Live Science

Why Multitasking Harms Your ProductivityResearchers looked at what happens in the brain when the process of gathering information and absorbing it is interrupted.
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Futurity.org

Helping coworkers can make you a jerk later on Giving help to coworkers in the morning can lead to feeling tired and behaving selfishly in the afternoon, potentially leading to a toxic workplace environment, a new study suggests. The study, published in Personnel Psychology , builds on the previous work of Russell Johnson, associate professor of management in Michigan State University’s Broad College of Business, that found helping others at
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Ars Technica

To mitigate major Edge printing bug, use a Xerox copier, baffled user advises (credit: Xerox ) A printer-display bug in the Edge browser is so baffling and potentially damaging that frustrated users are considering an unthinkable workaround: using a Xerox copier instead of using the browser's print function. The advice came in a bug report titled "Edge displays '123456' in PDF but prints '114447.'" The error, however, goes well beyond what's suggested in the title. Two por
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN aviation agency seeks public input on drone trackingThe International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on Wednesday asked the public for feedback on a proposal to track drones in real-time around the world to avoid collisions with jetliners.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Century-old tumours offer rare cancer clues DNA sequences from 100-year-old tumour samples could bolster childhood cancer research. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21975
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The extent of neuronal loss in the brain during MSA study establishes for the first time the extent of neuronal loss in the brain of a person with MS over their life, and finds that demyelination may not be as good an indicator of disease progression as previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thirsty seeds reach for medicine cabinetScientists have found that salicylic acid -- also used to make aspirin -- can help the cowpea be more drought tolerant. In Brazil, the cowpea one of the main sources of protein for many people. Americans may know the cowpea by the name black-eyed pea.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater powerA new generation of higher-powered batteries for phones and cameras could result from ground-breaking research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish should figure in to fate of nation's aging damsAs nearly 75 percent of the nation's largest dams approach the high maintenance years, safety and economics figure large in decisions to fix or replace. A recent study by Michigan State University (MSU) researchers makes a case to consider how those dams affect the streams and fish that live in them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study beefs up support for brain cells that control protein hungerHave you ever found yourself craving a steak or a burger? The brain controls our feelings of hunger and also determines the types of nutrients we should be seeking out. Not much is understood about the brain's regulation of nutrient-specific hunger, but in a new study published in Science, researchers identified the brain cells in fruit flies that regulate protein hunger and were able to control t
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Ars Technica

About a third of FDA-approved drugs go on to have major safety issues Enlarge (credit: Victor ) About a third of the drugs that the Food and Drug Administration deems safe and effective go on to have major safety issues years after their approval, researchers report in JAMA . The finding lands amid pressure from lawmakers and the Trump administration to hasten the already fast pace of the agency’s drug reviews. Among 222 novel therapeutics approved by the agency be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ongoing natural selection against damaging genetic mutations in humansInvestigators report that, as a species, humans are able to keep the accumulation of damaging mutations in check because each additional mutation that's added to a genome causes larger, and larger consequences, decreasing an individual's ability to pass on genetic material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer accurately identifies and delineates breast cancers on digital tissue slidesA deep-learning computer network was 100 percent accurate in determining whether invasive forms of breast cancer were present in whole biopsy slides. The network correctly made the same determination in each individual pixel of the slide 97 percent of the time, rendering near-exact delineations of the tumors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat's growth stalls in Facebook's shadow in 1Q reportFacebook has been bent on copying Snapchat ever since the social media giant tried unsuccessfully in 2013 to buy what was then an ephemeral photo-messaging app.
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Ars Technica

Tesla starts pre-orders on solar roof for $1,000, rolls out calculator for costs Enlarge / Tesla is starting pre-orders on smooth and textured black glass solar roofs. (credit: Tesla) Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced on Twitter on Wednesday that the company’s solar roof panels would be available for pre-order that afternoon. In a press conference Wednesday afternoon, Tesla and SolarCity executives said the roof would be cheaper, on the whole, than installing a regular tile roof
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A defence mechanism that can trap and kill TB bacteriaA natural mechanism by which our cells kill the bacterium responsible for tuberculosis (TB) has been discovered, which could help in the battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Fingertip touch' clue to human ancestors exploiting treetop environmentsResearch suggests that ancestral humans may have been more adept at negotiating unstable arboreal environment than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egypt says it's found burial chamber dating back 3,700 yearsEgypt's Ministry of Antiquities says a burial chamber dating back about 3,700 years has been found, attached to a recently discovered pyramid belonging to the 13th Dynasty.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla starts selling solar roof; says savings to cover costsElectric car maker Tesla has added another product to its lineup: Solar roof tiles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Far away, yet so near: App lets kids, distant loved ones read togetherHelping military families enjoy story time together was the inspiration for Caribu, an app enabling children and their loved ones far away to read together.
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New Scientist - News

A small class-action lawsuit could stop the US opioid epidemicA lawsuit settlement in Canada against Purdue, the pharmaceutical giant behind Oxycontin, offers a legal strategy for felling a giant with a thousand cuts
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New Scientist - News

Minnesota measles outbreak follows anti-vaccination campaignAnti-vaccination activists have been targeting Minnesota's Somali-American community, among whom the MMR vaccination rate has halved in a decade
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New Scientist - News

AI detective analyses police data to learn how to crack casesA system called VALCRI should do the laborious parts of a crime analyst's job in seconds, while also suggesting new lines of enquiry and possible motives
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New Scientist - News

Wiggling atom probes buddy molecule without disturbing itPhysicists can observe complex molecules without disrupting them by linking them up to a charged atom, giving a new way to probe fundamental physics
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New Scientist - News

Waves surge in opposite directions around Io’s largest lava lakeBest ever images of a lava lake on Jupiter’s innermost large moon reveal its surface regenerating itself, sometimes clockwise and sometimes anticlockwise
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Futurity.org

‘Formal’ preschool may sharpen kids’ focus Children who transition earlier to a formal school environment learn to be more focused and are less impulsive than children at play-based preschools, a new study suggests. “These results demonstrate for the first time how environmental context shapes the development of brain mechanisms in five-year-olds transitioning into school,” says Silvia Bunge, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ongoing natural selection against damaging genetic mutations in humansThe survival of the human species in the face of high rates of genetic mutations has remained an important problem in evolutionary biology. While mutations provide a source of novelty for the species, a large fraction of these genetic changes can also be damaging. A newborn human is estimated to have ~70 new mutations that the parents did not have. In a project conducted by Brigham and Women's Hos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeking solutions to a down-to-earth problem for space travelers—how to keep their clothes cleanAstronaut Don Pettit, a University of Arizona College of Engineering alumnus, wore the same pair of shorts for months at a time while living on the International Space Station. Doing laundry was not an option. When clothes got too dirty, he and his crewmates stored them onboard until they could be thrown out—launched with other debris on a spacecraft and incinerated upon entering Earth's atmospher
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Live Science

Taking ADHD Medications May Help Reduce Car AccidentsAdults with ADHD may be safer behind the wheel if they've taken their meds, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo

A Piece of the Famous Meteorite That Nailed a Person Has Just Been Sold Image Courtesy of Christie’s The only thing worse than getting struck by lightning or a large, flying bird is getting struck by a meteorite. Thankfully, the chances of this happening to you are incredibly low— according to National Geographic , there is only one confirmed case of a meteorite striking a person. So perhaps it’s no surprise that a piece of the offending space rock, called “Sylacauga
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Gizmodo

Microsoft’s Latest Workplace Tech Demos Creep Me Out Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo If you’re an employee under the heel of a giant corporation you should probably be terrified by the vision of the future of connected gadgets that Microsoft just revealed at its Build developer conference here in Seattle. Advertisement Two demos from today’s keynote stood out, both for being entertaining and for revealing a potentially frightening future for anyone worki
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computer accurately identifies and delineates breast cancers on digital tissue slidesA deep-learning computer network developed through research led by Case Western Reserve University was 100 percent accurate in determining whether invasive forms of breast cancer were present in whole biopsy slides. The network correctly made the same determination in each individual pixel of the slide 97 percent of the time, rendering near-exact delineations of the tumors.
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Science : NPR

Lead Dust From Firearms Can Pose A Silent Health Risk The Department of Defense has increased protections for military personnel from exposure to lead from firearms. It can be a health problem for people using recreational shooting ranges, too. (Image credit: Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dread of roses: Neurobehavioral effects found in children exposed to flower pesticidesResearchers have found altered short-term neurological behaviors in children associated with a peak pesticide spraying season linked to the Mother's Day flower harvest. This study examined children who did not work in agriculture but who lived in agricultural communities in Ecuador.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can the motion of checking your smartwatch charge it?Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are small devices that convert movement into electricity, and might just be what bring us into an era of energy-harvesting clothes and implants. But could TENGs, even theoretically, give us wearable electronics powered solely by the wearer's day-to-day body motion? The short answer is yes. New research demonstrates the ability of mechanical energy produced by t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

‘Inverse Designing’ Spontaneously Self-Assembling MaterialsResearchers at the University of Texas at Austin are exploring how molecular simulations with the latest optimization strategies can create a more systematic way of discovering new materials that exhibit specific, desired properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists identify key step in lung cancer evolutionBiologists have identified a major switch that occurs as lung adenomas transition to more aggressive adenocarcinomas -- and that blocking this switch prevents the transition. The findings suggest drugs interfering with this switch could be useful in treating early-stage lung cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yogurt consumption in older Irish adults linked with better bone healthThe largest observational study to date of dairy intakes and bone and frailty measurements in older adults has found that increased yogurt consumption was associated with a higher hip bone density and a significantly reduced risk of osteoporosis in older women and men on the island of Ireland, after taking into account traditional risk factors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do snowflakes form? Chemist sees ice crystal formation in new lightNew research by chemist has shed new light on ice crystal formation by combining an electron backscatter with a large single crystal ice model. Scientists discovered that an ice crystal's flat sides are formed by a hexagon that is larger and consists of a central water molecule surrounded by six others in the same layer.
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The Atlantic

The Making of a Friendly Microbe One day in October 2010, a volunteer firefighter named Thomas Fritz cut down a crab apple tree outside his house, and impaled his hand on one of the branches. He dressed the wound, but it still became infected. His doctor gave him a course of antibiotics and sent fluid from the wound to the University of Utah for analysis. The technicians there tested the microbes in the fluid, and found that the
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New on MIT Technology Review

How Do You Fight the Largest Cocaine Boom in History? With Drones.With record amounts of cocaine being shipped out of South America, the Coast Guard believes it needs more eyes in the sky.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air traffic control for drones is coming. Here's how it could workBy 2020, an estimated 7 million drones could be zipping around the country delivering packages, taking photos, inspecting infrastructure or conducting search and rescue missions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene-delivery system prevents vision loss from inherited eye diseaseResearchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed gene-carrying nanoparticles that home in on target cells and prevent vision loss in mice with a human form of Leber congenital amaurosis. They believe the technology holds promise for other forms of LCA as well as other inherited diseases that lead to severe vision loss or blindness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential Zika virus vaccinePreclinical research results in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The family dog could help boost physical activity for kids with disabilitiesThe family dog could serve as a partner and ally in efforts to help children with disabilities incorporate more physical activity into their daily lives. A case study of one 10-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and his family's dog, found the intervention program led to a wide range of improvements for the child.
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Live Science

New Battery Could Power Electric Cars 620 Miles on Single ChargeThe redesigned battery could ease people's "range anxiety" when it comes to electric cars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab NebulaAstronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space software company sees big promise in tiny satellitesMarshall Culpepper's career began in his teen years, when he volunteered to work for Nortel Networks, a telecom company that was headquartered outside Dallas. That high school gig turned into a paying one and got Culpepper started in the field of software engineering.
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Ars Technica

Drones: Is the Sky the Limit showcases drone tech from earliest stages to now Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Drones have become so mainstream that you may have considered getting one for a family member or a friend for their birthday. But this wasn't the case just a few decades ago, when drones were mostly used by those in the military and special forces. The Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum in New York City highlights the changing uses and perception
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The Atlantic

'A President Who Doesn't Play by Any Rules' President Trump’s abrupt firing Tuesday evening of FBI Director James Comey sent American media and lawmakers scrambling to make sense of what had happened. The termination came as the FBI continued to investigate the possibility of collusion between people involved in Trump’s presidential campaign and Russia, and it hit front pages across the nation . The story had international reverberations a
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Live Science

Jurassic Creature Preserved with Own 'Death Drag'A 28-foot-long (8.5 meters) drag mark ends with the fossil of the animal that made it.
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Live Science

Glacier National Park Is Losing Its GlaciersOver the past 50 years, 39 of the park's glaciers have shrunk dramatically, some by as much as 85 percent.
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Live Science

World War I Battle Artifacts Unearthed in IsraelA cache of artillery shells, shrapnel and other military artifacts unearthed in Israel reveal the history of a World War I battle between the Turks and the British.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Link between common brain disease and gut microbiomeBacteria in the gut microbiome drive the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures. The research team's research suggests that altering the microbiome in CCM patients may be an effective therapy for this cerebrovascular disease.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Just Named a Newly-Discovered Dinosaur After a Ghostbusters Character Scientists found a dinosaur that reminded them of this Ghostbusters character. So they named it Zuul. Image: Sony Hopefully, this opens the door for a Jurassic Park and Ghostbusters crossover. Advertisement Because that’s kind of what happened. CBC News reports that scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum recently discovered the 75 million-year-old fossil of a new type of ankylosaur. When trying
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create unique disease 'catalog' linked to immune system gene variationsA study led by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy has generated the first comprehensive catalog of diseases associated with variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes that regulate the body's immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke, MS patients walk significantly better with neural stimulationA research volunteer with MS and another who had suffered a stroke were able to walk significantly better with the aid of neural stimulation systems. Researchers hope these studies will lay the foundation for implanted systems that restore some independence to people in these two populations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping reveals reactions differ in male and female brains during cardiovascular activityA region of the brain that helps to manage body functions including stress, heart rate and blood pressure reacts differently between men and women when presented with certain stimuli, according to a new study from the UCLA School of Nursing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ongoing natural selection against damaging genetic mutations in humansInvestigators report that, as a species, humans are able to keep the accumulation of damaging mutations in check because each additional mutation that's added to a genome causes larger, and larger consequences, decreasing an individual's ability to pass on genetic material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shelf sediments reveal climate shifts through the eonsClimate change around Antarctica can severely affect Australia's rainfall and even influence the distribution of wet and dry zones across southeast Asia, an international study has revealed.Chelsea Korpanty of The University of Queensland's School of Biological Sciences worked on the study, which was led by Dr Jeroen Groeneveld from the Center of Marine and Environment Sciences at the University o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D and calcium from food is associated with lower risk of early menopauseA new study led by epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's School of Public Health and Health Sciences suggests that high intake of dietary vitamin D and calcium may be modestly associated with lower risk of early menopause, the cessation of ovarian function before age 45. Early menopause affects about 10 percent of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular imaging reveals mechanism for resistance to immune checkpoint blockadeA study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a surprising mechanism for resistance to immune checkpoint blockade. The study finds in a mouse model that an antibody-based drug designed to block the immunosuppressive molecule PD-1 is removed from its target T cells by macrophages.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tumor-dwelling immune cells thwart cancer immunotherapyResearchers have caught tumor-associated immune cells called macrophages in the act of stealing checkpoint inhibitor antibodies away from their intended T cell targets, and blocking this thievery led to improved therapeutic responses in tumor-bearing mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A bath for precision printing of 3-D silicone structuresResearchers have developed an oil-based 'bath,' or support system, that facilitates precise 3-D printing of silicon materials in a variety of shapes. They demonstrated the capability of this method by using it to create model tracheal implants and a functional fluid pump, among other items relevant to biomedicine.
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WIRED

For a Game About Identity, Prey’s Sure Short on Its Own Arkane Studios' latest is a sprawling title that doesn't know what kind of game it wants to be. The post For a Game About Identity, Prey's Sure Short on Its Own appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3D-printed 'bionic skin' could give robots the sense of touchEngineering researchers have developed a revolutionary process for 3D printing stretchable electronic sensory devices that could give robots the ability to feel their environment. The discovery is also a major step forward in printing electronics on real human skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exploring the conversion of heat to electricity in single moleculesResearchers have investigated the influence of the geometry of single-molecule devices on their ability to produce electricity from heat. They fabricated devices consisting of a single molecule bridging gold electrodes and measured device electrical conductance and thermovoltage simultaneously. The devices with thiol-gold contacts displayed the highest thermovoltage when the gold-thiol bond was st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-dimensional direction-dependent force measurement at the subatomic scaleScientists have developed a new atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique that can measure the three-dimensional force fields of atoms. In their technique, the precisely controlled tip of a mechanical arm is moved over a material surface at two different frequencies to provide information about the material surface in both vertical and parallel directions. This AFM technique will expand understandin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the bodyA new technology can monitor and maintain the level of drug in the bloodstream of animals. If it works in people, it could deliver the optimal dose of life-saving drugs and prevent harmful over- or underdosing.
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NYT > Science

A Baffling Brain Defect Is Linked to Gut Bacteria, Scientists SayA serendipitous experiment in mice suggests that patients with a mutated gene are more susceptible if they harbor certain types of bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In brain evolution, size matters—most of the timeWhich came first, overall bigger brains or larger brain regions that control specialized behaviors? Neuroscientists have debated this question for decades, but a new Cornell University study settles the score.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify novel technique to build better vaccine adjuvantsA study published this week in mBio demonstrates that a novel technique can be used to build better vaccines for infectious diseases. The study shows that a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), can be used to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants. Vaccines often combine a well-characterized recombinant protein antigen wit
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The Atlantic

Trump's Nixonian Moment And so it’s happened that Donald Trump has fired a clutch of law-enforcement officials who were engaged in the duty of investigating the president and his associates for potentially felonious behavior. Which has prompted Republican Party leaders to declare that they are, variously, concerned or disturbed about the timing of the latest dismissal—that of FBI Director James Comey—but to otherwise po
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The Atlantic

Obama's Climate-Focused Methane Rule Will Stand as Law The Senate failed to repeal an Obama-era rule limiting the release of methane from drilling on lands overseen by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, or BLM, on Wednesday. For now, at least, the climate-focused rule will stand as law. The 51-49 vote is the first time that this Congress has failed to repeal a law under the Congressional Review Act, or the CRA, a 1995 law that allows for Congress an
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Live Science

Why Donald Trump Is Wrong About ExercisePresident Donald Trump reportedly eschews exercise because he believes it drains the body's "finite" energy resources, but experts say this argument is flawed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shelf sediments reveal climate shifts through the eonsClimate change around Antarctica can severely affect Australia's rainfall and even influence the distribution of wet and dry zones across southeast Asia, an international study has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Net neutrality grabs spotlight again as FCC chief seeks to rescind the tough regulationsIt began as an academic subject with a wonky name - network neutrality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changes in tectonic activity may have shaped composition of Panama Canal rocksChanges in the composition of magma may have caused variations in the Panama Canal volcanic rock formations, according to a study published May 10, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Farris from Florida State University, and colleagues.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Things Get Heated When The Memphis Crew Sneaks Onto The Track And Starts Trash Talking #StreetOutlaws | Mondays at 9/8c on Discovery Memphis Boss JJ is back to talk a big game and challenge OKC. Money, pride and Chief's shoes are on the line. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Single Autonomous Car Has a Huge Impact on Alleviating TrafficEven intelligent cruise control systems could be used to clear up congestion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In brain evolution, size matters -- most of the timeWhich came first, overall bigger brains or larger brain regions that control specialized behaviors? Neuroscientists have debated this question for decades, but a new Cornell University study settles the score.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: The family dog could help boost physical activity for kids with disabilitiesThe family dog could serve as a partner and ally in efforts to help children with disabilities incorporate more physical activity into their daily lives. A case study of one 10-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and his family's dog, found the intervention program led to a wide range of improvements for the child.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify novel technique to build better vaccine adjuvantsA study published this week in mBio demonstrates that a novel technique can be used to build better vaccines for infectious diseases. The study shows that a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), can be used to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CCNY, TechnoVax translational research leads to potential Zika virus vaccinePreclinical results of research by City College of New York scientists and TechnoVax, Inc. in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The results were announced by Tarrytown, New York-based TechnoVax, a biotechnology developer of novel vaccines whose proprietary virus-like particle (VLP) is the center of the research.
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Science | The Guardian

Doctors partly to blame for opioid addiction | Letters Dr Hugh van’t Hoff and Martin Hoban on the use and overuse of painkillers Only a week ago I told a patient there would be a scandal soon about our over-prescribing of opioid medication for chronic pain. What comes across in your article ( Doctors call for action after prescriptions for addictive painkillers double in decade , 6 May) is the absence of any sense of the profession’s complicity in th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New light sensing molecule discovered in the fruit fly brainSix biological pigments called rhodopsins play well-established roles in light-sensing in the fruit fly eye. Three of them also have light-independent roles in temperature sensation. New research shows that a seventh rhodopsin, Rh7, is expressed in the brain of fruit flies where it regulates the fly's day-night activity cycles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotic breakthrough: How to overcome gram-negative bacterial defensesScientists report that they now know how to build a molecular Trojan horse that can penetrate gram-negative bacteria, solving a problem that for decades has stalled the development of effective new antibiotics against these increasingly drug-resistant microbes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reaching for the stormy cloud with ChameleonSome scientists dream about big data. The dream bridges two divided realms. One realm holds lofty peaks of number-crunching scientific computation. Endless waves of big data analysis line the other realm. A deep chasm separates the two. Discoveries await those who cross these estranged lands.
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Ars Technica

The FCC has received 128,000 identical anti-net neutrality comments Enlarge / Actual people who support net neutrality, rallying in front of the White House in November 2014. (credit: Stephen Melkisethian ) The FCC this week has received hundreds of thousands of new comments on its proposal to dismantle net neutrality rules, and more than 128,000 of them are identical comments calling for the reversal of the Obama administration's "power grab." It seems likely th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists find a way to control charged molecules -- with quantum logicPhysicists have solved the seemingly intractable puzzle of how to control the quantum properties of individual charged molecules, or molecular ions. The solution is to use the same kind of 'quantum logic' that drives an experimental NIST atomic clock.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Controlling bacteria's necessary evilUntil now, scientists have only had a murky understanding of how these relationships arise. Now they have an answer. It's good news and bad news, germophobes: The bad news? Mutualistic bacteria start out by invading animal cells just like malevolent disease-causing bacteria do. The good news? Once they're in, they calm down and play nice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Waves of lava seen in Jupiter's moon Io's largest volcanic craterThe most active volcanic crater in the solar system, Loki Patera on Jupiter's moon Io, is thought to be a lava lake that periodically brightens because of overturning lava. A UC Berkeley team regularly monitors Io, and took advantage of a rare 2015 event, Europa passing in front of Io, to map the surface of the lake in detail. They found evidence for two massive waves of overturning lava convergin
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Gizmodo

Vansky's Uber-Popular Under-Bed Motion Light Is Back On Sale For Just $14 Vansky Motion-Activated Under-Bed Night Light , $14 with code SJMFQK08 Finally, someone made the Glow Bowl , but for everywhere else in your home. This motion-sensing light strip is billed as an under-bed night light, but you could just as easily attach it under your bathroom counter, along a railing, beneath your baby’s crib, or anywhere else you might need to venture in the middle of the night.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds worsening outcomes in service members 5 years after mild blast-induced concussionAccording to a new study in JAMA Neurology, US military service members who endured a mild concussion after blast injury while deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan may continue to experience mental health symptoms as well as decreases in quality of life for at least five years after their injury. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Depa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team uncovers novel epigenetic changes in leukemiaUT Health San Antonio researchers discovered epigenetic changes that contribute to one-fifth of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer that arises out of the blood-forming cells in bone marrow. The mutations also play a role in a large majority of low-grade gliomas, which are among the most-treatable brain tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Guiding lightBiologists discover an unexpected role for a light-sensitive receptor protein in the central brain that regulates circadian rhythms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Image release: Telescopes team up for dramatic new look at the crab nebulaMultiwavelength image with VLA, Spitzer, Hubble, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observatories shows the 'whole picture' of the famous Crab Nebula supernova remnant, and provides astronomers with new insights into the object's complex physics.
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Gizmodo

This Laser Printer Creates High-Res Color Images Without a Single Drop of Ink Anyone with a color printer knows that selling replacement ink cartridges is the quickest way to become a millionaire. But what if your printer never needed a single drop of ink to produce color images at impossibly high resolutions? A new laser printer can already do that by etching microscopic patterns onto sheets of plastic. Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark have taken inspira
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Gizmodo

Did Amazon Rip Off the Echo Show From a Startup It Invested in? The Nucleus sure does look an awful lot like the new Echo Show (Image: Nucleus) A couple hours after Amazon announced the new Echo Show, a touchscreen communication device powered by the company’s AI voice assistant Alexa, I got an email from a PR firm representing a company called Nucleus. The subject was salacious: “Amazon is out for blood - the Echo Show is proof.” I almost never reply to thes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eccentric French maths genius's 'scribblings' go onlineNearly 18,000 pages of notes by eccentric French maths genius Alexandre Grothendieck were posted online Wednesday by his alma mater, Montpellier University in southern France.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Puerto Rico drinking water is worst in US: reportThe US territory of Puerto Rico has the worst drinking water in the nation, and the majority of the island's water supply is in violation of federal standards, a report said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook takes aim at 'low quality' websitesFacebook said Wednesday it was making changes designed to keep its users from linking to "low-quality" websites, part of an effort to fight spam and misinformation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Half-billion Windows 10 devices, but PC slump stunts growth (Update)Microsoft's latest version of Windows is faring better than its maligned predecessor, but the software's growth is still stunted by a shift away from personal computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab NebulaAstronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves seen by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to the powerful X-ray glow as seen by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. And, in between that range of wavelengths, the Hubble Space Telescope's crisp visib
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thirsty seeds reach for medicine cabinetJust like humans and animals sometimes need medicine to feel well or perform better, so can plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glaciers rapidly shrinking and disappearing: 50 years of glacier change in MontanaThe warming climate has dramatically reduced the size of 39 glaciers in Montana since 1966, some by as much as 85 percent, according to data released by the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University. On average, the glaciers have reduced by 39 percent and only 26 glaciers are now larger than 25 acres, which is used as a guideline for deciding if bodies of ice are large enough to be cons
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists unveil the UK's largest resource of human stem cells from healthy donorsReported in Nature today, one of the largest sets of high quality human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals has been produced by a consortium involving the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Comprehensively annotated and available for independent research, the hundreds of stem cell lines are a powerful resource for scientists studying human development and disease. The study
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biologists identify key step in lung cancer evolutionMIT biologists have identified a major switch that occurs as lung adenomas transition to more aggressive adenocarcinomas -- and that blocking this switch prevents the transition. The findings suggest drugs interfering with this switch could be useful in treating early-stage lung cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn study finds relationship between common brain disease and gut microbiomeBacteria in the gut microbiome drive the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures. The research team's research suggests that altering the microbiome in CCM patients may be an effective therapy for this cerebrovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotic breakthrough: Team discovers how to overcome gram-negative bacterial defensesScientists report that they now know how to build a molecular Trojan horse that can penetrate gram-negative bacteria, solving a problem that for decades has stalled the development of effective new antibiotics against these increasingly drug-resistant microbes. The findings appear in the journal Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New light sensing molecule discovered in the fruit fly brainSix biological pigments called rhodopsins play well-established roles in light-sensing in the fruit fly eye. Three of them also have light-independent roles in temperature sensation. New research shows that a seventh rhodopsin, Rh7, is expressed in the brain of fruit flies where it regulates the fly's day-night activity cycles. The study appears in Nature and was funded by the National Eye Institu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waves of lava seen in Io's largest volcanic craterThe most active volcanic crater in the solar system, Loki Patera on Jupiter's moon Io, is thought to be a lava lake that periodically brightens because of overturning lava. A UC Berkeley team regularly monitors Io, and took advantage of a rare 2015 event, Europa passing in front of Io, to map the surface of the lake in detail. They found evidence for two massive waves of overturning lava convergin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST physicists find a way to control charged molecules -- with quantum logicNational Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physicists have solved the seemingly intractablepuzzle of how to control the quantum properties of individual charged molecules, or molecular ions. Thesolution is to use the same kind of 'quantum logic' that drives an experimental NIST atomic clock.
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The Atlantic

Trump Trolls His Critics Imagine you are the president of the United States. Now, imagine you have just fired the director of the FBI, for a nonsensical rationale . You are being accused of firing the director in order to stifle an investigation into your campaign’s ties to Russia, in a move a wide range of critics are calling Nixonian. What do you do? If you are Donald Trump, the answer is clear: You make sure the first
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Gizmodo

An Amazing Hypothesis for Why the Trappist-1 System Hasn't Destroyed Itself GIF When astronomers announced the discovery of seven Earth-sized planets orbiting the ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, Earthlings immediately celebrated the possibility that one of those planetary neighbors could host life . But to physicists, TRAPPIST-1 presented a puzzle: How could those seven planets, all packed around a single star closer than Mercury orbits the Sun, survive? Why haven’t the
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Gizmodo

After Firing Lead Investigator, White House Says 'It's Time to Move On' From Russia Investigation Photo: Getty The White House made it almost four hours Tuesday night after the firing of James Comey before its communications staff began demanding an end to the FBI’s Russia investigation. Advertisement To Sarah Sanders, the White House deputy press secretary, the cyberattacks that laid waste to the president’s political rivals last summer is ancient history, best forgotten: “My gosh, Tucker, w
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Futurity.org

Women aren’t better than men at reading faces Despite conventional wisdom that suggests otherwise, women are no better than men in their ability to recognize faces and categorize facial expressions. For a new study researchers used behavioral tests, as well as neuroimaging, to investigate whether there is an influence of biological sex on facial recognition. “There has been common lore in the behavioral literature that women do better than m
20h
Popular Science

The smart hubs have eyes: Why the Amazon Echo Show should have you asking questions about privacy Technology It is, for better or worse, as trustworthy as Amazon itself New Amazon Echo has security risks, like all internet of things devices…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering the answer to an age-old question: How do snowflakes form?More than 400 years ago, renowned mathematician and scientist Johannes Kepler speculated about the creation of one of nature's most angelic and unique shapes: the six-sided snowflake. Although atoms would not be discovered until over two centuries later, Kepler openly pondered about the microscopic building blocks that lead to the ice crystal's hexagonal formation, including the myriad of factors
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kids, parents alike worried about privacy with internet-connected toysConsumer Privacy Rights Fund at the Rose Foundation for Communities and the Environment, University of Washington Tech Policy Lab
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Science | The Guardian

Enormous lava waves spotted on Jupiter moon Io Geological forces unleash waves on fourth largest Jovian moon, where hugely powerful active volcano has produced 8,300 square mile dent in the surface Astronomers have tracked two huge lava waves rolling around a volcanic crater the size of Wales on one of Jupiter’s many moons. Geological forces unleashed the waves on Io, the fourth largest Jovian moon, where the most powerful active volcano in t
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Futurity.org

Temps under 100 can kill in New England The heat index doesn’t have to reach 100 for New Englanders to experience serious health effects, new research shows. Better known for fall foliage and nor’easter blizzards, New England does experience spells of punishing summer heat and humidity. A new study that analyzes the health effects of summer weather in small to midsize population centers in three states shows that deaths and emergency d
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research from Samsung explores the possibilities of using everyday movement to support motion-powered TENG devicesTriboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are small devices that convert movement into electricity, and might just be what bring us into an era of energy-harvesting clothes and implants. But could TENGs, even theoretically, give us wearable electronics powered solely by the wearer's day-to-day body motion?
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New light sensing molecule discovered in the fruit fly brainSix biological pigments called rhodopsins play well-established roles in light-sensing in the fruit fly eye. Three of them also have light-independent roles in temperature sensation. New research shows that a seventh rhodopsin, Rh7, is expressed in the brain of fruit flies where it regulates the fly's day-night activity cycles. The study appears in Nature and was funded by the National Eye Institu
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waves of lava seen in Io's largest volcanic craterTaking advantage of a rare orbital alignment between two of Jupiter's moons, Io and Europa, researchers have obtained an exceptionally detailed map of the largest lava lake on Io, the most volcanically active body in the solar system.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists find a way to control charged molecules—with quantum logicNational Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physicists have solved the seemingly intractablepuzzle of how to control the quantum properties of individual charged molecules, or molecular ions. Thesolution is to use the same kind of "quantum logic" that drives an experimental NIST atomic clock.
21h
Live Science

In Photos: Thousands of Asylum Patients' Bodies Buried Under University of Mississippi CampusRecent radar scans revealed as many as 7,000 bodies buried on the grounds of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, where a formal state mental institution once stood.
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Ars Technica

In a surprise about-face, US Senate votes to keep Obama-era methane rule Enlarge The US Senate declined to overturn an Obama-era rule that requires oil and gas companies to limit their methane emissions if they’re drilling on federal and tribal lands. The outcome of the 51-49 vote was surprising given that Congress has thus far opted 13 times to use the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to overturn recent rules made in the previous administration, according to the Washin
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The Atlantic

What Happens to Bears After They're Rescued From Bile Farming? The open-walled shed, running the length of a tennis court, appeared forlorn at first glance. Tangled metal wires, tarnished steel frames, and empty petroleum barrels were strewn across the uneven dirt floor. It was a strange place to come looking for bears—but tucked away in a corner, hidden behind a corrugated zinc wall, we found them: two Asiatic black bears in adjoining copper cages. Wendles
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab NebulaAstronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

African lions face same threats as extinct Ice Age ancestorsThe extinction trends that caused the demise of several Ice Age species, including many of the sabre-toothed family, may be a threat to wildlife today and particularly to the African lion, a new Oxford University research collaboration has revealed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A defence mechanism that can trap and kill TB bacteriaA natural mechanism by which our cells kill the bacterium responsible for tuberculosis (TB) has been discovered by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which could help in the battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New rules for cellular entry may aid antibiotic developmentA new study lays out several rules to successfully enter gram-negative bacteria, which could lead to the development of sorely needed antibiotics.
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Gizmodo

Massive Lava Waves Detected on Jupiter’s Moon Io Jupiter’s moon Io. And yes, that’s a volcano erupting up top. (Image: NASA) Io is the closest thing we have to hell in our Solar System, a Jovian moon that features hundreds of active volcanoes and expansive lakes filled with lava. New observations suggests that the largest of these lakes, Loki Patera, produces enormous waves that repeatedly flow around the molten surface. Advertisement Thanks to
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Ars Technica

Rare dinosaur with preserved skin and bone-crushing tail found in Montana Illustration by Danielle Dufault The armored beasts of the Cretaceous known as ankylosaurine dinosaurs don't get as much love as the charismatic T. rex . But now, one of the world's only complete ankylosaurid skeletons has been acquired and analyzed by the Royal Ontario Museum—and the artifact even has a significant amount of mummified tissues like skin. At this point, there's no denying that thi
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Gizmodo

Donald Glover Is Making an Adult, Animated Deadpool TV Show Image: Marvel Coics Deadpool’s long-awaited arrival on the big screen ruffled the superhero movie genre a few years ago. Now, the merc with a mouth is hoping to do much the same with his own animated series, due to air on FXX next year—and one hell of a name is in the showrunner’s seat. Advertisement Announced this morning, Donald Glover— Atlanta star, one time Miles Morales, future Lando Calriss
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Scientific American Content: Global

Resolution to Revoke Obama-Era Environmental Rules Fails in SenateThe vote is a blow to the Trump administration’s attempts to repeal regulations on the oil and gas industry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thirsty seeds reach for medicine cabinetScientists have found that salicylic acid -- also used to make aspirin -- can help the cowpea be more drought tolerant. In Brazil, the cowpea one of the main sources of protein for many people. Americans may know the cowpea by the name black-eyed pea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yogurt consumption in older Irish adults linked with better bone healthThe largest observational study to date of dairy intakes and bone and frailty measurements in older adults has found that increased yogurt consumption was associated with a higher hip bone density and a significantly reduced risk of osteoporosis in older women and men on the island of Ireland, after taking into account traditional risk factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids, parents alike worried about privacy with internet-connected toysUniversity of Washington researchers have conducted a new study that explores the attitudes and concerns of both parents and children who play with internet-connected toys. Through a series of in-depth interviews and observations, the researchers found that kids didn't know their toys were recording their conversations, and parents generally worried about their children's privacy when they played
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uncovering the answer to an age-old question: How do snowflakes form?New research led by a Tufts University chemist has shed new light on ice crystal formation by combining an electron backscatter with a large single crystal ice model. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists discovered that an ice crystal's flat sides are formed by a hexagon that is larger and consists of a central water molecule surrounded by six oth
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method can selectively remove micropollutants from waterEngineers have developed a new way to get toxic micropollutants, including pesticides and pharmaceuticals, out of water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Live interactions with robots increase their perceived human likenessA recent study found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities.
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Popular Science

The best travel apps to install on your phone DIY Don't hit the road without them These essential smartphone apps for your next vacation will let you find your way around town, speak the local language, save money on your trip, and more.
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Popular Science

This new species of dinosaur looks like Zuul from Ghostbusters Animals I am become Zuul, Destroyer of Shins This so-called "destroyer of shins" could help us piece together more puzzling dinosaur fossils. Read on.
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Science : NPR

Why Do Children Love Those Fad Toys So? Today it's fidget spinners, but soon it will be another little gizmo that children dearly, desperately want. The complicated social dynamics of childhood are one big reason. (Image credit: Robert Gourley/Flickr)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Laser, sound waves provide live views of organs in actionBiomedical engineers are now able to take a live, holistic look at the inner workings of a small animal with enough resolution to see active organs, flowing blood, circulating melanoma cells and firing neural networks. The technique uses the best of both light and ultrasound, breaking long-standing resolution and speed barriers in small-animal whole-body imaging, providing full cross-sectional vie
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nipping flu pandemics in the budThe threat of a major flu pandemic is a perennial concern. Now scientists have developed a fast and easy-to-use point-of-care diagnostic test that could one day help doctors and hospitals head off the rapid spread of the flu.
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The Atlantic

2017 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest The National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest is now under way, and entries will be accepted until June 30. The grand-prize winner will receive a 10-day trip for two to the Galápagos Archipelago with National Geographic Expeditions. National Geographic was once more kind enough to allow me to share some of the early entries with you here, gathered from three categories: Nature,
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The Atlantic

Will Republicans Check Trump's Presidential Power? Richard Nixon’s firing of the Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox during the “Saturday Night Massacre” in October 1973 doesn’t just provide the clearest parallel and precedent for Donald Trump’s frightening decision to dismiss FBI director James Comey while his agency is investigating the president’s campaign for possible collusion with Russia. The Saturday Night Massacre also establishes
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The Atlantic

Why Did the U.S. Census Director Resign? The Department of Commerce announced on Tuesday that Census Bureau Director John H. Thompson will step down at the end of June, creating the possibility of a leadership void at the bureau in the run-up to undertaking the 2020 Census. In a statement, Thompson, who will retire on June 30, said he plans to “pursue opportunities in the private sector.” Thompson was sworn in as census director in 2013
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The Atlantic

How the Firing of the FBI Director Tests Conservatives Since Donald Trump won the Republican nomination close to a year ago, conservative responses to him have fallen into three broad categories: pro-Trump, anti-Trump and anti-anti-Trump. The firing of James Comey is no exception. The pro-Trumpers, right-wing populists like Sean Hannity , Mark Levin and the writers at Breitbart , said Comey deserved to be fired for going soft on Hillary Clinton. This
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mandatory headwear does not influence surgical site infectionsSurgical site infections are noteworthy and costly health complications. Patients with infections are likely to stay longer an intensive care unit and a hospital. Those with infections have an increased risk of hospital readmission or death. In an attempt to address this, hospital policy in the United States changed in February 2016 and made it obligatory to wear a bouffant cap and not traditional
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can the motion of checking your smartwatch charge it?Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are small devices that convert movement into electricity, and might just be what bring us into an era of energy-harvesting clothes and implants. But could TENGs, even theoretically, give us wearable electronics powered solely by the wearer's day-to-day body motion? The short answer is yes. New research published this week in APL Materials demonstrates the abili
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dread of roses: Neurobehavioral effects found in children exposed to flower pesticidesResearchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Ecuador and Minnesota, have found altered short-term neurological behaviors in children associated with a peak pesticide spraying season linked to the Mother's Day flower harvest. This study examined children who did not work in agriculture but who lived in agricultural communities in Ecuador.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glaciers rapidly shrinking and disappearing: 50 years of glacier change in MontanaThe warming climate has dramatically reduced the size of 39 glaciers in Montana since 1966, some by as much as 85 percent, according to data released by the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University. On average, the glaciers have reduced by 39 percent and only 26 glaciers are now larger than 25 acres, which is used as a guideline for deciding if bodies of ice are large enough to be cons
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals a new method to address a major barrier to eradicating HIVScientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that an enzyme called SMYD2 could be a new therapeutic target for flushing out the HIV that hides in infected individuals. Overcoming this latent virus remains the most significant obstacle to a cure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlling bacteria's necessary evilUntil now, scientists have only had a murky understanding of how these relationships arise. Now Colin Dale and his colleagues at the University of Utah have an answer. It's good news and bad news, germophobes: The bad news? Mutualistic bacteria start out by invading animal cells just like malevolent disease-causing bacteria do. The good news? Once they're in, they calm down and play nice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sugar or protein? How fruit fly brains control what they choose to eatUsing fruit flies, researchers say they have identified a specific and very small set of brain cells -- dubbed dopamine wedge neurons -- responsible for driving the insects' food preferences toward what they need, rather than what they like.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural disasters pose grave threat to planet's last Javan rhinosThe world's only population of Javan rhinoceros, already under severe threat from poaching, could go extinct in the future due to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.
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Popular Science

Cassini spotted some breezy summer methane clouds on Titan Space You won’t need sunblock, but you’ll definitely want a blanket or two It’s summer in the northern hemisphere and you know what that means: clouds of methane. Welcome to Titan.
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The Atlantic

Anne With an E Is the Best Kind of Adaptation The current consensus on Anne With an E, the new CBC adaptation of Anne of Green Gables debuting Friday on Netflix, is that it’s a darker interpretation of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s beloved 1908 novel. Certainly, the first two episodes, which explore how the 13-year-old Anne Shirley is adopted by Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, deviate from the book in offering dramatic and painful flashbacks to Anne’
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quorum sensing helps beneficial bacteria reign in their pathogenic originsGermophobes - let's chat. Microbes are everywhere—on every surface, every object, every plant and animal. Yes, including on and inside you. True, some of them cause disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Loss of spinal nerve fibers not the only cause of disability in multiple sclerosisResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have now sampled spinal cords of thirteen people with MS and five healthy controls, and found that spinal cord cross sectional area is not a good predictor of axonal loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The extent of neuronal loss in the brain during MSA study by researchers from Queen Mary University of London establishes for the first time the extent of neuronal loss in the brain of a person with MS over their life, and finds that demyelination may not be as good an indicator of disease progression as previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research links genetics to early-onset pancreatitis in pediatric patientsA study published today in The Journal of Pediatrics suggests that early-onset pancreatitis in children is strongly associated with certain genetic mutations and family history of pancreatitis.
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New Scientist - News

What vision of doom made Hawking seek a faster Earth exit plan?Stephen Hawking now says humanity must colonise other worlds within a century, rather than 1000 years, to ensure survival. Why the rush, asks Dirk Schulze-Makuch
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Futurity.org

Reviews don’t predict which movies we like Movie preferences are very idiosyncratic, and rarely line up with the preferences of others or the evaluations of movie critics, new research suggests. Moreover, these preferences don’t match the demographic groups movie studios use to pitch and market movies. “What we find enjoyable in movies is strikingly subjective—so much so that the industry’s targeting of filmgoers by broad demographic cate
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Scientific American Content: Global

Grizzly Diet Has Several Surprises, Bear Hair Chemistry ShowsEven in salmon season the bears eat lots of plants—and later gorge mostly on salmon brains -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Rare 'Dragon-Skin' Ice Spotted During Antarctic Research Voyage"Dragon skin" had not been seen in Antarctica since 2007, according to researchers.
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Live Science

Buried Secrets: 7,000 Bodies Lie Beneath Former 'Insane Hospital'An estimated 7,000 bodies are thought to be buried under The University of Mississippi Medical Center, according to radar scans of the campus grounds.
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Live Science

Ankylosaurus: Facts About the Armored LizardThick plates protected this massive dinosaur from predators.
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Gizmodo

An Old Satellite Dish Found on Google Maps Is Becoming West Africa's First Radio Telescope Image: SKA South Africa Astronomy needs expensive things, and lots of them. You might remember that astronomers almost literally turned the Earth into a telescope just to see a black hole, by combining lots of existing radio telescope dishes. There are telescopes in all sorts of places—Hawaii, the desolate Chilean desert, heck, there’s even one at the South Pole. But Africa’s got plenty of old te
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Hoover SteamVac, Sperry, Anker Lightning Cables, and More Anker’s most durable lightning cable , a Hoover SteamVac , Sperry’s Almost Summer Sale , and more lead Thursday’s best deals. Advertisement Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerLine II Dura 10' , $12 with code BEST8434 With its incredibly durable construction and lifetime warranty, Anker’s PowerLine II Dura might be the last Lightning cable
22h
Ars Technica

Mozilla and Thunderbird are continuing together, with conditions Enlarge (credit: Mozilla) The Thunderbird e-mail client still has its supporters, but for the past couple of years, Mozilla has been making moves to distance itself from the project . In late 2015, Mozilla announced that it would be looking for a new home for Thunderbird, calling its continued maintenance "a tax" on Firefox development. Yesterday, Mozilla Senior Add-ons Technical Editor Philipp K
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual support groups help grieving spouses with depressionFor older adults who can't attend a grief support group after losing a spouse, a virtual version may be effective, helping with loneliness, stress, sleep problems and depressive symptoms, University of Arizona research found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High levels of exercise linked to 9 years of less aging at the cellular levelDespite their best efforts, no scientist has ever come close to stopping humans from aging. Even anti-aging creams can't stop Old Father Time.But new research from Brigham Young University reveals you may be able to slow one type of aging -- the kind that happens inside your cells. As long as you're willing to sweat.
22h
TEDTalks (video)

Poetry, music and identity | Jorge DrexlerOne night in 2002, a friend gave Jorge Drexler the chorus to a song and challenged him to write the rest of it using a complex, poetic form known as the "Décima." In this fascinating talk, Drexler examines the blended nature of identity, weaving together the history of the Décima with his own quest to write one. He closes the talk with a performance of the resulting song, "La Milonga del Moro Judí
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The Atlantic

Now That We Can Read Genomes, Can We Write Them? NEW YORK CITY—Since the Human Genome Project (HGP) was completed in 2003, scientists have sequenced the full genomes of hundreds, perhaps thousands, of species. Octopuses. Barley. Mosquitoes. Birch trees. Reading genomes is now commonplace, but that’s not enough for the group of scientists who gathered at the New York Genome Center on Tuesday. They want to write entire genomes with the same ease,
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The Atlantic

Republicans Rush to Support Trump Updated on May 10 at 2:57 p.m. ET Top Senate Republicans are standing behind President Trump’s decision to fire FBI Director James Comey, rejecting calls from Democrats and some in their own party for the Justice Department to appoint a special prosecutor to lead the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell lent the president crucial support on Wed
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Gizmodo

Diving Into 1,000 Mouse Traps on a Trampoline Looks Even More Painful in Slo-Mo GIF GIF: YouTube High-speed cameras help make cars safer, factories run smoother, and athletes improve their performances. But The Slow Mo Guys have found an even better use for the technology: capturing the explosive chain reaction after diving onto a trampoline covered in 1,000 armed mouse traps. Advertisement Filmed at 1,000 frames per second, it took The Slow Mo Guys over four hours to set th
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Ars Technica

EA goes from cautious to “bullish” on Nintendo Switch support Enlarge / EA's recent comments suggest the company will be bringing more than just FIFA to the Nintendo Switch before too long. As Nintendo continues to celebrate an incredibly strong launch for its hybrid Switch console, a looming question remains about whether major third-party publishers will lend significant software support to the system. In a recent earnings call, mega-publisher Electronic
22h
The Atlantic

The Aftermath of James Comey's Dismissal On Tuesday, President Donald Trump fired James Comey , director of the FBI. Although Comey had been widely criticized for his handling of investigations related to the 2016 election, his dismissal was a shock to many observers, because he was overseeing an investigation into Russian interference in the election and whether any members of the Trump administration were involved. We're liveblogging
22h
The Atlantic

Was Russia the Real Reason Trump Fired James Comey? Updated on May 10 at 11:45 a.m. This much is clear: President Trump’s stated rationale for firing James Comey makes no sense. The president justified the FBI director’s abrupt dismissal on Tuesday with a memo from Rod Rosenstein , the deputy attorney general, in which Rosenstein systematically laid out an indictment of how Comey handled the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a personal e
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The Atlantic

What to Make of the Tunnel Collapse at a Nuclear Cleanup Site On Tuesday morning, workers at the Hanford Site, a Cold War-era plutonium-production facility turned nuclear-waste cleanup project in Washington, discovered a giant hole in the ground. A tunnel had collapsed. Because “tunnel collapse” and “nuclear waste” are two phrases you don’t want to see in the same sentence, the news quickly ricocheted around the national media . It’s too early to give a ful
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

With James Comey Out at the FBI, American Privacy Could Take a HammeringHis replacement is likely to be even more anti-encryption and pro-surveillance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Training surgeons to teach the public is effective in advancing bleeding control knowledgeTraining surgeons in bleeding control techniques so that they can in turn train the general public is an effective way to disseminate bleeding control knowledge and teach skills, according to study findings published on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common sweetener in low-cal foods also a marker for weight gainA new study has identified the sugar alcohol erythritol as a biomarker for increasing fat mass. In contrast to previous assumptions and research, erythritol can be metabolized by, and even produced in, the human body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program for recovery after surgery linked with decrease in length of hospital stay, postoperative complicationsImplementation at 20 hospitals of an enhanced recovery after surgery program among patients undergoing elective colorectal resection or emergency hip fracture repair was associated with decreases in hospital length of stay and postoperative complication rates, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ADHD medication associated with reduced risk for motor vehicle crashesIn a study of more than 2.3 million patients in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rates of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) were lower when they had received their medication, according to a new article published by JAMA Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enhanced recovery after surgery program at Kaiser Permanente improves surgical outcomesA comprehensive Enhanced Recovery After Surgery program implemented in Kaiser Permanente's 20 Northern California medical centers involved nearly 9,000 surgical patients and resulted in a one-third relative reduction in postoperative complication rates and a 21 percent reduction in opioid prescribing rates. A study of the program, published today in JAMA Surgery, also showed decreased hospital mor
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Ars Technica

AT&T could be punished for unlimited data throttling after all Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | ljhimages) AT&T has been dealt a blow in its attempt to avoid all regulatory oversight from the Federal Trade Commission, and the court decision could also play an important role in the debates over net neutrality and broadband privacy rules. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai yesterday welcomed the court decision and said it strengthens his argume
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Gather for Genome Writing Conference, but Funding Is ScarceMore than 250 attendees are meeting in New York City to discuss synthesizing genomes from scratch -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

How Will We Solve Big Energy Challenges?How will industry leaders, government officials, researchers, entrepreneurs - lift billions of people out of poverty - and continue to advance technological civilization? Jason Pontin, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of MIT Technology Review delivers a striking message of collaboration from the Offshore Technology Conference Statoil Reception in Houston, Texas.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft aims to make artificial intelligence mainstream (Update)Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled new tools intended to democratize artificial intelligence by enabling machine smarts to be built into software from smartphone games to factory floors.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Live interactions with robots increase their perceived human likenessMost human interactions with robots come from behind a screen. Whether it's fiction or a real-life interaction, rarely are we put face to face with a robot. This poses a significant barrier when we look towards a future where robots will be part of our everyday lives. How do we break down this barrier? A recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and A
23h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Former US mental-health chief leaves Google for start-up Tom Insel will help to launch a company to analyse behaviour and mental illness using smartphone data. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21976
23h
Ars Technica

Azure goes database crazy with one new NoSQL and two new SQL services (credit: Flickr user leolintang ) SEATTLE—In its continued efforts to make Azure a platform that appeals to the widest range of developers possible, Microsoft announced a range of new features at Build, its annual developer conference. Many of the features shown today had a data theme to them. The most novel feature was the release of Cosmos DB, a replacement for, or upgrade to, Microsoft's Docum
23h
Ars Technica

Windows 10 hits 500 million devices, growing by two-thirds in a year SEATTLE—At its Build developer conference, Microsoft announced that Windows 10 has now passed 500 million monthly active devices. A little over a year ago, the company said that the operating system had reached 300 million systems . As the operating system nears the end of its second full year on the market, it's clear that it's going to fall a long way short of the company's original estimates.
23h
Gizmodo

Everything New Is Terrible in the Latest Cars 3 Trailer GIF Image: Pixar The baffling ( and increasingly disturbing ) Cars 3 is all about an intergenerational rivalry between the upstart Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer) and the old star Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson). In this trailer, it’s not just the technologically new and superior Jackson that isn’t good—it’s apparently every bit of new technology out there. Advertisement See, to beat Storm, Lightnin
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Live interactions with robots increase their perceived human likenessA recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab, found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method can selectively remove micropollutants from waterEngineers at MIT and in Germany develop a new way to get toxic micropollutants, including pesticides and pharmaceuticals, out of water.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts argue that obesity is a chronic, relapsing, progressive diseaseIn a new article, World Obesity Federation experts consider the argument for obesity as a chronic relapsing disease process. They note that obesity fits the epidemiological model of a disease process except that the toxic or pathological agent is food rather than a microbe.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New strains of staple crops serve up essential vitaminsMore nutritious versions of staple crops could increase daily vitamin and mineral intake for millions of people with poor diets, helping to overcome undernourishment that can cause blindness, brittle bones, feeble muscles and brain damage.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ATLAS experiment seeks new insight into the Standard ModelEver since the LHC collided its first protons in 2009, the ATLAS Collaboration has been persistently studying their interactions with increasing precision. To this day, it has always observed them to be as expected by the Standard Model. Though it remains unrefuted, physicists are convinced that a better theory must exist to explain certain fundamental questions: What is the nature of the dark mat
23h
Ingeniøren

Klar besked til danske teleselskaber: Roaming er en dårlig undskyldning for jeres prisstigningerDet er sandsynligvis i strid med reglerne, når så godt som alle danske mobilselskaber har brugt kravet om gratis roaming til kunderne til at begrunde prisstigninger, konkluderer EU-Kommissionen, som derfor undersøger det danske marked.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Restaurants use technology to nudge us into spending moreRestaurant chains are making it easier to order food with a few taps of the screen—so much so that you may lose sight of how much you're spending.
23h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

DIY gene engineering, an attack on Darwinism and a probe into Nazi science. The week in science: 5–11 May 2017. Nature 545 138 doi: 10.1038/545138a
23h
Ars Technica

Wi-Fi router used to make hologram Enlarge (credit: Friedemann Reinhard/Philipp Holl ) One of the most visually striking technologies to be enabled by the laser is the hologram. But holography doesn't have to use lasers. Indeed, depending on what you want to image, laser light might not be a good choice—lasers are notoriously bad at seeing through walls, for example. Wi-Fi signals, in contrast, go right through most walls, and the
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hatchlings raise hope for Cambodia's endangered 'Royal Turtle'The birth of nine Cambodian royal turtle hatchlings has sparked hope for the future of a species on the brink of extinction, conservationists said Wednesday.
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Neural Networks Face Unexpected Problems in Analyzing Financial DataNeural networks can find hidden patterns in financial data. But they may not be the oracle the financial world was hoping for.
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cognitive science

The Self Doesn'€™t Exist submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Futurity.org

Did this other human species overlap with our ancestors? Scientists have discovered additional remains of a new human species, Homo naledi , in a series of caves northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa. The find, which includes the remains of two adults and a child in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star Cave system, expands the fossil record originally reported from a different chamber of the cave in 2015. Details of the latest discovery appear in eL
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Activists urge EU to rebuke Denmark for Faroe whale huntEnvironmental campaigners on Wednesday urged the EU to take action against Denmark, accusing officials there of facilitating the traditional annual hunt of pilot whales in the Faroe Islands.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn expert probes possible reasons for loss of smellStudies have shown that loss of the sense of smell can be among the first warning signs of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Now a researcher at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania wants to shift the search for clues about this process back even further, to find out if there is a common factor responsible for the loss of smell that may also serve as an ear
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helping clinicians through traumatic events also helps the bottom line, analysis showsPeer-support program can save close to $2 million annually, according to new study.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Access to long-lasting contraception after childbirth lags behind demandBefore leaving the hospital after childbirth, more women are opting to check one thing off their list: birth control.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Norway to build first self-sailing electric cargo shipNorway plans to launch the first autonomous and fully electric cargo ship next year that the project's backers said Wednesday will save 40,000 truck journeys per year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient site discovery in Albania halts work on gas pipelineWork on building a massive gas pipeline through southeastern Europe has been suspended after the discovery of an ancient settlement in eastern Albania, the Trans Adriatic Pipeline company said Wednesday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

West Virginia seeks future—without coalChuck Nelson spent 30 years underground in nearly every mining job available but today he is in no doubt about it: "There is no future in coal."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SoftBank's profit zooms on Sprint turnaround, AlibabaJapanese internet, robot and solar company SoftBank Group is reporting a 12-fold climb in quarterly profit, as a turnaround at its U.S. mobile unit Sprint helped it on its way to a record annual profit.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ella affecting American SamoaNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ella in the Southern Pacific Ocean and visible light imagery on May 9 revealed thick bands of thunderstorms over the islands of American Samoa.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Insects Donate DNA to Unrelated BugsBacteria swap DNA among themselves. And that process may be more common in multicellular organisms than previously believed. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Ars Technica

Given the hazards of landing on Mars, SpaceX may send two Dragons in 2020 Enlarge / A SpaceX concept image for a Red Dragon on Mars. (credit: SpaceX) In recent months, SpaceX has acknowledged that it will not be able to launch an uncrewed Dragon spacecraft to Mars in 2018. The technology to send the capsule safely through deep space and propulsively land it on Mars just won't be ready. However, that delay opens up an opportunity to launch two Dragons in 2020. And that'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Donna shearing apartNASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Donna as it was being sheared apart by winds southeast of New Caledonia.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophysicists find that planetary harmonies around TRAPPIST-1 save it from destructionWhen NASA announced its discovery of the TRAPPIST-1 system back in February it caused quite a stir, and with good reason. Three of its seven Earth-sized planets lay in the star's habitable zone, meaning they may harbour suitable conditions for life.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater powerA new generation of higher-powered batteries for phones and cameras could result from ground-breaking research led by scientists at the University of Kent.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New breakthrough makes it easier to turn old coffee waste into cleaner biofuelsFuture Americano, cappuccino and latte drinkers could help produce the raw material for a greener biofuel that would reduce our reliance on diesel from fossil fuels.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA spots Eastern Pacific season's earliest first tropical storm in satellite eraThe first tropical storm in the Eastern Pacific Ocean has formed west of Costa Rica as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed overhead. Tropical Storm Adrian's formation has already made a mark in hurricane history.
23h
Gizmodo

The Slot Watch Anderson Cooper Roll His Eyes at Kellyanne Conway As She Tries to Defend Trump | Dead The Slot Watch Anderson Cooper Roll His Eyes at Kellyanne Conway As She Tries to Defend Trump | Deadspin Kathy Berman, Wife Of Chris Berman, Dies In Car Crash | The Root Police: Va. Man Attacked Black Woman Because of Her Race, Spat on Cops During His Arrest | Fusion People Can’t Stop Comparing Trump’s Firing of James Comey To Richard Nixon |
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Gizmodo

The Latest Handmaid's Tale Is About Taking What You Can When There's Nothing Left All Images Courtesy Hulu The latest episode of The Handmaid’s Tale deals with answering one important question: How does someone cope with having no power? When everything is taken away, how do you keep from falling apart? For Offred, Ofglen, and dozens of other handmaids in Gilead, it’s about taking whatever you can. Because when you have nothing, every little victory becomes something. In the f
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell vaccine found to increase immune responses, inhibit tumors in animal modelsResearchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found that a cancer stem cell vaccine, engineered to express a pro-inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15) and its receptor (IL-15Ralpha), caused T cell production in animal models and enhanced immune responses against tumors. This T cell production showed a cellular immune response that could lead to new immunotherapy treatments for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Donna shearing apartNASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Donna as it was being sheared apart by winds southeast of New Caledonia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ella affecting American SamoaNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ella in the Southern Pacific Ocean and visible light imagery on May 9 revealed thick bands of thunderstorms over the islands of American Samoa.Terra image of Ella
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change could increase ER visits for allergy-related asthmaMore children could wind up in hospital emergency rooms suffering from allergy-induced asthma if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and cause longer oak pollen seasons, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does HIV infection affect brain connectivity and cognitive performance?A new study has shown that compared to HIV-negative young adults, those positive for HIV infection with limited or no treatment history had significant disruptions in whole brain structural networks, poorer strength and efficiency of connections, and corresponding reductions in cognitive performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater powerA new generation of higher-powered batteries for phones and cameras could result from ground-breaking research led by scientists at the University of Kent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New breakthrough makes it easier to turn old coffee waste into cleaner biofuelsFuture Americano, cappuccino and latte drinkers could help produce the raw material for a greener biofuel that would reduce our reliance on diesel from fossil fuels.Although a small number of businesses are using spent coffee grounds to make biofuels, researchers at Lancaster University have found a way to significantly improve the efficiency of the process- vastly increasing biofuel from coffee's
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estimating the size of animal populations from camera trap surveysCamera traps are a useful means to observe the behaviour of animal populations in the wild at remote locations. Researchers from the University of St Andrews, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) recently extended distance sampling analytical methods to accommodate data from camera traps. This allows abundances of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astrophysicists find that planetary harmonies around TRAPPIST-1 save it from destructionU of T astrophysicists create a digital symphony to highlight the unique configuration of the recently discovered TRAPPIST-1 system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spots Eastern Pacific season's earliest first tropical storm in satellite eraThe first tropical storm in the Eastern Pacific Ocean has formed west of Costa Rica as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed overhead. Tropical Storm Adrian's formation has already made a mark in hurricane history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A protein, a 'molecular staple' and CRISPR to develop an Ewing sarcoma modelA team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has optimized a system capable of generating a cellular model of Ewing sarcoma. The technique, based on CRISPR and described in the pages of Stem Cell Reports, makes it possible to generate cellular models to analyze the mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of this and other diseases, as well as the search for new treatment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proteins on the loose in a rare childhood diseaseAustralian scientists have shown, for the first time, that a family of untethered proteins builds up in the cells of children with a rare and serious genetic condition, known as mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). The findings could be used to fast-track the diagnosis of the disease -- a process that is often difficult and protracted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser, sound waves provide live views of organs in actionBiomedical engineers are now able to take a live, holistic look at the inner workings of a small animal with enough resolution to see active organs, flowing blood, circulating melanoma cells and firing neural networks. The technique uses the best of both light and ultrasound, breaking long-standing resolution and speed barriers in small-animal whole-body imaging, providing full cross-sectional vie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the bodyA new technology can monitor and maintain the level of drug in the bloodstream of animals. If it works in people, it could deliver the optimal dose of life-saving drugs and prevent harmful over- or underdosing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser, sound waves provide live views of organs in actionBiomedical engineers are now able to take a live, holistic look at the inner workings of a small animal with enough resolution to see active organs, flowing blood, circulating melanoma cells and firing neural networks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nipping flu pandemics in the budThe threat of a major flu pandemic is a perennial concern. Now scientists have developed a fast and easy-to-use point-of-care diagnostic test that could one day help doctors and hospitals head off the rapid spread of the flu. They report their new device in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmetic makers bottle bacteria for beautiful skinCosmetic companies have started developing and selling products designed to harness the skin microbiome to help treat a range of skin conditions from acne to eczema. Skeptics, however, warn that touting such an approach is premature because scientists are still working to understand the bacteria that live on our skin and interact with it. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the
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WIRED

The Little Robot That Taught the Big Robot a Thing or Two New research out today from MIT takes a big step toward making seamless transfers of knowledge between robots a reality. The post The Little Robot That Taught the Big Robot a Thing or Two appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

To Mars, and beyond: Buzz Aldrin describes vision for space exploration Aldrin urges US cooperation for Mars mission and says plan for ‘cycler’ spacecraft could be tested on asteroid visit during Trump’s first term and future Venus fly-by Nasa should aim to reach an important milestone on the way to Mars during Donald Trump’s presidency, astronaut Buzz Aldrin told a conference on Tuesday. Trump spoke of being “ready to unlock the mysteries of space” in his inaugural
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Dagens Medicin

Medicinråd ønsker mere tid til at behandle sagerAntallet af sager, der strømmer til det nye Medicinråd, er så stort, at rådet lægger op til en justering af arbejdsgange.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The dark side of helping coworkersIf you show up at work tired, you may want to focus strictly on your own tasks. New research suggests helping coworkers in the morning can lead to mental exhaustion and self-serving behavior in the afternoon that ultimately can create a toxic work environment.
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Futurity.org

How Webb telescope can best detect ‘Earth 2.0’ Astronomers say the best way to use the James Webb Space Telescope for studying the atmospheres of distant worlds will combine two of its infrared instruments. The telescope is scheduled to launch in late 2018. “We wanted to know which combination of observing modes (of Webb) gets you the maximum information content for the minimum cost,” says Natasha Batalha, graduate student in astronomy and as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural disasters pose grave threat to planet's last Javan rhinosThe world's only population of Javan rhinoceros, already under severe threat from poaching, could go extinct in the future due to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions and tsunamis, according to a new study published in Conservation Letters. The few remaining Javan rhinos live in Ujung Kulon National Park, which is within sight of volcanic Mount Krakatoa and close to the Indonesian Sunda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As heat index climbs, emergency visits, deaths rise in New EnglandBetter known for leaf peeping on crisp autumn days and the nor'easter blizzards that follow, New England is nevertheless subject to spells of punishing summer heat and humidity. A new study that analyzed the health effects of summer weather in small to midsize population centers in three states shows that deaths and emergency department visits begin to rise significantly across the region well bef
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wavy energy potential patterns from scattering nuclei reveal hidden informationAnomalies always catch the eye. They stand out from an otherwise well-understood order. Anomalies also occur at sub-atomic scale, as nuclei collide and scatter off into each other—an approach used to explore the properties of atomic nuclei. The most basic kind of scattering is called 'elastic scattering,' in which interacting particles emerge in the same state after they collide.
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Ars Technica

Macron campaign team used honeypot accounts to fake out Fancy Bear Enlarge / Newly elected French president Emmanuel Macron poses with a woman for a selfie. (credit: PATRICK KOVARIK / Getty Images) The failed effort by Russian attackers to influence the outcome of the French presidential campaign in its final hours was in part a forced error, thanks to an active defense by the digital team of French president-elect Emmanuel Macron's campaign organization, the di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decrease in the number of fatalities, but great power involvement worries researchersAccording to new data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP), the number of fatalities in organized violence decreased for the second consecutive year in 2016. However, the large share of conflicts with external involvement is a source of concern.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds Amazon River carbon dioxide emissions nearly balance terrestrial uptakeForests have always been considered huge carbon stores, helping to absorb greenhouse gas emissions, but new research in Brazil has found that rivers in the Amazon emit far more carbon dioxide (CO2) than previously estimated, suggesting that the Amazon Basin is closer to net carbon neutral. The results increase the most recent global estimates of CO2 emissions from rivers and lakes by almost 50%, w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our taste in movies is highly idiosyncratic—and at odds with critics' preferencesOur taste in movies is notably idiosyncratic, and not linked to the demographic traits that studios target, finds new study on film preferences. The work also shows that moviegoers' ratings are not necessarily in line with those of critics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Fingertip touch' clue to human ancestors exploiting treetop environmentsResearch by scientists at the University of Birmingham suggests that ancestral humans may have been more adept at negotiating unstable arboreal environment than previously thought.
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The Atlantic

The Voting Technology We Really Need? Paper In January, America’s main intelligence agencies issued a report concluding that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, using a combination of cyber-intrusion, espionage, and propaganda. In addition to the details provided in this account, media outlets have since reported that several election databases were hacked before and after the election. While the Department of Homeland Security found n
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Scientific American Content: Global

6 Ways to Beat Social AnxietySavvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers tips on how to tell the difference between satisfied solitude and fearful avoidance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservation endocrinology in a changing worldThe BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The continuum of HIV care: What does it mean and how is Europe doing?From diagnosis of HIV to successful viral suppression: this new ECDC report summarizes key findings concerning and the Continuum of HIV Care in Europe based on data reported by countries in Europe and Central Asia. In the 37 countries reporting data, an estimated 1.2 million people are living with HIV, 898 000 of whom (75 percent) have been diagnosed. 88 percent of these are estimated to be virall
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

African lions under same threats as extinct sabre-toothed tigers facedAfrican lions are under the same threats extinct sabre-toothed tigers faced.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women in East Germany will be more likely to die from smoking than those in West GermanyDue to a silent but dramatic increase in the number of young East German women smoking after reunification, their death rates are forecasted to exceed those in the West within the next few decades according to forecasts up to the year 2036 by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Rostock. The deadly trend is hidden beneath a currently favorable trend in life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Internet of things made simple: One sensor package does work of manyUbiquitous sensors seem almost synonymous with the internet of things (IoT), but some Carnegie Mellon University researchers say ubiquitous sensing -- with a single, general purpose sensor for each room -- may be better. The plug-in sensor package they've developed monitors multiple phenomena in a room, including things such as sounds, vibration, light, heat, electromagnetic noise and temperature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The dark side of helping coworkersIf you show up at work tired, you may want to focus strictly on your own tasks. New research suggests helping coworkers in the morning can lead to mental exhaustion and self-serving behavior in the afternoon that ultimately can create a toxic work environment.
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Futurity.org

Play Pokémon Go in class to learn communication skills? Bringing games like Pokémon Go into the classroom may help students learn and practice multiple modes of communication, from writing to gestures, a new paper suggests. The author of the paper, Emily Howell, is working with teachers to develop new ways to incorporate digital tools in the classroom. The focus of Howell’s work is two-fold—to give students equitable access to technology and help them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proving Einstein right using the most sensitive Earth rotation sensors ever madeEinstein's theory of gravity, also referred to as General Relativity, predicts that a rotating body such as the Earth partially drags inertial frames along with its rotation. In a study recently published in EPJ Plus, a group of scientists based in Italy suggests a novel approach to measuring what is referred to as frame dragging. Angela Di Virgilio of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, IN
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microdevice provides novel method of measuring cell mechanical propertiesThe mechanical properties of cells have an impact on biological processes ranging from wound healing and disease to cellular aging and differentiation. Currently, the most popular method of measuring the mechanical properties of a cell is by atomic-force microscopy (AFM). Very simply, AFM works by moving a very fine needle attached to a cantilever beam across the sample surface, and the deflection
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thin-film ferroelectrics go extremeScientists have created the first-ever polarization gradient in thin-film ferroelectrics, greatly expanding the range of functional temperatures for a key material used in a variety of everyday applications. The discovery could pave the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New robotic fish for environmental monitoringResearchers are developing a bio-inspired robot equipped with special chemical sensors able to detect the pH of water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early epigenetic switches associated with childhood bone healthThe health of children’s bones could be determined before they are born, a new study has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deciphering an embryo-protecting proteinRevelations about a protein expressed in fetal cells could provide novel insights into its function and future immunosuppressive therapies.
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Gizmodo

Neil deGrasse Tyson: I Pulled My Pants Down Too Fast and Fell Down Photo: AP Neil deGrasse Tyson might be an expert in the field of astrophysics, but when it comes to the Earth’s gravity, he’s just as helpless as the rest of us. Addressing his over 7 million followers on Twitter, the winner of NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal announced on Wednesday that he tried to take his pants off too fast and fell over. “I have pretty good balance for my body size,”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists help thin-film ferroelectrics go extremeScientists have greatly expanded the range of functional temperatures for ferroelectrics, a key material used in a variety of everyday applications, by creating the first-ever polarization gradient in a thin film.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stretchable hologram can switch between multiple imagesThe possibility of sending and receiving holographic messages has long tantalized sci-fi fans. Although we're not there yet, scientists have now created holograms that can change from one image to another as the materials used to generate them are stretched. The study detailing how they did it appears in ACS' journal Nano Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Targeted, high-energy cancer treatments get a supercomputing boostRadiation therapy shoots high-energy particles into the body to destroy or damage cancer cells. Over the last century, the technologies used have constantly improved and it has become a highly effective way to treat cancer. However, physicians must still walk a fine line between delivering enough radiation to kill tumors, while sparing surrounding healthy tissue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older age at menopause and use of hormone therapy produce increased risk of hearing lossIt has long been suspected that menopause and the use of hormones had a direct effect on hearing. However, findings from previous studies have been conflicting, with some suggesting that hearing worsens at menopause but that there is benefit with hormone therapy (HT). Now results from the first large population study conducted to assess the association show that older age at natural menopause and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists print nanoscale imaging probe onto tip of optical fiberA team of researchers has developed a way to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair, accelerating the production of the promising new device from several per month to several per day. The high-throughput fabrication technique opens the door for the widespread adoption of this and other nano-optical structures, which squeeze and manipulate light in way
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Scientific American Content: Global

Former U.S. Mental Health Chief Leaves GoogleTom Insel will launch his own company to analyze behavior and mental illness using smartphone data -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Sygehus Sønderjylland får ny lægefaglig direktør Region Syddanmark ansætter Bjarne Dahler-Eriksen som lægefaglig direktør på Sygehus Sønderjylland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Story of silver birch from genomic big dataResearchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and University at Buffalo, USA have analyzed the evolutionary history of silver birch using big data from the genomes of 150 birches.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cosmetic makers bottle bacteria for beautiful skinCosmetic companies have started developing and selling products designed to harness the skin microbiome to help treat a range of skin conditions from acne to eczema. Skeptics, however, warn that touting such an approach is premature because scientists are still working to understand the bacteria that live on our skin and interact with it. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nipping flu pandemics in the budThe threat of a major flu pandemic is a perennial concern. Now scientists have developed a fast and easy-to-use point-of-care diagnostic test that could one day help doctors and hospitals head off the rapid spread of the flu. They report their new device in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quit-smoking drug safe for patients with lung disease, study findsMedication that helps smokers to quit is safe for use by people with chronic lung conditions, research led by the Universities of Edinburgh and Dusseldorf suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early epigenetic switches associated with childhood bone healthThe health of children's bones could be determined before they are born, a new University of Southampton study has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain cancer discovery reveals clues in quest for new therapiesResearchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed two key molecules that drive the growth of an aggressive type of adult brain cancer. The findings shed light on the mechanisms that underpin brain cancer progression and could eventually reveal targets for the development of much-needed therapies, researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cells combat salmonellaWith drug resistance being on the rise worldwide, bacterial infections pose one of the greatest global threats to human health. By deciphering the host-pathogen interaction on a molecular level, researchers hope to pave the way for new therapies. Studying the cell's reaction to Salmonella, scientists from Goethe University Frankfurt have now made a critical discovery to this respect.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Baby brain scans reveal trillions of neural connectionsScientists release groundbreaking medical scans that reveal how the human brain develops.
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Ars Technica

How the Space Pope is helping to find real exoplanets by playing Eve: Online Enlarge (credit: CCP) Inside Reykjavik's bustling Harpa exhibition centre, players of Eve Online —an RPG where millions of players explore the depths of space through trade, combat, and propaganda —are being told they can change the world. In other years, attendees of the annual Eve Fanfest convention gather to meet online friends from the other side of the world, forge allegiances, and start in-
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Gizmodo

The Newest Cosmic Radio Burst Has Stumped Scientists Image: Benjamin Shaw /Wikimedia Commons Fast radio bursts are split-second intergalactic blips of radio waves we’ve detected over the last decade. You’d think that if we pointed our telescopes and other space cameras in the direction these bursts came from, we’d spot something else, too. But to date, we’ve got nothing—just radio waves. Advertisement Scientists spotted the newest burst (and the 22
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular dynamics simulations reveal chaos in electron transportPlants are very efficient at turning photons into electrons. But the transport of these electrons is a rather chaotic process, scientists have discovered. They used molecular dynamics to visualize the working of Photosystem II.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rising temperatures threaten stability of Tibetan alpine grasslandsA warming climate could affect the stability of alpine grasslands in Asia's Tibetan Plateau, threatening the ability of farmers and herders to maintain the animals that are key to their existence, and potentially upsetting the ecology of an area in which important regional river systems originate, says a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A possible way to new antibioticsTwo Swiss research teams from the University of Bern and the ETH Zurich have developed a new method to shed light onto a mostly unknown process of bacterial protein production. Their results could be used for the design of new antibiotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists predict supercurrent driven by potential information transfer(Phys.org)—Physicists have theoretically shown that a superconducting current of electrons can be induced to flow by a new kind of transport mechanism: the potential flow of information. This unusual phenomena is predicted to exist in chiral channels—channels in which electrons are usually restricted to flowing in one direction only—but has never been theoretically demonstrated before now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low-energy RHIC electron cooling gets green light, literallyAligning a sequence of amplifiers and mirrors with hair-thin precision on a tabletop anchored to a steel block deep underground, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have produced a powerful green laser. The light—the highest average power green laser ever generated by a single fiber-based laser—will be crucial to experiments in nuclear physics at the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study aims to provide accurate assessment of impact of future sea level rises on coral reef islandsRemote island nations in the Pacific and Indian Oceans have for many years been considered extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change and, in particular, rising sea levels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continental crust model illuminates processes that took place three to four billion years agoFor the first time, ETH scientists have successfully recreated the formation of continental crust in the Archean using a computer simulation. The model helps scientists to better understand processes that took place three to four billion years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Some People Suffer from Face Blindness for Other RacesCertain individuals are seriously impaired when it comes to recognizing individuals of another color -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

KRONIK: Begrænset udvalg af sprøjtemidler skaber resistens Forurening Landbrug Sundhedsskadelige stoffer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

African lions under same threats as extinct sabre-toothed tigers facedThe seven big cats that went extinct towards the end of the last Ice Age, including several sabre-toothed cats, are those which lost the greatest proportion of their prey, according to an international team of scientists who believe the African lion and Sunda clouded leopard are next on the list.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unbreakable quantum entanglementEinstein's "spooky action at a distance" persists even at high accelerations, researchers of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna were able to show in a new experiment. A source of entangled photon pairs was exposed to massive stress: The photons' entanglement survived the drop in a fall tower as well as 30 times the Earth's gravitational acceleration in a centrifuge. This
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study explains science behind one of the newest recognised cloudsCitizen science has helped experts to explain how the newly-recognised 'wave-like' asperitas cloud is formed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Protein missile' raises possibility of disease breakthroughsUniversity of Dundee researchers have shown that it is possible to rapidly target and destroy specific proteins in cells, raising the possibility of developing new ways of targeting 'undruggable' proteins in diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Immersion meta-lenses at visible wavelengths for nanoscale imagingA team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. This lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.
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Gizmodo

We Finally Figured Out How To Make Realistic CG Mud GIF Jurassic Park had just six minutes of computer-generated dinosaurs in it, compared to modern blockbusters which can have thousands of shots requiring complex visual effects. It’s no surprise that animators are eager to embrace any shortcut they can—which is why realistic-looking CG mud could be a game changer. Visual effects studios are not only under massive time constraints as they race to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wavy energy potential patterns from scattering nuclei reveal hidden informationAnomalies occur at sub-atomic scale, as nuclei collide and scatter off into each other -- an approach used to explore the properties of atomic nuclei. The most basic kind is called 'elastic scattering,' in which interacting particles emerge in the same state after they collide. Raymond Mackintosh from Open University, contends in a paper published in EPJ A that a new approach to analyzing such dat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decrease in the number of fatalities, but great power involvement worries researchersAccording to new data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP), the number of fatalities in organized violence decreased for the second consecutive year in 2016. However, the large share of conflicts with external involvement is a source of concern.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microdevice provides novel method of measuring cell mechanical propertiesResearchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have developed a new method of measuring the Young's modulus of a cell. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of a cell can potentially provide insight into various disease mechanisms as well as natural processes such as aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proving Einstein right using the most sensitive Earth rotation sensors ever madeEinstein's theory of gravity predicts that a rotating body, such as Earth, partially drags inertial frames along with its rotation. In a study recently published in EPJ Plus, scientists suggest a novel approach to measuring what is referred to as frame dragging. Angela Di Virgilio of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN, in Pisa, Italy, and colleagues propose using the most sensitive ty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Fingertip touch' clue to human ancestors exploiting treetop environmentsResearch by scientists at the University of Birmingham suggests that ancestral humans may have been more adept at negotiating unstable arboreal environment than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How cells combat SalmonellaWith drug resistance being on the rise worldwide, bacterial infections pose one of the greatest global threats to human health. By deciphering the host-pathogen interaction on a molecular level, researchers hope to pave the way for new therapies. Studying the cell's reaction to Salmonella, scientists from Goethe University Frankfurt have now made a critical discovery to this respect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As heat index climbs, emergency visits, deaths rise in New EnglandNew research shows that New Englanders are susceptible to serious health effects even when the heat index is below 100, a finding that has helped to change the National Weather Service threshold for heat warnings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our taste in movies is highly idiosyncratic -- and at odds with critics' preferencesOur taste in movies is notably idiosyncratic, and not linked to the demographic traits that studios target, finds new study on film preferences. The work also shows that moviegoers' ratings are not necessarily in line with those of critics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Through a child's eyes: Classroom study measures vision and academic achievementQUT researchers have investigated how vision can affect a child's ongoing learning, with results showing 30 per cent of Year 3 students tested had uncorrected eye problems that could affect their academic performances.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists help thin-film ferroelectrics go extremeScientists have created the first-ever polarization gradient in thin-film ferroelectrics, greatly expanding the range of functional temperatures for a key material used in a variety of everyday applications. The discovery could pave the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds Amazon River carbon dioxide emissions nearly balance terrestrial uptakeNew research in Brazil has found that rivers in the Amazon emit far more carbon dioxide (CO2) than previously estimated, suggesting that the Amazon Basin is closer to net carbon neutral. The results increase the most recent global estimates of CO2 emissions from rivers and lakes by almost 50 percent, with potentially huge implications for global climate policy.
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WIRED

Inside a Chinese Internet Cafe Where Gamers While Away Their DaysThe Lemon Internet Bar in Zhao Zhuang, China is open 24/7. The post Inside a Chinese Internet Cafe Where Gamers While Away Their Days appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered house-sized asteroid 2017 HX4 flies safely past the EarthOn May 8th, 2017, an asteroid swung past Earth on its way towards the sun. This Near Earth Object (NEO), known as 2017 HX4, measures between 10 and 33 meters (32.8 and 108 feet) and made its closest approach to Earth at 11:58 am UT (7:58 am EDT; 4:58 am PT). Naturally, there were surely those who wondered if this asteroid would hit us and trigger a terrible cataclysm!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploding Eta Aquarid meteor caught in the actAn Eta Aquarid meteor captured on video by astrophotographer Justin Ng shows an amazing explodingred meteor and what is known as a persistent train—what remains of a meteor fireball in the upper atmosphere as winds twist and swirl the expanding debris.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny houses—the big idea that could take some heat out of the housing crisisIf you could have a new home, exactly to your specification for about a year's average salary wouldn't you take it? Many people, in the US, UK and Europe want to find an alternative housing solution that is cheap and mortgage free but also ecologically sustainable. The solution may be to build so-called "tiny houses" – very small dwellings, often built on trailers, that make the most of unused, un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's why 'cool' offices don't always make for a happier workforceWho are Britain's happiest workers? The people who staff the London office of U.S. travel tech firm Expedia, according to Glassdoor's annual workplace satisfaction survey. In both 2016 and 2017, Expedia rated highest for employee satisfaction, according to anonymous reviews from current and past workers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny tug unleashes cryogenic currentsResearchers have found that a small stretch is enough to unleash the exotic electrical properties of a newly discovered topological insulator, unshackling a behavior previously locked away at cryogenic temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device expedites detection of harmful pathogens in food supplyWhen food shopping, it's easy to overlook what it took to get your favorite meats and produce to the grocery store shelves. Anything perishable – beef, chicken, pork, vegetables, fruit, dairy and even water – must undergo a rigorous and time-consuming inspection process before shipping to its destination.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extroversion, proactive personality linked to career success, researcher findsNearly 4 million students are expected to earn higher education degrees in the U.S. this academic year, and many of them will be awarded this month. Research shows that those who obtain college degrees on average earn more and have greater job satisfaction. Now new research from the University of Missouri reveals another factor related to success—those who are the most outgoing and proactive also
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why big-data analysis of police activity is inherently biasedIn early 2017, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a new initiative in the city's ongoing battle with violent crime. The most common solutions to this sort of problem involve hiring more police officers or working more closely with community members. But Emanuel declared that the Chicago Police Department would expand its use of software, enabling what is called "predictive policing," particularl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three-dimensional, direction-dependent force measurement at the subatomic scaleAtomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely sensitive technique that allows us to image materials and/or characterize their physical properties on the atomic scale by sensing the force above material surfaces using a precisely controlled tip. However, conventional AFM only provides the surface normal component of the force (the Z direction) and ignores the components parallel to the surface (the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploring the conversion of heat to electricity in single moleculesThe direct conversion of a temperature difference into electricity, known as the thermoelectric effect, is an environmentally friendly approach to directly harvesting electricity from heat. The ability of a material to convert heat to electricity is measured by its thermoelectric figure of merit. Materials with a high thermoelectric figure of merit are thus widely desired for use in energy harvest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changes in water temperature have an impact on the dentex in Medes IslandsThe movement of the dentex, a fish living in rocky sea floors and marine lands in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, is influenced by the changes in ocean temperatures, according to a study carried out in the Medes Islands and published in the journal Scientific Reports. Regarding climate change, which brings higher temperatures, this behavioral pattern of the dentex, an apical predator in marine
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New Scientist - News

Spray-on touch controls give an interactive twist to any surfaceArmed with a can of conductive paint, you can now give walls, guitars, steering wheels and even jellies an interactive surface
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day:3-Billion-Year-OldBubblesFossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.
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Futurity.org

Sync pink noise with brain to get better deep sleep Gentle sound stimulation—such as the rush of a waterfall—synchronized to the rhythm of brain waves significantly enhanced deep sleep in older adults, report researchers. The sound stimulation also improved the older adults’ ability to recall words. Deep sleep is critical for memory consolidation. But beginning in middle age, deep sleep decreases substantially, which scientists believe contributes
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Gizmodo

Is Deadpool 2 Looking to Cast Some Future X-Force Heroes? One of the Hellboy reboot writers promises a darker take on the character. Get a look behind the scenes at Alien: Covenant . Phoebe Waller-Bridge talks about those Doctor Who rumors. Plus, hints for The Defenders ’ big villain, the first look at the return of Cat Grant to Supergirl and a bizarre King Arthur clip. To me, my Spoilers! Deadpool 2/X-Force Sources speaking to Comicbook.com claim that
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Ars Technica

Apple buys Beddit, a sleep-tracking company with existing Apple Watch app Enlarge (credit: Beddit) Apple may be looking to integrate own sleep-tracking features to its product lineup sooner rather than later. According to a report by CNBC, Apple acquired the sleep tracking company Beddit. Beddit's website confirms the acquisition on its Privacy Policy page , which was last edited May 8, 2017: "Beddit has been acquired by Apple. Your personal data will be collected, use
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New on MIT Technology Review

Comey Exit Privacy Erosion, Better Translation AI, and Coffee Shops Without Wi-Fi—The Download, May 10, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Harmony That Keeps Trappist-1’s 7 Earth-size Worlds From CollidingAstronomers can now explain why the recently discovered Earth-size planets, tightly packed, don’t simply fly apart. And now, you can give it a listen.
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Quanta Magazine

Exoplanet Puzzle Cracked by Jazz Musicians When astronomers dropped the news that nearby star TRAPPIST-1 was circled by seven planets about the size of Earth — all of which could conceivably be studied by upcoming observatories, three or more of which could have lakes and oceans on their surfaces — most of the headlines were focused on the prospect of scouring these worlds for life. Daniel Tamayo noticed something else. The clockwork of t
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Ars Technica

Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook Opera is Reborn! No, literally, the new version of Opera is called Reborn. The Norwegian browser maker, which was acquired by a Chinese tech company in 2016 , has decided that Opera Reborn should focus on an intriguing new feature: the ability to pin Facebook, WhatsApp, and Telegram messaging apps to the left side of the browser. So, instead of tabbing to another browser window to respond to a fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cells calculate ratios to control gene expressionIn multicellular animals, cells communicate by emitting and receiving proteins, a process called signaling. One of the most common signaling pathways is the transforming growth factor b (Tgf-b) pathway, which functions in all animal species throughout their lifetimes and regulates numerous biological processes, such as instructing cells how to differentiate—whether a stem cell will become a muscle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pacific Northwest forests are at a crossroads, scientists argue in new bookThe Pacific Northwest faces two stark choices for managing its forests, scientists suggest in a new book. One choice leads to stagnant or declining rural communities and risks to some native species, and the other leads to environmental benefits and increases in employment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After 13 lucky years at Saturn, Cassini's mission comes to an endIn October 1997, the Cassini spacecraft blasted off to explore Saturn and drop a probe onto its eponymously named moon, Titan. Then, something unusual happened. What was meant to be a four-year mission was extended almost a decade beyond its original end-date. As we approach the end of Cassini's 13 years of continuous presence in the Saturnian system, it has become clear that these were some of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers isolate hydrogen fluoride and water to understand acid dissolution(Phys.org)—Beginning level chemistry classes learn about Brønsted-Lowry acids. These acids dissociate in water to form an H+ ion and a negatively charged counterion. While this is a fundamental lesson, the actual mechanism of dissolution is a bit of a mystery. The H+ molecule combines with water to form H3O+, but the number of water molecules needed to hydrate the simplest acid, HF, is unknown. At
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do red Smarties make you happier? 'Live the trial' class debunks the mythA test to assess the effect of red Smarties on happiness has been used to teach the often 'dull' or 'boring' concepts of clinical research. The study, published in the Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, was based on a mock randomised control trial across three countries and involved students at QUT and health professionals in Canada and Malaysia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-dimensional direction-dependent force measurement at the subatomic scaleOsaka University and collaborators have developed a new atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique that can measure the three-dimensional force fields of atoms. In their technique, the precisely controlled tip of a mechanical arm is moved over a material surface at two different frequencies to provide information about the material surface in both vertical and parallel directions. This AFM technique
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeted, high-energy cancer treatments get a supercomputing boostRadiation therapy shoots high-energy particles into the body to destroy or damage cancer cells, while sparing surrounding healthy tissue. New types of radiation systems are emerging that can better target cancer cells. These include proton beam therapy and MR-linac, which combines real-time imaging and radiation treatment in a single device. Scientists rely on supercomputers at the Texas Advanced
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exploring the conversion of heat to electricity in single moleculesResearchers at Osaka University investigated the influence of the geometry of single-molecule devices on their ability to produce electricity from heat. They fabricated devices consisting of a single molecule bridging gold electrodes and measured device electrical conductance and thermovoltage simultaneously. The devices with thiol-gold contacts displayed the highest thermovoltage when the gold-th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deciphering an embryo-protecting proteinThe structure of a protein that protects embryos from being attacked by their mothers' immune system is now uncovered. Further understanding of this protein could lead to immunosuppressive therapies.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Jellyfish Became the Ocean's Most Efficient SwimmersJellyfish manipulate physics to become the most efficient animals moving in the sea -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

40.000 containere flyttes fra norske veje til autonomt skibI 2020 skal et autonomt containerskib sejle gødning mellem norske havne. De norske myndigheder vil have nye regler, så det bliver muligt at sejle helt uden mandskab.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural disasters pose grave threat to planet's last Javan rhinosThe world's only population of Javan rhinoceros, already under severe threat from poaching, could go extinct in the future due to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nearly pristine ankylosaur fossil found in Montana(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto, both in Canada, has unearthed what is being described as one of the most complete ankylosaur fossilized skeletal remains ever from the Judith River Formation in Montana. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes the find and why they believe study will reveal
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Gizmodo

A Surreal Animated Tale of a Man, a Raft, a Paddle, and a Sarcastic Ghost Still: Vimeo “A cautionary tale,” reads the description for this surreal nursery rhyme of an animated short, Klementhro . It’s repetitive at first, but stick with it... it takes a dark turn and features maybe the snappiest, most over-it ghost ever to float beside a river bank. [ Short of the Week ]
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Scientific American Content: Global

Origins of Male Domination May Lie in FoodChemical signatures left behind in the bones of people living thousands of years ago suggest that the introduction of new commodities provided an opportunity for men -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Videnskabens Verden

Videnskab er kompliceret, detaljeorienteret og ofte meget langsomt, så hvordan får man formidlet videnskabshistorier i en medieverden, der kører i et noget hurtigere tempo? Det gør man bl.a. ved at lære forskere at formidle, så enhver kan forstå det. Det er lige netop, hvad Ph.D. cup går ud på. Det er et slags X-factor for forskere. Men i stedet for Blachman, Remee og Mette Lindberg i dommerpanele
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Ars Technica

Liveblog: Windows 10 Redstone 3’s new look and feel, at Microsoft Build 2017 day 2 Enlarge (credit: Microsoft ) Liveblog starts in: View Liveblog SEATTLE—In a welcome break from tradition, Microsoft is holding its annual developer conference, Build, in Seattle this year. We're live on the scene to enjoy America's best weather and learn all about Microsoft's plans for its developer platform. The day 1 keynote was all about Azure and AI; for day 2, we're expecting to hear a lot m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized music may help nursing home residents with dementiaPeople with dementia living in nursing homes that implemented the MUSIC & MEMORY program were more likely to cease using antipsychotic and antianxiety drugs and engaged in fewer problematic behaviors, according to the first evaluation of the program.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sugar or protein? How fruit fly brains control what they choose to eatUsing fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a specific and very small set of brain cells -- dubbed dopamine wedge neurons -- responsible for driving the insects' food preferences toward what they need, rather than what they like.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stretchable hologram can switch between multiple images (video)The possibility of sending and receiving holographic messages has long tantalized sci-fi fans. Although we're not there yet, scientists have now created holograms that can change from one image to another as the materials used to generate them are stretched. The study detailing how they did it appears in ACS' journal Nano Letters.
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WIRED

Oxitec Pioneered the GM Mosquito. Up Next? Moths, of Course The USDA is currently reviewing whether to allow Cornell University and Oxitec to release tens of thousands of GM moths into a 10-acre site in New York. The post Oxitec Pioneered the GM Mosquito. Up Next? Moths, of Course appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Mapped: The Top 263 Companies Racing Toward Autonomous Cars The auto industry is rebuilding itself. Here's a chart to keep you up to speed. The post Mapped: The Top 263 Companies Racing Toward Autonomous Cars appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

'A little bit OCD': the downside of mental health awareness | Dean Burnett People claiming they have serious conditions when they don’t just exacerbates negative stereotypes It’s mental health awareness week . So that’s good. Well, mostly. There are downsides to increased awareness of mental health, it turns out. You ever met someone who is needlessly cold or even outright rude to those who deign to engage with them? I used to work with someone like that, and eventually
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Science-Based Medicine

Inoculating – Against MisinformationA new study confirms what we suspected - you can't just correct misinformation with information, you have to expose the tactics of deception so people can recognize them for themselves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer model to help water resource managers reduce damage in cases of extreme floodingArtificial neural networks (ANNs) are a biologically-inspired method of computing that can receive large amounts of data, find patterns, learn from them and then develop predictions for future events. They have been proposed as a useful tool to process the complex relationships between large amounts of data related to the transformation of rainfall into runoff. This relationship is one of the most
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study into spirals of magnetic spin showcases potential of layered materials for future data storageTiny spirals of magnetism called skyrmions could be used as ultrahigh density energy-efficient data carriers.
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New Scientist - News

Snowball Earth melting led to freshwater ocean 2 kilometres deepA freshwater layer up to 2 kilometres deep floated on our planet’s oceans for some 50,000 years after the end of an extreme ice age
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Gizmodo

Find Out How Dirty Your Carpet Really Is With This $70 Hoover SteamVac Hoover SteamVac , $70 If you’ve never steam-cleaned a carpet, get ready for an eyeopening experience when you see just how much crap a person can track into a home. At $70 (its best price ever), this discounted Hoover SteamVac is perfect for keeping your carpets actually clean as opposed to just looking clean. Plus, its accessory hose is ideal for cleaning sofas and car seats as well. This being
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Scientific American Content: Global

Marijuana May Boost, Rather Than Dull, the Elderly BrainSenior mice treated with THC improved on learning and memory tests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ghana Telescope Heralds First Pan-African ArrayBy converting a defunct communications dish, astronomers are breaking ground on Earth and beyond -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Fox News Got Trump Elected and Fox News is the Reason He'll Stay in Power GIF GIF made from a Fox News segment announcing that former FBI Director James Comey had resigned, when in fact he had been fired (Fox News) Yesterday, President Trump shocked the world by firing FBI Director James Comey, the man who was leading the investigation into the Trump regime’s ties to Russia . Trump has sparked a constitutional crisis, as many Americans wonder if Trump has fundamentally
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Ingeniøren

Forsker skærper sin havbrugs-vurdering: Lakselus udgør måske allerede et problemUnder en folketingshøring vurderede ekspert fra DTU Aqua, at lakselus ikke er et problem i havbrug i dag. Den vurdering har han nu ændret.
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Ingeniøren

Datatilsynet: Læk af 95.000 jobansøgeres data fra Novo Nordisk er ‘meget beklagelig’ De fornødne sikkerhedsforanstaltninger var ikke på plads, da medicinalgiganten Novo Nordisk ved en menneskelig fejl lækkede personoplysninger på 95.000 potentielle jobansøgere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/datatilsynet-laek-95000-personers-data-novo-nordisk-meget-beklagelig-1076485 Version2
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Gizmodo

Korean TV Tracks Election With Game Of Thrones GIF [GIF via FUN TASTIC Vedio ] During the recent presidential election in South Korean, one television network decided the best way to track the votes would be turning all the candidates into Game of Thrones type characters. Advertisement Network SBS’s coverage was called, as tipster Sang points out, “Big Election Game: Searching For The Throne.” The intro graphics even looked like the opening c
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Futurity.org

Black and white kids do equally well in subsidized housing Black and white children who grow up in subsidized housing are doing equally well in school, jobs, and earnings, and the racial disparities that once sorted their families into very different housing developments are mostly gone, a new study finds. Once-stark racial differences in the prevalence of blacks and whites in the three main types of subsidized housing—large public housing “projects,” sm
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Dagens Medicin

Praktiserende læger i frontlinjen for hpv-kampagneDSAM lancerer sit eget informationsmateriale om hpv-vaccinen til de praktiserende læger.
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Live Science

Hanford Disaster: What Happens to Someone Who's Exposed to Plutonium?A nuclear-waste tunnel collapse might have released radioactive substances, such as plutonium, into the area near the Hanford nuclear facility, which could be dangerous for the people nearby.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Evidence of Mysterious Homo naledi Raises Questions about How Humans EvolvedThe much-anticipated dating of the enigmatic species, along with stunning new fossils, challenge key assumptions about human evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Hooked on the Shadow: 'Mr. Eclipse' Shares Tips for the 2017 Total Solar EclipseSpace.com caught up with Mr. Eclipse to hear about his very first eclipse, his crucial tips for eclipse-viewing newcomers and — most importantly — what he'll do if it's looking like rain before the Aug. 21 event.
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Live Science

Hidden, Briny Heart of Antarctica's 'Blood Falls' UncoveredNew research links a striking red waterfall in Antarctica to underground brines.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UN examines fossil fuel influence in climate talks processCampaigners say there should be greater scrutiny of industry bodies that are involved in UN climate talks.
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The Atlantic

'America's Deaf Team' Tackles Identity Politics The Homecoming game falls on a brilliant, unseasonably warm Saturday afternoon in late October 2016. The sun streams through the multicolored leaves of oak trees and dapples thousands of alumni and fans in patches of light and shade. Pop-up booths have been erected behind the football stadium: The Class of 2019 is selling crepes; the Class of 1992 is selling T-shirts; writers for the student news
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The Atlantic

The Young Academic's Twitter Conundrum George Ciccariello-Maher, an associate professor of politics at Drexel University and an outspoken political activist, has tweeted his way into some hot water. Over the past three years, Ciccariello-Maher, a proponent of the “decolonial turn” in humanities research and a long-time critic of American foreign policy, has regularly posted off-color remarks on social media that encapsulate the same l
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The Atlantic

Online Voting Won’t Save Democracy Technology can do a lot more to make our elections more secure and reliable , and to ensure that participation in the democratic process is available to all. There are three parts to this process. First, the voter registration process can improved. The whole process can be streamlined. People should be able to register online, just as they can register for other government services. The voter rol
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WIRED

The Alt-Right’s Newest Ploy? Trolling With False Symbols It's time for "normies" to stop taking the alt-right at its own word. The post The Alt-Right's Newest Ploy? Trolling With False Symbols appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Finesse of Flying Cassini Between Saturn’s Rings It takes spinning reaction wheels and rockets firing for mere seconds to keep the Cassini probe on course in orbit around Saturn. The post The Finesse of Flying Cassini Between Saturn's Rings appeared first on WIRED .
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Live Science

Photos: See the Armored Dinosaur Named for Zuul from 'Ghostbusters'An armored dinosaur known as an ankylosaurus looked so much like Zuul from the 1984 movie "Ghostbusters" that paleontologists made the monster the dinosaur's namesake.
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Live Science

Spiky Ankylosaurus Looks Like Monster from 'Ghostbusters'What's as long as a pickup truck, as heavy as a white rhinoceros and as weird-looking as Zuul, the monster from the 1984 "Ghostbusters" movie? A newfound species of ankylosaurus.
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Live Science

North Korea: A Hermit Country from Above (Photos)Images of North Korea snapped from NASA satellites reveal interesting details about the country, including the stark difference between the GDP of South and North Korea, and its economic and other development.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Fake females' to aid rare moth work in CairngormsMale Kentish glory moths are to be counted with the aid of bits of rubber coated in the scent of female moths.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ice particles shaped like lollipops fall from cloudsSmall ice particles called ice-lollies, because of their lollipop-like appearance, can form in clouds.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Cosmic ControversyA Scientific American article about the theory of inflation prompted a reply from a group of 33 physicists, along with a response from the article’s authors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

10 Ways to Listen to TreesTheir vibratory energies reveal humanity’s many connections with forests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump's Wall Threatens Thousands of Plant and Animal Species on the U.S.–Mexico BorderThe region—called the Sky Islands—harbors more than 7,000 species, many of which struggle to cross human-made obstructions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is building bigger houses a waste of energy?Research by Iman Khajehzadeh, who graduates with a PhD in Architecture next week, explores the significance of housing decisions on the use of resources and impact on the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-assembling cyclic protein homo-oligomersCyclic proteins that assemble from multiple identical subunits (homo-oligomers) play key roles in many biological processes, including cell signaling and enzymatic catalysis and protein function. Researchers in Berkeley Lab's Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging (MBIB) Division worked with University of Washington's David Baker, who led a team to design in silico and crystallize self-ass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How fruit fly brains control what they choose to eatUsing fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a specific and very small set of brain cells—dubbed dopamine wedge neurons—responsible for driving the insects' food preferences toward what they need, rather than what they like.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sweet compounds aid water retention in dry soilOrganic material added by plant roots and microbes provides nutritious candy for the soil. Literally. Released cellular sugar fortifies water and nutrient retention, and maintains the porous earth, according to new Cornell research in Advances in Water Resources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research may help combat abusive online commentsResearchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Interactive Computing have come up with a novel computational approach that could provide a more cost- and resource-effective way for internet communities to moderate abusive content.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop new way to clear pollutants from waterWhen it comes to removing very dilute concentrations of pollutants from water, existing separation methods tend to be energy- and chemical-intensive. Now, a new method developed at MIT could provide a selective alternative for removing even extremely low levels of unwanted compounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA delivers detectors for ESA's Euclid spacecraftThree detector systems for the Euclid mission, led by ESA (European Space Agency), have been delivered to Europe for the spacecraft's near-infrared instrument. The detector systems are key components of NASA's contribution to this upcoming mission to study some of the biggest questions about the universe, including those related to the properties and effects of dark matter and dark energy—two crit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New analytical methods to estimate the size of wild animal populations from a distanceCamera traps are a useful means for researchers to observe the behaviour of animal populations in the wild or to assess biodiversity levels of remote locations like the tropical rain forest. Researchers from the University of St Andrews, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research recently extended distance sampling analytical
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Ingeniøren

Et dansk diplom er ikke altid nok til ingeniørjob i udlandetSERIE OM INGENIØRER I UDLANDET: Sæt dig ind i de lokale forhold - ellers risikerer du at gå glip af dit udenlandske drømmejob.
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Ingeniøren

Sikkerhedsekspert: Hackere kan snildt påvirke det norske valg Det er naivt at tro, at Norge ikke skulle kandidatere til mål for de berygtede hackere, som forsøger at påvirke demokratiske processer rundt omkring i verden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedsekspert-hackere-kan-snildt-paavirke-norske-valg-1076475 Version2
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Ingeniøren

F-35B: Nu lander kampflyet vertikaltDen første erstatning for Harrier-flytypen er rullet ud fra fabrikken uden for Milano.
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Ingeniøren

DTU indkalder til digitaliseringstopmødeOver to dage i september sætter DTU fokus på digitalisering på et teknologitopmøde for erhvervsliv, forskere, studerende, udviklere og investorer. Arrangementet er inspireret af MIT’s Tech Conference.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular dynamics simulations reveal chaos in electron transportPlants are very efficient at turning photons into electrons. But the transport of these electrons is a chaotic process, University of Groningen scientists have discovered. They used molecular dynamics to visualize the working of photosystem II and published their results on 10 May in Nature Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers spot rare Antarctic 'dragon-skin' icen autumn voyage to the heart of an Antarctic polynya has rewarded expeditioners on a US icebreaker, including IMAS researcher Dr Guy Williams, with a glimpse of a rarely seen type of sea ice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Planetary stethoscope' could determine what lies in Europa's global oceanJupiter's moon Europa is definitely an odd place. Discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, it was first seen in detail only in the late 1970s, after spacecraft visited the jovian system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Merging galaxies have enshrouded black holesBlack holes get a bad rap in popular culture for swallowing everything in their environments. In reality, stars, gas and dust can orbit black holes for long periods of time, until a major disruption pushes the material in.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study investigates collapse of natural or social systemsA tipping point is a critical threshold at which a dynamical system undergoes an irreversible transformation, typically owing to a small change in inputs or parameters. This concept is very broad and can refer to the extinction of an animal or a plant species, the depletion of a water source, or the financial collapse of an institution, among many other natural and social phenomena.
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WIRED

Microsoft Build 2017: Watch the Livestream Right Here Watch Microsoft's keynote addresses from Build on Wednesday and Thursday mornings, right here on WIRED. The post Microsoft Build 2017: Watch the Livestream Right Here appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Microsoft Build Liveblog: News From the Keynote, as It Happens Join us for live analysis and commentary (and jokes!) from David Pierce, Brian Barrett, and the rest of our liveblog team. The post Microsoft Build Liveblog: News From the Keynote, as It Happens appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineering human stem cells to model the kidney's filtration barrier on a chipA team at Harvard's Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering now reports an approach in Nature Biomedical Engineering, which enables the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into mature podocytes with more than 90 percent efficiency. Linking the differentiation process with organ-on-a-chip technology pioneered by his team, the researchers went on to engineer the
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The Atlantic

Giuliani Says He's Not a Candidate for FBI Director Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said Tuesday he is not up for consideration to replace FBI Director James Comey, whose firing by President Trump set off a political maelstrom on Tuesday. Speaking to me and to New York ’s Olivia Nuzzi just past midnight at the Trump International Hotel on Wednesday, Giuliani said he was not a candidate for FBI director, contrary to speculation. "I’m not a
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The Atlantic

The 'Macron Leaks' Rebel in the Briefing Room Jack Posobiec, the Washington bureau chief for a right-wing Canadian outlet called The Rebel , was coming off a big weekend. At 2:49 p.m. on May 5, Posobiec directed his 111,000 Twitter followers to the hacked emails that had bubbled up on 4chan: “Massive doc dump at /pol/,” he tweeted. Posobiec was among a number of American alt-right internet personalities who amplified the hack, as French medi
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The Atlantic

How P.T. Barnum Helped the Early Days of Animal Rights The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will put on its last show this month, after more than 140 years in performance. Many factors led to the demise of the so-called “Greatest Show on Earth”—growing costs, shrinking attention spans, the rise of other forms of entertainment, the effect of local transport legislation on a show that still rides the rails. But one of the loudest arguments in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A portable measuring device to detect optimum ripeness in tomatoesA portable Raman spectrometer, a device used in very different fields such as metallurgy, archaeology and art, allows data to be obtained on the variation in the composition of tomatoes during various ripening phases, according to the results of a study conducted in the UPV/EHU's Department of Analytical Chemistry. The portable Raman spectrometer is an instrument widely used across a range of sect
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the futureAn experiment at the cutting edge of condensed matter physics and materials science has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can become reality. An international collaboration led by the scientists of Italy's International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Università Cattolica di Brescia and Politecnico di Milano used tailored laser pulses to snap the electronic int
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software specifically adapted to the special characteristics of the dairy sector presentedAZTI and INGENET have developed and validated a software tool adapted to the dairy sector and designed to evaluate, prevent and reduce the environmental impact caused by dairy products through the ecodesign of new products, offering increased added value.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists print nanoscale imaging probe onto tip of optical fiberCombining speed with incredible precision, a team of researchers has developed a way to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair, accelerating the production of the promising new device from several per month to several per day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rising temperatures threaten stability of Tibetan alpine grasslandsA warming climate could affect the stability of alpine grasslands in Asia's Tibetan Plateau, threatening the ability of farmers and herders to maintain the animals that are key to their existence, and potentially upsetting the ecology of an area in which important regional river systems originate, says a new study by researchers in China and the United States.
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Viden

Brinkmann om forskning i rummet: Det minder lidt om religionAstrofysikkens søgen efter svar minder om en religion, der placerer mennesket i en større sammenhæng, mener psykolog Svend Brinkmann. Ny teknologi øger sandsynligheden for, at jagten snart giver resultat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists print nanoscale imaging probe onto tip of optical fiberA team of researchers has developed a way to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair, accelerating the production of the promising new device from several per month to several per day. The high-throughput fabrication technique opens the door for the widespread adoption of this and other nano-optical structures, which squeeze and manipulate light in way
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rising temperatures threaten stability of Tibetan alpine grasslandsA warming climate could affect the stability of alpine grasslands in Asia's Tibetan Plateau, threatening the ability of farmers and herders to maintain the animals that are key to their existence, and potentially upsetting the ecology of an area in which important regional river systems originate, says a new study by researchers in China and the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular dynamics simulations reveal chaos in electron transportPlants are very efficient at turning photons into electrons. But the transport of these electrons is a rather chaotic process, University of Groningen scientists have discovered. They used molecular dynamics to visualize the working of Photosystem II and published their results on May 10 in Nature Communications.
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NYT > Science

Letter of Recommendation: Letter of Recommendation: Talking About the WeatherChatting about that heat wave isn’t banal. It’s an art form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As Facebook's grown, so have its challengesIn 2011 as Facebook inched ever closer to 1 billion active monthly users, it faced a vexing crisis: uproar about a facial recognition algorithm that tagged people in photos without their consent.
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The Atlantic

Will Congress Save the Children's Health Insurance Program? As Congress debates the future of the Affordable Care Act, will lawmakers forget about the kids? Federal funding for the Clinton-era Children’s Health Insurance Program runs out at the end of September, and its supporters fear the bitter ideological divide around Obamacare could threaten a bipartisan consensus in support of a law that insures nearly 9 million kids nationwide. “We’re very worried,
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The Atlantic

Meet Zuul, Destroyer of Shins—a Dinosaur Named After Ghostbusters In 2014, a commercial fossil company was digging for tyrannosaur skeletons in a giant Montana quarry when one of its pit-loaders accidentally bumped into the tail of a very different dinosaur. It was an ankylosaur—a low-slung plant-eater with armored plates on its back, and a huge defensive club at the end of its tail. The company was looking for a tyrannosaur, but it ended up finding the thing t
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Science : NPR

How Illegal Gold Mining Relates To The Spread Of Malaria New social science research shows a correlation between illegal gold mining and the spread of malaria. We explore why this might be the case.
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Ingeniøren

Rambøll: Unge ingeniører på udlandsophold styrker danske virksomheder Når ingeniørstuderende læser i udlandet, hjælper det danske firmaer til ny viden og med at tiltrække international arbejdskraft. Derfor uddeler Rambøll igen i år rejselegater til fire heldige studerende. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ramboell-unge-ingenioerer-paa-udlandsophold-styrker-danske-virksomheder-8034 Emner Arbejdsmarked Uddannelse Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

ITU-professor: Dårlig ledelse bærer en stor del af ansvaret for EFI-katastrofen Urealistiske forventninger, elendig kommunikation, manglende viden og overblik og generelt dårlig ledelse var grundene til, at EFI-sagaen endte, som den gjorde. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/skat-baerer-selv-stor-del-ansvaret-efi-katastrofen-1076449 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Elbiler: Tysk batteri lover 1.000 km på en opladningForskningsorganisationen Fraunhofer vil spare 50 procent af batteriets indpakning ved at stable cellerne oven på hinanden. Det skaber plads til flere battericeller og dermed længere rækkevidde. Dansk professor kalder løsningen 'spændende'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

If your mom wants to share a Google Doc with you, check the sourceYou might have heard a phishing scam has been making the rounds on the internet in the last day or so.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will sending selfies to Jupiter moon get the attention of an E.T.?Emcee Tom O'Key seemed giddy as dozens of guests filed into an outdoor theater in this Mojave Desert town on a recent Saturday night to learn about an icy moon of Jupiter and take a stab at connecting with whatever - or whomever - may be living there.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Science publishers try new tack to combat unauthorized paper sharing Rise in copyright breaches prompts industry to discuss ways to allow ‘fair sharing’ of articles. Nature 545 145 doi: 10.1038/545145a
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The Atlantic

How to Read Eggs A growing number of Americans know that almost all eggs come from chickens stacked in crates the size of shoeboxes, too small for the birds to lift their wings or turn around. That knowledge hasn’t slowed egg sales , but it has led egg purveyors to a new lexicon that’s partly meant to inform and partly meant to mislead and confuse consumers who are trying to feel okay about loving eggs. Even for
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Ingeniøren

Stort behov for dygtige projektledere i flere forskellige brancher - find det rette job for dig Virksomheder som Energinet, Patienterstatningen, Rambøll Group, GEA Process Engineering og Cowi jagter projekterledere til vigtige positioner. Tjek, om det lige netop er dig, som de søger. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/stort-behov-dygtige-projektledere-flere-forskellige-brancher-find-rette-job-dig-8032 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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The Atlantic

Anthony Kennedy's Choice Imagine if you will: You have worked for the government for 30 years. You believe in America, you believe in law, you believe in the majesty of the Constitution. You have served your vision both in good times and bad. Your name is Anthony Kennedy. Now it’s suggested you should step aside and let someone else take over. Someone appointed by President Donald Trump. What do you do? I have no inside
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Dagens Medicin

Regionerne: Danmark skal have et speciale i akutmedicin Hospitalerne har brug for et akutmedicinsk speciale til at kunne give akutte patienter den bedst mulige behandling. Det mener Danske Regioner, der nu stærkt opfordrer de øvrige specialer til at droppe modstanden imod det.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt speciale er essentielt for akutafdelingernes fremtidDet er meget uheldigt, at der er uenighed i den nationale arbejdsgruppe, som ser på behovet for et nyt speciale i akutmedicin. Etablering af et selvstændigt speciale vil sikre den rette faglighed, signalere anerkendelse og sikre lægerne en karrierevej og dermed styrke rekrutteringsmulighederne.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægen, der hader ynk Ynk. Regionspolitiker i Region Syddanmark og læge Marianne Mørk Mathiesen hader ynk. Al den ynk, hun så i både sin praksis og i samfundet generelt var det, som i 2013 fik hende til at gå ind i politik. Efter stridigheder med regionen har hun nu lukket sin praksis og går efter både en plads i regionsrådet igen – og en plads i Folketinget.
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Dagens Medicin

Professoren vildleder og fordrejer igen om diabetesTorsten Lauritzen fremfører ikke-faktabaserede påstande om opsporing og behandling af diabetes.
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Dagens Medicin

Jesper Mehlsen: HPV vaccination – er der et alternativ?Med et begrænset forebyggelsesbudget er det rimeligt at foretage en samlet vurdering af indsatsen for bekæmpelse af livmoderhalskræft og en sådan savnes aktuelt, skriver Jesper Mehlsen, overlæge på Synkopecenteret, i dette debatindlæg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Perfect Storm' ship about to become part of artificial reefThe ship made famous in the book and subsequent film "The Perfect Storm" is about to be intentionally sunk off the New Jersey and Delaware coasts so it can become part of an artificial reef.
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Ingeniøren

Ekspertpanel: Staten skal ofre økonomisk gevinst for at forbedre mobildækningFor at sikre en god dækning med fremtidens 5G-netværk skal staten reducere sit provenu fra teleselskabernes frekvensauktioner for at sikre en ordentlig dækning. Det vurderer regeringens digitale vækstpanel, der bakkes op af telebranchen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Name sought for rare albino orangutan rescued in IndonesiaA conservation group is asking the public to name a rare albino orangutan that was rescued from villagers on Borneo island last month, hoping it will become a symbol of efforts to save the critically endangered species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making volunteer-based legislatures work: Overcoming barriers for gender equalityA Dartmouth-led study finds that volunteer-based state legislatures by their very nature, may perpetuate gender inequality in political representation. Family responsibilities appeared to disproportionately affect female legislators than their male counterparts, as women often take on more family obligations for their household, which in turn, compete in time with their legislative responsibilitie
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Ben Barres (Stanford) 2: Women in Science Part 1: What do reactive astrocytes do? Ben Barres categorizes two types of reactive astrocytes, A1 and A2, and describes how they affect the fate of neurons after brain injuries Part 2: Women in Science: Ben Barres discusses the challenges that women face while taking the traditional academic path. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/what-do-reactive-astrocytes-do.html Talk Overview: Part 1: A
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Ben Barres (Stanford) 1: What do reactive astrocytes do? Part 1: What do reactive astrocytes do? Ben Barres categorizes two types of reactive astrocytes, A1 and A2, and describes how they affect the fate of neurons after brain injuries Part 2: Women in Science: Ben Barres discusses the challenges that women face while taking the traditional academic path. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/what-do-reactive-astrocytes-do.html Talk Overview: Part 1: A
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Dagens Medicin

Fra akutmodtagelse til almen praksis: »Her har jeg maksimal indflydelse« Da Tinne Nielsen var færdig som speciallæge i almen medicin, tog hun en uddannelse som akutlæge. Efterfølgende blev hun overlæge på en akutmodtagelse, men nu er den tilværelse skiftet ud. I august valgte hun at blive praktiserende læge i egen praksis. Og det har hun ikke fortrudt.
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Science | The Guardian

The psychology of the to-do list – why your brain loves ordered tasks Studies have shown that people perform better when they have written down what they need to do. What makes the to-do list such an effective productivity tool? Almost everyone struggles with getting stuff done. But some of us struggle with the stage before that: just figuring out what it is we need to do. The to-do list is, in theory, the answer. It’s a time-honoured system that’s beautiful in its
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

The secret war against counterfeit science China has a lucrative market for fake research reagents. Some scientists are fighting back. Nature 545 148 doi: 10.1038/545148a
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Dagens Medicin

Praksislæge kritiserer 1813: Reagerede ikke på tegn på meningitis 1813 fejlvisiterede en knap to-årig dreng med symptomer på meningitis, lyder kritikken fra praktiserende læge, der selv sendte drengen akut på hospitalet. Hovedstadens Akutberedskab afviser at have begået en fejl i sagen.
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Ingeniøren

Lektor: Fremtidens kryptovaluta er anonym og har kighul til politiet Hvis kryptovaluta skal blive alment anvendt er der brug for regulering. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/lektor-fremtidens-kryptovaluta-anonym-har-kighul-politiet-1076348 Version2
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Gizmodo

Comcast and Charter Just Showed Everyone How to Do Antitrust Violations Right Photo: Wikimedia FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has said that he wants to kill net neutrality because he believes it will somehow create more competition , which would be good for consumers. Let’s take a look at how the two biggest cable companies in America handle competition. Comcast and Charter have just announced a partnership in which they’ve agreed not to compete against one another in the wireless
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making volunteer-based legislatures work: Overcoming barriers for gender equalityA Dartmouth-led study finds that volunteer-based state legislatures by their very nature, may perpetuate gender inequality in political representation. Family responsibilities appeared to disproportionately affect female legislators than their male counterparts, as women often take on more family obligations for their household, which in turn, compete in time with their legislative responsibilitie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Postmenopausal hormone therapy associated with higher risk of hearing lossUse of postmenopausal hormone therapy was associated with higher risk of hearing loss, and the risk tended to increase with longer duration of use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older age at menopause and use of hormone therapy produce increased risk of hearing lossIt has long been suspected that menopause and the use of hormones had a direct effect on hearing. However, findings from previous studies have been conflicting, with some suggesting that hearing worsens at menopause but that there is benefit with hormone therapy (HT). Now results from the first large population study conducted to assess the association show that older age at natural menopause and
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The Scientist RSS

Homo naledi Likely Roamed Earth with H. sapiensNew research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why So Many Web-Fueled Protest Movements Hit a WallZeynep Tufekci’s new book shows how social networks have empowered mass protests—but also made them more fragile.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Identity of famous baby dinosaur fossil revealedThe fossil of a hatchling dinosaur dubbed Baby Louie is recognised as a new species of feathered dinosaur.
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Ingeniøren

Transportministeriet forsøgte at ændre Rigsrevisionens kritikMinisteriet forsøgte at påvirke konklusionerne i Rigsrevisionens stærkt kritiske granskning af Signalprogrammet, viser aktindsigt.
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Gizmodo

A Tribute To My Indestructible DualShock 3 Back in 2013, I had some very unkind things to say about the DualShock 3's design. Those points still stand—this is a bad controller for playing video games—but in the years since I’ve grown to appreciate one thing about the DS3: it can take one hell of a beating. I bought my first PlayStation 3 in early 2007, and for a while got by with just the one controller. But as the sports games started pi
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Big Think

Talking to Yourself Out Loud May Be a Sign of Higher Intelligence, Find Researchers A new study shows how talking to yourself may help your brain perform better. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Federally subsidized shrubs, grasses crucial to sage grouse survival in WashingtonThe federal program that pays farmers to plant agricultural land with environmentally beneficial vegetation is probably the reason that sage grouse still live in portions of Washington's Columbia Basin.
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Live Science

Zuul Lives! New Dino Looks Like 'Ghostbusters' Monster | VideoA newfound species of ankylosaurus — an armored dinosaur with a weaponized tail — reminded researchers of the monster from the 1984 movie "Ghostbusters," so they named the dino Zuul.
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Gizmodo

Following Comey's Firing, Lawmakers Call for Independent Russia Investigation [Updated] Photo: Getty “I simply said to him, ‘Mr. President, in all due respect, you’re making a very big mistake,’” Senator Chuck Schumer told reporters this evening. Schumer was referring to Trump’s sudden decision to fire FBI Director James Comey. The Senate minority leader then proceeded to call for a special investigation, a move that many members of Congress are aggressively demanding. At the time o
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Live Science

Adrenal Glands: Facts, Function & DiseaseThe adrenal glands affect metabolism, blood pressure, the immune system, sex hormones and the body’s response to stress.
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WIRED

Trump Firing FBI Director Comey Won’t Slow Down the Russia Investigation—Yet The president has fired the FBI director in charge of investigating him. But that won't slow the Russia probe. The post Trump Firing FBI Director Comey Won't Slow Down the Russia Investigation---Yet appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

Jakarta’s Christian Governor Imprisoned for Blasphemy Jakarta’s outgoing governor, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, was found guilty of blasphemy on Tuesday and sentenced to two years in jail following comments he made regarding the Koran, the central religious text of Islam. The maximum sentence for blasphemy in Indonesia is five years in prison. While staunch Islamist groups pushed for Purnama to receive the full sentence, prosecutors asked for a condition
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Buddha's birthplace faces serious air pollution threatData collected from air quality monitoring stations shows high levels of pollution at the site.
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WIRED

Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet Stem cell scientists are modern day witches. The post Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Elon Musk Isn’t the Only One Trying to Computerize Your Brain These companies are applying the Silicon Valley playbook to neuroscience. The post Elon Musk Isn’t the Only One Trying to Computerize Your Brain appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Ben Carson Just Got a Whole Lot Wrong About the Brain Oh, if only your brain remembered everything you ever encountered. The post Ben Carson Just Got a Whole Lot Wrong About the Brain appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Neuroscientist Who’s Building a Better Memory for Humans Ted Berger's implant electrically stimulates the brain to form memories—at least in rats and monkeys. And now, he's testing one that could work in humans. The post The Neuroscientist Who's Building a Better Memory for Humans appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Untold Story of Neuroscience’s Most Famous Brain In 1953, a neurosurgeon cut out two slivers from a patient's brain. The surgery helped the patient's epilepsy, but left him unable to form any new memories. The post The Untold Story of Neuroscience’s Most Famous Brain appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

A New Map of the Brain Redraws the Boundaries of Neuroscience Just like regular maps, brain maps are useful points of reference. Scientists use them to agree on what they're studying in the first place. The post A New Map of the Brain Redraws the Boundaries of Neuroscience appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

35 Mice Watched the Cult Film Touch of Evil for Science Researchers at the Allen Brain Observatory mapped the visual cortices of 35 mice while they watched the classic Touch of Evil . Well, part of it, at least. The post 35 Mice Watched the Cult Film Touch of Evil for Science appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Don’t Be So Quick to Flush 15 Years of Brain Scan Studies Neuroscientists—including the study's whistleblowing authors—are saying the negative attention focused on fMRI studies is overblown. The post Don’t Be So Quick to Flush 15 Years of Brain Scan Studies appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

A Gold-Leaf Brain Lights Up With the Awesome Complexity of Neurons "When you have this gigantic thing looming in front of you with the lights draping over it and it's just exploding with activity, even a little kid can look at that and just be like, 'Holy shit! This is really complicated.'" The post A Gold-Leaf Brain Lights Up With the Awesome Complexity of Neurons appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

A Map of the Brain Could Teach Machines to See Like You A race to decipher the brain's algorithms could revolutionize machine learning. The post A Map of the Brain Could Teach Machines to See Like You appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Possible human ancestor turns out to have shared Earth with us Enlarge / The new finds include the most complete skull from the species yet. In 2015, researchers announced a surprising discovery: a completely new species in our own genus, Homo . Homo naledi was discovered not as a few bone fragments or even a single skeleton, but as a huge collection of bones from 14 individuals, all found in the same chamber of a South African cave. The new species was smal
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The Atlantic

This Is Not a Drill Who can sincerely believe that President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey for any reason other than to thwart an investigation of serious crimes? Which crimes—and how serious—we can only guess. The suggestion that Comey was fired to punish him for overzealously mishandling the Clinton email investigation appears laughable: Just this morning, Trump’s social media director Dan Scavino gleefully
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The Atlantic

Democrats Call for an Independent Investigation Into the Election After Trump Fires FBI Director Updated on May 9, 2017 at 8:44 p.m. Democrats are calling for an independent investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election following the news that President Trump had fired FBI Director James Comey. The White House announced Comey’s dismissal on Tuesday evening. So far, reaction in Congress to Comey’s removal has split along partisan lines. Some high-ranking Re
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The Atlantic

'An Act of Presidential Imperialism' President Donald Trump’s extraordinary decision to fire the FBI director James Comey is a stunning moment in American politics, one that has historians reaching back decades for any parallels. Comey’s termination, which the president says was a recommendation from the Justice Department, comes as the FBI continues to investigate allegations that people involved in Trump’s presidential campaign ha
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Gizmodo

How South Korea's New President Changes The North Korea Game South Koreans have just elected a new president who has criticized the deployment of THAAD on his country’s soil, expressed a need to reconcile with Pyongyang and challenged Seoul to tell America, “no.” Advertisement Moon Jae-in, a former human rights lawyer and activist, is replacing disgraced ex-president Park Geun-hye who is sitting in prison awaiting trial on corruption charges . It will be t
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How dingoes could be shaping Australia’s landscape New study informs a long-standing debate about how predators shape ecosystems. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21962
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oldest evidence of life on land found in 3.48 billion-year-old Australian rocksFossils discovered in ancient hot spring deposits in the Pilbara have pushed back by 580 million years the earliest known evidence for microbial life on land.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dingo fence study shows dingo extermination leads to poorer soilA comparison of conditions in the outback on either side of Australia's dingo fence has revealed that extermination of these apex predators not only affects the abundance of other animals and plants, but also reduces the quality of the soil. The UNSW study indicates greater control of kangaroo numbers is needed across a third of the Australian continent where dingoes are rare, to reduce damage on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newborn baby brain scans will help scientists track brain developmentScientists have today published ground-breaking scans of newborn babies' brains which researchers from all over the world can download and use to study how the human brain develops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancersA new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumors that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy. This is the first time this combined therapy has been tested in live animals. The findings of this pre-clinical study, published in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer, could lead to the development of more effective therapies for treating life-threa
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Science | The Guardian

Project to map human brain from womb to birth releases stunning images Scientists hope to understand how conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy and attention deficit disorders arise using thousands images of brain’s wiring A landmark project to map the wiring of the human brain from womb to birth has released thousands of images that will help scientists unravel how conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy and attention deficit disorders arise in the brain. The
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Scientific American Content: Global

Gophers versus the VolcanoPocket gophers survived the Mount Saint Helens eruption in their underground burrows and immediately went to work bringing back the ecosystem. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Convenient Dismissal of James Comey FBI Director James Comey’s abrupt firing on Tuesday , executed by President Donald Trump at the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, is the latest stunning turn in a tumultuous season of American politics. It is also a deeply ironic moment: Trump fired Comey for mishandling an investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails. But while Trump claimed that Comey was too easy on Clin
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Baby Louie, the Dinosaur Orphan, Finds Its Species at LastPaleontologists have identified the species of the fossilized dinosaur fetus known as Baby Louie that was found in China.
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Science | The Guardian

Meet Zuul, destroyer of shins - the 75m-year-old 'Ghostbuster' dinosaur Bearing a striking resemblance to a creature from Ghostbusters, Zuul crurivastator is one of the most complete ankylosaur specimens ever found Scientists have identified a 75m-year old dinosaur that bears a striking resemblance to a monster from the film Ghostbusters . The dinosaur is one of the most complete specimens ever found belonging to the armoured ankylosaur group, featuring a complete sk
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Science | The Guardian

75m-year-old 'Ghostbuster' dinosaur discovered – in pictures Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum have identified a new species of anklylosaurid. Named Zuul crurivastator in a nod to a demon dog-like creature from the film Ghostbusters and its potentially shin-bruising armoured anatomy, the skeleton is one of the most complete and best preserved of this group of dinosaurs ever found. Continue reading...
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Ars Technica

President Trump fires FBI Director James Comey over Clinton e-mail probe Enlarge (credit: Brookings Institution ) FBI Director James Comey was fired Tuesday by President Donald Trump over his handling of the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal. A search has begun to replace Comey, who was appointed to the position by President Barack Obama in 2013. "The FBI is one of our nation’s most cherished and respected institutions, and today will mark a new beginning for our crown j
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dingo fence study shows dingo extermination leads to poorer soilA comparison of conditions in the outback on either side of Australia's dingo fence has revealed that extermination of these apex predators not only affects the abundance of other animals and plants, but also reduces the quality of the soil.
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Gizmodo

The First Teaser for Bryan Singer's X-Men Show The Gifted Is Here A still from The Gifted, the new X-Men show. Image: YouTube Fox’s latest X-Men show just got a series order, official title, and short teaser. Advertisement The show is called The Gifted and the pilot was directed by frequent X-Men movie director Bryan Singer. It follows a family that goes on the run when they realize their kids are mutants, and ends up falling in with a group of underground muta
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: An Abrupt Firing What We’re Following Comey’s Out: President Trump fired James Comey as director of the FBI today, a move that throws the investigation of Russian interference with the presidential election into some uncertainty. Follow our latest coverage here . The announcement comes shortly after it was revealed that Comey misstated a key fact in his Senate testimony last week. Elsewhere in the administration,
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WIRED

Trump’s Campaign Can’t Just Erase History on the Internet Even when you're president, the internet never forgets. The post Trump's Campaign Can't Just Erase History on the Internet appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-hypertension DASH diet may reduce the risk of goutThe results of a study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators suggest that following a diet known to reduce the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease may also reduce the risk of gout.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet rich in fruit, vegetables and whole grains may lower risk of goutA diet rich in fruit and vegetables, nuts and whole grains and low in salt, sugary drinks, and red and processed meats, is associated with a lower risk of gout, whereas a typical 'Western' diet is associated with a higher risk of gout, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heightened risk of heart attacks found with common painkillers in routine usePeople who use commonly prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain and inflammation could be raising their risk of having a heart attack, as early as in the first week of use and especially within the first month of taking high doses of such medication, suggests a study in The BMJ this week.Doctors and patients urged to weigh the risks and benefits of ibuprofen, diclof
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Science | The Guardian

Common painkillers may raise risk of heart attack by 100% – study Risk of myocardial infarction is greatest in first month of taking NSAIDs such as ibuprofen if dose is high, say researchers Commonly prescribed painkillers including ibuprofen increase the likelihood of having a heart attack within the first month of taking them if consumed in high doses, a study suggests. All five nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ) examined could raise the risk as
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Gizmodo

Donald Trump Just Fired FBI Director James Comey Photo: AP President Donald Trump has just fired James Comey, the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Advertisement In a statement on Tuesday, the White House said that Trump had removed Comey from office acting “on the clear recommendations of both Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.” The rationale for dismissing the director was laid in a lette
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Science : NPR

Primitive Humanlike Species Lived More Recently Than Expected The surprising finding suggests that small-brained Homo naledi may have lived at the same time as early humans in South Africa, complicating previous notions about human origins. (Image credit: Wits University/John Hawks)
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Comey's Exit Today in 5 Lines The White House announced that President Trump has fired FBI Director James Comey. Hours earlier, ProPublica reported that part of Comey’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee about Hillary Clinton’s private email server was inaccurate. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is reportedly reviewing Obama-era rules that eliminated harsh punishments for low-level drug crimes. Th
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Will The Mosquitoes Be Too Much For This Naked Survivalist? #NakedAndAfraid | Sundays at 10/9c Forget pirates and voodoo curses, the scariest thing about Louisiana might just be the mosquitoes. Will Michelle be able to make it through 21 days of biting torture? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Nak
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The Atlantic

Trump Fires FBI Director James Comey President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey on Tuesday, a shocking dismissal that removes the top federal law-enforcement official overseeing the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. In a statement announcing the removal, the White House said Trump had “acted based on the clear recommendations of both Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Attorney Gen
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The Atlantic

Trump's North Korea Policy Just Got More Complicated The Trump administration claims it’s considering all options, including military force, to restrict and reverse North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program. It has promised to apply “ maximum pressure ” on Kim Jong Un’s government by, among other things, ratcheting up sanctions, pressuring China to cut off economic support to the North, and rapidly installing the THAAD missile-defense system in South K
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Live Science

Brad Pitt Goes Sober: Why It's So Tough to Quit AlcoholOnly a small fraction of people with an alcohol use disorder manage to stop drinking. Here's a look at what happens in the brain.
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Gizmodo

Ex-Wife Said Bill O'Reilly Attacked Her After She Caught Him Having Phone Sex Photo: Getty Images Bill O’Reilly’s ex-wife swore in an affidavit that the disgraced Fox News host brutally assaulted her in their Long Island home after she discovered him half-naked and engaging in phone sex, Jezebel has learned. Advertisement In the affidavit, which was signed and notarized on October 10, 2011, and later entered as an exhibit in the couple’s divorce proceedings, O’Reilly’s ex-
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Live Science

Gin Recall: What Does Drinking 77 Percent Alcohol Do to You?Canadian authorities recalled the overly potent gin, which had nearly twice the alcohol advertised.
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Ars Technica

Minecraft on Nintendo Switch does the trick, hides most of its compromises Mario Kart 8 Deluxe only needed a few days to prove that good Wii U games play better—and sell better—on the Nintendo Switch. Coincidentally, the next major game for Switch seems poised to capitalize on the same idea: Minecraft , which officially goes on sale this Thursday, May 11, for $30. How big of a whoop can the zillionth port of Minecraft really be? Consider this rough VGChartz estimate for
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Gizmodo

Adequate Man Be Careful When You’re Drinking Alone | The Slot Ivanka Didn’t ‘Rewrite the Rules,’ She Adequate Man Be Careful When You’re Drinking Alone | The Slot Ivanka Didn’t ‘Rewrite the Rules,’ She Borrowed Them From Other People | Fusion Did George Will Plagiarize This Column? | The Grapevine This White Woman Singing About the Ghetto While Doing Yoga Is the Whitest Thing Ever |
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Popular Science

Ring Video Doorbell review Gadgets This smart doorbell doesn't need to be wired into your house. How does the Ring smart doorbell measure up against its competition?
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Gizmodo

Cotton Swabs Send Thousands of Kids to the ER Every Year Image: Will Cullpepper/Flickr/Andrew Liszewski New research from Nationwide Children’s Hospital shows that around 12,500 kids are treated in US hospital emergency departments each year for injuries caused by cotton tip applicators. That’s about 34 each day. In most cases, the swabs were used for cleaning, but as this study shows, it’s simply not worth the risks . Thankfully, there are safer ways
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The Atlantic

La venganza de México Read this article in English. L a primera vez que Donald Trump hizo una jugada de ofender a México—cuando acusó el vecino de los Estados Unidos de exportar violadores y “bad hombres”, cuando declaró el país una amenaza tan grande que necesitaba ser contenido por un muro y tan incompetente que podría ser obligado a pagar por su propio encajonamiento—su presidente respondió con una extraña tranquil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EPA signs off on North Dakota regulation of CO2 wellsThe Trump administration is proposing to make North Dakota the first state with the power to regulate underground wells used for long-term storage of waste carbon dioxide captured from industrial sources such as coal-fired power plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Threatened bird nesting again on Los Angeles area beachesThe western snowy plover is nesting along the Los Angeles area coast for the first time in nearly seven decades, federal officials said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook says it found faster way to translate through AIFacebook says its researchers have found a new way to use artificial intelligence to translate material on its social network faster and more accurately.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Techno-infused opera about Steve Jobs gets new backersA techno-infused opera about the life of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs has earned the financial backing of opera companies in San Francisco and Seattle, ensuring the musical meditation on the iconic entrepreneur will travel to America's high-tech enclave.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump delays decision on Paris climate dealPresident Donald Trump delayed a decision to honor or walk away from the Paris climate accord until he returns from Europe late this month, leaving global partners in limbo Tuesday.
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NYT > Science

Arctic Nations to Meet Amid Unsettled U.S. Stance on Climate ChangeWith the Trump administration still undecided about the Paris climate accord, Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson is to head to a meeting of the Arctic Council in Alaska.
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NYT > Science

Stay In or Leave the Paris Climate Deal? Lessons From KyotoThe Paris accord provides its members with more flexibility than the earlier Kyoto Protocol, an argument for those who want the United States to remain in the deal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find significant increase of invasive seaweed changing sea habitatWalking along the beaches of New England, it is easy to spot large amounts of a fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes in the marine environment occurring beneath the water. To further investigate, researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Achieving near-perfect optical isolation using opto-mechanical transparencyResearchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a new level of optical isolation necessary to advance on-chip optical signal processing. The technique involving light-sound interaction can be implemented in nearly any photonic foundry process and can significantly impact optical computing and communication systems.
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Get to Know Why People Openly Share Genomic DataIt's not only about health but also about exploring ancestry and contributing to science.
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Ars Technica

After net neutrality comment system fails, senators demand answers Enlarge / John Oliver takes on FCC Chairman Ajit Pai in net neutrality segment. (credit: HBO Last Week Tonight ) Two Democratic senators are demanding answers from the Federal Communications Commission about its response to distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks that temporarily prevented the public from commenting on a controversial proposal to dismantle net neutrality rules. The FCC's pub
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH researchers find significant increase of invasive seaweed changing sea habitatWalking along the beaches of New England, it's easy to spot large amounts of fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes beneath the water. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant kelp beds are declining and more invasive species have taken their
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New on MIT Technology Review

A “Bug Fix” That Could Unlock the Web for Millions Around the WorldToo many domain names with non-Latin letters are still shut out of the global Internet economy.
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Popular Science

A tunnel collapsed at the Hanford nuclear waste site on Tuesday. Here's what you need to know. Science It sounds scary, but we're probably fine A tunnel collapsed at Hanford today. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experiments show that a few self-driving cars can dramatically improve traffic flowThe presence of just a few autonomous vehicles can eliminate the stop-and-go driving of the human drivers in traffic, along with the accident risk and fuel inefficiency it causes, according to new research. The finding indicates that self-driving cars and related technology may be even closer to revolutionizing traffic control than previously thought.
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump Wants to Defeat the Islamic State—So He's Arming the Kurds After much debate, the Trump administration has decided to support Syria’s Kurds with weapons and training as part of the offensive on Raqqa. This is a dangerous if perhaps necessary decision that could have far-reaching long-term effects on the U.S. relationship with Turkey as well as the shape of post-conflict Syria. And although I support the decision, let me first lay out—as best I can—the ar
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Gizmodo

Doctors Have Built a Magnetic Robot to Gently Explore Your Colon GIF As you get older, colonoscopies become an important part of maintaining your health, allowing doctors to spot potentially fatal diseases like colon cancer before they progress too far. So medical researchers are hoping to make the procedure safer, and slightly less invasive, using a tiny capsule that’s remotely steered around using a magnet outside your body. Advertisement A colonoscopy typic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pupils' mental health improved through school-based programSchool-aged children can be taught to better their mental health through intervention programmes delivered at school, suggests a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell biology: A molecular rivet for long-range force transmissionResearchers have described, for the first time, how plastin, an actin-bundling protein, acts as a molecular rivet, providing global connectivity to the cortex underlying the plasma membrane of embryonic cells to facilitate polarization and cell division.
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WIRED

A Vicious Microsoft Bug Left a Billion PCs Exposed A newly fixed flaw in Microsoft's malware protection could have been bad news for a whole lot of PCs. The post A Vicious Microsoft Bug Left a Billion PCs Exposed appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

SpaceX proves Falcon Heavy is indeed a real rocket with a test firing Enlarge / A Falcon Heavy rocket is shown at Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in this concept drawing. (credit: SpaceX) SpaceX has teased rocket aficionados with the prospect of a Falcon Heavy booster launch for the better part of this decade. First, it was going to fly in 2014, then 2015, and so on. Now SpaceX is targeting the second half of this year, and perhaps we finally have cause to believe
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Ars Technica

Cisco kills leaked CIA 0-day that let attackers commandeer 318 switch models Cisco Systems has patched a critical flaw that even novice hackers could exploit using Central Intelligence Agency attack tools that were recently leaked to the Internet. As previously reported, the zero-day exploit allowed attackers to issue commands that remotely execute malicious code on 318 models of Cisco switches . The attack code was published in early March by WikiLeaks as part of its Vau
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Gizmodo

If You Love The Handmaid's Tale, Check Out These 10 Other Works of Feminist Science Fiction Still: Hulu You’ve read the book, you’ve seen all the episodes of the show so far, and you’ve spent the past week repeating “ Nolite te bastardes carborundorum , bitches!” Hulu’s excellent adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale is equal parts invigorating and infuriating—and its themes couldn’t be more eerily timely. Here’s 10 works that capture that same feeling. 1) Born in Flames D
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Inside Science

How Building a Wall Can Save a Forest Earth In Ethiopia, churches may hold the key to protecting threatened species. 05/09/2017 Teresa L. Carey, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/one-reason-build-wall-saving-forest
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Achieving near-perfect optical isolation using opto-mechanical transparencyResearchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a new level of optical isolation necessary to advance on-chip optical signal processing. The technique involving light-sound interaction can be implemented in nearly any photonic foundry process and can significantly impact optical computing and communication systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fentanyl can sicken first responders: Possible solution?Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, is 50 times more potent than heroin. Even a tiny amount inhaled or absorbed through the skin can be extremely dangerous or deadly. Researchers have demonstrated how trace detection technologies can be used to avoid accidental exposure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Doctors should be paid by salary, not fee-for-service, argue behavioral economistsResearchers outline the problems associated with the fee-for-service arrangements that most doctors currently operate under. Such compensation schemes, they argue, create incentives for physicians to order more, and different, services than are best for patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum computing now closer to reality with new materialsQuantum computing could outsmart current computing for complex problem solving, but only if scientists figure out how to make it practical. A Stanford team is investigating new materials that could become the basis for such an advance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the futureA new study has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality. Scientists have used suitably tailored laser pulses to snap the electronic interactions in a compound containing copper, oxygen and bismuth. This research opens new perspectives for the development of superconducting materials with applications in electronics, diagnostics and transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals globe-trotting history of sika deerOn first glance, Yakushima Island in Japan and Dorchester County, Maryland, wouldn't appear to have a lot in common, but a closer ecological look reveals one stark similarity: both are home to populations of sika deer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The first microbial supertree from figure-mining thousands of papersRecent reports reveal there are more than 114,000,000 published academic papers. Finding ways to efficiently summarize across published knowledge is an increasingly pressing issue. Seeking to address the problem through their PLUTo workflow, scientists perform the world's first attempt at automated phylogenetic supertree construction using data exclusively extracted by machines from published figu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nearly one in three drugs found to have safety concerns after FDA approvalResearchers have found that for drugs approved between 2001 and 2010, nearly 1 in 3 had a postmarket safety event.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Noise pollution from gas compressors changes abundance of insects, spidersThe relentless roar of natural gas compressors influences the numbers of insects and spiders nearby, triggering decreases in many types of arthropods sensitive to sounds and vibrations, a new study shows.
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Ars Technica

Vacant tunnel at nuclear site collapses in Washington state From Hanford.gov: "This picture shows a 20-foot by 20-foot hole in the roof of a tunnel that is hundreds of feet long. Surveys of the area show no indication of release of contamination as a result of the cave-in." (credit: Hanford ) A vacant tunnel leading to a 60-year-old plutonium uranium extraction plant (called PUREX) on southeastern Washington’s Hanford Site has collapsed, according to repo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Federally subsidized shrubs, grasses crucial to sage grouse survival in WashingtonThe sage grouse is an exceptionally showy bird and an icon of the American West. But its sagebrush habitat is disappearing, and there is debate over how best to protect the populations in an increasingly developed landscape.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The latest weapons against climate change: The beaver, the oyster, cold water and more...Beavers, high elevation streams, and oyster reefs are just three of the weapons in the fight against climate change discussed in 14 Solutions to Problems Climate Change Poses for Conservation, a new report released today by WCS.
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Live Science

Why Fitness (Not Just How Much You Exercise) Matters in Cancer RiskA person's overall cardiorespiratory fitness is linked to his or her risk of developing precancerous polyps in the colon, which can grow into colon cancer, a new study from Singapore found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Severe foot pain linked to recurrent fallsResearchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain -- correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls. This finding also extends to those diagnosed with planus foot posture (flat feet), indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls among older adults.
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