NYT > Science
E.P.A. Dismisses Members of Major Scientific Review BoardA spokesman for the agency’s administrator said he would consider replacing the academic scientists with representatives from industries the agency is supposed to regulate.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrated violation of Bell's inequality on frequency-bin entangled photon pairsQuantum entanglement, one of the most intriguing features of multi-particle quantum systems, has become a fundamental building block in both quantum information processing and quantum computation. If two particles are entangled, no matter how far away they are separated, quantum mechanics predicts that measurement of one particle leads to instantaneous wave-function collapse of the other particle.
4h
Ingeniøren
Robotter med kunstig intelligens skal fjerne batterier fra elektronikaffaldBatterier med miljøfarlige stoffer skal fremover genkendes af kunstig intelligens og fjernes fra affaldsstrømmen af robotter uden menneskers hjælp.
11h

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Futurity.org
Does your county believe in climate change? Check the map A new detailed, easily navigable opinion map clarifies what people in each county, city, and even congressional district in the United States believe about climate change. A vast majority of Americans—70 percent, according to recent research—think global warming is indeed happening. That’s encouraging for climate scientists, but the numbers don’t paint a complete picture. “The impetus for the pro
3min
WIRED
Brian Greene on How Science Became a Political Prisoner The author of The Fabric of the Cosmos , and other bestsellers, says America needs rational thinkers to step up and help fix its relationship with facts. The post Brian Greene on How Science Became a Political Prisoner appeared first on WIRED .
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Norway to kill 2,000 reindeer to eradicate diseaseThe Norwegian government on Monday authorised the slaughter of a herd of around 2,000 reindeer in a bid to eradicate a brain-destroying disease, after several cases were detected in Norway for the first time in Europe.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create touchpads with a can of spray paintTouch sensing is most common on small, flat surfaces such as smartphone or tablet screens. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, however, can turn surfaces of a wide variety of shapes and sizes into touchpads using tools as simple as a can of spray paint.
2min
Gizmodo
The Root Ohio Teacher Fired for Dragging Preschooler Down Hallway | Jezebel The Wedding of the Centu The Root Ohio Teacher Fired for Dragging Preschooler Down Hallway | Jezebel The Wedding of the Century Took Place This Weekend | Deadspin The Oilers Reminded Everyone They Have A Young Superstar Not Named Connor McDavid | Fusion France’s Far Right Isn’t Going Anywhere |
5min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team unveils dual-channel biological function generatorRice University bioengineers who specialize in creating tools for synthetic biology have unveiled the latest version of their "biofunction generator and "bioscilloscope," an optogenetic platform that uses light to activate and study two biological circuits at a time.
8min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US international military training programs tied to fewer civilian casualtiesU.S. grant programs that provided training to international military and civilian personnel since 1995 are tied to fewer conflict-related civilian casualties in foreign countries that were recipients of the U.S. security aid. However, arms-sales programs are ineffective at improving human rights in those countries that purchase U.S. weapons and services, according to a new University of Kansas stu
8min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers disprove the assumption that parents conflict with one another during a plant's embryonic developmentThe Arabidopsis thaliana is a tiny, inconspicuous and herbaceous offshoot of the family of cruciferous plant that one might easily overlook in a meadow, yet the plant has the potential to disrupt a common school of thought: Together with his working group and colleagues from the University of Nagoya, Japan, the Freiburg biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux show how plants start embryo development and t
8min
Ingeniøren
Følg pollenvarsling online i nyt europæisk systemDet fælleseuropæiske vejrcenter i England står i spidsen for et nyt system til varsling af pollen, som i første omgang skal afprøves i en periode på 18 måneder.
9min
Ingeniøren
Mac-malware spredt som open source-videoværktøj Hvis du har hentet og installeret open source-værktøjet til videotranscoding HandBrake i perioden 2. - 6. maj til MacOS, så har du måske fået malware på dit system. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/mac-malware-spredt-open-source-videovaerktoej-1076406 Version2
9min
Scientific American Content: Global
EPA Just Scrubbed Even More Mentions of Climate from Its WebsiteThe agency has said it is updating the site to better reflect the Trump administration's priorities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Commuter marriage study finds surprising emphasis on interdependenceThe concept of marriage may be in flux, but a new study of commuter marriages—in which a married couple lives apart in service to their dual professional careers—appears to confirm that married people still see interdependence as a key feature of their unions.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice U. unveils dual-channel biological function generatorRice University bioengineers who specialize in creating tools for synthetic biology have unveiled the latest version of their 'biofunction generator and bioscilloscope,' an optogenetic platform that uses light to activate and study two biological circuits at a time.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US international military training programs tied to fewer civilian casualtiesUS grant programs that provided training to international military and civilian personnel since 1995 are tied to fewer conflict-related civilian casualties in foreign countries that were recipients of the US security aid. However, arms-sales programs are ineffective at improving human rights in those countries that purchase US weapons and services.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fabrication technology in the fourth dimensionScientists use the term 4-D printing to refer to the simple production of objects that can transform their shape at different times. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now taken this approach one major step further by developing a construction principle that can produce load-bearing and predictable structures.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Manufacturing technique can make proteins less effectiveBiopharma and food businesses working with proteins now have access to better information about how a type of fluid flow commonly encountered in manufacturing processes can affect the quality of their products, following successful research.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maternal and paternal cooperationResearchers disprove the assumption that parents conflict with one another during a plant's embryonic development.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Public skeptical of research if tied to a companyWhen it comes to research warning us about the latest health risks or touting the latest cure, a new Michigan State University study indicates that many people won't trust the findings when an industry partner, even with a good reputation, is involved.
15min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-ever autonomously controlled 'capsule robot' explores colonNew research shows that an 18-mm magnetized capsule colonoscope, which can be paired with standard medical instruments, successfully performed intricate maneuvers inside the colon while guided by an external magnet attached to a robotic arm. Researchers believe this technology will reduce the potential discomfort of colonoscopies and lead to more people undergoing the life-saving screening test. T
15min
The Atlantic
The Real Chaos of Campus Gun Laws ATLANTA, Ga.—Last week, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal signed a bill that will allow Georgia weapons permit holders over 21 years of age to carry concealed firearms in most parts of the state’s college and university campuses. The impacted schools include the Georgia Institute of Technology, where I teach, and the University of Georgia. Here, as in other states where similar laws have arisen, oppon
16min
Futurity.org
Watch 4D-printed object become a sturdy dome A new construction principle makes it possible to print flat objects and to unfold them three-dimensionally later. 4D printing creates moveable and shape variable objects such as flat components that can be folded into three-dimensional objects at a later point, or even objects that can change their shape as a function of external influences. Kristina Shea, head of the Engineering Design and Comp
16min
Gizmodo
Australian Biosecurity Officers Just Destroyed an 'Irreplaceable' Plant Collection The destroyed sample would have looked similar to this Natural History Museum collection (Image: Natural History Museum) A box of rare daisies dating back to the mid 19th century has been destroyed by Australian biosecurity officials after a paperwork mix-up. Upsettingly, it’s the second such incident to happen in Australia in recent months. Advertisement As reported by ABC News, the pressed plan
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers unveil new password meter that will change how users make passwordsOne of the most popular passwords in 2016 was "qwertyuiop," even though most password meters will tell you how weak that is. The problem is no existing meters offer any good advice to make it better—until now.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental changeIn a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasise the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental cha
20min
Gizmodo
Doctor Who Is on One Hell of a Streak Lately Image: BBC Doctor Who ’s tenth season is only four episodes in, but I can’t remember the last time the show hit the ground running as well it has this season. We’ve had great chemistry between Peter Capaldi and Pearl Mackie, great fun, and now in this weekend’s episode, “Knock Knock”, we got the rest of the perfect Who formula: a whole load of scares and a lot of heartbreak. The last time Doctor
23min
Futurity.org
‘Open ports’ leave a hole in smartphone security Smartphone apps that use “open ports” to share and receive data are more vulnerable to security breaches than previously thought, mainly due to the their widespread use in internet communication, a new study suggests. The vulnerability the researchers highlighted is most pronounced in Android apps that let users share data across devices and connect to their phones from their computers. One app,
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Installing solar to combat national security risks in the power gridDistributed microgrid tech can secure the electrical grids at military bases to reduce the impact of cyberattacks, physical attacks from terrorists and natural disasters.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slingshot to shoot drugs onto the site of an infectionChemists specializing in nanotechnology create a molecular slingshot that could shoot drugs at precise locations in the human body once triggered by specific disease markers.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smartwatch that rotates, hinges, translates, orbits and rises to the occasionA prototype smartwatch that moves in five different directions in an effort to make digital smartwatches more convenient for their users.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hepatitis C virus: Possible new approach to battling infectionsAn international study has shone light on the way the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) hijacks the communication systems in the host cells it infects, uncovering potential new therapeutic targets for the disease.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum entanglement: Violation of Bell's inequality on frequency-bin entangled photon pairsMaking use of a specifically-developed slow light technique to reduce the velocity of light dramatically, researchers implemented a Bell Test and were able to generate frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons from spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in cold atoms with a double-path configuration, where the phase difference between the two spatial paths can be controlled independently and nonlo
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Refrigerator for quantum computers discoveredResearchers have invented a quantum-circuit refrigerator, which can reduce errors in quantum computing. This is a new twist towards a functioning quantum computer.
27min
Live Science
Air Force's X-37B Space Plane Lands in Florida After Record-Breaking Secret MissionThe record-breaking, hush-hush mission of the U.S. Air Force's robotic X-37B space plane is finally over.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New findings may explain the advantages of polyunsaturated fatPrevious research has demonstrated that saturated fat is more fattening and less muscle building than polyunsaturated fats. A new study shows that the choice of fat causes epigenetic changes which in turn could contribute to differences in fat storage.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scrib protein identified as a natural suppressor of liver cancerA protein that typically helps keep cells organized and on task becomes a tumor suppressor in the face of liver cancer, scientists say.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Commuter marriage study finds surprising emphasis on interdependenceA study, 'Going the Distance: Individualism and Interdependence in the Commuter Marriage,' by Lehigh University's Danielle Lindemann, explores how the seemingly conflicting cultural norms of personal autonomy and a commitment to the institution of marriage play out 'on the ground' from the viewpoint of participants in commuter marriages -- in which a married couple lives apart in service to their
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Incidental findings' from scans challenge efforts to reduce health care costsIn an analysis of medical records gathered from more than 300 hospitalized patients, a team of researchers reports that routine imaging scans used to help diagnose heart attacks generated 'incidental findings' (IFs) in more than half of these patients. The investigators say only about 7 percent of these IFs were medically significant and urged imaging experts and hospitals to explore ways to safel
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shortage of progranulin is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementiaIn a recent study in Human Molecular Genetics, researchers from VIB and KU Leuven led by prof. Philip Van Damme, reveal a novel function for progranulin in lysosomes: it acts as chaperone of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D. The results were obtained in collaboration with Prof. Paul Saftig from the University of Kiel.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Hot' electrons don't mind the gapRice University scientists discover that 'hot' electrons can create a photovoltage about a thousand times larger than ordinary temperature differences in nanoscale gaps in gold wires. This finding opens a path for plasmonic tunneling-based photodetectors for sensors, solar cells and electronics.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Installing solar to combat national security risks in the power gridPower grid vulnerabilities are one of the most prevalent national security threats. The technical community calls for building up grid resiliency using distributed energy and microgrids for stabilization as multiple sources increases the difficulty of triggering cascading blackouts, and following an attack or natural disaster, microgrids can provide localized energy security. An interdisciplinary
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers unveil new password meter that will change how users make passwordsResearchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Chicago have just unveiled a new, state-of-the-art password meter that offers real-time feedback and advice to help people create better passwords.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental changeIn a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasize the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental cha
36min
The Atlantic
The Destructiveness of Call-Out Culture on Campus Last month, hoping to better understand how digital communications affects life on campus, I posed this question: “ Were College Students Better Off Before Social Media ?” One undergraduate responded that what he likes best about the communications environment at his college, where there are about 10,000 students, is that “it has taught me a great deal about rapid-response crisis communications.”
36min
Ingeniøren
Airbus: Masser af tid til at opdage helikopterfejlVar det et pludseligt uheld eller langvarigt slid, der var skyld i dødsulykken ved Turøy sidste år? Myndigheder og helikopterproducent er uenige, mens undersøgelsen stadig kører på højttryk.
40min
Gizmodo
Save a Whopping $170 on Anker's Biggest Battery Pack Anker PowerHouse , $330 Anker has continued its inexorable march towards producing anything that includes a battery with the gargantuan PowerHouse electric “generator,” and you can save $170 on yours for a limited time, the best price ever by $70. I put “generator” in scare quotes because you can’t readily use the PowerHouse to generate electricity, unless you buy additional solar panels. Instead
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemically tailored grapheneGraphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists have succeeded in precisely verifying the spectral fingerprint of such compounds in both theory and experiment.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Watching movies can replace general anesthesia for kids with cancer having radiotherapyChildren with cancer could be spared dozens of doses of general anesthesia by projecting a video directly on to the inside of a radiotherapy machine during treatment, according to new research.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fetal reduction in multifetal pregnancies associated with better birth outcomesAmong twin and triplet pregnancies that were reduced to singleton or twin pregnancies, there was a substantial reduction in complications such as preterm birth and very preterm birth, according to new research.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traumatic brain injuries may be helped with drug used to treat bipolar disorderMedications used to treat depression and cancer may prevent nerve cell damage and help those suffering with traumatic brain injury, according to a new study.
41min
Gizmodo
John Oliver Pisses Off ISP Vultures With New Net Neutrality Segment Still: YouTube. Last time the FCC took on net neutrality, comedian John Oliver’s video about the issue was a turning point. The clip Went Viral, and led to thousands of public comments with the FCC in favor of rules enforcing net neutrality. Now that the FCC is seeking to smash those rules , Oliver is back again with another video explaining what the fuck net neutrality is and why it matters. Adv
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women perform worse in CPRDoes it matter whether a man or a woman carries out CPR? Researchers have shown that female resuscitation teams performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation less efficiently than their male counterparts. The study suggests that there is a need for action in the training of young female physicians.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tillage farming damaging earthworm populationsThe digging, stirring and overturning of soil by conventional ploughing in tillage farming is severely damaging earthworm populations around the world, say scientists. The findings show a systematic decline in earthworm populations in soils that are ploughed every year. The deeper the soil is disturbed the more harmful it is for the earthworms.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeogeneticist pinpoints Indian population origins using today's populaceResearchers identifies the origins of Indian populations comprising migrating humans from Africa, Iran and Central Asia over a period of 50,000 years.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon leads surging connected speakers market: surveyAmazon has grabbed more than two-thirds of the fast-growing market in the US for connected speakers with its family of Alexa-powered Echo devices, a survey showed Monday.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeogeneticist pinpoints Indian population origins using today's populaceIN addition to its vast patchwork of languages, cultures and religions, the Indian Subcontinent also harbours huge genetic diversity. Where did its peoples originate? This is an area of huge controversy among scholars and scientists. A University of Huddersfield PhD student is lead author of an article that tries to answer the question using genetic evidence.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early English language lessons in Germany less effective than expectedSeven years later, children who start learning English in the first grade achieve poorer results in this subject than children whose first English lesson isn't until the third grade. This is according to the findings unearthed by the team headed by Dr Nils Jäkel and Prof Dr Markus Ritter at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The researchers evaluated data gathered in a large longitudinal study in North Rhin
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New way to detect ecstasy discoveredWhile building molecular machines, researchers stumbled upon a new method to detect ecstasy. The discovery can lead to more reliable drug tests.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tillage farming damaging earthworm populations, say scientistsThe digging, stirring and overturning of soil by conventional ploughing in tillage farming is severely damaging earthworm populations around the world, say scientists.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to detect ecstasy discoveredWhile building molecular machines, researchers stumbled upon a new method to detect ecstasy. The discovery can lead to more reliable drug tests.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elementary school: Early English language lessons less effective than expectedSeven years later, children who start learning English in the first grade achieve poorer results in this subject than children whose first English lesson isn't until the third grade. This is according to the findings unearthed by a team headed by Nils Jäkel and Markus Ritter at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The researchers evaluated data gathered in a large longitudinal study in North Rhine-Westphalia,
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space radiation reproduced in the lab for better, safer missionsMan-made space radiation has been produced in research led by the University of Strathclyde, which could help to make space exploration safer, more reliable and more extensive.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeogeneticist pinpoints Indian population origins using today's populacePhD student Marina Silva identifies the origins of Indian populations comprising migrating humans from Africa, Iran and Central Asia over a period of 50,000 years.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tillage farming damaging earthworm populations, say scientistsThe digging, stirring and overturning of soil by conventional ploughing in tillage farming is severely damaging earthworm populations around the world, say scientists.The findings published in Global Change Biology show a systematic decline in earthworm populations in soils that are ploughed every year. The deeper the soil is disturbed the more harmful it is for the earthworms.The scientists from
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women perform worse in CPRDoes it matter whether a man or a woman carries out CPR? Researchers at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel have shown that female resuscitation teams performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation less efficiently than their male counterparts. The study suggests that there is a need for action in the training of young female physicians. The scientific journal Critical Care Medicine has
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New water filtration process uses 1,000 times less energyA new process for water filtration using carbon dioxide consumes one thousand times less energy than conventional methods, scientific research published recently has shown.
1h
Ars Technica
Facebook takes to newspapers to teach UK users how to spot “fake news” Enlarge (credit: Getty Images/ NurPhoto) Facebook has attempted to lightly rein in the spread of misinformation on the free content ad network by taking out full-page adverts in UK newspapers with "tips for spotting false news" ahead of next month's General Election . The Mark Zuckerberg-run company, which has long-swerved any suggestion that it is the publisher of content that is shared on its s
1h
Futurity.org
Why we stay loyal to villains on screen New research shows why people might feel good about characters who do bad things. Morality matters, says Matthew Grizzard, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo communication department. Viewers tend to like the good guys and dislike the bad guys. But the new study, which builds on previous research, also suggests that we don’t necessarily need to see behavior to make a distinction
1h
Gizmodo
Watch What Happens When an Algorithm Tries to Predict the Next Frame 100,000 Times in a Row GIF Like an athlete trying to push their body to its extreme limits, artist Damien Henry was curious what would happen if you asked a predictive algorithm to calculate the next frame of video in a sequence , again and again and again, over 100,000 times. The results are a fascinating music video that looks like overly compressed digital video filmed through the window of a moving car. The experim
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research could transform how we filter waterA new process for water filtration using carbon dioxide consumes one thousand times less energy than conventional methods, scientific research published recently has shown.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colorsNagoya University team replicates unique color of bird plumage. Raspberry-like particle systems simulate the spongy texture of Stellar's jay's blue feathers. These findings represent a new approach to artificial structural color-based pigments.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemically tailored grapheneGraphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, the University of Vienna, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University Yachay Tech in Ecuador succeeded in p
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cell separator could revolutionize medical advances in cancerA new cell separator that began life as a tinfoil and epoxy glue prototype built with supplies from a University shop could revolutionize stem-cell and regenerative cell-based therapies.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statins may benefit cirrhotic patients with hepatitis B or C infectionsInfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to cirrhosis as well as liver cancer. A Hepatology study from Taiwan has found that statins may provide benefits to patients with HBV- or HCV-related cirrhosis.
1h
Live Science
Flying High: 7 Post-Hindenburg AirshipsThe Hindenburg disaster effectively ended the nascent airship industry, but dirigible designs persist today.
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Scientific American Content: Global
FDA Approves New Drug to Treat ALS The drug may slow the progression of the disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Scientists relieved by Emmanuel Macron’s French election victory France's next president has vowed to ring-fence research budgets and boost innovation. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21952
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unpolarized single-photon generation with true randomness from diamondThe Tohoku University research group of Professor Keiichi Edamatsu and Postdoctoral fellow Naofumi Abe has demonstrated dynamically and statically unpolarized single-photon generation using diamond. This result is expected to play a crucial role in hardware random number generation using single photons (quantum dice or quantum coin toss), quantum cryptography and the testing of fundamental problem
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When electric vehicles crash, what happens to the battery?Safety, range and costs—these are the three big premises of electromobility. Safety definitely comes first. Lithium-based traction batteries are usually completely enclosed in the battery case and integrated in the vehicle to protect the battery from all conceivable stresses and external influences. This "armour" has an effect on construction, weight, size and overall design of the vehicle.
1h
Viden
Ulve kan starte en positiv spiral i vild naturI Yellowstone har ulvene sat gang i naturens hjul. Men så stor effekt vil de næppe have herhjemme, fortæller ekspert.
1h
Live Science
Gulag Letters: Translated Text Reveals Life Inside Stalin's Labor CampsThe recently translated letters of Latvian poet and journalist Arsenii Formakov depict everyday life – and suffering – in the Gulag.
1h
Ars Technica
Doctor Who: Knock Knock review Enlarge (credit: BBC) This is a post-UK broadcast review of Doctor Who : Knock Knock . River Song always warned the Doctor against spoilers, so be sure to watch the episode first. Doctor Who airs on Saturdays at 7:20pm UK time on BBC One, and 9pm EDT on BBC America. Meddling kids, alien woodlice, and a creepy Landlord throw Doctor Who 's Knock Knock into a Scooby Doo -meets- The Mummy adventure c
1h
Ars Technica
Ryzen 5 review: AMD muscles in on Intel’s i5 sweet spot Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) "It can't just be that we're the cheaper solution," said AMD in 2015, back when Ryzen was little more than a handful of hopeful slides in a press deck. But as AMD and the wider tech press knew, competing with Intel on performance as well as price was always going to be an uphill battle. The Bulldozer architecture was a bust, and Intel had cornered the market on high-
1h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Smells like RoyaltyIndian jumping ants, Harpegnathos saltator, can identify future queens based on a pheromone produced by the royal larvae.
1h
The Scientist RSS
Second-Ever ALS Drug ApprovedAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in the U.S. now have an option besides riluzole, which was approved by the FDA more than two decades ago and only extends life by two or three months.
1h
Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet sætter fokus unødig brug af svampemidlerPatienter med svækket immunforsvar får ofte ordineret unødvendig medicin mod svamp. Ekspertbistand skal begrænse forbruget.
1h
Dagens Medicin
DANNOAC-studie sat på standby National Videnskabsetisk Komité har sat den store DANNOAC-undersøgelse af NOAK-midler i bero, mens komiteen vurderer studiet.
1h
Popular Science
How to prevent blood clots as airlines squeeze you into tighter spaces Health The potentially fatal condition is likely to increase as legroom decreases—but it's totally preventable For nearly everybody, “blood clots on airplanes are completely preventable.” Knowing how they form and how prevent them could eliminate your risk. Read on.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is China to blame for the global avocado shortage?Recent media reports of an avocado shortage have hipsters and foodies horrified the world over. Prices are at a record high as a result of a classic supply and demand situation. Harvests from major producers in Mexico, Peru and California, have been poor, which has reduced supply. Meanwhile, demand has surged. And not just in the affluent West, Chinese consumers are developing an insatiable taste
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovation dilemma suggests that 'better' models are not always better(Phys.org)—If you had to predict the probability of a catastrophic meteor striking the Earth, you would likely want the most accurate models on which to base your predictions. But a new paper shows that, because the most accurate models are generally more innovative and complex, they may suffer from a higher probability of error. Consequently, the most innovative and accurate models may not offer
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consumers are willing to pay $4,900 extra for a car that drives itselfThe average consumer would be willing to pay $4,900 more for a car that had self-driving technologies, and $3,500 more for crash avoidance, according to a new study published in Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drivers are slower to respond to emergencies in semi-automated carsDrivers respond to emergencies more slowly and severely in semi-automated cars, according to a new study in the Journal of Safety Research. The authors of the study, from Clemson University in the US, say we will need new ways of assessing whether drivers are safe behind the wheel to keep up with the technology.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unpolarized single-photon generation with true randomness from diamondThe Tohoku University research group of Professor Keiichi Edamatsu and Postdoctoral fellow Naofumi Abe has demonstrated dynamically and statically unpolarized single-photon generation using diamond.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organic electronics: Semiconductors as decal stickersNo more error-prone evaporation deposition, drop casting or printing: Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and FSU Jena have developed organic semiconductor nanosheets, which can easily be removed from a growth substrate and placed on other substrates.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ben-Gurion U researchers find that low levels of a specific protein cause Alzheimer'sAccording to the study, published last month in Cell Reports, one of the key components in this DNA repair process is the protein SIRT6. BGU researchers have determined in mouse models that high levels of SIRT6 facilitate DNA repair while low levels enable DNA damage accumulation.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do toddlers learn best from touchscreens?Research recently published in Frontiers in Psychology suggests that Educational apps for kids can be valuable learning tools, but there's still a lot left to understand about how to best design them.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The influence of zero-hours contracts on care workers' livesA new paper published in Occupational Medicine indicates that deficiencies in health care workers' understanding of their role and the amount of control over their work were significant workplace hazards, though controversial zero-hours contracts did not adversely influence employee health and wellbeing.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Testosterone explains why women more prone to asthmaAn international research team has revealed for the first time that testosterone protects males against developing asthma, helping to explain why females are two times more likely to develop asthma than males after puberty.The study showed that testosterone suppresses the production of a type of immune cell that triggers allergic asthma. The finding may lead to new, more targeted asthma treatments
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Driest April for 35 years, dullest for 20 yearsArmagh Observatory reports that April 2017 was much drier than average, and slightly warmer and much duller. This was the driest April at Armagh for 35 years and the sixth-driest April at Armagh since rainfall records began in 1838. It was also the dullest April at Armagh for 20 years. Following a very dry autumn 2016 and winter 2016/2017, this year has seen the driest 8-month period, September th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colorsA team mimics the rich color of bird plumage and demonstrates new ways to control how light interacts with materials.
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New on MIT Technology Review
French Election Hacks, Stealing Passwords From Your Brain, and Zuck for Dinner—The Download, May 8, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low motivation in parents results in academically unmotivated childrenWhether parental help has positive or negative effects on students' academic outcomes depends on the motivation and involvement of their parents. Results of a study conducted by the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology suggest that students whose parents are interested in math and perceive their own math competencies to be high perform better than students with parents wh
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Science : NPR
Secret U.S. Space Plane Lands With A Boom In Florida For a secret aircraft, the X-37B wasn't very stealthy about its return to Earth. The space plane was launched in 2015. (Image credit: Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Twisted textile cords may contain clues to Inca messagesA writing system from the 1700s may illuminate even older knotty Inca messages.
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Ars Technica
The Air Force’s secretive spy plane returns after 718 days in space US Air Force Early on Sunday morning, for parts of Florida along the Atlantic coast, the tranquil calm was broken by a sonic boom. Residents didn't know it at the time, but the US Air Force's secretive X-37B uncrewed space plane had just returned to Earth after 718 days—the longest of its four missions into orbit. "This mission once again set an on-orbit endurance record and marks the vehicle's f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drivers are slower to respond to emergencies in semi-automated carsDrivers respond to emergencies more slowly and severely in semi-automated cars, according to a new study. The authors of the study say we will need new ways of assessing whether drivers are safe behind the wheel to keep up with the technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forestsA new technique makes it possible to cost-effectively analyse genetic material from fossil plant and animal remains. Researchers have used this technique to examine the DNA of silver fir needles found in lake sediment in Ticino. They found clues as to how forests reacted to the emergence of agriculture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parents’ motivation influences students’ academic outcomesWhether parental help has positive or negative effects on students’ academic outcomes depends on the motivation and involvement of their parents. Results of a new study suggest that students whose parents are interested in math and perceive their own math competencies to be high perform better than students with parents who show a low interest in math and regard their competencies in the domain as
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Gizmodo
Our First Look at an Important New Ship in Star Wars: The Last Jedi An unlikely source claims Marvel is looking to buy Spider-Man back permanently. Could Avengers: Infinity War have an interesting link back to Age of Ultron ? Supergirl ’s showrunner talks bringing General Zod to the show. Plus, new footage from Wonder Woman and Doctor Who . Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi A small model set available for pre-order on the German website Mikado gives us our f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hodgkin lymphoma survivors have more severe coronary artery disease post chest irradiationHodgkin lymphoma survivors have more severe coronary artery disease 20 years after chest irradiation, according to research presented today at ICNC 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From pill to needle: Prescription opioid epidemic may be increasing drug injectionThe prescription opioid epidemic is shrinking the time it used to take drug users to progress to drug injection, a new Keck School of Medicine of USC-led study suggests. The study may predict the next national public health threat related to prescription painkiller abuse. 'The prescription opioid epidemic is creating a heroin epidemic, which will create an injection drug use epidemic,' said Ricky
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Futurity.org
Biology will take some mistakes to maintain speed When it comes to duplicating DNA, evolution seems to value speed over accuracy, new research suggests. The finding challenges assumptions that perfectly accurate transcription and translation are critical to the success of biological systems. It turns out a few mistakes here and there aren’t critical as long as the great majority of the resulting biopolymers are correct. A new paper in the Procee
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WIRED
Review: Apple iPad (2017) All your favorite features from the iPad, now for $329. The post Review: Apple iPad (2017) appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two new Saturn-mass exoplanets discovered(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected two new giant alien worlds circling distant stars. The newly found planets are estimated to be as massive as Saturn and are orbiting M dwarfs beyond the snow line. The findings were presented May 2 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Speedy X-ray detector arrives at NSLS-IIThe National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), a DOE Office of Science User Facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a truly international resource. Geoscientists from Australia and France recently trekked across the globe to aim NSLS-II's tiny, intense beams of x-ray light at thin samples of nickel-rich mineral gathered from a mine in far-off Siberia. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drivers are slower to respond to emergencies in semi-automated carsDrivers respond to emergencies more slowly and severely in semi-automated cars, according to a new study in the Journal of Safety Research. The authors of the study, from Clemson University in the US, say we will need new ways of assessing whether drivers are safe behind the wheel to keep up with the technology.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Genes Explain Even Rube Goldberg-Like Homes of Many CreaturesThe homes that animals build are just as much a product of evolution as the creatures themselves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Elementary school: Early English language lessons less effective than expectedSeven years later, children who start learning English in the first grade achieve poorer results in this subject than children whose first English lesson isn’t until the third grade. The researchers evaluated data gathered in a large longitudinal study in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, that was carried out between 2010 and 2014.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When electric vehicles crash, what happens to the battery?Safety, range and costs: these are the three big premises of electromobility. Safety definitely comes first. Lithium-based traction batteries are usually completely enclosed in the battery case and integrated in the vehicle to protect the battery from all conceivable stresses and external influences. This “armour” has an effect on construction, weight, size and overall design of the vehicle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consumers are willing to pay $4,900 extra for a car that drives itselfThe average consumer would be willing to pay $4,900 more for a car that had self-driving technologies, and $3,500 more for crash avoidance, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cell separator with humble beginnings could revolutionize medical advances in cancer and Alzheimer’s researchA new cell separator that began life as a tinfoil and epoxy glue prototype built with supplies from a University shop could revolutionise stem-cell and regenerative cell-based therapies.
2h
New Scientist - News
UK government subsidises coal sector with £356 million a yearDespite pledges to phase out coal, UK and several other EU countries still provide various tax benefits to the coal sector, according to a new report
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New Scientist - News
Wish you had a shorter workday? Here’s why that’s a bad ideaThere’s nothing like a bank holiday to make you wish you worked less, and productivity researchers are starting to agree. But reduced hours might add to your stress
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Ars Technica
Voice control may be the biggest music leap since Hi-Fi—and more Collision 2017 Nathan Mattise NEW ORLEANS—Just as " space " may not be the first thing to come to mind about New Orleans, "tech" typically doesn't arrive high on the list, either. But for three days every spring in recent years, the Collision Conference has aimed to change that by raising the national profile of Silicon Bayou. The US-spinoff of the European Web Summit event gathers a wide variety of disciplines
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Gizmodo
The Latest It Trailer Shows Nobody Knows What's Lurking in the Sewers of Derry GIF Warner Brothers The true horror of Stephen King’s It was always that the adults of Derry, Maine, where the primordial evil lived, seemed to understand that their children were being periodically snatched and murdered. Advertisement In the latest trailer for the It reboot, though, it’s clear that the kids know something’s up and they know it’s living in the sewers. The spot features an extende
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental changeIn a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasize the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental cha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to laser print colors that will not fade using tiny columns(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the Technical University of Denmark has developed a way to print colors onto a surface without using ink and which will not fade. In their paper published in the open-access journal Sciences Advances, the group describes the inspiration for their approach, how it works, their results and the one thing they still need to solve before their technique can be indust
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher employs HFIR to explore the mysterious world of quantum spinJie Ma, a professor from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, is using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor to discover a three-dimensional image of the magnetic lattice of an oxide material (Ba2CoTeO6) containing quantum properties that could provide new insight into how electron "spins" can improve data processing and storage in computers.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Consumers are willing to pay $4,900 extra for a car that drives itselfThe average consumer would be willing to pay $4,900 more for a car that had self-driving technologies, and $3,500 more for crash avoidance, according to a new study published in Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First underwater carpet cloak realized with metamaterialResearchers at the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have designed and fabricated an underwater acoustic carpet cloak using transformation acoustics, a scientific first. The research was published online in Scientific Reports on April 6.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast, Charter Communications step into wireless togetherRival cable operators Comcast and Charter Communications said Monday that they will work together as they prepare to offer cellphone wireless plans to customers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook removes accounts in fight against fake newsFacebook says it has deleted tens of thousands of accounts in Britain ahead of the June 8 general election in a drive to battle fake news.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excitedIf they're quick about it, "hot" electrons excited in a plasmonic metal can tunnel their way across a nanoscale gap to a neighboring metal. Rice University scientists said the cool part is what happens in the gap.
2h
Ingeniøren
Crashkurser i robot eller AI er ingeniørfagets hop fremadKig mod USA efter inspiration til mikrouddannelser, der kan fintune medarbejdernes digitale kompetencer, lyder opfordringen fra erhvervsleder og Teknologisk Instituts innovationschef.
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Ingeniøren
FOTOS: Japansk luksustog med panoramavogne og toetagers suiterEt nyt japansk luksustog, Shiki-Shima, sætter nye standarder for skinnebåren luksus: gourmetrestaurant, bar og eget badekar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forestsA new technique makes it possible to cost-effectively analyse genetic material from fossil plant and animal remains. Researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL and the universities of Lausanne and Bern have used this technique to examine the DNA of silver fir needles found in lake sediment in Ticino. They found clues as to how forests reacted to the em
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disguising small wind turbinesThe visual impact of small wind turbines in an urban area can be a source of concerns. It's up to developers to find smart ideas and designs to integrate them into communities – and to convince locals that they're the way forward
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The crest of waveforms for next-gen radarA new method for shaping the waveform generated by multi-antenna radar systems is inexpensive and practical.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space radiation reproduced in the lab for better, safer missionsMan-made space radiation has been produced in research led by the University of Strathclyde, which could help to make space exploration safer, more reliable and more extensive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Refrigerator for quantum computers discoveredThe global race towards a functioning quantum computer is on. With future quantum computers, we will be able to solve previously impossible problems and develop, for example, complex medicines, fertilizers, or artificial intelligence.
2h
Gizmodo
Sony's Wireless On-Ears Are Back Down to $68, the Same as Black Friday Sony MDRXB650BT/B On-Ear Bluetooth Headphones , $68 If you want to cut the cord, but can’t abide earbuds, Sony’s popular on-ear MDRXB650BTs are on sale for $68 right now , an all-time low, and a match for Black Friday. These include NFC pairing, a built-in microphone, and 30 hours of battery life, and you even get your choice of three different colors. More Deals
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Millionbevillinger til to nye forskningsprojekter på Det Teologiske FakultetBevillinger til forskere på Det Teologiske Fakultet skal skabe ny viden om betydningen af koranens...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New cell separator with humble beginnings could revolutionise medical advances in cancer and Alzheimer's researchA new cell separator that began life as a tinfoil and epoxy glue prototype built with supplies from a University shop could revolutionise stem-cell and regenerative cell-based therapies.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemically tailored grapheneGraphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, the University of Vienna, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University Yachay Tech in Ecuador succeeded in p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galactic winds slow new star formationScientists have created computer simulations of events soon after the Big Bang to better understand how stars today are being formed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Semiconductors as decal stickersNo more error-prone evaporation deposition, drop casting or printing: Scientists at LMU Munich and FSU Jena have developed organic semiconductor nanosheets, which can easily be removed from a growth substrate and placed on other substrates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does Jupiter have a solid core?The gas giants have always been a mystery to us. Due their dense and swirling clouds, it is impossible to get a good look inside them and determine their true structure. Given their distance from Earth, it is time-consuming and expensive to send spacecraft to them, making survey missions few and far between. And due to their intense radiation and strong gravity, any mission that attempts to study
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colorsA Nagoya University-led research team mimics the rich color of bird plumage and demonstrates new ways to control how light interacts with materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will optimistic stories get people to care about nature?Nature doesn't make the news often these days. When it does, the story usually revolves around wildlife on the brink, record-setting climate extremes or ruined landscapes. However, that is not the whole story. There is also good news, but it often receives little attention.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sharks: How a cull could ruin an ecosystemAn Australian summer rarely passes without another chilling headline about a shark attack. And while the first response to the now seemingly regular attacks is to call for a cull, killing them is not the answer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The glaciers are goingAs can be seen above, the Waggonwaybreen glacier in Svalbard, Norway, has retreated substantially since 1900. Svalbard's glaciers are not only retreating, they are also losing about two feet of their thickness each year. Glaciers around the world have retreated at unprecedented rates and some have disappeared altogether. The melting of glaciers will affect people around the world, their drinking w
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New Scientist - News
Inquisitive bot asks questions to test your understandingAn AI that asks questions about Wikipedia articles it has read could help teach students and pave the way for better chatbots
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People don't trust scientific research when companies are involvedA soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who's paying for science?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There's a mathematical formula for choosing the fastest queueIt seems obvious. You arrive at the checkouts and see one queue is much longer than the other, so you join the shorter one. But, before long, the people in the bigger line zoom past you and you've barely moved towards the exit.
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Gizmodo
The FBI Paid $900,000 to Unlock the San Bernardino Terrorist's iPhone FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, May 3, 2017 (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Following the terrorist attack in San Bernardino in December of 2015, there was a lot of controversy over whether Apple should help the FBI open one of the terrorist’s phones. Ultimately, the FBI found a private company that helped crack it open, but we had no idea how much that ef
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New Scientist - News
Nanofridge could keep quantum computers cool enough to calculateQuantum computers need to be kept cool, just like regular computers, but an ordinary fan won’t cut it. A nanofridge that sorts electrons by temperature just might
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Technology, once thought the enabler of democracy, is threatening to kill it offDemocracy has entered a new phase marked by hacking by foreign states and fake stories shared on social media aimed at damaging political parties. The social media companies have so far been mostly incapable, or unwilling, to do anything about the fact that a large part of the dissemination of this "fake news" has been through automated software programs posting on Twitter.
3h
WIRED
10 of the Most Awesome, Most Gorgeous Telescopes on Earth Enrico Sacchetti went from shooting the fashion world's stars to shooting the telescopes that image the actual stars. The post 10 of the Most Awesome, Most Gorgeous Telescopes on Earth appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
What Happens When You Train Like Nike’s Two-Hour Marathon Runners Not long ago, running a 90-minutes half-marathon seemed impossibly fast. I've not only beaten 90 minutes, I've demolished it. The post What Happens When You Train Like Nike's Two-Hour Marathon Runners appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Who Really Created Batman? It Depends What Batman Means to You A new documentary unpacks the mystery over Batman's creatorship, and in the process raises some important questions about the nature of heroism. The post Who Really Created Batman? It Depends What Batman Means to You appeared first on WIRED .
3h
Live Science
Animals Can No Longer Escape Human Noise Pollution in the USMillions of hours of recordings made in national parks and other protected areas reveal what 'nature' in the US often sounds like: roaring airplane engines, accelerating cars, and clattering factories.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Inoculation' messages prevent spread of fake newsAn international team of researchers has demonstrated how people can be 'inoculated' against misinformation and fake news on topical issues such as climate change.
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The Atlantic
What Macron's Victory in France Means for the European Union Three elections across Europe in the past week have given the European Union reasons for joy, optimism, schadenfreude—and also plenty of cause for worry. The joy came from Emmanuel Macron’s victory in Sunday’s second round presidential election in France. Although the independent centrist’s win was never really in doubt, the margin of victory—65 percent versus 35 percent for Marine Le Pen, the ca
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The Atlantic
The Campaign to Rehabilitate Sebastian Gorka NEW YORK—Sebastian Gorka began his appearance at the Jerusalem Post Annual Conference by thanking his supporters. “I’d like to thank everybody who has stood by me and this administration for the last 15 weeks,” Gorka said. “Specifically, and I apologize in advance if I’ve forgotten you, but the two Davids, Ira, Bruce, Jeff, Mort, Joel, Noah, you know who you are, okay, especially thank you to Rab
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Dagens Medicin
Hjemløse optager psykiatriske sengepladser En gruppe patienter på Psykiatrisk Hospital optager sengepladser svarende til et helt sengeafsnit, selvom de er raske nok til at blive udskrevet.
3h
Live Science
Pinky-Sized Marine Animal Breaks Record for Ocean FiltrationA small marine creature just broke the world record for ocean filtration and is a newly named champion in the fight against climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not just 'revenge porn' – image-based abuse hits 1 in 5 AustraliansThe first comprehensive research on "revenge porn" has revealed the mass scale of victimisation across Australia, with one in five people suffering image-based abuse, according to a study by Monash University and RMIT University.
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Live Science
Ancient Funerary Garden Discovered in Egypt for First TimeAbout 4,000 years ago in ancient Egypt, landscapers constructed a rectangular funerary garden bed likely filled with lettuce, shrubs and trees, according to archaeologists.
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Live Science
Peaceful Funerary Garden Honored Egypt's Dead (Photos)In a funerary garden about 4,000 years ago, ancient Egyptians likely planted trees, shrubs and plants that symbolized rebirth and resurrection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Classroom study measures vision and NAPLAN achievementQUT researchers have investigated how vision can affect a child's ongoing learning, with results showing 30 per cent of Year 3 students tested had uncorrected eye problems that could affect their NAPLAN performances.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
"13 Reasons Why" and Suicide ContagionWhat science shows about the dangers of suicide depictions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Americans’ Bizarre Relationship With the Color of Their Food There are many parts of the world where, for much of human history, food was likely a dull visual affair. Take Tuscany, the culinarily renowned region of Italy that the writer Bill Buford muses on in his book about cooking, Heat . He details a near-monochrome local cuisine that has been passed down through the generations: Crostini with chicken-liver paté? Brown. Beans? Brown. Roasted pork, veal,
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The Atlantic
The New Intellectuals The political wars on today’s college campuses are being quickly reduced to a small number of unsatisfying explanations. Many of these are injurious and insulting to the students who already hold marginalized positions within the university. Diatribes against the “ coddling ” of students may have given way to debates over “ free speech .” But both conceptual frameworks, despite notable complicati
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The Atlantic
The Antidote to Authoritarianism My first known ancestor in the Americas was an Ashanti woman called “the African.” We don’t know her name, but through records kept by slaveholders, we know she existed. We know she was transported to Jamaica, where my known lineage began. These records of property bought and sold were a form of surveillance at the time. Early technologies, and the policies and practices that undergird them, were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterialsWith the tap of your finger, your tablet comes to life – thanks to tiny force sensors and accelerometers that contain piezoelectric materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX details plans to launch thousands of internet satellitesSpaceX and Tesla-founder Elon Musk has made some rather bold promises over the years. In addition to building a fleet of reusable rockets, an Interplanetary Transport System, colonizing Mars, and revolutionizing transportation, he has also made it clear that he hopes to provide worldwide broadband access by deploying a "constellation" of internet-providing satellites.
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Ars Technica
California cop union opposes new bill that would thwart license plate readers Enlarge (credit: Visions of America / Getty Images News ) If the Electronic Frontier Foundation and a San Diego-based Republican state senator have their way , it will soon become legal for Californians to cover their license plates while parked as a way to thwart automated license plate readers. Those devices, now commonly in use by law enforcement nationwide, can capture license plate numbers a
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In Florida, they’re fighting mosquitoes by meddling with their sex livesAs an alternative to genetically modified mosquitoes, Florida skeeter police are testing one of two strategies that use bacteria to meddle with insect sex lives.
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Dagens Medicin
Demente får alarmerende meget medicin Ældre med demens får væsentligt flere typer lægemidler samtidigt end ældre uden demens. Det skaber bekymring i Nationalt Videnscenter for Demens, da ældre med demens kan have svært ved at reagere på bivirkninger.
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Gizmodo
That Viral Video of a Girl Calling Donald Trump a Disgrace is Totally Fake GIF Have you seen that video of a young girl telling President Trump that he’s “a disgrace to the world”? It’s a satisfying clip for those who believe the president needs to be called out to his face. But the video is completely fake. Advertisement The clip went viral on Twitter yesterday, with countless people believing it was a young girl speaking truth to the most powerful man in the world. Bu
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Vastly Underdiagnosed Brain Disorder That Brings Frequent TearsThe patient’s sobs did not stem from depression but a condition known as pseudobulbar affect -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
We Must Strengthen the "Science" in Forensic ScienceA national commission created to improve the reliability of forensics has been dealt a possibly fatal blow -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Earth may have been born in a huge flare-up of the young sunA sudden brightening of the infant sun – called an FU Orionis outburst – could have melted dust grains and made them stick together, building our world
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Space Telescope arrives at NASA's Johnson Space CenterNASA's James Webb Space Telescope has arrived at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, where it will undergo its last cryogenic test before it is launched into space in 2018.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
A New Idea on How Earth Became a Giant SnowballA cool climate, sulfur and volcanism may have thrust the planet into an extreme glacial state -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opportunities to improve Dunedin's energy efficiencyDunedin residents are still far from efficient with their use of energy, a University of Otago Centre for Sustainability study says.
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Dagens Medicin
Hospitaler får kritik for behandling af persondataFem hospitaler er for lemfældige i deres omgang med personoplysninger. Det fastslår Datatilsynet, der har foretaget inspektioner på en række danske hospitaler.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five ways quantum computing will change the way we think about computingWhile technologies that currently run on classical computers, such as Watson, can help find patterns and insights buried in vast amounts of existing data, quantum computers will deliver solutions to important problems where patterns cannot be seen because the data doesn't exist and the possibilities that you need to explore to get to the answer are too enormous to ever be processed by classical co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Too soon to say if climate is changing cloud heightsA new analysis of 15 years of NASA satellite cloud measurements finds that clouds worldwide show no definitive trend during this period toward decreasing or increasing in height. The new study updates an earlier analysis of the first 10 years of the same data that suggested cloud heights might be getting lower.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wide-ranging recommendations for mitigating the grave effects of climate change on human healthA farmworker dies in 109-degree heat in a lemon orchard in California, in 2015. In Missouri, hospitalizations for heat-related illnesses skyrocket in 2006, a year of unusually high temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manufacturing technique can make proteins less effectiveBiopharma and food businesses working with proteins now have access to better information about how a type of fluid flow used in manufacturing processes can affect the quality of their products.
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor opbevarer vi maden koldere end i Sverige?En læser undrer sig over, at svenskerne bliver anbefalet at holde ferske kølevarer på 8° C, når vi herhjemme siger 5° C. Det svarer DTU Food samt de danske og svenske fødevarestyrelser på.
4h
Ingeniøren
FBI drev børnepornosite i to uger: »Vores hidtil mest succesfulde indsats mod Tor-brugere« Trods store problemer med at få anerkendt beviser mod Tor-bruger, var operationen mod børnepornoside en succes, vurderer FBI. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fbi-drev-boernepornosite-to-uger-vores-hidtil-mest-succesfulde-indsats-mod-tor-brugere Version2
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Ingeniøren
Tebladenes genom kan fortælle om den hemmelighedsfulde smagKinesiske forskere har kortlagt tebuskens genetiske arvemasse og giver et forsigtigt bud på, hvorfor teblade kan smage så forskelligt.
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Ingeniøren
Telenor vinder sag mod dansk filmdistributør: Får lov at holde kunder anonyme Sagen nåede helt til den norske højesteret. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/telenor-vinder-sag-mod-dansk-filmdistributoer-faar-lov-at-holde-kunder-anonyme-1076386 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-scale technology recycles wastewater into hydrogen for use in fuel production"Electrical" bacteria are the key ingredient in a new process developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that recycles wastewater from biofuel production to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen can then be used to convert bio-oil into higher grade liquid fuels such as gasoline or diesel.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Looking into the Cheops telescope tubeSeen here is a Cheops team member reflected in the satellite's main mirror, and framed by the black internal surface of the telescope tube. The back of the secondary mirror is seen at the centre of the image, held in place by three struts.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds choose their neighbours based on personalityBirds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plastics—not simply garbageFor good reason, plastics are found in almost everything that makes our lives easier – computers, cars and, of course, packaging. However, because it is so stable, and often not disposed of properly, more and more plastic refuse is gathering in the oceans. To explore the risk presented by plastics and possible alternatives, Frederik Wurm and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Researc
4h
New Scientist - News
The UK government’s attitude to air pollution stinksDespite debate over how many "deaths" air pollution causes, it is clear bad air damages our health, so attempts to delay rules on reducing it must be resisted
4h
The Atlantic
The Romance of Women's Friendships These are, in some ways, very good times for the Bechdel test . Recent movies have offered up nuanced , celebratory portrayals of women’s friendship. Recent TV shows have provided pairings of friends— Abbi and Ilana , Meredith and Cristina , Lucca and Maia , Leslie and Ann , Hannah and Jessa , Pennsatucky and Big Boo —whose friendships have taken on the tensions that Hollywood has traditionally r
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Generating power from polluted airResearchers from the University of Antwerp and KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a process that purifies air, and at the same time, generates power. The device must only be exposed to light in order to function.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Battered Earth revived by mineral weathering after mass extinctionEarth's bedrock was severely beaten by hothouse climate conditions during one of the planet's mass extinctions some 200 million years ago. But the process also allowed life to bounce back.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Test site for ESA-backed airbreathing engineWork began today on building the UK's latest rocket engine test facility, designed for firing the engine core of the ESA-backed SABRE propulsion system within three years.
4h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsplatformen har fortsat problemer med FMKSelv om Region Hovedstaden mener at have løst de største problemer med at få sit nye it-system Sundhedsplatformen til at spille sammen med Det Fælles Medicinkort, er der fortsat problemer i parforholdet. Det fremgår af en ny redegørelse fra regionen til sundhedsministeriet.
4h
Gizmodo
Top Secret Air Force Spaceplane Lands with Sonic Boom After Two Years in Orbit GIF GIF made from US Air Force videos of the X-37B spaceplane landing at NASA ‘s Kennedy Space Center on May 7, 2017 (US Air Force) The US Air Force’s secretive X-37B spaceplane landed yesterday after 718 days in orbit—just twelve days shy of a full two years. What was it doing up there in the sky? The government won’t say. Even the spaceplane’s budget is a secret. But the X-37B’s landing wasn’t
4h
WIRED
Uber Hires an AI Superstar in the Quest to Rehab Its Future The embattled ride-sharing giant is looking for a new way forward in self-driving cars. The post Uber Hires an AI Superstar in the Quest to Rehab Its Future appeared first on WIRED .
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Keep outThe minefields laid in the Falkland Islands 35 years ago have been a blessing for penguins, which are not big enough to trigger explosions. But now the time has come for their home to be demined.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Rare flowers destroyed in Australia after paperwork errorThe French collection was incinerated by Australian biosecurity officers due to missing paperwork.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Refrigerator for quantum computers discoveredResearchers at Aalto University have invented a quantum-circuit refrigerator, which can reduce errors in quantum computing. This is a new twist towards a functioning quantum computer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caltech chemical engineer explains oxygen mystery on cometsA Caltech chemical engineer who normally develops new ways to fabricate microprocessors in computers has figured out how to explain a nagging mystery in space -- why comets expel oxygen gas, the same gas we humans breathe.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study points to new approach to battling infectionsAn international study led by researchers at Monash University' Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) has shone light on the way the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) hijacks the communication systems in the host cells it infects, uncovering potential new therapeutic targets for the disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A slingshot to shoot drugs onto the site of an infectionChemists form Italy and Canada specializing in nanotechnology create a molecular slingshot that could shoot drugs at precise locations in the human body once triggered by specific disease markers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traumatic brain injuries may be helped with drug used to treat bipolar disorderMedications used to treat depression and cancer may prevent nerve cell damage and help those suffering with traumatic brain injury, according to a new Rutgers University study.
5h
Ingeniøren
Software skal fjerne sort røg fra skibeDen sorte røg skyldes NOx-reducerende teknologi på skibe, men med den nye software kan man nu nedbringe NOx-udledningen uden yderligere forurening.
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Arbejdsløs? - det er din egen skyldNy forskning fra Institut for psykologi viser, at evnen til at finde arbejde i dag handler mindre om...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
9,8 millioner til forskning i online søgning, risiko- og konsekvensberegning samt administrative EU-netværkDet Frie Forskningsråd for Samfund og Erhverv uddeler bevillinger til samfundsvidenskabelige forskere...
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A slingshot to shoot drugs onto the site of an infectionAn international team of researchers from the University of Rome Tor Vergata and the University of Montreal has reported, in a paper published this week in Nature Communications, the design and synthesis of a nanoscale molecular slingshot made of DNA that is 20,000 times smaller than a human hair. This molecular slingshot could "shoot" and deliver drugs at precise locations in the human body once
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical engineers explain oxygen mystery on cometsA Caltech chemical engineer who normally develops new ways to fabricate microprocessors in computers has figured out how to explain a nagging mystery in space—why comets expel oxygen gas, the same gas we humans breathe.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology generates power from polluted airResearchers from the University of Antwerp and KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have succeeded in developing a process that purifies air and, at the same time, generates power. The device must only be exposed to light in order to function.
6h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Stor ingeniørjagt hos Cowi, Rambøll Group, Forsvaret og mange flere Listen med ugentlige ingeniørjobs når nye længder. Der er arbejde for robot-, elektronik-, kemi-, automations-, konstruktions-, produktionsingeniører og meget mere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-kaempe-ingenioerjagt-hos-cowi-ramboell-group-forsvaret-mange-flere-7982 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
Dagens Medicin
Overlæge fra Rigshospitalet modtager forskerpris
6h
Ingeniøren
Ingeniører skal overflødiggøre sig selv – lige nu går det bare lidt for stærkt Nutidens ingeniøropgaver bliver overtaget af billigere og dårligere uddannet arbejdskraft. Fremtidens opgaver bliver komplekse og globale og har kun plads til de ingeniører, der ved, hvad de kan og vil, mener ekspert. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ingeniorer-skal-overflodiggore-sig-selv-lige-nu-gar-bare-lidt-staerkt-7931 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
7h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Stor ingeniørjagt hos Cowi, Rambøll Group, Forsvaret og mange flere Listen med ugentlige ingeniørjobs når nye længder. Der er arbejde for robot-, elektronik-, kemi-, automations-, konstruktions-, produktionsingeniører og meget mere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-kaempe-ingenioerjagt-hos-cowi-ramboell-group-forsvaret-mange-flere-7982 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
7h
Science | The Guardian
Are people who think they can multitask deluding themselves?We’ve all tried to juggle several things at once. So does it work, or is it better to concentrate on just one task at a time? You may be reading this while on a conference call, pushing your child on a swing – or both. But is multitasking really a good idea, or does it make us do everything more slowly and less well than if we were concentrating on one task at a time? Continue reading...
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record haul of pangolin scales seized in MalaysiaMalaysian customs officers have seized more than 700 kilograms of pangolin scales, the country's largest haul of the scales considered by some to have medicinal properties, officials said Monday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate talks under shadow of Trump threatsUS President Donald Trump's threats to pull America out of the climate-rescue Paris Agreement is expected to cast a long shadow over UN talks starting Monday to work on the nuts and bolts of the deal.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sinclair close to buying rival TV operator TribuneTelecommunications company Sinclair Broadcast Group is close to an agreement to buy rival TV station operator Tribune Media.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zcash, the virtual money making its markZcash, the latest virtual currency, has been a smash success since its launch seven months ago, drawing in new users with promises of unrivaled privacy protection.
7h
Science-Based Medicine
Cries the acupuncturist, “Medicine is biased against us, and there’s a double standard!”A recent article in Popular Science argues that medicine has a bias against acupuncture, holding it to a higher standard of evidence than conventional medical interventions. Even if there is a double standard, the answer is not to recommend acupuncture, but rather to stop recommending medical procedures that don't work.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insecticide-resistant flies 'rubbish' at courting femalesInsecticide resistance sounds like a superpower for the average male fruit fly—but there's a catch.
7h
Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Have a punt on the paddocks puzzle En garde! Let’s fence! Hi guzzlers. Today’s puzzle was invented by Elliott Line, editor of Enigma, the international puzzle magazine for Mensa members. It’s a Sudoku-esque logic puzzle, in which you make step-by-step deductions to gradually fill the grid. This type of puzzle is always highly addictive and very satisfying to complete. I’ve included 3 here: easy, medium and hard. Giddy up! Continue
8h
New Scientist - News
Increased cancer rate in US linked to bad environmentAround 39 in 100,000 cancer deaths could be avoided if US counties improved environment quality – a target that could be hampered by Trump's new legislation
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cotton tip applicators are sending 34 kids to the emergency department each dayA study conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers found that over a 21-year period from 1990 through 2010, an estimated 263,000 children younger than 18 years of age were treated in US hospital emergency departments for cotton tip applicator related ear injuries -- that's about 12,500 annually, or about 34 injuries every day.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrated violation of Bell's inequality on frequency-bin entangled photon pairsMaking use of a specifically-developed slow light technique to reduce the velocity of light dramatically, researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology implemented a Bell Test and were able to generate frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons from spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in cold atoms with a double-path configuration, where the phase difference between the two s
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insecticide-resistant flies 'rubbish' at courting femalesInsecticide resistance sounds like a superpower for the average male fruit fly -- but there's a catch.Scientists have found that the single genetic change which protects the flies from the pesticide DDT also makes males smaller, less aggressive and 'rubbish' at courting females.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dartmouth-led team develops smartwatch with all the movesA prototype smartwatch that moves in five different directions in an effort to make digital smartwatches more convenient for their users.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US strategy to defeat Islamic State in Iraq and Syria needs overhaulLongstanding weaknesses in America's Middle East strategy, spanning at least four decades, mean new options are needed to defeat the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq and Syria, stabilize the Middle East and reestablish a sense of domestic security in the US and Europe, according to a new RAND report.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Canadian clinical guideline for physicians tapers down use of opioidsThere are important risks associated with opioids. The guideline aspires to promote evidence-based prescribing of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor environmental quality linked to elevated cancer ratesExperts warn that recent legislative proposals could jeopardize research on the links between cancer and the environment.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fetal reduction in multifetal pregnancies associated with better birth outcomesAmong twin and triplet pregnancies that were reduced to singleton or twin pregnancies, there was a substantial reduction in complications such as preterm birth and very preterm birth, according to new research published in CMAJ.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New opioid guideline for chronic non-cancer pain focuses on preventing harmA new guideline for prescribing opioids for people with chronic non-cancer pain is aimed at helping health care professionals in Canada limit use of these addictive and potentially lethal drugs. The guideline, published in CMAJ contains 10 recommendations, of which seven are focused on preventing harm from opioid use.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Trump shadow hangs over climate talks openingClimate negotiators meet in Bonn amid concern that the US president could shun the Paris accord.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
The World’s Largest Electric Vehicle Maker Hits a Speed BumpChina’s BYD has huge market share and the backing of Warren Buffett, but a recent drop in government subsidies is hurting sales of its electric cars.
10h
Ars Technica
Comcast, Plume, and the next step for ISP Wi-Fi (credit: Ken Hawkins ) Broadband ISPs have been painted into a corner for a long time when it comes to Wi-Fi. If you're a broadband ISP and you don't offer Wi-Fi, hordes of your customer base will leave you for a competitor who does. But if you're a broadband ISP and you do offer Wi-Fi, you've just given your customer a good reason to hate you that has nothing to do with your core business model—
10h
Ingeniøren
Sundhedsplatformen er højrisikabel: Hele besparelsen kan gå fløjten Ifølge Region Hs egne udmeldinger står de økonomiske gevinstmuligheder ved Sundhedsplatformen på helt usikker grund. Det burde en kvalificeret ledelse ikke acceptere, lyder kritikken. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsplatformen-hoejrisikoprojekt-milliarder-med-gevinstrisiko-paa-100-procent-1076131 Version2
11h
The Atlantic
The Leftovers: See You on the Other Side Each week following episodes of the third and final season of The Leftovers , Sophie Gilbert and Spencer Kornhaber will discuss HBO’s drama about the aftermath of two percent of the world’s population suddenly vanishing. Sophie Gilbert: Do the two men in this show named Kevin Garvey know that there are, in this world, such things called telephones? And that one can use them to communicate in soun
12h
Big Think
Humans Are Less Genetically Diverse Than Wheat. What Does That Mean for Our Species? A cataclysmic event in our past may have led to this situation. Read More
12h
Gizmodo
Start a Light Show Anywhere with the Philips Hue Go, Now Under $50 For the First Time Philips Hue Go , $49 Philips Hue bulbs and lights are mostly confined to a single room in your home, with one notable exception: The battery-powered Hue Go , which is down to an all-time low $49 today, or roughly $20-$25 less than usual. . While it’s plugged in, the Hue Go is basically a brighter (300 lumen vs. 120) version of the Hue Bloom, and is best deployed facing a wall to “paint” it with c
13h
Big Think
Study: More Americans Than Ever Have Serious Mental Illnesses but Fewer Can Get Help A study finds an increasing number of Americans live with serious mental issues and their access to healthcare is getting worse. Read More
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Wilderness Areas Suffer From Human SoundHuman-produced noise doubles the background sound levels in 63 percent of protected areas, and raises it ten-fold in 21 percent of such landscapes. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
The Atlantic
Marine Le Pen's Real Victory PARIS—Sunday was undoubtedly Emmanuel Macron’s night. In a race watched around the world and billed as a fight for the future of Europe, the 39-year-old centrist candidate, who started and grew his own party in just over a year, defeated the National Front’s Marine Le Pen by a wider-than-expected 30-point margin. “What we’ve done, for so many months, has no precedent, no equivalent,” Macron said,
14h
Science-Based Medicine
Corrigendum. The Week in Review for 05/07/2017.Death from alternative medicine impersonators. An acupuncture study done so acupuncturists can get insurance money? A chiropractor has to refund the feds one million dollars. And more.
15h
Futurity.org
CRISPR enzymes act like Pac-Man to chew up RNA Once activated, 10 newly described CRISPR enzymes behave like Pac-Man to run amok and destroy RNA. The findings could be useful for detecting infectious viruses. The new enzymes are variants of a CRISPR protein, Cas13a. In September, scientists reported in the journal Nature that Cas13a could be used to detect specific sequences of RNA, such as those from a virus. They showed that once it binds t
15h
Gizmodo
Neil deGrasse Tyson Is Back to Ruin More Summer Flicks With His Constant Thinking Still: YouTube Neil deGrasse Tyson, aka that one guy in astronomy class who’s always going on about how no movies should have sound in space, is here to tell us that Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 shouldn’t have sound in space. Yeah we know, Dad, we watched Firefly too. Advertisement Tyson appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to “review” some of the upcoming summer blockbusters, includi
15h
Live Science
Can Patients with Celiac Disease Eat Oats?For people with celiac disease, the rules are clear: no gluten. But what about oats?
16h
Live Science
Some People Who Avoid Gluten Also Avoid VaccinesCHICAGO — A new study finds that many people with either celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity are wary of vaccines — a finding that doctors say is concerning.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watching movies can replace general anesthesia for kids with cancer having radiotherapyChildren with cancer could be spared dozens of doses of general anesthesia by projecting a video directly on to the inside of a radiotherapy machine during treatment, according to research presented at the ESTRO 36 conference.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests role for radiotherapy for extending the lives of pancreatic cancer patientsPatients with early stage pancreatic cancer could be given longer to live if they receive radiotherapy at a high enough dose, according to research presented at the ESTRO 36 conference.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brachytherapy rather than surgery is a good option for cancer of the penisResults from the largest group of men treated for cancer of the penis by a single institution have shown that treatment with brachytherapy is a good option that can be used instead of surgery in many cases. The study, presented at the 36th annual congress of the European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology, is important because penile cancer is extremely rare and so it is difficult to gather enoug
16h
Gizmodo
USA Today Is Pissed That Bots Are Such Big Fans of Its Facebook Page Photo: Getty Normally, if a publisher has a problem with spam bots. it has something to do with dreaded promotional comments that don’t make any sense. But USA Today has another problem—the bots just love the colorful newspaper’s Facebook page. That’s led to the FBI getting involved. USA Today’s parent company, Gannett Co., reached out to the FBI this week hoping that something could be done abou
16h
Science | The Guardian
US military's secret space plane lands with sonic boom in Florida Unmanned X-37B, which looks like a miniature space shuttle, was in orbit for more than 700 days before landing caused sonic boom heard across state The US military’s experimental X-37B space plane landed on Sunday at Nasa’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, completing a classified mission that lasted nearly two years , the US air force said. Related: Mysterious space plane blasts off for secretive
17h
Futurity.org
5 big threats in the fight against invasive species Efforts to control invasive species face a list of significant issues over the next two decades, say ecologists. “Environmental, biotechnological, and sociopolitical trends are transforming risks of invasion worldwide. We have identified some potential game-changers,” says McGill University professor Anthony Ricciardi, who led the study in Trends in Ecology and Evolution . Here are five of the ma
17h
Futurity.org
Floods will likely crumble more U.S. bridges The current way of assessing bridges in the US may underestimate their vulnerability, according to a new study. The findings reveal an obstacle to wisely spending the money in the $1 trillion budget proposal to update infrastructure, including crumbling bridges. Case in point is a bridge along California’s iconic Big Sur coast, which collapsed in March, isolating communities and costing local bus
18h
Gizmodo
Edge of Tomorrow Sequel Gets Title and Return of Emily Blunt Image: Warner Bros Edge of Tomorrow is one of those movies where if you haven’t seen it, someone who has will list off at least a dozen reasons why you should. Fans of the scifi thriller have been clamoring for a sequel since 2014, along with star Tom Cruise and director Doug Liman. While things are still up in the air, the movie’s definitely moving forward, with an official title and confirmed r
18h
Gizmodo
Despite Hacks, Macron Trounces Le Pen in French Presidential Election Photo: AP After a last minute effort by hackers to interfere with the French election, centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron still handily defeated his far right adversary Marine Le Pen. How the French press will handle the campaign hacks following a mandated blackout on election reporting remains to be seen. The election in France has been seen as a sort of litmus test for the direction the world m
19h
The Atlantic
Is France's Political Crisis Just Beginning? Emmanuel Macron, the next president of France, campaigned on a slogan of “ Together, France! ” And why not? He is a sunny centrist who attracted votes from the left and the right to decisively defeat the far-right nationalist Marine Le Pen on Sunday. The center seems not only to have held, but to have swelled. But Macron’s victory could further fracture French politics rather than bridge the coun
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Military orbiter's landing rattles Florida with sonic boom (Update)U.S. military officials say an unmanned spacecraft orbiting Earth since May 2015 has landed in Florida.
19h
Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on weapons that wait: clear them nowUnexploded munitions, landmines and improvised devices kill thousands of civilians annually. They must be removed for communities to recover The evacuation of 50,000 people from Hannover this weekend, following the discovery of five unexploded second world war bombs, reminds us that conflicts can have a deadly impact long after the fighting ends. But while the German city’s residents have been inc
19h
Science | The Guardian
Strong language can be good for a laugh too | Brief lettersExpressing your feelings | Caggie-handed Cameron | Colston Hall | Grandparents’ names Having worked as a psychotherapist for 12 years I concur that swearing makes us stronger ( Report , 5 May). People brought up in a culture of obedience and “being good” repress their negative feelings, which can lead to passivity, inertia and depression. I teach clients that swearing in private is a harmless way
20h
The Atlantic
Macron's Win: The Center Holds Firm in France French voters handed Emmanuel Macron, the independent candidate, a decisive victory in the presidential runoff Sunday over Marine Le Pen, the far-right candidate, buoying Europe’s political establishment that had watched with despair as populist movements threatened to derail the European experiment. Macron, 39 , who had all but been endorsed by Europe’s leaders after his first-round victory on A
20h
Ars Technica
EPA chief promises to recuse himself from lawsuits, advocates for coal Enlarge / Scott Pruitt on April 19, 2017 in East Chicago, Indiana. (credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt sent a memo to agency employees last week saying that he would recuse himself from lawsuits that he brought against the Agency as Oklahoma Attorney General, according to Reuters . Pruitt sued the EPA more than a dozen times under th
20h
Big Think
Watch How UAE Plans to Drag Icebergs from Antarctica to Solve Its Water Shortage A company plans to transform the world's most arid region by bringing icebergs from Antarctica. Read More
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Marketing Changed the Way We See AvocadosOnce upon a time, Americans didn't know what to do with "alligator pears." Now we can't get enough -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Gizmodo
Anker's Smallest Bluetooth Headphones Are Down to Their Smallest Price Anker SoundBuds Slim , $21 Anker’s SoundBuds are our readers’ favorite affordable Bluetooth headphones , and the newest version is down to a new all-time low price. The SoundBuds Slim are, as you might have gleaned from the name, far smaller than the originals. Heck, they look like a small set of wired earbuds; you might never guess there were batteries and Bluetooth radios in there. Despite the
21h
Gizmodo
Send Your Ashes to Republicans Who Voted to Take Away Your Health Insurance Photo: AP It would be funny, if it weren’t so damn sad. As a protest against the House Republican decision to pass a healthcare bill that will cause millions of people to lose their insurance, one programmer has set up a website that helps you mail your ashes to the ghouls responsible for your death. On Thursday, House Republicans passed the Affordable Health Care Act, and it’s on its way to the
21h
Gizmodo
No, Marvel Didn't Promote an Image Calling Jessica Jones an 'Evil Jew' Marvel has been in its share of hot water over the past few months— including when a VP of sales said diverse characters were causing its sales to slump, or when artist Ardian Syaf’s contract was sacked for putting controversial messages in X-Men Gold . The latest hotbed is an image that some claim was on Marvel’s official Defenders page, which has some awful names for Jessica Jones and Luke Cage
21h
Ars Technica
DNA damage in cancer cells targeted to kill them 3d render of a DNA spirals (credit: Image courtesy of NIST ) One thing cells must do in order to become cancerous is to overthrow the normal checks on their growth. As a part of this process, the stringent controls on things like copying and repairing DNA start to break down. As a result, tumors often contain chromosomal rearrangements, which are places where genes are cut and pasted back togethe
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds choose their neighbors based on personalityBirds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits choose neighbors with similar personalities to their own.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers seek better ways to farm popular Pacific fishThe dark gray fish prized for its buttery flavor live deep in the ocean, so researchers keep their lab cold and dark to simulate ideal conditions for sablefish larvae.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts meet in Egypt over moving King Tut artifactsArchaeologists and conservation experts met in Cairo on Sunday to discuss the safe transportation of King Tutankhamun's throne, chests and bed from the Egyptian Museum in central Cairo to a new one being built on the other side of the Egyptian capital.
22h
Ars Technica
Hands in the box: New puzzle game Statik does right by VR Enlarge / That’s how the doc’s face looks throughout Statik Institute of Retention. (credit: Tarsier Studios ) The first thing Statik Institute of Retention gets right is that it leans into every single limitation of the PlayStation VR platform . The last thing Statik gets right is that it turns those limitations into a bizarre, brilliant rumination on our relationship with computers and games—in
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wood filter removes toxic dye from waterEngineers have developed a new use for wood: to filter water. Scientists added nanoparticles to wood, then used it to filter toxic dyes from water.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Direct and not indirect childhood abuse linked to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescentsAdolescents who were physically abused or sexually abused were more likely to engage in non-suicidal self-injury than their non-abused counterparts, according to a new study.
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How Long Could You Go Only Eating Grouse? | Yukon Men #YukonMenTV | Fridays at 9/8c Jessi and Chris are still struggling for food on a day-to-day basis after their first year in the Yukon. Their only hope: tiny grouse that provide one meal at a time. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/yukon-men More Yukon: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/yukon-men/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us o
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benefits of antipsychotics outweigh risks, find expertsAn international group of experts has concluded that, for patients with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, antipsychotic medications do not have negative long-term effects on patients' outcomes or the brain.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study examines 'watch-and-wait' approach for people with rectal cancerNew study suggests a select group of patients with rectal cancer who undergo chemotherapy and radiation may have low rates of recurrence and good survival rates regardless of whether they go on to have surgery.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prolonged military-style training causes changes to intestinal bacteria, increases inflammationA new study finds that long periods of physiological stress can change the composition of microorganisms residing in the intestines (intestinal microbiota), which could increase health risks in endurance athletes and military personnel.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomasThe fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. Researchers have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unlocking the barrier: Surprising role of omega-3 fatty acids in keeping the blood-brain barrier closedAlready extolled for their health benefits as a food compound, omega-3 fatty acids now appear to also play a critical role in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which protects the central nervous system from blood-borne bacteria, toxins and other pathogens, according to new research.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large nuclear cardiology laboratory slashes radiation dose by 60% in eight yearsA large nuclear cardiology laboratory has slashed its average radiation dose by 60% in eight years, according to new research. The study shows dose reductions were achieved despite a large number of obese patients.
23h
Gizmodo
Popular Mac App Developers Issue Urgent Malware Warning Image source: Apple It’s been a rough week in Mac security. First, Checkpoint warned users of a Trojan spreading in Europe that was the first of its kind. And now, one of the most prominent video transcoding apps for Mac has a malware problem. The developers of the transcoding software Handbrake have issued a statement that warns one of the mirror sites to download the software has been compromis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 yearsLittle does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas. However, a biologist has now made a startling discovery: a new, beautiful butterfly named Acentria's fritillary, which was spotted as it flew over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel.
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Gizmodo
Sunday's Best Deals: Amazon Mother's Day Gadget Sale, Anker SoundBuds, and More Amazon device deals , an incredibly popular carpet cleaner , and Anker’s smallest Bluetooth headphones lead off Sunday’s best deals. Advertisement Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals If you haven’t yet picked out a Mother’s Day gift (or just want to treat yourself to something nice), Amazon’s running a big sale on many of its most popular gadgets. Th
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Big Think
Startup Promises Immortality Through AI, Nanotechnology, and Cloning They plan to record personality, memory, and body function information, and recreate it. Read More
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Ars Technica
Two defenses of research on useless knowledge Enlarge / Science! (credit: BRICK 101 ) In an era of intense, globalized economic competition and massive government debt, can we afford fundamental scientific research? Lately, the answer seems to be "not really." Companies that once supported R&D have cut back dramatically, and the US government hasn't kept pace with inflation when it comes to funding most research. In the last 50 years, the US
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White blood cell boosting drugs safe during chemo-radiotherapyNew research shows that white blood cell boosting drugs are safe during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MRSA blood infections are less fatal in kids, but cause significant complicationsChildren with bloodstream infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are less likely to die than adults with this condition and have different risk factors for treatment failure, a new study indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First molecular diagnostics for insecticide resistance in sandfliesA new study identifies a potent molecular mechanism for insecticide resistance in the world's most medically-important sandfly species and develops DNA-diagnostics for monitoring future impact on visceral leishmaniasis control and elimination programs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey finds colorectal cancer reported more commonly in individuals with unhealthy lifestyleA Cleveland Clinic colon cancer risk assessment survey found that respondents who exercised more, followed a healthy diet and did not smoke were less likely to have a personal history of colorectal cancer or colon polyps. The online risk analysis, which has had more than 27,000 responses from around the world, highlights the modifiable risk factors, such as diet and lifestyle behaviors, reported b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A unique enzyme could be a game-changer for gluten-sensitive patientsResearchers have found that taking an enzyme tablet while consuming foods containing gluten prevents a significant amount of it from entering the small intestine. This could enable gluten-sensitive patients to ingest small quantities of gluten without experiencing symptoms, such as bloating, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The encouraging results from the enzyme known as aspergillus niger-derived pro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New defense mechanism against bacteria discoveredResearchers believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells derived from specialized progenitorsDendritic cells are gatekeepers of Immunity and are crucial for the detection and initiation of Immunity against pathogens and foreign substances. Up to now dendritic cell subtypes were thought to develop from one common progenitor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dye makes flu germs visible to the naked eyeResearchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus.
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The Atlantic
The Case for a Taxpayer-Supported Version of Facebook There’s a wealth of tech-centric explanations for a 2016 presidential election that defied expectations and has many Americans scared about our civic future. Fake news. Cambridge Analytica. Filter bubbles. Russian hacking. WikiLeaks. Propaganda bots. It’s almost as if people are loath to admit that we live in a deeply divided nation (remember Bush v. Gore , anyone?) where Americans of all politic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interactionControl of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. Researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene controls birth defect common in diabetesResearchers have identified a gene that plays a key role in the formation of neural tube defects, a problem commonly found in infants of pregnant women with diabetes. This is the first time the gene has been shown to play this role; it opens up a new way to understand these defects, and may one day lead to new treatments that could prevent the problem or decrease its incidence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find genetic mutation responsible for rare skin disease in AfrikanersResearchers at the Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Division of Human Genetics at Wits, in collaboration with peers in Europe, the US and Canada published this research in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential new target for cancer treatmentInhibition of the enzyme RIOK1could stop the growth of tumors and the development of metastases
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Ingeniøren
Moesgaard skildrer livets faser i storslået filmMoesgaard Museum illustrerer menneskets rejse fra fødsel til død i en ny udstilling, hvor storslåede filmscener erstatter fysiske genstande.
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Science | The Guardian
I've created a monster! Shezad Dawood on his oceanic epic Leviathan Mass migration and climate change – not to mention a giant squid: Leviathan has it all. As his wildly ambitious new work opens in Venice, he reveals the story behind a strange odyssey that will take years to complete The giant squid, democracy, mental health, migration – big beasts, one and all. And each plays a role in Leviathan, a cycle of 10 films by artist Shezad Dawood that traces links from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New and improved genome sequence of Daphnia pulexBy understanding how they respond to toxic elements, scientists can look at how environmental changes caused by agriculture and road runoff or warming temperatures and climate change could impact populations in lakes, rivers and standing bodies of water.
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Ars Technica
New 2018 Mercedes-AMG GT C roadster: German brute or exotic alternative? Mercedes-Benz Some serious model proliferation has been going on at Mercedes-AMG, and few enthusiasts will have a problem with that. What began a couple of years ago as a follow-up to the gullwing-door SLS has grown into a model line unto itself. The AMG GT is now seven models, including the base GT, the GT S, the GT R, the GT3 race car, the GT convertible, the GT C roadster, and the GT C coupe.
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