming content with real-time television and DVR storage.
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Ars Technica
The AI revolution is making game characters move more realistically When we talk about artificial intelligence in games, we usually picture smarter or more realistic enemies that don't come off as mindless automatons. New research, though, is showing how an AI powered by a neural network could revolutionize the way player avatars animate realistically through complicated game environments in real time. Phase-Functioned Neural Networks for Character Control is a f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient meteorite impact sparked long-lived volcanic eruptions on EarthMeteorite impacts can produce more than craters on the Earth - they can also spark volcanic activity that shapes its surface and climate by bringing up material from depth. That is the headline finding of an international team, led by geochemists from Trinity College Dublin, who discovered that large impacts can be followed by intense, long-lived, and explosive volcanic eruptions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercharging the computers that will save the worldComputer scientist Gonzalo Rodrigo at Umeå University in Sweden has developed new techniques and tools to manage high performance computing systems more efficiently. This in an effort to comply with the increasing demand to handle large amounts of data within research and allowing for advance simulations.
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Ars Technica
NASA seeks industry help with lunar landings, potentially sample return Enlarge / The Moon seems to be reemerging as a preferred destination for NASA's human spaceflight program. (credit: NASA) NASA is interested in the Moon again. This week the space agency issued a new "request for information" to the aerospace industry for cargo transportation to the lunar surface. This new opportunity appears to represent NASA's increasing willingness to reconsider the Moon as a
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What roundworms can teach us about human growthHuman beings and the roundworm C. elegans have more in common than you'd expect. Thanks to a common ancestor more than 700 million years ago humans and roundworms have a similar hormone to drive and regulate growth. By activating or deactivating this hormone scientists can stimulate or stunt the growth of the worms. This is shown by researchers from the Functional Genomics and Proteomics Group at
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WIRED
Hulu’s Live TV Service Launches To Save You From Your Cable Bill This may seem like just another live TV service from just another internet company, but Hulu's launch is bigger than that. The post Hulu's Live TV Service Launches To Save You From Your Cable Bill appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient meteorite impact sparked long-lived volcanic eruptions on EarthLarge impacts were common on the early Earth and were likely much more important than previously thought in shaping our planet. The findings raise interest in the possibility of volcanism also shaping similar structures on Mercury, Venus, Mars and the Moon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phthalates increase the risk of allergies among childrenPhthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children. This was demonstrated by UFZ researchers in conjunction with scientists from the University of Leipzig and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ). According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavil
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What roundworms can teach us about human growthHuman beings and the roundworm C. elegans have more in common than you'd expect. Thanks to a common ancestor more than 700 million years ago humans and roundworms have a similar hormone to drive and regulate growth. By activating or deactivating this hormone scientists can stimulate or stunt the growth of the worms. This is shown by researchers from the Functional Genomics and Proteomics Group at
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiorespiratory fitness can reduce risk of fatty liverAccording to a new Finnish study, cardiorespiratory fitness is inversely related to risk of fatty liver. The research was conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, and shows that, despite the person's weight, achieving moderate cardiorespiratory fitness can protect from fatty liver.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new unexpected key player in melanoma development identifiedIn The Journal of Clinical Investigation researchers from VIB, KU Leuven (Belgium) together with colleagues from INSERM (France) now report the important role for FES in the initiation and progression of melanoma, a malignant type of skin cancer, that is notoriously quick to metastasize and that responds poorly to existing cancer treatments. Unexpectedly the expression of FES, which encodes a kind
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do fishes perceive their environment?Fishes perceive changes in water currents caused by prey, conspecifics and predators using their lateral line. The tiny sensors of this organ also allow them to navigate reliably. However, with increasing current velocities, the background signal also increases. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now created a realistic, three-dimensional model of a fish for the first time and have simulate
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common cold duration is shortened similarly by zinc acetate and zinc gluconate lozengesThere is no significant difference between zinc acetate lozenges and zinc gluconate lozenges regarding their efficacy in shortening the duration of common colds according to a meta-analysis published in Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Open.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How calorie restriction may prolong lifeA new review proposes a theory to explain how calorie restriction can extend life across a variety of species.
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Gizmodo
Hulu's Live TV Service Is Now Available in Beta With 50 Channels for $40 Per Month Image: Hulu At its Upfront presentation this morning, Hulu showed off more details of its new live streaming service , and announced that the service is now available in a public beta starting today. Interested users can sign-up here . Advertisement Hulu first announced its live TV service back in at its Upfront’s in May 2016 and since then, we’ve seen the live TV cordcutting market become more c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists to identify Nazi disabled victim remainsA German network of leading science institutes will begin identifying thousands of brain specimens belonging to people killed by the Nazis because they suffered from a disability or were ill.
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsministeren fremsætter tre nye lovforslagFungerende sundhedsminister Karen Ellemann fremsatte onsdag en række nye lovforslag i Folketinget.
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Gizmodo
New Details on a Wild Chase Scene in Star Wars: The Last Jedi James Gunn is already on to teasing Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 . The first story details for Dwayne Johnson’s Rampage movie are here. There’s a very ridiculous amount of speculation about a villain for the Batman movie. Plus, behind the scenes on Once Upon a Time ’s musical episode, and a very crunch clip from Doctor Who . Behold, Spoilers! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Making Star Wars has a new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find new source of dangerous electrical instability in the heartSudden cardiac death resulting from fibrillation - erratic heartbeat due to electrical instability - is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Now, researchers have discovered a fundamentally new source of that electrical instability, a development that could potentially lead to new methods for predicting and preventing life-threatening cardiac fibrillation.
2h
WIRED
It’s Not Just You—the Lowly Phone Call Is Making a Comeback Hello? Oh... hi! The post It’s Not Just You—the Lowly Phone Call Is Making a Comeback appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Watch Hackers Sabotage an Industrial Robot Arm Researchers were able to take control of a 220-pound robotic arm to damage the products it manufactures---or the person that operates it. The post Watch Hackers Sabotage an Industrial Robot Arm appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Wonder Woman Is Awesome—But We Still Need a Black SuperheroI've lived through the modern superhero era, which means I've supported a lot of white dudes. How about some other options? The post Wonder Woman Is Awesome—But We Still Need a Black Superhero appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The Secret Hit-Making Power of the Spotify Playlist By the time a song lands on Today's Top Hits or other equally popular sets, Spotify has so relentlessly tested it that it almost can't fail. The post The Secret Hit-Making Power of the Spotify Playlist appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
A Rare Journey Into the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, a Super-Bunker That Can Survive Anything With escalating fears about North Korean nuclear capabilities, Cheyenne Mountain's ability to predict and survive a nuclear attack resonates more than ever. The post A Rare Journey Into the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, a Super-Bunker That Can Survive Anything appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
America’s Plan to Somehow Make Drones Not Ruin the Skies Lots of testing. And lots of questions to answer. The post America's Plan to Somehow Make Drones Not Ruin the Skies appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Congress Saved the Science Budget—And That’s the Problem What the government pays for is what the government thinks is important. And the US government is getting that wrong. The post Congress Saved the Science Budget—And That's the Problem appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study reveals why people pay for news and what it means for future of journalismSlightly more than half of all U.S. adults pay for news, with roughly half of those subscribing to a newspaper, according to a study conducted by the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. With this study, the Media Insight Project has undertaken one of the largest efforts to date aimed at unders
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Same-sex couples denied religious marriage ceremonies, study showsDiscrimination against same-sex couples denied religious marriage is endemic, says a new study.
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Ingeniøren
Bilen lytter til sig selv og advarer, før den går i stykkerBiler kan blive mere sikre og holdbare, hvis fejl kan opdages, før de bliver til en skade. Nu vil bilproducenter lytte til bilens forkerte lyde.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Super P carbon black for reversible lithium and sodium ion storageSuper P carbon black (SPCB) has been widely used as the conducting additive in lithium/sodium ion batteries. However, limited knowledge on its structure and electrochemical lithiation/sodiation properties has been reported. Now researchers have comprehensively characterized its structural morphology and electrochemical performance for lithium/sodium ion storage as well as the influences of differe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Judging moral character: A matter of principle, not good deedsAccording to new research by Berkeley-Haas Assoc. Prof. Clayton Critcher, people evaluate others' moral character -- being honest, principled, and virtuous -- not simply by their deeds, but also by the context that determines how such decisions are made. Furthermore, the research found that what differentiates the characteristics of moral character (from positive yet nonmoral attributes) is that s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consumers warned about accuracy of heart rate appsConsumers are being warned about the accuracy of heart rate apps after a study found huge variability between commercially available apps, even those using the same technology. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study could provide first clues about the social lives of extinct human relativesA new study from The Australian National University (ANU) of the bony head-crests of male gorillas could provide some of the first clues about the social structures of our extinct human relatives, including how they chose their sexual partners.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel treatment offers kidney failure patients with rare disorder new hopeA novel treatment offers kidney failure and kidney transplant patients with a rare disorder new hope.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helistroke service: Flying the physician to the stroke patient worksFlying a stroke specialist by helicopter to a nearby stroke patient for emergency care is feasible, saves money and, most importantly, gets critical care to patients faster than transporting the patient to a hospital first, according to a single-patient, proof-of-concept study by a Johns Hopkins Medicine research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Political talk plagues workers months after US electionAmerican workers are more likely to say they are feeling stressed and cynical because of political discussions at work now than before the 2016 presidential election, according to survey results released today by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DMM launches new special collection on neurodegenerationAs a growing number of the ageing population are affected by diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, a new special collection from Disease Models & Mechanisms compiles the latest research in neurodegenerative disorders, providing a valuable resource for researchers in the field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TGen and UNC Lineberger studies help shed light on aggressive brain cancerOne study showed that mutations affect how cancer starts in glial cells -- brain cells that provide support and insulation for neurons -- and how those mutations affect the way cancer evolves from low-grade gliomas to full-blown high-grade glioblastomas, the most common and deadly of primary brain cancer.The other study showed how using a combination of drugs at increased potency could prove an ef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microphysical differences in precipitation between Tibet and southern ChinaStudies of raindrop size distribution (DSD) over different regions helps to advance our understanding of DSD characteristics and provide observational facts regarding the development and evaluation of microphysical parameterization schemes in numerical models over different regions in the future. The raindrop number concentration for convective precipitation over Tibet is much lower than that in s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford researchers analyze what a warming planet means for mosquito-borne diseasesA new analysis by Stanford researchers reveals that the ideal temperature for the spread of mosquito-born diseases like dengue, chikungunya and Zika is 29 degrees C. This finding helps predict disease outbreaks in a warming world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boston University scientists turn human induced pluripotent stem cells into lung cellsBoston University scientists have announced two major findings that further our understanding of how stem cells become organs: the ability to grow and purify the earliest lung progenitors that emerge from human stem cells, and the ability to differentiate these cells into tiny 'bronchospheres' that model cystic fibrosis. Researchers hope the results, published separately in the Journal of Clinical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How migrations and other population dynamics could have shaped early human cultureBursts of cultural advance are usually assumed to result from climate or biological changes. A new theory digs into how humans innovate, and suggests such bursts could be the result of population dynamics and culture itself.
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Ars Technica
Windows 10 S forces you to use Edge and Bing Enlarge (credit: Tim Sweeney ) Windows 10 S , Microsoft's new locked-down operating system that comes bundled with the Surface Laptop , won't allow you to change the default Web browser away from Microsoft's own Edge. Furthermore, Edge's default search provider can't be altered: Bing is all you get. Curiously you can download other browsers from the Windows Store, such as Opera Mini, but Windows
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The shock tactics set to shake up immunology An experimental procedure is exposing the links between the nervous and immune systems. Could it be the start of a revolution? Nature 545 20 doi: 10.1038/545020a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do fishes perceive their environment?Fishes perceive changes in water currents caused by prey, conspecifics and predators using their lateral line. The tiny sensors of this organ also allow them to navigate reliably. However, with increasing current velocities, the background signal also increases. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now created a realistic, three-dimensional model of a fish for the first time and have simulate
2h
Gizmodo
Guy Builds a Terrifying, Gigantic Mouse Trap That Can Pulverize a Coconut GIF What do you do if hungry raccoons are tearing your garbage to shreds every night? You can put locks on your cans, or if you’re YouTube’s The Backyard Scientist , you build a gigantic mouse trap with a spring-powered, coconut-smashing arm that reaches speeds of 42 miles per hour. Advertisement Its spring-powered mechanism is so powerful that an electric winch is needed to tighten the coil. Of
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Ars Technica
EFF’s Stupid Patent of the month: Dispatch a taxi (on a computer) (credit: David R. Tribble ) Paying for a ride to get around town isn't new. The first gas-powered taxicabs date to the beginning of the 20th century, and the horse-drawn "hackney coaches" of London date to the 17th century. In the vehicle-for-hire business, it's all about efficiency and execution, not "invention." That long history notwithstanding, the US Patent and Trademark Office has granted p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Narcissistic CEOs at American banks took great risks, study showsBanks that were led by a more narcissistic – that is, highly self-loving and self-appraising – CEO before the collapse of the US banking industry in September 2008 suffered more severe consequences of that systemic shock. That is one of the main conclusions by Tine Buyl and colleagues based on a recent study published in the Journal of Management.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Lægerne er blandt de mest stressedeLægerne er den jobgruppe i Danmark, som er mest plaget af stress - men helbredet fejler ikke noget, viser ny rapport.
2h
Live Science
'Lost' Monitor Lizard Rediscovered in Papua New GuineaThe first scientific specimen of the 3-foot-long lizard went down in a 19th-century shipwreck.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find new source of dangerous electrical instability in the heartSudden cardiac death resulting from fibrillation -- erratic heartbeat due to electrical instability -- is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Now, researchers have discovered a fundamentally new source of that electrical instability, a development that could potentially lead to new methods for predicting and preventing life-threatening cardiac fibrillation.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study reveals why people pay for news and what it means for future of journalismSlightly more than half of all US adults pay for news, with roughly half of those subscribing to a newspaper, according to a study conducted by the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BYU study finds more evidence why depressed dads should seek helpA father's depression has a direct effect on both internalized and externalized behavioral problems in adolescents, according to a recent study out of BYU's School of Social Work.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New survey reveals almost 6 in 10 teens take a break from social mediaA new survey reveals that 58 percent of American teens report taking significant breaks from social media, and that many of these breaks are voluntary. The findings are drawn from a broader Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey that explores teens' social media, messaging, and video content habits, with a special focus on understanding if and why teens take breaks from th
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Ars Technica
New zinc battery competes with lithium-ion Enlarge / Lithium-ion batteries do a lot of great things, but they also do this more often than we'd like. (credit: Crushader) Lithium batteries are currently the belle of the battery ball. They have a lot going for them, including high energy storage for their weight and the ability to charge and recharge many times before losing much capacity. But we’re all familiar with the drawbacks, too. Lit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Political talk plagues workers months after US electionAmerican workers are more likely to say they are feeling stressed and cynical because of political discussions at work now than before the 2016 presidential election, according to survey results released today by the American Psychological Association.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tomographic imaging shows massive five-fingered Icelandic mantle plume(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of Cambridge and the University of Strathclyde has found evidence of a giant, five-fingered Icelandic mantel plume. In their paper published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Charlotte Schoonman, Nicky White and David Pritchard describe how they carried out tomographic imaging of the area and developed a theory regarding why th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Persistent photoconductivity' offers new tool for bioelectronicsResearchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new approach for manipulating the behavior of cells on semiconductor materials, using light to alter the conductivity of the material itself.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bisexuality Can Benefit AnimalsHomosexual behavior is surprisingly common in the animal kingdom. It may be adaptive—helping animals to get along, maintain fecundity and protect their young -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using sulfur to store solar energyResearchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and their European partners plan to develop an innovative sulfur-based storage system for solar power. Large-scale chemical storage of solar power and its overnight use as a fuel are to be achieved by means of a closed sulfur-sulfuric acid cycle. In the long term, this might be the basis of an economically efficient renewable energy source cap
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the day: Stylish ZebrafishZebrafish, Danio rerio, develop patterns of colorful stripes on their skin thanks to pigmented cells-dark melanophores, orange-gold xanthophores, and iridescent iridophores.
3h
The Scientist RSS
Two New Dinosaur Species IdentifiedPalaeontologists report their findings of Galeamopus pabsti, a new sauropod, and Jianianhualong tengi, a small feathered dinosaur.
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The Scientist RSS
National Academies Revise Conflict of Interest PolicyThe proposed changes follow revelations in recent years that committee members preparing reports for the Academies did not disclose industry relationships.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces egg development in wild bumblebee queensNew research published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B has found that wild bumblebee queens are less able to develop their ovaries when exposed to a common neonicotinoid pesticide
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conflict or coexistenceCompetition within mixed bacterial populations can give rise to complex growth dynamics. LMU researchers are probing the interplay between differential growth rates and stochastic factors in determining the composition of such populations.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computers learn to understand humans better by modelling themResearchers from Aalto University, University of Birmingham and University of Oslo present results paving the way for computers to learn psychologically plausible models of individuals simply by observing them. In newly published conference article, the researchers showed that just by observing how long a user takes to click menu items, one can infer a model that reproduces similar behavior and ac
3h
Live Science
'Excess' Gamma-Rays Likely Not Sign of Dark Matter After AllA mysterious abundance of high-energy light near the Milky Way's core likely isn't a sign of elusive dark matter after all, a new study suggests.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump’s Climate Zigzag, Quantum Chip vs. 1940s Tech, and Alexa in the Lab—The Download, May 3, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students, doctors develop next-generation surgical implantsTwo groups of undergraduate students at Duke University have been creating biomedical devices for their senior design projects with a campus rarity—a titanium 3-D metal printer.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of troodontid with asymmetric feathers found in China(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Hong Kong, China and Canada has identified a new species of Chinese troodontid—an ancient species that sported asymmetric feathers. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes the specimen, which has been likened to a giant chicken with teeth, and why they believe the find extends the emergence of a certain trait further b
3h
Gizmodo
Clean Every Nook and Cranny With This Cordless Hand Vac, Just $20 Today Only Black & Decker Lithium Hand Vac , $20. Multiple colors available. Everyone should own a cordless hand vacuum for cleaning shelves and car seats, and this Black & Decker has never been cheaper than today’s $20 deal. In fact, it rarely dips below $30. While it’s not the most powerful hand vacuum you can buy, it does include a crevice tool, an upholstery brush, and a wall-mounted charger, so I imagi
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study looks to ice for fabricating useful porous materialsDiscovering a way to harness ice recrystallization could enable fabrication of highly efficient materials for a range of products, including porous electrodes for batteries and transparent conducting films used to manufacture touch screens and wearable electronics.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study could provide first clues about the social lives of extinct human relativesA new study from The Australian National University (ANU) of the bony head-crests of male gorillas could provide some of the first clues about the social structures of our extinct human relatives, including how they chose their sexual partners.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A ride on NASA's eye in the skyAs with most other telescopes, astronomers apply for observing time on SOFIA by submitting proposals that are being evaluated by peers for their scientific promise and intellectual merits. SOFIA, however, is special in that observers also can apply to be onboard during an observation run. Kate Su of the University of Arizona talked about what it was like to be aboard NASA's flying observatory whil
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Yes, statins protect hearts. But critics question their expanding useEven after decades of study, questions remain about statin safety.
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Viden
Du husker bedre, når du er bangeNår du føler noget, fx. angst, kan du huske meget bedre. Med den viden håber forskerne at udvikle metoder til at regulere menneskers hukommelse.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An atom interferometer that works without super cold temperatures(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Sandia Labs in the U.S. has developed a type of atom interferometer that does not require super-cooled temperatures. In their paper published the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the approach they used to overcome the main hurdles to warm interferometry and the ways in which their new device can be used. Carlos Garrido Alzar with Sorbonne Uni
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Scientific American Content: Global
People with This Phobia Suffer from a Fear of Being Laughed atGelotophobics can’t stand to hear chuckles because they think they’re the butt of the joke -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eye dilation sex specific but not sexually explicit, study findsPeople's eyes dilate when they are looking at people they find sexually appealing -- but new research suggests that their response does not depend on whether the person being viewed is naked or clothed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortalityResearchers detail how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist quietly inside the immune system's B cells in as many as 90 percent of adults. Should something go awry however, the virus can cause mononucleosis or cancers of the lymph.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging mRNA right where it is made -- at the site of translationThink of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time -- maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels. Today in ACS Central Scie
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Keeping cool in the summer leads to increased air pollutionAs the weather warms, so does the use of air conditioners. But running these devices requires power plants to ratchet up electricity production, causing air polluting emissions to rise. An analysis of 27 states found that, on average, summer emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) go up by hundreds to thousands of metric tons per degree Celsius increase. T
3h
Popular Science
Neil deGrasse Tyson explains why dark matter matters (and is kind of our frenemy) Entertainment Excerpt: Astrophysics for People in a Hurry We have no clue what it is. It’s kind of annoying. But we desperately need it in our calculations to arrive at an accurate description of the universe. Read on.
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Science-Based Medicine
NYT – Promoting False Hope as JournalismThe New York Times sells a narrative of false hope, and fails to engage in even basic journalism to tell a more complete story.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rosemary aroma can aid children's working memoryExposure to the aroma of rosemary essential oil can significantly enhance working memory in children.
3h
Live Science
Long-Necked 'Viper' Dino Is the Earliest Titanosaur on RecordAbout 160 million years ago, a gigantic, long-necked dinosaur — the earliest known titanosaur on record — swooped its lengthy neck to and fro as it foraged for a leafy meal in Jurassic-era France, a new study finds.
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Live Science
Blasphemy Laws Are More Widespread Than You Might ThinkMany in the West treat blasphemy as an obsolete concept. A scholar argues that blasphemy laws in the West suggest otherwise, while also sharing common features with such laws in the Muslim world.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsøkonom: Det kan for pokker ikke overraskende nogen, at økonomiloftet forlænges Hvis et kompromis skal nås, er det nødvendigt, at økonomiloftet fortsætter, mener sundhedsøkonom.
3h
Gizmodo
Two Worlds Collide in the Explosive First Trailer For The Dark Tower After what feels like ages, our first look at The Dark Tower is finally here—and it takes us into another world of death, destruction, and some very fancy gunwork from Idris Elba’s Roland the Gunslinger. Advertisement The first trailer introduces us to the premise quickly enough—there’s another world, a tower the Man in Black wants to destroy, and a Gunslinger to stop him. But most of the focus i
3h
Ars Technica
Altra Torin IQ smart shoes review: Putting a coach and convenience at your feet Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Smart running shoes and run-coaching wearables aren't new, but the Altra Torin IQ smart sneakers combine the tracking and coaching elements of each. Powered by iFit technology, the $220 Torin IQ shoes are a smarter version of the popular Torin sneaker the company has sold for some time. The IQ shoes are outfitted with sensors in the insole that cap
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
6 Ways to Build Your ResilienceLike grit, executive functioning, and mindfulness, resilience is a buzzword these days. But what does it really mean to be resilient? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging mRNA right where it is made—at the site of translationThink of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time—maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels. Today in ACS Central Science
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keeping cool in the summer leads to increased air pollutionAs the weather warms, so does the use of air conditioners. But running these devices requires power plants to ratchet up electricity production, causing air polluting emissions to rise. An analysis of 27 states found that, on average, summer emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) go up by hundreds to thousands of metric tons per degree Celsius increase. T
3h
Futurity.org
Malaria is like the flu but ‘way more complicated’ A new genetic fingerprinting technique is the first to show the huge diversity of the malaria parasite, one of nature’s most persistent and successful human pathogens. The technique validates a previously untestable “strain hypothesis” that was proposed more than 20 years ago and opens up new ways of thinking about how to tackle this cunning killer. Key to that understanding is changing the way w
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A faster way to calibrate piston gaugesFor industry and government labs to ensure their pressure-measurement machines are working correctly, they need a reliable source of pressure. Often, that source is a piston gauge – a cylinder of metal that falls through a hollow cylinder or "sleeve" at a predictable rate. Staff at NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) perform precise calibrations of piston gauges for customers including th
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pox virus discovery has implications for vaccines and cancerScientists at the Francis Crick Institute have made a surprising discovery about the Vaccinia virus, a large DNA virus belonging to the pox family that was used as the vaccine to eradicate smallpox.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can India Save the Warming Planet?Energy decisions that India makes in the next few years could profoundly affect how hot the planet becomes this century -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Today, even US water is overly medicated—these scientists want to change that Enlarge / The Trout Run Sewage Treatment Plant in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. (credit: Montgomery County Planning Commission / Flickr ) Sylvia Lee, PhD, is a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Milbrook, New York. She has access to an unusual—yet essential—set of laboratory equipment: a whole greenhouse filled with white fiberglass bathtubs. There’s no mistaking these ves
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA Visualization Explorer App now available for AndroidThe NASA Visualization Explorer App is now available to users with Android devices running version 5.0 or higher.
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Popular Science
One in four Americans drink water that fails safety standards Environment Danger on tap Aging infrastructure, questionable oversight, and lax regulation are colluding to deprive Americans of safe, clean drinking water. Read on.
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Big Think
Will This Insanely Powerful Psychedelic Drug Someday Help Your Sanity? As medicine's interest in psychedelic drugs increases,will a shamanistic brew join your therapist's list of go to prescriptions? Read More
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Viden
Hjerneforskning: Danmark er på vej mod superligaenHjernen er på mange måder stadig en sort boks. Men det vil dansk forskning være med til at ændre.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel diagnostic strip for gout patients using a single teardropA novel diagnostic strip for gout patients using a single teardrop has been announced by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) research team. This technology analyzes biological molecules in tears for a non-invasive diagnosis, significantly reducing the time and expense previously required for a diagnosis.
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Futurity.org
These 5 changes can make period apps work better Smartphone apps to track menstrual cycles often disappoint users with a lack of accuracy, assumptions about sexual identity or partners, and an emphasis on pink and flowery form over function and customization. Researchers collected data from 2,000 reviews of popular period tracking apps, surveyed 687 people and conducted in-depth interviews with a dozen respondents to understand how and why they
4h
The Atlantic
The Power of the Troublemaker As a veteran educator, I have encountered my share of “troublemaker” students—those who talk when they should be quiet, stand up when they should sit down, and generally find endless ways to turn the order of the classroom upside down. For Carla Shalaby, a former elementary-school teacher who has studied at the Rutgers and Harvard graduate schools of education and directed elementary-education pr
4h
The Atlantic
The Case for the Rebel It tends to be common knowledge that Albert Einstein was bad at school, but less known is that he was also bad in school. Einstein not only received failing grades—a problem for which he was often summoned to the headmaster’s office—but he also had a bad attitude. He sat in the back of the class smirking at the teacher; he was disrespectful and disruptive; he questioned everything; and, when he w
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The Atlantic
When a 'Remix' Is Plain Ole Plagiarism The messages began rolling in on an otherwise quiet Saturday. “This is your mural!” “This is your artwork!” “Isn’t this your artwork?” People had noticed that a design by the artist Gelila Mesfin had appeared on the side of an apartment building on the South Side of Chicago, and they wanted to congratulate her. It was as if the image, which depicts Michelle Obama as an Egyptian queen, had been pl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Index to identify important system processes in ecosystemsPredicting how ecosystems might respond to environmental change could become more precise thanks to a new method known as a process sensitivity index developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Florida State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Billy Kimmel's Rare Heart Condition ExplainedA number of cardiac defects turned an “easy” delivery into a race to save the life of Jimmy Kimmel’s newborn son -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plastics and the curse of durabilityPlastic is an indispensable part of everyday life. Bottles, bags, packaging and technical molded parts made of plastic are lightweight and resistant to water and decay. While such qualities are highly valued during usage, it is a different story when it comes to depositing plastic refuse in the environment. Here, the blessing of durability becomes the curse of imperishability.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab breakthrough in 3-D printing of glassLawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists and academic collaborators have demonstrated the synthesis of transparent glass through 3-D printing, a development that could ultimately lead to altering the design and structure of lasers and other devices that incorporate optics.
4h
New Scientist - News
Map of the underworld may let us play plate tectonics in reverseAn atlas of the ancient continents swallowed up long ago is the first to show the whereabouts of almost 100 tectonic plates that have sunk
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New Scientist - News
Would a North Korean space nuke really lay waste to the US?Warnings that North Korea could detonate a nuclear bomb in orbit to knock out US electrical infrastructure are far-fetched, says arms expert Jeffrey Lewis
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Yes, statins protect hearts. But critics questions their expanding useEven after decades of study, questions remain about statin safety.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Do We Have a Right to Mental Privacy and Cognitive Liberty?The rapid expansion of neuroimaging and related technologies suggests that we'd better answer that question—quickly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Envy pushes job seekers to fake their resumesJob seekers who stay in the search longer or see their peers getting hired may falsify their résumés, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Quantum mechanical squeezing' enables quantum state atomic force microscopyBy taking advantage of a phenomenon known as "quantum mechanical squeezing," researchers have conceptually designed a new method of applying atomic force microscopy. Ali Passian of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and George Siopsis of the University of Tennessee introduced a novel method of making measurements in a paper published in Physical Review A.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantifying changes in surface chemistry of woody plants during microbial fermentationA bottleneck to breaking down woody plants for use in biofuels or other products may occur at the plant cell wall's surface, according to a new Oak Ridge National Laboratory study.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aquatic rest stops may pose potential hazards for migratory waterfowlMigratory waterfowl around the world travel hundreds to thousands of miles annually, stopping at lakes, ponds and marshes to refuel and breed. Some of these aquatic rest stops may be at sites polluted by remnants of radioactive waste from nuclear production or accidents, exposing the birds to contamination that they take with them. This poses a potential risk to humans if the waterfowl enter the f
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New statistical methods would let researchers deal with data in better, more robust waysNo matter the field, if a researcher is collecting data of any kind, at some point he is going to have to analyze it. And odds are he'll turn to statistics to figure out what the data can tell him.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antioxidants and plastics could be made from byproducts of wheat millingIt's usually used as livestock feed, but wheat bran's value in human nutrition and medicine may soon reach its full potential with a new sustainable processing method developed by Swedish researchers.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Roommates not all they're cracked up to be (if you're a lizard)In a new study of lizard social behaviour, researchers at Macquarie University have discovered that despite their social nature, family-living lizards do not necessarily thrive in a 'share-house' environment.
4h
Ingeniøren
Det blev aldrig til noget: Rundetårn skulle flyttes 28 meterFor at skaffe plads til trafikken på Købmagergade foreslog arkitekt Rosen og ingeniør Schouboe i 1898 magistraten at flytte Rundetaarn. Læs om det detaljerede projektforslag her i Ingeniørens Tidsmaskine.
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Ingeniøren
Teknologirådet: Energiproduktion skal ikke optage danske jordarealerDer er lagt planer for 140 procent af Danmarks areal, viser sammentælling. Men hør...det kan man jo ikke. Så må vi prioritere.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early culture shaped by migration and population growthSomething odd happened in the transition from the Middle to the Upper Paleolithic, around 50,000 years ago. Modern humans and their immediate ancestors had been using tools for a few million years prior, but the repertoire was limited. Then, all of sudden, there was an explosion of new tools, art and other cultural artifacts.
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Science | The Guardian
Personal distance: why Russian life has no room for privacy A survey into how different countries view ideal personal space suggests Russians like to keep things close. Could language and communal living have something to do with it? Why do Russians have no sense of personal space? A study by the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology surveyed 9,000 people from a series of countries in order to calculate an international scale of personal space. Dubbed “the
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Controlling robots at the Human Robot Interaction LaboratoryWhat is the best way to control a robot from afar as you circle a planet with your mechanised alter ego doing precise work on the surface? ESA is testing human–robot control in space and on Earth as part of a strategy that sees astronauts controlling robots from space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fantastic fruit flies and where to find themFruit flies are no griffins, but they are more beautiful and varied than one might think. Biologists detail them in a field guide for the Midwest and Northeast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrological drought amplifies wildfires in Borneo's humid tropicsThe area of wildfires in Borneo during drought years turns out to be ten times larger than during non-drought years, an international research team reports in Nature Climate Change of this week. The fires recurrently affecting Borneo's humid tropical ecosystems have negative influence on the biodiversity and lead to large CO2 emissions, affecting atmospheric composition and regional climate proces
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3,000-year-old axes found in farmer's field in mid-NorwaySome 3,000 years ago, 24 axes were cached in Stjørdal municipality, about 44 km east of Trondheim. They're now seeing the light of day once again.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create shape-memory aerogels with rubber-like elasticityPolymeric aerogels are nanoporous structures that combine some of the most desirable characteristics of materials, such as flexibility and mechanical strength. It is nearly impossible to improve on a substance considered the final frontier in lightweight materials. But chemists from Missouri University of Science and Technology have done just that by making aerogels that have rubber-like elasticit
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Surprised to Find No Two Neurons Are Genetically AlikeThe genetic makeup of any given brain cell differs from all others. That realization may provide clues to a range of psychiatric diseases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device utilizing molecular technique could provide ultra-sensitive, automated system to detect viruses, diseaseAn innovation at Purdue University could allow highly sensitive detection of an infectious disease such as HIV or whooping cough by using a low-cost, automated, point-of-care test similar in packaging to a pregnancy test.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers present first results of solar observations with the Siberian Radioheliograph(Phys.org)—Russian scientists have presented the first results of solar observations made with the new radioheliograph of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). The Siberian Radioheliograph (SRH), has recently commenced regular observations of active processes in the sun's atmosphere, which will allow better monitoring of solar activity. Results of the initial SRH observations were described i
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Science | The Guardian
Finding zombies, ghosts and Elvis in the fossil record When there’s no more room in fossil hell, do the dead walk the earth again? Now that Easter is over, we’re firmly in Halloween now right through until the end of October. So what better time to tenuously justify taking a look at some paranormal concepts in palaeontology and biology such as ghosts, zombies and, err ... Elvis. Not actual ghosts, you understand, although there is much research neede
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate instability over the past 720,000 yearsA research group formed by 64 researchers from the National Institute of Polar Research, the University of Tokyo, and other organizations has analyzed atmospheric temperatures and dust for the past 720,000 years using an ice core obtained at Dome Fuji in Antarctica. Results indicate that when intermediate temperatures occurred within a glacial period, the climate was highly unstable and fluctuated
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How life (barely) survived Earth's greatest extinction eventAn international team of researchers at the University of Calgary and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has shown just how precarious the recovery of life was following Earth's greatest extinction event about 251.9 million years ago. A site near Shangsi in China's Sichuan Province highlights a short-lived community of organisms that may hold clues to forces shaping our planet today and into the futu
5h
Ingeniøren
Windows 10 S går i kødet op Chrome OS - men har sine begrænsninger Microsofts seneste bud på en forenklet udgave af Windows skal tage kampen op med Googles Chrome OS, som især har fundet fodfæste i uddannelsessektoren. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/windows-10-s-microsofts-svar-paa-chrome-os-har-sine-begraensninger-1076217 Version2
5h
The Atlantic
The Parts of America Most Susceptible to Automation Economists expect that millions of American jobs are going to be replaced by automation in the coming decades. But where will those job losses take place? Which areas will be hardest hit? Much of the focus regarding automation has been on the Rust Belt. There, many workers have been replaced by machines, and the number of factory jobs has slipped as more production is offshored. While a lot of th
5h
The Atlantic
How Novel Are America's Challenges? The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
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The Atlantic
Vito Acconci and the Shelf Life of Sensational Art Vito Acconci died last week at the age of 77. He was best known for intense performance-art provocations that skirted interpersonal boundaries: public–private, consensual–nonconsensual, real world–art world. It is hard to imagine a career like his taking the same course today. Some of his works would be almost unthinkable in museums now. Audiences might not be willing to tolerate them. Acconci wa
5h
The Atlantic
The Age of Misinformation There are two big problems with America’s news and information landscape: concentration of media, and new ways for the powerful to game it. First, we increasingly turn to only a few aggregators like Facebook and Twitter to find out what’s going on the world, which makes their decisions about what to show us impossibly fraught. Those aggregators draw—opaquely while consistently—from largely undiff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VISTA peeks through the Small Magellanic Cloud's dusty veilVISTA's infrared capabilities have now allowed astronomers to see the myriad of stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy much more clearly than ever before. The result is this record-breaking image -- the biggest infrared image ever taken of the Small Magellanic Cloud -- with the whole frame filled with millions of stars.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Erica answers: responses from an android - Science Weekly podcastErica - the world’s ‘most beautiful and intelligent’ android - responds to people’s questions about her memories, superintelligence, and the future of humanity
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Science | The Guardian
Erica answers: responses from an android - Science Weekly podcast Erica - the world’s ‘most beautiful and intelligent’ android - responds to people’s questions about her memories, superintelligence, and the future of humanity Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Following our documentary film Erica: Man Made , we gave viewers a chance to pose their own questions to Erica; the
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Ars Technica
San Francisco to DMV: How should cops deal with self-driving cars that park wrong? Enlarge / Autodesk VRED Design 2017. (credit: Waymo ) At a recent public comment hearing before the California Department of Motor Vehicles, numerous car manufacturers and tech firms urged the state to ease proposed regulations for the testing of autonomous vehicles, or AVs. Some even went as far as to suggest that such rule-making be left solely to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrat
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VISTA peeks through the Small Magellanic Cloud's dusty veilVISTA's infrared capabilities have now allowed astronomers to see the myriad of stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy much more clearly than ever before. The result is this record-breaking image—the biggest infrared image ever taken of the Small Magellanic Cloud—with the whole frame filled with millions of stars.
5h
Ingeniøren
NSA fortsætter med at masseovervåge telefoner trods lovændring Nye tal fremlagt for den amerikanske kongres viser, at NSA fortsat overvåger både amerikanere og allieredes telefoner i enormt omfang. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nsa-fortsaetter-med-at-overvaage-telefoner-trods-lovaendring-1076192 Version2
5h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Dreams of the Stone Age dated for first time in southern Africa Ancient rock art research could piece together how the peoples who lived in the region some 5,700 years ago interacted. Nature 545 14 doi: 10.1038/545014a
6h
Ingeniøren
10 teknologiske tendenser, du bør kende: #4. Trådløse signaler mellem hjerne og muskel erstatter ødelagt rygmarvLamme går igen: Neuroforskere skabt en trådløs bro, der forbinder de elektriske signaler mellem nervebanerne i hjernen og en beskadiget rygmarv.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab mice may not be effective models for immunology researchLaboratory mice may not be effective models for studying immune responses to disease. The research, published in Nature Communications, reveals limitations of laboratory mice as immunological models.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising link between blood sugar and brain cancer foundNew research further illuminates the surprising relationship between blood sugar and brain tumors and could begin to shed light on how certain cancers develop.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterialsA new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First large-scale population analysis reinforces ketamine's reputation as antidepressantResearchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego mined the FDA Adverse Effect Reporting System (FAERS) database for depression symptoms in patients taking ketamine for pain. They found that depression was reported half as often among the more than 41,000 patients who took ketamine, as compared to patients who took any other drug or drug com
6h
Viden
Brinkmann og it-ekspert: Selve samfundet bliver sårbart overfor hackingIt i alting giver smart styring af komplekse systemer. Men vigtig infrastruktur bliver langt mere udsat, end folk er klar over, siger førende dansk it-ekspert.
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The Atlantic
How to Stop Medicaid Expansion The Affordable Care Act is still the law of the land. A viable repeal-and-replace effort may or may not be forthcoming in Congress, but until one materializes the provisions of the ACA remain in effect, and the Trump administration is bound by law to enforce them. But the administration has made little secret of the fact that it does not want to enforce them—especially not the pieces that will te
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterialsA new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
6h
The Atlantic
Inside Béziers, France’s Far-Right Laboratory These are heady times for the far right in France, and particularly for the far-right elements in the small southwestern town of Béziers. When I visited the town last year and spoke to its mayor, Robert Menard, he described the place as a sort of laboratory for the French far right , one that produces results predictive of the country’s future. “What is happening in Béziers today,” he said, “will
6h
The Atlantic
Climate Change Is Causing More Sweltering Summer Days This past winter was an exceptionally strange one across North America. Rain deluged California, as unseasonable warmth fanned across the Midwest and Eastern seaboard. In New York, sales of salt and snow shovels plunged ; in Washington, some of the famous cherry trees bloomed too early and died . When the weather gets weird, many people now think of climate change. And nearly as many people know,
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Europe’s billion-euro quantum project takes shape Scientists offer more detail on flagship programme to harness quantum effects in devices. Nature 545 16 doi: 10.1038/545016a
7h
Dagens Medicin
Den første regionsklinik er kommet til Langeland Problemer med at rekruttere læger på Langeland har fået Region Syddanmark til at etablere sin første egentlige regionsklinik.
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The Atlantic
Why Americans Smile So Much On Reddit forums that ask “What’s a dead giveaway that someone is American?” one trait comes up over and over again: big, toothy grins. Here’s how one Reddit user in Finland put it: When a stranger on the street smiles at you: a. you assume he is drunk b. he is insane c. he’s an American Last year, I wrote about why some countries seem to smile less than average—and mistrust those who do seem unu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Peugeot to test driverless cars in SingaporeFrench automaker PSA said Wednesday it was teaming up with nuTonomy to integrate the US startup's software into one of its vehicles for on-road testing of fully autonomous cars in Singapore.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China to launch own encyclopaedia to rival WikipediaChina plans to launch its own online encyclopaedia next year, hoping to build a "cultural Great Wall" that can rival Wikipedia as a go-to information source for Chinese Internet users who Beijing fears are being corrupted by foreign influences.
7h
Viden
Nyt danmarkskort: Sådan rammer skybrud eller havstigning dit hjem
7h
Ingeniøren
Rutsjebane og kuppel på Rundetårn gør konstruktøren rundtossetJapansk kunstner vil installere en kuppel på toppen af det fredede Rundetårn og lade besøgende drøne ned i en indvendig rutsjebane.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tighter building controls needed to achieve government global warming targetsThousands of new homes, schools and offices may be using much more energy than they should, and the reason is rather unexpected, according to the authors of a new study published by the University of Bath.
8h
Live Science
Full List: US Cities Ranked by Healthy EatingWhere does your city rank on the list of healthiest eaters?
8h
Live Science
The Healthiest Eaters in the US Live in Naples, FloridaResidents of Naples, Florida, are the healthiest eaters in the nation, a new poll finds.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China tightens rules for online news providersChina has issued new internet regulations increasing Communist party control over online news providers, the latest step in the country's push to tighten its policing of the web.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Morocco fights to save its iconic monkey"If nothing is done, this species will disappear within 10 years," warns a poster on Ahmed Harrad's ageing 4x4 showing Morocco's famed Barbary macaque monkey.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's dilemma: what to do with $256 bn cash pileIt is a sign of Apple's success but also a thorny problem: its cash stockpile has hit a staggering $256.8 billion, sparking debate on what do with such massive reserves.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A trick of the light: How the hatchetfish hidesHatchetfish, tiny "alien-looking" creatures known for an uncanny ability to hide out in open water, use mirror-like scales to deflect and diffuse light to make themselves invisible to predators, scientists reported Wednesday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Montana dam, passage to save fish lacks fundingA federal agency targeted by President Donald Trump for budget cuts next year has only about half the money needed to build a new Yellowstone River dam and a bypass channel meant to save an endangered fish, but it plans to begin construction anyway.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's a dog's life: purity the key for treasured S.Korean breedPointy-eared and short-haired, the Jindo dog is a symbol of South Korea, where breeders and authorities keep its bloodline even purer than one of the world's least diverse societies.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaysian family sue Honda, Takata in US over air bag defectA Malaysian man whose wife's death is one of at least 16 blamed on air bag defects has sued Japanese automaker Honda and the Takata Corp. in a U.S. court, saying he wants the companies to disclose more about the dangers.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Washed up whale 'most contaminated' on recordLulu the killer whale had 20 times the expected level of banned chemicals known as PCBs in her system.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple delivers higher profits, but iPhone sales slipApple reported a rise in quarterly profits Tuesday, but its shares took a hit from weaker iPhone sales ahead of a 10-year-anniversary model on the horizon.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Savings groups lead to increased financial inclusion and women's empowerment, new three-country study findsSavings groups popular in rural areas of developing countries - in which people pool money for saving and borrowing - empower women, increase business investment, and provide greater access to financial services, according to a new three-country study released in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New look at satellite data questions scale of China's afforestation successChina has invested more resources than any other country in reversing deforestation and planting trees. However, given the large scale of these programmes it has been difficult to quantify their impact on forest cover. A new study shows that much of China's new tree cover consists of sparse, low plantations as opposed to large areas of dense, high tree cover. The results of the study could help po
9h
cognitive science
Alexythimia and empathy. submitted by /u/Sateloco [link] [comments]
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Magdalena Bezanilla (U. Mass-Amherst) 3: Myosin and actin steer plant cell division Part 1: Understanding cell shape: Big insights from little plants: Polarized cell growth in plants depends on the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments. Part 2: Using reverse genetics to dissect the formin gene family: Formins promote nucleation and elongation of actin filaments and are required for polarized cell growth. Part 3: Myosin and actin steer plant cell division: Plants have only
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Magdalena Bezanilla (U. Mass-Amherst) 2: Using reverse genetics to dissect the formin gene family Part 1: Understanding cell shape: Big insights from little plants: Polarized cell growth in plants depends on the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments. Part 2: Using reverse genetics to dissect the formin gene family: Formins promote nucleation and elongation of actin filaments and are required for polarized cell growth. Part 3: Myosin and actin steer plant cell division: Plants have only
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Magdalena Bezanilla (U. Mass-Amherst) 1: Understanding cell shape: Big insights from little plants Part 1: Understanding cell shape: Big insights from little plants: Polarized cell growth in plants depends on the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments. Part 2: Using reverse genetics to dissect the formin gene family: Formins promote nucleation and elongation of actin filaments and are required for polarized cell growth. Part 3: Myosin and actin steer plant cell division: Plants have only
9h
Science | The Guardian
Off with their heads: 3D scans reveal Lord Nelson and PM Pitt's secrets Wax portrait heads of historical figures captured in extraordinary detail in pioneering partnership of art and science Adm Lord Horatio Nelson and William Pitt the Younger have travelled together by taxi across the Thames, from their home in Westminster Abbey to St Thomas’ hospital, to have their heads run through some of the most sophisticated scanning equipment in the world in a pioneering part
9h
Ingeniøren
Lovråd slår fast: ‘URL-hacking‘ er ikke hacking Hvis du lægger noget på internettet, er du selv ansvarlig for, at det ikke kan tilgås med den direkte URL-adresse, lyder vurderingen fra Straffelovrådet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/lovraad-slaar-fast-url-hacking-ikke-hacking-1076182 Version2
9h
Dagens Medicin
Økonomiloft over almen praksis sendt i høring Et midlertidigt økonomiloft over almen praksis er sendt i høring i Folketinget. Økonomien skal ikke løbe løbsk, lyder det fra en række folketingspolitikere.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Village savings groups boosted financial inclusion and women's empowerment, study findsSavings groups popular in rural areas of developing countries -- in which people pool money for saving and borrowing -- empower women, increase business investment, and provide greater access to financial services, according to a new three-country study released in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prenatal cocaine exposure increases risk of higher teen drug useMothers smoking crack cocaine during pregnancy -- and its lingering effects on their children -- are the focus of 20-plus years of ongoing research by Case Western Reserve University.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How technology use affects at-risk adolescentsMore use of technology led to increases in attention, behavior and self-regulation problems over time for adolescents already at risk for mental health issues, a new study from Duke University finds. However, on days that adolescents spent more time using digital technologies they were less likely to report symptoms of depression and anxiety.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking devices reduce warblers' chances of returning from migrationThe tools ornithologists use to track the journeys of migrating birds provide invaluable insights that can help halt the declines of vulnerable species. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that these data come at a cost -- in some cases, these tracking devices reduce the chances that the birds carrying them will ever make it back to their breeding grounds.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review highlights challenges faced by birds in the Gulf of MexicoThe Gulf of Mexico is hugely important to birds that migrate between North America and the Neotropics -- almost all migrants have to go around it or across it. However, coastal habitats around the Gulf of Mexico face more and more threats from human activity. A new Review in The Condor: Ornithological Applications brings together what we know -- and don't know -- about the state of the region's ec
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review highlights challenges faced by birds in the Gulf of MexicoThe Gulf of Mexico is hugely important to birds that migrate between North America and the Neotropics—almost all migrants have to go around it or across it. Coastal habitats around the Gulf of Mexico are critical for these migrating birds, but these habitats face more and more threats from human activity. A new Review in The Condor: Ornithological Applications brings together what we know—and don'
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking devices reduce warblers' chances of returning from migrationThe tools ornithologists use to track the journeys of migrating birds provide invaluable insights that can help halt the declines of vulnerable species. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that these data come at a cost—in some cases, these tracking devices reduce the chances that the birds carrying them will ever make it back to their breeding grounds.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
A Year After Approval, Gene-Therapy Cure Gets Its First CustomerGlaxoSmithKline says it has treated a child with Strimvelis, its gene therapy for immune deficiency.
11h
The Atlantic
United Airlines Testifies Before an Angry Congress Following the release of a viral video in which a passenger was violently removed from an overbooked United Airlines flight at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, United was called to testify before the U.S. House of Representatives Tuesday to address their poor customer service. Joining United representatives were top executives from American Airlines, Southwest Airlines, and Alaska Airlines
11h
Gizmodo
Melania Trump's Twitter Just Liked a Tweet About How Much She Hates Her Husband Screenshot: Twitter Melania Trump’s personal Twitter account has been dormant since election day. Once a prolific tweeter, the first lady has since transferred her activity to the @FLOTUS account—she doesn’t use it very much. But the Twittersphere lit up this evening with screenshots of a tweet that was liked from her personal account, which suggests that the rumors of her dislike for her husband
12h
Ingeniøren
Ingeniører og it-folk: Masser af jobmuligheder i konsulent- og rådgivningsbranchen Danske virksomheder kalder på kvalificerede rådgivere og konsulenter. Der er job inden for it-, byggeri-, jernbaner, trafik-, skibs- og endnu flere industrier. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ingenioerer-it-folk-masser-jobmuligheder-konsulent-raadgivningsbranchen-7870 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
The Scientist RSS
New Gene Therapy Shrinks Aggressive Tumors in MiceScientists shut down cancer-causing fusion genes with CRISPR.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mineral resources: Exhaustion is just a myth, say scientistsRecent articles have declared that deposits of mineral raw materials (copper, zinc, etc.) will be exhausted within a few decades. An international team of scientists, however, has shown that this is incorrect and that the resources of most mineral commodities are sufficient to meet the growing demand from industrialization and future demographic changes. Future shortages will arise not from physic
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More efficient way to make oil from dead treesA research team has made new headway on a solution to remove beetle-killed trees from the forest and use them to make renewable transportation fuels or high-value chemicals. The researchers have refined this technique to process larger pieces of wood than ever before, saving time and money in future commercial applications.
13h
Gizmodo
Did Sean Spicer Tweet a Nefarious Bitcoin Address in January? Photo: AP Press Secretary Sean Spicer had a tough day today. If you listen to the feckless mainstream media, he ran from the White House press corps this afternoon in order to avoid questions about bizarre interviews Trump has been giving. But, if you listen to the #russiagate sleuths , he ran because the lid had been blown off of his bitcoin conspiracy. Back in January, Spicer was widely ridicul
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New use for a pesky weedDandelions are much-maligned weeds, with a paratrooper-like seed dispersal system that makes them difficult to eradicate. However, new research finds a great benefit in an unlikely place for the pesky dandelion: each of its tiny seeds can be used as a perfect pipette in the laboratory setting.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shape-memory aerogels created with rubber-like elasticityChemists have made aerogels that have rubber-like elasticity and can "remember" their original shapes. Aerogels are created by replacing liquids with gases in a silica, metal oxide or polymer gel. They are used in a wide variety of products, from insulation of offshore oil pipelines to NASA space missions.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aquatic rest stops may pose potential hazards for migratory waterfowlMigratory waterfowl around the world travel hundreds to thousands of miles annually, stopping at lakes, ponds and marshes to refuel and breed. Some of these aquatic rest stops may be at sites polluted by remnants of radioactive waste from nuclear production or accidents, exposing the birds to contamination that they take with them. This poses a potential risk to humans if the waterfowl enter the f
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrological drought amplifies wildfires in Borneo’s humid tropicsThe area of wildfires in Borneo during drought years turns out to be ten times larger than during non-drought years, an international research team reports. The fires recurrently affecting Borneo's humid tropical ecosystems have negative influence on the biodiversity and lead to large carbon dioxide emissions, affecting atmospheric composition and regional climate processes. Future droughts in wet
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep learning helps scientists keep track of cell's inner partsHigh throughput screens of image-based data allow a direct view of proteins' whereabouts in the cell but the lack of fast and accurate analysis tools has been a bottleneck. Scientists reveal DeepLoc, a deep learning algorithm that is faster and more accurate than the human eye and brings analysis time down from months to hours.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New nuclear magnetic resonance technique offers 'molecular window' into living organismsA new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique has potential for noninvasive disease diagnosis using current MRI technology, researchers outline in a new report.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long lost monitor lizard 're-discovered' on Papua New Guinean islandScientists have recently found and re-described a monitor lizard species from the island of New Ireland in northern Papua New Guinea. It is the only large-growing animal endemic to the island that has survived until modern times. The lizard, Varanus douarrha, was already discovered in the early 19th century, but the type specimen never reached the museum where it was destined as it appears to have
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stereotactic radiation highly effective for kidney cancerKidney cancer patients may soon have more treatment choices that provide a higher quality of life, thanks to new research. A recent study showed that treating metastatic kidney cancer with an advanced and focused form of radiation called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy achieves more than 90 percent control of local tumors, and offers the possibility of safely delaying systemic therapy.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Busy shipping lanes could cause 'seal hearing loss'Researchers say noise could affect how whales, dolphins and seals find food and communicate.
14h
Science-Based Medicine
Afterword. Chiropractic and the New York Times. Is the newspaper TRYING to prove Trump right? The New York Times had to go an publish "For Bad Backs, It May Be Time to Rethink Biases About Chiropractors" right after my Friday extravaganza, "Spinal Manipulation and the JAMA Meta-Analysis: An Analysis of Fuel. Sigh. Doody [ sic ] Calls.
14h
cognitive science
Healing Voices (2017) A documentary that is changing the conversation on Mental Illness. submitted by /u/healingvoices [link] [comments]
14h
The Atlantic
No Charges for Officers in Alton Sterling Case The two police officers involved in last summer’s fatal shooting of 37-year-old Alton Sterling will not be charged, The Washington Post reported Tuesday, citing four people familiar with the matter. Sterling’s death sparked outcry in July when video footage from bystanders’ cell phones showed him being shot and killed by the officers from the Baton Rouge Police Department. Shortly before the inci
14h
Ingeniøren
Se tegnene på, at din virksomhed ikke tror på ytringsfrihed De fleste virksomheder vil gerne at deres medarbejdere bidrager konstruktivt og engageret med at forbedre virksomheden. Siger de. Her er en række tegn på, at en organisation alligevel ikke bryder sig om medarbejdere, der er for konstruktive og engagerede. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/se-tegnene-paa-at-din-virksomhed-ikke-tror-paa-ytringsfrihed-7671 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
NYT > Science
Zika Twins: A Window Into Much More Than a VirusI did not anticipate the situation of João Lucas and Ana Vitória, whose different fates had overwhelmed their mother and led to the brain-damaged boy being placed with a guardian.
15h
The Atlantic
The Shooting of Jordan Edwards The most surprising thing about Jordan Edwards’s death is not that police officers misrepresented what happened. It’s how quickly the police chief in Balch Springs, Texas, came forward and announced it. Edwards, 15, was killed by Officer Roy Oliver in the Dallas suburb Saturday night, shot through the door of a car. Police explained that they were called to investigate reports of underage drinkin
15h
WIRED
You Don’t Have to Wait for Tesla to Get Your Electric Pickup Truck Now now, stop giggling. An electric pickup makes a lot of sense. The post You Don't Have to Wait for Tesla to Get Your Electric Pickup Truck appeared first on WIRED .
15h
Gizmodo
Here Are Your 2017 Eisner Award Nominees Marvel For some people, this is just early May. But for us, it’s time to run down the list of Eisner award nominees—and to remind ourselves that San Diego Comic-Con, where the winners will be announced, is just a few short months away. Advertisement This year, as always, there’s something for everyone to root for, ranging from the poetic dread of Tom King’s Vision to Ben Passmore’s thoughtful ref
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Bumblebees: Pesticide 'reduces queen egg development'Using the insecticide thiamethoxam in spring could reduce bee numbers later in the year, a study finds.
15h
Big Think
People Are Aggressively Prejudiced If They Think They Won't Get Caught, Study Finds A study suggests people act aggressively on their prejudices when they have plausible deniability. Read More
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flexible, organic and biodegradable: Researchers develop new wave of electronicsA new semiconductor is as flexible as skin and easily degradable, report scientists. It could have diverse medical and environmental applications, without adding to the mounting pile of global electronic waste.
15h
Gizmodo
The Best Lightning Cables Are Back On Sale Anker PowerLine II Dura Lightning Cable , $10 | 3-Pack PowerLine Lightning Cables , $24 Anker’s PowerLine Lightning cables have long been our readers’ favorites , and two different models are on sale today on Amazon. First up, $24 gets you a 3-pack of standard PowerLine cables in three different lengths, including an extra-long 10' cable that’d be great for using on the couch. That price is about
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
At last, a clue to where cancer metastases are bornScientists have discovered why some cancers may reoccur after years in remission. Importantly, the scientists demonstrated that the escaping tumor cells reach the bloodstream by entering blood vessels deep within the dense tumor core, upending the long-held belief that metastatic cells come from a tumor's invasive borders.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human inner ear organs grown: Could lead to new therapies for hearing, balance impairmentsResearchers have successfully developed a method to grow inner ear tissue from human stem cells, a finding that could lead to new platforms to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of hearing and balance disorders.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find giant wave rolling through the Perseus galaxy clusterCombining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio observations and computer simulations, an international team of scientists has discovered a 200,000-light-year wave of hot gas in the Perseus galaxy cluster.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stool microbes predict advanced liver diseaseNonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- a condition that can lead to liver cirrhosis and cancer -- isn't typically detected until well advanced. Even then, diagnosis requires a biopsy. To more easily detect NAFLD, researchers report that the microbial makeup of a patient's stool -- gut microbiome -- can be used to predict advanced NAFLD with 88 to 94 percent accuracy.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bending sheet glass using lasers and gravityA new technique makes it possible to bend sheet glass into complex or unconventional shapes with the help of laser beams. This opens up a whole new range of potential products for architects and designers. The researchers are taking advantage of a particular attribute glass has of becoming viscous and therefore malleable when exposed to high temperatures. Precise calculations and gravity do the re
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
1000 km range for e-cars thanks to a new battery conceptYou cannot get far today with electric cars. One reason is that the batteries require a lot of space. Scientists are stacking large cells on top of one another. This provides vehicles with more power. Initial tests in the laboratory have been positive. In the medium term, the project partners are striving to achieve a range of 1,000 kilometers for electric vehicles.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antioxidants, plastics could be made from byproducts of wheat millingIt's usually used as livestock feed, but wheat bran's value in human nutrition and medicine may soon reach its full potential with a new sustainable processing method.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three-week radiation therapy treatment given post mastectomy is safe and effectiveA shorter course of radiation therapy given to breast cancer patients following mastectomy is safe and effective and cuts treatment time in half. That is according to data from a phase II clinical trial by investigators who examined a hypofractionated regimen given over three weeks versus the traditional six week course of treatment.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop novel chemical 'dye' to improve liver cancer imagingA new nanodiamond-based dual-mode contrast agent provides clearer and more accurate images of liver tumors at lower dosages, report researchers.
16h
NYT > Science
Debate Over Paris Climate Deal Could Turn on a Single PhraseThe Trump administration is split on whether the phrase allows a country to back away from its emissions pledges, as the president has pledged to do.
16h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
NIH to limit the amount of grant money a scientist can receive US agency creates point system to address imbalance in distribution of research funds. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21930
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New look at satellite data quantifies scale of China's afforestation successChina has invested massive resources into halting and reversing tree cover loss. However, 'planting trees is not the same as gaining forests.' It is likely that much of China's tree cover gains consist of low-height, sparse and/or scattered plantations, which are unlikely to provide the same benefits as natural forests, such as diverse habitats for wildlife, prevention of soil erosion, and timber
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mongoose pups conceal identity to surviveYoung mongooses may conceal their identity -- even from their own parents -- to survive.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye dilation sex specific but not sexually explicit, study findsPeople's eyes dilate when they are looking at people they find sexually appealing -- but new research from the University of Kent suggests that their response does not depend on whether the person being viewed is naked or clothed.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Facebook likes don't make you feel betterReceiving 'likes' on social media posts doesn't make people feel better about themselves or improve their mood if they are down.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rosemary aroma can aid children's working memoryExposure to the aroma of rosemary essential oil can significantly enhance working memory in children.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New anti-rejection drug reduces weight gain and enhances outcomes for liver transplant recipientsResearchers have discovered that a new anti-rejection drug that is gentler on the kidneys after liver transplant also reduces weight gain, which is common after surgery and can lead to serious problems for transplant patients.
16h
Ars Technica
Decrypted: American Gods: New series is as good as the book Enlarge / Wednesday (Ian McShane) meets Shadow (Ricky Whittle) under some extremely dark and mysterious circumstances. (credit: American Gods / Starz ) Welcome back to Ars Technica's podcast Decrypted , which is all about the TV we love to analyze. Right now, we're watching American Gods , a new Starz series created by Bryan Fuller ( Hannibal , Pushing Daisies ) and based on the bestselling novel
16h
The Atlantic
Moderation in Defense of Liberty Is No Vice This essay is adapted from a contribution to a special online forum organized by the Cato Institute in honor of the 40th anniversary of its founding. Conserving hard won liberties and advancing toward a freer society would be easy if everyone wanted to “live and let live” among a wide variety of people, or if the humans who want to suppress, disparage, or punish difference could be educated or ac
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Budget Blues What We’re Following Trump vs. Congress: As lawmakers prepare to vote on a budget deal that rejects many of his proposed cuts, President Trump voiced his displeasure on Twitter, calling for a government shutdown in September—though if he doesn’t sign the bill, he could shut down the government himself this week. GOP leaders aren’t following Trump’s instructions on taxes either: They’re drafting a
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mongoose pups conceal identity to surviveYoung mongooses may conceal their identity—even from their own parents—to survive.
16h
Ars Technica
Hands-on with the Surface Laptop: Well, it’s a laptop Hands-on with the Surface Laptop. Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK CITY—The Surface Laptop has no gimmicks or novelties. It's a Microsoft PC with Surface branding. But unlike the predecessor systems—the Surface RT and Surface Pro with their convertible tablet and kickstand design, the Surface Book with its hybrid concept and detachable GPU, the Surface Studio with its
16h
The Atlantic
Putin's Disappointing Phone Call With Trump On Tuesday afternoon, after President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin had their third phone call in about as many months, news emerged that the two leaders would finally meet this summer. For those tracking the Trump-Putin dance, it might seem just another date in a long love affair. The reality, however, looks far bleaker for Putin. Consider this: After three phone calls and an
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary gluten is not linked to heart risk in non-celiacsA study revealed that while dietary gluten does not increase heart disease risk in people without celiac disease, limiting whole grains may increase their heart risk.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac diseaseLong term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease -- and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doctors should question the value of most heavily promoted drugsTop promoted drugs are less likely than top selling and top prescribed drugs to be effective, safe, affordable, novel, and represent a genuine advance in treating a disease, argue US researchers in The BMJ today.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brexit's Great Repeal Bill will axe the right to health, warn expertsBrexit's Great Repeal Bill will axe the right to health, warn experts in The BMJ today.
17h
Live Science
Gluten-Free Diets Don't Lower Heart Disease RiskGluten-free diets are popular these days, but a new study finds that this diet won't lower your risk of heart disease.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Statin side-effects only felt by those who believe in them – study Researchers hope study will end debate around drugs, which could benefit over six million more UK patients Common side-effects of statins are not down to the drugs, but are instead a result of patients’ negative expectations, research suggests. Statins are typically prescribed to help lower levels of “bad cholesterol” – or low-density lipoprotein – in order to reduce the risk of a heart attack or
17h
The Atlantic
Why Hillary Clinton Thinks She Lost the Election Hillary Clinton conceded that her presidential campaign was flawed on Tuesday, but largely pinned the blame for her defeat on factors beyond her control, including Russian interference in the election, and actions taken by FBI Director James Comey. “Did we make mistakes? Of course we did. Did I make mistakes? Oh, my gosh yes,” Clinton told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour at a “Women for Women Internati
17h
Gizmodo
If You're Going to Go Gluten Free Don't Be Dumb About It Image: Nikolas Moya /Flickr Gluten is incredible for its ability to piss off a diverse spectrum of people: Folks who are giving it up for a diet, folks who say it’s stupid to give up gluten, and folks with celiac disease who probably just wish they could avoid their symptoms and their gluten in peace. Advertisement A team of researchers is trying to add data to the question of whether or not a gl
17h
Gizmodo
Adequate Man Big Pancakes Vs. Adequate Man Big Pancakes Vs. Little Pancakes: WHO YA GOT?! | Jezebel The Fyre Festival Drama Is Still Blazing | Fusion The New York Times Offers a Brutal Reminder That Ivanka Trump Is Full of Shit | The Root Why Wypipo Love the Confederacy, Explained |
17h
Gizmodo
Tesla Might Have A Solution For Electric Vehicles' Enormous Dirty Secret Tesla’s recent announcements of a few additional Gigafactories and a significant expansion of its Supercharger network show the company hopes to invest heavily in infrastructure to supports its ambitions. And a new filing uncovered by the CB Insights database suggests Tesla’s linked to a project to create an advanced materials recycling initiative. Advertisement The Securities and Exchange Commis
17h
Science : NPR
Microscopic Cars Square Off In Big Race This car race involved years of training, feats of engineering, high-profile sponsorships, competitors from around the world and a racetrack made of gold. And it's invisible to the naked eye. (Image credit: CNRS)
17h
Live Science
Move Over, Oxytocin: Other Chemicals Also Shape Social LivesThe "cuddle hormone" oxytocin gets all the attention, but a new study finds that other chemicals in the brain may play even bigger roles in people's interactions with others.
17h
Quanta Magazine
The Quantum Thermodynamics Revolution In his 1824 book, Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire , the 28-year-old French engineer Sadi Carnot worked out a formula for how efficiently steam engines can convert heat — now known to be a random, diffuse kind of energy — into work, an orderly kind of energy that might push a piston or turn a wheel. To Carnot’s surprise, he discovered that a perfect engine’s efficiency depends only on the
17h
Quanta Magazine
The New Familiar Quanta Dear Readers, Welcome to the new home of Quanta Magazine . We have completely re-engineered and redesigned the site to better serve you and the journalism you trust us to produce. This is an important time in the magazine’s development. Since we began publishing in late 2012, taking on the name Quanta in the summer of 2013, we’ve worked hard to bring you the very best coverage of mathematics and
17h
Quanta Magazine
A Cosmic-Ray Hunter Takes to the Sky On April 25, at 10:50 a.m. local time, a white helium balloon ascended from Wanaka, New Zealand, and lifted Angela Olinto ’s hopes into the stratosphere. The football stadium-size NASA balloon, now floating 20 miles above the Earth, carries a one-ton detector that Olinto helped design and see off the ground. Every moonless night for the next few months, it will peer out at the dark curve of the E
17h
Quanta Magazine
Solution: ‘Friday the 13th’ Our Insights questions this month were based on the vagaries of the modern calendar and that eternal question about any specified date: “What day of the week is that?” Our first two questions concerned the frequency of Friday the 13th’s, which some consider an unlucky day. Question 1: The year 2017 began with a Friday the 13th in January, and another one is due in October. What’s the maximum and
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Quanta Magazine
The Secret Power of the Cell’s Waste Bin At a conference in Maine during the summer of 2008, the biochemist David Sabatini stood before an audience of his peers, prepared to dazzle them with a preview of unpublished results emerging from his lab at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The presentation did not go over well. His group was studying mTOR, a cellular enzyme he and colleagues had discov
17h
Ars Technica
Behold, the spear phish that just might be good enough to hook you Enlarge (credit: Unbiassed ) To understand why Carbanak is one of the Internet's most skilled and successful criminal groups, consider the recent spear-phishing campaign it used to infect computers in the hospitality and restaurant industries with malware that steals banking credentials. One variation started with an e-mail threatening a lawsuit because a visitor got sick after eating at one of t
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Live Science
Trump Fuzzy on Andrew Jackson, Civil War HistoryTrump suggested that President Andrew Jackson was "really angry" about the Civil War, but Jackson died 16 years before the war began.
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Live Science
Pill for Exercise? Chemical Builds Stamina in Mice, Study FindsIt may not take much time at all to build up endurance -- perhaps one day, you could do it by taking a pill.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Shut It Down Today in 5 Lines President Trump tweeted that the U.S. government “needs a good ‘shutdown’” to fix the “mess” in the Senate. During a White House press briefing, Mick Mulvaney, the president’s budget director, criticized Democrats for trying to “ spike the football ” during budget negotiations, and said that a shutdown is a “negotiating tool to an extent.” The White House said in a statement that
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The Atlantic
Republican Loyalists Are Dooming the Obamacare Repeal Bill When the American Health Care Act died its first death in March, the House Republican who dealt the final, fatal blow to the bill was not a conservative member of the Freedom Caucus, nor was it a freshman worried about his or her chances of reelection. It was Representative Rodney Frelinghuysen, a 22-year House veteran, scion of a New Jersey political dynasty, and chairman of the House Appropriat
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The Atlantic
End Times at the Met Ball Rihanna once wore something that is now widely referred to as The Omelette Dress —so named for its broad, yellow train that looked very much like a giant, eggy concoction. And so there is certainly precedent for the outlandish, the absurd, the quite possibly awful, when it comes to the Costume Institute fundraising gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, better known as the Met Ball. The Omelette
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Scientific American Content: Global
Hot Chilies Cool Down Gut Inflammation in MiceThe spicy compound in chilies kicks off a chemical cascade that reduces gut inflammation and immune activity in mice. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Wastewater injection played a role in Oklahoma’s largest earthquake Science A magnitude 5.8 earthquake near Pawnee It was a few minutes past 7:00 am on Saturday morning, September 3, 2016, when the earth started shaking in Pawnee, Oklahoma. Read on.
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Popular Science
iRobot Braava Jet 240 Mopping Robot Review Gadgets Sometimes a vacuum robot just won't cut it. This automated mopping robot is built for kitchens, bathrooms, and other hard floors that might need mopping.
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Ars Technica
iPhone holds steady while Macs and services keep Apple growing in Q2 2017 Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple has just released its earnings report for the second quarter of fiscal 2017 , which runs from the beginning of January to the end of March. So far, Apple is back to modest growth in 2017: iPhone unit sales are down just a little, and iPad sales continue their precipitous slide. But iPhone revenue is actually up, and the Mac, the Services division, and the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple growing cash stash spurs talk of huge acquisitionAs Apple's stash of cash grows, so does the possibility that the company will use some of the money for a huge acquisition that would expand its empire beyond iPhones and other gadgets.
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Gizmodo
This Video of Cuttlefish Trying to Bang Will Scar You For Life GIF Dramatic video of two male cuttlefish fighting over a female consort (Aegean Sea, 2011). Credit: Derya Akkaynak and Justine Allen When you hear “cuttlefish,” naturally, you think “cuddly,” right? Turns out these charming little cephalopods can—and will—throw down if they have to, especially when it involves mating. In a newly-released video, two male cuttlefish suitors duke it out for a lady,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortalityViruses are notorious for taking over their host's operations and using them to their own advantage. But few human viruses make themselves quite as cozy as the Epstein-Barr virus, which can be found in an estimated nine out of ten humans without causing any ill effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel designs for interference microscopy objectives earn Rudolf Kingslake MedalTwo researchers from Zygo Corporation are recipients of the Rudolf Kingslake Medal and Prize for 2016. The award is presented annually to the most noteworthy original paper published in the journal Optical Engineering by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Holy chickens: Did Medieval religious rules drive domestic chicken evolution?Chickens were domesticated from Asian jungle fowl around 6,000 years ago. Since domestication they have acquired a number of traits that are valuable to humans, including those concerning appearance, reduced aggression and faster egg-laying, although it is not known when and why these traits evolved. Now, an international team of scientists has combined DNA data from archaeological chicken bones w
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Live Science
Why Jimmy Kimmel's Newborn Son Needed Heart SurgeryLate-night host Jimmy Kimmel's son was born with a heart defect, and the newborn needed surgery within days of his birth.
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Popular Science
Love eating chicken? Thank hungry Medieval Catholics. Animals Two legs good, four legs bad A gene that makes chickens get along may come from Medieval Europe—and Christianity may have helped it spread.
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NYT > Science
Black Americans Are Living Longer, C.D.C. ReportsDisparities between blacks and whites in death rates and life expectancy are disappearing over time, according to federal researchers.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Controversial microplastics study to be retracted Authors of high-profile paper strongly criticized by Swedish ethics panel. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21929
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People could be genetically predisposed to social media useScientists used a behavior genetics framework and twin study data from the 2013 Midlife in the United States survey, York examined how both environmental and genetic factors contribute to social media use by applying an analytical model called Defries-Fulker Regression.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality of care for peripheral artery disease is lowLess than half of individuals with peripheral artery disease, which is a narrowing of arteries to the limbs, stomach and head, are treated with appropriate medications and lifestyle counseling. These findings highlight the need to improve the quality of care for this high-risk group of individuals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortalityDuke researchers detail how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist quietly inside the immune system's B cells in as many as 90 percent of adults. Should something go awry however, the virus can cause mononucleosis or cancers of the lymph. 'The challenge is that it's a really efficient pathogen,' said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holy chickens: Did Medieval religious rules drive domestic chicken evolution?Chickens were domesticated from Asian jungle fowl around 6000 years ago. Since domestication they have acquired a number of traits that are valuable to humans, including those concerning appearance, reduced aggression and faster egg-laying, although it is not known when and why these traits evolved.
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The Atlantic
The Trump Administration Sketches a Border-Fence Plan Mick Mulvaney, the president’s budget director, said on Tuesday that the administration will replace segments of chain-link fencing with a 20-foot-tall steel fence along the southern border, despite Congress refusal to fund the president’s border wall in its spending bill. Trump, for his part, has claimed that the administration is “beginning to build the wall,” which was a central plank of his p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at Illinois gain insights to redirect leading HIV cure strategyResearch at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has provided the first evidence that viruses and hosts share highly similar regulatory sequences in their promoters -- the initiation sequences of human genes that code for functional proteins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hawaii scientists scrutinize first aid for man o' war stingsUniversity of Hawai'i researchers investigated which commonly recommended first aid actions are the most effective for Physalia, man 'o war jellyfish, stings. UH researchers and their colleagues in Ireland found the best first aid is to rinse with vinegar to remove any residual stingers or bits of tentacle on the skin and then immerse in 45°C hot water or apply a hot pack for 45 minutes-findings t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A fast, non-destructive test for 2-dimensional materialsThinning a material down to a single-atom thickness can dramatically change that material's physical properties. Researchers have begun to study hundreds of other 2-D materials for the purposes of electronics, sensing, early cancer diagnosis, water desalination and a host of other applications. Now, a team of Penn State researchers in the Department of Physics and the Center for Two-Dimensional an
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Crack in Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf forksAn 180-kilometer-long rift in Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf has forked into two branches, new satellite observations show.
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Popular Science
Why I can never eat onions or garlic again Health Animal, vegetable, miserable Though no good data exists on the number of people with an allium allergy, I’ve come to learn that I’m definitely not alone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists scrutinize first aid for man o' war stingsIn recent decades, trusted first aid resources have recommended stings from man o' war (Physalia species) be treated differently from other jellies. But when researchers at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa (UHM) dug into the scientific literature, they found scant evidence to support such individualized first aid. Adding to a recent push for evidence-based sting treatments, members of the Pacific
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Gizmodo
Stunning Blue-Eyed Albino Orangutan Rescued From Captors Image: Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation A conservation group has rescued an incredibly rare albino orangutan from villagers on the Indonesian part of Borneo island, who were keeping the blue-eyed, white-haired primate in a cage. Sick, dehydrated, and exhibiting signs of a bloody nose, it could take a month before the ape can be released back to the wild. Advertisement The group responsible fo
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Ars Technica
Google rater fired after speaking to Ars about work conditions Enlarge / The bad guys will try to get you with their glowing keyboards and headsets, at least in the classic movie Hackers . (credit: Hackers / United Artists) Last week we reported on the lives of Google raters , people whose job is to provide Google with data on the usefulness of its algorithms. The 10 anonymous raters we spoke with were all contractors at Leapforce, a staffing firm that provi
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Big Think
How To Break Free From Email Addiction Unlike social media, email is especially seductive as its content is specific to you. Author Cal Newport offers tips for breaking free from this constant distraction. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nearby star is a good model of our early solar systemScientists have confirmed a nearby star's planetary system contains separate belts of asteroids, similar to our own solar system. The star is also about one-fifth the age of our sun. All that makes this star a good model of the early days of our solar system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study makes strides towards generating lung tissueUsing Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers have for the first time profiled the complete genetic programs of early lung progenitors identifying genes that control lung formation and have created mini-lung organoids (artificially grown cells that resemble those of an organ) that can be used to model human lungs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study uncovers an additional strategy for targeting treatment-resistant prostate cancerRecently, the observation that an androgen synthesis inhibitor effectively treated a patient's prostate cancer without actually lowering androgen levels led researchers at Duke University to further investigate the drug's therapeutic activity. A study published this week in the JCI indicates that androgen synthesis inhibitors may act through an additional mechanism, providing insights that may lea
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WIRED
Hack Brief: Intel Fixes a Critical Bug That Lingered for 7 Dang Years A remotely executable bug in some Intel microprocessors means it's time to get patching. The post Hack Brief: Intel Fixes a Critical Bug That Lingered for 7 Dang Years appeared first on WIRED .
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Live Science
Spherical Drone Display Looks Like 360-Degree Flying ScreenThere is new way to advertise in the sky.
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Live Science
Gout: Causes, Symptoms and TreatmentAlso called ‘gouty arthritis,’ gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by too much uric acid in the blood. Learn about causes, symptoms and treatment.
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Gizmodo
Police Chief Claims He 'Misspoke' After Body Cam Contradicts Account of Black Teen's Killing Photo: Getty On Monday, Balch Springs Police Chief Jonathan Haber walked back from an earlier statement concerning the fatal shooting of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards. Originally, Haber claimed that the car Edwards was traveling in reversed toward an officer “in an aggressive manner ” Saturday night, prompting an officer to shoot into the vehicle and kill Edwards. After reviewing body camera footage
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The Atlantic
Why Don’t More People Consider Competitive Cheerleading a Sport? In one episode of the reality-TV show Cheer Squad , four members of a competitive-cheerleading team sit on blue mats at their gym discussing a common problem they face. Their all-girl squad, known as Cheer Sport Great White Sharks, is a two-time world champion—but they have a hard time getting respect for it. “You know what my biggest pet peeve is with cheer?” 16-year-old Nubs (the team goes by t
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The Atlantic
The Thug Appeal of Rodrigo Duterte On Saturday, Donald Trump extended a White House invitation to Rodrigo Duterte, president of the Philippines. The invitation surprised many: Duterte has compared himself to Hitler, and even Trump’s closest aides didn’t know that Hitler might be coming to dinner. Almost all of Duterte’s press in the U.S. has been negative. He has bragged of summarily executing criminals, in at least three cases by
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Gizmodo
American Gods Examines the Hidden Cost of Immigrating to the United States Image: Starz America is a country of opportunity, as we’re constantly told. People come here with nothing yet can make themselves billionaires. But there’s a price that immigrants have to pay when they come to this country, an unspoken loss that lies at the heart of American Gods . “We are a country of cultural appropriation,” says executive producer Bryan Fuller. Advertisement What Fuller is tal
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NYT > Science
Brazil Yellow Fever Outbreak Spawns Alert: Stop Killing the MonkeysAuthorities are urging worried residents to stop killing monkeys, which experts say can serve as beacons for where the virus is spreading.
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NYT > Science
Molina, Key Provider Under Obamacare, Ousts C.E.O., a Trump CriticDr. J. Mario Molina is a son of the founder of the firm, a mainstay in the federal marketplaces. It had reported losses of hundreds of millions of dollars.
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Live Science
Hair Loss and Balding: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentsHair loss is typically considered the domain of aging men, but this equal-opportunity condition — which has many causes — can affect virtually anyone.
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Live Science
Why Health Experts Are Concerned Over New School Lunch RulesSchool lunch programs in the U.S. will no longer be required to meet all of the nutrition standards set in the Obama era.
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Live Science
Animals on Treadmills Walk, Scamper and Scurry for Science | VideoWhat can scientists learn by putting different types of animals on treadmills?
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Gizmodo
Mansplain Happy Hour With This Video On the Science of Whiskey Image: ACS Reactions There’s no feeling more rewarding than being the smartest person in the room. Sure, your friends might think it’s annoying. But just imagine the sheer joy of going to the bar, hearing what drink they ordered, and explaining it to them. Try doing it on a date! Advertisement I myself have a phobia of explaining things to people I don’t know. But if your friend orders a whisky a
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Gizmodo
Save $45 On an Amazon Echo With This Certified Refurb Sale, While Supplies Last Refurb Amazon Echo , $135 If you’ve been itching to get an Amazon Echo ( and you really should get one ), but balk at the $180 price tag, Amazon’s offering up certified refurbs for $135 right now, the best price of the year. Amazon’s certified refurbished products are all inspected and tested to work like new, and include the same one-year warranty you’d get with a brand new product, so there’s r
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Ars Technica
San Francisco, Airbnb settle lawsuit over new short-term rental law (credit: Open Grid Scheduler / flickr ) The City and County of San Francisco have settled a lawsuit filed by Airbnb, which had sued over the city’s new short-term rental registration law. As Ars has reported before, the new law expands upon a previous ordinance that Airbnb itself helped initially draft. The earlier law went into effect in February 2015. The law defined and began to regulate short
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flexible, organic and biodegradable: Stanford researchers develop new wave of electronicsA new semiconductor developed by Stanford researchers is as flexible as skin and easily degradable. It could have diverse medical and environmental applications, without adding to the mounting pile of global electronic waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California proposes stringent cap on toxic chemical in drinking waterCalifornia regulators are proposing a strict limit on a toxic man-made chemical that has contaminated water supplies throughout the state, particularly in its vast agricultural heartland.
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Gizmodo
Surface Laptop First Impressions: Microsoft Is Finally Making the Computer It Should Have Made All Along All images: Carmen Hilbert/Gizmodo The Surface Laptop might not have turned many heads if it had been the first mobile computer from Microsoft. It’s not as radical and influential as the Surface Pro or as crazy looking as the Surface Book. From afar, the silver notebook looks like something as easily made by Apple or Asus as by Microsoft. It feels like that too, with the same heft as a powerful p
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Live Science
Meet the Robot That Can Turn Your Vehicle Into a Self-Driving CarA new self-driving car robot fits inside a suitcase and can be made with off-the-shelf parts for less than a few thousand dollars.
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The Atlantic
The Most Polarized Freshman Class in Half a Century College freshmen are more politically polarized today than they have been in the last 51 years, new survey results show. Just over two in five of the 137,456 first-year college students across the United States who responded last fall to the UCLA Higher Education Research Institute’s (HERI) annual freshman survey identified as non-partisan. On the other hand, 35.5 percent of students aligned them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
USA Today owner Gannett warns workers of possible breachGannett, the publisher of USA Today and other newspapers, has warned about 18,000 current and former employees that hackers may have had access to their personal information after breaking into the emails of members of its human resources department.
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Ars Technica
Officer recorded shooting unarmed man in back pleads guilty Note: this video contains violence. A white South Carolina police officer accused of the video-taped shooting of a fleeing, unarmed suspect pleaded guilty Tuesday to a single federal civil rights violation. A video of Officer Michael Slager shooting and killing 50-year-old Walter Scott was secretly taken in 2015 by a passerby. The video has been viewed millions of times online and on television.
20h
WIRED
Who Wants Disease-Resistant GM Tomatoes? Probably Not Europe The regulatory scene in Europe can't seem to look straight at rules for new kinds of genome editing The post Who Wants Disease-Resistant GM Tomatoes? Probably Not Europe appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PET/CT helps predict therapy effectiveness in pediatric brain tumorsIn this first ever molecular drug-imaging study in children, researchers in The Netherlands used whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine whether bevacizumab (Avastin) treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) in children is likely to be effective. The study is featured in the May 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People could be genetically predisposed to social media useChance York (Kent State University) used a behavior genetics framework and twin study data from the 2013 Midlife in the United States survey, York examined how both environmental and genetic factors contribute to social media use by applying an analytical model called Defries-Fulker Regression.
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The Atlantic
A Guilty Plea in the Death of Walter Scott Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET A former South Carolina police officer pleaded guilty Tuesday to violating the civil rights of Walter Scott when he fatally shot the unarmed black motorist in the back in April 2015 in North Charleston. Michael Slager faced state and federal charges in connection with the fatal shooting of Scott shortly after he pulled the motorist over at a traffic stop. The incident was
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakesBiology must be in a hurry. In balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA, produce proteins and carry out other processes, evolution has apparently determined that speed is of higher priority, according to Rice University researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting students closer to explosive solar eventsNJIT has a long-established reputation as a leader in researching phenomena originating on the star closest to Earth—the Sun. NJIT's optical telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory and radio telescope array at Owens Valley, both in California, have greatly expanded our understanding of solar events that periodically impact our home planet, events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CM
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Exercise-in-a-pill' boosts athletic endurance by 70 percentSedentary mice given the drug ran longer without training.
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Popular Science
Is breakfast really the most important meal of the day? Health Scientists haven't quite landed on an answer Despite a plethora of research, the scientific community still hasn’t come to a solid conclusion as to when the best time to eat after waking up really is. Read on:…
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Big Think
Autism May Be Linked to Ones Maternal Grandmother Smoking While Pregnant If a maternal grandmother smokes, it increases her grandchildren’s risk of autism by 53%. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlling the HIV epidemic: A progress report on efforts in sub-Saharan AfricaScientists report on a clinical trial evaluating an intervention to achieve universal HIV testing and treatment in Zambia. Researchers estimate that, after one year, the overall proportion of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) had increased from 44 percent to 61 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pathways leading to beta cell division identified, may aid diabetes treatmentPancreatic beta cells help maintain normal blood glucose levels by producing the hormone insulin -- the master regulator of energy (glucose). Impairment and the loss of beta cells interrupts insulin production, leading to type 1 and 2 diabetes. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, researchers have, for the first time, mapped out pathways that regulate beta cell growth that could be exploited to trick
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakesIn balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA and produce proteins, Rice University researchers find evolution determined that speed is favored much more.
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