Popular Science
Forensic scientists caught a deer munching on a human carcass for the first time ever Animals It’s gruesome, but could help investigations This is the first known evidence of a white-tailed deer scavenging human bones. To find out how it could help investigations, read on.
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Viden
Nyt håb for en "vaccine" mod diabetes og andre autoimmune sygdommeForskere har fundet en mekanisme, der måske kan fungere som vaccine mod flere sygdomme - fx type 1-diabetes og sklerose.
7h
Ingeniøren
I 2020 vil Bitcoin bruge lige så meget energi som Danmark Kryptovalutaen er en energisluger af dimensioner. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/2020-vil-bitcoin-bruge-lige-saa-meget-energi-danmark-1076294 Version2
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Scientists Transplanted a Rat Testicle onto Another Rat's Neck [WARNING: Graphic] Image: Janet Stephens/Wikimedia Commons Lab rats probably don’t have many deep thoughts. But one of these days, right as a scientist is transplanting a testicle onto a rats’s neck, one of those little furry guys is going to ask itself—what did I do to deserve this? And how will I get my revenge? Advertisement Case-in-point, the little guy below. Entire testes have proven especially difficult to t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obese women less likely to suffer from dangerous preeclampsia complicationsDespite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnancy linked to higher risk of death from traumatic injury, Penn study findsStudies have found that one in six pregnant women have been abused by a partner -- beaten, stabbed, shot, or even murdered. New Penn research shows the risks to these women may be especially profound.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obese women less likely to suffer from dangerous preeclampsia complicationsDespite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder. The findings are among those from two new studies of preeclampsia by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania showing how obesity may hel
7min
NYT > Science
Opinion: Are These Birds Too Sexy to Survive?Natural selection can’t explain this.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mutation giving leaves with white spots has been identifiedGarden and potted plants with white spots on their leaves are so popular that they are specially selected for this feature. An international research team has now identified a new mutation in the plant Lotus japonicus which gives leaves with white spots. These results could be important for the improvement of garden and potted plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Battered Earth revived by mineral weathering after mass extinctionBedrock of Earth got severely beaten up by hothouse climate conditions during one of planet’s mass extinctions some 200 million years ago. But the process also allowed life to bounce back.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Red light, green light invention prevents work interruptionsA computer scientist has invented a unique desk light that automatically switches from green to red when you are ‘in the zone’ and shouldn’t be disturbed by colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut microbes linked to brain structure in people with irritable bowel syndromeResearch shows for the first time an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies. Also, the researchers gained insight into the connections among childhood trauma, brain development and gut microbiome composition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How flu viruses hijack human cellsMuch is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection. Now, a research team has identified a mechanism by which influenza A, a family of pathogens that includes the most deadly strains of flu worldwide, hijacks cellular machinery to replicate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How One Drug Could Affect Pain, Memory and Nicotine AddictionResearchers are working to develop drugs to enhance the function of these receptors in the brain, which could have three very different applications: easing pain, slowing the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s and making it easier for people to stop smoking.
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Gizmodo
What the Hell Is Going on at the FDA With This Fox News Email Saga? Photo: AP It’s a sleepy Friday afternoon on the East Coast, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t some weird stuff going on. This time, it’s coming out of a department at the Food and Drug Administration, where a group of employees allegedly received an email informing them that office TVs would now play Fox News due to a “decision from the current administration administrative officials.” Advertisem
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Live Science
4,000-year-Old Funerary Garden Unearthed in Egypt | VideoArchaeologists found a 4,000-year-old funerary garden in Luxor, Egypt.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regions with stronger gun laws have fewer gun-related pediatric emergency department visitsRegions of the United States with the strictest gun laws also have the fewest emergency department visits for pediatric firearm-related injuries, according to a new study by Children's National Health System researchers. The findings, presented at the 2017 annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, could inform policies at the state and regional levels.
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Gizmodo
Bring a Galaxy Far, Far Away, A Lot Closer With This Star Wars Toy and Board Game Sale Star Wars Toys and Board Games Yesterday may have been May the Fourth, but the Star Wars deals seem to be like Sandpeople, walking single file to hide their numbers. Amazon has a ton of Star Wars toys and board games marked down , and you don’t need to be Force-sensitive to see that these prices aren’t ones to pass up. A couple board games are thrown in as well and even though it’s not listed on
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial boost for bio-based fuels“Electrical” bacteria are the key ingredient in a new process that recycles wastewater from biofuel production to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen can then be used to convert bio-oil into higher grade liquid fuels such as gasoline or diesel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cellsScientists have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farmsA new study is the first in a series to understand how marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins may be impacted by the construction of wind farms off the coast of Maryland. The new research offers insight into previously unknown habits of harbor porpoises in the Maryland Wind Energy Area, a 125-square-mile area off the coast of Ocean City that may be the nation's first commercial-scale
53min
Ars Technica
Guardians of the Galaxy 2 is a crazy disco gunfight of joy Disney It's hard for the Guardians of the Galaxy sequel to live up to its predecessor because the first film was a genuine surprise. Nobody expected it to be so weirdly great, nor so appealing to a broad audience. You can't ever re-experience that feeling of unanticipated delight. But you can fall for the characters' bozo chemistry again, and you can revel in their deepening bonds as they deal wi
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Gizmodo
Let Glorious Jupiter Distract You From Existential Dread Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset Lingering sense of ennui creeping in? Concerned about our crumbling infrastructure? Allow me to temporarily assuage your problems by offering up some lovely images of Jupiter. They won’t solve anything, but they just might help you get through day the without shouting into a stranger’s face or kicking over a traffic cone. Advertisement The stunning,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internet of things sensors could connect via ambient radio wavesInternet of things (IoT) systems usually link networks of sensors via radio, but radios demand battery power thus limiting usability. Disney Research has determined that one solution may be to get rid of the radios all together and communicate via the ambient radio waves from TV, radio and cell phones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stretching may reduce walking pain among peripheral artery disease patientsWearing a splint to stretch calf muscles may enhance blood flow through clogged leg arteries. After four weeks of stretching, people with clogged leg arteries had better blood flow and could walk further without discomfort.
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Ars Technica
Google phishing attack was foretold by researchers—and it may have used their code Enlarge (credit: Sean Gallup / Getty Images) The "Google Docs" phishing attack that wormed its way through thousands of e-mail inboxes earlier this week exploited a threat that had been flagged earlier by at least three security researchers—one raised issues about the threat as early as October of 2011. In fact, the person or persons behind the attack may have copied the technique from a proof of
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WIRED
The Nike Two-Hour Marathon: Watch Live Coverage of Race Here Nike hopes to run a marathon in two hours or less. The action starts at 11:45 pm Eastern, and you can watch the livestream here. The post The Nike Two-Hour Marathon: Watch Live Coverage of Race Here appeared first on WIRED .
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why Facebook’s First Social VR App Is So SimpleRachel Franklin, who led the rollout of Facebook Spaces as head of social VR, is preparing for a day when you hang out with your friends in a virtual world.
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Live Science
Boom! Supersonic Passenger Jet Coming by 2020A supersonic passenger jet could change commercial flight.
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Live Science
Do Fasting Diets Work? | VideoFasting diets may help with weight loss but could be hard to follow over the long term.
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Gizmodo
Thoughts I Had While Watching Law & Order: SVU's 'Pizzagate' Episode Photo: NBC Universal Now in its eighteenth season (!), Law & Order: SVU is famous for storylines that are “ ripped from the headlines .” This season alone, episodes have been inspired by the Apple vs. FBI battle, Netflix’s Making a Murderer , and the Roger Ailes saga at Fox News. (An episode that seemed to be inspired by the sexual misconduct allegations about Donald Trump was supposed to air bac
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The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘Sixty’ by Philip Booth Shortly after New England poet Philip Booth passed away a decade ago, our poetry editor David Barber remembered his work : Booth published ten collections of laconic, scrupulously crafted lyric verse notable for its spare colloquial language and contemplative presence of mind. Much of his work drew on his intimate local knowledge of the Down East Maine coast in and around his ancestral summer hom
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Gizmodo
Goodnight, Sweet Pup GIF GIF: Instagram / clubali Sleep tight!
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Gizmodo
10 Real Laws Straight Out of The Handmaid's Tale All Photos Courtesy Hulu On Thursday, the House of Representatives passed their version of the American Health Care Act, a bill to replace Obamacare with something that, among many other things, cracks down on women’s health and safety. There was one phrase that resonated a lot that day : “This sounds just like The Handmaid’s Tale .” Advertisement Should AHCA become law, it will defund Planned Pa
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Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from Pop Sci's commerce editor. Vol. 10. The end-of-week dispatch from Pop Sci's commerce editor. Vol. 10. Read on.
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Gizmodo
A Deer Was Caught Gnawing on Human Remains and the End Is Nigh Image: edbo23 Deer are generally considered one of the more benign creatures of the forest, going about their herbivorous ways in peace. But as new research shows, there’s a dark side to these ungulates. Using camera traps, forensic scientists have captured unprecedented photos of deer munching on the skeletal remains of a human carcass. Advertisement “Herein, we report on the first known photogr
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New Scientist - News
Lasers print ultra high-res images narrower than a human hairA new ink-free printing technique that involves blasting lasers at nanoscale structures has created some of the most detailed images ever printed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows association between gut microbes and brain structure in people with IBSResearch shows for the first time an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies. This suggests that signals generated by the brain can influence the composition of microbes residing in the intestine and that the chemicals in the gut can shape the human brain's structure. Also, the researchers gained insight into
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WIRED
All About Breast Pumps This week, an update on the state of women's health tech: not great, but getting better. With Arielle Pardes. The post All About Breast Pumps appeared first on WIRED .
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NYT > Science
ScienceTake: Battle of Cuttlefish Caught on TapeScientists recorded a rare physical fight between two male cuttlefish.
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NYT > Science
Cuttlefish BattleA cuttlefish conflict escalated from a visual display of aggression into actual aggression in the first recording of a physical battle between male cuttlefish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Big TV sound for big price: Sonos Playbase packs power of 10 speakersSonos. It's the gold standard for multi-room audio.
2h
The Atlantic
Q of the Week: What's the Best Commencement Address From a Political Figure? The month of May signals the start of college commencement speeches— a tradition featuring many political figures. In 2016, former President Barack Obama, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, and Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor all gave popular addresses . This year, Hillary Clinton is scheduled to speak at Wellesley College, and Donald Trump will speak at Liberty University. So, we aske
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The Atlantic
The Dinner Is a Stew of Privilege and Resentment Like the 2011 Steve Coogan movie The Trip , The Dinner is an examination of the frailty of the human spirit structured around the ritual excess of formal dining. Instead of a fictionalized version of himself, Coogan plays Paul Lohman, an unstable misanthrope who joins his wife, his brother, and his sister-in-law for an extravagant dinner at a fiendishly expensive restaurant to discuss a situation
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The Atlantic
Around the World in Election Interference All politics may be local, but foreigners still like to have their say in their friends’ and adversaries’ elections. Russia’s interference in the U.S. presidential election is the most famous case, but it’s long been popular for countries to put their thumbs on the scale of others’ votes—and for politicians to make strawmen out of the specters of foreign meddling. In several major elections comin
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Futurity.org
Glaucoma biomarker may predict speed of vision loss A biomarker could be a way to monitor how fast glaucoma is progressing, as well as the effectiveness of treatment. “There hasn’t been a reliable way to predict which patients with glaucoma have a high risk of rapid vision loss,” says principal investigator Rajendra S. Apte, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. “But we’ve identified a biomarker that
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Ars Technica
Feds propose heightened social media vetting of visa applicants (credit: Jorge Díaz ) The State Department is opening the public comment period for a proposal that seeks to inspect social media accounts and other data of visa applicants the government believes may pose a danger. The new vetting, the State Department said, likely will only impact about 0.5 percent of visa applicants per year—roughly 65,000 people. The new vetting being proposed would apply to
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Gizmodo
Scientists Are Turning WiFi Routers Into Creepy Radar Cameras Image: Physics Your WiFi router is probably sitting passively in some corner of your room, beaming out invisible light (and the internet). But it’s also sending information on all the stuff the light passes through and around. It’s essentially carrying a holographic image of the room with it. Researchers have tried using WiFi signals to make images before , but not with an out-of-the-box commerci
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The Atlantic
The First U.S. Casualty in Somalia Since 'Black Hawk Down' A U.S. Navy SEAL was killed in Somalia during a fight with al-Shabaab militants, and is likely the first combat death in the country since the 1993 “Black Hawk Down” incident. The SEAL was part of a U.S. special-operations advise-and-assist team in the country working with the Somali National Army to fight terrorism, an arrangement that has become increasingly common for the U.S., and that Raymon
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Gizmodo
Would You Have Sex with Billy McFarland, Fyre Festival Bro-in-Chief? Screenshot via ABC . Please: light a candle, lean back, and close your eyes. You are standing on a beach adjacent to a Sandals resort, dehydrated and frantically looking for the inhaler stored inside your missing luggage. A crowd of angry millennials swarms nearby. Above the horde, a sweaty, dark-haired figure emerges, balancing atop an overturned port-a-potty. “Uhhhhhhhh,” he announces confident
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Futurity.org
Could targeting myelin treat binge eating? Researchers have identified a gene in mice associated with binge eating, a new study suggests. The team may have also found evidence that binge eating alters the makeup of proteins in the brain. Recent technological developments, such as whole genome sequencing, have made it much easier to map genetic risk factors for addiction, says Camron D. Bryant, an assistant professor of pharmacology and ps
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Trackers may tip a warbler’s odds of returning to its nestGeolocator devices that help track migrating birds could also hamper migration survival or timing.
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WIRED
George R. R. Martin Doesn’t Need to Finish Writing the Game of Thrones Books George R. R. Martin owes you nothing. The post George R. R. Martin Doesn't Need to Finish Writing the Game of Thrones Books appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
Skier Captures Awesome Aerial Footage of His Stunts By Just Throwing His GoPro GIF Despite what drone makers want you to think, you don’t need to buy an expensive camera-equipped quadcopter to capture awesome aerial footage of your adventures. GoPro sells an $800 drone just for this, but skier Nicolas Vuignier discovered he could get similarly impressive results by just chucking his GoPro camera in the air. You might remember Vuignier as the skier who recreated The Matrix’s
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
You need more than just a white hat to tell the hero from the villainThe Sopranos' Tony Soprano and Walter White from Breaking Bad rank among recent television drama's most notorious protagonists, each of questionable morality. So, here's the question: Do you like them?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Platelets suppress T cell immunity against cancerIn the May 5, 2017, issue of Science Immunology, cancer researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina report that blood platelets blunt the immune response to cancer. Genetic inactivation of platelets improved the ability of T cells to fight melanoma in preclinical tests. Adoptive T cell therapies for cancer could be enhanced when combined with common antiplatelet drugs.
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Ars Technica
Creator of infamous Playpen website sentenced to 30 years in prison Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News) Steven Chase—creator of the world’s most notorious darknet child pornography site, Playpen—was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this week. By comparison, his two co-defendants pleaded guilty and were sentenced to 20 years each earlier this year for their involvement in Playpen. According to the plea agreement of one of Chase’s co-defendants,
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Gizmodo
Trump 'Wiretap' Truther Rand Paul Now Thinks Obama Spied on Him, Too Photo: Getty In a speech at the CATO Institute in Washington DC on Friday, Senator Rand Paul intends to explain why he believes that he and other U.S. lawmakers may have been spied on by the Obama administration. Advertisement Paul is a steadfast supporter of President Trump’s false claim that his campaign was “wiretapped” by the Obama White House and now believes that he, too, may have been on t
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Ars Technica
Measles outbreak rages after anti-vaccine groups target vulnerable community Enlarge / MINNEAPOLIS, MN - APRIL, 28: Lydia Fulton, LPN, administers the MMR vaccine to a child at Children's Primary Care Clinic. (credit: Getty | The Washington Post ) Minnesota is experiencing its largest measles outbreak since the 1990s following a targeted and intense effort by anti-vaccine groups there to spread the false belief that vaccinations cause autism. As of Thursday, health offici
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Mountaintop Mining Affects Life and Landscape in West VirginiaSurface mining carries a huge cost: nothing less than mountains themselves. Now the Appalachian landscape is being fundamentally and irrevocably changed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
New York City Has a Bold Plan to Fight Homelessness with DataSharing information across city departments and nonprofits will help provide a roof for as many people as possible.
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Science | The Guardian
A Hippocratic oath for young scientists to sign | Letters The new director of the Royal Institution, Sarah Harper, asks young scientists “to consider the whole social, ethical, moral and political framing of debates … It’s important that the scientist is no longer someone who just sits in a lab. All young scientists should think about public engagement” ( Report , 2 May). A good start might be to implement the Nobel laureate Joseph Rotblat’s Hippocratic
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Popular Science
The most efficient way to brush and floss Health We hate to say you've been doing it all wrong but...you've probably been doing it all wrong. if you haven’t thought about your brushing routine in years, it might be a good idea to take a step back and evaluate your cleaning work—your teeth might thank you for…
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New printer creates color by shaping nanostructuresResearchers developed the structure-based color printing technique as an alternative to ink-based printing, in which colors fade with time.
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The Atlantic
The Borrowed Words of Ivanka Trump Beloved , Toni Morrison’s 1987 novel, tells the story of Sethe, a woman who was born into slavery and who escaped her plantation—only to be, a mere month after she found freedom, re-captured. Before she was returned, Sethe, rather than subject her 2-year-old daughter to the horrors that awaited them, paid the girl the only mercy she could: She killed her. Years later and, now, “free” once again,
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The Atlantic
Sense8 Is Auteur Television That’s Actually Fun The Netflix drama Sense8 has all the flaws typical of what one might dub “auteur TV.” Think of shows like Legion , American Gods , Bloodline , and Mr. Robot , where character arcs are thinly stretched over an entire season to encourage binge-watching. Or where any plot movement occurs right at the end of an episode, and impressive cinematography and directorial style matter more than a cohesive s
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Gizmodo
Hands-On With The New 2DS XL The newly announced New 2DS XL looks sort of like an iPhone attached to a 3DS bottom, as you can see in the above video, which Kotaku boss Stephen Totilo and I shot at a Nintendo event in New York City this week. Advertisement If you’re in the market for one of these New 2DS XLs, the two important differences are: 1) it doesn’t have 3D , obviously; and 2) it’s a lot lighter than the New 3DS XL. I
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Gizmodo
Send Mom Double the Love with Double the Flowers from The Bouqs GIF Deluxe bouquet for the price of Original with code 2XMOM The Bouqs is probably the best place to use when sending flowers right now . The bouquets are unique and the blooms are harvested from the side of a freakin’ volcano. And right now, you’ll be able to get double the flowers for free. Just choose the Deluxe size of select Mother’s Day bouquets , use the code 2XMOM at check out and get it
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farmsA new study is the first in a series to understand how marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins may be impacted by the construction of wind farms off the coast of Maryland. The new research offers insight into previously unknown habits of harbor porpoises in the Maryland Wind Energy Area, a 125-square-mile area off the coast of Ocean City that may be the nation's first commercial-scale
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cellsA team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells.
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 4/29–5/5 Happy cows in Sweden, Apple’s new circular headquarters in California, fiery demonstrations in Venezuela and Brazil, tornado damage in Texas, a hobby horsing championship in Finland, Walpurgisnacht in Germany, and much more.
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The Atlantic
Wrestling With an Icon in Malcolm Cowley’s ‘Ernest’ The question of what one would do with a time machine—which is a terribly interesting one among, at the very least, 18-year-old boys—often provokes an answer variating on the theme of going back to a historical hero’s heyday to meet him face to face. My own answer, at 18, was one of these: I wanted to go hang around outside the old Scribner’s building with a couple pairs of boxing gloves and chal
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Popular Science
The science behind Blood Falls, the genetics of corgis' weird body shapes, and other amazing images of the week Science Newsworthy eye candy Our favorite images from this week in science, health, and space news. Read on:…
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Popular Science
Learning to farm on Mars could actually save agriculture on Earth Space Can we, uh, not give up on this planet quite yet? What's the difference between living sustainably on Mars today or in California in 100 years? Read on.
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Science | The Guardian
Human-robot interactions take step forward with 'emotional' chatbot Researchers describe the ‘emotional chatting machine’ as a first attempt at the problem of creating machines that can fully understand user emotion An “emotional chatting machine” has been developed by scientists, signalling the approach of an era in which human-robot interactions are seamless and go beyond the purely functional. The chatbot, developed by a Chinese team, is seen as a significant
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Gizmodo
I Hope to God Amazon's New Echo Isn't This Ugly Image: Twitter We had high hopes for the long-rumored Amazon Echo with a touchscreen, but today, those hopes were absolutely shattered. Advertisement A new image of a hideous device that is purportedly the new Amazon Echo with a built-in touchscreen has been discovered by the site AFTVnews , who has recently become somewhat of a source for supposed Amazon hardware leaks. The product looks like an
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WIRED
The Greasy Smudges on Your Phone Aren’t Grime. They’re Art Despite the clean, sleek aesthetic of an iPad or smartphone, the virtual world is just as messy as the real one. The post The Greasy Smudges on Your Phone Aren't Grime. They're Art appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
This Cancer-Causing Virus Lies Dormant for Years Before Striking Merkel cell carcinoma (Image: Nephron /Wikimedia Commons) There’s no limit to viral ruthlessness. These lifeless packets of genetic code cause countless ails, often without a known cure. One such monster spends most of its time as a seemingly benign strand of DNA that could sit latent for years before striking, causing cells to turn into a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer called Merkel cel
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Gizmodo
How West Virginia Lost the Workers' Revolution Image: Jim Cooke/GMG, Photos: author, Shutterstock, NYTimes, Public Domain I had only been in West Virginia for a day when Josh Sword, the head of the state AFL-CIO, told me casually that a revolution is coming. He is not a particularly radical guy. He was just giving an honest, matter-of-fact reading of the political situation. “I don’t know how bad things have to get. In West Virginia, it got t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With big goals, initiative hopes to prove robots create and complement jobsRecently in Lawrenceville, Pa., roboticists sat alongside executives of some of the largest manufacturing companies in the country, as hundreds gathered to start a $260 million national initiative headquartered in Pittsburgh.
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Gizmodo
How the Horrific New Republican Health Care Bill Punishes Women Photo: AP After a wave of public outcry, yesterday, the GOP’s controversial American Health Care Act narrowly passed in the House of Representatives. While a horde of Republicans were toasting in the Rose Garden afterward, millions of Americans struggled to make sense of the calamity they had just witnessed. For many women and non-binary people, seeing the bill move onto the Senate means the stat
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Gizmodo
Let's Break Down All Five of the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 End-Credits Scenes The Guardians have a lot of surprises in store in Vol. 2. All Images: Disney Marvel movies are known for their teasing mid- and post-credits scenes, but with Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 , they up the ante with five of them after the conclusion of the movie. Some are jokes, but some have huge ramifications for future Marvel movies. Here’s how and why. 1) Kraglin’s Accident After helping the Gua
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover how flu viruses hijack human cellsMuch is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection. Now, a research team headed by investigators from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is the first to identify a mechanism by which influenza A, a family of pathogens that includes the most deadly strains of flu worldwide, hijacks cellular machinery to replicate.
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The Atlantic
Are Americans 'Sick and Tired of Winning' Yet? During his campaign for president, Donald Trump promised , “We’re going to win so much, you’re going to be so sick and tired of winning.” If the American Health Care Act that the House passed on Tuesday is an indication, perhaps what he meant was that citizens would be both ill and also exhausted from victories. The celebration that Trump threw in the Rose Garden on Thursday, marking the House’s
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Ars Technica
18 months after discovery, the “Nintendo PlayStation” is finally working In the nearly 18 months since a CD-ROM-based "Nintendo PlayStation" prototype was first found in an estate sale , emulator makers and homebrew programmers have created a facsimile of what CD-based games would look like on an SNES . Efforts by hacker Ben Heck to get that kind of software actually working on the one-of-a-kind hardware, though, had been stymied by problems getting the CD-ROM drive t
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Gizmodo
Watch: Black Women Dive Headfirst Into the Future With Virtual Reality Project NeuroSpeculative AfroFeminism is an art installation and virtual reality experience recently featured at the Tribeca Film Festival. The project, which seeks to put women of color in the virtual reality space, was created by Hyphen-Labs, a collective of women from diverse backgrounds. “We worked with character modelers, animators and developers to create an empowering experience that puts black wo
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The Scientist RSS
Immunological Differences Between Lab Mice and Wild MiceDiscrepancies in the populations' immune systems suggest murine models of immunological disorders possess more limitations than scientists had appreciated.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
French plan to create €5-billion science ‘super-campus’ in disarray Proposal to create integrated research university near Paris stymied by elite institutions’ fears of losing autonomy. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21950
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New Scientist - News
UK’s plan to clean up its air is still inadequate, critics sayThe government has published long-awaited plans to cut illegal pollution but critics have warned they are too weak to improve the UK's dirty air
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Science : NPR
Crayola Gives The People What They Want: A New Blue Crayon After Crayola announced it was retiring the yellow crayon Dandelion, the company said its replacement would be blue, but would it be a true blue? No, it's actually an accidental blue. (Image credit: Patrick Shuck/Crayola)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Group rituals can make us biased against outsidersFrom our greetings to our celebrations to how we take our coffee, everyday life is full of shared rituals. The effort and commitment involved in these rituals can help us bond with others -- but new research suggests that they may also push us away from those who don't share the same practices. Findings from a series of experiments suggest that people trust others who did not engage in the same ri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New theory on how Earth's crust was createdConventional theory holds that all of the early Earth's crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, earth scientists have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth's early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time.
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WIRED
The Loony ‘Circular Runway’ Will Never Happen, But Maybe It Should Maybe it is time to rethink modern aviation. The post The Loony ‘Circular Runway’ Will Never Happen, But Maybe It Should appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
This Hilarious Video’s Fake. I Can Tell From the Physics A video making the rounds online shows a strong dog giving an old lady a hard pull. Let's use video analysis to see if it's real. The post This Hilarious Video’s Fake. I Can Tell From the Physics appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Gizmodo
How to Set Up Auto-Respond Texts When You're Driving Image: Gizmodo It’s incredibly tempting to reach out and respond to a text you get while you’re driving, but maybe less so when you realize that distracted driving is causing thousands of deaths and hundreds of thousands of injuries every year in the US . Take away the temptation by having your phone reply to messages for you, so you don’t have to worry about it. Advertisement If you’re in any do
5h
Popular Science
Honeywell Lyric T5 Wi-Fi Thermostat Review Gadgets A smart thermostat on a budget This smart thermostat is $100 cheaper than most of its brainy competition, but are the savings worth it?
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal new and improved genome sequence of Daphnia pulexBy understanding how they respond to toxic elements, scientists can look at how environmental changes caused by agriculture and road runoff or warming temperatures and climate change could impact populations in lakes, rivers and standing bodies of water.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New theory on how Earth's crust was createdConventional theory holds that all of the early Earth's crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, McGill University earth scientists have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth's early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Donna blanket VanuatuThe 80 plus islands that make up the nation of Vanuatu were blanketed by the clouds of Tropical Cyclone Donna when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Donna that showed strong storms with heavy rain potential.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
NIH grant limits rile biomedical research community Scientists are split over whether limiting grant support to individuals will help young researchers or hurt collaboration. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21949
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Ars Technica
Report: Amazon is making an Apple TV app almost 2 years after it said it would Enlarge / The fourth-generation Apple TV. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) At long last, Amazon will release an official Prime Video app for the Apple TV—at least, if a new report from Recode is to be believed . Citing "people familiar with the two companies," the report indicates that Amazon and Apple are "close to an agreement" that would bring Amazon's app to Apple's box sometime over the summer. C
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem cellsLack of vitamin A in the body has a detrimental effect on the hematopoietic system in the bone marrow. The deficiency causes a loss of important blood stem cells, scientists now report. These findings will open up new prospects in cancer therapy.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology measures small-scale currents that transport ocean plastics, oil spillsResearchers have developed a new technology to measure the currents near the ocean's surface that carry pollutants such as plastics and spilled oil.
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New Scientist - News
Menopause-causing bait is curbing rat populations in New YorkGenerations of childless rats are living to ripe old age as their overall numbers plummet thanks to new contraceptive baits
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Fragile X syndrome disrupts perceptionA new study sheds light on the neural mechanisms of Fragile X syndrome. This genetic disorder, which affects males twice as often as females due to males' single X chromosome, causes disruptions in the way neurons transmit information to each other.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic study shows central ice sheet is stable since milder timesCentral parts of Antarctica's ice sheet have been stable for millions of years, from a time when conditions were considerably warmer than now, research suggests.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poultry feed with arsenic more problematic than assumed?Supplements containing arsenic have been banned in the European Union since 1999 and in North America since 2013. In many countries they are still added to poultry feed to prevent parasitic infection and promote weight gain. Scientists have now demonstrated that the danger to human health may be greater than previously thought because the metabolic breakdown of these compounds in chickens occurs v
5h
Ars Technica
Verizon’s gigabit upgrade pricing still makes almost no sense Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Scott Olson) When Verizon FiOS unveiled a $70-per-month gigabit Internet plan two weeks ago, the company's existing customers quickly discovered that the deal was too good to be true. It turned out that only new customers were eligible for the $70 price, even though Verizon's announcement didn't mention that caveat. Worse, existing subscribers who tried to upgrade
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How Many Times Will The WelderUp Crew Have To Paint This Custom Ride? #VegasRatRods | Mondays 10/9c Cheyenne quickly learns that nothing is final at WelderUp until it matches Steve's crazy vision. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/vegas-rat-rods More Rat Rods: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/vegas-rat-rods/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follo
5h
The Atlantic
Sexual Assault and Free College: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories The Unanswered Questions of New York’s Free-College Program Keshia Clukey | Politico ALBANY, New York—It’s May 1, college-decision day for thousands of high-school seniors around New York. … But for some students and their families, this May Day may not bring the same sort of clarity, the same sigh of relief, that it normally would. That’s because of the introduction of New York's Excelsior schol
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Live Science
What Really Caused the Hindenburg Disaster?What brought down the Hindenburg airship on its ill-fated journey in May 1937?
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New Scientist - News
Fukushima accident gave everyone an X-ray’s worth of radiationAfter the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan was hit by a tsunami in 2011, everyone was exposed to extra radiation, but for most people the dose was small
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggestedScientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Retirement associated with lower stress, but only if you were in a top jobA new article suggests that the period around retirement may widen socio-economic inequalities in stress and health.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Smart Alarm Clock, Teva Sandals, USB Power Outlets, and More The smartest alarm clock you’ve ever seen , Teva sandals , and USB power receptacles lead off Friday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals BEDDI combines all the best parts of alarm clocks, phone chargers, Bluetooth speakers, and wake-up lights into the ultimate bedside companion, and you can pick one up for an all-time low $87 today . Sh
5h
Inside Science
Glaucoma Test: Anywhere, Anytime Glaucoma Test: Anywhere, Anytime A portable glaucoma test saves vision. Glaucoma Test: Anywhere, Anytime Video of Glaucoma Test: Anywhere, Anytime Human Friday, May 5, 2017 - 11:30 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- Interview with Karam Alawa at the University of Miami: “When you consider vision, it’s something that we often take for granted. People are born seeing, or see, we never
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NYT > Science
Sunday Routine: How Dr. Eric Kandel, Neuroscientist, Spends His SundaysThe Columbia University professor likes to exercise and be with his wife of 60 years, Dr. Denise Kandel, also a professor at Columbia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shape-changing fog screen inventedThere is something spooky about being able to see and talk to the pirate Blackbeard while one walks down a dark alley and then stepping right through him as he disappears into thin air. Such entertainment experiences are now possible thanks to a shape-changing fog screen that has just been developed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How photosynthetic cells deal with a lack of ironResearchers discovered a small RNA molecule in cyanobacteria that affects metabolic acclimation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extinction of Alpine plants may remain undetectable for a long timeHow do alpine plants react to warmer climatic conditions? Due to their longevity, the plants may survive longer than expected in their habitats, but produce offspring that are increasingly maladapted. Population size may decrease faster than the contraction of the species range, as researchers show using computer models. Scientists who wish to track the precise extinction risk of plant species mus
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Group rituals can make us biased against outsidersFrom our greetings to our celebrations to how we take our coffee, everyday life is full of shared rituals. The effort and commitment involved in these rituals can help us bond with others -- but new research suggests that they may also push us away from those who don't share the same practices. Findings from a series of experiments suggest that people trust others who did not engage in the same ri
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 yearsLittle does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas. However, Vladimir Lukhtanov, a biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: a new, beautiful butterfly named Acentria's fritillary, which was spotted as it flew over the slopes of the popular Mount Herm
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify gene that controls birth defect common in diabetesResearchers have identified a gene that plays a key role in the formation of neural tube defects, a problem commonly found in infants of pregnant women with diabetes. This is the first time the gene has been shown to play this role; it opens up a new way to understand these defects, and may one day lead to new treatments that could prevent the problem or decrease its incidence.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CCNY physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interactionControl of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. City College of New York researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interactionControl of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. City College of New York researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 yearsVladimir Lukhtanov, entomologist and evolutionary biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: what people had thought was a population of a common species, turned out to be a whole new organism and, moreover - one with an interesting evolutionary history. This new species is named Acentria's fritillary (Melitaea acentria) and was found flying right
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Burger King revealed the hackability of voice assistantsBurger King pulled a pretty juicy marketing stunt last month that drew plenty of attention—not just to the Whopper, but also to the intrinsic vulnerabilities of a new type of voice-activated gadget.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple jumps to lead wearable computing with smartwatchApple has leapt to the lead in wearable computing on strong sales of it smartwatch, a market survey shows.
5h
The Atlantic
Three Takeaways From the April Jobs Report On Friday, the Labor Department reported that 211,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy in April, while the unemployment rate fell to 4.4 percent. The report beat analyst expectations—economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal were expecting only 188,000 jobs —which was a welcome relief after a miss in March . Here are the three most important takeaways. The U.S. labor market is near full e
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New defence mechanism against bacteria discoveredResearchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers shed new light on influenza detectionResearchers at the University of Notre Dame have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. By engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus, the team was able to develop a test kit that emitted fluorescent light when illuminated with a hand-held lamp or blue laser pointer.
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Gizmodo
The Brilliant Engineering That Keeps Your Engine Cool As smoke billows from your hood, you look down at your gauges to see the needle pegged in the red. Your engine is overheating because something in your cooling system has failed. In the final episode of David Dissects , I take apart and dive into an entire engine cooling system out of a junkyard Jeep Cherokee. Advertisement The purpose of your vehicle’s cooling system is to make sure your engine
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
A New Dam on the Nile Reveals Threats from WarmingIf countries don't reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, rainfall patterns over the Nile could change drastically -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem cellsLack of vitamin A in the body has a detrimental effect on the hematopoietic system in the bone marrow. The deficiency causes a loss of important blood stem cells, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute of Stem Cell Research and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM) now report in the latest issue of the journal Cell. These findings will open up new prospects
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Differences in levels of trust and power can affect buyer-supplier performanceMutual trust does not appear on the ledger sheets of buyers and suppliers, but researchers suggest that levels of trust between companies may be an important influence on how they operate and perform.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Oculus Shuts Down Its Film Studio as VR Still Struggles to Catch OnAs consumers remain unconvinced about virtual reality, manufacturers may rein in spending and decide which aspects of the technology to focus on.
6h
New Scientist - News
Robot inspector helps check bridges for dangerous defectsPerforming safety checks on bridges is slow and expensive work. A new autonomous robot can do the job quickly and cheaply
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research shows growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggestedScientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic study shows central ice sheet is stable since milder timesCentral parts of Antarctica's ice sheet have been stable for millions of years, from a time when conditions were considerably warmer than now, research suggests.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A mutation giving leaves with white spots has been identifiedGarden and potted plants with white spots on their leaves are so popular that they are specially selected for this feature. An international research team has now identified a new mutation in the plant Lotus japonicus which gives leaves with white spots. These results could be important for the improvement of garden and potted plants.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shape-changing fog screen inventedThere is something spooky about being able to see and talk to the pirate Blackbeard while one walks down a dark alley and then stepping right through him as he disappears into thin air. Such entertainment experiences are now possible thanks to a shape-changing fog screen that has been developed at the University of Sussex.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New rules for lobstering in southern New England up for voteNew restrictions on lobster fishing are up for a vote as regulators try to slow the loss of the valuable crustaceans from southern New England waters.
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Gizmodo
Colorado Cop Admits to Faking Body Cam Footage in Felony Weapons Case Photo: AP On Thursday, the District Attorney’s office of Pueblo, Colorado officially dropped felony drug and weapons possession charges against a 36-year-old man after an officer admitted to faking body camera footage of a search of his car. Advertisement In November of last year, the man’s vehicle was pulled over and searched. According to police, Officer Seth Jensen found seven grams of heroin
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The Atlantic
Resistance in Russia and Gastronomy in Georgia: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing Alexei Navalny on Putin’s Russia: ‘All Autocratic Regimes Come to an End’ Shaun Walker | The Guardian “For Navalny, the fortnight behind bars seems to have been an energizing rather than a demoralizing experience. ‘There were some others in the jail, and for all of them it was their first protest in their lives,’ says Navalny when I meet him in his office in a Moscow business centre. ‘When they s
6h
Ars Technica
More Android phones than ever are covertly listening for inaudible sounds in ads Enlarge (credit: Arp et al. ) Almost a year after app developer SilverPush vowed to kill its privacy-threatening software that used inaudible sound embedded into TV commercials to covertly track phone users, the technology is more popular than ever, with more than 200 Android apps that have been downloaded millions of times from the official Google Play market, according to a recently published r
6h
WIRED
The Crazy Eruptions That Spit Up Diamonds What would happen if we had a new kimberlite eruption? The post The Crazy Eruptions That Spit Up Diamonds appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The Giant Purple History of Guardians 2’s Best New Character Kurt Russell aside, Ego is one of Marvel's more obscure characters—but there may just be a reason he shows up. The post The Giant Purple History of Guardians 2's Best New Character appeared first on WIRED .
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Viden
5 sygdomme, hvor kroppen angriber sig selvDer findes ingen kur mod autoimmune sygdomme som fx type 1-diabetes, leddegigt og kronisk tyktarmsbetændelse, der hvert år rammer mange danskere.
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Live Science
Boy Gets Rare 'Handlebar Hernia' from Motorbike AccidentA boy crossing a street in Cameroon got a rare and painful abdominal injury when a motorbike driver lost control and ran into him, according to a new report.
6h
TEDTalks (video)
A summer school kids actually want to attend | Karim AbouelnagaIn the US, most kids have a very long summer break, during which they forget an awful lot of what they learned during the school year. This "summer slump" affects kids from low-income neighborhoods most, setting them back almost three months. TED Fellow Karim Abouelnaga has a plan to reverse this learning loss. Learn how he's helping kids improve their chances for a brighter future.
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Futurity.org
Does knowing junk food by name raise kids’ obesity risk? Young children who recognize food name brands, like Lucky Charms, M&M’s, and Cheetos are more likely to make unhealthy choices and be at higher risk of obesity later, say researchers. This weight gain occurs independently of other variables, including family demographics and TV viewing—and despite the fact that these children may struggle to recall details about food brands like mascots or other
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Gizmodo
Swearing May Be Your Best Option When Trying to Open That #$@&%*! Jar Hillary Clinton struggles with a pickle jar on Kimmel. New research suggests swearing may have helped. Here’s a cool bodyhack to remember next time you’re embroiled in battle against a jar lid that refuses to budge: use your go-to expletive. This trick was recently uncovered by Keele University psychologists whose experiments suggest that swearing might make people stronger—at least for tasks req
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Gizmodo
Watching Wonder Woman Save Poor, Imperiled Steve Trevor Is So, So Satisfying GIF I’m all for Chris Pine cracking jokes and being rescued by a kickass Gal Gadot all the time in Wonder Woman , which basically means the movie just needs to be different versions of this new clip over and over again. Advertisement The snippet aired on last night’s Jimmy Fallon , as part of an interview with Chris Pine, and sees Diana use her bracelets to full majestic effect coming to Steve’s
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem cellsLack of vitamin A in the body has a detrimental effect on the hematopoietic system in the bone marrow. The deficiency causes a loss of important blood stem cells, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute of Stem Cell Research and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM) now report in the latest issue of the journal CELL. These findings will open up new prospects
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The Atlantic
Does Electrifying Mosquitoes Protect People From Disease? I spent my childhood in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where I was tormented by mosquitoes day and night. I happen to be one of those people whom the bugs find very attractive. My legs and ankles were perennially so bitten that sometimes I was asked if I had a skin disorder. Now I live in Jamaica, and the mosquito torment continues. Last year, I contracted Zika. For these reasons and others, I must reluc
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Futurity.org
Here’s the ideal temp for mosquito-borne diseases New research shows how rising temperatures might influence mosquito behavior and disease risk around the world. The researchers also calibrated their model with field data on human infections of mosquito-borne diseases. Scientists have known for some time that climate change has caused the extension of mosquito season beyond the summer months, but the ways in which climate change affects the risk
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Popular Science
Why it’s so hard to figure out if acupuncture actually works Health Should you stick a needle in it? One study alleges that acupuncture is being held to a higher level of scientific rigor than other medical interventions. Read on.
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cognitive science
Game XP: Action Games as Experimental Paradigms for Cognitive Science submitted by /u/Burnage [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica
YouTube taps creators, celebrities for new original shows on ad-supported site Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The past few days have seen announcements from Twitter, Hulu , and others about the future of online video streaming. Last night in New York, YouTube made an announcement of its own: the Google-owned online video platform will come out with six new original series that will be available exclusively on YouTube. Last year, the company debuted subscription servi
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Ingeniøren
ESA-topchef ser en international månelandsby for sigMånen drager verdens rumfartsnationer og kan overtage Den Internationale Rumstations rolle som brobygger i krisetider, mener Den Europæiske Rumorganisation. Og Andreas Mogensen er klar til en månerejse.
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Ingeniøren
Supermarkedets prisskilte skal køre på solcellerNy dansk teknologi høster energi fra supermarkedets indendørs belysning og bruger det til elektroniske prisskilte.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphane could act as efficient and water-free hydrogen fuel cell membraneResearchers have found that the unusual properties of graphane -- a two-dimensional polymer of carbon and hydrogen -- could form a type of anhydrous 'bucket brigade' that transports protons without the need for water, potentially leading to the development of more efficient hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles and other energy systems.
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Gizmodo
North Korea Thinks the CIA Hired a Lumberjack to Assassinate Kim Jong Un With Nano Weapons? Photo: AP / Wong Maye-E The North Korean government is famous for coming up with some peculiar theories. But have you heard the one about how the CIA and South Korea’s intelligence agency paid a “lumberjack” $20,000 to kill Kim Jong Un and his cronies with “radioactive” and “nano poisonous” substances? It’s a doozy. Advertisement The allegation surfaced on Friday in the form of an 1,800-word repo
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shape-changing fog screen inventedThere is something spooky about being able to see and talk to the pirate Blackbeard while one walks down a dark alley and then stepping right through him as he disappears into thin air. Such entertainment experiences are now possible thanks to a shape-changing fog screen that has been developed at the University of Sussex.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Differences in levels of trust and power can affect buyer-supplier performanceMutual trust does not appear on the ledger sheets of buyers and suppliers, but researchers suggest that levels of trust between companies may be an important influence on how they operate and perform.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research shows growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggestedScientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise.
7h
Ars Technica
Prey impressions: Underpowered and loving it Enlarge / Oh crap, did he see me? He saw me, didn't he? Ohhhhhh crap. Owing to Bethesda's recently enacted policy of withholding review copies until just before release, we've barely had five hours of in-game time with Prey prior to the game's launch today. Consider these impressions a review-in-progress as we work toward the game's conclusion. This piece includes spoilers for some very early por
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Science | The Guardian
Hey, personality quiz, what if I want to use a sauna and be introverted? | Fay Schopen We’re fascinated by what quizzes might show us about ourselves, but being human means being unpredictable – doesn’t it? Are you a quiz taker? Do you yearn to “build a boyfriend” in order to discover your favourite Starbucks drink ? Because presumably you have no idea what that might be. Or perhaps you want something more sophisticated, such as Buzzfeed’s incisive “ Which ousted Arab Spring ruler
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Gizmodo
The Slot ‘The Prodigal Son Comes Home’: Protesters and Fans Greet Trump on First Presidential Visit The Slot ‘The Prodigal Son Comes Home’: Protesters and Fans Greet Trump on First Presidential Visit to NYC | Deadspin Police Investigating Alleged Rape At Penguins Game | Fusion GOP Congressman Admits He Didn’t Even Read the Monstrous Health Care Bill He Just Voted For | The Root Ga. Cop Steps in to Help Family of 7 After Responding to Call About 12-Year-Old Trying to Shoplift a Pair of $2 Shoes
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The Atlantic
The GOP Health-Care Bill Is the Ultimate Reverse Robin Hood The American Health Care Act, which the House of Representatives passed Thursday afternoon, is a cruel bill, one that seems exquisitely designed to afflict the afflicted, comfort the comfortable, punish the sick, immiserate the poor, and move the United States—nearly alone among advanced countries without universal insurance—further away from a morally defensible health-care system. Indeed, it is
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Popular Science
Humans are infecting wild lands with our noises Environment It’s getting loud out there Human sounds—like the sound of cars and airplane—are encroaching even on otherwise wild protected areas.
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WIRED
South Korea’s New Missile Defense Tech Isn’t a Cure-All For North Korea South Korea's US-supplied THAAD is now operational, but it's no magic bullet. The post South Korea’s New Missile Defense Tech Isn’t a Cure-All For North Korea appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
A Graphene Speaker With No Moving Parts Uses Heat to Produce Sound The traditional speaker design involves the use of a vibrating membrane that pushes air to create sound waves that travel to your ears. The technology has been in use for well over a century, but scientists at the University of Exeter might have found a way to improve how speakers work —eliminating movement altogether—using the wonder material graphene. Advertisement It takes quite a bit of energ
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Gizmodo
The Smartest Alarm Clock Has Never Been Cheaper BEDDI combines all the best parts of alarm clocks, phone chargers, Bluetooth speakers, and wake-up lights into the ultimate bedside companion, and you can pick one up for an all-time low $87 today . Shane tried this out, and came away impressed . Advertisement Advertisement BEDDI starts to get interesting with its mood lights and wake-up light, the latter of which can be paired with Spotify integ
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Futurity.org
Some of our muscles can ‘taste’ sugar A new study uncovers an unexpected mechanism of glucose sensing in skeletal muscles that contributes to the body’s overall regulation of blood sugar levels. It’s well known that our taste buds can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulin—which helps the sugar enter cells, where the body can use it for energy. “We found t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find genetic mutation responsible for rare skin disease in AfrikanersResearchers at the Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Division of Human Genetics at Wits, in collaboration with peers in Europe, the US and Canada published this research in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells derived from specialised progenitorsDendritic cells are gatekeepers of Immunity. Up to now dendritic cell subtypes were thought to develop from one common progenitor. Now, in a joint effort, researchers from A*STAR Singapore Immunology Network, LIMES-Institute and cluster of excellence ImmunoSensation from University of Bonn and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases were able to show with single cell resolution that this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers shed new light on influenza detectionNotre Dame Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New defence mechanism against bacteria discoveredResearchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poultry feed with arsenic more problematic than assumed?Supplements containing arsenic have been banned in the European Union since 1999 and in North America since 2013. In many countries they are still added to poultry feed to prevent parasitic infection and promote weight gain. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now demonstrated that the danger to human health may be greater than previously thought because the metabolic breakdown of th
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover a potential new target for cancer treatmentInhibition of the enzyme RIOK1could stop the growth of tumors and the development of metastases
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Gizmodo
These Flowers Hold Clues to Spreading Life Beyond Earth Image: Michael Lucas / Flickr Creative Commons It feels like we’re constantly searching for a friend out there in the cosmos, only to be repeatedly disappointed . But what if, in our quest to discover life beyond Earth, we’ve overlooking a more important question? What if the question we should really be asking is, how do we ensure life spreads beyond Earth? Advertisement Seeds from the humble mo
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Science | The Guardian
Will you regret later what you’re doing now? Don’t even think about it | Oliver Burkeman Worrying about the risk of future regret is a rubbish way to spend your time, and therefore something you’re likely to regret One thing a lot of people tell you when you become a parent, I’ve found, is that you should savour the early months and years, because they’re over so quickly. Most of them mean well, I think, except for a minority who just enjoy trying to scare new parents about what’s co
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The Atlantic
The Soviet Union's Scientific Marvels Came From Prisons There’s no shortage of stories about clashes between science and politics throughout history, and there are plenty still being written today. Scientific evidence has been distorted and manipulated in the name of ideology since Galileo suggested the earth revolved around the sun. But perhaps few battles may be as dramatic as the one that unfolded in the Soviet Union in the early 20th century, unde
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Popular Science
Office workout gear that'll slow down your body's inevitable decay Gadgets Get buff while you do stuff. Workout gear for the office. Get buff while you do stuff. Read on.
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Gizmodo
What Should Elon Musk Name His Tunneling Machine? Image: Getty Elon Musk, best known for running Tesla and SpaceX, has recently turned his attention back to Earth. Specifically, under the earth: His Boring Company wants to build a tunnel under Los Angeles to alleviate its traffic problem. It’s a bold plan, and details are still relatively scarce. Advertisement But more crucially than mundane details like “permits” or “whether it’ll actually work
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The Scientist RSS
Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go UnpublishedLess than half of completed stem cell studies in humans are published in peer-reviewed journals, according to an analysis of regenerative medicine trials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis examines mortality risks after different types of kidney surgeryA new study provides insights into the true risks of all types of nephrectomy, or surgical removal of the kidney.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A mutation giving leaves with white spots has been identifiedGarden and potted plants with white spots on their leaves are so popular that they are specially selected for this feature. An international research team has now identified a new mutation in the plant Lotus japonicus which gives leaves with white spots. These results could be important for the improvement of garden and potted plants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First molecular diagnostics for insecticide resistance in sandfliesA study led by LSTM identifies a potent molecular mechanism for insecticide resistance in the world's most medically-important sandfly species and develops DNA-diagnostics for monitoring future impact on visceral leishmaniasis control and elimination programs.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antarctic study shows central ice sheet is stable since milder timesCentral parts of Antarctica's ice sheet have been stable for millions of years, from a time when conditions were considerably warmer than now, research suggests.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Macular evaluation with spectral domain type optic coherence tomographyAcute nonarteritic anterior ischemic opticneuropathy (NAION) is the most common optic neuropathy observed in the elderly population. The condition presents itself in the form of painless unilateral sudden vision loss.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists gain insights into how Fragile X syndrome disrupts perceptionA collaboration between scientists in Belgium, the United States, Norway, France and the UK has resulted in a study that sheds light on the neural mechanisms of Fragile X syndrome. This genetic disorder, which affects males twice as often as females due to males' single X chromosome, causes disruptions in the way neurons transmit information to each other.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How photosynthetic cells deal with a lack of ironUniversity of Freiburg researchers discover a small RNA molecule in cyanobacteria that affects metabolic acclimation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are high-achieving black students invisible?Since 1966, when a now-famous and often replicated study known as "The Coleman Report" was published, the phrase "achievement gap" has referred to one thing: the differences in academic success between the average black student and the average white student in America.
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Futurity.org
Fluffy dandelion seeds make great tools in the lab New research finds a clever use for the dandelion: each of its tiny seeds can work as a perfect pipette in the lab. “We found you can actually use dandelion seeds to perform precise droplet handling. There aren’t many tools that exist for this,” says Guy Genin, professor of mechanical engineering at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Engineering & Applied Science. The team examined
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
When Sex Is a Foreign LanguageSexuality can be baffling for people with autism—a situation science has mostly ignored -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swearing can help you boost your physical performanceA few years ago my good friend Mark Foulks occupied the rear seat of a tandem on a sponsored long distance cycle ride from Berkshire to Barcelona. His pithily entitled JustGiving website "Berks2Barca", is typical Mark and no doubt contributed to him raising more than £10,000 towards a mobile chemotherapy unit at the Royal Berkshire Hospital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers achieve direct counterfactual quantum communication(Phys.org)—In the non-intuitive quantum domain, the phenomenon of counterfactuality is defined as the transfer of a quantum state from one site to another without any quantum or classical particle transmitted between them. Counterfactuality requires a quantum channel between sites, which means that there exists a tiny probability that a quantum particle will cross the channel—in that event, the ru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney functionA new technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Biomedical Optics.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
India launches 'invaluable' South Asia satelliteThe satellite, funded by India, will help South Asian nations boost their communication services.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Red light, green light invention prevents work interruptionsA UBC computer scientist has invented a unique desk light that automatically switches from green to red when you are 'in the zone' and shouldn't be disturbed by colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retirement associated with lower stress, but only if you were in a top jobA new paper published in the Journal of Gerontology suggests that the period around retirement may widen socio-economic inequalities in stress and health.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney functionA new optical spectroscopy technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week in the Journal of Biomedical Optics. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
8h
New Scientist - News
Let’s seek traces of ancient indigenous ETs in our own backyardThe search for aliens beyond our solar system has drawn a blank so far. There is merit in looking closer to home, says Geraint Lewis
8h
WIRED
Obama Pioneers a New Approach to the Presidential Library In reflecting the 44th president's proclivities and priorities, the Obama Presidential Center creates a monument to community. The post Obama Pioneers a New Approach to the Presidential Library appeared first on WIRED .
8h
WIRED
11 Fantastic Gifts for the Mother in Your Life, From Bikes to Booze We've put together a list of gifts so you don't have to show up empty-handed this Mother's Day on Sunday, May 14th. The post 11 Fantastic Gifts for the Mother in Your Life, From Bikes to Booze appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable biomedical textiles for the futureThe textile and clothing industry has a long history in Switzerland. In order to remain competitive in the international market, the industry relies on innovations. The "SUBITEX – Sustainable Biomedicine Textiles" research initiative was set up by Empa and Swiss Textiles, the Swiss textile industry association, for this very purpose. Through innovative approaches and knowledge transfer, researcher
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spying made simple: Hackers use old tools to dodge detectionA Romanian security firm says it has discovered a ring of digital spies using bottom-rung tools to break into hundreds of government computers. The find suggests that you don't necessarily need sophistication to steal secrets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers one step closer to understanding deadly facial tumor in Tasmanian devilsNew findings in research funded by Morris Animal Foundation offer valuable insight on how to fight devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) that has resulted in a catastrophic decline in wild Tasmanian devils. Researchers have shed light on how the tumors successfully evade the immune system, which may offer possible strategies to protect the endangered devils from this devastating disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology measures small-scale currents that transport ocean plastics, oil spillsResearchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have developed a new technology to measure the currents near the ocean's surface that carry pollutants such as plastics and spilled oil.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Red light, green light invention prevents work interruptionsA computer scientist has invented a unique desk light that automatically switches from green to red when you are 'in the zone' and shouldn't be disturbed by colleagues.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU aviation agency proposing rules for drone operationThe European Aviation Safety Agency is proposing rules on the use of small drones that would include a requirement for operators of all but the smallest devices to register with authorities.
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet 5. maj: Saboterede man under krigen betonbunkerne med sukker?5. maj: En læser har hørt, at modstandsfolk under krigen hældte sukker i betonen for at svække bunkerne. Betonekspert vurderer rygtet.
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Science | The Guardian
'Unnecessary' painkillers could leave thousands addicted, doctors warn Prescriptions for powerful opioid painkillers have doubled from 12m to 24m in past decade, NHS Digital figures reveal Prescription pain killers: share your stories with us Powerful and potentially addictive opiate painkillers are being handed out too readily, leading doctors have warned after it emerged that the number of times the drugs are being prescribed in the UK has doubled in the past deca
8h
Gizmodo
Something Totally Crazy Could Happen to Bumblebee in Transformers: The Last Knight The BBC is waging a new War of the Worlds . Get a bizarre look at a Guardian of the Galaxy on the set of Avengers: Infinity War . Aquaman teases some flashbacks ahead for Arthur Curry. Plus, teasing new details for the Han Solo movie, and what’s to come on Arrow , Flash , iZombie , and Supergirl . To me, my Spoilers! Transformers: The Last Knight A recently discovered standee for the film depicts
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Gizmodo
Hulu Live TV Is the Best Cordcutter Service Yet, But It Needs Some Work All Photos: Christina Warren/Gizmodo Hulu’s highly-anticipated live TV service is now available in beta and from my viewing experience, it’s the strongest offering yet, thanks to its combination of live TV, Hulu originals, and an on-demand selection of thousands of movies and TV shows. Advertisement It used to be that if you wanted to watch ESPN, you had to subscribe to a traditional cable packag
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Social Genius of AnimalsResearch shows that animals interact in amazingly sophisticated ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fruit fly brains found to have a ring of cells that work as a compass(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has found that a ring of cells in the middle of the fruit fly brain acts as a compass, helping the insect understand where it is, where it has been and where it is going. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team explains how they expanded on research they began two years ago and what their findings may mean
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene drives may cause a revolution, but safeguards and public engagement are neededA "gene drive" occurs when a specific gene is spread at an enhanced rate through an animal or plant population.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turkish court rejects Wikipedia appeal on banA Turkish court has rejected an appeal filed by Wikipedia against a ban in Turkey on its website.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UT Health San Antonio team cures diabetes in mice without side effectsA discovery made at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First underwater carpet cloak realized, with metamaterialResearchers at the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have designed and fabricated an underwater acoustic carpet cloak using transformation acoustics, a scientific first. The research was published online in Scientific Reports on April 6.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology measures small-scale currents that transport ocean plastics, oil spillsResearchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have developed a new technology to measure the currents near the ocean's surface that carry pollutants such as plastics and spilled oil.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers one step closer to understanding deadly facial tumor in Tasmanian devilsNew findings in research funded by Morris Animal Foundation offer valuable insight on how to fight devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) that has resulted in a catastrophic decline in wild Tasmanian devils.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
Using Brainwaves to Guess PasswordsMalicious software could use brain interfaces to help steal passwords and other private data.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Air quality: Diesel scrappage scheme being consideredThe scheme is part of the government's draft clean air plan, which critics dismissed as "toothless".
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Gizmodo
This Warhammer 40,000 Animated Short Series Is Unbelievably Gorgeous GIF Not only is this fan-made short series really well edited and put together, it’s got an art style quite unlike anything you’ve seen before from the grim dark future of Warhammer 40,000 's setting. Advertisement Animated by Richard Boylan , Helsreach is a multi-part adaptation of Aaron Dembski-Bowden’s 2010 novel of the same name, which follows the exploits of the Black Templar chapter of Spac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New effort helps power utilities and others better plan for the futureIf you're an electric utility planning a new power plant by a river, it would be nice to know what that river will look like 20 years down the road. Will it be so high that it might flood the new facility? Will the water be so low that it can't be used to cool the plant?
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The Scientist RSS
New Method Can Sense Babies PainBy measuring brain activity patterns, scientists can more objectively assess infant distress.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:Cantankerous CrabHermit crabs living in broken shells outperform those inhabiting intact shells in fights because they attack more aggressively, compensating for lower muscle strength with vigor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet trolls are made, not born, researchers sayYou, too, could become a troll. Not a mythological creature that hides under bridges, but one of those annoying people who post disruptive messages in internet discussion groups – "trolling" for attention—and off-topic posters who throw out racist, sexist or politically controversial rants. The term has come to be applied to posters who use offensive language, harass other posters and generally co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to use water to convert methane into methanol(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institut and ETH Zurich, both in Switzerland, has developed a one-step process that uses water to convert methane to methanol. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique, noting that in addition to offering a simple and relatively cheap way to make methanol, the only other byproduct is hydrogen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Worrying lack of strategy' for U.K. smart citiesCity residents are not benefitting from a clear strategy for developing cities that are 'smart' according to a new RICS Research Trust report by University of Reading academics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer cells detected more accurately in hospital with artificial intelligenceCancer cells are to be detected and classified more efficiently and accurately, using ground-breaking artificial intelligence – thanks to a new collaboration between the University of Warwick, Intel Corporation, the Alan Turing Institute and University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust (UHCW).
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The Atlantic
'English Is Losing Its Importance in Europe' Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, has said “English is losing its importance in Europe,” remarks that are certain to reignite tensions with the U.K. over its decision to leave the European Union. Juncker, who made his remarks Friday in Florence, Italy, said he would talk in French also because “France has an election.” The French presidential runoff Sunday pits Emmanu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Food insecurity increases global migration: UNAt a time of a record-high number of people fleeing their homes due to violent conflicts, the UN food agency said Friday a global crisis in food supplies is causing even more migrants to cross borders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Buffett cuts stake in IBM and shares slideWarren Buffett says he's sold about a third of the 81 million shares he holds in IBM, sending the stock down sharply in early trading.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists solve major cancer protein conundrumDespite intense research, there's been much confusion regarding the exact role of a protein in a critical cancer-linked pathway. On one hand, the protein is described as a cell proliferation inhibitor, on the other, a cell proliferation activator, a duality that has caused a great deal of scientific head scratching. Now scientists have solved the conundrum, uncovering the regulatory machinery unde
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: sporty and sweary, potty-mouthed and powerful – it's this week's science I really hate running, but for various, doubtless misguided reasons, I’m currently training to run a 10K charity race. Needless to say it’s awful: I’m slow and overweight; during training I look like a tomato on the verge of explosion and would do almost anything to make it all stop. However, one thing I do enjoy is a good swear. So imagine my joy at finding that introducing a bit of swearing int
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Futurity.org
Cells in petri dish ‘oscillate’ like Parkinson’s tremors Abnormal oscillations in neurons that control movement, which likely cause the tremors that characterize Parkinson’s disease, have long appeared in patients with the disease. Now, scientists working with stem cells report that they have reproduced these oscillations in a petri dish, paving the way for much faster ways to screen for new treatments or even a cure for Parkinson’s disease. “With this
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A digital archive of slave voyages details the largest forced migration in historyBetween 1500 and 1866, slave traders forced 12.5 million Africans aboard transatlantic slave vessels. Before 1820, four enslaved Africans crossed the Atlantic for every European, making Africa the demographic wellspring for the repopulation of the Americas after Columbus' voyages. The slave trade pulled virtually every port that faced the Atlantic Ocean – from Copenhagen to Cape Town and Boston to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic analysis reveals patterns of migration of early Bantu speaking people(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has learned more about the migration history of early Bantu speaking people (BSP) in Africa by conducting a genetic analysis of over 2000 people living on the continent today. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their approach and what they learned about the BSP migration in Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Amsterdam, NetherlandsThe Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over part of the western Netherlands on 16 March, with the capital city of Amsterdam at the centre of the image.
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The Atlantic
The Border Patrol's Corruption Problem SOUTH PADRE ISLAND, Tex.—In the calm waters of the Texas Gulf Coast, Robert Hannan steered his boat toward what he thought was a crab trap. He found a corpse. “There’s nothing that can help this person if it's a real body,” Hannan said in disbelief to the 911 dispatcher. “It's floating just like it would a body, but there’s no head.” That grisly find would lead investigators first to an assassin
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The Atlantic
Is Psychiatry Partisan? Minutes before Don Davis was to be executed last month, word came from the U.S. Supreme Court not to proceed. For now, Davis is still alive, a convicted murderer among the survivors of Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson’s April rush to execute eight death-row inmates before state’s supply of midazolam expired and could no longer be considered safe to use in bringing about death. The execution, alon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study highlights growing significance of cryptocurrenciesMore than 3 million people (three times previous estimates) are estimated to be actively using cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, finds the first global cryptocurrency benchmarking study by the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Titan ripe for drone invasionWith its dense and hydrocarbon-rich atmosphere, Titan has been a subject of interest for many decades. And with the success of the Cassini-Huygens mission, which began exploring Saturn and its system of moons back in 2004, there are many proposals on the table for follow-up missions that would explore the surface of Titan and its methane seas in greater depth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Agronomist urges farmers to commit to weed control to prevent herbicide resistanceFarmers faced with tight profit margins may consider cutting back on weed control efforts this growing season, but an Iowa State University agronomist said doing so may cost farmers money in the long term.
9h
WIRED
Robot & Us: Self-Driving Trucks Are Coming to Save Lives and Kill Jobs Bad news for the 2.8 million drivers who work one of the most common jobs in the country, one that provides a steady middle class income. The post Robot & Us: Self-Driving Trucks Are Coming to Save Lives and Kill Jobs appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
Palmer Luckey Cosplays As Quiet From Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain [Image: Chelreezy ] Where in the world is Palmer Luckey? He’s at Machi Asobi, an annual anime event held in Tokushima, cosplaying as Quiet. Advertisement And he’s actually wearing shoes. Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.
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Live Science
In Photos: The History of the Hindenburg DisasterThe huge Hindenburg airship embarked on its first North American transatlantic flight in May 1937, but the journey ended in flames as the ship crashed to the ground in New Jersey. Here are photos of the impressive airship and its unfortunate demise.
9h
New Scientist - News
Man dreams in colour for first time during cancer radiotherapyAn Australian who used to dream in black and white began dreaming in vivid colour about cars, fish and former girlfriends while having cancer radiotherapy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study looks to safeguard red squirrels' futureResearchers are embarking on a new project aimed at helping to safeguard the future of the red squirrel in the UK.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Illustration of an Earth-sized 'Tatooine' planetWith two suns in its sky, Luke Skywalker's home planet Tatooine in "Star Wars" looks like a parched, sandy desert world. In real life, thanks to observatories such as NASA's Kepler space telescope, we know that two-star systems can indeed support planets, although planets discovered so far around double-star systems are large and gaseous. Scientists wondered: If an Earth-size planet were orbiting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sexually deceptive spider orchids fool waspsScientists at The University of Western Australia, in collaboration with researchers from The Australian National University, have uncovered the chemical compounds used by a species of spider orchid (Caladenia) to sexually seduce male wasp pollinators.
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Ingeniøren
ING BAGSIDEN: Strammeren er et bødker-redskabSidste uges efterlysning af en løsning på mysteriet om en læsers grønlandske raritet ledte til svar - en tøndevinde.
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Science-Based Medicine
New Study Reveals Increase in Babies Injured by Nursery ProductsAfter years of steady decline, a new study reveals a concerning increase in overall baby product-related injuries since 2003 and a sharp rise in concussions.
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Live Science
Missing Link? What the Piltdown Man Hoax Can Teach Science TodayA century-old case of scientific fraud illustrates how hard it is to untangle the truth when access to new discoveries is limited.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colony density, not hormones, triggers honeybee 'puberty'New research helps answer a long-standing mystery of how honeybees sense the size and strength of their colony, a critical cue for the bees to switch from investing solely in survival to also investing in reproduction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) marks 15 years of seeing what's in the airAccurate weather forecasts save lives. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, launched on this date 15 years ago on NASA's Aqua satellite, significantly increased weather forecasting accuracy within a couple of years by providing extraordinary three-dimensional maps of clouds, air temperature and water vapor throughout the atmosphere's weather-making layer. Fifteen years later, AIR
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
East of Siberia: An Undesirable NestThe last thing you want to find in your mattress is a nest of wasps -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Cartel Murder That Exposed a Rogue U.S. Border Patrol Agent When a headless body washed up in the calm waters of the Texas gulf coast, investigators began to unravel a crime that led first to a drug cartel assassin, then to a locked safe containing​ more than a kilo of cocaine, methamphetamine, a gold-plated pistol— and U.S. Border Patrol agent Joel Luna’s badge. At a moment when Border Patrol may relax its hiring standards to meet President Trump's execu
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Futurity.org
Coating could let grease slide off your clothes Giving fabric a resistance to oil, called oleophobicity, makes cleaning spaghetti sauce off your favorite shirt as easy as spilling it in the first place. A new coating offers this quality without fluorines, which break down into chlorofluorocarbon gas, a greenhouse gas that’s harmful to the environment. Emmanuel Giannelis, professor of materials science and engineering in the Cornell University
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool may assist U.S. regional sea level planningThanks in large part to satellite measurements, scientists' skill in measuring how much sea levels are rising on a global scale - currently 0.13 inch (3.4 millimeters) per year - has improved dramatically over the past quarter century. But at the local level, it's been harder to estimate specific regional sea level changes 10 or 20 years away - the critical timeframe for regional planners and deci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sandwiched between superconductors, graphene adopts exotic electronic statesIn normal conductive materials such as silver and copper, electric current flows with varying degrees of resistance, in the form of individual electrons that ping-pong off defects, dissipating energy as they go. Superconductors, by contrast, are so named for their remarkable ability to conduct electricity without resistance, by means of electrons that pair up and move through a material as one, ge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5's second liftoff this yearAriane 5 has delivered two telecom satellites, SGDC and Koreasat-7, into their planned orbits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Listening for CassiniESA's sensitive tracking antennas at New Norcia, Western Australia, and Malargüe, Argentina (seen here in 2012), are being called in to help gather crucial science data during Cassini's last months in orbit, dubbed the Grand Finale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A small RNA molecule in cyanobacteria affects metabolic acclimationInternational researchers working in collaboration with Professor Wolfgang R. Hess and Dr. Jens Georg, both from the University of Freiburg's Faculty of Biology, have discovered a small RNA molecule that plays a key role in how cyanobacteria adjust their metabolism to the amount of iron available in the environment. Oxygenic photosynthesis – in which plants, algae and cyanobacteria generate oxygen
9h
Live Science
Science Videos Wow Judges in Data-Visualization Face-OffThe journal Science announced the winners of its second annual data-visualization competition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop device to predict clear-sky turbulence for safer air travelTurbulence in clear skies comprises the most unpleasant kind of vortex drifts in air travel. These occur in cloudless space with perfect visibility when an airplane travels between air flows that differ in direction, speed of movement, temperature and density. This is the kind of turbulence that Aeroflot flight SU-270 from Moscow to Bangkok experienced, resulting in 27 injuries of varying severity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dendrite-free lithium metal anodes using N-doped graphene matrixRecently, Researchers in Tsinghua University have proposed a nitrogen-doped graphene matrix with densely and uniformly distributed lithiophilic functional groups for dendrite-free lithium metal anodes, appearing in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Methylated phenylarsenical metabolites identified in chicken liversSupplements containing arsenic have been banned in the European Union since 1999 and in North America since 2013. In many countries they are still added to poultry feed to prevent parasitic infection and promote weight gain. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now demonstrated that the danger to human health may be greater than previously thought because the metabolic breakdown of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA rover takes samples from active linear dune on MarsAs it drives uphill from a band of rippled sand dunes, NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is toting a fistful of dark sand for onboard analysis that will complete the rover's investigation of those dunes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dog virus found in Australia for the first timeA new form of the common and highly contagious dog virus canine parvovirus (CPV) has been discovered in Australia for the first time by researchers from the University of Adelaide.
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The Atlantic
License to Speak Nearly 20 years ago, a man in Oregon found himself threatened with 98 years in prison for testifying against a proposed gravel mine. It took a team of pro bono lawyers—including me—to convince a state board that this frontal attack on free speech violated the U.S. and Oregon constitutions. Bureaucracies are slow to internalize bad news, however. Today, an Oregon man named Mats Jarlstrom is fighti
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Live Science
Understanding the Big One: Scientists Focus on Subduction ZonesSeismologists take a tool out of the playbook of astronomers and particle physicists.
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Ars Technica
New device can harvest indoor light to power electronics Enlarge / This probably isn't the first lightbulb you've ever seen. (credit: NikonFilm35 - Flickr ) We spend a fair bit of energy creating stray electromagnetic fields in order to make sure our cellular and WiFi devices are constantly fed with data. Every now and again, someone suggests that there must be a way to harvest these fields in order to charge our devices wirelessly. Now, a team of rese
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Futurity.org
How e-cigarettes are burning people’s thighs The failure of lithium ion batteries located inside electronic cigarettes can cause serious burns to e-cigarette smokers, a new study suggests. Gary Vercruysse, lead author of the study, and his colleagues noticed something strange going on in their emergency room about a year and a half ago. It all started when a 58-year-old man with severe burns to his left thigh arrived at Banner – University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First test flight of stratospheric solar plane (Update)The first solar plane aimed at reaching the stratosphere made an initial low-altitude test flight over Switzerland Friday.
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Live Science
Ancient Meteor Strike Triggered Eruptions Lasting Up to a Million YearsA giant meteor impact on Earth nearly 2 billion years ago triggered more explosive and long-lived volcanic eruptions than previously thought, a new study finds.
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Dagens Medicin
SF: Socialdemokratiet holder hånden under effektiviseringskrav Det skuffer SF og flere andre partier, at Socialdemokratiet ikke vil stemme for en afskaffelse af kravet om årlige effektiviseringer på to procent i sundhedsvæsenet.
10h
WIRED
How Crispr Could Snip Away Some of Humanity’s Worst Diseases Hiding a gene-editing snipper inside a peaceful virus could treat everything from HIV to cancer. The post How Crispr Could Snip Away Some of Humanity's Worst Diseases appeared first on WIRED .
10h
WIRED
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Is Great—But All Too Familiar Director James Gunn's sequel is here to give you the good time you had in 2014. The post Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Is Great—But All Too Familiar appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
NYC’s New Tech to Track Every Homeless Person in the City Think Salesforce, but for homelessness. The post NYC's New Tech to Track Every Homeless Person in the City appeared first on WIRED .
10h
Ars Technica
Lawyers: How can we scrutinize surveillance records that remain sealed? Enlarge / The Oakland division of the US District Court for the Northern District of California heard arguments on May 4, 2017 for In re: Granick . (credit: Cyrus Farivar) OAKLAND, Calif.—A federal judge appeared generally skeptical to two legal scholars’ efforts to get the court to unseal years' worth of sealed surveillance records held in a Northern California court. However, US Magistrate Judg
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Viden
Tidsrejse: Det er matematisk muligtIfølge matematikerne bag en ny tidsrejse-formel er hop frem og tilbage i tiden ikke kun et sci-fi fænomen.
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Science | The Guardian
Eat insects and fake meat to cut impact of livestock on the planet – study Changes in diet are vital to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation caused by the world’s growing appetite for meat, say scientists Insects and imitation meat are the best alternatives to real meat in tackling the huge and growing environmental impact of livestock on the planet, new research has shown. The world’s appetite for meat is rising fast as incomes grow but the resulting green
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mars may not have been born alongside the other rocky planetsMars formed farther away from the sun than its present-day orbit, not near the other terrestrial planets, new research suggests.
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Science : NPR
Why Taste Buds Dull As We Age You're born with roughly 9,000 taste buds, and they're very good at regenerating — which is why you can recover the ability to taste just days after burning your tongue. But that can change as we age. (Image credit: CSA Images/Getty Images)
10h
Ars Technica
Not-so-secret DOD “spy drone” footage, live on the Internet [Updated] On Wednesday, Kenneth Lipp, a contributor to the Daily Beast, was doing what amounts to a random search on the security search engine Shodan when he discovered what appears to be a Web console for full-motion video feeds from two Predator drones. The website Lipp found bears the logos of the National Reconnaissance Office, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's (NGA's) Aerospace Data Facil
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Some People Are Born to Worry [Excerpt]How do early-life traumas get under our skin? A researcher details his quest for the stress-causing mechanism -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
The Atlantic
Rex Tillerson Doesn't Understand America On May 3rd Secretary of State Rex Tillerson gave his first big speech about American foreign policy to the employees of the Department of State. In so doing, he gave those who think that American diplomacy matters more reason to worry. It was a speech given in the style of an executive delivering a pep talk to anxious employees, a substantial number of whom suspect the boss intends to declare the
10h
The Atlantic
Guardians of the Galaxy 2: Twice Is (Still) the Charm Perhaps the finest, funniest moment in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is the first action sequence. Or perhaps I should put quote marks around that: “action sequence.” Because for most of its duration, the action is strictly an afterthought. The titular supergroup has been enlisted to defeat a giant star-squid, and its smallest member, Baby Groot (the twig-like offshoot of last installment’s arbo
11h
Ingeniøren
4.000 snekanoner skal redde stor gletsjer i AlperneForskere vil dække Morteratsch-gletsjeren i de schweiziske alper med et tæppe af sne for at beskytte isen mod at smelte.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deep-seated tectonic genesis of large earthquakes in North ChinaNorth China is one of the areas of strong earthquake activity on the Chinese mainland. Between the 1960s and 1970s, North China experienced the 1966 Xingtai Ms7.2, 1969 Bohai Ms7.4, 1975 Haicheng Ms7.3 and 1976 Tangshan Ms7.8 earthquakes, causing great losses of life and property. The Tangshan earthquake caused 240,000 casualties. In the past 50 years, Chinese seismologists have conducted large-sc
11h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Oysters, Despite What You’ve Heard, Are Always in SeasonNever eat oysters in months that don’t have the letter “r”? With proper precautions, you can ignore that adage.
11h
NYT > Science
Works in Progress: Rebuilding the New York Aquarium After Hurricane SandyThe aquarium in Coney Island was hit hard by the 2012 storm, and it’s still recovering. A top priority: Make it floodproof.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With more light, chemistry speeds upLight initiates many chemical reactions. Experiments at the aser Centre of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Warsaw's Faculty of Physics have, for the first time, demonstrated that by increasing the illumination intensity, some reactions can be significantly accelerated. Here, researchers achieved reaction acceleration using pairs of ultras
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The first one-bit chemical memory unit—the 'chit'In classical computer science, information is stored in bits; in quantum computer science, information is stored in quantum bits, or qubits. Experiments at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw prove that chemistry is also a suitable basis for storing information. The chemical bit, or 'chit,' is a simple arrangement of three droplets in contact with each o
11h
Ingeniøren
Advarsel: Kommende kæmpebøder for datasjusk bliver fed fidus for hackere Persondataforordningen giver grundlag for hacker-afpresning, mener Henning Mortensen, Chief Privacy Officer I grossistfimaet A & O Johansen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/cpo-gdpr-kaempeboeder-datasjusk-giver-god-businescase-hackere-1076289 Version2
11h
Ingeniøren
Nyt lovforslag tillader stadig, at fjernvarmekunder malkes’Dybt foruroligende’ kalder fjernvarmedirektør et nyt lovforslag, der vil give kommuner mulighed for at bruge fjernvarmebrugernes penge i deres el- eller gasforsyning.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What will carmakers think of next? Three cool Chevrolet features worth a lookI recently spent time driving a lot of new Chevrolet cars, trucks and SUVs.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extinction of Alpine plants may remain undetectable for a long timeHow do alpine plants react to warmer climatic conditions? Due to their longevity, the plants may survive longer than expected in their habitats, but produce offspring that are increasingly maladapted. Population size may decrease faster than the contraction of the species range, as UZH researchers show using computer models. Scientists who wish to track the precise extinction risk of plant species
12h
The Atlantic
You Cannot Encrypt Your Face The night of December 16, 1773, dozens of Massachusetts colonists quietly boarded three ships and dumped what would now be close to $1 million worth of British tea into Boston Harbor. The Sons of Liberty painted their faces and dressed like Native Americans. They barely spoke, to avoid revealing their identities. “There appeared to be an understanding that each individual should volunteer his ser
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First large Chinese-made passenger jet makes its maiden flightThe first large Chinese-made passenger jetliner completed its maiden test flight on Friday, a milestone in China's long-term goal to break into the Western-dominated aircraft market.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traffic signals in Frisco will soon talk with cars as part of a new technology pushWhat if you knew when you stopped at a traffic signal whether you had two minutes or 10 seconds before the light turned green?
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sweden's booming video game industry is more than just Microsoft's 'Minecraft'Microsoft raised eyebrows in 2014 with the announcement it was spending a hefty $2.5 billion to buy Mojang, the Swedish developer of world-building game "Minecraft."
12h
Ingeniøren
It-efterforskningshold: Hør om vores hverdag og værktøjer Efterforskning af hackerangreb på virksomheder er vigtigt for at lukke mulige bagdøre i it-systemer og forhindre fremtidig forsøg fra cyberkriminelle. Læs om en almindelig fredag for et digitalt efterforskningsteam. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/it-efterforskningshold-hoer-vores-hverdag-vaerktoejer-7936 Emner Arbejdsmarked It-sikkerhed Jobfinder
12h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Netcompany, Draware, TDC og endnu flere jagter udviklere samt it-specialister På ugens it-liste er der jobs i mange forskellige industrier. Få eksempelvis arbejde i vind-, telekommunikations-, uddannelses- eller it-sikkerhedsbranchen. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-netcompany-draware-tdc-endnu-flere-jagter-udviklere-samt-it-specialister-7947 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extinction of Alpine plants may remain undetectable for a long timeHow do alpine plants react to warmer climatic conditions? Due to their longevity, the plants may survive longer than expected in their habitats, but produce offspring that are increasingly maladapted. Population size may decrease faster than the contraction of the species range, as UZH researchers show using computer models. Scientists who wish to track the precise extinction risk of plant species
12h
The Atlantic
Are Brits Tired of Politics? When Theresa May, the U.K. prime minister, called for a surprise snap election in April, she framed the vote as a necessary measure to give her Conservative government a strong mandate to press forward with negotiations over her country’s exit from the European Union. A strong Conservative showing in the election, scheduled for June 8, will also empower May to pursue a domestic agenda more aligne
12h
The Atlantic
The Korean Peninsula's Other High-Stakes Drama To be clear, there’s never a good time for a crisis on the Korean peninsula. But this is an especially tricky time, as South Korea gears up for its presidential election on May 9. Unsurprisingly, North Korea policy is one of the major fault lines in South Korean politics: The country’s conservatives are more hawkish towards the North, its liberals more dovish. Liberals tend to subscribe to former
12h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsjurist: Lovindgreb i praksis’ økonomi kan være ulovligt Regeringens bebudede lovindgreb mod de praktiserende læger kan være grundlovsstridigt, vurderer sundhedsjurist.
12h
NeuWrite San Diego
Phrenology: An Infographic
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bangladesh coal plant could cause 6,000 early deaths: GreenpeaceA giant coal-fired power plant approved by Bangladesh could drastically worsen air pollution for millions and cause the early deaths of 6,000 people over its lifetime, Greenpeace said Friday.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Ny professor i ortopædkirurgi på Aalborg Universitetshospital
13h
Dagens Medicin
Lægemiddelkomite vil vaccinere patienter i biologisk behandlingImmunsvækkede patienter bør vaccineres mod pneumokokker, mener Den Regionale Lægemiddelkommité i Region Midtjylland.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Økonomisk belønning til rygere afprøves som mulig vej til rygestop Nyt projekteskal undersøge, om en økonomisk belønning kan være en vej til at gøre rygererøgfrie på sigt.
13h
The Atlantic
How Obamacare Repeal Could Run Aground in the Senate The gavel hadn’t even sounded on the House vote to replace the Affordable Care Act when the snap judgements of Republican senators started streaming in. They weren’t exactly warm and friendly. “I don’t support the House bill,” declared Senator Rob Portman of Ohio. “The House bill does not address the concerns” of Senator Shelley Moore Capito, said a spokeswoman for the West Virginia Republican. “
13h
The Atlantic
The American Health Care Act's Prosperity Gospel Stop me if you’ve heard this one. A Trump voter in Trump country—maybe a coal miner in West Virginia or the patron of a sleepy diner in rural Kentucky—is a recipient of Medicaid coverage under Obamacare for a life-threatening illness or chronic condition, but still maintains total support for President Trump and a zeal for repealing the program. Soon enough, there may be an addition to the tale o
13h
Ingeniøren
10 teknologiske tendenser, du bør kende: #5. Genterapi rykker for alvorAlvorlige bivirkninger og dødsfald har været en hæmsko for udviklingen af genterapi, men nu har forskerne omsider fået styr på vira, der fungerer som chauffører for indsættelsen af raske gener.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Millionregning til danske hospitaler efter eksplosion på kinesisk fabrik Pris på bestemt bredspektret antibiotika er steget 660 procent for regionernes lægemiddelorganisation, Amgros.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strike-delayed European rocket launches in French GuianaAn Ariane 5 rocket carrying two telecommunications satellites for South Korea and Brazil blasted off Thursday in a launch which had been delayed since March 20 due to a crippling strike in French Guiana.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fishing with guns on a lake under threat in KenyaThe beach looks ready for war: in the sparse lakeshore shade hundreds wait, sweaty from the heat, weapons at their feet.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iraqi entrepreneurs find business success in smartphone appsIt didn't take long for Ahmed Subhi and his friends to figure out the best project to launch amid Iraq's acute economic crisis. They just looked at their phones.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Smart' denim promises touchscreen tech clothesA young man in a white t-shirt pulls on a dark blue denim trucker jacket, tucks his smartphone in an inside pocket and puts in-ear headphones in his right ear.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iceland drills 4.7 km down into volcano to tap clean energyIt's named after a Nordic god and drills deep into the heart of a volcano: "Thor" is a rig that symbolises Iceland's leading-edge efforts to produce powerful clean energy.
14h
Ingeniøren
Den umulige geometriopgave: Er dette løsningen på vinklens tredeling?VIDEO: En læser udfordrer skæbnen med en video af en geometrisk udfordring, som ingen troede mulig. Men holder det?
14h
Ars Technica
Dota 2’s first co-op campaign mode will launch in May for $10 Enlarge / Siltbreaker, coming this month to Dota 2 for $10. (credit: Valve Software) The online team-battling game Dota 2 has long differentiated itself from other "MOBA" games by charging zero money for its core gameplay, including all of its playable characters. That changes later this month, as developer Valve Software has announced the game's first-ever campaign mode on Thursday. It will cost
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows white blood cell boosting drugs safe during chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancerA late breaking subanalysis of the phase III CONVERT trial presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) shows that white blood cell boosting drugs are safe during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
16h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Nej, vi skal ikke belønne uansvarlig brug af sprøjtegifte Landbrug
16h
Ingeniøren
Linux: Det 'ukendte' styresystem, du møder overalt Open source-styresystemet Linux breder sig på alt fra de mindste smartphones til de største supercomputere. Men de færreste ved, at de bruger det. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ukendte-styresystem-du-moeder-overalt-1076268 Version2
16h
Ingeniøren
Første barn behandlet med kommerciel genterapiMed en genterapi-kur til den nette sum af 4,4 millioner kroner har et firma forsøgt at behandle et barn med en immunfejl, som forvandler alle bakterier til potentielle dræbere.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRSA blood infections are less fatal in kids, but cause significant complicationsChildren with bloodstream infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are less likely to die than adults with this condition and have different risk factors for treatment failure, a new study led by a Children's National Health System clinician indicates.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Head & neck cancer recurrence following radiation associated with high tumor PD-L1 expressionRecurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) following radiation therapy was associated with high tumor levels of the protein PD-L1.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of antipsychotics outweigh risks, find expertsAn international group of experts has concluded that, for patients with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, antipsychotic medications do not have negative long-term effects on patients' outcomes or the brain.
17h
The Atlantic
Trayvon Martin Will Receive a Posthumous College Degree Five years after his death, Trayvon Martin will receive a posthumous bachelor’s degree in aeronautical science from Florida Memorial University (FMU), the university announced Wednesday on its Facebook page. If Martin were alive today, he would be 22 years old—the same age as many college graduates. Martin’s degree will specify a concentration in flight education, the university said, “in honor o
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Digital Advertising Takes a HitBig-name advertisers have begun to question whether they’ve placed too much faith—and money—in targeted advertising.
17h
cognitive science
Future Navy Engineer (me) shares his Artificial Intelligence research submitted by /u/notGucci94 [link] [comments]
17h
Live Science
Biodegradable Circuitry Could Shrink the World's Growing Piles of E-WasteResearchers in California report they have produced a lightweight and flexible semiconductor built on a base of cellulose, the main ingredient in plant fibers.
18h
The Atlantic
In Alabama, Faith-Based Adoption Agencies Can Deny Gay Couples Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed a bill Wednesday making it legal for private faith-based adoption agencies to turn away gay couples. The new law does not apply to agencies that receive state or federal funding. The bill, known as the Alabama Child Placing Agency Inclusion Act, was approved last month by the state Senate in a vote of 23-9. All eight Senate Democrats voted against the bill, along
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can trusting your doctor help reduce pain?Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally connected to your doctor, will the shot hurt less?
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atlases of immune cells surrounding tumors may guide immunotherapyTwo independent studies have begun mapping the connections between and identities of the thousands of immune cells surrounding human tumors. One research group, looking at kidney cancer, found that tumors with different clinical outcomes have unique immune cell profiles. These profiles can also estimate a cancer patient's prognosis. The other group, looking at lung cancer, showed that even early t
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving control of age-related obesityThe function and distribution of adipose tissue in the body change during the course of life. Beige fat cells, a special type of adipocytes, have the capability to use energy reserves – fatty deposits – by generating heat in a process known as thermogenesis. With increasing age, beige adipocytes take on the morphology of white adipocytes. Thermogenic activity ceases and with it the cells' ability
19h
Live Science
Parathyroid Glands: Facts, Function & DiseaseThe parathyroids are four small glands that play a big part in regulating the amount of calcium in the blood.
19h
Science | The Guardian
The great climate silence: we are on the edge of the abyss but we ignore it | Clive Hamilton We continue to plan for the future as if climate scientists don’t exist. The greatest shame is the absence of a sense of tragedy After 200,000 years of modern humans on a 4.5 billion-year-old Earth, we have arrived at new point in history: the Anthropocene. The change has come upon us with disorienting speed. It is the kind of shift that typically takes two or three or four generations to sink in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foodsAlmost half of baby rice food products contain illegal levels of inorganic arsenic despite new regulations set by the EU, new research concludes.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The liver increases by half during the dayIn mammals, the liver reaches its maximum efficiency when they are active and feed. Biologists showed in mice that the size of the liver increases by almost half before returning to its initial dimensions, according to the phases of activity and rest. This fluctuation disappears when the normal biological rhythm is reversed. The disruption of our circadian clock probably has important repercussion
19h
The Atlantic
Democrats Target Vulnerable Republicans Over Health-Care Vote Updated on May 5, 2017 at 10:25 a.m. Democrats are targeting House Republicans who voted in support of legislation to repeal and replace major parts of the Affordable Care Act. Activists are hoping to channel opposition to GOP efforts to dismantle former President Obama’s signature health-care law into fundraising that will help back Democratic candidates in the 2018 midterm elections, though it’
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomasThe fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. Researchers have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistryResearchers have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level. Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor controlA new connection between two regions of the brain has been discovered that may help explain how motor skills develop. Working with infant rats, the scientists found that the hippocampus and the red nucleus, part of the brain stem, synchronize during REM sleep.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bravery may cost fish their livesFish that show bravery often become prey themselves, whereas shyer individuals survive to a greater extent. Researchers have now successfully established a connection between bold personalities and the risk of being killed by a predator in the wild.
20h
Gizmodo
Uber Faces Criminal Probe for 'Greyball' Program Photo: AP Reuters is reporting tonight that Uber faces a criminal investigation by the Department of Justice for using software to avoid scrutiny by government regulators. Advertisement In March, the New York Times’ Mike Isaac reported the existence of the “Greyball” software, used to “identify and circumvent officials who were trying to clamp down on the ride-hailing service.” Government officia
20h
Science | The Guardian
Nike’s two-hour marathon project reveals technological inequities in sport This weekend, with technological help, three runners will try to break the two-hour marathon barrier. This is a good time to ask who technology is for This weekend in Italy three elite athletes sponsored by Nike, the athletics company, will, conditions permitting, attempt to break two hours for running a marathon, 26.2 miles. The current world record is 2:02:57, set by Dennis Kimetto of Kenya in
20h
Ingeniøren
It-efterforskningshold: Hør om vores hverdag og værktøjer Efterforskning af hackerangreb på virksomheder er vigtigt for at lukke mulige bagdøre i it-systemer og forhindre fremtidig forsøg fra cyberkriminelle. Læs om en almindelig fredag for et digitalt efterforskningsteam. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/it-efterforskningshold-hoer-vores-hverdag-vaerktoejer-7936 Emner Arbejdsmarked It-sikkerhed Jobfinder
20h
WIRED
The House Health Plan Makes Your Genes a Preexisting Condition When does "preexisting" turn to "existing?" More sophisticated and readily available genetic tests make that area greyer and greyer. The post The House Health Plan Makes Your Genes a Preexisting Condition appeared first on WIRED .
20h
Ars Technica
Report: Uber faces federal criminal probe over regulator-evading software Enlarge (credit: Latrell G. / YouTube ) Federal authorities have begun a criminal investigation into Uber’s use of Greyball, a software tool that the company used to evade local officials in places where the service had not been formally approved, which notably includes Portland, Oregon. This is according to Reuters , which cited two unnamed sources in its Thursday evening report. The Department
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For people with Down Syndrome, varying test results can make it harder to get the right vision prescriptionEven objective, automated vision testing—using a device called an autorefractor—gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a new study.
20h
Ars Technica
Oculus shuts down Emmy-winning VR short-film division Enlarge / Sorry, Henry. Oculus just blew your candle out. (credit: Oculus Story Studio ) If the world of virtual-reality filmmaking has a big future, it won’t be developed within one major company's offices: Oculus. The Facebook-owned VR company announced late Thursday that its internal Oculus Story Studio, dedicated to producing short films for viewing within an Oculus Rift headset, has been shu
21h
The Atlantic
How the Obamacare Repeal Could Cost Republicans the House The House’s passage of its new health-care bill is an immediate win for Trump. But he’s not thinking ahead, argues David Frum. According to a recent Pew survey , 60 percent of Americans believe it is the responsibility of the federal government to provide health care for all. The Obamacare repeal may cost the Republicans their majority in the 2018 midterms.
21h
Gizmodo
These Are Your Three Picks For the Best Clothes Hangers Amid a closetful of nominations , three clothes hangers stood out from the pack. So check out the finalists below, and don’t leave us hanging by forgetting to vote at the bottom of the post. IKEA BUMERANG IKEA BUMERANG Hangers The wooden clothes hangers from Ikea. They are friendly to the environment and really inexpensive. They last forever and take care of your clothes. I’ve seen the price as l
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sugar-sweetened beverages becoming more affordable around the worldA new study concludes that sugar-sweetened beverages have become more affordable around the globe, and are likely to become even more affordable and more widely consumed.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Policies to curb short-lived climate pollutants could yield major health benefitsA commitment to reducing global emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) such as methane and black carbon could slow global warming while boosting public health and agricultural yields, aligning the Paris Climate Agreement with global sustainable development goals, a new analysis by an international panel of scientists shows.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
With more light, chemistry speeds upLight initiates many chemical reactions. Experiments have for the first time demonstrated that increasing the intensity of illumination some reactions can be significantly faster. Here, acceleration was achieved using pairs of ultrashort laser pulses.
21h
The Atlantic
Safe Zones in Syria Russia, Iran, and Turkey have agreed to a memorandum establishing four safe zones across the north, central, and southern parts of Syria, constituting a major advancement in the nation’s ongoing civil war. Russia released the memorandum Thursday at peace talks in Astana, Kazakhstan. Russia and Iran are allied with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, while Turkey is allied with some of the rebel gro
21h

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