The Atlantic
What the GOP's Health-Care Gamble Means for 2018 In a gamble that looks poised to shape the 2018 midterm landscape, the vast majority of House Republicans in districts that backed Democrats in any of the most recent presidential elections voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act in Thursday’s nail-biting tally. That decision will elevate almost all of them on the target list for Democrats aching to recapture the House majority next year. Most im
5min
Science | The Guardian
Strong language: swearing makes you stronger, psychologists confirm Repeating profanities during tasks including cycling and a hand-grip test boosted performance, researchers say It isn’t big and it isn’t clever. But the benefits, known to anyone who has moved home, climbed a mountain, or pushed a broken-down car, have finally been confirmed: according to psychologists, swearing makes you stronger. The upside of letting profanities fly emerged from a series of ex
32min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The digitization of medical knowledgeResearchers have challenged traditional teaching and learning concepts employed in medical training. A comparison with conventional learning methods led them to conclude that tablet-based, multimedia-enhanced training improves medical examination results. Their study clearly shows that an integrated program of tablet-based theoretical training and clinical practice enhances medical training.
50min

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after disease progressionSome advanced lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after the disease has progressed as evaluated by standard criteria, according to new research. The findings pave the way for certain patients to continue treatment if the disease is not progressing according to new, more specific, criteria.
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White blood cell count predicts response to lung cancer immunotherapyWhite blood cell counts can predict whether or not lung cancer patients will benefit from immunotherapy, according to new research.
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biofuel pays for itself with goods made from wasteA recent discovery may unlock the potential of biofuel waste -- and ultimately make biofuels competitive with petroleum. The researchers solved the structure of LigM, an enzyme that breaks down molecules derived from the biofuel waste product lignin. This opens a path toward new molecules and new, marketable products.
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Swearing aloud can make you strongerIn the research, Dr Stephens and his team conducted two experiments. In the first, 29 participants completed a test of anaerobic power -- a short, intense period on an exercise bike -- after both swearing and not swearing. In the second, 52 participants completed an isometric handgrip test, again after both swearing and not swearing.
10min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living in a poor area increases the risk of anxiety in women, but not in menWomen living in the most deprived areas are over 60 percent more likely to have anxiety as women living in richer areas. However, whether men lived in poorer or richer areas made very little difference to their anxiety levels, according to new research from the University of Cambridge.
10min
cognitive science
Why is it flooding across eastern Canada? - Flood risk extends across 4 provinces — Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia --- “The reason why we’ve had these water levels is for three reasons: rain rain and more rain" submitted by /u/endtimesranter [link] [comments]
13min
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK clean air strategy: Government to publish draft proposalsAfter a protracted legal battle, ministers are forced to reveal anti-pollution proposals.
23min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: AHCA (Again) What We’re Following Repealing Obamacare: The House of Representatives narrowly passed the GOP’s replacement health-care bill today. Now, it goes to the Senate, where it faces stiff opposition from Democrats—and where conservative and moderate Republicans alike hope their Senate allies will demand changes. For now, the bill has the same basic provisions as the version that failed last month, apar
25min
Science | The Guardian
Skin patch costing 39p could save lives of stroke victims, researchers say Trials show patch significantly increases chances of survival when rapidly applied by paramedics during journey to hospital A skin patch costing as little as 39p could revolutionise stroke treatment , significantly increasing the chances of survival, researchers have found. The patch contains glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), which lowers blood pressure and opens up blood vessels, helping reduce the dam
26min
Live Science
Could Your Cells Be Worth Millions?Some people like Ted Slavin have cells in their bodies that could be beneficial to the medical field. In the case of Slavin, he sold his blood to the pharmaceutical industry, which developed a hepatitis b vaccine with it.
30min
Live Science
His and Her Genes: How Sex Affects Muscles, Fat & MoreMen and women differ in some surprising ways, right down to their genes, according to a new study that found thousands of genes expressed differently in the two sexes.
30min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advanced prostate cancer treatment failure due to cell reprogrammingResearchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that reprograms tumor cells in patients with advanced prostate cancer, reducing their response to anti-androgen therapy. The findings, based on a study in mice, could help to determine which patients should avoid anti-androgen therapy and identify new treatments for people with advanced prostate cancer.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teasing apart the effects of higher mutation load on fitnessAs animals increasingly acquire interacting mutations that result in loss of gene function, the relative decline in their fitness may only be exacerbated, a new study in humans and fruit flies suggests.
36min
NYT > Science
Dr. Julius Youngner, Polio Vaccine Pioneer, Dies at 96Dr. Youngner was the last surviving member of the original three-man research team assembled by Dr. Jonas Salk to address the American polio scourge.
41min
The Atlantic
Why Does Trump Want to Address Israel at Masada? When Donald Trump travels to Israel later this month as part of his first foreign trip, he plans to give his main speech at Masada, a hilltop fortress soaked with bloody symbolism. It looks like a strange choice. Trump’s trip is theoretically about combatting religious extremism , but the historic event that made Masada famous—960 Jewish rebels chose to commit mass suicide there in the first cent
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Snow in Hawai'i: What does the future hold?Researchers, led by climate modelers, used satellite images to quantify recent snow cover distributions patterns on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. They developed a regional climate model to simulate the present-day snowfalls and then to project future Hawaiian snowfalls. Their results indicate that the two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each winter, but that the sno
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noise created by humans is pervasive in US protected areasAnthropogenic, or human-caused, noise pervades many US protected areas and habitats of endangered species, but is rarely managed as a threat in these highly valued areas.
57min
Science : NPR
Denmark Now Has A Wild Wolf Pack Again — For The First Time In 200 Years Citing CCTV footage and DNA samples, two researchers say a female has migrated more than 340 miles from Germany to join a small group of wolves in the Jutland peninsula. (Image credit: Courtesy of Natural History Museum Aarhus)
1h
The Atlantic
So Much for Trump's Populism The merger is complete. As recently as 10 months ago, the Republican Party seemed an uneasy coalition between Paul Ryan conservatives and Donald Trump populists. The conservatives demanded Obamacare repeal, upper-bracket tax cuts, entitlement reform, budget restraint, and a outward-looking American foreign policy. The Trumpists were identified instead with immigration restriction, trade protectio
1h
New Scientist - News
Republican-led US House votes to repeal Affordable Care ActThe bill now needs to be debated in the Senate, but could cost millions of people their health insurance if it passes
1h
Ars Technica
Spider silk genes used in… venom gland? Enlarge (credit: National Park Service ) According to the National Human Genome Research Institute, about 300 different species have had their entire genomes sequenced. Us, obviously, but also rats, puffer fish, fruit flies, sea squirts, roundworms, chickens, dogs, yeast, honey bees, gorillas, chimpanzees, sea urchins, a bunch of bacteria, and many assorted other birds, plants, animals, and fungi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cervical cancer survivors suffer from fatigue, insomnia and hot flushesAround half of women who have been treated for locally advanced cervical cancer suffer from symptoms of insomnia, fatigue or hot flushes at some point, according to new research presented at the ESTRO 36 conference.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests omega-3 in mothers' diets may lower children's risk of type 1 diabetesNew research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) suggests that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derived primarily from fish in maternal diet during pregnancy or lactation, may help protect infants at high risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from developing the disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ESTRO announces GIRO: A project to save one million lives in under 20 yearsESTRO aims to save one million lives by 2035 with the launch of a new partnership to bring radiotherapy to countries where its provision is lacking.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after disease progressionSome advanced lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after the disease has progressed as evaluated by standard criteria, according to research presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC). The findings pave the way for certain patients to continue treatment if the disease is not progressing according to new, more specific, criteria.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White blood cell count predicts response to lung cancer immunotherapyWhite blood cell counts can predict whether or not lung cancer patients will benefit from immunotherapy, according to research presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osimertinib improves symptoms in advanced lung cancer patientsOsimertinib improves cancer-related symptoms in patients with advanced lung cancer, according to an analysis of patient-reported outcomes from the AURA3 phase III clinical trial presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).
1h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Curt Schilling Isn’t Sold On The Claim That Someone Was Racist At Fenway Park | The Slot GO Deadspin Curt Schilling Isn’t Sold On The Claim That Someone Was Racist At Fenway Park | The Slot GOP Health Care Bill Passes House as Republicans Drink Beer, Democrats Sing | The Root ‘Stealthing’ Is Just Rape by a Different Name | Fusion Vogue India Celebrated Its 10th Anniversary by Getting Kendall Jenner Into Even More Trouble |
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Ars Technica
Congress just blocked Jeff Sessions from messing with medical marijuana Enlarge / Attorney General Jeff Sessions has staunchly opposed legalizing marijuana. (credit: Getty | Spencer Platt ) Attorney General Jeff Sessions is clearly fired up to fight state marijuana laws. Unfortunately for him, Congress just doused his chances. The recent 1,665-page spending bill maintains a provision that prevents the Department of Justice from using any of its funds to hamper state
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Gizmodo
The State Department Wants 5 Years of Social Media Handles From Refugees Before Entry Photo: AP On Thursday, the Department of State issued a notice to the Federal Register, soliciting public comments on a new procedure for vetting immigrants and asylum-seekers applying for US visas. If approved, applicants will be asked for their past five years of social media handles and could be denied entry if they refuse. The new rule, which is still under review but is slated to take effect
1h
Big Think
Why Do Humans Still Believe in Souls? Five hundred years after the Reformation, a new book on Martin Luther reminds us how long the notion of a soul has influenced our lives. Read More
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Gizmodo
What the Hell Is Marvel's Inhumans Doing About Medusa's Wig Situation? Image Credit: Michael Muller/Marvel for Entertainment Weekly . Inhumans: Once and Future Kings cover art by Nick Bradshaw. Today, we got our first look at the royal family of Marvel’s upcoming Inhumans TV series. We saw Black Bolt grimacing without his mask, Maximus looking suspiciously like Ramsay Bolton, and of course, we saw Queen Medusa. Wearing what looks like a Party City wig. Marvel, what
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The AHCA Makes a House Call Today in 5 Lines The U.S. House passed legislation to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act in a narrow 217-213 vote, advancing it to the Senate, where lawmakers reportedly plan to write their own bill. Following the vote, House Republicans gathered at the White House Rose Garden with President Trump, who called the legislation a “great plan.” Earlier in the day, Trump signed an ex
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Ars Technica
YouTube channel tries swapping hosts, gets caught by 1 million subscribers Enlarge / It's cool, old SourceFedNERD fans. This new channel's host, which just automatically appeared in your feed because it overtook the original channel's URL and subscriber counts by way of corporate ownership, is a nerd, too. (credit: NowThis Nerd ) Used to be that when a beloved media property was replaced, you found out by flipping the dial. Maybe you'd tap the "favorite" button on your
1h
Live Science
Uncle Fatty: Obese Monkey Shows Dangers of Human FoodA morbidly obese monkey named Uncle Fatty is shining light on a growing problem: More and more animals in captivity and the wild are becoming obese from eating human foods.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Orangutan rescued after two years in box in IndonesiaWatch the moment a young ape is freed after two years locked away in a wooden cage in Indonesia.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Birdwatching from spaceScientists are counting albatrosses on remote islands from satellite images.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tablet market extends slide as consumer habits shiftThe tablet craze from a few years ago showed more signs of fading this year, with most major producers reporting sales declines, market surveys showed Thursday.
2h
Live Science
Snow Machines Could Rescue Melting Swiss GlacierHow do you save a glacier? Refreeze it using snow machines.
2h
Live Science
'13 Reasons Why': Is It Helping or Harming Teens?There are potential risks that may come with watching the Netflix show "13 Reasons Why," experts say.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unlocking the barrierAlready extolled for their health benefits as a food compound, omega-3 fatty acids now appear to also play a critical role in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which protects the central nervous system from blood-borne bacteria, toxins and other pathogens, according to new research from Harvard Medical School.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomasThe fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. Researchers at the University of Missouri have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study, recently reported in Analyst published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses
2h
New Scientist - News
Watch Cassini’s first two dives between Saturn and its ringsNew video puts those stunning first images from the Cassini spacecraft's Grand Finale into context in Saturn's cloud tops
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SwRI spectrograph to help answer some of the mysteries of the SunA sounding rocket originally developed as a prototype for NASA's next generation of space-based solar spectrographs will make its third flight tomorrow, May 5, at 12:25 p.m. MDT from White Sands, N.M.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
5 Things to Watch as the Future of Obamacare Moves to the SenateThe upper chamber will have its own struggles ahead -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
The Atlantic
What's in the Health-Care Bill the House Just Passed? The American Health Care Act just passed the House, but what does it do? The arguments on the floor—and the House’s decision to vote before the bill could be scored by the Congressional Budget Office—suggest that even many of the people who just passed it don’t even know everything about the bill. That’s to be expected: A collection of amendments written to garner political support since the orig
2h
The Atlantic
How the GOP Health Bill Affects Sick People The House of Representatives on Thursday passed the American Health Care Act, a revived (and revised) version of the Republican health-care bill that was pulled in March. This time, the bill included several provisions that will likely affect health coverage for people with preexisting conditions, estimated to be about a quarter of the adult, non-elderly population. Under Obamacare, insurers had
2h
The Atlantic
The House Gets One Step Closer to Scrapping Dodd-Frank On Thursday, the House Financial Services Committee approved the Final Choice Act, thus helping President Donald Trump move one step closer to his long-stated goal of repealing the Dodd-Frank Act. The bill now must be passed by the full House and Senate before becoming law. The Choice Act —which stands for Creating Hope and Opportunity for Investors, Consumers, and Entrepreneurs—is in some ways a
2h
Science : NPR
5 Things To Watch As GOP Health Bill Moves To The Senate Just three "no" votes by Senate Republicans would likely be enough to sink the GOP health bill. Democrats who lost the battle in the House are still convinced they can win the political war. (Image credit: Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
2h
Science : NPR
Citizen Scientist Challenges Math Behind Red Light Camera Tickets A man in Oregon is challenging the math behind red light camera tickets. Mats Järlström calculates that drivers who end up in an intersection when the light goes yellow can be trapped in a no-win dilemma, particularly if they are making a turn. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Aarian Marshall, who wrote about the case for Wired magazine.
2h
Popular Science
Facebook is hiring 3000 new content monitors for a job AI cannot do Technology Moderation remains a human problem Automating video monitoring would be really hard, so Facebook is hiring lots of humans instead…
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Popular Science
A super tall air mattress for 50 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets An air mattress that doesn't suck. A super tall air mattress 50 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
2h
Gizmodo
Scientists Think They Know What’s Behind Those Mysterious Gamma Rays in the Galactic Center Image: NASA; A. Mellinger/Central Michigan University; T. Linden/University of Chicago Count up all the stuff in a galaxy and you should have a pretty good understanding of how much light is being emitted. But that doesn’t seem to be the case for our own Milky Way. Our galaxy’s got a source of extra gamma rays, the highest-energy light, right in its center. And scientists don’t know where all tha
2h
Gizmodo
Ghouls Celebrate Blood Feast GIF GIF: CNN At approximately 2:15pm today, 217 House Republicans voted to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act, sending their own plan to the Senate and potentially destroying healthcare for millions . Advertisement Then they had a little party . Photo: AP Photo: AP Photo: AP Photo: AP Photo: AP Photo: AP Photo: AP Bon appétit, you fucking vampires.
3h
Ars Technica
California utility augments 1,800 air conditioning units with “ice battery” Ice Energy A Santa Barbara-based company called Ice Energy has partnered with NRG Energy to deliver 1,800 “ice batteries” to commercial and industrial buildings served by electric utility Southern California Edison (SCE). The units are expected to reduce air conditioning bills by up to 40 percent and eliminate 200,000 tons of CO 2 over the next 20 years. Ice Energy has been building ice-based coo
3h
Gizmodo
HBO and George R.R. Martin Are Developing Four Game of Thrones Spinoffs Image: HBO HBO is preparing for the eventual end of Game of Thrones by developing not one, not two, not three, but four spinoffs set in that world. Advertisement While we’ve known for awhile that there was a possibility of a prequel series, this is a lot more of a commitment than we’d previously heard. According to IGN , David Benioff and David Weiss will be on board all four of the projects, wit
3h
Big Think
A Study of Anorexics and Bulimics 22 Years Later Offers New Hope A new study suggests that more anorexia and bulimia victims recover than was previously thought. Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snow in Hawai'i: What does the future hold?Daydreams of the tropical paradise of Hawai'i rarely include snow in the imagery, but nearly every year, a beautiful white blanket covers the highest peaks in the state for at least a few days. However, systematic observations of snowfall and the snow cover dimensions on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa are practically nonexistent. A group of climate modelers led by Chunxi Zhang from the International Paci
3h
Popular Science
This is what New York City sounded like over 400 years ago Environment Hearing is believing Use your ears to travel back in time. Listen on.
3h
Gizmodo
Self-Driving Cars Feel Like Death Traps–Can We Be Convinced Otherwise? Delphi’s autonomous car outfitted with Intel technology. Image: Intel Since we’re all friends here on the internet, I’ll let you in on a little secret: I hate driving. I drive too slowly, lurch violently when I change lanes, and the thought of having to merge onto a speeding California highway makes my heart speed up a little even as I write this. I’m no good at driving and never have been. Adver
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
All Eyes on Blockchain: A New Way to Do BusinessA recent Deloitte survey conducted at the inaugural the Business of Blockchain conference, produced by MIT Technology Review and the MIT Media Lab Digital Currency Initiative, yielded some interesting responses.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. House Passes Republican Health Bill, a Step Toward Obamacare RepealThere will now be a tough fight in the Senate -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Gizmodo
This Famous Star Wars Photo Has A Huge Mystery And I'm Going To Find The Truth So today is May 4th, which is Star Wars Day , which is nice because Star Wars doesn’t get much attention. So, in honor of this important day, I want to address something that’s been gnawing at me for years. A strange detail, an obvious mistake hidden in plain sight for years and years, mocking me. Something that makes no sense. Something within that famous picture you see above. Before I talk spe
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Snow in Hawai'i: What does the future hold?Researchers, led by University of Hawai'i climate modelers, used satellite images to quantify recent snow cover distributions patterns on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. They developed a regional climate model to simulate the present-day snowfalls and then to project future Hawaiian snowfalls. Their results indicate that the two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each wi
3h
Gizmodo
Char-Broil's Highly Rated Electric Smoker Just Keeps Getting Cheaper Char-Broil Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker , $156 Update : This price has continued to drop, now down to $156! When we first posted this at $195, that was the best price Amazon had ever listed, so this is a pretty incredible discount. This $195 $168 $156 Char-Broil electric smoker makes cooking jerky, brisket, or (insert meat of your choice) as easy as dropping in some wood chips and hitting a few
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Your muscles can 'taste' sugarIt's obvious that the taste buds on the tongue can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulin—which helps the sugar enter cells, where it can be used by the body for energy. Now researchers have uncovered an unexpected mechanism of glucose sensing in skeletal muscles that contributes to the body's overall regulation of bloo
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists engineer baker's yeast to produce penicillin moleculesScientists have inserted fungus genes into a yeast cell to make it produce penicillin molecules. In laboratory experiments, they were able to demonstrate that this yeast had antibacterial properties against streptococcus bacteria.
3h
Gizmodo
Adorable New Tarsiers Look Like Stoned Yoda Image: Screenshot via Primate Conservation Happy Star Wars Day, everyone! What better way to celebrate than by ooh-ing and aww-ing over two newly-discovered species of tarsier that look exactly like Yoda if he were extremely high? Advertisement A new study published today in Primate Conservation has all the details on these little guys, which were found on Sulawesi, an island in Indonesia. The tw
4h
cognitive science
What the Hidden Fractals in Jackson Pollock’s Art Tell Us submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Human Noise in U.S. Parks Threatens WildlifeSounds of traffic and industry invade over half of protected areas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First EPA-approved outdoor field trial for genetically engineered algaeScientists have successfully completed the first outdoor field trial sanctioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency for genetically engineered algae. The researchers tested a genetically engineered strain of algae in outdoor ponds under real-world conditions. The researchers conclude that genetically engineered algae can be successfully cultivated outdoors while maintaining engineered traits
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene mutation may speed up memory loss in Alzheimer's diseaseA gene mutation may accelerate the loss of memory and thinking skills in people who are at risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study. The gene mutation is called the BDNF Val66Met allele, or just the Met allele.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extending weight loss program helps people who are overweight keep more weight off, and is cost-effectiveExtending NHS weight loss programs from one session per week for 12-weeks to one session per week for a year helped people who are overweight to lose more weight and keep it off for longer, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious molecule's function in skin cancer identifiedA researcher has uncovered the M.O. of a mysterious molecule called SPRIGHTLY that acts as a hub for cancer-related genes in the nucleus. The study identified 'major' RNA binding partners -- genes already implicated in a variety of cancers. In a mouse model of melanoma, tumors with reduced SPRIGHTLY grew more slowly, indicating use as a therapeutic target or biomarker.
4h
The Scientist RSS
Breaking: CDCs Prevention and Public Health Fund Could Be AxedIf made law, the American Health Care Act passed today in the US House would eliminate the Obamacare-funded initiative.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advanced prostate cancer treatment failure due to cell reprogrammingResearchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that reprograms tumor cells in patients with advanced prostate cancer, reducing their response to anti-androgen therapy. The findings, based on a study in mice, could help to determine which patients should avoid anti-androgen therapy and identify new treatments for people with advanced prostate cancer.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disappointed by House action, AGS urges Senate to reject amended American Health Care ActThe American Geriatrics Society (AGS) remains opposed to the amended American Health Care Act (AHCA) that today passed the US House of Representatives despite serious concerns from geriatrics experts and a host of other stakeholders across health care.
4h
Live Science
In Photos: Obese Macaque Gorges on Human Junk FoodAn obese long-tailed macaque that chows down on tons of tourist food, from sweet corn and melons to milkshakes, is being sent to fat camp. Here's a look at the poor macaque.
4h
Live Science
Lights On, Sven! Ikea Surveys People on AI-Based FurnitureThe furniture company Ikea is conducting a survey to see how people would like their artificially intelligent sofas to behave.
4h
Popular Science
Stephen Hawking says we have 100 years to colonize a new planet—or die. Could we do it? Space Here's what it would take to survive this particular doomsday prophecy Sure, it’d be great to have a backup civilization somewhere in case asteroids wipe out all life on Earth. But what would that actually require?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disfiguring eye symptoms diminish in Graves' eye disease drug trialThere has never been a safe and effective treatment for Graves' eye disease, also known as thyroid eye disease, for the one million Americans with the condition. A Graves' eye disease trial shows success of 'breakthrough therapy" to reduce suffering and disfigurement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stopping the brain's memory circuits from overheatingIn the absence of CA2 activity, mice experience epilepsy-like activity, a sign that this area is essential for regulating the balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain. A silenced CA2 region has broader implications for information processing in hippocampal circuits, according to a new study.
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Futurity.org
If this spider dances for the wrong mate, she might eat him Male jumping spiders will try to court whomever, whenever, wherever, but choosing the wrong female can be deadly. For a new study, researchers documented the courting techniques of jumping spiders and discovered that male spiders spend a lot of time and energy—including singing and dancing—trying to mate with potential females, even when these females are the wrong species. (Credit: Colin Hutton/
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of new pathway in brain has implications for schizophrenia treatmentNeuroscientists have discovered a new signaling pathway that directly connects the brain’s NMDA and a7nACh receptors – both associated with learning and memory –– which has significance for development of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Astrocytes are the key elements that link the receptors, say investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three of 48 fetuses exposed to Zika in utero had abnormal fetal MRIsFattened up on bites of potatoes, yucca and chicken starting at 4 months, some of the babies wearing sporty clothes and frilly dresses are rolly-polly chubby. As striking as their sizable girth are their heads, beautifully round and fully formed with none of the deep skin folds that corroborate the Zika virus' devastating ability to halt normal brain expansion as infants develop in utero.
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Gizmodo
'Why Is There Only One Wonder Woman?' Image: DC Comics. Art by Nicola Scott. Greetings, my little priority envelopes. I apologize for the spottiness of “Postal Apocalypse” recently, but rest assured I had very good reasons that I’m absolutely not going to tell you about. This week: Whether superheroes truly create their villains, the reason Jurassic World ’s dinosaurs didn’t and won’t have feathers, and why Wonder Woman stands alone.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Human noise in US parks threatens wildlife Sounds of traffic and industry invade over half of protected areas. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21933
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarker test for ALS useful in diagnosing canine neurodegenerative diseaseIn 2009, Joan Coates, a veterinary neurologist, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute at MIT/Harvard, found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease. Now, researchers have found that a biomarker test that diagnoses ALS also can assist with determining a diagnosis for DM.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New blood test predicts who will benefit from targeted prostate cancer treatmentsA new blood test could predict which men with advanced prostate cancer will respond to new targeted treatments for the disease. These men could be spared treatments that are unlikely to work for them, and doctors could offer them alternative options instead.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New light shed on 'world's oldest animal fossils'Ancient fossils, thought to be some of the world's earliest examples of animal remains, could in fact belong to other groups such as algae, scientists suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rub each other up the right wayGiving your partner a massage can improve both their well being and yours, new research concludes. A total of 38 participants completed a three-week massage course, assessing their wellbeing via questionnaires before and after massage sessions across eight areas of physical and mental wellbeing, stress, coping and relationship satisfaction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychological benefits for kids when moms keep taking folic acidTaking folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy may improve psychological development in children, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise study offers hope in fight against Alzheimer'sA new study adds more information about how physical activity impacts brain physiology and offers hope that it may be possible to reestablish some protective neuronal connections. Researchers explored how a 12-week walking intervention with older adults affected functionality of a brain region known to show declines in people suffering from mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to seek social media details from certain visa applicantsThe State Department wants to review social media, email addresses and phone numbers from some foreigners seeking U.S. visas, as part of the Trump administration's enhanced screening of potential immigrants and visitors.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Navy, Marine Corps spotlight the future of amphibious, autonomous warfareAutonomous vehicles, augmented reality systems and advanced wireless networks were among over 50 new technologies showcased during the Ship-to-Shore Maneuver Exploration and Experimentation Advanced Naval Technology Exercise (S2ME2 ANTX) 2017—a series of amphibious beach landings held recently at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in California.
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Popular Science
Pillsy is the latest smart pill bottle trying to solve a massive healthcare problem Technology A wave of connected products aims to help patients take their medicine It’s a big deal when people don’t take the medications prescribed to them. But a smart pill bottle is trying to fix the problem. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic findings in 'type 1.5' diabetes may shed light on better diagnosis, treatmentResearchers investigating a form of adult-onset diabetes that shares features with the two better-known types of diabetes have discovered genetic influences that may offer clues to more accurate diagnosis and treatment. The team found that latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is genetically more similar to type 1 diabetes than to type 2 diabetes.
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Big Think
How to Make Maps and Graphs Colorblind People Can Actually Read Not everyone sees color the way you do. There are a suite of tools available to help graphic designers work more inclusively. Read More
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Gizmodo
House Republicans Vote to Destroy Health Care for Millions Image: AP The fate of America’s healthcare system on Thursday came down to four votes: 217 House Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it with the latest version of the much-maligned American Health Care Act, while 213 votes against it. After public outcry against the bill, in the end, twenty Republicans voted against it, but those votes were not quite enough to stop the bill
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Science : NPR
America's Protected Natural Areas Are Polluted, By Noise A new survey shows that the sound of cars and planes and other forms of noise pollution are rampant across the American wilderness. In many cases, man-made noise is drowning out the background sounds. (Image credit: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)
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Futurity.org
To promote scientific tweets, try these graphics A new study identifies a way for scientists and scientific journals to share new research with even more people on Twitter. A Twitter-friendly graphic called a visual abstract can nearly triple the number of people who click the link in the tweet to read a full scientific paper, the study shows. The results appear in the Annals of Surgery , a journal that began creating visual abstracts for selec
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Gizmodo
Rian Johnson Asked for a Small, Crucial Change to The Force Awakens BB-8 almost didn’t get to spend time with Poe in The Last Jedi. All Images: Disney When Rey leaves Leia and the Resistance to go find Luke Skywalker, she brings two friends with her: Chewbacca and R2-D2. However, that wasn’t originally the case. Advertisement In an interview with Entertainment Weekly , The Last Jedi director Rian Johnson said that the original ending of The Force Awakens had BB-8
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuke waste debate: Turn it into glass or encase in cement?Congress should consider authorizing the U.S. Department of Energy to study encasing much of the nuclear waste at the nation's largest waste repository in a cement-like mixture instead of turning it into glass logs, according to a new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office.
5h
The Atlantic
The House Votes to Repeal Obamacare Updated on May 4 at 3:47 p.m. ET For House Republicans, the burden of an unfulfilled campaign promise had simply become too much to bear alone. And so on Thursday, after an embarrassing early failure and weeks of fits and starts, a narrow GOP majority passed legislation to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act that even many of its supporters conceded was deeply flawed. The party-l
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The Atlantic
How Many Galaxies Can You Count in This Picture? For three years, the Hubble Space Telescope spent hundreds of hours peering at distant galaxy clusters and their surrounding areas, looking for the hazy light of the earliest stars in the universe. The mission, known as Frontier Fields, produced dozens of photos of dark backgrounds riddled with galaxies of all shapes, bright jewels so numerous you’d think they were all Photoshopped in. After 630
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Popular Science
Why corgi mixes look like adorable munchkin versions of other dogs Animals Like Mendel’s peas, but cuter Look at some cute doggos and learn a little genetics at the same time.
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Live Science
Wait ... How Many People Died? | VideoThe Student Entry winner in the journal Science's second annual "Data Stories" data-visualization competition.
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Live Science
'Data Stories' Winners Animate Beautiful Data | VideoWatch highlights from the winning entries in the journal Science's second annual "Data Stories" data-visualization competition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA measures rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone DonnaNASA found that Tropical Cyclone Donna is generating heavy rainfall as the storm is forecast to move over Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean.Tropical Cyclone Donna formed in the South Pacific Ocean northeast of Vanuatu On May 2, 2017 at 1800 UTC. Vanuatu is made up of about 80 islands that covers about 808 miles or 1,300 kilometers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New survey reveals effects of incarceration for older Americans' work and retirement plansAmericans age 50 and older who report that they have been incarcerated at some point in their lives are more likely to express anxiety about several aspects of retirement, to have experienced unemployment in the recent past, and to have fewer sources of income for retirement than those who have not, according to a new national survey of Americans age 50 and older from The Associated Press-NORC Cen
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foodsIn January 2016, the EU imposed a maximum limit of inorganic arsenic on manufacturers in a bid to mitigate associated health risks. Researchers at the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen's have found that little has changed since this law was passed and that 50 per cent of baby rice food products still contain an illegal level of inorganic arsenic.
5h
The Scientist RSS
Sex Differences in Human Gene ExpressionResearchers uncover thousands of genes whose activity varies between men and women.
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Gizmodo
This Brain Scanning Technique Can Measure Your Baby's Pain Image: Oxford University Babies can’t tell us how much pain they’re in, which poses a problem for healthcare practitioners who are trying to manage their care. A new technique that uses non-invasive brain scans overcomes this frustrating limitation by providing what may be the first objective measure of infant pain. Advertisement The new system, developed by researchers at Oxford University, uses
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New on MIT Technology Review
Is Microsoft Innovating Its Way to Customer Alienation?A recent burst of ingenuity by the folks in Redmond is at risk of turning into a commercial failure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA measures rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone DonnaNASA found that Tropical Cyclone Donna is generating heavy rainfall as the storm is forecast to move over Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The digitization of medical knowledgeResearchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have challenged traditional teaching and learning concepts employed in medical training. A comparison with conventional learning methods led them to conclude that tablet-based, multimedia-enhanced training improves medical examination results. Their study, which has been published in the journal PLOS ONE, clearly shows that an integrated progra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Queen's research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foodsResearchers from Queen's University Belfast have found that almost half of baby rice food products contain illegal levels of inorganic arsenic despite new regulations set by the EU.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal how epigenetic changes in DNA are interpretedA new study in Science from Karolinska Institutet maps out how different DNA-binding proteins in human cells react to certain biochemical modifications of the DNA molecule. The scientists report that some 'master' regulatory proteins can activate regions of the genome that are normally inactive due to epigenetic changes. Their findings contribute to a better understanding of gene regulation, embry
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Policies to curb short-lived climate pollutants could yield major health benefitsA commitment to reducing global emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) such as methane and black carbon could slow global warming while boosting public health and agricultural yields, aligning the Paris Climate Agreement with global sustainable development goals, a new analysis by an international panel of scientists shows.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Current climate change measurements mask trade-offs necessary for policy debatesScientists and policymakers use measurements like global warming potential to compare how varying greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and methane, contribute to climate change. Yet, despite its widespread use, this measurement fails to provide an accurate look at how greenhouse gases affect the environment in the short and long-term, according to a policy piece in Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teasing apart the effects of higher mutation load on fitnessAs animals increasingly acquire interacting mutations that result in loss of gene function, the relative decline in their fitness may only be exacerbated, a new study in humans and fruit flies suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wonder what drives protein cravings? This study will satiate your curiosityResearchers have identified the neural circuit that drives protein cravings in fruit flies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The genetic history of Bantu speakers and their relationship to African-AmericansResearchers have used genetic analysis to model the much-debated migration paths, and mingling patterns, of Bantu-speaking people as they disseminated across Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans are creating quite a racket, even in the wildernessHuman-related noise is doubling background sound levels in 63 percent of US protected areas, where manmade disturbances are supposed to be reduced, a new study reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel tool confers targeted, stable editing of epigenome in human stem cellsNew Salk technology adds methyl groups at specific positions on DNA, allowing targeted gene correction of aberrant epigenetic disorders.
5h
Live Science
Seasonal Changes in Carbon Dioxide | VideoThe Professional Entry winner in the journal Science's second annual "Data Stories" data-visualization competition.
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Live Science
Listening to Landscapes | VideoThe People's Choice winner in the journal Science's second annual "Data Stories" data-visualization competition.
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Live Science
Ecological Footprint: Deficit or Reserve? | VideoThe Corporate Entity Entry winner in the journal Science's second annual "Data Stories" data-visualization competition.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Internal compass guides fruit fly navigationExperiments show how flies navigate — and why this might be important for humans.
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Ars Technica
There’s a federal law to lower drug prices—and Louisiana may just use it Enlarge / Joel Roth, 65, of San Rafael, California, is a long-suffering Hepatitis C patient who is taking Sovaldi, which costs $1,000 per pill, or $84,000 for a 12-week treatment course. Roth got financial assistance to pay his $11,600 share of the bill. (credit: Getty | MCT ) An obscure federal patent law that has been on the books for more than a century gives the government the power to drag d
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Science current issue
Climate extremes stress ecosystems
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Science current issue
RPE cranks it up a Notch
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Science current issue
Not making the right contacts
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Science current issue
The three-dimensional world in the brain
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Science current issue
Short chains for a smart film
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Science current issue
Competing inputs and shifting outcomes build shape
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Science current issue
Committees, candidates, and gender
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Science current issue
Miniaturizing optical gyroscopes
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Science current issue
Integration of CpG-free DNA induces de novo methylation of CpG islands in pluripotent stem cells CpG islands (CGIs) are primarily promoter-associated genomic regions and are mostly unmethylated within highly methylated mammalian genomes. The mechanisms by which CGIs are protected from de novo methylation remain elusive. Here we show that insertion of CpG-free DNA into targeted CGIs induces de novo methylation of the entire CGI in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The methylation status is
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Science current issue
DeepStack: Expert-level artificial intelligence in heads-up no-limit poker Artificial intelligence has seen several breakthroughs in recent years, with games often serving as milestones. A common feature of these games is that players have perfect information. Poker, the quintessential game of imperfect information, is a long-standing challenge problem in artificial intelligence. We introduce DeepStack, an algorithm for imperfect-information settings. It combines recurs
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Science current issue
Anti-inflammatory effect of IL-10 mediated by metabolic reprogramming of macrophages Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the control of immune responses. However, its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we show that IL-10 opposes the switch to the metabolic program induced by inflammatory stimuli in macrophages. Specifically, we show that IL-10 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced glucose uptake and glycolysis and
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Science current issue
Thermal processing of diblock copolymer melts mimics metallurgy Small-angle x-ray scattering experiments conducted with compositionally asymmetric low molar mass poly(isoprene)- b -poly(lactide) diblock copolymers reveal an extraordinary thermal history dependence. The development of distinct periodic crystalline or aperiodic quasicrystalline states depends on how specimens are cooled from the disordered state to temperatures below the order-disorder transiti
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Science current issue
Selective anaerobic oxidation of methane enables direct synthesis of methanol Direct functionalization of methane in natural gas remains a key challenge. We present a direct stepwise method for converting methane into methanol with high selectivity (~97%) over a copper-containing zeolite, based on partial oxidation with water. The activation in helium at 673 kelvin (K), followed by consecutive catalyst exposures to 7 bars of methane and then water at 473 K, consistently pr
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Science current issue
The complex effects of ocean acidification on the prominent N2-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium Acidification of seawater caused by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is anticipated to influence the growth of dinitrogen (N 2 )–fixing phytoplankton, which contribute a large fraction of primary production in the tropical and subtropical ocean. We found that growth and N 2 -fixation of the ubiquitous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium decreased under acidified conditions, notwithstanding a benefic
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Science current issue
Noise pollution is pervasive in U.S. protected areas Anthropogenic noise threatens ecological systems, including the cultural and biodiversity resources in protected areas. Using continental-scale sound models, we found that anthropogenic noise doubled background sound levels in 63% of U.S. protected area units and caused a 10-fold or greater increase in 21%, surpassing levels known to interfere with human visitor experience and disrupt wildlife be
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Science current issue
Branch-specific plasticity of a bifunctional dopamine circuit encodes protein hunger Free-living animals must not only regulate the amount of food they consume but also choose which types of food to ingest. The shifting of food preference driven by nutrient-specific hunger can be essential for survival, yet little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We identified a dopamine circuit that encodes protein-specific hunger in Drosophila . The activity of these neurons increased
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Science current issue
Negative selection in humans and fruit flies involves synergistic epistasis Negative selection against deleterious alleles produced by mutation influences within-population variation as the most pervasive form of natural selection. However, it is not known whether deleterious alleles affect fitness independently, so that cumulative fitness loss depends exponentially on the number of deleterious alleles, or synergistically, so that each additional deleterious allele resul
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Science current issue
Dispersals and genetic adaptation of Bantu-speaking populations in Africa and North America Bantu languages are spoken by about 310 million Africans, yet the genetic history of Bantu-speaking populations remains largely unexplored. We generated genomic data for 1318 individuals from 35 populations in western central Africa, where Bantu languages originated. We found that early Bantu speakers first moved southward, through the equatorial rainforest, before spreading toward eastern and so
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Science current issue
New Products
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Science current issue
Completing a career
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Science current issue
Impact of cytosine methylation on DNA binding specificities of human transcription factors The majority of CpG dinucleotides in the human genome are methylated at cytosine bases. However, active gene regulatory elements are generally hypomethylated relative to their flanking regions, and the binding of some transcription factors (TFs) is diminished by methylation of their target sequences. By analysis of 542 human TFs with methylation-sensitive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by
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Science current issue
Advances in engineering hydrogels Hydrogels are formed from hydrophilic polymer chains surrounded by a water-rich environment. They have widespread applications in various fields such as biomedicine, soft electronics, sensors, and actuators. Conventional hydrogels usually possess limited mechanical strength and are prone to permanent breakage. Further, the lack of dynamic cues and structural complexity within the hydrogels has li
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Science current issue
Self-organized Notch dynamics generate stereotyped sensory organ patterns in Drosophila The emergence of spatial patterns in developing multicellular organisms relies on positional cues and cell-cell communication. Drosophila sensory organs have informed a paradigm in which these operate in two distinct steps: Prepattern factors drive localized proneural activity, then Notch-mediated lateral inhibition singles out neural precursors. Here we show that self-organization through Notch
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Science current issue
Moving forward after the march
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Science current issue
News at a glance
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Science current issue
Congress trumps president in backing science
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Science current issue
DOE freezes millions in awards
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Science current issue
Mauritius invites primate research labs to set up shop
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Science current issue
New crop pest takes Africa at lightning speed
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Science current issue
NASA pushes for diversity in planetary science
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Science current issue
Fast and curious
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Science current issue
Going green on the silver screen
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Science current issue
Beyond Hamilton's rule
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Science current issue
Surprising states of order for linear diblock copolymers
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Science current issue
Inflammation by way of macrophage metabolism
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Science current issue
Transcription factors read epigenetics
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Science current issue
Thomas Earl Starzl (1926-2017)
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Science current issue
Unmask temporal trade-offs in climate policy debates
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Science current issue
A climate policy pathway for near- and long-term benefits
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Science current issue
Melting glaciers: Hidden hazards
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Science current issue
Resetting the bar for graduate admissions
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Science current issue
The roadless dunes less traveled
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Science current issue
Comment on "Density functional theory is straying from the path toward the exact functional" Medvedev et al . (Reports, 6 January 2017, p. 49) argue that recent density functionals stray from the path toward exactness. This conclusion rests on very compact 1s 2 and 1s 2 2s 2 systems favored by the Hartree-Fock picture. Comparison to actual energies for the same systems indicates that the "straying" is not chemically relevant and is at best specific to the studied dense systems.
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Density functional theory is straying from the path toward the exact functional" Kepp argues in his Comment, among other concerns, that the atomic densities we have considered are not relevant to molecular bonding. However, this does not change the main conclusion of our study, that unconstrained fitting of flexible functional forms can make a density functional more interpolative but less widely predictive.
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Science current issue
Artificial intelligence masters poker
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Science current issue
Shhh, you're disturbing the ecosystem
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Science current issue
On the history of Bantu speakers
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Science current issue
A way to switch off IBD
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Science current issue
A watery route from methane to methanol
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Science current issue
Give us our daily protein
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Science current issue
LAMP shines a light on Zika virus
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Science current issue
Finding drugs for fragile X syndrome
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Science current issue
When polymers behave like metals
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Science current issue
Wet, soft, squishy, and tunable
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Science current issue
Self-organization for sensory brushes
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Science current issue
Positives and negatives of methylated CpG
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Science current issue
Inducing DNA methylation where it wasn't
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Science current issue
Reconciling pH and future productivity
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Science current issue
Genetic interactions drive selection
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Science current issue
Inter-innate cooperation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parkinson: Weight gain after deep brain stimulationIt was already known that people affected by Parkinson's disease, when subjected to deep brain stimulation, gained weight, but it was less clear why that was so. New research has now shown that the weight gain after implant has a multifactorial origin. The study monitored for the first time a group of patients before and after the intervention, assessing cognitive, psychological and behavioral asp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decades of data on world's oceans reveal a troubling oxygen declineThe amount of dissolved oxygen contained in the water -- an important measure of ocean health -- has been declining for more than 20 years, reveals a new analysis of decades of data on oceans across the globe.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Peace and quiet is becoming more elusive in U.S. wild areasHuman noise stretches into the wilderness.
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Gizmodo
How to Tell Cool Free Apps From Dangerous Ones Image: Screenshot You’ve spotted an app, site, or service you like the look of, it’s completely free to use, and so you’re ready to sign up—but how can you tell the service is above-board and legit? That you’re not going to be subject to nefarious dark pattern tactics or see you or your teens sensitive data shared with advertisers . Before joining a service that seems to good to be true take the
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Science | The Guardian
Noise pollution is drowning out nature even in protected areas – study Human noises are often 10 times that of background levels, impairing our enjoyment of natural parks and impacting animal behaviour, scientists have found The sounds of the natural world are being overwhelmed by the blare of human activity, even in protected wildlife areas, new research has revealed. The racket is not only harming people’s enjoyment of natural havens, which are known to have signi
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The Atlantic
A Not-So-Silent Spring If a tree falls in the forest, and there’s no one around, the National Park Service will still hear it. For the past decade, staff at the NPS have been lugging recording equipment into almost 500 sites around the U.S. , in a bid to measure the sounds of the nation’s quietest places. For weeks at a time, sensors measured local noise levels, microphones recorded the actual soundscapes, and weather
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change, tornadoes and mobile homes: A dangerous mixTornadoes and mobile homes don't mix to begin with, but throw in the volatility of climate change and the potential for massive property damage and deaths is even higher in coming decades, indicates a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noise created by humans is pervasive in US protected areasProtected areas in the United States, representing 14 percent of the land mass, provide places for respite, recreation, and natural resource conservation. However, noise pollution poses novel threats to these protected areas, according to a first-of-its-kind study from scientists at Colorado State University and the U.S. National Park Service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Policies to curb short-lived climate pollutants could yield major health benefitsA commitment to reducing global emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) such as methane and black carbon could slow global warming while boosting public health and agricultural yields, aligning the Paris Climate Agreement with global sustainable development goals, a new analysis by an international research panel shows.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Current climate change measurements mask trade-offs necessary for policy debatesScientists and policymakers use measurements like global warming potential to compare how varying greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and methane, contribute to climate change.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reveal how epigenetic changes in DNA are interpretedA new study in Science from Karolinska Institutet maps out how different DNA-binding proteins in human cells react to certain biochemical modifications of the DNA molecule. The scientists report that some 'master' regulatory proteins can activate regions of the genome that are normally inactive due to epigenetic changes. Their findings contribute to a better understanding of gene regulation, embry
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trash into treasure: Sandia could help biofuel pay for itself with goods made from wasteA recent discovery by Sandia National Laboratories researchers may unlock the potential of biofuel waste -- and ultimately make biofuels competitive with petroleum. The researchers solved the structure of LigM, an enzyme that breaks down molecules derived from the biofuel waste product lignin. This opens a path toward new molecules and new, marketable products.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Direct and not indirect childhood abuse linked to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescentsAdolescents who were physically abused or sexually abused were more likely to engage in non-suicidal self-injury than their non-abused counterparts, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto and Western University. The study appears online in the journal Child Abuse & Neglect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sandia develops math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistryResearchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level.Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can trusting your doctor help reduce pain?Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally connected to your doctor, will the shot hurt less?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For people with Down syndrome, varying test results can make it harder to get the right vision prescriptionEven objective, automated vision testing -- using a device called an autorefractor -- gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a study in the May issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New survey reveals effects of incarceration for older Americans' work and retirement plansAmericans age 50 and older who report that they have been incarcerated at some point in their lives are more likely to express anxiety about several aspects of retirement, to have experienced unemployment in the recent past, and to have fewer sources of income for retirement than those who have not, according to a new national survey of Americans age 50 and older from The Associated Press-NORC Cen
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New on MIT Technology Review
Apple’s $1 Billion Manufacturing Boost Will Likely Bring Robots, Not Factory JobsAdvanced processes can certainly boost productivity—but they’re unlikely to lead to more jobs in the industry.
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Gizmodo
Bad Star Wars Tweets, Ranked Image: Getty Here are some tweets, ranked bad to most bad: Please send any thoughts or feedback to william@gizmodo.com .
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Gizmodo
Build the Home (Office) Of Your Dreams With 15% Off Everything Herman Miller Sells 15% off at Herman Miller Herman Miller furniture is legendary, and also legendarily out of reach for most of us. But if you have one chair, table, or bed that you’ve just been dying to get your hands on, everything they sell is 15% off today , so you won’t find a better chance to splurge. Advertisement The Aeron office chair is one of our readers’ favorites , and the Embody is another great optio
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Gizmodo
Dear Handmaid's Tale: I Can't Believe There's No Butter Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo and Hulu I have a few beefs with Hulu’s adaptation of the notable novel that has set many a school girl on a path to feminism and rejection of fuckbois. There’s obviously my disappointment with Serena Joy’s transformation from spackled mess of a Tammy Faye icon to coifed Ivanka Trump twin (mainly because I want to see Yvonne Strahovski in an ‘80s church lady bouffant), b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Affluent countries contribute less to wildlife conservation than the rest of the worldLess affluent countries are more committed to conservation of their large animals than richer ones, a new Oxford University research collaboration has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Student creates first synthetic retina for the visually impairedA synthetic, soft tissue retina could offer fresh hope to visually impaired people. Until now, all artificial retinal research has used only rigid, hard materials. The new research is the first to successfully use biological, synthetic tissues, developed in a laboratory environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biggest X-ray laser in the world generates its first laser lightEuropean XFEL, the biggest X-ray laser in the world, has generated its first X-ray laser light. The X-ray light has a wavelength of 0.8 nm -- about 500 times shorter than that of visible light. At first lasing, the laser had a repetition rate of one pulse per second, which will later increase to 27,000 per second.
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Science | The Guardian
Journal retracts controversial paper on dangers of microplastics to fish Researchers behind study, which may have helped cement case for banning microbeads , found guilty of scientific misconduct A landmark paper claiming to show the devastating impact of microplastics on fish has been retracted after an investigation found the authors guilty of scientific misconduct. The study , published in the prestigious journal Science, claimed that fish became “smaller, slower a
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The Atlantic
Donald Trump's Excellent Abrahamic Adventure President Trump is going big on his first foreign trip, planning to visit the symbolic homes of the three Abrahamic faiths as he makes a plea for global unity. Trump will visit Saudi Arabia, Israel, and the Vatican, where he plans to meet Pope Francis, later this month. He’d already announced plans to visit NATO and G7 summits in France and Italy respectively, and will complete those visits after
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The Atlantic
Trump Just Got Palestinians' Hopes Up Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s official delegation and the Palestinian mission in Washington haven’t been this ebullient or enthusiastic in at least a decade. One can certainly understand why. Abbas’s visit to the White House, strikingly early in the new Trump administration, is a political and diplomatic bonanza for Abbas as leader of the mainstream nationalist Palestine Liberation Organi
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Live Science
WWI Training Tunnels Discovered in EnglandEngland's Salisbury Plain is famous as the home of Stonehenge and other enigmatic ancient sites. But it has just yielded a much more recent archaeological wonder: a network of World War I tunnels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Falkland Islands basin shows signs of being among world's largest cratersA basin in the Falkland Islands exhibits traits of a large impact crater, according to a new analysis by a team of scientists. The structure measures approximately 250 kilometers, or more than 150 miles, in diameter and is described in the latest issue of the journal Terra Nova.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers identify 6,500 genes that are expressed differently in men and womenMen and women differ in obvious and less obvious ways -- for example, in the prevalence of certain diseases or reactions to drugs. How are these connected to one's sex? Researchers recently uncovered thousands of human genes that are expressed -- copied out to make proteins -- differently in the two sexes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stink bugs: Free guide for agricultural integrated pest managementFarmers in the midwestern United States have been battling increasing infestations from a variety of stink bug species in recent years, and now they have a new free resource for understanding and managing the emerging pests. A profile is now being published of several of the most common stink bug pests will be that reviews existing research to offer methods for differentiating stink bug species, s
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Gizmodo
Silicon Valley Can’t Stop Puking Money All Over Soylent Image: Wikicommons Soylent, a substance, is about to be everywhere. A team of queasy venture capitalists just invested $50 million into the company. This, despite the fact that Soylent is perhaps best known for lying about its ingredients and giving people fits of relentless vomiting and uncontrollable diarrhea. Advertisement Welcome to the clammy embrace of late capitalism. This is a world where
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sounding rocket will take 1,500 images of sun in five minutesOn May 5, 2017, scientists will launch a sounding rocket 200 miles up into the atmosphere, where in just five minutes, it will take 1,500 images of the sun. The NASA-funded RAISE mission is designed to scrutinize split-second changes occurring near the sun's active regions—areas of intense, complex magnetic activity that can give rise to solar flares, which eject energy and solar material out into
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Sea creatures’ sticky ‘mucus houses’ catch ocean carbon really fastA new deepwater laser tool measures the carbon-filtering power of snot nets created by little-known sea animals called giant larvaceans.
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Gizmodo
CRISPR Could Transform the Way We Diagnose Disease A diagnostic test for detecting Zika with CRISPR. Image: Wyss Institute The gene editing tool CRISPR could one day mean that we can simply edit away disease, blight and undesirable genetic traits. Now, it’s also gaining traction in another realm of medical technology: diagnosing disease. Advertisement On Thursday, researchers at UC Berkeley announced that they’ve discovered ten new CRISPR enzymes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Holographic analysis of Wi-Fi data generates 3-D images of the vicinityScientists have developed a holographic imaging process that depicts the radiation of a Wi-Fi transmitter to generate three-dimensional images of the surrounding environment. Industrial facility operators could use this to track objects as they move through the production hall.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In Huntington's disease, traffic jams in the cell's control center kill brain cellsWorking with mouse, fly and human cells and tissue, researchers report new evidence that disruptions in the movement of cellular materials in and out of a cell's control center -- the nucleus -- appear to be a direct cause of brain cell death in Huntington's disease, an inherited adult neurodegenerative disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential predictor of glaucoma damage identifiedA biomarker that appears linked to damage to cells in the retina of the eye has been identified by researchers. The marker may make it possible to better monitor the progression of glaucoma, as well as the effectiveness of treatment for the blinding disease.
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The Atlantic
An Iran-Style Nuclear Deal With North Korea Is the Best America Can Hope For Donald Trump, who campaigned for president promising to bring his unique dealmaking skills to gridlocked Washington, assumed office facing a twin choice. On the one hand, he would have to decide whether, as candidate Trump had repeatedly pledged, to undo “the worst deal ever” with Iran that the Obama administration and the world’s major powers had negotiated in 2015 to block that country’s pathwa
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The Atlantic
How Does Congressional Budget Office Scoring Work? Updated on May 4 at 2:41 p.m. ET The House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act on Thursday on a tight, party-line vote. After weeks of setbacks and negotiations, the White House and GOP leaders in Congress had seemed confident ahead of the vote that the amended law would have enough support among both moderate Republicans and the more conservative Freedom Caucus to pass and pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast milk appears to aid white matter microstructural organization in preemiesTo the growing list of reasons why mothers should consider breast-feeding infants, add another: Critical white matter structures in the brains of babies who are born so prematurely that they weigh less than 1,500 grams develop more robustly when their mothers breast-feed them, compared with preemie peers who are fed formula.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Affluent countries contribute less to wildlife conservation than the rest of the worldLess affluent countries are more committed to conservation of their large animals than richer ones, a new Oxford University research collaboration has found.In collaboration with Panthera, researchers from Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) have assessed how much, or little, individual countries contribute to protecting the world's wildlife.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three of 48 fetuses exposed to Zika in utero had abnormal fetal MRIsFattened up on bites of potatoes, yucca and chicken starting at 4 months, some of the babies wearing sporty clothes and frilly dresses are rolly-polly chubby. As striking as their sizable girth are their heads, beautifully round and fully formed with none of the deep skin folds that corroborate the Zika virus' devastating ability to halt normal brain expansion as infants develop in utero.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exosomes derived from very obese patients' fat send wrong signals throughout bodyExosomes isolated from very obese patients behave very differently than those derived from lean patients and may be key players in heightening youths' likelihood of developing atherosclerosis -- which, in turn, places them at higher risk for suffering heart disease and stroke as adults.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can Zapping the Vagus Nerve Jump-Start Immunity?An experimental procedure is exposing links between nervous and immune systems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Models that forecast impact of government spending are easily manipulatedThe most widely used model for predicting how US government spending affects gross domestic product (GDP) can be rigged using theoretical assumptions to control forecasts, economists have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Believe you can stop climate change and you willIf we believe that we can personally help stop climate change with individual actions -- such as turning the thermostat down -- then we are more likely to make a difference, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For richer or poorer, we all eat fast foodWhether rich or poor, one thing unites Americans of all economic classes: Our love for fast food. A new nationwide study of young baby boomers contradicts the popular belief that fast-food consumption is concentrated among the poor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine conservation must consider human rightsOcean conservation is essential for protecting the marine environment and safeguarding the resources that people rely on for livelihoods and food security. But there are many documented cases where conservation has bumped up against the people who share the same places and resources, even leading to human rights abuses, say authors of a new report.
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Big Think
New Research Reveals How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain A new study shows that being (and remaining) overweight and having type 2 diabetes is neurological nightmare. Read More
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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WIRED
Apple’s Billion-Dollar Investment Provides a Blueprint for US Manufacturing By focusing on advanced manufacturing, Apple's putting a billion dollars into the future of manufacturing, not the past. The post Apple's Billion-Dollar Investment Provides a Blueprint for US Manufacturing appeared first on WIRED .
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New Scientist - News
Resurrected gene allows time travel to an Earth before oxygenResearchers have rebuilt the gene coding for an ancient form of the photosynthesis enzyme rubisco, which should tell us how life coped with oxygen-poor air
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New Scientist - News
Parasite living inside fish eyeball controls its behaviourYoung parasites make their fish hosts extra careful – but once they mature they do all they can to ensure the fish are eaten by a bird to complete their life cycle
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Ars Technica
Cop fakes body cam footage, prosecutors drop drug charges Enlarge (credit: Boston Globe/Getty Images) Prosecutors in Pueblo, Colorado are dropping felony drug and weapon-possession charges after an officer involved in the case said he staged body cam footage so he could walk "the courts through" the vehicle search that led to the arrest. The development means that defendant Joseph Cajar, 36, won't be prosecuted on allegations of heroin possession and of
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Live Science
Can the Pain Medication Ketamine Also Relieve Depression?In a novel study, researchers looked at symptoms of depression reported by people who had been given ketamine as a treatment for chronic pain.
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The Atlantic
Stephen Colbert’s ‘Apology’ Stephen Colbert walked onto the stage of The Late Show Wednesday night on an ironic note of triumph. “Am I still the host?” he jokingly asked the bandleader Jon Batiste. “I’m still the host!” he affirmed, raising his arms in triumph. For not the first time in his late-night career, Colbert had been the target of an online campaign to fire him on the basis of a joke many deemed offensive. #FireCol
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Science | The Guardian
Richard Darrah obituary My brother Richard Darrah, who has died from cancer aged 67, was a well-known experimental archaeologist who specialised in ancient wood and the way it was worked. He carried out some spectacular archaeological reconstructions. Richard was born in Alderley Edge, Cheshire, eldest of three sons of John, a businessman, and his wife, Elizabeth (nee Smith). Both our parents were interested in archaeol
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Live Science
Marijuana-Related ER Visits Spike Among Colorado TeensThe number of marijuana-related ER visits made by teens and young adults more than quadrupled at one Colorado hospital after the state legalized the drug.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Reinventing Rice for a World Transformed by Climate ChangeUC Davis plant geneticist Pamela Ronald wants to create rice varieties that can survive in harsher conditions, including more frequent droughts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika virus could cost United States billions of dollarsAs United States policymakers debate how to devote money and resources to the Zika virus outbreak, understanding the potential economic impact of the virus in the US is key. Now, using a new computational model described in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers have calculated that Zika, depending on the rate at which it infected people in at-risk states, could result in total costs rangin
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Ingeniøren
Large Hadron Collider er kommet ud af sit vinterhiUgens videnskabelige nyhedsstrøm bød også på en afklaring omkring klimapausen, nyt fra en årtier gammel jagt på hypotetiske partikler samt fremavl af store Schrödinger-katte.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of a Zika antibody offers hope for a vaccineSearching for a way to thwart Zika, scientists have discovered an antibody with a potent ability to neutralize the virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Edible insects could play key role in cutting harmful emissionsEating insects instead of beef could help tackle climate change by reducing harmful emissions linked to livestock production, research suggests.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cell maps reveal fresh details on how the immune system fights cancer Immune cells that encompass and invade tumours could dictate the success or failure of therapy. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21931
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Ars Technica
“Brains in a dish” move out of science fiction and into the lab Small cultures of human neuronal cells developing in a dish are not quite “brains in a petri dish” as they are sometimes described. But these cerebral organoids give scientists unprecedented options for studying and understanding the early embryonic stages of human brain development. Two recent papers published in Nature show just how powerful these neuroscience research tools are. The first pape
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D printers open new design space for wireless devicesMaterials scientists and chemists have shown a way to bring electromagnetic metamaterials into the third dimension using commercial 3-D printers. Printed metamaterial cubes were found to interact with radio and microwave electromagnetic waves 14 times more strongly than their 2-D counterparts. The breakthrough could revolutionize the rapid design and prototyping of radio frequency devices for Blue
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cranky crabs in broken shells often have the upper claw in fightsSheer aggression rather than pure muscle strength often gives hermit crabs living in broken shells the edge during a fight. Crabs living in broken shells value an intact shell and will fight more aggressively to get a better one, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Smart contact lens sensor' for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosisA research team has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First one bit chemical memory unit: The 'chit'In classical computer science information is stored in bits, in quantum computer science -- in quantum bits, i.e. qubits. Experiments now show that not only physics, but also chemistry is suitable for storing information. The role of the chemical bit, the 'chit', can be fulfilled by a simple arrangement of three droplets in contact with each other, in which oscillatory reactions occur.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel molecular signal for triggering septic shock identifiedThe mechanism by which cellular signaling transduction network is exquisitely controlled in mediating innate immune response such as sepsis by the enzyme IPMK (Inositol polyphosphate multikinase) essential for inositol biosynthesis metabolism, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticidesThere are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. A new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.
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The Atlantic
Why Trump's Executive Order on Religious Liberty Left Many Conservatives Dissatisfied Updated May 4 at 1:20 pm EST President Trump signed an executive order “promoting free speech and religious liberty” on Thursday. The final version of the order addresses two issues. First, it instructs the Internal Revenue Service to “not take any adverse action against any individual, house of worship, or other religious organization” that endorse or oppose candidates from the pulpit, which is
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The Atlantic
What Democracies Can Learn From Greece's Failed Populist Experiment While the crisis in Greece no longer captures international headlines as it once did, the country’s troubles never went away. Greece remains the only Eurozone country still subject to a joint Eurozone-International Monetary Fund fiscal adjustment and structural reform progra m . In the long-running saga’s latest episode, the recent completion of a crucial compliance review paves the way for the r
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Ars Technica
Intel’s Skylake “Scalable Processor” family is a new approach to Xeon Last month, Intel's new naming scheme for its Xeon processors leaked. Instead of E3, E5, and E7 branding, the chips would be given metallic names , from Bronze at the bottom-end through Silver and Gold to Platinum at the top. Today, the company made this new branding official as part of a larger shake-up of its Xeon platform. The next generation of Xeons, due to arrive this summer, will make up w
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Gizmodo
The GOP's Healthcare Plan Will Harm the Most Vulnerable Among Us First Photo: AP Americans who obtain health insurance through their employers are poised to get screwed by a last-minute amendment to the House Republican healthcare bill. Advertisement Health policy analysts inform the Wall Street Journal that a provision of the bill would allow states to obtain waivers exempting them from certain Affordable Care Act regulations. Insurers in those states “could be fre
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Big Think
A Judge Lets an App Help Him Decide a Wisconsin Man’s 6-Year Sentence A case in which a judge used an undisclosed software algorithm to determine a defendant’s sentence has caught the interest of the U.S. Supreme Court. Read More
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WIRED
US Sanctions Didn’t Stop Russia’s Election Hacking—Or Even Slow It Down The Fancy Bear group's continued attacks on electoral campaigns shows how easily the Kremlin brushed off Obama's sanctions. The post US Sanctions Didn't Stop Russia's Election Hacking---Or Even Slow It Down appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Falkland Islands basin shows signs of being among world's largest cratersA basin in the Falkland Islands exhibits traits of a large impact crater, according to a new analysis by a team of scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique primary care residency program hangs in budget balanceThe Teaching Health Centers program, which funds outpatient primary care residencies serving rural and indigent patients, awaits Congressional budget reauthorization at a time when there is a primary care shortage, Brown University medical scholars write in a new article in JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-funded sounding rocket will take 1,500 images of sun in 5 minutesOn May 5, 2017, scientists will launch a sounding rocket that will shoot 200 miles up into the atmosphere, and in just five minutes, take 1,500 images of the sun.
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Popular Science
How to choose the right smartphone for you DIY Make sense of operating systems, specs, and more From important specs to the right time of year to be shopping, here are all the factors you should consider when buying a new phone.
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Viden
Små operationer koster flere smerter end de storeEksempelvis giver en simpel blindtarmsoperationer mere smerte end en hjerteoperation, viser en undersøgelse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphane could act as efficient and water-free hydrogen fuel cell membraneResearchers have found that the unusual properties of graphane -- a two-dimensional polymer of carbon and hydrogen -- could form a type of anhydrous 'bucket brigade' that transports protons without the need for water, potentially leading to the development of more efficient hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles and other energy systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why does so much of nature rely on sex for reproduction?Why is sex so popular among plants and animals, and why isn't asexual reproduction, or cloning, a more common reproductive strategy?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New self-sustained multi-sensor platform for environmental monitoringA research team has engineered a self-sustaining sensor platform to continuously monitor the surrounding environment without having an external power source.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Home styles linked to water use levelsAffluent neighborhoods with lawns -- and occasionally swimming pools -- use up to 10 times more water than neighborhoods with higher density housing with less landscaping, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart failure more fatal than common cancersA new study shows that men and women suffering from heart failure have a higher risk of death than people with most common types of cancer.
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Science | The Guardian
Unicorns, meteorites and Genghis Khan family goblet go on show in London Art dealer Oliver Hoare curates collection of curious relics with bizarre backstories – including King James II’s pomander The art dealer Oliver Hoare believes in unicorns and has gathered a wealth of material and documentary evidence at an exhibition that he believes will convince any sceptic. Related: Extinct 'Siberian unicorn' may have lived alongside humans, fossil suggests Continue reading..
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wolves return to Denmark for first time in 200 yearsAt least five wolves, including one female, have returned to Denmark for the first time in two centuries, a zoologist who has obtained DNA evidence said on Thursday.
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Live Science
Kamikaze Starshot: Will Some Interstellar Probes Slam into Their Target Planets?The first fleet of robotic spacecraft that humanity launches to explore nearby exoplanets may include a few kamikazes.
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The Scientist RSS
Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink DailyFeeding-fasting rhythms and light-dark cycles direct regular changes in organ and cell size, as well as ribosome number and protein levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists solve major cancer protein conundrumDespite intense research, there's been much confusion regarding the exact role of a protein in a critical cancer-linked pathway. On one hand, the protein is described as a cell proliferation inhibitor, on the other, a cell proliferation activator, a duality that has caused a great deal of scientific head scratching. Now scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have solv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unveiling the bottlenecks to discovering the root causes of rare genetic diseasesA commentary paper including feedback from 40 scientists, says international cooperation is needed now more than ever; despite advances in technology and decades of research, the genetic mutations behind half of the 7,000 known rare genetic diseases in the world remain a mystery. There is international support for IRDiRC-recognized platforms, tools, standards and guidelines to streamline resources
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comprehensive atlas of immune cells in renal cancerResearchers from the University of Zurich have individually analyzed millions of immune cells in tumor samples from patients with renal cell carcinoma. They are now presenting an immunological atlas of the tumor environment for the first time, leading to possible further developments of immunotherapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of a Zika antibody offers hope for a vaccineSearching for a way to thwart Zika, scientists have discovered an antibody with a potent ability to neutralize the virus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pac-Man-like CRISPR enzymes have potential for disease diagnosticsUC Berkeley researchers have found 10 new variants of the Cas13a enzyme, the Pac-Man of the CRISPR world, that hold promise for disease diagnostics. Seven of these are like the known Cas13a enzyme, which binds RNA and, once activated, indiscriminately chews up all RNA. Three, however, bind and cut at different RNA nucleotides, and could be used in combination with the known Cas13a enzyme to simult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 2 diabetes genetic mapping identifies new 'loci'Scientists are closer to understanding the genetic causes of type 2 diabetes by identifying 111 new chromosome locations ('loci') on the human genome that indicate susceptibility to the disease, according to a UCL-led study in collaboration with Imperial College London.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar-sweetened beverages becoming more affordable around the worldA new American Cancer Society study concludes that sugar-sweetened beverages have become more affordable around the globe, and are likely to become even more affordable and more widely consumed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor controlA team of University of Iowa researches has discovered a new connection between two regions of the brain that may help explain how motor skills develop. Working with infant rats, the scientists found that the hippocampus and the red nucleus, part of the brain stem, synchronize during REM sleep. Findings published in the journal Current Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The liver increases by half during the dayIn mammals, the liver reaches its maximum efficiency when they are active and feed. Biologists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, showed in mice that the size of the liver increases by almost half before returning to its initial dimensions, according to the phases of activity and rest. This fluctuation disappears when the normal biological rhythm is reversed. The disruption of our
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of new pathway in brain has implications for schizophrenia treatmentNeuroscientists at Tufts have discovered a new signaling pathway that directly connects the brain's NMDA and a7nACh receptors -- both associated with learning and memory -- which has significance for development of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Astrocytes are the key elements that link the receptors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify immunotherapy targets in early-stage lung cancerImmunotherapy, which has achieved remarkable results in late-stage lung cancer patients, can also hold great hope for newly diagnosed patients, cutting the deadly disease off before it has the chance to take hold and offering a potential cure, according to a new Mount Sinai study published today in Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atlases of immune cells surrounding tumors may guide immunotherapyTwo independent studies have begun mapping the connections between and identities of the thousands of immune cells surrounding human tumors. One research group, looking at kidney cancer, found that tumors with different clinical outcomes have unique immune cell profiles. These profiles can also estimate a cancer patient's prognosis. The other group, looking at lung cancer, showed that even early t
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Ars Technica
California seeks to tax rocket launches, which are already taxed Enlarge / A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in January, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) Home to the Mojave Air & Space Port and promising launch companies such as SpaceX and Virgin Orbit, California has a thriving rocket industry. Accordingly, the state is now looking into taxing this vibrant industry, and the Franchise Tax Board has issued a proposed regulation for p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Models that forecast impact of government spending are easily manipulatedEconomists at North Carolina State University and Indiana University have found that the most widely used model for predicting how U.S. government spending affects gross domestic product (GDP) can be rigged using theoretical assumptions to control forecasts of how government spending will stimulate the economy.
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Futurity.org
Virus sleeps for years then wakes up to cause skin cancer Scientists now know how the virus that is responsible for the most aggressive form of skin cancer can stay dormant for decades after infection—but then re-emerge to cause cancer. In general, viruses ensure their survival by either defeating their host’s immune system and replicating themselves or finding a new host. However, sometimes, viruses can remain silent in the body without replicating, pe
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About This Week's Massive Phishing Worm Image: Gizmodo / Google Over a million Gmail users got hit by a phishing worm on Wednesday afternoon, sending the security world into a cacophony of screams and laughter. Screams, because the attack looked like it came from Google itself. Laughter, because the attack looked like it came from Google itself. While some chin-scratching observers called it “sophisticated,” Wednesday’s worm was dreadf
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A global movement championing scienceEvidence-based science is at the heart of discoveries that transform our world. From the development of life-saving antibiotics to the resolution of climate change issues; from the reversal of social injustices to the furthering of space exploration, collaborative research has set the foundation for a brighter future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How bears bulk up ahead of the summer: A study into the Asiatic black bear's spring dietMuch like gym enthusiasts, every year Asiatic black bears seem to be on the lookout for protein-rich food ahead of the summer, so that they can bulk up on lean muscle mass in place of the fat tissue formed last year prior to hibernation. This was concluded in a study by Dr. Shino Furusaka, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and his team, based on direct observations on bears living acr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printers open new design space for wireless devicesResearchers at Duke University have 3-D printed potent electromagnetic metamaterials, using an electrically conductive material compatible with a standard 3-D printer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Believe you can stop climate change and you willIf we believe that we can personally help stop climate change with individual actions - such as turning the thermostat down—then we are more likely to make a difference, according to research from the University of Warwick.
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Quanta Magazine
Swirling Bacteria Linked to the Physics of Phase Transitions At first glance, the movie didn’t seem like much: a chaotic swarm of E. coli bacteria twiddling this way and that in a petri dish, seemingly at random. Such scenes are daily fare in bacteriology labs around the world. But Chong Chen, a graduate student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who was showing the movie at a 2015 physics meeting, highlighted a remarkable observation: As the colony gr
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Popular Science
China's air force has a new ground-attack plane Blog: Eastern Arsenal Meet the L-15B. The L-15B prototype attack jet got a big roll-out ceremony last week, complete with giant red banners and uniformed PLAAF officers. Read on.
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Big Think
This Malaysian Architect Came Up With a Skyscraper That Dispenses Apartments Like A Vending Machine Haseef Rafiei, a young Malaysian architect, had a thought one day: what if we could convert the real estate industry into an automated vending system? Read More
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The Atlantic
Why Won't Susan Rice Testify to Congress? In the latest strange twist in the investigation of Russian interference into the election, former Obama National Security Advisor Susan Rice has declined to appear before the Senate Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism on Monday. Senator Lindsey Graham, the subcommittee’s Republican chair, announced on Tuesday that he wanted Rice to testify alongside former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates and
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The Atlantic
A Parent’s and Child’s Perspective on the Gene-Editing Debate We’ve heard already from a few parents whose children have, or may carry, genetic disorders. This reader’s son suffers from Tourette syndrome, ADHD, and OCD, all severe: He is a brave and strong-willed young man, and he has chosen to live and manage his issues without medication. He describes the pain, frustration and embarrassment that he lives with; he has endured chronic pain for nearly 10 yea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pac-Man-like CRISPR enzymes have potential for disease diagnosticsUniversity of California, Berkeley, researchers have described 10 new CRISPR enzymes that, once activated, behave like Pac-Man to chew up RNA in a way that could be used as sensitive detectors of infectious viruses.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Does This Moose Hunter Have The Skills To Survive In Alaska? #LastAlaskans | Wednesdays at 10/9c Verging on desperation, Charlie finally spots a moose to stalk; and that moose sounds less than pleased about it. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/the-last-alaskans/ More Alaskans! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-last-alaskans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
JNeurosci: Highlights from the May 3 issueCheck out these newsworthy studies from the May 3, 2017, issue of JNeurosci. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the study should contact media@sfn.org.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A global movement championing scienceWiley, publishing partners engage to support science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oxford student creates first synthetic retina for the visually impairedA synthetic, soft tissue retina developed by an Oxford University student could offer fresh hope to visually impaired people.Until now, all artificial retinal research has used only rigid, hard materials. The new research, by Vanessa Restrepo-Schild, a 24 year old D.phil student and researcher at the Oxford University, Department of Chemistry, is the first to successfully use biological, synthetic
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Gizmodo
The Powerhouse of the Cell Could Be Way Hotter Than We Thought GIF Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum/ YouTube / DataBase Center for Life Scienc e/Wikimedia Commons Mitochondria are the only cellular organelle you probably remember—they’re the powerhouse of the cell, after all. It turns out, they might be a little more powerful than you thought. Advertisement That, at least, is what an international team of scientists have measured. One new (but not yet peer-reviewed
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: May The Fourth Sales, Anker PowerCore, Dutch Oven, and More Star Wars collectibles , your favorite USB battery pack , and a heavy duty dutch oven lead off Thursday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerCore 20100 , $34 You probably know by now that Anker’s PowerCore line is your favorite brand of USB battery packs , and the 20,000mAh model is marked down to just $34 today, or about $6 l
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Gizmodo
Smelly Poo Water Rains Down From New York's Penn Station Roof If you’ve ever been inside New York City’s Penn Station, you know that it often smells like piss and shit. Yesterday, things somehow managed to get worse when commuters were greeted with a waterfall of rotten-smelling, poo-colored water that gushed from the station’s ceiling. Advertisement The Associated Press reports that people “were holding their noses” because the smell was so bad. NBC New Yo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warwick Research: Believe you can stop climate change and you willIf we believe that we can personally help stop climate change with individual actions -- such as turning the thermostat down -- then we are more likely to make a difference, according to research from the University of Warwick.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Models that forecast impact of government spending are easily manipulatedEconomists have found that the most widely used model for predicting how US government spending affects gross domestic product (GDP) can be rigged using theoretical assumptions to control forecasts.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D printers open new design space for wireless devicesDuke materials scientists and chemists have shown a way to bring electromagnetic metamaterials into the third dimension using commercial 3-D printers. Printed metamaterial cubes were found to interact with radio and microwave electromagnetic waves 14 times more strongly than their 2-D counterparts. The breakthrough could revolutionize the rapid design and prototyping of radio frequency devices for
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WIRED
Handmaid’s Tale: Revolutions Start With Graffiti and Food There's surprising strength in appearing to play along. Remember: Nolite te bastardes carborundorum. The post Handmaid's Tale : Revolutions Start With Graffiti and Food appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
Nick Cave Is Still Looking for Redemption For someone who’s been relentlessly pegged as a doom-and-gloom merchant for the majority of his lengthy career, Nick Cave perseveres. As early as the ’70s, when he sang blatantly about suicide with his first group The Boys Next Door, the Australian-born bandleader has trawled the darkest depths of the human soul, first with the post-punk gang The Birthday Party and then, since 1983, with his long
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Futurity.org
Four damaged genes linked to risk of Tourette’s Researchers identified one damaged, or mutant, “high confidence” risk gene for Tourette syndrome as well as three others they believe are genes whose mutation is a probable risk for the disorder. “Many are calling me and telling me that for the first time, this is giving them hope.” These findings, published in Neuron , are important because the genetics of Tourette syndrome has been a mystery. T
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Ars Technica
Plan to kill municipal broadband fails in state legislature Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | arcoss) Cities and towns in Maine that want to provide their own broadband service just helped defeat a proposed law that would have made it impossible to build taxpayer-funded networks. "The bill, introduced by Rep. Nate Wadsworth, a Hiram Republican, would impose stringent conditions that critics say would make it all but impossible for Maine towns and cities to
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Scientific American Content: Global
Growing Antarctic Crack Primes Delaware-Size IcebergThe new fissure has turned toward the ice shelf's ocean edge, potentially speeding up the iceberg's process of breaking off -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
The Royal Family Unites in the First Look at Marvel's Inhumans TV Show Image Credit:Michael Muller/Marvel for Entertainment Weekly We’ve seen the casting news , we’ve seen the set pictures —we’ve even seen the poster . But now it’s time to get our first look at the stars of Marvel’s long-in-the-works adaptation of Inhumans . And... well, you can see for yourself. Advertisement Released through Entertainment Weekly this morning, the first-look image unites Black Bolt
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Ars Technica
Insensitive gravitational wave detectors improved using clever addition Enlarge (credit: NASA ) The detection of a black hole merger through gravitational waves signaled the opening up of new ground in astronomy. Until that moment, astronomers had only one way to observe the Universe: via the electromagnetic spectrum. It is hoped that gravitational waves will let us see further back in time and deeper into general relativity than ever before. The first generation of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The final frontier of the Frontier FieldsThe NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope has peered across six billion light years of space to resolve extremely faint features of the galaxy cluster Abell 370 that have not been seen before. Imaged here in stunning detail, Abell 370 is part of the Frontier Fields program which uses massive galaxy clusters to study the mysteries of dark matter and the very early universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How bears bulk up ahead of the summer: A study into the Asiatic black bear's spring dietMuch like gym enthusiasts, every year Asiatic black bears seem to be on the lookout for protein-rich food ahead of the summer, so that they can bulk up on lean muscle mass in place of the fat tissue formed last year prior to hibernation. This was concluded in a study, based on direct observations on bears living across an area of about 60 km2 in Japan and published in the open access journal ZooKe
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water, water, nowhereResearchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have found that the unusual properties of graphane -- a two-dimensional polymer of carbon and hydrogen -- could form a type of anhydrous 'bucket brigade' that transports protons without the need for water, potentially leading to the development of more efficient hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles and other energy systems.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prevalence of visual impairment among preschool children projected to increaseThe number of preschool children in the US with visual impairment is projected to increase by more than 25 percent in the coming decades, with the majority of visual impairment resulting from simple uncorrected refractive error, according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large data set brings precision to breast cancer diagnosis and careAlthough the odds of developing breast cancer are nearly identical for black and white women, black women are 42 percent more likely to die from the disease. A large, multi-institutional study, published on-line May 4, 2017, in JAMA Oncology, explores the germline genetic variations and tumor biological differences between black and white women with breast cancer.
8h
Live Science
How Fidget Spinners Work: It's All About the PhysicsFidget spinners ― kids spin them and spin them ― and while parents may not "get" why the boomerang-shaped toys have caught on with such force, there's real physics to explain how the distracting devices work.
8h
WIRED
Silicon Valley’s Mission to Save California Ag From Dying of Thirst As climate change continues tightening the state's water supply, farmers will have to become more calculating. The post Silicon Valley’s Mission to Save California Ag From Dying of Thirst appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Blame the Fyre Festival Fiasco on the Plague of Celebrity Influencers The Fyre Festival fiasco is a good reminder why celebrities should make it clear when they're paid to endorse products or services. The post Blame the Fyre Festival Fiasco on the Plague of Celebrity Influencers appeared first on WIRED .
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video Game Hall of Fame adds 'Halo: Combat Evolved,' 3 moreAttention Halo Nation, "Halo: Combat Evolved" is in the World Video Game Hall of Fame.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why does so much of nature rely on sex for reproduction?Why is sex so popular among plants and animals, and why isn't asexual reproduction, or cloning, a more common reproductive strategy?
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decades of data on world's oceans reveal a troubling oxygen declineA new analysis of decades of data on oceans across the globe has revealed that the amount of dissolved oxygen contained in the water - an important measure of ocean health - has been declining for more than 20 years.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spin-out company helps get effective drugs to market, more quickly and cheaplyGetting better drugs to market faster, and at a fraction of the cost, is a step closer thanks to technology for speeding up the testing process, which is being developed by a Swansea University spin-out company, Moleculomics.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly nanoparcel for cancer cellsMost tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. The free radicals destroy the cell components even in oxygen-depleted conditions, causing apoptosis. Delivery, r
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High temperature step-by-step process makes graphene from etheneAn international team of scientists has developed a new way to produce single-layer graphene from a simple precursor: ethene -- also known as ethylene -- the smallest alkene molecule, which contains just two atoms of carbon.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boostNew research shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of Wi-Fi data generates 3-D images of the vicinityScientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a holographic imaging process that depicts the radiation of a Wi-Fi transmitter to generate three-dimensional images of the surrounding environment. Industrial facility operators could use this to track objects as they move through the production hall.
8h
Live Science
Follow a Complete Everest Expedition in New VR FilmGet a first-person perspective of the most notorious mountaineering journey in the world.
8h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump Is Helping the Very Media Organizations He Despises Throughout the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump crisscrossed the country promising to do the impossible: to rescue businesses in the crosshairs of complex economic changes and restore a sense of glory to firms in industries torn asunder by the forces of modern capitalism. And he did it. Not for miners, though—for the media. And, quite often, for the media companies he criticized the most. Pay TV is in
8h
TEDTalks (video)
There's no shame in taking care of your mental health | Sangu DelleWhen stress got to be too much for TED Fellow Sangu Delle, he had to confront his own deep prejudice: that men shouldn't take care of their mental health. In a personal talk, Delle shares how he learned to handle anxiety in a society that's uncomfortable with emotions. As he says: "Being honest about how we feel doesn't make us weak -- it makes us human."
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In home healthcare, not speaking patients' native language negatively affect care outcomesThe study examined language concordance visits -- duty calls where the provider spoke the same language as the patient or an interpreter accompanied the provider -- for registered nurses (RN) and physical therapists (PT) from home health care services in the New York City area. Korean speakers had the highest percentage of language-concordant visits, while Spanish speaking patients had the least.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parkinson: Weight gain after deep brain stimulationIt was already known that people affected by Parkinson's disease, when subjected to deep brain stimulation, gained weight, but it was less clear why that was so. New research by the International School for Advanced Studies -- SISSA in Trieste (Italy) has now shown that the weight gain after implant has a multifactorial origin. The study monitored for the first time a group of patients before and
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia at time of diagnosisOn diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow often show alterations in gene and protein expression, proliferation capacity, and function, but whether these are a cause or result of malignancy is not well understood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RTI finds TROSA, an innovative substance abuse treatment program, saves NC $7.5 million annuallyTROSA, a therapeutic community providing substance abuse treatment and job training, saves North Carolina $7.5 million every year, according to an independent study conducted by RTI International.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Holography with the Wi-fi-routerScientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a holographic imaging process that depicts the radiation of a Wi-Fi transmitter to generate three-dimensional images of the surrounding environment. Industrial facility operators could use this to track objects as they move through the production hall.
8h
Ingeniøren
Studerende i praktik kan nu få 3.000 kr. oven i SU’enBåde IDA og DTU’s studenterforening værdsætter, at studerende nu lovligt må få op mod 3000 kr. månedligt for indsatsen i projektforløb eller ulønnet praktik. Men de er ikke enige om beløbets rammer.
8h
Science : NPR
To Bring Down Stubbornly High Blood Pressure, It Helps To Have A Team A quick prescription and annual lecture from a doctor often aren't enough to help people control hypertension. So some clinics now mobilize teams of health pros to motivate and support patients. (Image credit: Wendy Rigby/TPR)
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Gizmodo
LAX's New Private Luxury Terminal For The Rich Is The Most Obnoxiously LA Thing Ever The one thing that helped me combat my irritation at being at an airport was the knowledge that airports are the great social equalizer: generally, it doesn’t matter who you are—rich, poor, famous, normal, whatever—you still have to check-in, go through security and get on the moving sidewalks to your gate. It sucks equally for everyone. Not anymore, if LAX has anything to say about it. Advertise
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A lot of galaxies need guardingLike the quirky characters in the upcoming film Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, the Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing galaxies across time and space. One stunning example is galaxy cluster Abell 370, which contains a vast assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity. That's a lot of galaxies to be guar
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Circadian clock changes can alter body's response to dietChanging the circadian clock in mouse liver can alter how the body responds to diet and also change the microbes living in the digestive track.
8h
New Scientist - News
Statin muscle aches are all in my head? I beg to differHaving taken statins and experienced muscle aches, I've yet to be convinced that research has proven this is nothing to do with the drug, says Michael Brooks
8h
Ars Technica
Tim Cook announces $1 billion investment in “advanced” US manufacturing Apple CEO Tim Cook takes the stage at an Apple event in September 2015. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple plans to create a $1 billion fund to invest in "advanced manufacturing" jobs in the United States. CEO Tim Cook made the announcement last night in a CNBC interview with Mad Money host Jim Cramer, and he says that Apple plans to announce its first investment later this month. Cook wants the n
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
WHO Plans to Bring Cheap Biosimilar Cancer Drugs to PoorThe copies will not be exactly identical to the originals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic
Why Can't the Left Win? President Trump wields great power. Those who believe him to be a cruel, dishonest man who is glaringly unqualified to preside over the executive branch or U.S. foreign policy, should welcome challenges from the left, right, and center to his administration. But is the American left capable of political success right now? Its recent win-loss record is poor, whether one begins with the Seattle WTO
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why does so much of nature rely on sex for reproduction?Why is sex so popular among plants and animals, and why isn't asexual reproduction, or cloning, a more common reproductive strategy?
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines 'small for gestational age' across European countriesA new study questions the use of common references for assessing 'small for gestational age' (SGA) in very preterm infants across Europe. SGA describes a baby who is smaller than the usual amount for the number of weeks of pregnancy.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A lot of galaxies need guarding in this NASA Hubble viewA stunning example is galaxy cluster called Abell 370 that contains an astounding assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity. That's a lot of galaxies to be guarding, and just in this one cluster!
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased rates of suicidal thoughts and attempts among transgender adults reportedSuicidal thoughts and attempts by adult transgender individuals were 14 and 22 times higher, respectively, than rates for the general public, according to a new study.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decades of data on world's oceans reveal a troubling oxygen declineA new analysis of decades of data on oceans across the globe has revealed that the amount of dissolved oxygen contained in the water -- an important measure of ocean health -- has been declining for more than 20 years.
8h
Futurity.org
Test for ALS could detect similar disease in dogs A biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS can also help diagnose degenerative myelopathy in dogs, report researchers. In 2009, researchers discovered a genetic link between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, in people and degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs. The neurodegenerative disease, an older adult onset disease than can eventually lead to paralysis, has been confi
8h
Popular Science
Here's the video of NASA's epic dive through Saturn's gap Space Cassini's first foray into the space between Saturn and its rings The Cassini spacecraft sent home some pretty spectacular pictures of its epic dive, and now NASA has stitched them together into a video. Behold.
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Viden
Forskerne kan nu måle dit spædbarns smerteniveauTidligere opererede man spædbørn uden bedøvelse. Man er blevet klogere, og nu har forskere fundet ud af, hvordan man tjekker, smerteniveauet hos spædbørn.
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Gizmodo
Cassini's Second Grand Finale Dive Might Be Outshining the First One Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Cassini’s six-month-long Grand Finale mission has become the unofficial nerd Super Bowl: each time the NASA-led spacecraft drops a new batch of raw images, we jump to our computers and frantically scroll through to find the best. (Actually, we never leave our computers, because we are nerds.) But in any case, the raw photos from Cassini’s second div
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Science | The Guardian
Pfizer to give out breast cancer drug free while awaiting NHS decision Pharmaceutical firm says it will offer palbociclib to patients while regulator rules on whether it should be available on NHS A drug described as one of the most important advances in treating breast cancer in the past 20 years is to be given to women in the UK for free while the medicines regulator decides whether it should be available on the NHS. The National Institute for Health and Care Exce
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Ars Technica
Snapchat lines up media companies to produce original shows for Snap TV The surprise is $5. (credit: Snapchat) Snap Inc. is working with media companies to bolster Snapchat's original content with mini, TV-like episodes. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal , Snap Inc. has signed deals with NBC Universal, Turner, Discovery, ESPN, Vice Media, and the NFL to produce original shows for Snap TV. The company is expected to announce new deals today with Scrip
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A lot of galaxies need guarding in this NASA Hubble viewMuch like the eclectic group of space rebels in the upcoming film Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing innumerable galaxies flung across time and space.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook turns to real people to fix its violent video problemFacebook has recently been under fire for not doing enough to keep disturbing content out of our newsfeeds. It hopes a hiring spree will fix the problem.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A first-ever find in Egypt: 4,000-year-old funerary garden at tomb entranceScientists have discovered a 4,000-year-old funerary garden- the first such garden ever to be found- on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor, Egypt.
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Gizmodo
Um, Kim Kardashian? I Think I Found Your New BlackBerry All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Pardon me dear readers. Normally this space is reserved for missives to you, but I am positive you do not care about the BlackBerry KeyOne, a new phone from BlackBerry Mobile. Besides Kim Kardashian, very few people have cared about BlackBerry phones in recent years. That’s why today I’m going to take a moment to reach out to Kim. The girl’s been a wreck since her a
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Popular Science
13 classy Star Wars products that'll make you say 'That's so wizard, Ani!' Gadgets May the fourth be with you and all that. May the fourth be with you. Star Wars swag you need. Read on.
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Popular Science
Genetically modified algae could soon show up in food, fuel, and pharmaceuticals From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Researchers created souped-up algae that can thrive outdoors Scientists have successfully grown genetically engineered algae outside the lab. Look out for souped-up algae that can be made into food, fuel and pharmaceuticals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Egypt: 4000-year old funerary garden discovered in LuxorEgypt's antiquities ministry says that a Spanish archaeological mission has discovered a nearly 4000-year old funerary garden in the southern city of Luxor.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stink bugs: Free guide for agricultural integrated pest managementFarmers in the midwestern United States have been battling increasing infestations from a variety of stink bug species in recent years, and now they have a new free resource for understanding and managing the emerging pests.
9h
Ars Technica
NASA wants YOU (to make its Fortran code run faster) Enlarge / NASA feels the need...the need for Fortran speed. (credit: NASA) NASA has teamed up with two technology crowdsourcing organizations in an effort to put some of its supercomputer code into afterburner mode. In an announcement on May 2, the director of NASA's Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program (TACP) launched the High Performance Fast Computing Challenge, an effort to accelerate
9h
The Atlantic
Apple's $1 Billion Advanced Manufacturing Fund Apple CEO Tim Cook says his company has created 2 million jobs in the U.S., adding the tech giant was setting up a $1 billion fund to promote advanced manufacturing in the country. The 2 million number counts not only the 80,000 Apple employees in the U.S., but also 450,000 jobs through the company’s U.S.-based suppliers (up 90,000 from last year), and an additional 1.53 million jobs for develope
9h
The Atlantic
Obama's Endorsement of Macron Former U.S. President Obama announced Thursday he is supporting Emmanuel Macron for the French presidency, noting that though he did not plan to get involved in many elections after his presidency, “the success of France matters to the entire world.” L'espoir est en marche. Merci @BarackObama . pic.twitter.com/0azZHLZLse — Emmanuel Macron (@EmmanuelMacron) May 4, 2017 The endorsement comes three
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Gizmodo
These Environmentalists Say Meat Is Okay Sometimes Chik’n, cashew, and mushroom korma. Image via the Reductarian Foundation. Brian Kateman, like many once-vegetarians, wasn’t perfect. But he wasn’t trying to be. One Thanksgiving during his college years, Kateman recalls reaching for a piece of turkey, which he permitted himself because of the special occasion. His older sister, predictably, started making fun of him. Advertisement “In that moment
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Gizmodo
This Amazon Sale on Darth Vader Comics Is Impressive. Most Impressive. Star Wars: Darth Vader Volumes , $5-$10 If The Hallway Scene rekindled your Darth Vader love affair, all four volumes of his new comic series are on sale on Kindle today. The first three volumes will only set you back $5 each , while the fourth is marked down to $10 . Once you purchase, you’ll be able to read them on basically any device via Comixology. Update : Vader Down is also on sale, and ta
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cage-constrained growth of engineered cartilage reduces swelling and improves functionResearchers have shown that a novel cage constraint can prevent engineered cartilage from swelling during growth in culture, leading to better collagen stability and enhanced functional properties of the cartilage.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify 6,500 genes that are expressed differently in men and womenMen and women differ in obvious and less obvious ways -- for example, in the prevalence of certain diseases or reactions to drugs. How are these connected to one's sex? Weizmann Institute of Science researchers recently uncovered thousands of human genes that are expressed -- copied out to make proteins -- differently in the two sexes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lessons in inhumanityDid Nazi-era physicians study medical ethics? Does the concept of medical ethics exist independently of political systems? These were the questions driving Dr. Florian Bruns of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Dr. Tessa Chelouche from the University of Haifa in Israel when they embarked on their recent collaboration. Their study, 'Lectures on Inhumanity: Teaching Medical Ethics in German Med
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fiber-based sensor could quickly detect structural problems in bridges and damsToday, there is great interest in using distributed sensors to continually monitor the structural health of large structures such as dams or bridges. With 1 million sensing points, a newly developed fiber optic distributed sensor could offer significantly faster detection of structural problems than is currently available.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Circadian clock changes can alter body's response to dietChanging the circadian clock in mouse liver can alter how the body responds to diet and also change the microbes living in the digestive track.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High temperature step-by-step process makes graphene from etheneAn international team of scientists has developed a new way to produce single-layer graphene from a simple precursor: ethene -- also known as ethylene -- the smallest alkene molecule, which contains just two atoms of carbon.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In Huntington's disease, traffic jams in the cell's control center kill brain cellsWorking with mouse, fly and human cells and tissue, Johns Hopkins researchers report new evidence that disruptions in the movement of cellular materials in and out of a cell's control center -- the nucleus -- appear to be a direct cause of brain cell death in Huntington's disease, an inherited adult neurodegenerative disorder.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stink bugs: Free guide for agricultural integrated pest managementFarmers in the midwestern United States have been battling increasing infestations from a variety of stink bug species in recent years, and now they have a new free resource for understanding and managing the emerging pests. Next week, the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management will publish a profile of several of the most common stink bug pests that reviews existing research to offer m
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High temperature step-by-step process makes graphene from etheneAn international team of scientists has developed a new way to produce single-layer graphene from a simple precursor: ethene - also known as ethylene - the smallest alkene molecule, which contains just two atoms of carbon.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fiber-based sensor could quickly detect structural problems in bridges and damsToday, there is great interest in using distributed sensors to continually monitor the structural health of large structures such as dams or bridges. With 1 million sensing points, a newly developed fiber optic distributed sensor could offer significantly faster detection of structural problems than is currently available.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Edible insects could play key role in cutting harmful emissionsEating insects instead of beef could help tackle climate change by reducing harmful emissions linked to livestock production, research suggests.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bio-inspired catalysts that work in water open door to greener chemical processesUniversité Laval researchers have developed catalysts that, like enzymes present in living cells, are able to function efficiently in water. This discovery, the details of which were published today in Chemical Communications, shows that it may be possible to substantially reduce the use of toxic and non-recyclable organic solvents in a host of chemical reactions, particularly when synthesizing ph
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oldest orchid fossil on record identifiedA newly published study documents evidence of an orchid fossil trapped in Baltic amber that dates back some 45 million years to 55 million years ago, shattering the previous record for an orchid fossil found in Dominican amber some 20-30 million years old.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young childrenAs the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in US homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Last African dinosaur' discovered in Moroccan mineOne of the last dinosaurs living in Africa before their extinction 66 million years ago has been discovered in a phosphate mine in northern Morocco. A study of the fossil suggests that following the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana in the middle of the Cretaceous period, a distinct dinosaur fauna evolved in Africa.
9h
WIRED
How to Bring Satellite Data Back Down to Earth Companies are deploying tons of tiny satellites to collect terabytes of data. But they have to bring all that data down somehow—and they can't do it alone. The post How to Bring Satellite Data Back Down to Earth appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cranky crabs in broken shells often have the upper claw in fightsSheer aggression rather than pure muscle strength often gives hermit crabs living in broken shells the edge during a fight. Broken shells constrain crabs' activities because they are heavy and a large portion of them unusable. Crabs living in broken shells value an intact shell and will fight more aggressively to get a better one. This is according to research conducted by Guillermina Alcaraz of t
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bravery may cost fish their livesFish that show bravery often become prey themselves, whereas shyer individuals survive to a greater extent. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now successfully established a connection between bold personalities and the risk of being killed by a predator in the wild.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deadly nanoparcel for cancer cellsMost tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the free radicals destroy the cell components even in
9h
Futurity.org
People with good memories get sick of stuff faster Memory could be the key to how quickly we get tired of certain experiences, such as listening to music or eating certain foods. “People with larger working memory capacities actually encode information more deeply,” says Noelle Nelson, lead author of the study in the Journal of Consumer Research . “They remember more details about the things they’ve experienced, and that leads them to feel like t
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Gizmodo
The Midwest Looks Absolutely Drenched in This New Image From Space Image: NASA Earth Observatory Several states across the American Midwest are experiencing intensive flooding in the wake of unusually vigorous storm system that passed through earlier in the week. Images taken from above and on the ground show the extent of the record-breaking floods, which now threaten areas downstream. Advertisement From April 29 to May 1, a volatile weather system spawned heav
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The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: ‘Mildly Nauseous’
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Ingeniøren
Den store finale fortsætter ude ved Saturn - og DTU Space er medNasas rumsonde Cassini har foretaget sit andet af 22 spektakulære dyk ind gennem ringene på Saturn. Og selv om DTU Space oprindeligt ikke var med i missionen, spiller folkene i Lyngby i dag også en rolle takket være Jupiter.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transgender patients not electing as much gender-affirming surgery as many believe, study findsResearchers from Boston Medical Center have conducted the first study in the US to determine the prevalence of gender-affirming surgeries among a defined group of transgender patients, and found that most patients did not elect to have surgery.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bravery may cost fish their livesFish that show bravery often become prey themselves, whereas shyer individuals survive to a greater extent. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now successfully established a connection between bold personalities and the risk of being killed by a predator in the wild.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deadly nanoparcel for cancer cellsMost tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the free radicals destroy the cell components even in
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutation discovered that, linked with drug, predisposes osteoporosis patients to femur fractureBisphosphonates are the first line of fracture prevention treatment in osteoporosis. However, their use has been associated with atypical fracturing of the femur and this study explains how this fracture is linked to a mutation.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change, tornadoes and mobile homes: A dangerous mixTornadoes and mobile homes don't mix to begin with, but throw in the volatility of climate change and the potential for massive property damage and deaths is even higher in coming decades, indicates a new study by Michigan State University researchers.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cranky crabs in broken shells often have the upper claw in fightsSheer aggression rather than pure muscle strength often gives hermit crabs living in broken shells the edge during a fight. Crabs living in broken shells value an intact shell and will fight more aggressively to get a better one, according to research conducted by Guillermina Alcaraz of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico and Gastón Ignacio Jofre of Texas A&M University in the US
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bio-inspired catalysts that work in water open door to greener chemical processesUniversité Laval researchers have developed catalysts that, like enzymes present in living cells, are able to function efficiently in water. This discovery shows that it may be possible to substantially reduce the use of toxic and non-recyclable organic solvents in a host of chemical reactions, particularly when synthesizing pharmaceutical ingredients.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Chemobrain': Post-traumatic stress affects cognitive function in cancer patientsSubtle cognitive dysfunction and decline in breast cancer patients was largely independent of chemotherapy but associated with cancer-related post-traumatic stress in a German multi-site study.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Edible insects could play key role in cutting harmful emissionsEating insects instead of beef could help tackle climate change by reducing harmful emissions linked to livestock production, research suggests.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving control of age-related obesityResearch results promise new approaches for prevention and treatment of the condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Buprenorphine cuts length of stay nearly in half for infants withdrawing from opioidsA research team from Thomas Jefferson University published research finding buprenorphine cuts length of stay nearly in half for infants withdrawing from opioids. The finding is likely to change practice in neonatal intensive care units internationally.
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Futurity.org
Does defending racist ‘free speech’ reveal prejudice? A new study finds a correlation between defending racist language and expression as “free speech” and racially prejudicial attitudes and beliefs. “The correlation between using the free speech defense and people’s own racial prejudice is pretty high.” “When people make appeals to democratic principles—like “freedom of speech”—they don’t always represent a genuine interest in that principle,” says
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New Scientist - News
Martian life must be rare as free energy source remains untappedThe amount of carbon monoxide in Mars’s atmosphere suggests that any existing bacteria that feed on it make up no more than one billionth of Earth’s biomass
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water, water, nowhere: Research indicates graphane could act as efficient and water-free hydrogen fuel cell membraneHydrogen powered fuel cell cars, developed by almost every major car manufacturer, are ideal zero-emissions vehicles because they produce only water as exhaust. However, their reliability is limited because the fuel cell relies upon a membrane that only functions in when enough water is present, limiting the vehicle's operating conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Good vibrations no longer needed for speakers as research encourages graphene to talkA pioneering new technique that encourages the wonder material graphene to "talk" could revolutionise the global audio and telecommunications industries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sperm study reveals testes cells that may offer fertility hopeScientists have discovered a tiny group of cells that is critical to repairing damage to the testes. Blocking the cells prevents repair to tissue involved in producing healthy sperm, the research has found. The findings shed light on mechanisms of cell repair and could help scientists develop ways to preserve fertility, which may benefit boys receiving cancer therapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biggest X-ray laser in the world generates its first laser lightEuropean XFEL, the biggest X-ray laser in the world, has generated its first X-ray laser light. The X-ray light has a wavelength of 0.8 nm -- about 500 times shorter than that of visible light. At first lasing, the laser had a repetition rate of one pulse per second, which will later increase to 27,000 per second.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good vibrations no longer needed for speakers as research encourages graphene to talkA pioneering new technique that encourages the wonder material graphene to 'talk' could revolutionize the global audio and telecommunications industries.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russians may be happier than they appear, but they hide itA comparative cross-cultural study conducted by the HSE International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation has found that Russians tend to be as open with their friends as Americans, but unlike Americans, Russians prefer to hide their happiness when talking to strangers or government officials. These findings were published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology in
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lake water recharged by atmospheric precipitation in the Badain Jaran DesertThe water sources for the many of the lakes in the Badain Jaran Desert have been the focus of controversy in recent years. Now researchers have shown several lines of evidence, such as the physical and chemical deposits resulting from shallow subsurface runoff, spring streams, infiltration-excess runoff, and gravity capillary water with a moisture content of 3%-6%, demonstrating that precipitation
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With more light, chemistry speeds upLight initiates many chemical reactions. Experiments at the Laser Centre of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Warsaw's Faculty of Physics have for the first time demonstrated that increasing the intensity of illumination some reactions can be significantly faster. Here, acceleration was achieved using pairs of ultrashort laser pulses.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
KAIST team identifies the novel molecular signal for triggering septic shockProfessor Seyun Kim's team from KAIST reported the mechanism by which cellular signaling transduction network is exquisitely controlled in mediating innate immune response such as sepsis by the enzyme IPMK (Inositol polyphosphate multikinase) essential for inositol biosynthesis metabolism.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google coughs up 306 million euros in Italy tax settlementGoogle said Thursday that it would pay 306 million euros ($334 million) to settle a tax dispute in Italy, where it was under criminal investigation for booking profits generated in the country in Ireland.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New self-sustained multi-sensor platform for environmental monitoringA recent study, affiliated with UNIST has engineered a self-sustaining sensor platform to continuously monitor the surrounding environment without having an external power source.
9h
The Atlantic
How Central Park Could Fix Public Education “[T]hat which is common to the greatest number has the least care bestowed upon it.” - Aristotle The economics concept of “the tragedy of the commons” sounds both dramatic and complex, but it’s actually quite familiar, particularly to anyone who has rented a car. Also known as “the open-access problem,” the theory gained notoriety when the ecologist Garrett Hardin used it in a 1968 Science articl
9h
The Atlantic
The Awful Pinkness of Period Apps For products ostensibly aimed at adult women, period-tracking apps look awfully like the girls’ aisle of a toy store. Hearts. Pink. Flowers. Pink flowers! Is this really what women want? At last, someone has bothered to even ask the question. Daniel Epstein and Nicole Lee were sitting in a cafe wondering what women wanted out of period-tracking apps when they realized that no one—at least no one
9h
Live Science
R2-D2 Gets Real: 'Star Wars' Droids Already ExistEven people who aren't diehard fans of the "Star Wars" films will likely remember C-3PO and R2-D2. These sci-fi creations provided a glimpse of how robots could be used in the future, but how close is the world to making its a real R2-D2?
9h
Live Science
'Star Wars' Tech: 8 Sci-Fi Inventions and Their Real-Life CounterpartsWhile the tech behind the “Star Wars” is firmly rooted in fantasy, the franchise has served as inspiration for many real-life scientists and engineers. Here are some of the most notable attempts to turn "Star Wars'" science fiction into science fact.
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Futurity.org
Electronic device bends like skin and biodegrades Researchers have created a flexible electronic device that can easily degrade just by adding a weak acid like vinegar. “In my group, we have been trying to mimic the function of human skin to think about how to develop future electronic devices,” says Stanford University engineer Zhenan Bao. She described how skin is stretchable, self-healable, and also biodegradable—an attractive list of charact
9h
Ingeniøren
IDA kritiserer nyt regeringsforslag: Tekniske uddannelser er stadig underfinansieredeFormanden for IDA, Thomas Damkjær Petersen, er skeptisk overfor regeringens forslag til en ny måde at tildele universiteterne penge på.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Factory Robot Hacks, Electric Medication, and Laws Against Encryption—The Download, May 4, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Results of prospective randomized phase III study of the EBMT (Ricmac trial) dose-reduced versus standard conditioning followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with myelodysplastic syndromeThe EBMT announces the results from the RICMAC trial, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on Tuesday 2 May 2017. These results show evidence that reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) result in at least a 2-year relapse-free survival and overall survival similar to standard conditioning regimen (MAC) in patients with MDS or secondary acute AML.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A first-ever find in Egypt: A funeral garden known of until now only throughThe Djehuty Project, led by research professor, José Manuel Galán, from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), has discovered a 4,000-year-old funerary garden- the first such garden ever to be found- on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor, Egypt. The discovery comes during the 16th year of archaeological excavations which are sponsored this year by Técnicas Reunidas and Indra.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The first one bit chemical memory unit: The 'chit'In classical computer science information is stored in bits, in quantum computer science -- in quantum bits, i.e. qubits. Experiments at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw prove that not only physics, but also chemistry is suitable for storing information. The role of the chemical bit, the 'chit', can be fulfilled by a simple arrangement of three drople
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-seated tectonic genesis of large earthquakes in North ChinaIn the 1960s-1970s, North China has undergone a series of strong earthquakes. For nearly 50 years, Chinese seismologists have carried out a great deal of researches in the fields of seismotectonics and deep environment of strong earthquakes. Deep geophysical survey and seismic tomography imaging revealed the basic characteristics of crustal structures in North China, and significant progresses hav
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New self-sustained multi-sensor platform for environmental monitoringA research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has engineered a self-sustaining sensor platform to continuously monitor the surrounding environment without having an external power source.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential predictor of glaucoma damage identifiedResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a biomarker that appears linked to damage to cells in the retina of the eye. The marker may make it possible to better monitor the progression of glaucoma, as well as the effectiveness of treatment for the blinding disease.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Arbejdsgruppe om akutmedicin kan ikke blive enige Arbejdsgruppe, som Sundhedsstyrelsen har nedsat til at vurdere, om der fagligt er belæg for at etablere et akutmedicinsk speciale eller ej, er splittet og kan ikke give samlet indstilling.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Liberal Alliance vil give parter mere tid til forhandling om almen praksis Det er ikke rimeligt at kalde den nye særlov om almen praksis for et indgreb, mener Liberal Alliance.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Hot Jupiter' transiting a rapidly-rotating star discovered(Phys.org)—A "hot Jupiter" exoplanet transiting a rapidly rotating star has been discovered jointly by WASP and KELT survey, a new study reveals. The newly found alien world, designated WASP-167b/KELT-13b, is several times more massive than Jupiter and orbits its parent star every two days. The finding was presented Apr. 25 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
10h
Gizmodo
We Might Know One of the Pivotal General Leia Scenes in Star Wars: The Last Jedi There’s another new update on the troubled Crow reboot. Get a look at Seth Rogen’s Last Starfighter -esque new comedy for Hulu. The Gears of War movie has a writer. Plus, what’s to come on Lucifer and Gotham , a new snifter of Wonder Woman footage, and another new song from the Once Upon a Time musical episode. Spoilers! Star Wars: The Last Jedi A new video from Nerdist claims the film begins wit
10h
Ars Technica
Imagination Technologies can’t resolve Apple IP spat, opens formal dispute Enlarge (credit: Lewis Mulatero/Getty Images) Imagination Technologies has placed its patents row with Apple on a formal footing, confirming to the City that it has opened a dispute resolution process because—it says—attempts to settle a licence and royalty deal with the iPhone maker remain at a standstill. In April, the British chip design company hinted that a IP row was brewing by claiming tha
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Futurity.org
What mice and rats can teach us about anorexia A common assumption is that media and society trigger anorexia, says Chiye Aoki, professor at New York University’s Center for Neural Science. “However, neuroscientists have shown that ordinary female adolescent rats and mice can be induced to become anorexic, too.” In this 90-second video, Aoki explains how neuroscientists are exploring anorexia’s origins and potential treatments. Their motivati
10h
WIRED
Luke, the Jedi Shouldn’t End. They Just Need Workers’ Comp And other policy recommendations so that the order can evolve instead of just dying out. The post Luke, the Jedi Shouldn’t End. They Just Need Workers' Comp appeared first on WIRED .
10h
Science-Based Medicine
The Medical Medium’s Thyroid PseudoscienceAnthony William calls himself a "Medical Medium". He has no medical expertise, but he provides medical advice based on claimed communication with the spirit world. What could possibly go wrong?
10h
The Atlantic
Why Kurt Russell Is Still a One-of-a-Kind Movie Star At certain points in his life, Kurt Russell just stops making movies. Few actors possess obvious self-awareness about their own changing place in the industry, but Russell has always been someone who takes a hint. After breaking into Hollywood in 1979 by playing Elvis Presley in the TV movie Elvis , he spent two decades as one of the industry’s most charming leading men. But after the action epic
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Smart contact lens sensor' for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosisA research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robots may bring reef reliefThe University of Delaware is part of a multinational team that used underwater vehicles to map deep sea reefs near the island of Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean. Researchers believe data culled from the study can help local conservation efforts and aid in hazard risk management throughout the Caribbean.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify evidence of oldest orchid fossil on recordA newly published study documents evidence of an orchid fossil trapped in Baltic amber that dates back some 45 million years to 55 million years ago, shattering the previous record for an orchid fossil found in Dominican amber some 20-30 million years old.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does my algorithm work? There's no shortcut for community detectionCommunity detection is an important tool for scientists studying networks, but a new paper published in Science Advances calls into question the common practice of using metadata for ground truth validation.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping deep reefs produces valuable data for researchers, conservationistsA study authored by University of Delaware Professor Art Trembanis and colleagues reveals new details about deep sea reefs—known as mesophotic reefs—near the island of Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Smart contact lens sensor' for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosisA recent study, affiliated with UNIST has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reconciling differences in interpretations of global warming hiatus(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science has conducted an analysis of the events surrounding the global warming hiatus of 1998 and 2012 and has concluded that inconsistencies reported by scientists can be attributed to natural short-term weather variations, incomplete data and different methods of modeling. In their paper published in the journal Natu
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving adult skills can help globalisation benefitsIn an increasingly competitive international environment, providing workers with the right mix of skills can help ensure that globalisation translates into new jobs and productivity gains rather than negative economic and social outcomes, according to a new OECD report launched today in London in partnership with the University's Institute for Policy Research (IPR).
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Is the Baby in Pain? Brain Scans Can TellBrainwaves might soon determine whether an analgesic for infants is effective -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Ars Technica
Will Facebook actually hire 3,000 content moderators, or will they outsource? Enlarge / Many content moderators say they work in cubical farms like this one from Office Space . (credit: Office Space) Videos of murders and suicides are posted regularly on Facebook, and now the company has vowed to keep that kind of content off the site. In a recent post , Mark Zuckerberg said his company will hire 3,000 content moderators this year to, "help us get better at removing things
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows link between home styles and high water useAffluent neighborhoods with lawns—and occasionally swimming pools—use up to 10 times more water than neighborhoods with higher density housing with less landscaping, according to a Portland State University study.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First EPA-approved outdoor field trial for genetically engineered algaeScientists at the University of California San Diego and Sapphire Energy have successfully completed the first outdoor field trial sanctioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for genetically engineered algae.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biggest X-ray laser in the world generates its first laser lightThe European XFEL, the biggest X-ray laser in the world, has reached the last major milestone before the official opening in September. The 3.4 km long facility, most of which is located in underground tunnels, has generated its first X-ray laser light. The X-ray light has a wavelength of 0.8 nm - about 500 times shorter than that of visible light. At first lasing, the laser had a repetition rate
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Everest braces for record number of summit attemptsNepal has issued a record number of permits to climbers wanting to summit Mount Everest this spring, an official said Thursday, prompting fears of overcrowding on the world's highest peak.
10h
Gizmodo
May the Force Be With You, Always, With Amazon's Star Wars Memorabilia Sale Star Wars Memorabilia Gold Box Never tell me the odds that Amazon would host an incredible sale on signed Star Wars memorabilia to celebrate May the Fourth. Everything from a Kenny Baker/R2D2 photo all the way up to a Dark Horse comics and glossy photos signed by all the big names (Jar Jar Binks, notwithstanding) is there. These prices will set like the two suns of Tatooine at the end of the day,
10h
Gizmodo
A Mysterious Box Causes Curiosity and Chaos in This Clever Stop-Motion Short Stop-motion animator Kevin Parry now works at Laika, where he helped make Kubo and the Two Strings and The Boxtrolls . The film that got him the gig: student film The Arctic Circle . Guided by silent movie-style titles, it observes a man whose solitary life takes a sudden turn when he makes a strange discovery. [ Dust ]
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there such a thing as a national sense of humour?We're all aware that there are stereotypes. The British are sharply sarcastic, the Americans are great at physical comedy, and the Japanese love puns. But is humour actually driven by culture to any meaningful extent? Couldn't it be more universal – or depend largely on the individual?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When good animals make bad decisionsLife is full of choices and animals have to make them every day, such as where to live, where to feed, and which other animals to interact with. These decisions are often based on an animal's perception of their surroundings – is it raining, am I too cold, is that a predator I smell? The consequences of getting this wrong could mean the difference between life and death.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Kræftlæger: Markant cheflæge vil styrke Kræftens Bekæmpelse Niels Kromans engagerede og markante stil vil være en gevinst for Kræftens Bekæmpelse, vurderer centrale aktører på kræftområdet.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pathogenic bacteria train their defence in lakes and oceansPeter Mathisen at Umeå University has found links between the aquatic environment and the spreading of diseases such as tularaemia. The results indicate that aquatic environments act as "gyms" for bacteria, where the presence of predators train their defence against being killed and eaten up. The results are important for assessments of aquatic environments at risk of spreading pathogenic bacteria
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How robots can help us embrace a more human view of disabilityWhen dealing with the otherness of disability, the Victorians in their shame built huge out-of-sight asylums, and their legacy of "them" and "us" continues to this day. Two hundred years later, technologies offer us an alternative view. The digital age is shattering barriers, and what used to the norm is now being challenged.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State research shows link between home styles and high water useAffluent neighborhoods with lawns -- and occasionally swimming pools -- use up to 10 times more water than neighborhoods with higher density housing with less landscaping, according to a Portland State University study.
10h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Sådan får vi grøn, billig og sikker energi Biogas Solceller Vindmøller
11h
Ingeniøren
Dong indgår forlig om ubrugelig Hejre-platformRettet: Dong Energy og leverandørerne af en platform til det skandaleramte Hejrefelt har nu indgået et forlig: Den ubrugelige beboelses- og produktionsplatform skal skrottes af entrepenørerne.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery from IBM could enable more efficient oil extraction from existing wellsIBM scientists recently discovered that a drop of oil doesn't look like a drop at all if it is small, to the scale of one billionth of a billionth of a liter, or attoliter. Rather, a nanoscale oil droplet looks more like a flat film against a solid surface. This discovery reveals that the simulation tools and techniques commonly employed by the oil industry do not take into account the increased e
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Landslide Forecasts Could Save LivesA novel system could provide more reliable, localized landslide-risk estimates and thus more trustworthy warnings to residents -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Scientist RSS
Developer of Amniocentesis DiesJohn Littlefield pioneered the use of the prenatal testing method in diagnosing genetic disorders in the womb.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Worms FeastingWax worms, Galleria mellonella, can biodegrade plastic, including the sturdy and common polyethylene.
11h
The Atlantic
Up to 1 Million Gmail Users Affected in Massive Phishing Attack A sophisticated scam against Gmail users on Wednesday afternoon may have affected as many as 1 million people, Google suggested in a statement late Wednesday night. “We realize people are concerned about their Google accounts, and we’re now able to give a fuller explanation after further investigation,” Google said in a statement emailed by its communications team. “We have taken action to protec
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New intervention brings hope to patients with primary progressive aphasiaA Baycrest Health Sciences researcher and clinician has developed the first group language intervention that helps individuals losing the ability to speak due to a rare form of dementia, and could help patients maintain their communication abilities for longer.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First EPA-approved outdoor field trial for genetically engineered algaeScientists have successfully completed the first outdoor field trial sanctioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency for genetically engineered algae. The researchers tested a genetically engineered strain of algae in outdoor ponds under real-world conditions. The researchers conclude that genetically engineered algae can be successfully cultivated outdoors while maintaining engineered traits
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When a suburb's turn for gentrification comesThose who value "multiculturalism" and "access to the city" as key markers of a vibrant, progressive city will find these attributes in the Melbourne suburb of Footscray. Yet, at the same time, they will find them under threat through the forces of gentrification. These are the same forces that have, through time, transformed former "slums" such as Carlton, Fitzroy, Abbotsford and Richmond into "b
11h
New Scientist - News
The energy generators inside our cells reach a sizzling 50°CYour mitochondria burn food to produce most of your energy. Now we know this produces a lot of heat, raising them high above our 37°C body temperature
11h
WIRED
America’s Obscene Wealth, in Pictures Lauren Greenfield has dedicated her career to documenting what she calls "the influence of affluence." The post America’s Obscene Wealth, in Pictures appeared first on WIRED .
11h
WIRED
Want to Start Riding Your Bike to Work? Get This Gear Whether you're new to commuting or just want to ride more, these practical accessories will make it easier. The post Want to Start Riding Your Bike to Work? Get This Gear appeared first on WIRED .
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Cashless Debit Card Trial is working and it is vital – here's whyThe federal government's Cashless Debit Card Trial, which began in selected communities in South Australia and Western Australia from March 2016, is a significant innovation in tackling the health and socioeconomic disadvantages in communities with high rates of social security dependency for long periods of time, and – in many cases – across generations. It is simply wrong to say, as some have ar
11h
Popular Science
These animal moms go to extreme lengths to feed their babies Animals Excerpt: Raised by Animals Providing milk is only the beginning. Read on.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Who left food in the fridge? The rise of the 'Dark Knight' workplace vigilante Self-appointed enforcers, keen to report colleagues for misdemeanours, are a common – and potentially costly – issue for organisations, survey finds They are the Dark Knights of the office: lone vigilantes who police the workplace, ever watchful for heinous crimes that cannot go unpunished. Woe to those who step out of line and return from break two minutes late, leave food in the office fridge t
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, U.S. fell short on mosquito eradicationResearchers boldly predicted mosquitoes’ demise 50 years ago. They never came close.
11h
Ingeniøren
Alvorlige huller i industrirobotters it-sikkerhedDet er alt for let at hacke en industrirobot, konkluderer en forskergruppe i en ny rapport. Forældet styresoftware og dårligt beskyttede servicebokse øger risikoen for hackerangreb på industriens voksende skare af industribotter.
11h
Ingeniøren
DTU tager ny unik hybriddrone i brugDronen giver mulighed for at lave målinger i svært tilgængelige områder, men lovgivningen begrænser forskerne i at udnytte de teknologiske muligheder til fulde.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring the mass number of superheavy, human-made elementsA new tool at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) will be taking on some of the periodic table's latest heavyweight champions to see how their masses measure up to predictions.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bizarre, Giant Birds Once Ruled the SkiesFossils of enormous extinct seabirds are now illuminating how such behemoths took wing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Red alert: Kofi Annan on the photos that capture our choking planet From a masked Tokyo commuter in a crush to the plastic particles killing our oceans, the former UN secretary-general hails the photographers shortlisted for tonight’s space-themed Prix Pictet prize We are running out of space. Fly over Africa at night and you will see mile after mile of fires burning red in the dark as scrub is removed to make way for human beings. Satellite images of nocturnal E
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change, tornadoes and mobile homes—a dangerous mixTornadoes and mobile homes don't mix to begin with, but throw in the volatility of climate change and the potential for massive property damage and deaths is even higher in coming decades, indicates a new study by Michigan State University researchers.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could a doodle replace your password?Nearly 80 percent of Americans own a smartphone, and a growing proportion of them use smartphones for internet access, not just when they're on the go. This leads to people storing considerable amounts of personal and private data on their mobile devices.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does my algorithm work? There's no shortcut for community detectionCommunity detection is an important tool for scientists studying networks. It provides descriptions of the large-scale network by dividing its nodes into related communities. To test community detection algorithms, researchers run the algorithm on known data from a real-world network and check to see if their results match up with existing node labels—metadata—from that network.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Nasa runs competition to help make old Fortran code fasterTwo coders will share a $55,000 prize for what a Nasa official calls the "ultimate 'geek' dream assignment.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientific guidance to prevent and mitigate chemical accidentsA handbook published by the JRC supports EU Member States and third countries in their decisions to reduce the impacts of major industrial accidents. It provides common reference scenarios for authorities to assess the risks associated with industrial sites where dangerous substances are present, taking into account their proximity to residential areas, transport infrastructure or other public spa
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Envisioning a future quantum internetThe quantum internet, which connects particles linked together by the principle of quantum entanglement, is like the early days of the classical internet – no one can yet imagine what uses it could have, according to Professor Ronald Hanson, from Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands, whose team was the first to prove that the phenomenon behind it was real.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biomarker test for Lou Gehrig's disease useful in diagnosing canine neurodegenerative diseaseIn 2009, Joan Coates, a veterinary neurologist, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute at MIT/Harvard, found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease in people. Now, researchers have found that a biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS also can assist with determining a di
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyanine dyes could improve the efficiency of molecular probesScientists use fragments of RNA and DNA with specific nucleotide sequences to identify others with complementary sequences, indicating, for example, the presence of a specific virus.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Online security won't improve until companies stop passing the buck to the customerIt's normally in the final seconds of a TV or radio interview that security experts get asked for advice for the general public – something simple, unambiguous, and universally applicable. It's a fair question, and what the public want. But simple answers are usually wrong, and can do more harm than good.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using a nickel catalyst with hydrocarbons to make fatty acids(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology has developed a way to make fatty acids using a nickel catalyst along with hydrocarbons. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their technique and the uses to which it might be put. Matthew Gaunt and Patrick Williamson with the University of Cambridge offer a News & Views piece on
12h
Ars Technica
Kodi: Open source TV app inspires full-blown copyright panic in the UK You know a technology's gone mainstream when the tabloids start yelling about it. This year the Sun , the Mirror , the Express , and the Daily Star have run splashes ranging from "Kodi Crackdown" through "Kodi Killers" to "Kodi TOTAL BAN!". It's not that they've stumbled on an underground hack scene; the stories have been briefed by copyright owners and law enforcement agencies. So what is Kodi,
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
When Power Turns ToxicSuccess changes how people think and act—often, but not always, for the worse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
New Scientist - News
Deadly infection spread by contaminated heart surgery machinesTo get a new heart valve, patients have to undergo open-heart surgery. But a machine used in such procedures has been contaminating these implants
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For richer or poorer, we all eat fast foodWhether rich or poor, one thing unites Americans of all economic classes: Our love for fast food. A new nationwide study of young baby boomers contradicts the popular belief that fast-food consumption is concentrated among the poor.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reasons for eczema susceptibility uncoveredScientists have uncovered evidence that a deficiency in the skin's barrier is key to triggering eczema.
12h
Futurity.org
Zika outbreak in U.S. could cost $1.2 billion Even a relatively mild Zika outbreak in the continental United States could cost more than $183 million in medical bills and productivity losses, and a worse epidemic could come with a price tag of $1.2 billion or even more. Experts estimated the potential impact of epidemics of various sizes in five Southeastern states and Texas, the US locations most populated by Aedes aegypti , the mosquito mo
12h
Science | The Guardian
New fossil mammal was the first ‘King’ of Scotland | Elsa Panciroli Palaeontologists have found a new mammal called Wareolestes rex - ‘Ware’s brigand king’ – which scampered across the Isle of Skye in the Jurassic Until now, only two mammal species were known from the Middle Jurassic of Scotland. This month, my colleagues and I added a third one to the list: Wareolestes rex. This fossil from the Isle of Skye isn’t a new species, but until now only a few of its te
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wind turbines affect behavior of desert tortoise predatorsHow a wind energy facility is designed can influence the behavior of animal predators and their prey, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Wildlife Management by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and the U.S. Geological Survey.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Jewelled' LAGEOS satellites to measure the EarthCould this be one of the most beautiful satellites ever made? In fact it is one of twins, as there are two of these jewelled spheres orbiting Earth.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel technique measures warpage in next-gen integrated circuitsAs integrated circuit components are coming up against size limits, manufacturers are turning to new approaches based on stacking extremely thin wafers. However, the thin wafers easily warp under the stresses involved in fabrication, and measuring the stress and warpage has so far proven challenging.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify evidence of oldest orchid fossil on recordThe orchid family has some 28,000 species – more than double the number of bird species and quadruple the mammal species. As it turns out, they've also been around for a while.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: North pole of EnceladusIn the north, Enceladus' surface appears to be about as old as any in the solar system. The south, however, is an entirely different story.
12h
Live Science
Will Emojis Be Your Next Password?Useful for expressing moods, emotions and nuances in messages, emojis could have another use: as your next smartphone password.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Jurassic animal found on Skye 'fed milk to young'A fossil found on Skye of the early mammal suggests it had a set of milk teeth, say palaeontologists.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart decarceration can shrink sprawling American prison systemThe United States is the world's leader in incarceration, spending $52 billion a year on correctional supervision and another $948 billion in related social costs.
12h
WIRED
Airbnb’s San Francisco Deal Puts Storyline Over Bottom Line In San Francisco, Airbnb became a prime target of the anti-tech backlash. As it approaches a possible IPO, it would like to be seen as a good neighbor. The post Airbnb's San Francisco Deal Puts Storyline Over Bottom Line appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED
How Artists Engineer Their Work to Mess With Our Minds The most compelling visual artists are tech innovators, using advanced materials, industrial design, and clever light manipulation to trick your brain. The post How Artists Engineer Their Work to Mess With Our Minds appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED
With the Model 3 Coming, Tesla Grapples With Quality Control And Musk's newer customers may not be so forgiving. The post With the Model 3 Coming, Tesla Grapples With Quality Control appeared first on WIRED .
12h
Live Science
Humpbacks Block Killer Whale Feeding Frenzy in Wild VideoA deadly gang of orcas roving off the coast of northern California is meeting surprising opposition – humpback whales trying to foil their kills.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Fix Peer ReviewIt's often accused of being slow (sometimes taking months), inefficient, biased and open to abuse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Appraising the linguistic value of emojisTake heart, 45-year-olds who have no idea what that string of skulls or pandas means in a text.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building rovers that can detect life and sequence DNA on other worldsIn 2015, then-NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan stated that, "I believe we are going to have strong indications of life beyond Earth in the next decade and definite evidence in the next 10 to 20 years." With multiple missions scheduled to search foe evidence of life (past and present) on Mars and in the outer solar system, this hardly seems like an unrealistic appraisal.
12h
The Atlantic
How a Frog Became the First Mainstream Pregnancy Test The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis , is a palm-sized, greenish-gray animal that hails from the ponds and rivers of sub-Saharan Africa, where it lived for millions of years without anyone injecting it with urine. That unbroken streak changed in the 1930s, thanks to a British scientist with the fantastic name of Lancelot Hogben. Hogben was a talented but irascible zoologist with strident left-
12h
The Atlantic
Prince Philip's Retirement Prince Philip will retire this fall from his royal duties, Buckingham Palace announced Thursday. Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, will attend previously scheduled engagements until August, but won’t accept invitations after that, a palace spokesman said, adding the decision was made by the 95-year-old Duke of Edinburgh and supported by the queen. Elizabeth, who is 91, “will continue to
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover how cancer-causing virus could stay silently hidden in your bodyResearchers at the University of Pittsburgh have discovered a new mechanism that could explain how the Merkel Cell Polyomavirus, responsible for the most aggressive form of skin cancer, can stay dormant for decades after infection but then reemerge to cause cancer. The results are published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molybdenum-coated catalyst splits water for hydrogen production more efficientlyHydrogen is one of the most promising clean fuels for use in cars, houses and portable generators. When produced from water using renewable energy resources, it is also a sustainable fuel with no carbon footprint.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Printing bricks from moondust using the sun's heatBricks have been 3-D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight – proving in principle that future lunar colonists could one day use the same approach to build settlements on the moon.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New movie shows Cassini's first dive over SaturnA new movie sequence of images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows the view as the spacecraft swooped over Saturn during the first of its Grand Finale dives between the planet and its rings on April 26.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Older, denser neighborhoods offer better access to everyday destinations, study findsResidents of older, denser, lower-income neighborhoods and smaller, multifamily homes in Southern California can more easily access commonly frequented sites such as grocery stores, restaurants, clothing stores and gas stations, according to a recent report from the University of California, Irvine.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Ominous Beauty of the Arctic MeltdownArtist and photographer Diane Tuft captures the rapidly changing polar landscape in her new book, The Arctic Melt -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forgotten crops making meals taste betterLocal farmers and researchers are foraging through forgotten crops to recover long-lost flavours.
12h
Viden
Ekspert: 3.000 ansatte er ikke nok til at forhindre drab og voldtægt på FacebookDansk professor forudser flere og endnu mere ubehagelige eksempler på transmission af fx drab, selvmord og voldtægt.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Myanmar coal plant growth could kill 280,000: studyMyanmar's plans to grow the country's desperately needed but polluting coal-fired power plants could kill more than a quarter of a million people in the coming decades, environmentalists said Thursday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU accepts Amazon's e-book commitmentsThe European Union's competition watchdog says it accepts commitments made by online giant Amazon to change part of its e-book contracts to avoid fines for anti-competitive behavior.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Komodo dragon bites Singaporean tourist in IndonesiaA Komodo dragon has bitten an overly inquisitive tourist in Indonesia who ignored warnings about getting too close to the enormous reptile while it was eating, a national park official said.
13h
Ingeniøren
Google forpligter sig til at overholde EU’s nye persondataforordning - i hvert fald når det gælder de betalte cloudtjenester. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/google-forpligter-sig-at-overholde-eus-nye-persondataforordning-1076276 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren
Nasas Cassini-mission nærmer sig sin afslutning: Få overblik over 20 års missionNasas rumsonde Cassini er i gang med den store finale, der skal afslutte 20 års rummission med udforskning af Saturn og gasplanetens måner. Her ridser vi det vigtigste op.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify potential Zika virus targetNew research provides insights into why infection with Zika virus after birth generally causes only mild symptoms, whereas devastating fetal malformations can develop when infection occurs during pregnancy.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China compiles its own Wikipedia, but public can't edit itChina is compiling a free online encyclopedia to rival Wikipedia, but it will likely only give Beijing's official version of sensitive historical events, and the public won't be able to write or edit it.
13h
WIRED
In Which We Literally Calculate the Power of the Force Darth Vader uses the Force to move a rebel soldier. What kind of physics power output does this motion require? The post In Which We Literally Calculate the Power of the Force appeared first on WIRED .
13h
Ingeniøren
Google Docs-brugere ramt af phishing Google oplyser, at de har stoppet et phishing-angreb, der har ramt omtrent en million brugere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/google-docs-brugere-ramt-phishing-1076265 Version2
13h
The Atlantic
What Went Wrong With 13 Reasons Why? By Netflix’s metric of success, 13 Reasons Why is a huge hit. The 13-episode drama, structured around the narrative of a girl explaining posthumously why she killed herself, is the most tweeted-about show of 2017. It’s also been hugely popular among teen viewers, whom Netflix is eager to hook . Given that the streaming service’s business model values perceived popularity over actual popularity ,
13h
The Atlantic
When Internet Memes Infiltrate the Physical World In addition to people of all genders at the Women’s March on Washington and Inauguration Day, there were a number of creatures: octopi, frogs, honey badgers, and cats. No, people hadn’t brought a variety of exotic pets—they were bringing along memes, and those memes appeared on signs, pins and other physical media. The octopus was the famous “ Nope nope nope ” octopus; the frog was Pepe and his l
13h
Viden
Titusindvis af skribenter på vej med kinesisk konkurrent til WikipediaStyret planlægger over 300.000 indlæg produceret af udvalgte eksperter.
14h
Ingeniøren
FN dropper tusindvis af brandfarlige Ikea-telte til flygtninge10.000 telte, der skulle have givet flygtninge husly, er aldrig blevet pakket ud på grund af brandfare. Det indrømmer FN, der satser på re-designede telte senere i år.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists engineer baker's yeast to produce penicillin moleculesScientists have inserted fungus genes into a yeast cell to make it produce penicillin molecules.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop new capabilities for genome-wide engineering of yeastUniversity of Illinois researchers describe how their successful integration of several cutting-edge technologies -- creation of standardized genetic components, implementation of customizable genome editing tools, and large-scale automation of molecular biology laboratory tasks -- will enhance our ability to work with yeast. The results of their new method demonstrate its potential to produce val
14h
Dagens Medicin
Borre: DSKO indbydes til dialogMichael Borre, formand for Danske Multidisciplinære Cancer grupper, svarer på Lars Henrik Jensens bekymringer om Danish Comprehensive Cancer Center.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Kræftlæger føler sig i overset i nyt kræftcenter »Vi føler, at Dansk Selskab for Klinisk Onkologi har været kørt ud på et sidespor.« Sådan siger onkologernes formand Lars Henrik Jensen om etableringen af Danish Comprehensive Cancer Center. DMCG forstår ikke kritikken.
14h
Dagens Medicin
DNA-analyser kan finde effektive kræftbehandlingerForskningsresultater fra Rigshospitalet viser, at DNA-fragmenter i blodet hurtigt kan vise, om en behandling virker.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Ældre kvinder tilbydes screening for livmoderhalskræftSom en del af Kræftplan IV skal regionerne som noget nyt tilbyde screening for livmoderhalskræft til kvinder over 69 år i løbet af i år. Region Syddanmark går i gang nu.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists engineer baker's yeast to produce penicillin moleculesThe synthetic biologists from Imperial College London have re-engineered yeast cells to manufacture the nonribosomal peptide antibiotic penicillin. In laboratory experiments, they were able to demonstrate that this yeast had antibacterial properties against streptococcus bacteria.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new capabilities for genome-wide engineering of yeastOne of humankind's oldest industrial partners is yeast, a familiar microbe that enabled early societies to brew beer and leaven bread and empowers modern ones to synthesize biofuels and conduct key biomedical research. Yeast remains a vital biological agent, yet our ability to explore and influence its genomic activity has lagged.
14h
Ingeniøren
Højesteret slår fast: Elregning på 200.000 kr. var en fejlDet var en fejl fra elselskabets side, at en elkunde i 2011 fik en regning på over 200.000 kroner for en periode på fire måneder, fastslog Højesteret fredag. En ufaglært montør kan have tabt måleren, lyder konklusionen.
14h
The Atlantic
Can the Democrats Convince Millennials to Vote in 2018? President Trump’s historically low approval ratings provide Democrats legitimate reasons for optimism about their prospects in the 2018 elections, especially in the House. But that confidence rests on a contradiction: Minorities and Millennials, the groups most alienated from Trump, are traditionally the constituencies least likely to vote in midterm elections. The contrast between the electorate
14h
The Atlantic
Should Taxpayers Sponsor Attorneys for Undocumented Immigrants? Unlike most criminal defendants in the United States, undocumented immigrants facing potential deportation are not constitutionally guaranteed counsel if they aren’t able to afford a private attorney. While for years attorneys and advocates have pressed for publicly funded lawyers in immigration courts, it wasn’t until Donald Trump’s political ascendency that immigrant-friendly local governments
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildlife-rich lagoon in Florida threatened by building boomThe most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill.
15h
Ingeniøren
Analyse: Store multiforsyningsselskaber er et effektivt alternativNy analyse har set på effektiviseringsgevinsten i en sammenlægning af forsyningsvirksomheder på tværs af sektorerne i stedet for en konsolidering inden for hver af sektorerne vand, gas, varme og el.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Grandparents who practice outdated health myths may pose safety threat on grandchildrenMany grandparents raising their grandchildren practice outdated health and parenting myths that could potentially pose serious risks to young children, according to illuminating new research by a Northwell Health pediatrician.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Health halo' foods likely to pass parents' scrutiny by not examining nutrition labelsParents choosing foods for their children are significantly more likely to purchase 'health halo' products -- branded to cause misleading assumptions of good nutritional value.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ER visits related to marijuana use at a Colorado hospital quadruple after legalizationVisits by teens to a Colorado children's hospital emergency department and its satellite urgent care centers increased rapidly after legalization of marijuana for commercialized medical and recreational use, according to new research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internet health information can reduce parents' trust in doctors' diagnosesNew research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests online health information can influence whether parents trust a diagnosis made by their child's doctor, potentially leading to delayed treatment.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking devices may improve quality of life for parents of children with autismMany children with Autism Spectrum Disorder face increased risk of injury when they wander away from adults who care for them. Even when parents take safety precautions such as installing window bars at home, studies show parents' fear of their children wandering is a significant source of stress for families. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests t
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds social challenges amplify negative effects of childhood lead exposureScientists already know early lead exposure can slow a child's cognitive and language development. Findings of an abstract being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting show lead's impact is especially strong for children in families also facing socioeconomic challenges.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children's hospitals admissions for suicidal thoughts or actions double during past decadeThe number of children and adolescents admitted to children's hospitals for thoughts of suicide or self-harm more than doubled during the last decade, according to new research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ordinary sounding expressions of teen angst may signal early depressionWhile it's estimated at least one in 10 teens in the US suffer from depression at some point, few will use the word 'depressed' to describe negative emotions hanging over them. Instead, new research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco suggests, they're likely to use terms such as 'stressed,' or 'down,' and other words that may sound like ordinary teen angst but could
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Buprenorphine cuts neonatal abstinence syndrome treatment length by nearly halfFindings of a phase 3 clinical trial being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting show that buprenorphine is just as safe and more effective than morphine when used to treat newborns suffering withdrawal symptoms after prenatal drug exposure.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young childrenAs the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in US homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol marketing in popular movies doubles in past 2 decadesAlcohol brand placements in popular movies of all ratings nearly doubled during the past two decades, new research shows, but particularly in child-rated movies. Researchers presenting these findings at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco found the alcohol brands on the movie set are often those young people report drinking the most.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boostNew research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds infants prescribed antacids have increased risk of fractures during childhoodNew research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting found infants prescribed antacids to manage acid reflux, or spitting up, under age 1 had more bone fractures later in childhood.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saliva test predicts prolonged concussion symptoms in childrenAlthough most of the 3 million concussions diagnosed in the US each year occur in children, the bulk of clinical guidelines are based on adults. Because of this, pediatricians are limited in how accurately they can advise families about how long a child may suffer symptoms such as headaches, fatigue and trouble concentrating that can interfere with school and other activities.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens and adolescents who consume too much salt show unhealthy changes to blood vesselsFindings of a new study being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco suggest adolescents who consume too much salt have measurable changes in their blood vessels associated with early signs of cardiovascular disease in adults.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Youth most at risk for violence or mental health issues have increased access to gunsNew research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting found adolescents who reported greatest access to guns -- either in their own home or a friend's - also were among those with higher risk for violent behavior. Researchers discovered additional factors linked with increased firearms access that included past suicide attempts and self-reported mental health disorder diagn
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children who survive sepsis often experience lingering effectsSurvival rates have risen dramatically in recent years among children who develop sepsis, a severe, life-threatening immune reaction to an infection somewhere in the body. But new research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that recovery remains a long haul for patients, with many still feeling effects on their physical, social, emotional and school functioning
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds 16 US children hospitalized for firearms injuries each dayNew research being highlighted at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco reveals that firearms injuries caused more than 5,800 US youth to be hospitalized in 2012, or roughly 16 children each day.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kentucky study highlights harms from disruptions in children's Medicaid coverageNew research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggest that when children lose state Medicaid coverage even for a short time, they are likely to go without needed health care, or to receive care in resource-intensive setting such as emergency departments rather than less expensive primary care offices.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds exposure to racism harms children's healthNew research to be presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies 2017 Meeting illustrates the unhealthy effects racism can have on children, with reported exposure to discrimination tied to higher rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression, as well as decreased general health.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alternative treatment approach for neonatal abstinence syndrome may shorten hospital stayNew research suggests a revamped, 'common sense' approach to treating newborns suffering opioid withdrawal -- gauging whether the baby can eat, sleep and be consoled within 10 minutes before administering drugs to wean them off exposure -- may safely reduce the length of hospitalization they need.
16h
Dagens Medicin
Niels Kroman bliver cheflæge i Kræftens Bekæmpelse Den kendte brystkræftkirurg skal skærpe organisationens lægefaglige profil med afsæt i en helt ny stilling.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple steps up its effort to emphasize its economic impactApple is getting more aggressive about emphasizing its role in the U.S. economy, apparently hoping to counter recurring criticism over its reliance on overseas factories.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some cling to landlines, but cell-only homes now dominateDeborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group—people with a landline phone at home.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google Docs phishing scam doused after catching fireA 'phishing' scam that tricked people with what appeared to be Google Docs links was doused by the internet giant after spreading wildly.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticidesThere are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. A new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.
16h
Live Science
Hanging Up on Landlines: Most US Homes Are Now Cellphone-OnlyAre landline phones going the way of floppy disks and VCRs? A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says yes.
16h
Science | The Guardian
In the round: centuries of circular design – in pictures A new book explores information design in the form of circles – from 18th-century musical scores to photographs of Jupiter Continue reading...
17h
Science | The Guardian
Give overweight patients a year of weight-loss classes, say researchers Tens of thousands of cases of obesity-related diseases could be prevented if the standard three-month course of weight-loss classes were extended, says study Overweight or obese patients should be offered 12 months of weight-loss classes rather than the standard three months, according to research showing that the move could prevent tens of thousands of cases of obesity-related diseases over the
18h
Ingeniøren
Elbilaftale gør opladning på gaden markant dyrereInvesteringen i det offentlige ladenetværk til elbiler vil gå i stå, hvis Folketinget vedtager den nye aftale om elbiler.
18h
Ingeniøren
Digitaliseringsstyrelsen: »Forfærdelige og frygtindgydende muligheder« med borgerdata Debatten omkring hvordan det offentlige skal håndtere borgernes data raser i disse dage. Det gør den også på Infosecurity, hvor to debattører diskuterede, hvad der bør ske fremover med borgernes data og privatliv. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/digitaliseringsstyrelsen-forfaerdelige-frygtindgydende-muligheder-at-forstaa-borgerne Version2
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Albatrosses counted from spaceSuper-sharp images from a US satellite are keeping track of remote bird-breeding sites.
18h
Science | The Guardian
Secretive spore shooter prized by gourmets Wolsingham, Weardale We were about to give up when we spotted the first morel, its convoluted, toffee-coloured, cap not much larger than a golf ball Every winter this gently sloping bank on the outside of a bend in the Wear is swept clean by flood water. When spring arrives buried plant life reasserts itself through layers of sandy silt deposited when the river has swirled through the alders. Fir
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists use satellites to count endangered birds from spaceAlbatrosses, one of the most iconic but also one of the most threatened groups of birds on the planet, are difficult to study in part because they breed on some of the world's remotest and most inaccessible islands. Scientists have now shown that the highest resolution satellite imagery is capable of 'seeing' these birds from space, allowing researchers to count their numbers on remote islands dir
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticidesThere are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. A new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hand osteoarthritis is a common conditionA new study estimates that the lifetime risk of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis is 40 percent, and nearly one in two women and one in four men will develop the condition, which affects hand strength and function and causes disability in activities of daily living.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment seeks to address exacerbations of COPDA new study finds that delivery of oxygen via high-flow nasal tubes may help patients who experience exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart failure is as 'malignant' as some common cancersA new analysis finds that, despite advances in care, men and women with a diagnosis of heart failure continue to have worse survival rates than patients with certain common cancers.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noisy knees may be an early sign of knee osteoarthritisA new study using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a multi-center observational study of nearly 3500 participants, indicates that people who hear grating, cracking, or popping sounds in or around their knee joint may be at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.
19h
Gizmodo
Popular YouTuber Gets Arrested for 'Prank' Removal of Real Stop Signs Screengrab: RossCreations A YouTuber going by the name RossCreations is one of those loathsome channel operators that doesn’t really understand what a prank is. Recently, he removed some stop signs that he deemed “unnecessary” and now, he’s been arrested. In a video published to his channel today, Ross is pleading with his half a million subscribers to donate to his legal fund. Advertisement Here
19h
The Atlantic
China and North Korea Battle It Out in the Press North Korea’s state media outlet shared harsh words on Wednesday after a major Chinese newspaper called their nation’s nuclear program into question. The feud began Sunday when People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China's Communist Party, released an editorial saying that “nuclear and missile ambitions have put [North Korea] and the whole region into dire peril.” The newspaper added that Nor
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use satellites to count endangered birds from spaceAlbatrosses, one of the most iconic but also one of the most threatened groups of birds on the planet, are difficult to study in part because they breed on some of the world's remotest and most inaccessible islands. Scientists have now shown that the highest resolution satellite imagery is capable of "seeing" these birds from space, allowing researchers to count their numbers on remote islands dir
19h
Live Science
Hindenburg Crash: The End of Airship TravelThe German zeppelin Hindenburg exploded 80 years ago, bringing an abrupt end to the age of airship travel.
20h
Popular Science
Simple Amazon Kindle tricks that'll optimize your e-reading DIY More battery life, better syncing, and more. Tips and tricks to get more out of your Amazon Kindle ereader, from looking up word definitions, to saving unread web articles to your device as if by magic.
20h
NYT > Science
Jimmy Kimmel Sheds Light on Health Coverage for Infants With Birth DefectsMr. Kimmel’s experience with his son focused attention on health coverage for such infants, and what lies ahead should the Affordable Care Act be repealed.
21h
The Scientist RSS
Individual Investigators to Have Limit on NIH FundsA point system seeks to ensure that funding is spread more evenly among researchers, especially early- and mid-career scientists.
21h
Gizmodo
The Turds Who Voted to Sell Out Your Online Privacy Get Their Faces Plastered on Billboards Courtesy: Fight for the Future Last month, Congress voted to repeal FCC rules that would prevent internet service providers from selling your personal web browsing and app usage data. It was a decision that’s unpopular across the country , regardless of party affiliation. If the politicians that voted in favor of the reversal thought no one would notice, there are some big ass signs in their dist
21h
The Atlantic
Rex Tillerson Spells Out U.S. Foreign Policy U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson addressed the State Department on Wednesday, shedding light on various aspects of the Trump administration’s “America First” foreign-policy agenda. While President Trump has made clear his intent to prioritize American interests above those of foreign nations, the details of his foreign policy were largely speculative prior to Wednesday’s address. In a 40-min
22h
New Scientist - News
African T. rex was one of last dinosaurs alive before extinctionAn African version of a tyrannosaur-like predator has been discovered by chance in a mine in Morocco
22h
WIRED
Judge in Waymo Dispute Lets Uber’s Self-Driving Program Live—for Now The self-driving car battle enters its papers-and-lawyers phase. The post Judge in Waymo Dispute Lets Uber's Self-Driving Program Live—for Now appeared first on WIRED .
22h
Science | The Guardian
Global warming scientists learn lessons from the pause that never was | Planet Oz New study finds there never was an unexpected lull in climate change but says the science community needs to communicate better People don’t talk about how global warming has stopped, paused or slowed down all that much any more – three consecutive hottest years on record will tend to do that to a flaky meme. But there was a time a few years ago when you couldn’t open your news feed without being
22h
Gizmodo
New U.S. Transportation Secretary Doesn't Seem To Know Anything About Autonomous Cars Photo: AP Here’s Elaine Chao, the new U.S. Transportation Secretary who is concerned about the comfort level citizens have toward autonomous cars , talking about self-driving cars this week : “We have now self-driving cars. We have level-two self-driving cars. They can drive on the highway, follow the white lines on the highway, and there’s really no need for any person to be seated and controlli
22h
The Atlantic
House Republicans Say They're Ready to Repeal Obamacare Updated on May 3 at 8:37 p.m. House Republican leaders will try again on Thursday to pass legislation partially repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, insisting they now have the votes six weeks after their bill collapsed before reaching the floor. “We will pass this bill,” House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters on Wednesday evening after he and Speaker Paul Ryan decided to
23h
Ingeniøren
Undgå den fejl, der øjeblikkeligt diskvalificerer dig ved en online-ansøgning Stadig flere af de større virksomheder kræver, at du udfylder en standard online-ansøgning, når du søger job. Her er det afgørende vigtigt, at du ikke begår den fejl, som diskvalificerer dig på stedet. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/undgaa-fejl-oejeblikkeligt-diskvalificerer-dig-ved-online-ansoegning-7676 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Pollution Peaks When Temperatures Top OutAs temperatures rise, energy demands peak, with a corresponding increase in air pollutants. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Ars Technica
Microsoft takes aim at Chrome OS with a new, and very necessary, education push Hands-on with some of the cheap education systems. Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Microsoft's New York City event to launch Windows 10 S and the Surface Laptop appears to have confused many people. The larger theme of the event was "education," but this is a broad topic. Judging by many of the reactions, Microsoft didn't do a good job of distinguishing the Surface Laptop fro
23h
The Atlantic
Le Pen and Macron Spar in Final Debate Independent centrist Emmanuel Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen traded barbs and insults Wednesday night in their first and final head-to-head debate ahead of Sunday’s presidential runoff. More than two hours long, the debate ultimately ended the way it began: With Le Pen equating her opponent to deeply unpopular Socialist President François Hollande, while Macron characterizing his as an
23h
Ars Technica
Musk talks Model 3 preparation and gives Model Y hints in financial call Enlarge / The Tesla Model S. (credit: Tesla ) Tesla posted record revenues of $2.7 billion in the first quarter of 2017, thanks to record auto deliveries . But the company ultimately lost $330 million in the quarter. The market, however, seems forgiving of these losses, showing only a 2.5-percent drop at the time of this writing. The electric vehicle company’s letter to investors primarily focuse
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Big bang theoryPioneering work that extracts information from audio of gunshots could help solve criminal cases.
23h
Gizmodo
All the Secrets Unlocked by the Dark Tower Trailer All images: Sony via YouTube We got the first Dark Tower trailer today and it was a lot . So we, of course, picked it apart to figure out what we could about this seemingly complicated movie. The thing to know about Dark Tower the movie is that it isn’t the usual translation of the first book in a series into a movie, kicking off a franchise. Instead, based on this trailer and an Entertainment We
23h
Gizmodo
Save $10 On the Already-Affordable 16GB Amazon Fire Tablet Fire Tablet with Alexa, 7" Display, 16 GB , $60 Once again, Amazon’s offering solid savings on one of its popular (and already absurdly affordable) Fire Tablets. Save $10 and pick up a 16GB 7" tablet for $60 , in your choice of three different colors.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modified soybeans yield more in future climate conditionsResearchers proved engineered soybeans yield more than conventional soybeans in 2050's predicted climatic conditions after a three-year field study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers advance low-cost, low-tech Zika virus surveillance toolUsing loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, researchers found that they could easily detect Zika virus in human and mosquito samples from the United States, Brazil and Nicaragua.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Rare Russian tiger returns to the wildAmur tigers were nearly driven to extinction, but conservation work in Russia is helping them bouncing back slowly.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Doctors should question the value of most heavily promoted drugsTop promoted drugs are less likely than top selling and top prescribed drugs to be effective, safe, affordable, novel, and represent a genuine advance in treating a disease, argue US researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parkinson's in a dish: Researchers reproduce brain oscillationsAbnormal oscillations in neurons that control movement, which likely cause the tremors that characterize Parkinson's disease, have long been reported in patients with the disease. Now, researchers working with stem cells report that they have reproduced these oscillations in a petri dish, paving the way for much faster ways to screen for new treatments or even a cure for Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic doxycycline may offer hope for treatment of Parkinson's diseaseDoxycycline, an antibiotic used for over half a century against bacterial infections, can be prescribed at lower doses for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish step up to lead when predators are nearSome fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earth sank twice, flooding the Eastern AmazonA tiny shark tooth, part of a mantis shrimp and other microscopic marine organisms reveal that as the Andes mountains rose, the Eastern Amazon sank twice, each time for less than a million years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biophysics: Conflict or coexistenceCompetition within mixed bacterial populations can give rise to complex growth dynamics. Researchers are probing the interplay between differential growth rates and stochastic factors in determining the composition of such populations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do fishes perceive their environment?Fish perceive changes in water currents caused by prey, conspecifics and predators using their lateral line. The tiny sensors of this organ also allow them to navigate reliably. However, with increasing current velocities, the background signal also increases. Scientists have now created a realistic, three-dimensional model of a fish for the first time and have simulated the precise current condit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Elephant herpes: Super-shedders endanger young animalsElephants have species-specific herpesviruses, which frequently lead to death, especially in the young. Researchers have traced the infection transmission route of different elephant calves, recognizing the following in the process: some animals do not shed the virus or shed it only rarely, while other do so frequently. In the process, these super-shedders and their offspring are only mildly affec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Last African dinosaur' discovered in Moroccan mineOne of the last dinosaurs living in Africa before their extinction 66 million years ago has been discovered in a phosphate mine in northern Morocco. A study of the fossil, led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, suggests that following the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana in the middle of the Cretaceous period, a distinct dinosaur fauna evolved in Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood test predicts who will benefit from targeted prostate cancer treatmentsA new blood test could predict which men with advanced prostate cancer will respond to new targeted treatments for the disease. These men could be spared treatments that are unlikely to work for them, and doctors could offer them alternative options instead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research sheds new light on 'world's oldest animal fossils'A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has uncovered that ancient fossils, thought to be some of the world's earliest examples of animal remains, could in fact belong to other groups such as algae.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rub each other up the right wayGiving your partner a massage can improve both their well being and yours.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychological benefits for kids when mums keep taking folic acidTaking folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy may improve psychological development in children.
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Ars Technica
Don’t trust OAuth: Why the “Google Docs” worm was so convincing An evil phishing worm masquerading as "Google Docs" took the Internet by storm today. It sent an e-mail claiming to be from a friend or relative who wanted to share a document with you. Clicking on the "Open in Docs" button asked you to log in to Google, then it popped up a familiar OAuth request asking for some permissions. If you clicked "Allow," the permissions granted it full control over you
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: In Pursuit of Justice What We’re Following Partisan Problems: During a routine oversight hearing in Congress today, FBI Director James Comey defended his controversial decision to announce the Bureau’s reopening of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server, less than two weeks before the presidential election. Comey’s critics say he influenced that election’s outcome; in its aftermath, new polling
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Last African dinosaur' discovered in Moroccan mineOne of the last dinosaurs living in Africa before their extinction 66 million years ago has been discovered in a phosphate mine in northern Morocco. A study of the fossil, led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, suggests that following the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana in the middle of the Cretaceous period, a distinct dinosaur fauna evolved in Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research sheds new light on 'world's oldest animal fossils'A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has uncovered that ancient fossils, thought to be some of the world's earliest examples of animal remains, could in fact belong to other groups such as algae.
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Gizmodo
WhatsApp Is Down Around the Globe and Nobody Knows Why [Updated] GIF GIF source: WhatsApp WhatsApp appears to be down around the world and that means that over a billion users are currently unable to use what is often their primary communication service. At the moment, when users log into the app, the notification that it is trying to connect appears at the top of the screen and then... it just keeps connecting. According to the outage-tracking website Down De
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Gizmodo
Facebook Adds Reactions to Comments, Panic Attacks to Me Screenshot: Facebook Facebook made another bad decision today, adding an unnecessary amount of nuance to your interactions on its social platform. You can now “sad” and “wow” not just posts and messages, but also comments. I don’t know about you, but I certainly don’t want this level of comprehensive feedback. Advertisement Why would you do this? “We’ve heard from people they’d like more ways to
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Live Science
Gaining Weight In Middle Age? It's This Molecule's Fault, Scientists SayIt's common for people to pack on more pounds as they age, but now a new study may have an explanation for this weight gain — and it has nothing to do with exercise or poor food choices.
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The Atlantic
Trump: Middle East Peace Is 'Not as Difficult as People Have Thought' One of Donald Trump’s great strengths is his ability to project confidence and bravado nearly constantly. The president is sometimes peevish, and he sometimes lashes out, but he seldom seems glumly resigned. Who else, in the middle of a rough stretch of his presidency (one that, arguably, has persisted since Inauguration Day) could blithely assert that he would solve the most famously unsolvable
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WIRED
If You Want to Like The Dark Tower, Reset Your Expectations The sprawling fantasy epic adaptation may well be a movie folks like. But it won't be the movie they need. The post If You Want to Like The Dark Tower, Reset Your Expectations appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook ramps up its response to violent videosFacebook is stepping up its efforts to keep inappropriate and often violent material—including recent high-profile videos of murders and suicides, hate speech and extremist propaganda—off of its site.
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Big Think
3 Border Walls From History and What They Tell Us About Trump’s Proposal Do border walls keep countries safer, or merely project the illusion of safety? Read More
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Big Think
Psychology Tells Us There Are 2 Kinds of Politically Correct People A new study says there are two main categories of politically correct people – PC egalitarian and PC authoritarian. Read More
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The Atlantic
Would You Edit Your Babies’ Genes to Keep Them Healthy? Two week ago, I asked readers, “ Will Editing Your Baby’s Genes Be Mandatory ?” That is to say, parents are sometimes charged with crimes when religious beliefs cause them to deny their child lifesaving antibiotics, or an appendectomy, or a blood transfusion. In the future, if and when editing a baby’s genes can prevent an awful disease, the inevitable parents who reject the technology may be sim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasitic fig wasp hypodermic egg injector sniffs out host larvae to lay eggsIt takes a special kind of insect to pollinate an inside-out flower, which is exactly what the wasps that pollinate figs do. Crawling inside the firm swelling lined with microscopic flowers that will eventually ripen into a fleshy fig, tiny fig wasps pollinate the flowers within while laying their own eggs. However, the fig wasps' robust nursery is not entirely secure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do flies over-generalize memories like PTSD sufferers?No two cakes smell identical, yet we are still able to recognise the general aroma that promises pleasure. Ayse Yarali from the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Germany, explains that this ability to generalise a previously learned link between a cue - such as an odour - and an experience - such as a pleasant taste or the attack of a predator - to a range of similar cues can help us to ensure t
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WIRED
The One Hire Facebook Really Needs to Make to Curb Violence By involving ethicists and social scientists in its product-building process, Facebook could better anticipate problems before they fester. The post The One Hire Facebook Really Needs to Make to Curb Violence appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Don’t Open That Google Doc Unless You’re Positive It’s Legit A sneaky new phishing scam has taken Gmail inboxes by storm. The post Don't Open That Google Doc Unless You're Positive It's Legit appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Want a True Bionic Limb? Good Luck Without Machine Learning Conscious thought is holding back the cyborg revolution. Which is why the next generation of prosthetics will use computer vision and neural nets instead. The post Want a True Bionic Limb? Good Luck Without Machine Learning appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Comey’s Choice Today in 5 Lines The House overwhelmingly approved a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September. The White House is pushing for a vote on the GOP health-care bill after two defectors threw their support behind the legislation. During a joint press conference with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, President Trump vowed to be a “facilitator” of peace between Israel and
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New on MIT Technology Review
An AI-Driven Genomics Company Is Turning to DrugsDeep Genomics aims to develop drugs by using deep learning to find patterns in genomic and medical data.
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Gizmodo
Telling the Story of the Radium Girls, Who Died to Make Luminous Watch Dials Images courtesy Sourcebooks. In the late 1910s—in an unnerving prologue to the atomic age—there was a brief mania for radium. Advertisement The newly discovered element , with its seemingly magical radioactive properties, was hailed as one of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time, a marvel with the potential to cure the sick and provide benefits even to the robustly healthy. Then there
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Gizmodo
These Ants Do a Lion King-Like Ritual But With Chemicals Image: Clint Penick Based on the popular Disney film The Lion King , I assume identifying lion royalty is fairly easy. After all, an elder baboon, Rafiki presented the young lion prince Simba to the entirety of the animal kingdom from atop Pride Rock during some ceremony yet-to-be-observed by humans. But how do the ants know who’s going to be their next monarch? Advertisement A new study of India
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The Atlantic
Haim Returns With Old Charms—and New Gloss The title “Want You Back” might be a nod from Haim to listeners who, in the four years since the Los Angeles trio released their debut Days Are Gone , have craved the return of the last new rock band that the mythical “everybody” can love. Haim fans—whose ranks include mainstreamers U2, Taylor Swift, and Hillary Clinton but also alt types like Pitchfork and Grimes—wanted them back, and now they h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistryResearchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disfiguring eye symptoms diminish in Graves' eye disease drug trialGraves' eye disease, also known as thyroid eye disease, takes a physical and emotional toll on patients as inflammation and tissue buildup cause the eyes to bulge painfully from their sockets. A new clinical trial led by the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center shows a failed cancer drug can successfully reduce eye symptoms and improve quality of life for TED patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla revenues surge as it ramps for Model 3 launchTesla said Wednesday that revenues more than doubled in the past quarter compared with a year ago, as the electric carmaker prepared for production of its new mass-market vehicle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Groups sue to stop Trump from renewing offshore drillingEnvironmental and Alaska Native groups sued Wednesday to maintain a U.S. ban on oil and gas exploration in most of the Arctic Ocean and select areas of the Atlantic after President Donald Trump took steps to put the waters back in play for offshore drilling.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook profit jumps as user base nears 2 billionFacebook on Wednesday reported that its quarterly profit surged as its ranks of monthly users closed in on two billion, but warned of rising expenses and slowing revenue growth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine conservation must consider human rightsOcean conservation is essential for protecting the marine environment and safeguarding the resources that people rely on for livelihoods and food security. But there are many documented cases where conservation has bumped up against the people who share the same places and resources, even leading to human rights abuses.
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Gizmodo
No Visit to Rome Will Ever Be as Spectacular as This Hyperlapse Race Through the City GIF GIF: YouTube Before you decide to travel to an exotic locale, you now have to stop and ask yourself if it’s worth dealing with a terrible airline to get there . The answer, obviously, is no. But you have no reason to be upset about not seeing Rome, at least, thanks to this amazing hyperlapse video . Advertisement Shot over six days using a small arsenal of cameras, Kirill Neiezhmakov spent we
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake news and filters aren't fooling internet usersDespite what some politicians argue, fake news and biased search algorithms aren't swaying public opinion, finds a Michigan State University researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery could lead to design of next-generation antibioticsAntibiotic resistance is a growing global health threat. So much so that a 2014 study commissioned by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom predicted that, if the problem is left unchecked, in less than 35 years more people will die from antibiotic resistant superbugs than from cancer. It is critical that researchers develop new antibiotics informed by knowledge of how superbugs are resistant t
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Popular Science
A massive phishing scheme disguised as Google Docs just hijacked Gmail Technology Don't click on that Google Doc unless you know what it is. The app will email a similar phishing email to everyone you have ever emailed.
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Live Science
Man Survives 'Hangman's Fracture' After CrashA young man in Tunisia who was in a high-speed crash suffered a broken neck — an injury doctors call a "hangman's fracture" — yet recovered with no lingering problems, according to a recent report of the man's case.
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The Atlantic
Trump's First Spending Deal Passes the House With Democrats' Help Annoyed at Democratic boasting, President Trump and congressional Republicans have scrambled to claim victories in the first bipartisan spending deal of the new administration. But the true score could be found in the House vote on the bill on Wednesday, as Democrats overwhelmingly embraced the $1.1 trillion agreement while the GOP split. The legislation passed easily on a tally of 309 to 118 and
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: When Science Meets ActivismScientists new to advocacy must find balance between embracing diverse perspectives and guarding against anti-scientific beliefs.
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The Scientist RSS
More Details on How Pesticides Harm BeesScientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees' reproduction and honey bees' ability to fly.
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Ars Technica
Vector has completed the first successful flight test of its new micro rocket Vector Space Systems Vector Space Systems successfully launched a full-scale model of its Vector-R rocket on Wednesday in Mojave, California. The test flight, which remained under 50,000 feet for regulatory purposes, allows the company to remain on track to begin providing launch services for small satellites in 2018, said Jim Cantrell, the company’s chief executive and cofounder. The Arizona-bas
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Gizmodo
The BMW Addiction That Completely Destroyed This Man’s Life “Before we get to your car questions,” my former next door neighbor, Terrance, said, “I need to tell you both something. My wife left me. My kids won’t talk to me. I lost my job. I embezzled almost a half a million dollars because I’m addicted to BMWs, and have been hiding them all over the state. I’ll probably be going to prison soon.” Advertisement My wife and I looked at each other in utter di
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Gizmodo
Lunar Colonists May Make Bricks From Moon Dust and Sunlight Multi-dome lunar base being constructed, based on the 3D printing concept. (Image: ESA/Foster + Partners) Scientists with the European Space Agency have shown that it’s possible to make durable bricks using simulated Moon dust and concentrated sunlight. A similar approach may eventually allow lunar colonists to 3D-print their own habitats and structures using materials found on the Moon. Advertis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report: Younger women battling breast cancer face more aggressive diagnosesYounger women are more likely to be diagnosed with later stage cancers (Stages III and IV), and when they are, the excess costs to treat them are more than $132,000, compared to $124,000 for older women.
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Live Science
US Test-Launches Another Ballistic Missile (Video, Photos)For the second week in a row, the United States Air Force has tested an unarmed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).
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Live Science
Ancient Ice Age Affected Handstanding Skunks' DNA | VideoWestern spotted skunks are adorable stinkers that provide insights into how climate change shapes animals and ecosystems.
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Live Science
Genetic Modification Explored in “Mutant Menu” (Trailer) | VideoIn “Mutant Menu,” Vanessa Hill, host of YouTube’s “BrainCraft,” delves into the technology and ethics of genetic manipulation.
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Gizmodo
James Comey Testifies He Got Tummy Troubles Over Swaying the 2016 Election Photo: AP FBI Director James Comey on Wednesday defended his decision to announce the reopening of the Hillary Clinton investigation less than two weeks before the U.S. presidential election—though the thought that he might impact the results, he said, made him “mildly nauseous.” Advertisement Comey testified during an annual oversight hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee that he beli
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Ars Technica
All your Googles are belong to us: Look out for the Google Docs phishing worm Enlarge / Don't click. A widely reported e-mail purporting to be a request to share a Google Docs document is actually a well-disguised phishing attack. It directs the user to a lookalike site and grants the site access to the target's Google credentials. If the victim clicks on the prompt to give the site permission to use Google credentials, the phish then harvests all the contacts in the victi
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Science : NPR
Unfounded Autism Fears Are Fueling Minnesota's Measles Outbreak State health officials are struggling to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened mostly Somali-American children. The vaccination rate is low in this tight community that's worried about autism. (Image credit: Mark Zdechlik/MPR)
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Gizmodo
Somehow There Were No Injuries From This Terrifying Plane Crash Caught on Dashcam GIF GIF: YouTube Driver Simon Li was in the right place, at the right time, for his vehicle’s dashcam to capture what looks like a terrifying and deadly crash of a Piper PA32 single-engine airplane. But it turns out both the plane’s pilot and passenger were able to climb out of the plane’s wreckage and walk away afterwards, with no other reported injuries. Advertisement The crash happened Tuesday
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Live Science
Handstanding Skunks' DNA Shaped by Ancient Climate ChangeGenetic distinctions in groups of adorable — but stinky — spotted skunks were shaped by climate change during the waning ice age.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Why Two Volcanoes in Hawaii Are So Close, but So DifferentA model to explain why neighboring Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa are so different could offer insights into Earth’s deep geological history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene mutation may speed up memory loss in Alzheimer's diseaseA gene mutation may accelerate the loss of memory and thinking skills in people who are at risk for Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the May 3, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The gene mutation is called the BDNF Val66Met allele, or just the Met allele.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don't think they need to improve healthA Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. While most of those at highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to making changes. Older and white participants were more likely than younger a
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Live Science
Plan to Save this Swiss Glacier Requires 4,000 Snow Machines | VideoA team of researchers plans to rebuild a landmark glacier in Switzerland by using snow machines to cover the ice with the reflective artificial snow.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Migrating mule deer track 'green waves' of spring forageNew research has documented that these economically and ecologically important game animals are not just moving from low-elevation winter range to high-elevation summer range. Rather, the daily movements of migratory mule deer are closely timed to track spring green-up, known as 'surfing the green wave.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diving deep, researchers find wealth of fishMarine biologists for the first time have documented a wealth of fish in the 'vastly underexplored' deep coral reefs off Hawaii Island. The study gives fishery managers a more complete picture of fish species and habitat around the Big Island, home to a thriving aquarium fish trade, as well as other deep waters around the globe.
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Gizmodo
Captain America Is No Longer a Supervillain, He's a Monster Image: Marvel Comics. Art by Steve McNiven, Jay Leisten, Matthew Wilson, and Travis Lanham. The road Marvel Comics has taken to Secret Empire has seen Steve Rogers turn from sleeper agent to full-on supervillain . But Secret Empire #1 , out today, goes well beyond that: it makes Captain America complicit in horrors so extreme it’s hard to see how the character can ever return to being the hero he
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Gizmodo
Stock Up on Soylent For 20% Off, And Skip the Mediocre Meals Soylent , clip coupon for 20% off Grabbing breakfast or lunch with coworkers can be a great way to break up the day, but more often than not you’ll just wallow in your own indecision before ordering a bad $17 sandwich. Break the cycle with Soylent , a nutritionally complete meal replacement shake that now comes in multiple flavors ( Coffiest is good!). Clip the coupon to save 35% off your first S
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Live Science
Don't Worry If You're a Worrier … It Could Be Good for YouThe right amount of worrying might be good for you.
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Gizmodo
What the Hell Is This Space Council Mike Pence Is Going to Lead? Photo: Getty Images/Chip Somodevilla When considering vice president Mike Pence, one might be inclined to recall that time he voted against recognizing Pi Day , or his alleged tendency to refer to his wife as “mother.” In his latest ascension within the Trump administration, Pence—who is ostensibly a creationist —will be given the responsibility of leading a science and technology-oriented commit
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Gizmodo
A Dangerously Convincing Google Docs Phishing Scam Is Spreading Like Crazy [Updated] Image: Gizmodo / Pexels Oh God, a hacker’s on the loose with a new ( but familiar ) Google Docs phishing scam, and journalists (among many others) are in the crosshairs. On Wednesday afternoon, countless unsuspecting email users—including reporters from BuzzFeed, Hearst, New York Magazine, Vice, as well as your friends here at Gizmodo Media—received some seemingly legit invites to view a Google D
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NYT > Science
The ‘Sounds’ of Space as NASA’s Cassini Dives by SaturnThe spacecraft recorded some light patter as it passed between Saturn and its innermost ring, when scientists had expected the sound of “driving through Iowa in a hailstorm.”
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NYT > Science
Long-Awaited Miami Science Museum Comes to LifeThe opening of the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science comes after a scramble to finish the 250,000-square-foot structure.
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Popular Science
Net neutrality is under threat (again). Here's why you should care Technology The internet was built to work as a level playing field. Net neutrality is a crucial piece in keeping the internet working as it was intended, but it's currently under attack.
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Gizmodo
Apple CEO to World: 😀 [Updated] Screenshot: Twitter At approximately 11:38am Cupertino time on Wednesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook posted a cryptic message on Twitter reading only “😀.” It was quickly deleted. Advertisement What could the man in charge of the world’s most valuable brand be trying to say? Was it a mistake? A test? Did the tweet herald a new, Apple-developed two-way neural interface that feeds users pleasant imagery un
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The Atlantic
Did Someone Just Share a Random Google Doc With You? Journalists in newsrooms across the United States are swapping warnings about what appears to be a widespread phishing attack, sent via a particularly sneaky invitation to a fake Google Doc. The scope of the attack is not limited to news organizations, but appears to be spreading on a massive scale through people’s contacts. If you’re concerned your account has been compromised, you can go to Goo
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Science : NPR
Understanding The History Behind Communities' Vaccine Fears A measles outbreak in Minnesota's Somali-American community is the latest example of the challenges public health officials face in addressing deeply ingrained concerns about vaccine safety. (Image credit: Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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Ars Technica
Thieves drain 2fa-protected bank accounts by abusing SS7 routing protocol Enlarge (credit: Raimond Spekking ) A known security hole in the networking protocol used by cellphone providers around the world played a key role in a recent string of attacks that drained bank customer accounts, according to a report published Wednesday. The unidentified attackers exploited weaknesses in Signalling System No. 7 , a telephony signaling language that more than 800 telecommunicat
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Scientific American Content: Global
Slime Houses of Pinky-Size Plankton Cycle CarbonSee how a giant Larvacean’s intricate mucus house, constructed for filter feeding, contributes to oceanic carbon cycling. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMD exercise study offers hope in fight against Alzheimer'sA new study led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers adds more information about how physical activity impacts brain physiology and offers hope that it may be possible to reestablish some protective neuronal connections. Dr. J. Carson Smith, associate professor of kinesiology, explored how a 12-week walking intervention with older adults affected functionality of a brain r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New hope in the fight against superbugsIn a new paper published in the journal Structure, researchers from McGill University present in atomic detail how specific bacterial enzymes, known as kinases, confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics, a widely used class of antibiotics and an alternative medication for patients with penicillin allergies. The study shows for the first time how these kinases recognize and chemically destroy macr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making the numbers work: Researchers use math to develop personalized chemo treatmentsA team of Florida State University researchers is using mathematical modeling to find the best and most effective chemotherapy treatments for cancer patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neuroscientists seek brain basis of craving in addiction and binge eatingA new article in JAMA Psychiatry details the first step in revealing how craving works in the brain. Scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas are the first to propose a quantitative model for drug addiction research. The model focuses on craving: the intense, urgent feeling of needing or wanting drugs. Their ongoing research and subsequent findings have the potential to open a new fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fake news and filters aren't fooling internet usersDespite what some politicians argue, fake news and biased search algorithms aren't swaying public opinion, finds a Michigan State University researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain 'relay' also key to holding thoughts in mindLong assumed to be a mere 'relay,' an often-overlooked egg-like structure in the middle of the brain also turns out to play a pivotal role in tuning-up thinking circuity. A trio of studies in mice are revealing that the thalamus sustains the ability to distinguish categories and hold thoughts in mind. It might even become a target for interventions for psychiatric disorders marked by working memor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine conservation must consider human rightsOcean conservation is essential for protecting the marine environment and safeguarding the resources that people rely on for livelihoods and food security. But there are many documented cases where conservation has bumped up against the people who share the same places and resources, even leading to human rights abuses.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why 3,000 (More) People Won’t Fix Facebook’s Violent Video ProblemThe social network is using manpower to get footage of grisly acts off its site, but that may not be enough.
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New Scientist - News
Electrode can tell you if a baby is really experiencing painGrimaces and squints can mean a baby is in pain, but can also be signs of hunger. Now a single electrode device can tell what a baby’s really feeling
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cognitive science
A new paper in PSPB explores the benefits of helping other people deal with their emotionally difficult situations. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo
Black Guns Matter: My Day at the NRA Convention in the Age of Trump Jason Johnson getting shot (with a camera) at the NRA convention in Atlanta (Jason Johnson/The Root) “You know that’s just a Klan rally without the hoods, right?” Advertisement “Bring Kevlar.” “SMH.” Advertisement None of my friends was all that hot about me going to the National Rifle Association’s convention in Atlanta this year. No one. Not even my friends who owned guns. And definitely not th
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Ars Technica
Samsung could displace Intel as the world’s biggest chip company in 2017 Enlarge (credit: Samsung) Intel has been the world's biggest chipmaker by revenue since January of 1993 , when sales of its 386 and 486 processors helped it surpass Japanese companies like NEC and Toshiba. The release of the first Pentium CPU later that year and the proliferation of Windows 95 and 98-powered PCs over the next decade helped keep Intel on top. The company continues to grow today—re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recognizing food brands puts preschoolers at risk for obesityYoung children who recognize food name brands, such as Lucky Charms, M&M's and Cheetos, often eat unhealthy items that lead to their high body mass index.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Phthalates increase the risk of allergies among childrenPhthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children, researchers show. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The mother-child cohort from the LINA study was the starting and end po
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cardiorespiratory fitness can reduce risk of fatty liverCardiorespiratory fitness is inversely related to risk of fatty liver, according to a new study. The research shows that, despite the person's weight, achieving moderate cardiorespiratory fitness can protect from fatty liver.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New unexpected key player in melanoma development identifiedIdentification and functional validation of proteins involved in tumorigenesis are essential steps toward advancing cancer precision medicine. Scientists now report the important role for FES in the initiation and progression of melanoma, a malignant type of skin cancer, that is notoriously quick to metastasize and that responds poorly to existing cancer treatments.
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Futurity.org
Restricting drug reps may shift doctors to generics A new study suggests that restricting how pharmaceutical sales representatives can market drugs to physicians changes which medications doctors prescribe to their patients. A team of researchers examined restrictions at 19 academic medical centers (AMCs) in five US states placed on pharmaceutical representatives’ visits to doctors’ offices. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Associa
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The Scientist RSS
Quick and Cheap Zika DetectionA heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hand that sees offers new hope to amputeesBioengineers have developed a 'hand that sees' which is able to reach for and grasp objects automatically, responding ten times quicker than current prosthetics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Speech and language deficits in children with autism may not cause tantrumsSpeech or language impairments may not be the cause of more frequent tantrums in children with autism, according to researchers. The findings could help parents of children with autism seek out the best treatment for behavior problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neonic pesticides threaten wild bees' spring breeding, study findsThiamethoxam, one of the most commonly used neonicotinoid, leads to fewer fully developed eggs in queen bumblebees from four wild bumblebee species. This will likely translate into slower egg-laying rates, which will hinder colony development and growth. Researchers also found queen bees from two of the four species ate less nectar after pesticide exposure further hampering reproductive success.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large trial of acupuncture for allergic asthma finds benefits in quality of lifeA large randomized controlled, pragmatic trial involving 1445 patients with allergic asthma found that an integrative medicine approach in which acupuncture is added to routine care demonstrated improvements in both quality of life and physical and mental health for those receiving acupuncture.
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Gizmodo
Restaurant Targeted by Racist Harassment After Police Union Spreads Hoax Online Screencap: WNCN Last week, a North Carolina barbecue joint found itself in the crosshairs of a Raleigh police union and, by extension, police supporters as a whole after employees supposedly disrespected officers dining. Guess what? The union pretty much made up the whole thing . According to a Facebook post by the Raleigh Police Protective Association, the incident involved the employees and man
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Popular Science
Artificial snow might save a glacier in the Swiss Alps Environment But it can't save us from climate change Researchers are trying to stop a famous glacier from melting. Their plan: cover it in fake snow. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Waymo to judge: Stop Uber from using our trade secrets, ASAP Enlarge (credit: Getty Images ) SAN FRANCISCO - In a packed courtroom today, lawyers for Google's Waymo self-driving car division made their case that Uber's self-driving car chief should be kicked off the job by judicial order. Anthony Levandowski, a former Google employee who now works on Uber's self-driving car project, has been accused by Google of stealing trade secrets before he left to cre
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: In Disposable Mucus Houses, These Zooplankton Filter the OceansScientists near Monterey Bay in California find that giant larvaceans, a kind of zooplankton, can filter all of the water between 300 and 1,000 feet in the bay in less than two weeks.
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NYT > Science
Filtering the OceanResearchers used a remotely operated vehicle to gain insights into giant larvaceans, sea creatures the size of pinkie fingers that filter the ocean faster than any other zooplankton.
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Gizmodo
FBI's Disturbing Hacking Powers Challenged in Court Over Child Pornography Case Photo: Getty Arguments were heard in an appeals court on Wednesday involving a controversial government hacking case in which the FBI participated in the distribution of child pornography. This is the most recent legal test of the FBI’s ability to hack any computer, anywhere. Advertisement In February 2015, the Federal Bureau of Investigation seized control of a server located in North Carolina u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New catalyst for water splitting developedWater-splitting systems require a very efficient catalyst to speed up the chemical reaction that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, while preventing the gases from recombining back into water. Now an international research team has developed a new catalyst with a molybdenum coating that prevents this problematic back reaction and works well in realistic operating conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In children with severe heart defect, more brain abnormalities appear as staged surgeries progressAs children with single-ventricle disease, a complex and severe heart defect, undergo a series of three reconstructive surgeries, pediatric researchers have detected higher rates of brain abnormalities at each stage. The scientists also found associated changes in the infants’ cerebral blood flow that could offer important clues to improving long-term neurological outcomes in these children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research team finds no adverse risk to use of common antimalarials in first trimester of pregnancyThe most comprehensive international analysis on artemisinin combination antimalarials safety in pregnancy has now been released by researchers. Malaria is more common and severe in pregnant women, increasing their risk of miscarriage and other adverse outcomes. Now an international collaboration released the largest meta-analysis of all observational studies-to-date showing there was no differenc
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WIRED
RIP About.com: A Look at the Tumultuous Life of a Web Legend About.com was one of the biggest and oldest web sites on the internet. Then it died. Why? The post RIP About.com: A Look at the Tumultuous Life of a Web Legend appeared first on WIRED .
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Inside Science
New Method Looks into Babies' Brains to Measure Pain New Method Looks into Babies' Brains to Measure Pain Findings may help researchers identify better ways to reduce pain in infants. InfantPain_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Hebe Agullera via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Human Wednesday, May 3, 2017 - 14:15 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Pain is highly subjective and personal -- a bonk on the elbow could be merely an anno
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Inside Science
The Rural Challenge of HIV The Rural Challenge of HIV New study identifies obstacles for UN strategy of treatment as prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. Lesotho_prevalence_map_topnteaser.jpg HIV epidemic surface prevalence map for Lesotho. The color scale indicates the percentage of the population aged 15-49 years who is infected with HIV. Image credits: Image created by Justin T. Okano Human Wednesday, May 3, 2017 - 12:30 J
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method for producing plant-based drinking bottles from FDCAAn environmentally sound and economical method has been developed for producing furan dicarboxylic acid (FDCA) from plant sugars for the production of drinking bottles, paints and industrial resins, for example. This technology enables production of plant-based products.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterialsA new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers analyze what a warming planet means for mosquito-borne diseasesA new analysis reveals that the ideal temperature for the spread of mosquito-borne diseases like dengue, chikungunya and Zika is 29 degrees C. This finding helps predict disease outbreaks in a warming world.
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Live Science
Humpbacks Block Orcas’ Feeding Frenzy | VideoHumpbacks are interfering in killer whales’ feeding frenzy in Monterey Bay.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First clear-cut risk genes for Tourette disorder revealedTourette disorder afflicts as many as one person in a hundred worldwide with potentially disabling symptoms including involuntary motor and vocal tics. However, researchers have so far failed to determine the cause of the disorder, and treatments have only limited effectiveness, in part because the genetics underlying the disorder have remained largely a mystery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spotted skunk evolution driven by climate change, suggest researchersClimate plays a key role in determining what animals can live where. And while human-induced climate change has been causing major problems for wildlife as of late, changes in the Earth's climate have impacted evolution for millions of years -- offering tantalizing clues into how to protect animals facing climate change today. In a new paper, scientists have delved into the effects of Ice Age clim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cost of Zika outbreak in the United States could be highEven a relatively mild Zika outbreak in the United States could cost more than $183 million in medical costs and productivity losses, suggests a computational analysis, while a more severe one could result in $1.2 billion or more in medical costs and productivity losses.
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Futurity.org
Speech deficits don’t explain tantrums in kids with autism Speech or language impairments may not be the cause of more frequent tantrums in children with autism, a new study suggests. Children with autism experience more tantrums than children without, and speech and language problems often take the blame for the frequent outbursts. Some children with autism spectrum disorder aren’t able to speak or have speech that is not clear or well-understood by oth
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Scientific American Content: Global
Watch Live Today: What Does a Black Hole Collision Sound Like? [Video]Physicist and author Janna Levin will present a free live Webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time about merging black holes and gravitational waves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Comcast and Verizon’s Sneaky Push to Kill Net Neutrality Is Just Embarrassing A still from Verizon’s anti-net neutrality video, featuring general counsel Craig Silliman and “Jeremy” A week after FCC Chair Ajit Pai outlined his plan to kill net neutrality, the internet providers who support his proposal are spinning the effort harder than a 20-something at SoulCycle. The basic message from companies like Comcast and Verizon is this: “We don’t want to get rid of net neutrali
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Gizmodo
The 8 Best Games For The Nintendo Switch You just bought a new Nintendo Switch . First of all, good job! They’re kind of hard to find. Now it’s time to figure out what games you want to play. We’ve got you covered. The Switch is only a few months old, and like any new console, it doesn’t have a ton of games. However, it has a solid ratio of good games, and a few are legit greats. As with all of our Bests lists, we’ll be updating this on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find wealth of fish at deep Hawaiian reefWashington State University marine biologists for the first time have documented a wealth of fish in the "vastly underexplored" deep coral reefs off Hawaii Island.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First result from upgraded CEBAF opens door to exploring universal glueThe first experimental result has been published from the newly upgraded Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The result demonstrates the feasibility of detecting a potential new form of matter to study why quarks are never found in isolation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lasers shed light on the inner workings of the giant larvaceanNew laser technology is allowing MBARI scientists to look into the structure of giant larvaceans-tadpole-like marine animals that are important players in ocean ecosystems. In a recent paper in Science Advances, MBARI researchers described a new method for measuring the flow of seawater through larvaceans and other gelatinous animals. The results will help scientists understand how much carbon dio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How migrations and other population dynamics could have shaped early human cultureBursts of cultural advance are usually assumed to result from climate or biological changes. A new theory digs into how humans innovate, and suggests such bursts could be the result of population dynamics and culture itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Detailed images reveal interactions that affect signaling in the brainDetailed images of chemical signaling in the brain may shed light on neurodegenerative disease processes, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technologies show brain tumor firmness, adhesion before surgeryIt's not often that a fall saves someone's life. Helen Powell, 74, says that was the case for her. A computerized tomography scan that followed her fall revealed a cancerous brain tumor that led her to surgery using first-in-the-world technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
35-year South Carolina alligator study uncovers mysteries about growth and reproductionResearch by wildlife biologists is shattering conventional scientific understanding about American alligator growth and reproduction.
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The Atlantic
After the Fire: Recovery in Fort McMurray One year ago this week, a raging wildfire burned through nearly 1.5 million acres of forest surrounding the city of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada. Most of the city’s 100,000 residents were evacuated, and more than 2,500 buildings burned down in Canada’s most destructive wildfire ever. One year later, the recovery is moving slowly. Some homes are being rebuilt, but the AFP has reported that Mel
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The Atlantic
Puerto Rico Files for Bankruptcy Puerto Rican Governor Ricardo Rosselló announced Wednesday the island would seek to address its $70 billion debt crisis in federal bankruptcy court, marking the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in U.S. history. “We have sustained our position to negotiate in good faith, but before the current scenario, we choose to protect our people,” Rosselló said Wednesday in a tweet . The announcement came
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doubling vegetable consumption in schools with a lower-cost gaming approachA new study shows that the successful strategy to get elementary school children to eat more vegetables based on use of the FIT Game, can be just as effective and less costly to implement when teachers no longer administer the game.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First result from Jefferson Lab's upgraded CEBAF opens door to exploring universal glueThe first experimental result has been published from the newly upgraded Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the US Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab. The result demonstrates the feasibility of the experiment that is designed to study quark confinement: why no quark has ever been found alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diving deep, WSU researchers find wealth of fishWashington State University marine biologists for the first time have documented a wealth of fish in the 'vastly underexplored' deep coral reefs off Hawaii Island.The study gives fishery managers a more complete picture of fish species and habitat around the Big Island, home to a thriving aquarium fish trade, as well as other deep waters around the globe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lasers shed light on the inner workings of the giant larvaceanNew laser technology is allowing MBARI scientists to look into the structure of giant larvaceans -- tadpole-like marine animals that are important players in ocean ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mysterious molecule's function in skin cancer identifiedSBP researcher Ranjan Perera uncovered the M.O. of a mysterious molecule called SPRIGHTLY that acts as a hub for cancer-related genes in the nucleus. The study identified 'major' RNA binding partners -- genes already implicated in a variety of cancers. In a mouse model of melanoma, tumors with reduced SPRIGHTLY grew more slowly, indicating use as a therapeutic target or biomarker.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elephant herpes: Super-shedders endanger young animalsElephants have species-specific herpesviruses, which frequently lead to death, especially in the young. Researchers at the University of Zurich have traced the infection transmission route of different elephant calves, recognizing the following in the process: Some animals do not shed the virus or shed it only rarely, while other do so frequently. In the process, these super-shedders and their off
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Earth sank twice, flooding the Eastern AmazonA tiny shark tooth, part of a mantis shrimp and other microscopic marine organisms reveal that as the Andes mountains rose, the Eastern Amazon sank twice, each time for less than a million years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish step up to lead when predators are nearResearchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that some fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study defines the environment as an influencer of immune system responses in dolphinsTwo populations of wild dolphins living off the coast of Florida and South Carolina are experiencing more chronically activated immune systems than dolphins living in controlled environments, raising concerns of researchers about overall ocean health, and the long-term health of bottlenose dolphins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-diving technology finds little filter feeder has giant carbon cycling impactUsing a novel deep-sea technology, scientists have measured for the first time how a species of zooplankton called giant larvaceans contributes to the transfer of atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean. Data from the instrument DeepPIV revealed that giant larvaceans filter carbon particles at higher rates than any other zooplankton filter feeder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A speedy, sensitive, and low-cost detection test for Zika virusA fast, highly sensitive, and inexpensive new test not only detects Zika virus in mosquitoes and human bodily fluids, but can also distinguish between African and Asian strains -- a result that could improve efforts to more effectively track the virus' spread.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resilience offers escape from trapped thinking on poverty alleviationDevelopment aid reached a new peak of US$142.6 billion, according to recent data from the OECD. Now, researchers question a cornerstone of development aid: the 'poverty trap' and its 'Big Push' solution. Co-lead author Jamila Haider at the Stockholm Resilience Centre says, 'For the first time, we provide a way to extend poverty-trap thinking to more fully include the links between financial well-b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers advance low-cost, low-tech Zika virus surveillance toolUsing loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, researchers found that they could easily detect Zika virus in human and mosquito samples from the United States, Brazil and Nicaragua.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drosophila buzzatii fruit fly females may use courtship songs to pick same-species matesFemale Drosophila buzzatii cluster fruit flies may be drawn to the specific courtship songs of males of their own species, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Iglesias and Esteban Hasson from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meerkat call patterns are linked to sex, social status and reproductive seasonWithin a group of meerkats, call patterns vary with factors including sex, rank and reproductive season -- but not with stress hormones, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jelena Mausbach from University of Zurich, Switzerland; Marta Manser from University of Pretoria, South Africa; and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Register changes in professional sopranos may correspond to vocal fold vibrationsRegister shifts in professional singers may correspond to altered vocal fold vibration patterns which are audible to experts, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthias Echternach from University of Freiburg, Christian Herbst from University of Vienna and colleagues.
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Gizmodo
Artificial Intelligence Could Prevent the Next Video Game Animation Disaster GIF Image: Yoshiboy2/YouTube Human character animation has gotten much better over the years, but it’s still one of the most recognizable issues when enjoying video games. Animations are normally a predetermined set of canned motions, and while real enough looking in the right setting, can totally break the immersive experience when they stray out of bounds . The uncanny valley is a particularly
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Ars Technica
Sextortion suspect must unlock her seized iPhone, judge rules Enlarge / Hencha Voigt has been ordered to provide police with the password to her seized iPhone. (credit: Hencha Voigt ) A Miami-Dade county judge has ruled that two defendants in a sextortion case must provide police with the passwords to their respective iPhones so authorities can unlock the devices and execute a search warrant. Whether or not courts can force individuals to give up passwords
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why India and Pakistan Are Renewing Their Love Affair with CoalOne nation is shirking emissions targets and the other is investing in more coal plants—but with America as a role model, that’s hardly surprising.
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New Scientist - News
US science budget gets some breathing room ahead of Trump cutsCongress’ new spending deal will keep funding for science mostly flat for the rest of 2017 despite extreme cuts proposed by Donald Trump earlier this year
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New Scientist - News
Gravitational waves could show hints of extra dimensionsSignatures of extra dimensions that don’t normally affect the four dimensions we can observe could show up in the way they warp ripples in space-time
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New Scientist - News
Immune war with donor cells after transplant may wipe out HIVA potentially fatal battle between the immune cells of a blood marrow donor and a recipient seems to kill off any HIV as a side effect
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New Scientist - News
Chatbot challenges will make AIs discuss the latest newsVoice assistants and text chatbots have mastered simple tasks, but now contests will get them to engage in much more complicated conversations
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New Scientist - News
Arctic oil and gas must remain off limits for good, TrumpThe US president's executive order seeking to overturn a ban on fossil fuel exploration in Arctic waters is unsafe and irresponsible, says Owen Gaffney
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New Scientist - News
First results from Jupiter probe show huge magnetism and stormsObservations from the Juno spacecraft are confounding astronomers with revelations about the weather and magnetism of our solar system's biggest planet
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Ars Technica
US Intelligence “transparency report” reveals breadth of surveillance by NSA, others Enlarge / While the intelligence community may have had some of its collection tentacles trimmed, the breadth of US surveillance continues to expand. A report issued by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) yesterday provides a sobering set of statistics on the breadth and depth of US intelligence surveillance of targets both overseas and within the United States. Even after
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists turn human induced pluripotent stem cells into lung cellsScientists have announced two major findings that further our understanding of how stem cells become organs: the ability to grow and purify the earliest lung progenitors that emerge from human stem cells, and the ability to differentiate these cells into tiny 'bronchospheres' that model cystic fibrosis. Researchers hope the results will lead to new, 'personalized medicine' approaches to treating l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
You're not too old to learn thatIf we as adults continue to learn the way we did as children, we can redefine what it means to be an 'aging' adult, a new theory asserts.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A baby’s pain registers in the brainEEG recordings can help indicate whether a newborn baby is in pain, a preliminary study suggests.
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Gizmodo
Everything the Defenders Trailer Tells Us About What's Going on in Marvel's New York All images: Netflix via YouTube We got a good look at Netflix and Marvel’s Defenders today. As usual, we’ve broken down the trailer and examined every scene, comparing it to what we know for certain and what we’ve heard rumored. Join us, won’t you? Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter) is once again in custody. She’s got cuffs on that I think we all know she could break if she wanted, so she’s clearly c
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The Atlantic
Sheriff Clarke's Potential Escape Hatch There are about 3,200 county jails in the United States, but few have drawn as much recent scrutiny as the one supervised by Milwaukee County sheriff and conservative media darling David Clarke in Wisconsin. Four inmates died while in its custody last year. But local prosecutors have focused their attention on the fate of Terrill Thomas, one of the four, who died of dehydration in solitary confin
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Popular Science
Ancient climate change drove the evolution of this adorable hand-standing skunk Animals Way back in the ice ages Yes, this skunk stinks, but it's also really cute. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish step up to lead when predators are nearResearchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that some fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study defines the environment as an influencer of immune system responses in dolphinsTwo populations of wild dolphins living off the coast of Florida and South Carolina are experiencing more chronically activated immune systems than dolphins living in controlled environments, raising concerns of researchers about overall ocean health, and the long-term health of bottlenose dolphins. The research, publishing May 3 in the scientific journal PLOS ONE is the first study of its kind an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Resilience offers escape from trapped thinking on poverty alleviationDevelopment aid reached a new peak of 142.6 billion USD, according to recent data from the OECD.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elephant herpes: Super-shedders endanger young animalsMany herpesviruses infect only a few animal species. Elephants also have their own spectrum of herpesviruses, which can cause infections that end in death. Asian elephants are carriers of virus types1, 4 and 5, while African elephants carry types 2, 3 and 6. Type 1 is particularly dangerous for young Asian elephants and has led to numerous deaths in the wild and in zoos worldwide. In Switzerland a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drosophila buzzatii fruit fly females may use courtship songs to pick same-species matesFemale Drosophila buzzatii cluster fruit flies may be drawn to the specific courtship songs of males of their own species, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Iglesias and Esteban Hasson from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meerkat call patterns are linked to sex, social status and reproductive seasonWithin a group of meerkats, call patterns vary with factors including sex, rank and reproductive season—but not with stress hormones, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jelena Mausbach from University of Zurich, Switzerland; Marta Manser from University of Pretoria, South Africa; and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Earth sank twice, flooding the Eastern Amazon: Team finds shark tooth in northwest Amazon basinA tiny shark tooth, part of a mantis shrimp and other microscopic marine organisms reveal that as the Andes rose, the Eastern Amazon sank twice, each time for less than a million years. Water from the Caribbean flooded the region from Venezuela to northwestern Brazil. These new findings by Smithsonian scientists and colleagues, published this week in Science Advances, fuel an ongoing controversy r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Register changes in professional sopranos may correspond to vocal fold vibrationsRegister shifts in professional singers may correspond to altered vocal fold vibration patterns which are audible to experts, according to a study published May 3, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthias Echternach from University of Freiburg, Christian Herbst from University of Vienna and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New particle flow algorithm improves ATLAS experiment precisionProton collisions in the Large Hadron Collider often result in the production of "jets" of particles. These jets are a key element in the measurement of many processes, such as the decays of Higgs bosons or other exotic particles. A jet is a stream of particles produced when a quark or gluon is one of the outgoing particles of the decay.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strike-delayed European rocket launch to go aheadA satellite launch delayed since March 20 due to a crippling general strike in French Guiana, will go ahead on Thursday, launch firm Arianespace said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modified soybeans yield more in future climate conditionsBy 2050, we will need to feed 2 billion more people on less land. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide levels are predicted to hit 600 parts per million—a 150% increase over today's levels—and 2050 temperatures are expected to frequently match the top 5% hottest days from 1950-1979. In a three-year field study, researchers proved engineered soybeans yield more than conventional soybeans in 2050's predicted c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Operating smart devices from the space on and above the back of your handSmartwatches such as the Apple Watch have been called a 'revolution on the wrist', but the operation of these devices is complicated, because the screen is small. Researchers have therefore developed a novel input method that expands the input space to the back of the hand and the 3-D space above the back of the hand wearing the watch.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineering research focuses on bringing efficiency to network processesIt is human nature to seek to spend the least amount of energy, time and cost on any given task to achieve a desirable result, whether that is working out at the gym, finding the best path to travel to work or buying cereal at the grocery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Princess pheromone' tells ants which larvae are destined to be queensFor Indian jumping ants (Harpegnathos saltator), becoming royalty is all about timing.
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WIRED
Trailer: Netflix’s Heroes Team Up in Defenders. Even, Um, Iron Fist The new teaser for the Marvel crossover mini-series seems well aware of which heroes fans like. Sorry, Danny Rand. The post Trailer: Netflix's Heroes Team Up in Defenders . Even, Um, Iron Fist appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
FBI Boss Comey Finally Explains His Infamous Clinton Letter The most candid look yet at what prompted James Comey to make the Clinton email investigation public right before the election. The post FBI Boss Comey Finally Explains His Infamous Clinton Letter appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Why You’ll Never Run a Sub 2 Hour Marathon—But the Pros Might To fully appreciate what it will take to complete a two-hour marathon, you really have to try running one yourself. The post Why You'll Never Run a Sub 2 Hour Marathon—But the Pros Might appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The Fascinating Evolution of the World’s Most Charming Skunk The two-pound terror has evolved into three genetically distinct groups, called clades, in an intriguing way. The post The Fascinating Evolution of the World's Most Charming Skunk appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
How to Clean Up and Optimize Your Sluggish Mac GIF Illustration: Elena Scotti/GMG, photo: Shutterstock Your Mac is running a little slow these days. It takes forever to boot up. You have to delete something just to download that file attachment from Carla in accounting. Any time you stream a video it seems to lock up for a few seconds. Let’s fix all that. Update Your System Software Before we do anything, let’s make sure your Mac is up to dat
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Serving Up a Rare $50 Discount On Your Favorite Toaster Oven Breville Smart Oven 800XL , $200 Breville’s reader-favorite Smart Ovens almost never go on sale, but Amazon’s offering a rare $50 discount on the most popular model today. I got one of these as a wedding gift last year, and it’s every bit as good as advertised . In addition to the obvious use cases like toasting bread or cooking a frozen pizza, I basically use it as my “real” oven for any recipe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conservation agriculture offers tired soil remediesWhen you are tired or hungry, you're not as productive. You may need to rest or eat. If you push yourself too far, you may get ill.
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Futurity.org
How our brains respond to feeling left out People with loosely knit Facebook friend groups—small numbers of friends who don’t know each other well—tend to react more dynamically when excluded in real-world social situations, a new study suggests. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , looked at the brain’s response to social exclusion under fMRI, particularly in the mentalizing system, which includes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hawaii: How the world's biggest volcanoes formedA new study has solved the 168-year-old mystery of how the world's biggest and most active volcanoes formed in Hawaii.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New role found for brain region: Focusing attention during decision-makingLong thought to simply pass on information received from the senses, the thalamus may also quickly assemble the circuits that enable successful decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Princess pheromone' tells ants which larvae are destined to be queensScientists have identified a 'princess pheromone' that tells an ant colony when a larva is preparing to become a queen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modified soybeans yield more in future climate conditionsIn a three-year field study, researchers proved engineered soybeans yield more than conventional soybeans in 2050's predicted climatic conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineering research focuses on bringing efficiency to network processesIt is human nature to seek to spend the least amount of energy, time and cost on any given task to achieve a desirable result, whether that is working out at the gym, finding the best path to travel to work or buying cereal at the grocery. Now, University of New Mexico researchers have discovered through complex numerical modeling a method that could lead to ways to more efficiently perform a vari
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Popular Science
Your air conditioning habit makes summer smog worse Environment As temperatures rise, power plants pump out more emissions Cranking up the AC to beat the summer heat can put power plants on over drive and make smog worse. Read on.
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Live Science
Vicious Cuttlefish Fight Captured on Video for 1st TimeNo one has ever witnessed common cuttlefish fighting for a mate in the wild...until now.
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Ars Technica
FBI’s Comey says he is “mildly nauseous” to think he influenced election Enlarge / FBI Director James Comey testifies Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (credit: Jim Watson/Getty Images) FBI Director James Comey told a Senate panel on Wednesday that it would have been "catastrophic" for the bureau to not have disclosed in October, just 11 days before the presidential election, that the agency was revisiting the Hillary C
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Popular Science
In photos: 100 years of Denali National Park Environment Archival shots of, on, and around North America's tallest peak. Denali National Park is celebrating its 100th birthday. Now more than ever our national parks deserve recognition for safeguarding America's natural beauty.
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Live Science
Elon Musk's Pipe Dream: Underground Electric Sleds for LA TrafficThe man behind Tesla and SpaceX proposes dropping individual vehicles into a network of subterranean platforms and tunnels.
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The Atlantic
What’s Changed Since More Than 1,110 People Died at Rana Plaza? Four years ago, Rana Plaza—an eight-story building in Bangladesh’s capital city of Dhaka that housed several factories producing clothing for brands such as the Children’s Place, J.C. Penney, and Walmart— came crashing down , killing approximately 1,130 people and injuring thousands more. In the wake of the disaster, companies, trade unions, and workers’-rights groups agreed to make the buildings
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Gizmodo
Science Reveals the Right Way to Treat a Man O’ War Sting Image: Volkan Yuksel . Stings from a Portuguese man o’ war are as common as they are dangerous, yet there’s a lack of consensus over the best way to treat these painful pricks. New research published in the journal Toxins reveals that stings from the man o’ war ( Physalia species) shouldn’t be treated any differently than stings from jellyfish, a conclusion that upends conventional wisdom. And no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migrating mule deer track 'green waves' of spring forageNew research has documented that these economically and ecologically important game animals are not just moving from low-elevation winter range to high-elevation summer range. Rather, the daily movements of migratory mule deer are closely timed to track spring green-up, known as 'surfing the green wave.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
March for Science draws hundreds of thousands of supporters across the globeHundreds of thousands of scientists and others participated in more than 500 marches on Earth Day across the U.S. and the world to show their support for science. Reporters and editors from Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, were there to document events as they happened at the March for Science's epicenter in Washington, D.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover how world's biggest volcanoes formedA study led by The Australian National University has solved the 168-year-old mystery of how the world's biggest and most active volcanoes formed in Hawaii.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New role found for brain region: Focusing attention during decision-makingLong thought to simply pass on information received from the senses, the thalamus may also quickly assemble the circuits that enable successful decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nickel: A greener route to fatty acidsChemists designed a nickel catalyst that easily transforms petroleum feedstocks into valuable compounds like fatty acids. The process is environmentally friendly: not only it works at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but also recycles carbon dioxide, contributing to the fight against climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spotted skunk evolution driven by climate changeClimate plays a key role in determining what animals can live where. And while human-induced climate change has been causing major problems for wildlife as of late, changes in the Earth's climate have impacted evolution for millions of years -- offering tantalizing clues into how to protect animals facing climate change today. In a new paper in Ecology and Evolution, scientists have delved into th
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New Scientist - News
Ancient humans: What we know and still don’t know about themConfused by the flood of news about ancient humans? Here’s the low-down on what new discoveries are revealing about the complicated story of our ancestors
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Science | The Guardian
Global warming 'hiatus' doesn't change long term climate predictions – study Detailed analysis rejects view that apparent slowing of global rise in temperature from 1998-2012 is evidence against man-made climate change An apparent hiatus in global warming that spawned a decade-long controversy has had no impact on long-term climate projections, a detailed analysis has concluded. The slower rise in temperatures from 1998 to 2012 has repeatedly been cited by climate sceptic
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The Atlantic
'A Mediator or an Arbitrator or a Facilitator': Trump's Role in the Mideast Peace Process President Trump told the Palestinian Authority’s president that he envisions the U.S. being “a mediator or an arbitrator or a facilitator” between Israelis and Palestinians as Mahmoud Abbas marked his first visit to Washington in three years. “I want to support you in being the Palestinian leader who signs his name to the final and most important peace agreement that brings safety, security, and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study measures air pollution increase attributable to air conditioningA new University of Wisconsin-Madison study shows that the electricity production associated with air conditioning causes emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide to increase by hundreds to thousands of metric tons, or 3 to 4 percent per degree Celsius (or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Migrating mule deer track 'green waves' of spring forageMigratory mule deer in Wyoming closely time their movements to track the spring green-up, providing evidence of an underappreciated foraging benefit of migration, according to a new study from a team of researchers led by University of Wyoming and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ice Age climate change played a bigger role in skunk genetics than geological barriersClimate plays a key role in determining what animals can live where. And while human-induced climate change has been causing major problems for wildlife as of late, changes in the Earth's climate have impacted evolution for millions of years—offering tantalizing clues into how to protect animals facing climate change today. In a new paper in Ecology and Evolution, scientists have delved into the e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover how world's biggest volcanoes formedA study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has solved the 168-year-old mystery of how the world's biggest and most active volcanoes formed in Hawaii.
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Live Science
Angry Cuttlefish Battle Over a Mate | VideoBy sheer luck, scientists capture the first-ever video of fighting cuttlefish in the wild while on a research dive in the Aegean Sea.
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WIRED
Inside Artsy’s Quest to Make You Love Art as Much as Music With help from machine learning algorithms, Artsy wants to create an art brain that understands the whims and nuances of the art market the way an insider would. The post Inside Artsy’s Quest to Make You Love Art as Much as Music appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New anti-rejection drug reduces weight gain, enhances outcomes for liver transplant recipientsResearchers have discovered that a new anti-rejection drug that is gentler on the kidneys after liver transplant also reduces weight gain, which is common after surgery and can lead to serious problems for transplant patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quality of care for peripheral artery disease is low, study suggestsLess than half of individuals with peripheral artery disease, which is a narrowing of arteries to the limbs, stomach and head, are treated with appropriate medications and lifestyle counseling. These findings highlight the need to improve the quality of care for this high-risk group of individuals.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Nvidia Lets You Peer Inside the Black Box of Its Self-Driving AIIn a step toward making AI more accountable, Nvidia has developed a neural network for autonomous driving that highlights what it’s focusing on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statins: No increase in muscle-related side effects in patients who are unaware they are taking the drug, analysis findsWhen patients were unaware they were taking statins there was no reported increase in muscle-related symptoms. But, when patients knew they were taking a statin, they were more likely to report symptoms, a finding consistent with the nocebo effect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lessons from the past on how to be happyA study from the 1930s into what made people happy may have lessons for policymakers today. In 1938 the Bolton Evening News ran a competition for two guineas for the best letter on "What does happiness mean for you and yours?" The resulting 226 handwritten letters have now been translated and analyzed by researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mongoose pups conceal identity to surviveYoung mongooses may conceal their identity -- even from their own parents -- to survive. Killing of pups is common in mongoose social groups, and researchers believe offspring may do best if they hide which adults they are related to.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doctoring the soilResearchers studied the impact of conservation agriculture techniques over a span of 11 years on two different farms. The farms have soils that are typically challenging to keep productive.
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cognitive science
The complexity of social problems is outsmarting the human brain submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo
Farms Could Be Changing the Climate in Ways You'd Never Expect Image: AP Back on a crisp January day in 2016, I slipped around on a frozen lake in Wisconsin to ask a bunch of portly men in grey hoodies and trucker hats how the fishing had been compared to when they were kids. Secretly, I wanted to know what they thought about the changing climate. The men had various backgrounds, many of them in agriculture, and nearly all noticed fewer ice fishing days than
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Ars Technica
With latency as low as 25ms, SpaceX to launch broadband satellites in 2019 Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Olena_T) SpaceX today said its planned constellation of 4,425 broadband satellites will launch from the Falcon 9 rocket beginning in 2019 and continue launching in phases until reaching full capacity in 2024. Space X gave the Senate Commerce Committee an update on its satellite plans during a broadband infrastructure hearing this morning via testimony by VP of sate
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A brisk walk instead of sitting down: Just ten minutes a day makes a differenceIt is not the amount of time spent sitting still that matters. Instead it is the extent of physical activity that is essential in reducing the risk of elderly women developing cardiovascular disease, as shown in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning chicken feces, weeds into biofuelChicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient meteorite impact sparked long-lived volcanic eruptions on EarthLarge impacts were common on the early Earth and were likely much more important than previously thought in shaping our planet. The findings raise interest in the possibility of volcanism also shaping similar structures on Mercury, Venus, Mars and the Moon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Persistent photoconductivity' offers new tool for bioelectronicsResearchers have developed a new approach for manipulating the behavior of cells on semiconductor materials, using light to alter the conductivity of the material itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social smoking carries same heart-disease risks as everyday habitSocial smokers’ risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol is identical to those who light up every day, new research has found.
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The Atlantic
Online Dating Tries to Flirt With the Workplace Last week, the dating app Feeld released a bot that, theoretically at least, lets you find out if your coworkers have crushes on you. The way it works is this: Once the bot is installed in the office chat platform Slack, you message the bot with the name of your crush. And then you wait. If they have also messaged the bot with a confession of love for you, the bot will let you know you like each
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The Atlantic
Democrats Have Lost Confidence in America's Future As the Democratic Party adjusts to the reality of Donald Trump in the White House, its voters are angrier, less trusting of government, and less confident in the future of the United States than they were before the presidential election. That’s according to polling from the Pew Research Center released on Wednesday tracking public perceptions of government. The survey data paints a picture of a
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Gizmodo
130 Million at Risk of Fraud After Massive Leak of Indian Biometric System Data Image: AP A series of potentially calamitous leaks in India leave as many as 130 million people at risk of fraud or worse after caches of biometric and other personal data became accessible online. That’s according to a new report from the Bangalore-based Centre for Internet and Society (CIS), which details breaches at four national- and state-run databases, all of which are said to contain purpo
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Science | The Guardian
German scientists to begin identifying Nazi victims' brain specimens Project aims to build database listing names of sick and disabled people killed under Hitler’s ‘euthanasia’ programme German scientists are to begin identifying thousands of brain specimens belonging to people killed by the Nazis because they had a disability or were ill. Related: 'I will never be free of it': Auschwitz survivor recalls horror 75 years on Continue reading...
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Ars Technica
Prey developer: Go ahead, use Steam refunds to demo our game Enlarge / Take a look at these hands for two hours, then decide whether you want to keep playing. Almost two years ago, Valve introduced the ability to request refunds on practically any Steam game within the first two hours of play. Some developers worried about the impact this would have on the way games were designed and played on the service. Today, though, at least one developer sees the Ste
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NYT > Science
Want to Make More Baskets? Science Has the AnswerA new study suggests that throwing a little more slowly can help improve accuracy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compilation of research showcases latest advances in obesity treatmentMore than 60 percent of American adults weigh more than is healthy. To help health-care providers better care for patients with obesity -- a chronic disease in which someone has so much extra fat that it negatively impacts his or her health -- Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association's flagship journal and the premiere journal in the field, has published a special obesity-foc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In severe pediatric heart defect, more brain abnormalities appear as staged surgeries progressAs children with single-ventricle disease, a complex and severe heart defect, undergo a series of three reconstructive surgeries, pediatric researchers have detected higher rates of brain abnormalities at each stage. The scientists also found associated changes in the infants' cerebral blood flow that could offer important clues to improving long-term neurological outcomes in these children.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic doxycycline may offer hope for treatment of Parkinson's diseaseA study published in the journal Scientific Reports, an online journal published by Springer Nature, suggests that doxycycline, an antibiotic used for over half a century against bacterial infections, can be prescribed at lower doses for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First evidence of ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells in post-stroke human brainResearchers have shown that following a stroke-induced ischemic injury to the human brain, stem cells are produced that have the potential to differentiate and mature to form neurons that can help repair the damage to the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detailed images reveal interactions that affect signaling in the brainDetailed images of chemical signaling in the brain may shed light on neurodegenerative disease processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hand that sees offers new hope to amputeesBioengineers at Newcastle University, UK, have developed a 'hand that sees' which is able to reach for and grasp objects automatically, responding ten times quicker than current prosthetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How neurons and glia cells are created in the developing brainNeurons and glia are the cells that make up our brain. In the cortex, the brain area that enables us to think, speak and be conscious, they are produced by a particular type of neural stem cell. But how is this production of neurons and glia cells controlled? Researchers now found that a gene called Lgl1 controls the production of neurons in the cortex of mouse embryos, clarifying the previously u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Damaged genes considered high risk for developing tourette syndrome identifiedRearchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick, UC San Francisco, Massachusetts General Hospital, the University of Florida, Yale University and other institutions across the world identified one damaged, or mutant, 'high confidence' risk gene for Tourette's as well as three others they believe are genes whose mutation is a probable risk for the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First clear-cut risk genes for Tourette disorder revealedTourette disorder afflicts as many as one person in a hundred worldwide with potentially disabling symptoms including involuntary motor and vocal tics. However, researchers have so far failed to determine the cause of the disorder, and treatments have only limited effectiveness, in part because the genetics underlying the disorder have remained largely a mystery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stopping the brain's memory circuits from overheatingIn the absence of CA2 activity, mice experience epilepsy-like activity, a sign that this area is essential for regulating the balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain. A silenced CA2 region has broader implications for information processing in hippocampal circuits, according to a new study from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute (BSI) in Japan and the Université Paris Descartes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests genetic reason for impaired skilled movementsScientists report in Neuron the lost function of two genes prevents infant laboratory mice from developing motor skills as they mature into adults. Researchers also suggest in their study that people with certain motor development disabilities be tested to see if they have mutant forms of the same genes. Their data show that neural circuits between the brain's motor cortex region and the spinal co
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Gizmodo
Is Hulu Live TV Worth It Versus All the Rest? Image: Screenshot Hulu’s riding high thanks to the critical success of its original miniseries, The Handmaid’s Tale , so now is the perfect time for it to follow up a great show with some good news. The TV provider is now giving subscribers access to live TV potentially as good as the stuff your cable provider pipes in. While Hulu was one of the first companies to provide next-day viewing of show
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Scientific American Content: Global
Take the Tube: Underground as a Way of LifeEmory University paleontologist, geologist and ichnologist Anthony J. Martin talks about his new book, The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers and the Marvelous Subterranean World beneath Our... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking humanity: The new key to forecasting global changeHumankind may still prove to be the planet's best friend or its worst enemy, advise global earth science leaders at Arizona State University. But those in this field can no longer limit their studies to the recent past and present times, they say, nor view modern humans as outside agents convoluting a more natural order.
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Ars Technica
Hulu debuts $40-per-month live TV streaming service with over 50 channels YouTube, Hulu Hulu's live TV streaming service has been rumored for quite some time. At the company's annual Upfront presentation today, it announced the beta version of the service. You can now sign up for Hulu with Live TV , a $40-per-month package that includes all the benefits of Hulu's monthly $7.99 streaming service while adding live TV streams from over 50 channels. It's clear from the ser
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Keeping cool in the summer leads to increased air pollutionAs the weather warms, so does the use of air conditioners. But running these devices requires power plants to ratchet up electricity production, causing air polluting emissions to rise. An analysis of 27 states found that, on average, summer emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide go up by hundreds to thousands of metric tons per degree Celsius increase.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imaging mRNA right where it is made: At the site of translationThink of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time -- maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels. In a new article, researc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Childhood adversity may enhance adult decision-makingA difficult childhood can put people at a lasting disadvantage with their peers on a material and cognitive level. But can there actually be some benefits from a challenging upbringing? A study suggests that individuals reared in harsh or unpredictable environments may actually be better decision-makers in the face of uncertainty.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Australske Avril og Thomas får legat af KronprinsessenHKH Kronprinsesse Mary uddelte onsdag The Crown Princess Mary Scholarship til Avril Francis og Thomas...
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New Scientist - News
Bionic hand that can see for itself makes things easy to graspA new prosthetic hand with a built in camera can choose the best grip to use when picking up an object
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New Scientist - News
Synthetic genes can make weird new proteins that actually workThrowing amino acids together has made a handful of proteins that help bacteria lacking certain enzymes survive, giving us a new route to useful molecules
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Gizmodo
Chill Out to This Galaxy-Sized Wave of Hot Gas Swirling Through the Void GIF Image: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center It’s another casual day in space discovery: Apparently, an international team of scientists has found a giant wave of hot gas chugging along through the Perseus galaxy cluster , located about 250 million lightyears away. By combining data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio observations and computer simulations, the researchers have attem
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Gizmodo
The Handmaid's Tale Gives More Proof That Men Are Monsters All Photos Courtesy Hulu I’m guessing the fourth episode of The Handmaid’s Tale will go down as the slowest episode of the season. It’s a lot of set-up and world-building, going further into the role that women are forced to play in this man’s world. However, that’s kind of a blessing. In a horrific dystopia like Gilead, sometimes you need to stop and smell the corpses. The latest episode, “Nolit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell 'canibalism' educates our defensesPhagocytosis is a biological mechanism whereby specialized cells ingest and degrade old, dead, or damaged cells to prevent tissue damage due to their accumulation. But phagocytosis appears to also have an educational role. When macrophages ingest these expired cells, they acquire protective properties, scientists report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computers learn to understand humans better by modelling themDespite significant breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, it has been notoriously hard for computers to understand why a user behaves the way s/he does. Now researchers report that computers are able to learn to explain the behavior of individuals by tracking their glances and movements.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Big dads carry weight among wandering albatrossesFor male albatrosses, bulking up impacts survival and reproduction.
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Live Science
Rift in Antarctic Ice Shelf Sprouts New BranchWinter has descended on Antarctica. Even as cold and darkness blankets the bottom of the world, the region's most watched ice shelf is is continuing its epic breakdown.
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The Atlantic
Imagining the Presence of Justice Over the past several decades, America has seen a startling divergence between crime and punishment. While crime rates dropped steadily from the dramatic peaks of the 1990s, the nation’s incarceration rates continued just as steadily to grow. And so, despite containing only 5 percent of the world’s population, the United States came to hold a quarter of the world’s prisoners. We’ve covered this d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Daily stress can trigger uptick in illegal drug use for those on parole, probationA recent study finds that even small, day-to-day stressors can cause an increase in illegal drug use among people on probation or parole who have a history of substance use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hand that 'sees' offers new hope to amputeesA new generation of prosthetic limbs which will allow the wearer to reach for objects automatically, without thinking—just like a real hand—are to be trialled for the first time.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Does This NASA Official Know What Astronaut Gordon Cooper Was Really Up To? Cooper's Treasure | Tuesdays at 10/9c Could Gordon Cooper have had a secondary mission while orbiting the Earth in the Faith 7 spacecraft? Darrell interviews NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz for the answer. Full Episodes of Your Favorites Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/coopers-treasure/ Learn more about the quest: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/coopers-treasure/ Sub
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Popular Science
Start coding for the voice-activated future Sponsored Post Learn how to build apps for Amazon Alexa for under $20. Learn how to build apps for Amazon Alexa for under $20. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Neuralink Wants to Wire Your Brain to the Internet--What Could Possibly Go Wrong?Elon Musk’s Neuralink is probably a dangerous idea, but to the first person who fell into a firepit, so was fire -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Wow, Brad Pitt Is Paranoid as Fuck Image: Focus Features Brad Pitt’s had a rough few months. His soon-to-be ex-wife kicked him out of the house, amidst allegations that he was drinking and smoking too much weed. Pitt ended up sleeping on a friend’s floor, where apparently, hackers got involved. Advertisement A splashy new GQ Style feature on the Twelve Monkeys star details Pitt’s newfound sobriety, love for making fire, and frankl
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Gizmodo
Facebook Will Add 3,000 More People to Watch Murders and Suicides Image: AP Photo/Paul Sakuma Facebook has a problem. Not the one where they admitted to being a megaphone for propaganda and psy-ops . Or the one where they narced on at-risk teens . No, today’s news concerns how the social giant/massive data collection scheme has (increasingly) become an unwilling platform for users to broadcast violent crimes , sexual acts , child exploitation , and suicide . Ad
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: QHD Monitor, $20 Hand Vac, Whitening Toothbrush, and More A QHD monitor , the outgoing Ecobee thermostat , and a $20 hand vacuum lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Acer 23.8" QHD IPS Display , $170 I know 4K is the new hotness, but 2560x1440 QHD monitors still give you a ton of screen real estate, and work with a wider variety of computers. So if you’re looking to upgrade y
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Ingeniøren
Professor: Slagt langt de fleste landbrugsdyr og spis kunstigt kødDen voksende middelklasse i Indien og Kina har samme appetit på kød som forbrugerne i de industrialiserede lande. Men miljømæssigt og arealmæssigt vil det være katastrofalt at fortsætte tradtionel kødproduktion. Hvis vi ikke vil være vegetarer, skal vi i stedet vænne os til at spise kunstigt kød,...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Studies help shed light on aggressive brain cancerMutations affect how cancer starts in glial cells -- brain cells that provide support and insulation for neurons -- and how those mutations affect the way cancer evolves from low-grade gliomas to full-blown high-grade glioblastomas, the most common and deadly of primary brain cancer, shows a new study. A second study shows how using a combination of drugs at increased potency could prove an effect
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic finding may allow doctors to predict newborn health during pregnancySpecific genetic changes in the placentas of women who gave birth to growth-restricted infants have been discovered by researchers. Up to 10 percent of pregnancies worldwide are affected by intrauterine growth restriction, which means a baby weighed less than 90 percent of babies at the same gestational age. The condition increases the risk of a wide range of serious health problems, but the cause
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New data to aid production and storage of 'fascinating' medicationAmantadine hydrochloride may be the most common medication you've never heard of. Now, chemists have published the very first data on this important chemical's thermodynamic properties, including data on how it responds to heat and changes from a solid into a gas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Geologists use radioactive clock to document longest earthquake recordUsing radioactive elements trapped in crystallized, cream-colored 'veins' in New Mexican rock, geologists have peered back in time more than 400,000 years to illuminate a record of earthquakes along the Loma Blanca fault in the Rio Grande rift. It is the longest record of earthquakes ever documented on a fault.
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